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Sample records for prevents macrophage multinucleation

  1. CD44 Occupancy Prevents Macrophage Multinucleation

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Hyacinth; Saginario, Charles; Vignery, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    Cells of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage have the capability to adhere to and fuse with each other and to differentiate into osteoclasts and giant cells. To investigate the macrophage adhesion/fusion mechanism, we focused our attention on CD44, a surface glycoprotein known to play a role in hematopoietic cell–cell adhesion. We report that CD44 expression by macrophages is highly and transiently induced by fusogenic conditions both in vitro and in vivo. We show that CD44 ligands, hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfates, and osteopontin prevent macrophage multinucleation. In addition, we report that the recombinant extracellular domain of CD44 binds fusing macrophages and prevents multinucleation in vitro. These data suggest that CD44 may control the mononucleated status of macrophages in tissues by virtue of mediating cell–cell interaction. PMID:9813101

  2. In vitro expression of IL-1α, GM-CSF, and TNF-α by multinucleated macrophages from BCG-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Iljine, D A; Arkhipov, S A; Shkurupy, V A

    2013-09-01

    Peritoneal cells from intact and BCG-infected mice were explanted in vitro. In these cultures, multinucleated macrophages in different number of nuclei were formed. The intensity of multinucleated cell formation was higher in cultures from BCG-infected mice. Increasing role of amitosis in the formation of multinucleated macrophages with relatively high number of nuclei was noted with presumable domination of cell fusion mechanism. Relatively high level of IL-1α expression was noted only in the population of binucleated macrophages of BCG-infected mice in comparison with mononuclear cells. It was found macrophages from BCG-infected mice demonstrate a kind of "lineage commitment" towards multinucleated cells, which manifested in culture in initially high and increasing (with increasing the number of nuclei in cells) expression of granulocyte-macrophage CSF and TNF-α as well as initially high amitotic activity of macrophages.

  3. IFN-γ Prevents Adenosine Receptor (A2bR) Upregulation To Sustain the Macrophage Activation Response.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Heather B; Ward, Amanda; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ravid, Katya; Mosser, David M

    2015-10-15

    The priming of macrophages with IFN-γ prior to TLR stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we demonstrate that, following TLR stimulation, macrophages upregulate the adenosine 2b receptor (A2bR) to enhance their sensitivity to immunosuppressive extracellular adenosine. This upregulation of A2bR leads to the induction of macrophages with an immunoregulatory phenotype and the downregulation of inflammation. IFN-γ priming of macrophages selectively prevents the induction of the A2bR in macrophages to mitigate sensitivity to adenosine and to prevent this regulatory transition. IFN-γ-mediated A2bR blockade leads to a prolonged production of TNF-α and IL-12 in response to TLR ligation. The pharmacologic inhibition or the genetic deletion of the A2bR results in a hyperinflammatory response to TLR ligation, similar to IFN-γ treatment of macrophages. Conversely, the overexpression of A2bR on macrophages blunts the IFN-γ effects and promotes the development of immunoregulatory macrophages. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism whereby IFN-γ contributes to host defense by desensitizing macrophages to the immunoregulatory effects of adenosine. This mechanism overcomes the transient nature of TLR activation, and prolongs the antimicrobial state of the classically activated macrophage. This study may offer promising new targets to improve the clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases in which macrophage activation is dysregulated. PMID:26355158

  4. MicroRNA 21 is a homeostatic regulator of macrophage polarization and prevents prostaglandin E2-mediated M2 generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Brandt, Stephanie; Medeiros, Alexandra; Wang, Soujuan; Wu, Hao; Dent, Alexander; Serezani, C Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages dictate both initiation and resolution of inflammation. During acute inflammation classically activated macrophages (M1) predominate, and during the resolution phase alternative macrophages (M2) are dominant. The molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage polarization are understudied. MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in M1 and M2 macrophages that influence macrophage polarization. We identified a role of miR-21 in macrophage polarization, and found that cross-talk between miR-21 and the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a determining factor in macrophage polarization. miR-21 inhibition impairs expression of M2 signature genes but not M1 genes. PGE2 and its downstream effectors PKA and Epac inhibit miR-21 expression and enhance expression of M2 genes, and this effect is more pronounced in miR-21-/- cells. Among potential targets involved in macrophage polarization, we found that STAT3 and SOCS1 were enhanced in miR-21-/- cells and further enhanced by PGE2. We found that STAT3 was a direct target of miR-21 in macrophages. Silencing the STAT3 gene abolished PGE2-mediated expression of M2 genes in miR-21-/- macrophages. These data shed light on the molecular brakes involved in homeostatic macrophage polarization and suggest new therapeutic strategies to prevent inflammatory responses.

  5. Nuclear asynchrony in multinucleate rat kangaroo cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Paweletz, N

    1984-11-01

    Multinucleate (MN) cells were induced in PtK1 cells by colcemid treatment. A large percentage of cells developed nuclear asynchrony both in relation to DNA synthesis and mitosis within one cell cycle. Asynchrony could be traced even in metaphase and anaphase cells in which interphase nuclei, PCC of S-phase nuclei and less condensed prophase-like chromosomes could be observed along with normally condensed chromosomes. The occurrence of such abnormalities in these large MN cells may be explained on the basis of an uneven distribution of inducer molecules of DNA synthesis and mitosis due to cytoplasmic compartmentation. The less condensed form of all the chromosomes except chromosome 4 could be traced in asynchronous metaphase. The failure of the less condensed chromosomes to undergo complete condensation does not always appear to result from late entry of nuclei containing these chromosomes into G2 phase. It is likely that chromosome 4 carries gene(s) for chromosome condensation, as this chromosome itself never appears in a less condensed form. The inducers for chromosome condensation may not always be available at equal concentrations to all chromosomes located in separate nuclei, thus they may sometimes fail to undergo complete condensation before other nuclei reach the end of prophase, when the nuclear envelopes of all nuclei present in the cell break down simultaneously.

  6. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  7. Lipocalin 2 prevents intestinal inflammation by enhancing phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Toyonaga, Takahiko; Matsuura, Minoru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Honzawa, Yusuke; Minami, Naoki; Yamada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Taku; Hibi, Toshifumi; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), also called neutrophil gelatinase B-associated lipocalin (NGAL), is an anti-microbial peptide originally identified in neutrophil granules. Although Lcn2/NGAL expression is increased in the inflamed intestinal tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the role of Lcn2/NGAL in the development of intestinal inflammation remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of Lcn2/NGAL in intestinal inflammation using a spontaneous mouse colitis model, interleukin-10 knock out (IL-10 KO) mice. Lcn2 expression in the colonic tissues of IL-10 KO mice increased with the development of colitis. Lcn2/IL-10 double-KO mice showed a more rapid onset and development of colitis compared to IL-10 KO mice. Lcn2 enhanced phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages in vitro after infection with Escherichia coli. Transfer of Lcn2-repleted macrophages prevented the development of colitis in Lcn2/IL-10 double-KO mice in vivo. Our findings revealed that Lcn2 prevents the development of intestinal inflammation. One crucial factor seems to be the enhancement of phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages by Lcn2. PMID:27734904

  8. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Shaktawat, Sameer Singh; Golka, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells. PMID:18067673

  9. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Shaktawat, Sameer Singh; Golka, Dariusz

    2007-12-08

    This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  10. IL-1β differently stimulates proliferation and multinucleation of distinct mouse bone marrow osteoclast precursor subsets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yixuan; Jansen, Ineke D C; Sprangers, Sara; Stap, Jan; Leenen, Pieter J M; Everts, Vincent; de Vries, Teun J

    2016-09-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells and targets for treating bone diseases. Previously, we reported that distinct murine osteoclast precursor subsets, such as early blasts (CD31(hi) Ly-6C(-)), myeloid blasts (CD31(+) Ly-6C(+)), and monocytes (CD31(-) Ly-6C(hi)), respond differently to the osteoclastogenesis-inducing cytokines, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand. It is unknown, however, how these cell types respond to the osteoclast-stimulating inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β. This study aims to investigate the effect of interleukin 1β on osteoclastogenesis derived from different mouse bone marrow precursors. Early blasts, myeloid blasts, and monocytes were sorted from mouse bone marrow cells using flow cytometry. Cells were cultured on plastic or on bone slices in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand, without or with interleukin 1β (0.1-10 ng/ml). We found that interleukin 1β stimulated multinucleation and bone resorption of osteoclasts derived from the 3 precursors at different rates. The most large osteoclasts (>20 nuclei) and highest level of bone resorption (16.3%) was by myeloid blast-derived osteoclasts. Interleukin 1β particularly accelerated proliferation of early blasts and the most small osteoclasts (3-5 nuclei) formed on plastic. Life span varied among osteoclasts derived from different precursors: large osteoclasts (>2400 µm(2)) formed most rapidly (75 h) from myeloid blasts but had a short life span (30 h). Monocytes needed the longest time (95 h) for the generation of such large osteoclasts, but these cells had a longer life span (50 h). Our results indicate that the different bone marrow osteoclast precursors are differently stimulated by interleukin 1β with respect to proliferation, multinucleation, life span, and bone resorption. PMID:26957213

  11. Adoptive Transfer of Ex Vivo HO-1 Modified Bone Marrow–derived Macrophages Prevents Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Bibo; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Ji, Haofeng; Qiao, Bo; Zhai, Yuan; Farmer, Douglas G; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in the pathophysiology of liver ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury (IRI). However, macrophages that overexpress antioxidant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) may exert profound anti-inflammatory functions. This study explores the cytoprotective effects and mechanisms of ex vivo modified HO-1-expressing bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMDMs) in well-defined mouse model of liver warm ischemia followed by reperfusion. Adoptive transfer of Ad-HO-1-transduced macrophages prevented IR-induced hepatocellular damage, as evidenced by depressed serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (sGOT) levels and preserved liver histology (Suzuki scores), compared to Ad-β-gal controls. This beneficial effect was reversed following concomitant treatment with HO-1 siRNA. Ad-HO-1-transfected macrophages significantly decreased local neutrophil accumulation, TNF-α/IL-1β, IFN-γ/E-selectin, and IP-10/MCP-1 expression, caspase-3 activity, and the frequency of apoptotic cells, as compared with controls. Unlike in controls, Ad-HO-1-transfected macrophages markedly increased hepatic expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2/Bcl-xl and depressed caspase-3 activity. These results establish the precedent for a novel investigative tool and provide the rationale for a clinically attractive new strategy in which native macrophages can be transfected ex vivo with cytoprotective HO-1 and then infused, if needed, to prospective recipients exposed to hepatic IR–mediated local inflammation, such as during liver transplantation, resection, or trauma. PMID:20029397

  12. Dynamics of the Establishment of Multinucleate Compartments in Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shermineh; Beerens, Bas; Manders, Erik M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics can vary widely between fungal species and between stages of development of fungal colonies. Here we compared nuclear dynamics and mitotic patterns between germlings and mature hyphae in Fusarium oxysporum. Using fluorescently labeled nuclei and live-cell imaging, we show that F. oxysporum is subject to a developmental transition from a uninucleate to a multinucleate state after completion of colony initiation. We observed a special type of hypha that exhibits a higher growth rate, possibly acting as a nutrient scout. The higher growth rate is associated with a higher nuclear count and mitotic waves involving 2 to 6 nuclei in the apical compartment. Further, we found that dormant nuclei of intercalary compartments can reenter the mitotic cycle, resulting in multinucleate compartments with up to 18 nuclei in a single compartment. PMID:25398376

  13. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    PubMed Central

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  14. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Sheena C; Fischer, Gregory J; Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M; Choera, Tsokyi; Lim, Fang Yun; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P; Fahy, John V

    2016-04-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. PMID:27058347

  15. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M.; Choera, Tsokyi; Yun Lim, Fang; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D.; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A.; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P.; Fahy, John V.

    2016-01-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. PMID:27058347

  16. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Sheena C; Fischer, Gregory J; Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M; Choera, Tsokyi; Lim, Fang Yun; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P; Fahy, John V

    2016-04-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia.

  17. Prevention of arthritis markers in experimental animal and inflammation signalling in macrophage by Karanjin isolated from Pongamia pinnata seed extract.

    PubMed

    Bose, Madhura; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Mukherjee, Debarati; Mandal, Suvra; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-08-01

    Karanjin, the furanoflavonoid reported to possess gastroprotective and anti-diabetic properties, was investigated against experimental arthritis and its molecular signalling in inflammation was explored in macrophages. Karanjin was isolated from hexane extract of Pongamia pinnata seeds and was evaluated on arthritis markers in adjuvant induced arthritis model (AIA) in two doses (per oral; 10 mg/kg/day and 20 mg/kg/day). Karanjin dose dependently reduced collagen and cartilage breakdown markers viz. urinary hydroxyproline and glucosamine, respectively, serum lysosomal enzymes responsible for articular cartilage damage, and major proinflammatory cytokine TNFα, secreted by macrophages involved in articular inflammation and destruction. Karanjin also prevented joint damage as evidenced from arthritis score, radiographic and histopathological analysis. To delineate the molecular target of Karanjin, in vitro study on LPS induced macrophages were performed at calibrated non toxic doses (4 µg/mL and 6 µg/mL). Karanjin reduced TNFα production and also showed potent inhibitory effect on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production which is generally induced by TNFα from activated macrophages. NF-κB, the key regulator of TNFα signalling during inflammation was significantly suppressed by Karanjin. Our study for the first time highlights the anti-inflammatory role of Karanjin in experimental arthritis model as well as on macrophage signalling, thereby depicting its probable mechanism of action. PMID:24399783

  18. Glutathione prevents preterm parturition and fetal death by targeting macrophage-induced reactive oxygen species production in the myometrium.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Tarik; Bardou, Marc; Mace, Guillaume; Sicard, Pierre; Wendremaire, Maeva; Barrichon, Marina; Richaud, Sarah; Demidov, Oleg; Sagot, Paul; Garrido, Carmen; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Preterm birth is an inflammatory process resulting from the massive infiltration of innate immune cells and the production of proinflammatory cytokines in the myometrium. However, proinflammatory cytokines, which induce labor in vivo, fail to induce labor-associated features in human myometrial cells (MCs). We thus aimed to investigate if reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could be the missing step between immune cell activation and MC response. Indeed, we found that ROS production is increased in the human preterm laboring myometrium (27% ROS producing cells, respectively, versus 2% in nonlaboring controls), with 90% ROS production in macrophages. Using LPS-stimulated myometrial samples and cell coculture experiments, we demonstrated that ROS production is required for labor onset. Furthermore, we showed that ROS are required first in the NADPH oxidase (NADPHox)-2/NF-κB-dependent macrophage response to inflammatory stimuli but, more importantly, to trigger macrophage-induced MCs transactivation. Remarkably, in a murine model of LPS-induced preterm labor (inducing delivery within 17 hours, with no pup survival), cotreatment with glutathione delayed labor onset up to 94 hours and prevented in utero fetal distress, allowing 46% pups to survive. These results suggest that targeting ROS production with the macrophage-permeable antioxidant glutathione could constitute a promising strategy to prevent preterm birth. PMID:25757563

  19. Ploidy variation in multinucleate cells changes under stress

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cori A.; Roberts, Samantha; Zhang, Huaiying; Kelly, Courtney M.; Kendall, Alexxy; Lee, ChangHwan; Gerstenberger, John; Koenig, Aaron B.; Kabeche, Ruth; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Ploidy variation is found in contexts as diverse as solid tumors, drug resistance in fungal infection, and normal development. Altering chromosome or genome copy number supports adaptation to fluctuating environments but is also associated with fitness defects attributed to protein imbalances. Both aneuploidy and polyploidy can arise from multinucleate states after failed cytokinesis or cell fusion. The consequences of ploidy variation in syncytia are difficult to predict because protein imbalances are theoretically buffered by a common cytoplasm. We examined ploidy in a naturally multinucleate fungus, Ashbya gossypii. Using integrated lac operator arrays, we found that chromosome number varies substantially among nuclei sharing a common cytoplasm. Populations of nuclei range from 1N to >4N, with different polyploidies in the same cell and low levels of aneuploidy. The degree of ploidy variation increases as cells age. In response to cellular stress, polyploid nuclei diminish and haploid nuclei predominate. These data suggest that mixed ploidy is tolerated in these syncytia; however, there may be costs associated with variation as stress homogenizes the genome content of nuclei. Furthermore, the results suggest that sharing of gene products is limited, and thus there is incomplete buffering of ploidy variation despite a common cytosol. PMID:25631818

  20. Grape Cells (Multinucleated Keratinocytes) in Noninfectious Dermatoses: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sarah A; Sulit, Daryl J; Adams, Erin G; Shvartsman, Katerina R; Rapini, Ronald P

    2015-12-01

    Multinucleated keratinocytes (also known as multinucleated epidermal giant cells) are a frequently overlooked histological finding in noninfectious inflammatory dermatoses. They are sometimes found in conditions characterized by chronic rubbing and pruritus, such as lichen simplex chronicus or prurigo nodularis, and may be a helpful clue in making the clinical diagnosis. This finding must be differentiated from other conditions characterized by multinucleated keratinocytes on histopathology, specifically herpes simplex, varicella zoster, or measles viral infections. The authors present a case series of 2 patients with unique clinical noninfectious diagnoses but similar histopathologic findings on biopsy. The histopathologic findings on both cases demonstrated multinucleated keratinocytes, which were related to manipulation of the epidermis.

  1. Grape Cells (Multinucleated Keratinocytes) in Noninfectious Dermatoses: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sulit, Daryl J.; Adams, Erin G.; Shvartsman, Katerina R.; Rapini, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Multinucleated keratinocytes (also known as multinucleated epidermal giant cells) are a frequently overlooked histological finding in noninfectious inflammatory dermatoses. They are sometimes found in conditions characterized by chronic rubbing and pruritus, such as lichen simplex chronicus or prurigo nodularis, and may be a helpful clue in making the clinical diagnosis. This finding must be differentiated from other conditions characterized by multinucleated keratinocytes on histopathology, specifically herpes simplex, varicella zoster, or measles viral infections. The authors present a case series of 2 patients with unique clinical noninfectious diagnoses but similar histopathologic findings on biopsy. The histopathologic findings on both cases demonstrated multinucleated keratinocytes, which were related to manipulation of the epidermis. PMID:26588345

  2. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    PubMed

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans. PMID:24932991

  3. Surfactant Protein A Prevents IFN-γ/IFN-γ Receptor Interaction and Attenuates Classical Activation of Human Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minutti, Carlos M; García-Fojeda, Belén; Sáenz, Alejandra; de Las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; de Lorenzo, Alba; Serrano-Mollar, Anna; Corbí, Ángel L; Casals, Cristina

    2016-07-15

    Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important function in modulating inflammation in the lung. However, the exact role of SP-A and the mechanism by which SP-A affects IFN-γ-induced activation of alveolar macrophages (aMϕs) remains unknown. To address these questions, we studied the effect of human SP-A on rat and human aMϕs stimulated with IFN-γ, LPS, and combinations thereof and measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators as well as SP-A's ability to bind to IFN-γ or IFN-γR1. We found that SP-A inhibited (IFN-γ + LPS)-induced TNF-α, iNOS, and CXCL10 production by rat aMϕs. When rat macrophages were stimulated with LPS and IFN-γ separately, SP-A inhibited both LPS-induced signaling and IFN-γ-elicited STAT1 phosphorylation. SP-A also decreased TNF-α and CXCL10 secretion by ex vivo-cultured human aMϕs and M-CSF-derived macrophages stimulated by either LPS or IFN-γ or both. Hence, SP-A inhibited upregulation of IFN-γ-inducible genes (CXCL10, RARRES3, and ETV7) as well as STAT1 phosphorylation in human M-CSF-derived macrophages. In addition, we found that SP-A bound to human IFN-γ (KD = 11 ± 0.5 nM) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and prevented IFN-γ interaction with IFN-γR1 on human aMϕs. We conclude that SP-A inhibition of (IFN-γ + LPS) stimulation is due to SP-A attenuation of both inflammatory agents and that the binding of SP-A to IFN-γ abrogates IFN-γ effects on human macrophages, suppressing their classical activation and subsequent inflammatory response.

  4. PER1 prevents excessive innate immune response during endotoxin-induced liver injury through regulation of macrophage recruitment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, S; Du, Jie; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    The severity of acute liver failure (ALF) induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with the hepatic innate immune response. The core circadian molecular clock modulates the innate immune response by controlling rhythmic pathogen recognition by the innate immune system and daily variations in cytokine gene expression. However, the molecular link between circadian genes and the innate immune system has remained unclear. Here, we showed that mice lacking the clock gene Per1 (Period1) are more susceptible to LPS/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN)-induced macrophage-dependent ALF compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Per1 deletion caused a remarkable increase in the number of Kupffer cells (KCs) in the liver, resulting in an elevation of the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS treatment. Loss of Per1 had no effect on the proliferation or apoptosis of macrophages; however, it enhanced the recruitment of macrophages, which was associated with an increase in CC chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) expression levels in monocytes/macrophages. Deletion of Ccr2 rescued d-GalN/LPS-induced liver injury in Per1−/− mice. We demonstrated that the upregulation of Ccr2 expression by Per1 deletion could be reversed by the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist GW9662. Further analysis indicated that PER1 binds to PPAR-γ on the Ccr2 promoter and enhanced the inhibitory effect of PPAR-γ on Ccr2 expression. These results reveal that Per1 reduces hepatic macrophage recruitment through interaction with PPAR-γ and prevents an excessive innate immune response in endotoxin-induced liver injury. PMID:27054331

  5. PER1 prevents excessive innate immune response during endotoxin-induced liver injury through regulation of macrophage recruitment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, S; Du, Jie; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    The severity of acute liver failure (ALF) induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with the hepatic innate immune response. The core circadian molecular clock modulates the innate immune response by controlling rhythmic pathogen recognition by the innate immune system and daily variations in cytokine gene expression. However, the molecular link between circadian genes and the innate immune system has remained unclear. Here, we showed that mice lacking the clock gene Per1 (Period1) are more susceptible to LPS/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN)-induced macrophage-dependent ALF compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Per1 deletion caused a remarkable increase in the number of Kupffer cells (KCs) in the liver, resulting in an elevation of the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS treatment. Loss of Per1 had no effect on the proliferation or apoptosis of macrophages; however, it enhanced the recruitment of macrophages, which was associated with an increase in CC chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) expression levels in monocytes/macrophages. Deletion of Ccr2 rescued d-GalN/LPS-induced liver injury in Per1(-/-) mice. We demonstrated that the upregulation of Ccr2 expression by Per1 deletion could be reversed by the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist GW9662. Further analysis indicated that PER1 binds to PPAR-γ on the Ccr2 promoter and enhanced the inhibitory effect of PPAR-γ on Ccr2 expression. These results reveal that Per1 reduces hepatic macrophage recruitment through interaction with PPAR-γ and prevents an excessive innate immune response in endotoxin-induced liver injury. PMID:27054331

  6. Prevention of Encephalomyocarditis Virus-Induced Diabetes in Mice by Inhibition of the Tyrosine Kinase Signalling Pathway and Subsequent Suppression of Nitric Oxide Production in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, K.; Jun, H. S.; Han, H. S.; Zhang, M. L.; Hollenberg, M. D.; Yoon, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Macrophages comprise the major population of cells infiltrating pancreatic islets during the early stages of infection in DBA/2 mice by the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC-D virus). Inactivation of macrophages prior to viral infection almost completely prevents EMC-D virus-induced diabetes. This investigation was initiated to determine whether a tyrosine kinase signalling pathway might be involved in the activation of macrophages by EMC-D virus infection and whether tyrosine kinase inhibitors might, therefore, abrogate EMC-D virus-induced diabetes in vivo. When isolated macrophages were infected with EMC-D virus, inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA was expressed and nitric oxide was subsequently produced. Treatment of macrophages with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin AG126, but not tyrphostin AG556, prior to EMC-D virus infection blocked the production of nitric oxide. The infection of macrophages with EMC-D virus also resulted in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p42MAPK/ERK2/p44MAPK/ERK1, p38MAPK, and p46/p54JNK. In accord with the greater potency of AG126 than of AG556 in blocking EMC-D virus-mediated macrophage activation, the incidence of diabetes in EMC-D virus-infected mice treated with AG126 (25%) was much lower than that in AG556-treated (75%) or vehicle-treated (88%) control mice. We conclude that EMC-D virus-induced activation of macrophages resulting in macrophage-mediated β-cell destruction can be prevented by the inhibition of a tyrosine kinase signalling pathway involved in macrophage activation. PMID:10482607

  7. miR-142-3p prevents macrophage differentiation during cancer-induced myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Sonda, Nada; Simonato, Francesca; Peranzoni, Elisa; Calì, Bianca; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Bisognin, Andrea; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Naldini, Luigi; Gentner, Bernhard; Trautwein, Christian; Sackett, Sara Dutton; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2013-06-27

    Tumor progression is accompanied by an altered myelopoiesis causing the accumulation of immunosuppressive cells. Here, we showed that miR-142-3p downregulation promoted macrophage differentiation and determined the acquisition of their immunosuppressive function in tumor. Tumor-released cytokines signaling through gp130, the common subunit of the interleukin-6 cytokine receptor family, induced the LAP∗ isoform of C/EBPβ transcription factor, promoting macrophage generation. miR-142-3p downregulated gp130 by canonical binding to its messenger RNA (mRNA) 3' UTR and repressed C/EBPβ LAP∗ by noncanonical binding to its 5' mRNA coding sequence. Enforced miR expression impaired macrophage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Mice constitutively expressing miR-142-3p in the bone marrow showed a marked increase in survival following immunotherapy with tumor-specific T lymphocytes. By modulating a specific miR in bone marrow precursors, we thus demonstrated the feasibility of altering tumor-induced macrophage differentiation as a potent tool to improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Curcumin retunes cholesterol transport homeostasis and inflammation response in M1 macrophage to prevent atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Juan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Wang-Ge; Huang, Xin; Wang, Huan; Yuan, Zu-Yi

    2015-11-27

    Lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism dysfunction in the arterial wall is a major contributor to atherosclerosis, and excessive lipid intake and failed cholesterol homeostasis may accelerate the atherogenic process. Curcumin exerts multiple effects by alleviating inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis; however, its role in cholesterol transport homeostasis and its underlying impact on inflammatory M1 macrophages are poorly understood. This work aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on cholesterol transport, the inflammatory response and cell apoptosis in M1 macrophages. RAW264.7 macrophages (M0) were induced with LPS plus IFN-γ for 12 h to develop a M1 subtype and were then incubated with curcumin at different concentrations (6.25 and 12.5 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of oxLDL. Then, cholesterol influx/efflux and foam cell formation as well as inflammation and apoptosis were evaluated. It was found that curcumin increased cholesterol uptake measured by the Dil-oxLDL binding assay, and simultaneously increased cholesterol efflux carried out by Apo-A1 and HDL in M1 cells. Curcumin further reinforced ox-LDL-induced cholesterol esterification and foam cell formation as determined by Oil Red O and BODIPY staining. Moreover, curcumin dramatically reduced ox-LDL-induced cytokine production such as IL-1β, IL-6 as well as TNF-α and M1 cell apoptosis. We also found that curcumin upregulated CD36 and ABCA1 in M1 macrophages. Curcumin increased PPARγ expression, which in turn promoted CD36 and ABCA1 expression. In conclusion, curcumin may increase the ability of M1 macrophages to handle harmful lipids, thus promoting lipid processing, disposal and removal, which may support cholesterol homeostasis and exert an anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  9. Multinucleate spores contribute to evolutionary longevity of asexual glomeromycota.

    PubMed

    Jany, Jean-Luc; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2010-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota) are the dominant symbionts of land plants and one of the oldest multicellular lineages that exist without evidence of sexual reproduction. The mechanisms that protect these organisms from extinction due to accumulation of deleterious mutations in the absence of sexual recombination are unclear. Glomeromycota reproduce by spores containing hundreds of nuclei, which represents a departure from the typical eukaryotic developmental pattern, where a multicellular organism is re-created from a uninucleate propagule. To understand whether the multinucleate spore makeup may have contributed to the evolutionary success of Glomeromycota, we examined the dynamics of spore nuclei in Glomus etunicatum using live three-dimensional imaging and mathematical models. We show that the spores are populated by an influx of a stream of nuclei from the surrounding mycelium rather than by divisions of a single founder nucleus. We present evidence that mechanisms of selection are likely to operate at the level of individual nuclei. On the basis of mathematical analyses of the effects that these nuclear dynamics have on the population mutation load, we postulate that the developmental patterns of sporogenesis have adaptive significance for moderating the accumulation of deleterious mutations and may have contributed to the evolutionary longevity of Glomeromycota. PMID:20170364

  10. Formation of solid tumors by a single multinucleated cancer cel

    PubMed Central

    Weihua, Zhang; Lin, Qingtang; Ramoth, Asa J.; Fan, Dominic; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large multinucleated cells (MNC) commonly exist in tumorigenic cancer cell lines widely used in research, but their contributions to tumorigenesis are unknown. METHODS In this study, we characterized MNCs in the murine fibrosarcoma cell line UV-2237 in vitro and in vivo at a single cell level. RESULTS We observed that MNCs originated from a rare subpopulation of mononuclear cells; MNCs were positive for a senescent marker, β-galacosidase (SA-β-Gal); MNCs were responsible for the majority of clonogenic activity when cultured in hard agar; MNCs were more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents than were mononuclear cells; MNCs could undergo asymmetric division (producing mononuclear cells) and self-renewal in vitro and in vivo; and, most importantly a single MNC produced orthotopic subcutaneous tumors (composed mainly of mononuclear cells) that gave rise to spontaneous lung metastases in nude mice. CONCLUSIONS MNCs can be growth-arrested under stress, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, and can generate clonal orthotopic metastatic tumors PMID:21365635

  11. Multinucleate spores contribute to evolutionary longevity of asexual glomeromycota.

    PubMed

    Jany, Jean-Luc; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2010-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota) are the dominant symbionts of land plants and one of the oldest multicellular lineages that exist without evidence of sexual reproduction. The mechanisms that protect these organisms from extinction due to accumulation of deleterious mutations in the absence of sexual recombination are unclear. Glomeromycota reproduce by spores containing hundreds of nuclei, which represents a departure from the typical eukaryotic developmental pattern, where a multicellular organism is re-created from a uninucleate propagule. To understand whether the multinucleate spore makeup may have contributed to the evolutionary success of Glomeromycota, we examined the dynamics of spore nuclei in Glomus etunicatum using live three-dimensional imaging and mathematical models. We show that the spores are populated by an influx of a stream of nuclei from the surrounding mycelium rather than by divisions of a single founder nucleus. We present evidence that mechanisms of selection are likely to operate at the level of individual nuclei. On the basis of mathematical analyses of the effects that these nuclear dynamics have on the population mutation load, we postulate that the developmental patterns of sporogenesis have adaptive significance for moderating the accumulation of deleterious mutations and may have contributed to the evolutionary longevity of Glomeromycota.

  12. Mutations in Citron Kinase Cause Recessive Microlissencephaly with Multinucleated Neurons.

    PubMed

    Harding, Brian N; Moccia, Amanda; Drunat, Séverine; Soukarieh, Omar; Tubeuf, Hélène; Chitty, Lyn S; Verloes, Alain; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Joriot, Sylvie; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Martins, Alexandra; Passemard, Sandrine; Bielas, Stephanie L

    2016-08-01

    Primary microcephaly is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by a reduction in brain size as a result of defects in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells during development. Mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the mitotic spindle and centrosomes have been implicated in the pathogenicity of primary microcephaly. In contrast, the contractile ring and midbody required for cytokinesis, the final stage of mitosis, have not previously been implicated by human genetics in the molecular mechanisms of this phenotype. Citron kinase (CIT) is a multi-domain protein that localizes to the cleavage furrow and midbody of mitotic cells, where it is required for the completion of cytokinesis. Rodent models of Cit deficiency highlighted the role of this gene in neurogenesis and microcephaly over a decade ago. Here, we identify recessively inherited pathogenic variants in CIT as the genetic basis of severe microcephaly and neonatal death. We present postmortem data showing that CIT is critical to building a normally sized human brain. Consistent with cytokinesis defects attributed to CIT, multinucleated neurons were observed throughout the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of an affected proband, expanding our understanding of mechanisms attributed to primary microcephaly. PMID:27453579

  13. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms prevent macrophage phagocytosis and attenuate inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, Lance R; Hanke, Mark L; Fritz, Teresa; Angle, Amanda; Aldrich, Amy; Williams, Stetson H; Engebretsen, Ian L; Bayles, Kenneth W; Horswill, Alexander R; Kielian, Tammy

    2011-06-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of bacteria encased in a matrix composed primarily of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA, and protein. Staphylococcus aureus can form biofilm infections, which are often debilitating due to their chronicity and recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. Currently, the immune mechanisms elicited during biofilm growth and their impact on bacterial clearance remain to be defined. We used a mouse model of catheter-associated biofilm infection to assess the functional importance of TLR2 and TLR9 in the host immune response during biofilm formation, because ligands for both receptors are present within the biofilm. Interestingly, neither TLR2 nor TLR9 impacted bacterial density or inflammatory mediator secretion during biofilm growth in vivo, suggesting that S. aureus biofilms circumvent these traditional bacterial recognition pathways. Several potential mechanisms were identified to account for biofilm evasion of innate immunity, including significant reductions in IL-1β, TNF-α, CXCL2, and CCL2 expression during biofilm infection compared with the wound healing response elicited by sterile catheters, limited macrophage invasion into biofilms in vivo, and a skewing of the immune response away from a microbicidal phenotype as evidenced by decreases in inducible NO synthase expression concomitant with robust arginase-1 induction. Coculture studies of macrophages with S. aureus biofilms in vitro revealed that macrophages successful at biofilm invasion displayed limited phagocytosis and gene expression patterns reminiscent of alternatively activated M2 macrophages. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that S. aureus biofilms are capable of attenuating traditional host proinflammatory responses, which may explain why biofilm infections persist in an immunocompetent host.

  14. Assessing cell fusion and cytokinesis failure as mechanisms of clone 9 hepatocyte multinucleation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simic, Damir; Euler, Catherine; Thurby, Christina; Peden, Mike; Tannehill-Gregg, Sarah; Bunch, Todd; Sanderson, Thomas; Van Vleet, Terry

    2012-08-01

    In this in vitro model of hepatocyte multinucleation, separate cultures of rat Clone 9 cells are labeled with either red or green cell tracker dyes (Red Cell Tracker CMPTX or Vybrant CFDA SE Cell Tracer), plated together in mixed-color colonies, and treated with positive or negative control agents for 4 days. The fluorescent dyes become cell-impermeant after entering cells and are not transferred to adjacent cells in a population, but are inherited by daughter cells after fusion. The mixed-color cultures are then evaluated microscopically for multinucleation and analysis of the underlying mechanism (cell fusion/cytokinesis). Multinucleated cells containing only one dye have undergone cytokinesis failure, whereas dual-labeled multinucleated cells have resulted from fusion.

  15. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Galvano, Fabio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Masella, Roberta; Giovannini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power. PMID:26180584

  16. Chelation of dietary iron prevents iron accumulation and macrophage infiltration in the type I diabetic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Tatsuyori; Nakano, Daisuke; Kitada, Kento; Morimoto, Satoshi; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Shiojima, Ichiro; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the functional deletion of p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, in mice attenuated renal cell senescence in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice. In the present study, we investigated the effect of iron chelation on renal cell senescence and inflammation in the type 1 diabetic kidney. STZ-treated mice showed increase in iron accumulation, tubular cell senescence and macrophage infiltration at week 28 in the kidney. Administering deferasirox, which removes only dietary iron, significantly attenuated iron accumulation in proximal tubules and the number of infiltrating F4/80-positive cells without effecting blood glucose, hematocrit or hemoglobin levels. In contrast however, deferasirox did not influence renal cell senescence. The lack of p21 decreased the renal tubular iron accumulation and did not change tubular cell senescence. Interestingly, the STZ-treated animals showed an increase in p16, another cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. The results suggest that type 1 diabetes increases renal tubular iron accumulation and macrophage infiltration through a p21-dependent mechanism, and that the chelation of dietary iron attenuates these responses. PMID:25820160

  17. Multinucleation during C. trachomatis Infections Is Caused by the Contribution of Two Effector Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Heather M.; Knowlton, Andrea E.; Snavely, Emily; Nguyen, Bidong D.; Richards, Theresa S.; Grieshaber, Scott S.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen and the second leading cause of sexually transmitted infections in the US. Infections cause significant morbidity and can lead to serious reproductive sequelae, including an epidemiological link to increased rates of reproductive cancers. One of the overt changes that infected cells exhibit is the development of genomic instability leading to multinucleation. Here we demonstrate that the induction of multinucleation is not conserved equally across chlamydial species; C. trachomatis L2 caused high levels of multinucleation, C. muridarum intermediate levels, and C. caviae had very modest effects on multinucleation. Our data show that at least two effector pathways together cause genomic instability during infection leading to multinucleation. We find that the highly conserved chlamydial protease CPAF is a key effector for one of these pathways. CPAF secretion is required for the loss of centrosome duplication regulation as well as inducing early mitotic exit. The second effector pathway involves the induction of centrosome position errors. This function is not conserved in three chlamydial species tested. Together these two pathways contribute to the induction of high levels of genomic instability and multinucleation seen in C. trachomatis infections. PMID:24955832

  18. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  19. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  20. Novel inhibitors of macrophage migration inhibitory factor prevent cytokine-induced beta cell death.

    PubMed

    Vujicic, Milica; Nikolic, Ivana; Krajnovic, Tamara; Cheng, Kai-Fan; VanPatten, Sonya; He, Mingzhu; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava; Stojanovic, Ivana; Al-Abed, Yousef; Saksida, Tamara

    2014-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is a multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of immune processes and also in apoptosis induction. Elevated MIF expression is detrimental for insulin-producing beta cells and MIF inhibition protected beta cells from several cytotoxic insults such as inflammatory cytokines, high fatty acids or high glucose concentrations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate two newly synthesized small molecule MIF inhibitors (K664-1 and K647-1) and to compare them with previously established effects of the prototypical MIF inhibitor, ISO-1. Our results indicate that K664-1 and K647-1 are 160- and 40-fold more effective in inhibition of MIF׳s tautomerase activity than ISO-1. Also, new inhibitors confer beta cell protection from cytokine-triggered apoptosis at significantly lower concentrations than ISO-1. Although all three MIF inhibitors inhibit caspase 3 activity, K664-1 and K647-1 suppress pro-apoptotic BAX protein expression and up-regulate anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA. Finally, all three MIF inhibitors operate through blockade of nitric oxide production stimulated by cytokines. In conclusion, two novel MIF inhibitors are more potent than ISO-1 and operate through inhibition of the mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway. We propose that these compounds represent a unique class of anti-MIF antagonists that should be further tested for therapeutic use.

  1. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2015-07-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation.

  2. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma

    PubMed Central

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E

    2014-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation. PMID:25504013

  3. Structural Interactions Dictate the Kinetics of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Inhibition by Different Cancer-Preventive Isothiocyanates

    PubMed Central

    Crichlow, Gregg V.; Fan, Chengpeng; Keeler, Camille; Hodsdon, Michael; Lolis, Elias J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cellular processes by dietary nutrients is known to affect the likelihood of cancer development. One class of cancer preventive nutrients, isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from consumption of cruciferous vegetables, is known to have various effects on cellular biochemistry. One target of ITCs is macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a widely expressed protein with known inflammatory, pro-tumorigenic, pro-angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic properties. MIF is covalently inhibited by a variety of ITCs, which in part, may explain how they exert their cancer-preventive effects. We report the crystallographic structures of human MIF bound to phenethylisothiocyanate and to L-sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanates derived from watercress and broccoli, respectively), and correlate structural features of these two isothiocyanates with their second-order rate constants for MIF inactivation. We also characterize changes in the MIF structure using NMR HSQC spectra of these complexes and observe many changes at the subunit interface. While a number of chemical shifts do not change, many of those that change do not have similar features in magnitude or direction for the two isothiocyanates. The difference in the binding modes of these two ITCs provides a means of using structure-activity relationships to reveal insights into MIF biological interactions. The results of this study provide a framework for the development of therapeutics that target MIF. PMID:22931430

  4. Methods to Prevent or Treat Refractory Diseases by Focusing on Intestinal Microbes Using LPS and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soma, Gen-Ichiro; Inagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal microbes are known to influence host homeostasis by producing various substances. Recently, the presence of a diverse range of intestinal microbiota has been shown to play a key role in the maintenance of health, along with influencing the host's innate immunity towards various diseases. For example, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy individuals was remarkably effective in cases of refractory Clostridium difficile colitis. Conversely, decreased number of intestinal microbes resulting from the oral administration of antibiotics reportedly suppressed the antitumor effects of immunotherapy or anticancer drugs. Furthermore, it has been shown that a change in the intestinal environment triggered by oral administration of antibiotics resulted in increased number of drug-resistant microbes causing nosocomial infections. Intestinal microbes are also shown to be effective in cancer treatment as they activate macrophages at the site of cancer. One of the effects of intestinal microbes on hosts that has been gaining increasing attention is the biological regulation caused by the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Among the intestinal microbiota present in the host, Gram-negative bacteria form the most dominant flora. The administration of antibiotics leads to a decreased number of intestinal microbes, as well as to suppression of cancer immunotherapy effects or anticancer drug effects, and this deterioration has been shown to be improved by oral administration of LPS. In this article, we discuss the functions of intestinal microbiota, that is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in relation to maintenance of health and the validity of LPS as a possible target for bio-treatment in the future.

  5. CD163 Identifies Perivascular Macrophages in Normal and Viral Encephalitic Brains and Potential Precursors to Perivascular Macrophages in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Ki; Alvarez, Xavier; Fisher, Jeanne; Bronfin, Benjamin; Westmoreland, Susan; McLaurin, JoAnne; Williams, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Perivascular macrophages are uniquely situated at the intersection between the nervous and immune systems. Although combined myeloid marker detection differentiates perivascular from resident brain macrophages (parenchymal microglia), no single marker distinguishes perivascular macrophages in humans and mice. Here, we present the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 as a marker for perivascular macrophages in humans, monkeys, and mice. CD163 was primarily confined to perivascular macrophages and populations of meningeal and choroid plexus macrophages in normal brains and in brains of humans and monkeys with human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) encephalitis. Scattered microglia in SIV encephalitis lesions and multinucleated giant cells were also CD163 positive. Consistent with prior findings that perivascular macrophages are primary targets of human immunodeficiency virus and SIV, all SIV-infected cells in the brain were CD163 positive. Using fluorescent dyes that definitively and selectively label perivascular macrophages in vivo, we confirmed that dye-labeled simian perivascular macrophages were CD163 positive and able to repopulate the central nervous system within 24 hours. Flow cytometric studies demonstrated a subset of monocytes (CD163+CD14+CD16+) that were immunophenotypically similar to brain perivascular macrophages. These findings recognize CD163+ blood monocytes/macrophages as a source of brain perivascular macrophages and underscore the utility of this molecule in studying the biology of perivascular macrophages and their precursors in humans, monkeys, and mice. PMID:16507898

  6. Inhibition of NOS-NO System Prevents Autoimmune Orchitis Development in Rats: Relevance of NO Released by Testicular Macrophages in Germ Cell Apoptosis and Testosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jarazo Dietrich, Sabrina; Fass, Mónica Irina; Jacobo, Patricia Verónica; Sobarzo, Cristian Marcelo Alejandro; Lustig, Livia; Theas, María Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the testis is considered an immunoprivileged organ it can orchestrate immune responses against pathological insults such as infection and trauma. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a model of chronic inflammation whose main histopathological features it shares with human orchitis. In EAO an increased number of macrophages infiltrate the interstitium concomitantly with progressive germ cell degeneration and impaired steroidogenesis. Up-regulation of nitric oxide (NO)-NO synthase (NOS) system occurs, macrophages being the main producers of NO. Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of NO-NOS system in orchitis development and determine the involvement of NO released by testicular macrophages on germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion. Method and Results EAO was induced in rats by immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants (E group) and a group of untreated normal rats (N) was also studied. Blockage of NOS by i.p. injection of E rats with a competitive inhibitor of NOS, L-NAME (8mg/kg), significantly reduced the incidence and severity of orchitis and lowered testicular nitrite content. L-NAME reduced germ cell apoptosis and restored intratesticular testosterone levels, without variations in serum LH. Co-culture of N testicular fragments with testicular macrophages obtained from EAO rats significantly increased germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion, whereas addition of L-NAME lowered both effects and reduced nitrite content. Incubation of testicular fragments from N rats with a NO donor DETA-NOnoate (DETA-NO) induced germ cell apoptosis through external and internal apoptotic pathways, an effect prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). DETA-NO inhibited testosterone released from Leydig cells, whereas NAC (from 2.5 to 15 mM) did not prevent this effect. Conclusions We demonstrated that NO-NOS system is involved in the impairment of testicular function in orchitis. NO secreted mainly by testicular

  7. The evo-devo of multinucleate cells, tissues, and organisms, and an alternative route to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Cobb, Edward D; Crawford, David R

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleate cells, tissues, or organisms occur in 60 families of land plants and in five otherwise diverse algal lineages (Rhodophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Charophyceae). Inspection of a morphospace constructed out of eight developmental processes reveals a large number of possible variants of multinucleate cells and organisms that, with two exceptions, are represented by one or more plant species in one or more clades. Thus, most of these permutations of developmental processes exist in nature. Inspection of the morphospace also shows how the siphonous body plan (a multinucleate cell with the capacity for indeterminate growth in size) can theoretically serve as the direct progenitor of a multicellular organism by a process similar to segregative cell division observed in siphonocladean algae. Using molecular phylogenies of algal clades, different evolutionary scenarios are compared to see how the multicellular condition may have evolved from a multinucleate unicellular progenitor. We also show that the siphonous progenitor of a multicellular organism has previously passed through the alignment-of-fitness phase (in which genetic similarity among cells/nuclei minimizes internal genomic conflict) and the export-of-fitness phase (in which genetically similar cells/nuclei collaborate to achieve a reproductively integrated multicellular organism). All that is theoretically required is the evolutionary acquisition of the capacity to compartmentalize its cytoplasm. PMID:24261447

  8. The evo-devo of multinucleate cells, tissues, and organisms, and an alternative route to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Cobb, Edward D; Crawford, David R

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleate cells, tissues, or organisms occur in 60 families of land plants and in five otherwise diverse algal lineages (Rhodophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Charophyceae). Inspection of a morphospace constructed out of eight developmental processes reveals a large number of possible variants of multinucleate cells and organisms that, with two exceptions, are represented by one or more plant species in one or more clades. Thus, most of these permutations of developmental processes exist in nature. Inspection of the morphospace also shows how the siphonous body plan (a multinucleate cell with the capacity for indeterminate growth in size) can theoretically serve as the direct progenitor of a multicellular organism by a process similar to segregative cell division observed in siphonocladean algae. Using molecular phylogenies of algal clades, different evolutionary scenarios are compared to see how the multicellular condition may have evolved from a multinucleate unicellular progenitor. We also show that the siphonous progenitor of a multicellular organism has previously passed through the alignment-of-fitness phase (in which genetic similarity among cells/nuclei minimizes internal genomic conflict) and the export-of-fitness phase (in which genetically similar cells/nuclei collaborate to achieve a reproductively integrated multicellular organism). All that is theoretically required is the evolutionary acquisition of the capacity to compartmentalize its cytoplasm.

  9. Cross-Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Interleukin-10 and miR-155 in Orientia tsutsugamushi-Infected Human Macrophages Prevents Cytokine Storm.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Hong, Yi-Ren; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Fan, Kan-Tang; Peng, Chi-Wen; Wu, Ching-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Li; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Chen, Li-Kuang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-07-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi. Macrophages are host cells for its replication and clearance. Severe complications in patients are mainly caused by a cytokine storm resulting from overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines; nevertheless, the molecular mechanism for the occurrence remains obscure. Herein, we investigate the interactive regulation of cytokines and micro-RNA (miR) in human macrophages infected with low and high doses of O. tsutsugamushi. During low dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of IL-10 through extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, which inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and facilitates pathogen replication. Increasing levels of pathogen results in reduced levels of IL-10, and macrophages begin to generate high levels of proinflammatory cytokines through NF-κB activation. However, during a high dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of miR-155 to slow the proinflammatory response. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/IL-10 axis suppresses the NF-κB/tumor necrosis factor alpha axis via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Both IL-10 and miR-155 inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, IL-10 is a potent inhibitor of miR-155. Patients susceptible to a cytokine storm, peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed significantly lower IL-10 and miR-155 responses to O. tsutsugamushi challenge. Thus, IL-10 and miR-155 operate inhibitory mechanisms to achieve a proper defense mechanism and prevent a cytokine storm.

  10. Stabilin-1 expression defines a subset of macrophages that mediate tissue homeostasis and prevent fibrosis in chronic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Rantakari, Pia; Patten, Daniel A.; Valtonen, Joona; Karikoski, Marika; Gerke, Heidi; Dawes, Harriet; Laurila, Juha; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Elima, Kati; Hübscher, Stefan G.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Adams, David H.; Salmi, Marko; Shetty, Shishir

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of fibrosis development and resolution. Elucidating the mechanisms by which they mediate this process is crucial for establishing their therapeutic potential. Here, we use experimental models of liver fibrosis to show that deficiency of the scavenger receptor, stabilin-1, exacerbates fibrosis and delays resolution during the recovery phase. We detected a subset of stabilin-1+ macrophages that were induced at sites of cellular injury close to the hepatic scar in mouse models of liver fibrosis and in human liver disease. Stabilin-1 deficiency abrogated malondialdehyde-LDL (MDA-LDL) uptake by hepatic macrophages and was associated with excess collagen III deposition. Mechanistically, the lack of stabilin-1 led to elevated intrahepatic levels of the profibrogenic chemokine CCL3 and an increase in GFAP+ fibrogenic cells. Stabilin-1−/− macrophages demonstrated a proinflammatory phenotype during liver injury and the normal induction of Ly6Clo monocytes during resolution was absent in stabilin-1 knockouts leading to persistence of fibrosis. Human stabilin-1+ monocytes efficiently internalized MDA-LDL and this suppressed their ability to secrete CCL3, suggesting that loss of stabilin-1 removes a brake to CCL3 secretion. Experiments with cell-lineage–specific knockouts revealed that stabilin-1 expression in myeloid cells is required for the induction of this subset of macrophages and that increased fibrosis occurs in their absence. This study demonstrates a previously unidentified regulatory pathway in fibrogenesis in which a macrophage scavenger receptor protects against organ fibrosis by removing fibrogenic products of lipid peroxidation. Thus, stabilin-1+ macrophages shape the tissue microenvironment during liver injury and healing. PMID:27474165

  11. Paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability in cells with dysfunctional telomeres: Implication in multinucleation and chemosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Woo, Seon Rang; Kang, Chang-Mo; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun Ran; Park, In-chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kim, Hae Kwon; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Paclitaxel serves as a stimulator of chromosomal fusion in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. {yields} Typical fusions involve p-arms, but paclitaxel-induced fusions occur between both q- and p-arms. {yields} Paclitaxel-stimulated fusions in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional evoke prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest and delay multinucleation. {yields} Upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel promotes chromosomal instability and subsequent apoptosis. {yields} Chromosomal fusion enhances paclitaxel chemosensitivity under telomere dysfunction. -- Abstract: The anticancer effect of paclitaxel is attributable principally to irreversible promotion of microtubule stabilization and is hampered upon development of chemoresistance by tumor cells. Telomere shortening, and eventual telomere erosion, evoke chromosomal instability, resulting in particular cellular responses. Using telomerase-deficient cells derived from mTREC-/-p53-/- mice, here we show that, upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel propagates chromosomal instability by stimulating chromosomal end-to-end fusions and delaying the development of multinucleation. The end-to-end fusions involve both the p- and q-arms in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. Paclitaxel-induced chromosomal fusions were accompanied by prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest, delayed multinucleation, and apoptosis. Telomere dysfunctional cells with mutlinucleation eventually underwent apoptosis. Thus, as telomere erosion proceeds, paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability, and both apoptosis and chemosensitization eventually develop.

  12. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent the development of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. Modulation of macrophage secretory activities.

    PubMed

    Renier, G; Skamene, E; DeSanctis, J; Radzioch, D

    1993-10-01

    We examined the effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids on the development of the atherogenic process in mice and on the macrophage ability to secrete several effector molecules that may be involved in the atherogenic process. The secretion of inflammatory proteins such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and the production of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), nitrogen oxide (NO2), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were evaluated in peritoneal macrophages isolated from atherosclerosis-susceptible C57BL/6J mice. The mice were assigned at random to three experimental groups: the first group was fed a semi-defined control diet (control diet); the second group was maintained on the control diet supplemented with 10% menhaden oil (menhaden diet); and the third group received the control diet supplemented with 10% palm oil plus 2% cholesterol (saturated fat diet). Macrophages derived from mice fed the menhaden diet showed a suppression of their basal TNF-alpha mRNA expression and production. They also presented a dramatically decreased ability to express TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNAs in response to exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared with the macrophages from the control group. LPL mRNA and protein expression were downregulated after 6 and 15 weeks of menhaden-diet feeding. Significantly higher NO2 production in response to interferon gamma was found, both after 6 and 15 weeks of diet feeding, in the menhaden group compared with the control group. In addition, prostaglandin production and macrophage tumoricidal activity in response to LPS were decreased in this group compared with the control group. Macrophages derived from the saturated fat group did not show any significant alterations in TNF-alpha, LPL, NO2, or PGE2 secretion compared with controls. Interestingly, we observed a progressive increase of the LPS-induced IL-1 beta gene expression and secretion among macrophages harvested from mice receiving

  13. Novel grooved substrata stimulate macrophage fusion, CCL2 and MMP-9 secretion.

    PubMed

    Moon, Haisle; Cremmel, Clément V M; Kulpa, Alina; Jaeger, Nicolas A F; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Overall, Christopher M; Waterfield, J Douglas; Brunette, Donald M

    2016-09-01

    Rough surface topographies on implants attract macrophages but the influence of topography on macrophage fusion to produce multinucleated giant cells (MGC) and foreign body giant cells (FBGC) is unclear. Two rough novel grooved substrata, G1 and G2, fabricated by anisotropic etching of Silicon <110> crystals without the use of photolithographic patterning, and a control smooth surface (Pol) were produced and replicated in epoxy. The surfaces were compared for their effects on RAW264.7 macrophage morphology, gene expression, cyto/chemokine secretion, and fusion for one and five days. Macrophages on grooved surfaces exhibited an elongated morphology similar to M2 macrophages and increased cell alignment with surface directionality, roughness and cell culture time. Up-regulated expression of macrophage chemoattractants at gene and protein level was observed on both grooved surfaces relative to Pol. Grooved surfaces showed time-dependent increase in soluble mediators involved in cell fusion, CCL2 and MMP-9, and an increased proportion of multinucleated cells at Day 5. Collectively, this study demonstrated that a rough surface with surface directionality produced changes in macrophage shape and macrophage attractant chemokines and soluble mediators involved in cell fusion. These in vitro results suggest a possible explanation for the observed accumulation of macrophages and MGCs on rough surfaced implants in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2243-2254, 2016.

  14. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  15. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  16. Dietary fatty acid composition is sensed by the NLRP3 inflammasome: omega-3 fatty acid (DHA) prevents NLRP3 activation in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Micaelo, N; González-Abuín, N; Pinent, M; Ardévol, A; Blay, M

    2016-08-10

    The Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is considered to be a pivotal host platform responsible for sensing of exogenous and endogenous danger signals, including those generated as a result of metabolic dysregulation, and for the subsequent, IL-1β-mediated orchestration of inflammatory and innate immunity responses. In this way, although the molecular link between diet-induced obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, free fatty acids (FFA) have been proposed as a triggering event. We report that dietary fatty acid (FA) composition is sensed by the NLRP3 inflammasome in human macrophages. For this purpose, we have analysed three roles of FA supplementation: as a priming signal for ATP-activated macrophages, in determining where the administration of dietary FAs interferes with LPS-mediated inflammasome activation and by inducing inflammasome activation per se. In this study, we confirm that saturated (SFAs) activated the NLRP3 inflammasome and stimulated the secretion of the IL-1β cytokine, while PUFAs were mainly inhibitors. Moreover, in general, DHA (n-3 PUFA) was more effective in preventing inflammasome activation than arachidonic acid (n-6 PUFA). PMID:27405925

  17. Occurrence of multinucleated hepatocytes in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from different geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Novilla, M N; Jackson, M K; Reim, D A; Jacobson, S B; Nagata, R A

    2014-11-01

    Multinucleated hepatocytes (MNHs) have been occasionally reported in macaques, as well as chimpanzees and gorillas, as an incidental finding. However, information is sparse on variations in incidence in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). A survey was conducted to assess the occurrence of MNHs in the liver of stock (nonstudy) animals from SNBL SRC (Alice, TX) and SNBL USA (Everett, WA) submitted for diagnostic purposes. A total of 215 cynomolgus monkeys originally from Cambodia (61), China (5), Indonesia (125), and Mauritius (24) were used for this investigation. From each animal, usually 2 liver samples were processed for histopathology with 2 sections in each slide. An MNH was defined as a hepatocyte with 3 or more nuclei. A threshold of 3 MNHs was selected for the Multinucleated Hepatocyte Grading System: 0 = not remarkable (≤3 MNHs counted from 2-4 liver sections), minimal = 4 to 15 MNHs, mild = 16 to 30 MNHs, moderate = 31 to 59 MNHs, and severe ≥60 MNHs. The incidence of MNHs was 60 of 86 (70%) in males and 72 of 129 (56%) in females for a total overall incidence of 132 of 215 animals (61%). Affected hepatocytes were frequently observed close to the capsule and generally had 3 to 8 nuclei per hepatocyte but as many as 15 occurred in a single cell. Awareness of the incidence of MNHs in cynomolgus monkeys is important for potential use as background data in preclinical safety and toxicity evaluation studies.

  18. Kinetic and cytochemical identification of osteoclast precursors and their differentiation into multinucleated osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Baron, R; Neff, L; Tran Van, P; Nefussi, J R; Vignery, A

    1986-02-01

    Positive identification of osteoclast percursors has not yet been possible. The authors have, in the present report, used a model system in the rat in which it is possible to induce the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts at a predictable and reproducible site and time (Tran Van P, Vignery A, Baron R. Anat Rec 1982, 202:445-451; Cell Tissue Res 1982, 225:283-292). This system allowed the investigation of the cellular events occurring locally during the recruitment and differentiation of osteoclast precursors. Prior to the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts, mononuclear cells positive for fluoride-inhibitable nonspecific esterase and cells positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase increase in number locally. Double staining procedures demonstrated the presence of both enzymes in a number of cells, thereby suggesting that they are steps in the differentiation of a single cell population. Ultrastructural studies show that lysosomal enzymes are present in every compartment of the biosynthetic pathway, in small primary lysosomes and various forms of storage granules. As these precursors arrive at the bone surface, the storage granule lysosomes are markedly depleted. It is concluded that mononuclear precursors of the osteoclast are members of the mononuclear-phagocyte lineage and differentiate early to synthesize, store, and later secrete large quantities of lysosomal enzymes. The mature osteoclast, which, as its precursor, is positive for the mononuclear-phagocyte marker enzyme nonspecific esterase, results from the fusion of these mononuclear precursors, which occurs only after their attachment to the bone surface to be resorbed.

  19. Overexpression of hnRNPC2 induces multinucleation by repression of Aurora B in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, DA-Quan; Wang, Ying; Liu, Ding-Gan

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous ribonuclear protein C2 (hnRNPC2), an RNA binding protein, is a component of hnRNPC which is upregulated in many tumors. Multinucleation exists in many tumors and is positively correlated with tumor grade. To uncover the correlation between hnRNPC2 and multi-nucleation in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells, we constructed a pEGFP-hnRNPC2 vector and transfected it into cancer cells. Our results revealed that overexpression of hnRNPC2 induced multinucleation in SMMC-7721 cells. Tracking tests indicated that the induced multinucleated cells were unable to recover to mononuclear cells and finally died as a result of defects in cell division. Furthermore, Aurora B, which was localized at the midbody and plays a role in cytokinesis, was repressed in hnRNPC2-overexpressing cells, whose knockdown by RNA interference also induced multinucleation in SMMC-7721 cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and mRNA-protein co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that Aurora B mRNA did not decrease in hnRNPC2-overexpressing cells, instead it bound more hnRNPC2 and less eIF4E, an mRNA cap binding protein and translational initiation factor. Moreover, hnRNPC2 bound more eIF4E in hnRNPC2-overexpressing cells. These results indicate that hnRNPC2 repressed Aurora B binding with eIF4F, which must bind with Aurora B mRNA in order to initiate its translation. This induced multinucleation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In addition, hnRNPC2 accelerated hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. Collectively, these data suggest that hnRNPC2 may be a potential target for hepatocellular carcinoma cell diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23599772

  20. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells.

  1. The Mus cervicolor MuLV isolate M813 is highly fusogenic and induces a T-cell lymphoma associated with large multinucleated cells.

    PubMed

    Prassolov, V; Ivanov, D; Hein, S; Rutter, G; Münk, C; Löhler, J; Stocking, C

    2001-11-10

    M813 is a type-C murine leukemia virus (MuLV) isolated from the Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. We have recently demonstrated that M813 defines a distinct MuLV receptor interference group. Here we show that M813 rapidly induces fusion of MuLV-expressing fibroblasts from "without," with syncytia being observed within 1 h after exposure to virus. Infection of fibroblasts with MuLV from all tested receptor-interference groups imparts susceptibility to M813-induced fusion, provided the cells also express the M813 receptor. Syncytium induction is also observed in vivo; mice infected with M813 develop a peripheral T-cell lymphoma, which is associated with large multinucleated cells of macrophage origin. A recombinant Moloney MuLV/M813 chimeric virus demonstrated that syncytium induction is a function of the Env SU protein. We postulate that the highly fusogenic property of M813 is attributable to either its unique receptor usage or sequences in the proline-rich domain of the Env protein.

  2. Filter Paper Degrading Ability of a Trichoderma Strain With Multinucleate Conidia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Hideo; Yano, Makiko; Hotta, Takeshi; Toyama, Nobuo

    The multinucleate conidia were produced from the green mature conidia of Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 strain by colchicine treatment. The strain with higher Filter paper degrading ability was selected among those conidia using a double layer selection medium. The selected strain, JS-2 was able to collapse the filter paper within 15 min but the original strain took 25 min to collapse it completely. Moreover, the amount of reducing sugar in the L-type glass tube of the strain, JS-2, was greater than that of the original strain. The Avicel, CMC-Na, and Salicin hydrolyzing activity of the strain, JS-2, increased 2.1 times, 1.2 times, and 3.6 times higher than that of the original strain.

  3. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  4. The unique low-Reynolds-number spinning hydrodynamics of release of a giant multinucleate multiflagellate zoospore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzay, Javier; Ott, Donald; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Asexual reproduction in aquatic algal species of Vaucheria occurs by the formation of large multinucleate zoospores formed within elongated club-shaped zoosporangia at the tips of young branches. During development, the zoosporangia are separated from the rest of the thallus by membranes, resulting in multiple chambers hosting zoospores which will be released and dispersed in the surrounding aqueous environment. The apical gelatinization of the zoosporangial tip, together with the turgor pressure in the segregated portion of the filament, lead to a narrow aperture through which the zoospore escapes. However ordinary this may seem, Vaucheria zoospores have a unique multiflagellated patterned surface that warrants helicoidal flow entrainment at relatively high speeds, and which enables them to undergo a spinning motion that elastohydrodynamically assists the rather unfavorable escape maneuver. Experimental observations of this phenomenon, together with quantitative interpretations, are provided in this talk.

  5. Prevention of asbestos-induced cell death in rat lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages by scavengers of active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Shatos, M.A.; Doherty, J.M.; Marsh, J.P.; Mossman, B.T.

    1987-10-01

    The possible modulation of asbestos-related cell death using antioxidants in both target and effector cells of asbestosis was investigated. After exposure to crocidolite asbestos at a range of concentrations (2.5-25 ..mu..gcm/sup 2/ dish), the viability of a normal rat lung fibroblast line and freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AM) was determined. In comparison to fibroblasts, AM were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of asbestos. Cytotoxic concentrations of asbestos then were added to both cell types in combination with the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -./), and catalase, an enzyme scavenging H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of the hydroxyl radical (OH/sup ./) and deferoxamine, an iron chelator, also were evaluated in similar studies. Results showed significant dosage-dependent reduction of asbestos-associated cell death with all agents. In contrast, asbestos-induced toxicity was not ameliorated after addition of chemically inactivated SOD and catalase or bovine serum albumin. Results above suggest asbestos-induced cell damage is mediated by active oxygen species. In this regard, the iron associated with the fiber andor its interaction with cell membranes might be critical in deriving a modified Haber-Weiss (Fenton-type) reaction resulting in production of OH/sup ./.

  6. AM-3K, an anti-macrophage antibody, recognizes CD163, a molecule associated with an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hirahara, Junko; Horikawa, Tomohiro; Kawamura, Kyoko; Kiyota, Emi; Sakashita, Naomi; Araki, Norie; Takeya, Motohiro

    2006-07-01

    CD163 is a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily restricted to the monocyte/macrophage lineage and is thought to be a useful marker for anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated macrophages. In this study we used mass spectrometric analysis to determine that the antigen recognized by the antibody AM-3K, which we previously generated as a tissue macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody, was CD163. An anti-inflammatory subtype of macrophages stimulated by dexamethasone or interleukin-10 showed strong reactivity for AM-3K and increased expression of CD163 mRNA. Immunohistochemical staining of routinely processed pathological specimens revealed that AM-3K recognized a specialized subpopulation of macrophages. In granulomatous diseases such as tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, or foreign body reactions, tissue macrophages around granulomas, but not component cells of the granulomas such as epithelioid cells and multinucleated giant cells, showed positive staining for AM-3K. In atherosclerotic lesions, scattered macrophages in diffuse intimal lesions were strongly positive for AM-3K, whereas foamy macrophages in atheromatous plaques demonstrated only weak staining. We therefore suggest that, in routine pathological specimens, AM-3K is a useful marker for anti-inflammatory macrophages because these cells can be distinguished from inflammatory or classically activated macrophages. Because AM-3K cross-reacts with macrophage subpopulations in different animal species including rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, cats, dogs, goats, pigs, bovine species, horses, monkeys, and cetaceans, it will have wide application for detection of CD163 in various animals.

  7. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Olga Hernández de la; Marchat, Laurence A.; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; Rosas, Itzel López; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  8. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Hernández de la Cruz, Olga; Marchat, Laurence A; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; López Rosas, Itzel; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  9. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  10. Blocking IL-6 trans-signaling prevents high-fat diet-induced adipose tissue macrophage recruitment but does not improve insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kraakman, Michael J; Kammoun, Helene L; Allen, Tamara L; Deswaerte, Virginie; Henstridge, Darren C; Estevez, Emma; Matthews, Vance B; Neill, Bronwyn; White, David A; Murphy, Andrew J; Peijs, Lone; Yang, Christine; Risis, Steve; Bruce, Clinton R; Du, Xiao-Jun; Bobik, Alex; Lee-Young, Robert S; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Vasanthakumar, Ajithkumar; Shi, Wei; Kallies, Axel; Lancaster, Graeme I; Rose-John, Stefan; Febbraio, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a paradoxical role in inflammation and metabolism. The pro-inflammatory effects of IL-6 are mediated via IL-6 "trans-signaling," a process where the soluble form of the IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) binds IL-6 and activates signaling in inflammatory cells that express the gp130 but not the IL-6 receptor. Here we show that trans-signaling recruits macrophages into adipose tissue (ATM). Moreover, blocking trans-signaling with soluble gp130Fc protein prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced ATM accumulation, but does not improve insulin action. Importantly, however, blockade of IL-6 trans-signaling, unlike complete ablation of IL-6 signaling, does not exacerbate obesity-induced weight gain, liver steatosis, or insulin resistance. Our data identify the sIL-6R as a critical chemotactic signal for ATM recruitment and suggest that selectively blocking IL-6 trans-signaling may be a more favorable treatment option for inflammatory diseases, compared with current treatments that completely block the action of IL-6 and negatively impact upon metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Quantitative spatial analysis of transcripts in multinucleate cells using single-molecule FISH.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChangHwan; Roberts, Samantha E; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2016-04-01

    mRNA positioning in the cell is important for diverse cellular functions and proper development of multicellular organisms. Single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) enables quantitative investigation of mRNA localization and abundance at the level of individual molecules in the context of cellular features. Details about spatial mRNA patterning at various times, in different genetic backgrounds, at different developmental stages, and under varied environmental conditions provide invaluable insights into the mechanisms and functions of spatial regulation. Here, we describe detailed methods for performing smFISH along with immunofluorescence for two large, multinucleate cell types: the fungus Ashbya gossypii and cultured mouse myotubes. We also put forward a semi-automated image processing tool that systematically detects mRNAs from smFISH data and statistically analyzes the spatial pattern of mRNAs using a customized MATLAB code. These protocols and image analysis tools can be adapted to a wide variety of transcripts and cell types for systematically and quantitatively analyzing mRNA distribution in three-dimensional space. PMID:26690072

  12. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  13. Orbital solitary fibrous tumor with multinucleate giant cells: case report of an unusual finding in an uncommon tumor.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare soft-tissue neoplasm which may occur at any site although it is more frequent in the pleura, mediastinum and lung. Orbital involvement by SFT is uncommon. Giant cells are extremely rare to be seen in a SFT and have been described to be immunoreactive for CD34. We present a case of orbital SFT with multinucleate giant cells expressing CD68 and lacking immunoreactivity for CD34. The differential diagnosis is discussed.

  14. Wear Particles Derived from Metal Hip Implants Induce the Generation of Multinucleated Giant Cells in a 3-Dimensional Peripheral Tissue-Equivalent Model

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debargh K.; Potnis, Pushya A.; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1–5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which

  15. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  16. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-01

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  17. Macrophages in Langerhans cell histiocytosis are differentiated toward M2 phenotype: their possible involvement in pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Sakashita, Naomi; Iyama, Ken-Ichi; Murayama, Toshihiko; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    Although numerous macrophages are found in the lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), their activation phenotypes and their roles in the disease process have not been clarified. Paraffin-embedded LCH samples were examined on immunohistochemistry and it was found that CD163 can be used to distinguish infiltrated macrophages from neoplastic Langerhans cells (LC). The number of CD163-positve macrophages was positively correlated with the number of multinucleated giant cells (MGC), indicating that most MGC are derived from infiltrated macrophages. A significant number of CD163-positive macrophages were positive for interleukin (IL)-10 and phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3), an IL-10-induced signal transduction molecule. This indicates that these macrophages are polarized to anti-inflammatory macrophages of M2 phenotype. Tumor-derived macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was considered to responsible for inducing M2 differentiation of infiltrated macrophages. The number of CD163-positive macrophages in different cases of LCH varied, and interestingly the density of CD163-positive macrophages was inversely correlated with the Ki-67-positivity of LC. Although the underlying mechanism is not fully elucidated, macrophage-derived IL-10 was considered to be involved in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation via activation of STAT3. PMID:20055949

  18. Homegrown Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Wook; Zhang, Nan; Choi, Kyunghee; Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2016-09-20

    Macrophages residing in different organs have diverse gene-expression programs. Mass et al. (2016) propose that this diversity develops "at home"-within those organs-after the recruitment of a common precursor that had not made prior commitments to diversity. PMID:27653599

  19. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors.

  20. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor. PMID:24499686

  1. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  2. Switch-like reprogramming of gene expression after fusion of multinucleate plasmodial cells of two Physarum polycephalum sporulation mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Pauline; Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Ebeling, Britta; Haas, Markus; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •We investigate reprogramming of gene expression in multinucleate single cells. •Cells of two differentiation control mutants are fused. •Fused cells proceed to alternative gene expression patterns. •The population of nuclei damps stochastic fluctuations in gene expression. •Dynamic processes of cellular reprogramming can be observed by repeated sampling of a cell. -- Abstract: Nonlinear dynamic processes involving the differential regulation of transcription factors are considered to impact the reprogramming of stem cells, germ cells, and somatic cells. Here, we fused two multinucleate plasmodial cells of Physarum polycephalum mutants defective in different sporulation control genes while being in different physiological states. The resulting heterokaryons established one of two significantly different expression patterns of marker genes while the plasmodial halves that were fused to each other synchronized spontaneously. Spontaneous synchronization suggests that switch-like control mechanisms spread over and finally control the entire plasmodium as a result of cytoplasmic mixing. Regulatory molecules due to the large volume of the vigorously streaming cytoplasm will define concentrations in acting on the population of nuclei and in the global setting of switches. Mixing of a large cytoplasmic volume is expected to damp stochasticity when individual nuclei deliver certain RNAs at low copy number into the cytoplasm. We conclude that spontaneous synchronization, the damping of molecular noise in gene expression by the large cytoplasmic volume, and the option to take multiple macroscopic samples from the same plasmodium provide unique options for studying the dynamics of cellular reprogramming at the single cell level.

  3. Post-slippage multinucleation renders cytotoxic variation in anti-mitotic drugs that target the microtubules or mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanting; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Jue

    2014-01-01

    One common cancer chemotherapeutic strategy is to perturb cell division with anti-mitotic drugs. Paclitaxel, the classic microtubule-targeting anti-mitotic drug, so far still outperforms the newer, more spindle-specific anti-mitotics in the clinic, but the underlying cellular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study we identified post-slippage multinucleation, which triggered extensive DNA damage and apoptosis after drug-induced mitotic slippage, contributes to the extra cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in comparison to the spindle-targeting drug, Kinesin-5 inhibitor. Based on quantitative single-cell microscopy assays, we showed that attenuation of the degree of post-slippage multinucleation significantly reduced DNA damage and apoptosis in response to paclitaxel, and that post-slippage apoptosis was likely mediated by the p53-dependent DNA damage response pathway. Paclitaxel appeared to act as a double-edge sword, capable of killing proliferating cancer cells both during mitotic arrest and after mitotic slippage by inducing DNA damage. Our results thus suggest that to predict drug response to paclitaxel and anti-mitotics in general, 2 distinct sets of bio-markers, which regulate mitotic and post-slippage cytotoxicity, respectively, may need to be considered. Our findings provide important new insight not only for elucidating the cytotoxic mechanisms of paclitaxel, but also for understanding the variable efficacy of different anti-mitotic chemotherapeutics. PMID:24694730

  4. Primary Urinary Bladder Angiosarcoma with Osteoclast-Like Multinucleated Giant Cells: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Nariman A.; Olsen, Jamie; Jelic, Tomislav M.; He, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Urinary bladder angiosarcoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: TURBT Specialty: Diagnostics, Laboratory Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Angiosarcoma is a fatal and aggressive mesenchymal tumor. It occurs in skin, breast, and parenchymal organs. It rarely arises primarily in the urinary bladder. Only 13 cases of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma have been reported in the English literature. Case Report: The patient was a 68-year-old man who presented to the Emergency Department with inability to void. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a urinary bladder mass. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Pathological examination results were consistent with angiosarcoma. In addition to the unusual location of this tumor, the pathology was different from the previously reported cases in that this case was rich with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells. Conclusions: The pathological diagnosis of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma is challenging. Histological patterns and immunophenotypes are variable. Here, we review all reported cases of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma, highlight the clinical and morphological features of this malignant neoplasm, and report a unique case of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells. PMID:26947436

  5. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  6. Macrophage fusion, giant cell formation, and the foreign body response require matrix metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    MacLauchlan, Susan; Skokos, Eleni A.; Meznarich, Norman; Zhu, Dana H.; Raoof, Sana; Shipley, J. Michael; Senior, Robert M.; Bornstein, Paul; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells in several pathologic conditions, including the foreign body response (FBR). We detected high levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 during macrophage fusion in vitro and in foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) in vivo. Wild-type (WT) bone marrow-derived macrophages were induced to fuse with IL-4 in the presence of MMP-9 function-blocking antibodies and displayed reduced fusion. A similar defect, characterized by delayed shape change and abnormal morphology, was observed in MMP-9 null macrophages. Analysis of the FBR in MMP-9 null mice was then pursued to evaluate the significance of these findings. Specifically, mixed cellulose ester disks and polyvinyl alcohol sponges were implanted s.c. in MMP-9 null and WT mice and excised 2–4 weeks later. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses indicated equal macrophage recruitment between MMP-9 null and WT mice, but FBGC formation was compromised in the former. In addition, MMP-9 null mice displayed abnormalities in extracellular matrix assembly and angiogenesis. Consistent with a requirement for MMP-9 in fusion, we also observed reduced MMP-9 levels in MCP-1 null macrophages, previously shown to be defective in FBGC formation. Collectively, our studies show abnormalities in MMP-9 null mice during the FBR and suggest a role for MMP-9 in macrophage fusion. PMID:19141565

  7. MCT-1 expression and PTEN deficiency synergistically promote neoplastic multinucleation through the Src/p190B signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M-H; Chen, Y-A; Chen, H-H; Chang, K-W; Chang, I-S; Wang, L-H; Hsu, H-L

    2014-10-23

    Multinucleation is associated with malignant neoplasms; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the nuclear abnormality remains unclear. Loss or mutation of PTEN promotes the development of malignant tumors. We now demonstrate that increased expression of the oncogene MCT-1 (multiple copies in T-cell malignancy 1) antagonizes PTEN gene presentation, PTEN protein stability and PTEN functional activity, thereby further promoting phosphoinositide 3 kinase/AKT signaling, survival rate and malignancies of the PTEN-deficient cells. In the PTEN-null cancer cells, MCT-1 interacts with p190B and Src in vivo, supporting that they are in proximity of the signaling complexes. MCT-1 overexpression and PTEN loss synergistically augments the Src/p190B signaling function that leads to inhibition of RhoA activity. Under such a condition, the incidence of mitotic catastrophes including spindle multipolarity and cytokinesis failure is enhanced, driving an Src/p190B/RhoA-dependent neoplastic multinucleation. Targeting MCT-1 by the short hairpin RNA markedly represses the Src/p190B function, improves nuclear structures and suppresses xenograft tumorigenicity of the PTEN-null breast cancer cells. Consistent with the oncogenic effects in vitro, clinical evidence has confirmed that MCT-1 gene stimulation is correlated with p190B gene promotion and PTEN gene suppression in human breast cancer. Accordingly, MCT-1 gene induction is recognized as a potential biomarker of breast tumor development. Abrogating MCT-1 function may be a promising stratagem for management of breast cancer involving Src hyperactivation and/or PTEN dysfunction. PMID:24858043

  8. Endocytosis of indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles by macrophages provokes pyroptosis requiring NLRP3-ASC-Caspase1 axis that can be prevented by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Abderrahim; Muzembo, Basilua André; Yagyu, Ken-ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensebé, Luc; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) are of considerable importance because workers exposed to indium compounds have been diagnosed with interstitial lung disease or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; however, the pathophysiology of these diseases is undefined. Here, mice intraperitoneally inoculated with ITO-nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) resulted in peritonitis dependent in NLRP3 inflammasome, with neutrophils recruitment and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Withal peritoneal macrophages exposed ex vivo to ITO-NPs caused IL-1β secretion and cytolysis. Further, alveolar macrophages exposed to ITO-NPs in vitro showed ITO-NP endocytosis and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, ensued cell death by cytolysis. This cell death was RIPK1-independent but caspase1-dependent, and thus identified as pyroptosis. Endocytosis of ITO-NPs by activated THP-1 cells induced pyroptosis with IL-1β/TNF-α production and cytolysis, but not in activated THP-1 cells with knockdown of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1. However, exposing activated THP-1 cells with NLRP3 or ASC knockdown to ITO-NPs resulted in cell death but without cytolysis, with deficiency in IL-1β/TNF-α, and revealing features of apoptosis. While, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with macrophages impaired both inflammation and cell death induced by ITO-NPs. Together, our findings provide crucial insights to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases caused by ITO particles, and identify MSCs as a potent therapeutic. PMID:27194621

  9. Prevention of copper-induced cell death by GC-rich DNA oligomers in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Sakiko; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Impact of redox active transition metals on activation of cell death signaling in plant cells have been documented to date. We have recently reported that GC-rich DNA oligomers with high affinity for binding of copper and catalytic activity for removal of ROS as novel plant cell-protecting agents. Here, we show that similar DNA oligomers protect the mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells from copper-induced cell death, suggesting that the phenomenon firstly observed in plant model can be expanded to a wider range of cells and/or organisms including mammalian cells. PMID:27066170

  10. Prevention of copper-induced cell death by GC-rich DNA oligomers in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Sakiko; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Impact of redox active transition metals on activation of cell death signaling in plant cells have been documented to date. We have recently reported that GC-rich DNA oligomers with high affinity for binding of copper and catalytic activity for removal of ROS as novel plant cell-protecting agents. Here, we show that similar DNA oligomers protect the mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells from copper-induced cell death, suggesting that the phenomenon firstly observed in plant model can be expanded to a wider range of cells and/or organisms including mammalian cells. PMID:27066170

  11. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  12. Probiotics prevent the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic tumorigenesis through suppressed colonic mucosa cellular proliferation and increased stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Foo, Ning-Ping; Ou Yang, Hui; Chiu, Hsueh-Huei; Chan, Hing-Yuen; Liao, Chii-Cherng; Yu, Chung-Keung; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2011-12-28

    Probiotics modulate immunity and inhibit colon carcinogenesis in experimental models, but these effects largely depend on the bacterial strain, and the precise mechanisms are not well understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of Bifidobacterium longum and/or Lactobacillus gasseri on the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic precancerous lesions and tumors in mice while delineating the possible mechanisms involved. The results suggest that dietary consumption of probiotics (B. longum and L. gasseri) resulted in a significant inhibition of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in male ICR mice. Long-term (24 weeks) dietary consumption of probiotics resulted in a reduction of colon tumor multiplicity and the size of the tumors. Administration of B. longum and L. gasseri suppressed the rate of colonic mucosa cellular proliferation in a manner correlating with the inhibition of tumor induction by DMH. In addition, the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was significantly increased in the DMH-treated mice that were fed various doses of B. longum, but not with L. gasseri or combined probiotics (B. longum + L. gasseri). We also found that L. gasseri significantly increased the proliferation of RAW264.7 macrophage cells through an increase in S phase DNA synthesis, which was related to the up-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin A. Taken together, these results demonstrate the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy and the immune stimulating mechanisms of dietary probiotics against DMH-induced colonic tumorigenesis.

  13. VIP treatment prevents embryo resorption by modulating efferocytosis and activation profile of maternal macrophages in the CBAxDBA resorption prone model

    PubMed Central

    Gallino, Lucila; Calo, Guillermina; Hauk, Vanesa; Fraccaroli, Laura; Grasso, Esteban; Vermeulen, Mónica; Leirós, Claudia Pérez; Ramhorst, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation occurs followed by a local pro-inflammatory response subsequently shifted toward a tolerogenic one. VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) has embryotrofic, anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic effects. In this sense, we investigated whether the in vivo treatment with VIP contributes to an immunosuppressant local microenvironment associated with an improved pregnancy outcome in the CBA/J × DBA/2 resorption prone model. Pregnancy induced the expression of VIP, VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the uterus from CBA/J × DBA/2 mating females on day 8.5 of gestation compared with non-pregnant mice. VIP treatment (2 nmol/mouse i.p.) on day 6.5 significantly increased the number of viable implantation sites and improved the asymmetric distribution of implanted embryos. This effect was accompanied by a decrease in RORγt and an increase in TGF-β and PPARγ expression at the implantation sites. Moreover, VIP modulated the maternal peritoneal macrophages efferocytosis ability, tested using latex beads-FITC or apoptotic thymocytes, displaying an increased frequency of IL-10-producer F4/80 cells while did not modulate TNF-α and IL-12 secretion. The present data suggest that VIP treatment increases the number of viable embryos associated with an increase in the efferocytic ability of maternal macrophages which is related to an immunosuppressant microenvironment. PMID:26733206

  14. Probiotics prevent the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic tumorigenesis through suppressed colonic mucosa cellular proliferation and increased stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Foo, Ning-Ping; Ou Yang, Hui; Chiu, Hsueh-Huei; Chan, Hing-Yuen; Liao, Chii-Cherng; Yu, Chung-Keung; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2011-12-28

    Probiotics modulate immunity and inhibit colon carcinogenesis in experimental models, but these effects largely depend on the bacterial strain, and the precise mechanisms are not well understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of Bifidobacterium longum and/or Lactobacillus gasseri on the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic precancerous lesions and tumors in mice while delineating the possible mechanisms involved. The results suggest that dietary consumption of probiotics (B. longum and L. gasseri) resulted in a significant inhibition of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in male ICR mice. Long-term (24 weeks) dietary consumption of probiotics resulted in a reduction of colon tumor multiplicity and the size of the tumors. Administration of B. longum and L. gasseri suppressed the rate of colonic mucosa cellular proliferation in a manner correlating with the inhibition of tumor induction by DMH. In addition, the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was significantly increased in the DMH-treated mice that were fed various doses of B. longum, but not with L. gasseri or combined probiotics (B. longum + L. gasseri). We also found that L. gasseri significantly increased the proliferation of RAW264.7 macrophage cells through an increase in S phase DNA synthesis, which was related to the up-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin A. Taken together, these results demonstrate the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy and the immune stimulating mechanisms of dietary probiotics against DMH-induced colonic tumorigenesis. PMID:22049926

  15. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  16. Effects of acute radon progeny exposure on rat alveolar macrophage number and function

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.; Newton, G.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    Alveolar macrophages play a key role in removal and translocation of inhaled particles and have been shown to influence proliferation of Alveolar Type II cells and fibroblasts. The effect of radon progeny on alveolar macrophage number and function is not documented. Functional impairment of alveolar macrophages may be an ancillary event in the induction of pulmonary lesions and may also indicate dose to the peripheral lung. In our study, rats were exposed to 1000 working level months (WLM) of radon progeny over a 3- to 5-h period, with a vector aerosol of environmental tobacco smoke. Groups of animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were lavaged immediately after exposure and on days 2, 18, 16, 21 and 29 after exposure. The numbers and viabilities of the lavaged macrophages were determined. Cytological preparations were made to determine the number of binucleated/multinucleated macrophages and macrophages containing micronuclei. The DNA content was measured flow-cytometrically using Hoechst 33342, and phagocytosis was assayed by determining the uptake of fluorescent microspheres. The numbers and viabilities of macrophages recovered from exposed animals were similar to the values measured for control animals. There was no evidence of an inflammatory reaction during any period after radon progeny exposure. Nuclear atypia, evidenced by increases in the number of binucleated cells and cells with micronuclei, occurred in animals 8 days after exposure, and this response peaked at 21 days after exposure. The phagocytic capability of the alveolar macrophages was not significantly affected at any time point after exposure. These results show that there was little functional impairment of alveolar macrophages in rats after acute radon-progeny exposure; however, there was long-standing interference with cell division, resulting in binucleated and micronucleated macrophages.

  17. Imaging macrophages in trehalose with SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, S. A.; Kurczy, M. E.; Fan, X.; Halleck, M. S.; Schlegel, R. A.; Winograd, N.

    2008-12-01

    Phagocytosis is a major component of the animal immune system where apoptotic cellular material, metabolites, and waste are safely processed. Further, efficient phagocytosis by macrophages is key to maintaining healthy vascular systems and preventing atherosclerosis. Single-cell images of macrophage phagocytosis of red blood cells, RBCs, and polystyrene microspheres have been chemically mapped with TOF-SIMS. We demonstrate here cholesterol and phosphocholine localizations as relative to time and activity.

  18. Gall-forming root-knot nematodes hijack key plant cellular functions to induce multinucleate and hypertrophied feeding cells.

    PubMed

    Favery, Bruno; Quentin, Michaël; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Abad, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Among plant-parasitic nematodes, the root-knot nematodes (RKNs) of the Meloidogyne spp. are the most economically important genus. RKN are root parasitic worms able to infect nearly all crop species and have a wide geographic distribution. During infection, RKNs establish and maintain an intimate relationship with the host plant. This includes the creation of a specialized nutritional structure composed of multinucleate and hypertrophied giant cells, which result from the redifferentiation of vascular root cells. Giant cells constitute the sole source of nutrients for the nematode and are essential for growth and reproduction. Hyperplasia of surrounding root cells leads to the formation of the gall or root-knot, an easily recognized symptom of plant infection by RKNs. Secreted effectors produced in nematode salivary glands and injected into plant cells through a specialized feeding structure called the stylet play a critical role in the formation of giant cells. Here, we describe the complex interactions between RKNs and their host plants. We highlight progress in understanding host plant responses, focusing on how RKNs manipulate key plant processes and functions, including cell cycle, defence, hormones, cellular scaffold, metabolism and transport.

  19. Switch-like reprogramming of gene expression after fusion of multinucleate plasmodial cells of two Physarum polycephalum sporulation mutants.

    PubMed

    Walter, Pauline; Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Ebeling, Britta; Haas, Markus; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-05-24

    Nonlinear dynamic processes involving the differential regulation of transcription factors are considered to impact the reprogramming of stem cells, germ cells, and somatic cells. Here, we fused two multinucleate plasmodial cells of Physarum polycephalum mutants defective in different sporulation control genes while being in different physiological states. The resulting heterokaryons established one of two significantly different expression patterns of marker genes while the plasmodial halves that were fused to each other synchronized spontaneously. Spontaneous synchronization suggests that switch-like control mechanisms spread over and finally control the entire plasmodium as a result of cytoplasmic mixing. Regulatory molecules due to the large volume of the vigorously streaming cytoplasm will define concentrations in acting on the population of nuclei and in the global setting of switches. Mixing of a large cytoplasmic volume is expected to damp stochasticity when individual nuclei deliver certain RNAs at low copy number into the cytoplasm. We conclude that spontaneous synchronization, the damping of molecular noise in gene expression by the large cytoplasmic volume, and the option to take multiple macroscopic samples from the same plasmodium provide unique options for studying the dynamics of cellular reprogramming at the single cell level.

  20. Mulberry fruit prevents LPS-induced NF-κB/pERK/MAPK signals in macrophages and suppresses acute colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengjiang; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Lian; Qiu, Huiling; Wang, Liyan; Li, Li; Yao, Lijun; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Wu, Yonghou; Luo, Jun; Liu, Johnson J; Yang, Yi; Yang, Wancai; Gou, Deming

    2015-11-30

    Here, we investigated the impact of mulberry fruit (MBF) extracts on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the therapeutic efficacy of MBF diet in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis and MUC2(-/-) mice with colorectal cancer. In vitro, LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly inhibited by MBF extracts via suppressing the expression of proinflammatory molecules, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-β) and IL-6. Particularly, a dose-dependent inhibition on LPS-induced inflammatory responses was observed following treatment with MBF dichloromethane extract (MBF-DE), in which linoleic acid and ethyl linolenate were identified as two active compounds. Moreover, we elucidated that MBF-DE attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses by blocking activation of both NF-κB/p65 and pERK/MAPK pathways. In vivo, DSS-induced acute colitis was significantly ameliorated in MBF-fed mice as gauged by weight loss, colon morphology and histological damage. In addition, MBF-fed MUC2(-/-) mice displayed significant decrease in intestinal tumor and inflammation incidence compared to control diet-fed group. Overall, our results demonstrated that MBF suppressed the development of intestinal inflammation and tumorgenesis both in vitro and in vivo, and supports the potential of MBF as a therapeutic functional food for testing in human clinical trials.

  1. [6]-Gingerol inhibits nitric oxide synthesis in activated J774.1 mouse macrophages and prevents peroxynitrite-induced oxidation and nitration reactions.

    PubMed

    Ippoushi, Katsunari; Azuma, Keiko; Ito, Hidekazu; Horie, Hideki; Higashio, Hisao

    2003-11-14

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives, e.g. peroxynitrite (ONOO-), have been proposed as being able to influence signal transduction and cause DNA damage, contributing to carcinogenic processes. In this study, the effect of [6]-gingerol, a pungent phenolic compound present in ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), on NO synthesis in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated J774.1 macrophages was tested, and the protective ability of this compound against peroxynitrite-mediated oxidation and nitration reactions were evaluated. [6]-Gingerol exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of NO production and significant reduction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in LPS-stimulated J774.1 cells. Moreover, [6]-gingerol effectively suppressed peroxynitrite-induced oxidation of dichlorodihydrofluorescein, oxidative single strand breaks in supercoiled pTZ 18U plasmid DNA, and formation of 3-nitrotyrosine in bovine serum albumin (BSA) and J774.1 cells. Our results indicate that [6]-gingerol is a potent inhibitor of NO synthesis and also an effective protector against peroxynitrite-mediated damage. PMID:14572883

  2. Preventive effect of bis-eugenol, a eugenol ortho dimer, on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B activation and inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Shoji, Masao; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Tanaka, Shoji; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2003-09-15

    Eugenol exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, but at higher concentrations acts as an oxidant and potent allergen. It was earlier shown that bis-eugenol synthesized by the oxidation of eugenol was less cytotoxic and more highly antioxidative than eugenol. But its anti-inflammatory mechanism remains yet unclear. Since nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) is a key transcriptional factor in the expression of inflammatory cytokines, we examined whether eugenol and bis-eugenol are inhibitors of NF-kappa B activation. We observed that bis-eugenol, but not eugenol, clearly inhibited the degradation of inhibitory kappa B-alpha in RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and, consequently, the transcriptional activity of the stimulated NF-kappa B in the cells. In addition, bis-eugenol actually inhibited LPS-stimulated expression of inflammatory cytokines at both gene and protein levels. These findings suggest that bis-eugenol acts as a potent inhibitor of NF-kappa B.

  3. Mulberry fruit prevents LPS-induced NF-κB/pERK/MAPK signals in macrophages and suppresses acute colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhengjiang; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Lian; Qiu, Huiling; Wang, Liyan; Li, Li; Yao, Lijun; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Wu, Yonghou; Luo, Jun; Liu, Johnson J.; Yang, Yi; Yang, Wancai; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the impact of mulberry fruit (MBF) extracts on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the therapeutic efficacy of MBF diet in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis and MUC2−/− mice with colorectal cancer. In vitro, LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly inhibited by MBF extracts via suppressing the expression of proinflammatory molecules, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-β) and IL-6. Particularly, a dose-dependent inhibition on LPS-induced inflammatory responses was observed following treatment with MBF dichloromethane extract (MBF-DE), in which linoleic acid and ethyl linolenate were identified as two active compounds. Moreover, we elucidated that MBF-DE attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses by blocking activation of both NF-κB/p65 and pERK/MAPK pathways. In vivo, DSS-induced acute colitis was significantly ameliorated in MBF-fed mice as gauged by weight loss, colon morphology and histological damage. In addition, MBF-fed MUC2−/− mice displayed significant decrease in intestinal tumor and inflammation incidence compared to control diet-fed group. Overall, our results demonstrated that MBF suppressed the development of intestinal inflammation and tumorgenesis both in vitro and in vivo, and supports the potential of MBF as a therapeutic functional food for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:26615818

  4. Murine macrophage behavior on peptide-grafted polyethyleneglycol-containing networks.

    PubMed

    Kao, W J; Hubbell, J A

    1998-07-01

    Polyethyleneglycol-based networks were employed as substrates to graft bioactive peptides to study macrophage interactions with materials. Our overall objective was to utilize biologically active factors to stimulate certain macrophage function on materials suitable for implantation in connective tissues. In this study, we sought to explore the bioactivity of several peptides derived from extracellular matrix adhesion proteins and macrophage-active proteins that are normally soluble. The candidate peptides examined corresponded to residues 63 to 77 of complement component C3a (C3a(63-77)), residues 178 to 207 of interleukin-1 beta (IL1beta(178-207)), residues 1615 to 1624 of fibronectin (FN(1615-1624)), endothelial-macrophage activating polypeptide II, complement component C5a inhibitory sequence, macrophage inhibitory peptide, and YRGDG; materials lacking peptides were used as negative controls. An established murine cell-line IC-21 was employed as a macrophage model, and human dermal fibroblasts were used for comparison. Our results showed that the substrates without grafted peptides were free from artifactual cell adhesion associated with the adsorption of serum or cellularly secreted proteins for long duration of culture. Of all grafted samples, IL1beta(178-207)- and C3a(63-77)-grafted surfaces supported higher adherent macrophage densities. C3a(63-77)- and FN(1615-1624)-grafted surfaces supported higher adherent fibroblast densities. From competitive inhibition studies, cell adhesion was determined to occur in a receptor-peptide specific manner. The presence of grafted YRGDG in addition to IL1beta(178-207), C3a(63-77), or FN(1615-1624) synergistically increased macrophage and fibroblast adhesion. Materials grafted with IL1beta(178-207) or C3a(63-77) co-grafted with or without YRGDG did not support the formation of multinucleated giant cells from the fusion of adherent macrophages in vitro. PMID:10099308

  5. The plant cell inhibitor KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and cytokinesis disruption in giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2015-01-01

    The plant cell cycle inhibitor gene KRP6 has been investigated in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Unexpectedly, KRP6 overexpressing lines revealed a distinct role for this specific KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. This function was confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures ectopically expressing KRP6. A blockage in the mitotic exit was observed in cell suspensions and in giant cells resulted in the appearance of multi-nucleated cells. KRP6 expression during nematode infection and the similarity in phenotypes among KRP6 overexpressing cell cultures and giant-cell morphology strongly suggest that KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and acytokinesis occurring in giant-cells. Once again nematodes have been shown to manipulate the plant cell cycle machinery in order to promote gall establishment.

  6. The plant cell inhibitor KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and cytokinesis disruption in giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Paulo; Engler, Janice de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The plant cell cycle inhibitor gene KRP6 has been investigated in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Unexpectedly, KRP6 overexpressing lines revealed a distinct role for this specific KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. This function was confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures ectopically expressing KRP6. A blockage in the mitotic exit was observed in cell suspensions and in giant cells resulted in the appearance of multi-nucleated cells. KRP6 expression during nematode infection and the similarity in phenotypes among KRP6 overexpressing cell cultures and giant-cell morphology strongly suggest that KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and acytokinesis occurring in giant-cells. Once again nematodes have been shown to manipulate the plant cell cycle machinery in order to promote gall establishment. PMID:25915833

  7. HDAC inhibition prevents white matter injury by modulating microglia/macrophage polarization through the GSK3β/PTEN/Akt axis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohua; Shi, Yejie; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Leak, Rehana K; Hu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yun; Pu, Hongjian; Li, Wei-Wei; Tang, Bo; Wang, Yun; Gao, Yanqin; Zheng, Ping; Bennett, Michael V L; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits destruction of both gray and white matter, which is exacerbated by secondary proinflammatory responses. Although white matter injury (WMI) is strongly correlated with poor neurological status, the maintenance of white matter integrity is poorly understood, and no current therapies protect both gray and white matter. One candidate approach that may fulfill this role is inhibition of class I/II histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we demonstrate that the HDAC inhibitor Scriptaid protects white matter up to 35 d after TBI, as shown by reductions in abnormally dephosphorylated neurofilament protein, increases in myelin basic protein, anatomic preservation of myelinated axons, and improved nerve conduction. Furthermore, Scriptaid shifted microglia/macrophage polarization toward the protective M2 phenotype and mitigated inflammation. In primary cocultures of microglia and oligodendrocytes, Scriptaid increased expression of microglial glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), which phosphorylated and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), thereby enhancing phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling and polarizing microglia toward M2. The increase in GSK3β in microglia and their phenotypic switch to M2 was associated with increased preservation of neighboring oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with recent findings that microglial phenotypic switching modulates white matter repair and axonal remyelination and highlight a previously unexplored role for HDAC activity in this process. Furthermore, the functions of GSK3β may be more subtle than previously thought, in that GSK3β can modulate microglial functions via the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and preserve white matter homeostasis. Thus, inhibition of HDACs in microglia is a potential future therapy in TBI and other neurological conditions with white matter destruction. PMID:25691750

  8. Epigallocatechin gallate prevents inflammation by reducing macrophage infiltration and inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α signaling in the pancreas of rats on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanli; Bao, Suqing; Yang, Wanli; Zhang, Jin; Li, Lin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) would suppress inflammation in the pancreas, and thus, we investigated the effects that EGCG administration had in the pancreas of rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). To test our hypothesis, 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups: normal diet (control) group and HFD group. When there was a significant difference in body weight between the 2 groups (P < .05), the HFD group was further divided into 2 subgroups: the HFD group (HFD, n = 10, 16 weeks) and the EGCG group (HFD + 3.2 g/kg EGCG, n = 10, 16 weeks). Metabolite levels and the expression of inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin 6 [IL-6], and toll-like receptor 4) were measured using standard biochemical techniques. Insulin secretion and pancreatic histology were also evaluated. Epigallocatechin gallate significantly decreased fasting insulin levels as well as the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index. In the HFD group, the average glucose infusion rate and the TNF-α and IL-6 levels increased, whereas toll-like receptor 4 and TNF receptor-associated factor-6 did not. A pathologic analysis of pancreatic tissue revealed an increase in inflammatory TNF-α and infiltrating CD68+ macrophages in the islets of the HFD rats, but rarely is this observed in the in the HFD + EGCG rats. Overall, these data suggest that EGCG suppresses inflammation, partially reverses metabolic abnormalities, and ultimately increases insulin sensitivity in the pancreas of HFD rats.

  9. The riddle of multinucleated “floret-like” giant cells and their detection in an extensive gluteal neurofibroma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The neurofibromatoses are inherited tumor predisposition syndromes involving two major clinical phenotypes: neurofibromatosis type 1 (von Recklinghausen's disease) is linked to chromosome 17q, and tends to occur seven times more frequently than neurofibromatosis type 2. Neurofibromatosis type 1 entails a distinctive cutaneous manifestation prevailed upon by benign neurofibromas, which may vary in size, number and distribution. On the histological level, neurofibromas are composed of an admixture of neurilemmal cells, including Schwann cells, fibroblasts, and – to a lesser extent – perineurial cells. Case presentation The case of a 39-year-old Caucasian man with a voluminous recurrent neurofibroma of 27×15cm extending from the left gluteal region to thoraco-lumbar levels Th6 through L4 is reported. Within the soft tissue tumor a pseudocyst of 7.3×9.3cm was found preoperatively. Conclusion Histopathological study of the excised mass was conspicuous for revealing a large number of multinucleated floret-like giant cells within an otherwise classical soft tissue neurofibroma. Previous reports on neurofibromas with multinucleated floret-like giant cells are distinctly scant. Available evidence from the literature does not suggest any consistent correlation of multinucleated floret-like giant cells in neurofibromas with gender, age, traumatic antecedents, size of the lesion, recurrence, or malignant transformation. Furthermore, the presence of such cells may not be specific for neurofibromatosis type 1, as they occasionally are encountered in some unrelated mesenchymal neoplasms as well. PMID:23890233

  10. Di-n-Butyl Phthalate Induces Multinucleated Germ Cells in the Rat Fetal Testis Through a Nonproliferative Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Spade, Daniel J; Hall, Susan J; Wilson, Shelby; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-11-01

    In utero exposure to some phthalate esters adversely affects the development of the rat seminiferous cord, causing germ cell loss and increasing the number of multinucleated germ cells (MNGs). To understand the timing of MNG formation and determine whether it requires nuclear division, timed pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 500 mg/kg di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) or corn oil vehicle by oral gavage on Gestational Day (GD) 17 or 18 (0 h) and euthanized after 2, 4, 6, or 24 h or given a second dose at 24 h and euthanized 48 h after the initial dose. Dams were simultaneously exposed to 0.3 M 5-bromo-2'-deoxycitidine (BrdC; converted to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridylate [BrdU] in vivo) through a subcutaneous micro-osmotic pump implanted at -2 h. In the testes of male fetuses, DBP induced MNGs significantly beginning at 4-6 h and dramatically by 24 h when exposure began on GD 18 but not GD 17. Seminiferous cord diameter was significantly elevated in testes of rats treated with DBP at 24 and 48 h, and cell death, measured by TUNEL assay, was significantly elevated by DBP only at 48 h, when treatment began on GD 18. TUNEL-labeled MNGs were rare. Overall BrdU labeling rate in the testis was unaffected by DBP. Only one of 606 MNGs in BrdU-labeled sections had a strongly positive nucleus, confirming a nonproliferative mechanism of MNG formation, which is a degenerative process with the potential to adversely affect testis development.

  11. Late stages of the synchronized macrophage fusion in osteoclast formation depend on dynamin.

    PubMed

    Verma, Santosh K; Leikina, Evgenia; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2014-12-15

    Macrophage fusion that leads to osteoclast formation is one of the most important examples of cell-cell fusion in development, tissue homoeostasis and immune response. Protein machinery that fuses macrophages remains to be identified. In the present study, we explored the fusion stage of osteoclast formation for RAW macrophage-like murine cells and for macrophages derived from human monocytes. To uncouple fusion from the preceding differentiation processes, we accumulated fusion-committed cells in the presence of LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) that reversibly blocks membrane merger. After 16 h, we removed LPC and observed cell fusion events that would normally develop within 16 h develop instead within 30-90 min. Thus, whereas osteoclastogenesis, generally, takes several days, our approach allowed us to focus on an hour in which we observe robust fusion between the cells. Complementing syncytium formation assay with a novel membrane merger assay let us study the synchronized fusion events downstream of a local merger between two plasma membranes, but before expansion of nascent membrane connections and complete unification of the cells. We found that the expansion of membrane connections detected as a growth of multinucleated osteoclasts depends on dynamin activity. In contrast, a merger between the plasma membranes of the two cells was not affected by inhibitors of dynamin GTPase. Thus dynamin that was recently found to control late stages of myoblast fusion also controls late stages of macrophage fusion, revealing an intriguing conserved mechanistic motif shared by diverse cell-cell fusion processes. PMID:25336256

  12. Differentiation of macrophages from normal human bone marrow in liquid culture. Electron microscopy and cytochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Bainton, D R; Golde, D W

    1978-01-01

    To study the various stages of human mononuclear phagocyte maturation, we cultivated bone marrow in an in vitro diffusion chamber with the cells growing in suspension and upon a dialysis membrane. At 2, 7, and 14 days, the cultured cells were examined by electron microscopy and cytochemical techniques for peroxidase and for more limited analysis of acid phosphatase and arylsulfatase. Peroxidase was being synthesized in promonocytes of 2- and 7-day cultures, as evidenced by reaction product in the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and storage granules. Peroxidase synthesis had ceased in monocytes and the enzyme appeared only in some granules. By 7 days, large macrophages predominated, containing numerous peroxidase-positive storage granules, and heterophagy of dying cells was evident. By 14 days, the most prevalent cell type was the large peroxidase-negative macrophage. Thus, peroxidase is present in high concentrations in immature cells but absent at later stages, presumably a result of degranulation of peroxidase-positive storage granules. Clusters of peroxidase-negative macrophages with indistinct borders (epithelioid cells), as well as obvious multinucleated giant cells, were noted. Frequently, the interdigitating plasma membranes of neighboring macrophages showed a modification resembling a septate junction--to our knowledge, representing the first documentation of this specialized cell contact between normal macrophages. We suggest that such junctions may serve as zones of adhesion between epithelioid cells. Images PMID:659615

  13. Macrophages are required for host survival in experimental urogenital schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Odegaard, Justin I.; Hsieh, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Urogenital schistosomiasis, Schistosoma haematobium worm infection, afflicts millions of people with egg-triggered, fibrotic bladder granulomata. Despite the significant global impact of urogenital schistosomiasis, the mechanisms of bladder granulomogenesis and fibrosis are ill defined due to the prior lack of tractable animal models. We combined a mouse model of urogenital schistosomiasis with macrophage-depleting liposomal clodronate (LC) to define how macrophages mediate bladder granulomogenesis and fibrosis. Mice were injected with eggs purified from infected hamsters or vehicle prepared from uninfected hamster tissues (xenoantigen and injection trauma control). Empty liposomes were controls for LC: 1) LC treatment resulted in fewer bladder egg granuloma-infiltrating macrophages, eosinophils, and T and B cells, lower bladder and serum levels of eotaxin, and higher bladder concentrations of IL-1α and chemokines (in a time-dependent fashion), confirming that macrophages orchestrate leukocyte infiltration of the egg-exposed bladder; 2) macrophage-depleted mice exhibited greater weight loss and bladder hemorrhage postegg injection; 3) early LC treatment postegg injection resulted in profound decreases in bladder fibrosis, suggesting differing roles for macrophages in fibrosis over time; and 4) LC treatment also led to egg dose-dependent mortality, indicating that macrophages prevent death from urogenital schistosomiasis. Thus, macrophages are a potential therapeutic target for preventing or treating the bladder sequelae of urogenital schistosomiasis.—Fu, C.-L., Odegaard, J. I., Hsieh, M. H. Macrophages are required for host survival in experimental urogenital schistosomiasis. PMID:25351984

  14. MFR, a Putative Receptor Mediating the Fusion of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saginario, Charles; Sterling, Hyacinth; Beckers, Cornelius; Kobayashi, Ruji; Solimena, Michele; Ullu, Elisabetta; Vignery, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    We had previously identified a macrophage surface protein whose expression is highly induced, transient, and specific, as it is restricted to actively fusing macrophages in vitro and in vivo. This protein is recognized by monoclonal antibodies that block macrophage fusion. We have now purified this protein and cloned its corresponding cDNA. This protein belongs to the superfamily of immunoglobulins and is similar to immune antigen receptors such as the T-cell receptor, B-cell receptor, and viral receptors such as CD4. We have therefore named this protein macrophage fusion receptor (MFR). We show that the extracellular domain of MFR prevents fusion of macrophages in vitro and therefore propose that MFR belongs to the fusion machinery of macrophages. MFR is identical to SHPS-1 and BIT and is a homologue of P84, SIRPα, and MyD-1, all of which have been recently cloned and implicated in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction events. PMID:9774638

  15. Analysis of embryo morphokinetics, multinucleation and cleavage anomalies using continuous time-lapse monitoring in blastocyst transfer cycles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    incidence of multinucleation and reverse cleavage amongst the embryos observed was 25% and 7%, respectively. Over 40% of embryos exhibiting these characteristics did however form blastocysts meeting our criteria for freezing. Conclusions These data provide us with a platform with which to potentially enhance embryo selection for transfer. PMID:24951056

  16. T Cell–Macrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophage–T cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cell–macrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  17. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  18. Isolation of an MH2 retrovirus mutant temperature sensitive for macrophage but not fibroblast transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, S

    1986-01-01

    A conditional mutant of the MH2 avian retrovirus, termed ts41MH2, was isolated. Unlike wtMH2, ts41MH2 permitted transformed macrophages to differentiate during a 5- to 7-day temperature shift from 37 to 42 degrees C. Mutant-infected cells incubated at 42 degrees C exhibited a flattened morphology and then fused to form giant multinucleated cells that closely resembled normal macrophage maturation in vitro. These differentiated cells reacted strongly with a myeloid-macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody. The process of differentiation was inhibited when ts41MH2-transformed nonproducer clones were superinfected before the temperature shift with the myc gene-containing MC29 or OK10 viruses. By contrast, no inhibition was observed in clones superinfected with the MH2-PA200 virus that contains only the mil gene. The mutant also demonstrated a reduced oncogenic potential relative to that of wtMH2 when it was inoculated intravenously into young birds. However, in contrast to the results obtained with hematopoietic cells, none of the five fibroblast transformation parameters tested for ts41MH2 were altered from those induced by wtMH2. These results suggest that the mutation in ts41MH2 is located in a region of myc required for macrophage transformation, but not required for fibroblast transformation. Images PMID:3005642

  19. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  20. Epigenetic regulation of macrophage polarization by DNA methyltransferase 3b.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaosong; Wang, Xianfeng; Liu, Dongxu; Yu, Liqing; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang

    2014-04-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) undergo a phenotypic switch from alternatively activated antiinflammatory M2 macrophages in lean individuals to classically activated proinflammatory M1 macrophages in obese subjects. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study we aim to determine whether DNA methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) regulates macrophage polarization and inflammation. We found that the expression of DNMT3b was significantly induced in macrophages exposed to the saturated fatty acid stearate, was higher in ATMs isolated from obese mice, but was significantly lower in alternatively activated M2 vs classically activated M1 ATMs, suggesting a role for DNMT3b in regulation of macrophage polarization and inflammation in obesity. DNMT3b knockdown promoted macrophage polarization to alternatively activated M2 phenotype and suppressed macrophage inflammation, whereas overexpressing DNMT3b did the opposite. Importantly, in a macrophage-adipocyte coculture system, we found that DNMT3b knockdown significantly improved adipocyte insulin signaling. The promoter of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ1, a key transcriptional factor that regulates macrophage polarization, is enriched with CpG sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that DNMT3b bound to the methylation region at PPARγ1 promoter, which was further enhanced by stearate. Moreover, pyrosequencing analysis revealed that stearate increased DNA methylation at PPARγ1, which was prevented by DNMT3b deficiency. Therefore, our data demonstrate that DNMT3b plays an important role in regulating macrophage polarization through epigenetic mechanisms. In obesity, elevated saturated fatty acids enhance DNMT3b expression, leading to DNA methylation at the PPARγ1 promoter, which may contribute to deregulated adipose tissue macrophage polarization, inflammation, and insulin resistance.

  1. BMP pathway regulation of and by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Talati, Megha; West, James; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Hong, Charles C; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Tom; Robinson, Linda; Blackwell, Timothy S; Lane, Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease of progressively increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, associated with mutations of the type 2 receptor for the BMP pathway, BMPR2. The canonical signaling pathway for BMPR2 is through the SMAD family of transcription factors. BMPR2 is expressed in every cell type, but the impact of BMPR2 mutations affecting SMAD signaling, such as Bmpr2delx4+, had only previously been investigated in smooth muscle and endothelium. In the present study, we created a mouse with universal doxycycline-inducible expression of Bmpr2delx4+ in order to determine if broader expression had an impact relevant to the development of PAH. We found that the most obvious phenotype was a dramatic, but patchy, increase in pulmonary inflammation. We crossed these double transgenic mice onto an NF-κB reporter strain, and by luciferase assays on live mice, individual organs and isolated macrophages, we narrowed down the origin of the inflammatory phenotype to constitutive activation of tissue macrophages. Study of bone marrow-derived macrophages from mutant and wild-type mice suggested a baseline difference in differentiation state in Bmpr2 mutants. When activated with LPS, both mutant and wild-type macrophages secrete BMP pathway inhibitors sufficient to suppress BMP pathway activity in smooth muscle cells (SMC) treated with conditioned media. Functionally, co-culture with macrophages results in a BMP signaling-dependent increase in scratch closure in cultured SMC. We conclude that SMAD signaling through BMP is responsible, in part, for preventing macrophage activation in both live animals and in cells in culture, and that activated macrophages secrete BMP inhibitors in sufficient quantity to cause paracrine effect on vascular smooth muscle. PMID:24713633

  2. Growth regulation by macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.; Walker, E.; Stewart, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence reviewed here indicates that macrophages, either acting alone or in concert with other cells, influence the proliferation of multiple types of cells. Most of the data indicate that these effects are mediated by soluble macrophage-elaborated products (probably proteins) although the role of direct cell-to-cell contacts cannot be ruled out in all cases. A degree of success has been achieved on the biochemical characterization of these factors, due mainly to their low specific activity in conditioned medium and the lack of rapid, specific assays. Understanding the growth-regulating potential of macrophages is an important and needed area of research.

  3. Tissue-resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Luke C.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; Allen, Judith E.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-resident macrophages are a heterogeneous population of immune cells that fulfill tissue-specific and niche-specific functions. These range from dedicated homeostatic functions, such as clearance of cellular debris and iron processing, to central roles in tissue immune-surveillance, response to infection and the resolution of inflammation. Recent studies highlight marked heterogeneity in the origins of tissue macrophages that arise from hematopoietic versus self-renewing embryo-derived populations. We discuss the tissue–niche-specific factors that dictate cell phenotype, the definition of which will allow novel strategies to promote the restoration of tissue homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms that dictate tissue macrophage heterogeneity should explain why simplified paradigms of macrophage activation do not explain the extent of heterogeneity seen in vivo. PMID:24048120

  4. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S. S.; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  5. Macrophage polarization in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  6. Macrophage-Mediated Injury and Repair After Ischemic Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Sarah C.; Cantley, Lloyd G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic kidney injury is a common complication in hospitalized patients. Currently no treatment is available for augmenting kidney repair or preventing progressive kidney fibrosis. Animal models of acute kidney injury demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system plays a major role in the systemic response to ischemia/reperfusion injury. Macrophage depletion studies suggest that macrophages, key participants in the innate immune response, augment the initial injury after reperfusion, but also promote tubular repair and contribute to long-term kidney fibrosis after ischemic injury. The distinct functional outcomes seen following macrophage depletion at different time points after ischemia/reperfusion injury suggest heterogeneity in macrophage activation states. Identifying the pathways that regulate the transitions of macrophage activation is thus critical for understanding the mechanisms that govern both macrophage-mediated injury and repair in the post-ischemic kidney. This review examines our current understanding of the complex and intricately controlled pathways that determine monocyte recruitment, macrophage activation, and macrophage effector functions after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Careful delineation of repair and resolution pathways could provide therapeutic targets for the development of effective treatments to offer patients with acute kidney injury. PMID:24442822

  7. Mycobacteria, metals, and the macrophage.

    PubMed

    Neyrolles, Olivier; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here, we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies.

  8. Mycobacteria, Metals, and the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies. PMID:25703564

  9. Mycobacteria, metals, and the macrophage.

    PubMed

    Neyrolles, Olivier; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here, we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies. PMID:25703564

  10. The Role of Integrins αMβ2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) and αDβ2 (CD11d/CD18) in Macrophage Fusion.

    PubMed

    Podolnikova, Nataly P; Kushchayeva, Yevgeniya S; Wu, YiFei; Faust, James; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2016-08-01

    The subfamily of β2 integrins is implicated in macrophage fusion, a hallmark of chronic inflammation. Among β2 family members, integrin Mac-1 (αMβ2, CD11b/CD18) is abundantly expressed on monocyte/macrophages and mediates critical adhesive reactions of these cells. However, the role of Mac-1 in macrophage fusion leading to the formation of multinucleated giant cells remains unclear. Moreover, the role of integrin αDβ2 (CD11d/CD18), a receptor with recognition specificity overlapping that of Mac-1, is unknown. We found that multinucleated giant cells are formed in the inflamed mouse peritoneum during the resolution phase of inflammation, and their numbers were approximately twofold higher in wild-type mice than in Mac-1(-/-) mice. Analyses of isolated inflammatory peritoneal macrophages showed that IL-4-induced fusion of Mac-1-deficient cells was strongly reduced compared with wild-type counterparts. The examination of adhesive reactions known to be required for fusion showed that spreading, but not adhesion and migration, was reduced in Mac-1-deficient macrophages. Fusion of αDβ2-deficient macrophages was also significantly decreased, albeit to a smaller degree. Deficiency of intercellular adhesion molecule 1, a counter-receptor for Mac-1 and αDβ2, did not alter the fusion rate. The results indicate that both Mac-1 and αDβ2 support macrophage fusion with Mac-1 playing a dominant role and suggest that Mac-1 may mediate cell-cell interactions with a previously unrecognized counter-receptor(s).

  11. Metalloproteinase-mediated Shedding of Integrin β2 Promotes Macrophage Efflux from Inflammatory Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ivan G.; Tang, Jingjing; Wilson, Carole L.; Yan, Wei; Heinecke, Jay W.; Harlan, John M.; Raines, Elaine W.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage exiting from inflammatory sites is critical to limit the local innate immune response. With tissue insult, resident tissue macrophages rapidly efflux to lymph nodes where they modulate the adaptive immune response, and inflammatory macrophages attracted to the site of injury then exit during the resolution phase. However, the mechanisms that regulate macrophage efflux are poorly understood. This study has investigated soluble forms of integrin β2 whose levels are elevated in experimental peritonitis at times when macrophages are exiting the peritoneum, suggesting that its proteolytic shedding may be involved in macrophage efflux. Both constitutive and inducible metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of integrin β2 from mouse macrophages are demonstrated. Soluble integrin β2 is primarily released as a heterodimeric complex with αM that retains its ability to bind its ligands intracellular adhesion molecule-1, fibrin, and collagen and thus may serve as a soluble antagonist. In a model of accelerated exiting, administration of a metalloproteinase inhibitor prevents macrophage efflux by 50% and impedes loss of macrophage integrin β2 from the cell surface. Exiting of peritoneal macrophages in mice lacking integrin β2 is accelerated, and antibody disruption of integrin β2-substrate interactions can reverse 50% of the metalloprotease inhibitor blockade of macrophage exiting. Thus, our study demonstrates the ability of metalloproteinase-mediated shedding of integrin β2 to promote macrophage efflux from inflammatory sites, and the release of soluble integrin heterodimers may also limit local inflammation. PMID:22170060

  12. The macrophage mediates the renoprotective effects of endotoxin preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Winfree, Seth; Kalakeche, Rabih; Dube, Shataakshi; Kumar, Rakesh; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Plotkin, Zoya; Dagher, Pierre C

    2015-06-01

    Preconditioning is a preventative approach, whereby minimized insults generate protection against subsequent larger exposures to the same or even different insults. In immune cells, endotoxin preconditioning downregulates the inflammatory response and yet, preserves the ability to contain infections. However, the protective mechanisms of preconditioning at the tissue level in organs such as the kidney remain poorly understood. Here, we show that endotoxin preconditioning confers renal epithelial protection in various models of sepsis in vivo. We also tested the hypothesis that this protection results from direct interactions between the preconditioning dose of endotoxin and the renal tubules. This hypothesis is on the basis of our previous findings that endotoxin toxicity to nonpreconditioned renal tubules was direct and independent of immune cells. Notably, we found that tubular protection after preconditioning has an absolute requirement for CD14-expressing myeloid cells and particularly, macrophages. Additionally, an intact macrophage CD14-TRIF signaling pathway was essential for tubular protection. The preconditioned state was characterized by increased macrophage number and trafficking within the kidney as well as clustering of macrophages around S1 proximal tubules. These macrophages exhibited increased M2 polarization and upregulation of redox and iron-handling molecules. In renal tubules, preconditioning prevented peroxisomal damage and abolished oxidative stress and injury to S2 and S3 tubules. In summary, these data suggest that macrophages are essential mediators of endotoxin preconditioning and required for renal tissue protection. Preconditioning is, therefore, an attractive model to investigate novel protective pathways for the prevention and treatment of sepsis.

  13. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  14. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  15. Changes in macrophage function and morphology due to biomedical polyurethane surfaces undergoing biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Loren A; Santerre, J Paul; Labow, Rosalind S

    2004-04-01

    Monocytes are recruited to the material surface of an implanted biomedical device recognizing it as a foreign body. Differentiation into macrophages subsequently occurs followed by fusion to form foreign body giant cells (FBGCs). Consequently, implants can become degraded, cause chronic inflammation or become isolated by fibrous encapsulation. In this study, a relationship between material surface chemistry and the FBGC response was demonstrated by seeding mature monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) on polycarbonate-based polyurethanes that differed in their chemical structures (synthesized with poly(1,6-hexyl 1,2-ethyl carbonate) diol, and either (14)C-hexane diisocyanate and butanediol (BD) (referred to as HDI) or 4,4'-methylene bisphenyl diisocyanate and (14)C-BD (referred to as MDI)) and material degradation assessed. At 48 h of cell-material interaction, the FBGC attached to HDI were more multinucleated (73%) compared to MDI or the polystyrene (PS) control (21 and 36%, respectively). There was a fivefold increase in the synthesis and secretion of a protein with an approximate molecular weight of 48 kDa and a pI of 6.1 (determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis) only from cells seeded on HDI. Immunoprecipitation confirmed that MSE and CE were synthesized and secreted de novo. Immunoblotting also showed an increase in secreted monocyte-specific esterase (MSE) and cholesterol esterase (CE) from cells seeded on HDI relative to PS and MDI. Significantly more radiolabel ((14)C) release and esterase activity were elicited by MDMs on HDI than MDI (P < 0.05). The material that was more degradable (HDI), elicited greater protein synthesis and esterase secretion as well as more multinucleated MDMs than MDI, suggesting that the material surface chemistry modulates the function of MDM at the site of an inflammatory response to an implanted device.

  16. [Macrophages in asthma].

    PubMed

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings. PMID:9432275

  17. In vivo bronchoalveolar macrophage defense against Rhizopus oryzae and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, A R; Levitz, S M; Diamond, R D

    1984-11-01

    The ability of bronchoalveolar macrophages from normal, diabetic, and cortisone-treated mice to inhibit spore germination and kill fungal spores in vivo was investigated. The data indicated that the normal host controls different fungal infections in the lungs by different mechanisms. Prevention of mucormycosis required inhibition of fungal spore germination by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, pulmonary defense against aspergillosis depended on early killing of conidia by alveolar macrophages and not on inhibition of germination by bronchoalveolar macrophages. Bronchoalveolar macrophages in diabetic and cortisone-treated animals allowed fungal spore germination, thereby permitting infection by Rhizopus oryzae. In the cortisone-treated mouse, bronchoalveolar macrophages did not kill fungal conidia and progressive infection by Aspergillus fumigatus occurred. Fungicidal activity of bronchoalveolar macrophages was measured with a new in vivo killing assay.

  18. Immunophenotyping of macrophages in human pulmonary tuberculosis and sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Lee-Anne; Fenhalls, Gael; Lucas, Andrew; Gough, Peter; Greaves, David R; Mahoney, James A; Helden, Paul Van; Gordon, Siamon

    2003-01-01

    Classic studies of tuberculosis (TB) revealed morphologic evidence of considerable heterogeneity of macrophages (MØs), but the functional significance of this heterogeneity remains unknown. We have used newly available specific antibodies for selected membrane and secretory molecules to examine the phenotype of MØs in situ in a range of South African patients with TB, compared with sarcoidosis. Patients were human immunodeficiency virus-negative adults and children, and the examined biopsy specimens included lung and lymph nodes. Mature pulmonary MØs (alveolar, interstitial, epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells) selectively expressed scavenger receptor type A and a novel carboxypeptidase-like antigen called carboxypeptidase-related vitellogenin-like MØ molecule (CPVL). CPVL did not display enhanced expression in sarcoidosis, vs. TB patients, as observed with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), a related molecule. Immunocytochemical studies with surfactant proteins (SP)-A and -D showed that type II alveolar cells expressed these collectins, as did MØs, possibly after binding of secreted proteins. Studies with an antibody specific for the C-terminus of fractalkine, a tethered CX3C chemokine, confirmed synthesis of this molecule by bronchiolar epithelial cells and occasional endothelial cells. These studies provide new marker antigens and extend previous studies on MØ differentiation, activation and local interactions in chronic human granulomatous inflammation in the lung. PMID:14748748

  19. Antigen-Mediated Fusion of Specifically Sensitized Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, B.

    1972-01-01

    Rabbits sensitized intravenously with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (strain H37Ra) suspended in mineral oil developed a strong pulmonary granulomatous response which reached its peak about 3 to 4 weeks after injection. Alveolar cells (4 × 106 cells/ml of tissue culture medium 199) procured 6 weeks after sensitization showed extensive development of multinucleated giant cells after 12 hr of incubation in tissue culture flasks containing heat-killed H37Ra (5 μg/ml). Giant cells measured 80 μm to 2.5 mm in length and contained between 30 and 700 nuclei. In contrast, no giant cells were observed when similar samples of the same cell populations were incubated in flasks containing: (i) no mycobacteria; (ii) heat-killed Escherichia coli; (iii) heat-killed Bacillus subtilis; (iv) latex particles; (v) ovalbumin; or (vi) phytohemagglutinin. The addition of immune (anti-H37Ra) sera potentiated the phenomenon of giant cell formation. In addition, supernatant fluids obtained from sensitive alveolar cells incubated with H37Ra were capable of inducing giant cell formation when incubated with nonsensitized alveolar cells. The results suggest that fusion of alveolar macrophages is mediated by an immunological mechanism. Images PMID:4629127

  20. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    PubMed Central

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-01-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus. PMID:6286497

  1. Kharon1 Null Mutants of Leishmania mexicana Are Avirulent in Mice and Exhibit a Cytokinesis Defect within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Valli, Jessica; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis. PMID:26266938

  2. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair.

  3. Macrophage responses to implants: prospects for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Riabov, Vladimir; Dollinger, Camille; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-12-01

    Implants, transplants, and implantable biomedical devices are mainstream solutions for a wide variety of human pathologies. One of the persistent problems around nondegradable metallic and polymeric implants is failure of macrophages to resolve the inflammation and their tendency to stay in a state, named "frustrated phagocytosis." During the initial phase, proinflammatory macrophages induce acute reactions to trauma and foreign materials, whereas tolerogenic anti-inflammatory macrophages control resolution of inflammation and induce the subsequent healing stage. However, implanted materials can induce a mixed pro/anti-inflammatory phenotype, supporting chronic inflammatory reactions accompanied by microbial contamination and resulting in implant failure. Several materials based on natural polymers for improved interaction with host tissue or surfaces that release anti-inflammatory drugs/bioactive agents have been developed for implant coating to reduce implant rejection. However, no definitive, long-term solution to avoid adverse immune responses to the implanted materials is available to date. The prevention of implant-associated infections or chronic inflammation by manipulating the macrophage phenotype is a promising strategy to improve implant acceptance. The immunomodulatory properties of currently available implant coatings need to be improved to develop personalized therapeutic solutions. Human primary macrophages exposed to the implantable materials ex vivo can be used to predict the individual's reactions and allow selection of an optimal coating composition. Our review describes current understanding of the mechanisms of macrophage interactions with implantable materials and outlines the prospects for use of human primary macrophages for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to personalized implant therapy. PMID:26168797

  4. Interleukin-10 Promotes Pathological Angiogenesis by Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia during Development

    PubMed Central

    Dace, Dru S.; Khan, Aslam A.; Kelly, Jennifer; Apte, Rajendra S.

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis in the eye is the most common cause of blindness. The current study examined the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in ischemia-induced pathological angiogenesis called neovascularization during postnatal development. IL-10 deficiency resulted in significantly reduced pathological retinal angiogenesis. In contrast to the choroicapillaris where IL-10 interferes with macrophage influx, IL-10 did not prevent anti-angiogenic macrophages from migrating to the retina in response to hypoxia. Instead, IL-10 promoted retinal angiogenesis by altering macrophage angiogenic function, as macrophages from wild-type mice demonstrated increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nitric oxide (NO) compared to IL-10 deficient macrophages. IL-10 appears to directly affect macrophage responsiveness to hypoxia, as macrophages responded to hypoxia with increased levels of IL-10 and STAT3 phosphorylation as opposed to IL-10 deficient macrophages. Also, IL-10 deficient macrophages inhibited the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells in response to hypoxia while wild-type macrophages failed to do so. These findings suggest that hypoxia guides macrophage behavior to a pro-angiogenic phenotype via IL-10 activated pathways. PMID:18852882

  5. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity. PMID:27337479

  6. DC-SIGN(+) Macrophages Control the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Conde, Patricia; Rodriguez, Mercedes; van der Touw, William; Jimenez, Ana; Burns, Matthew; Miller, Jennifer; Brahmachary, Manisha; Chen, Hui-ming; Boros, Peter; Rausell-Palamos, Francisco; Yun, Tae Jin; Riquelme, Paloma; Rastrojo, Alberto; Aguado, Begoña; Stein-Streilein, Joan; Tanaka, Masato; Zhou, Lan; Zhang, Junfeng; Lowary, Todd L; Ginhoux, Florent; Park, Chae Gyu; Cheong, Cheolho; Brody, Joshua; Turley, Shannon J; Lira, Sergio A; Bronte, Vincenzo; Gordon, Siamon; Heeger, Peter S; Merad, Miriam; Hutchinson, James; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Ochando, Jordi

    2015-06-16

    Tissue effector cells of the monocyte lineage can differentiate into different cell types with specific cell function depending on their environment. The phenotype, developmental requirements, and functional mechanisms of immune protective macrophages that mediate the induction of transplantation tolerance remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that costimulatory blockade favored accumulation of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages that inhibited CD8(+) T cell immunity and promoted CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell expansion in numbers. Mechanistically, that simultaneous DC-SIGN engagement by fucosylated ligands and TLR4 signaling was required for production of immunoregulatory IL-10 associated with prolonged allograft survival. Deletion of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages in vivo, interfering with their CSF1-dependent development, or preventing the DC-SIGN signaling pathway abrogated tolerance. Together, the results provide new insights into the tolerogenic effects of costimulatory blockade and identify DC-SIGN(+) suppressive macrophages as crucial mediators of immunological tolerance with the concomitant therapeutic implications in the clinic.

  7. Mechanisms for macrophage-mediated HIV-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Hardegen, Neil J; Wahl, Larry M; Hewlett, Indira K; Clouse, Kathleen A; Yamada, Kenneth M; Dhawan, Subhash

    2004-12-01

    Viral latency is a long-term pathogenic condition in patients infected with HIV-1. Low but sustained virus replication in chronically infected cells can be activated by stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, or other host factors. However, the precise mechanism by which cellular activation induces latently infected cells to produce virions has remained unclear. In the present report, we present evidence that activation of HIV-1 replication in latently infected U1 or ACH2 cells by human macrophages is mediated by a rapid nuclear localization of NF-kappaB p50/p65 dimer with concomitant increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Multiplexed RT-PCR amplification of mRNA isolated from cocultures of macrophages and U1 and ACH2 cells showed significant induction of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta expression within 3 h of coincubation. Fixation of macrophages, U-1, or ACH2 cells with paraformaldehyde before coculture completely abrogated the induction of NF-kappaB subunits and HIV-1 replication, suggesting that cooperative interaction between the two cell types is an essential process for cellular activation. Pretreatment of macrophage-U1 or macrophage-ACH2 cocultures with neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha Ab down-regulated the replication of HIV-1. In addition, pretreatment of macrophage-U1 or macrophage-ACH2 cocultures with the NF-kappaB inhibitor (E)3-[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (BAY 11-7082) prevented the induction of cytokine expression, indicating a pivotal role of NF-kappaB-mediated signaling in the reactivation of HIV-1 in latently infected cells by macrophages. These results provide a mechanism by which macrophages induce HIV-1 replication in latently infected cells.

  8. Macrophage polarization following chitosan implantation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniela P; Fonseca, Ana C; Costa, Madalena; Amaral, Isabel F; Barbosa, Mário A; Águas, Artur P; Barbosa, Judite N

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages are a key cell in the host response to implants and can be polarized into different phenotypes capable of inducing both detrimental and beneficial outcomes in tissue repair and remodeling, being important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the macrophage response to 3D porous chitosan (Ch) scaffolds with different degrees of acetylation (DA, 5% and 15%). The M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages was investigated in vivo using a rodent air-pouch model. Our results show that the DA affects the macrophage response. Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced the adhesion of lower numbers of inflammatory cells, being the M2 the predominant phenotypic profile among the adherent macrophages. In the inflammatory exudates F4/80(+)/CD206(+) cells (M2 macrophages) appeared in higher numbers then F4/80(+)/CCR7(+) cells (M1 macrophages), in addition, lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines together with higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines were found. Ch scaffolds with DA 15% showed opposite results, since M1 were the predominant macrophages both adherent to the scaffold and in the exudates, together with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced a benign M2 anti-inflammatory macrophage response, whereas Ch scaffolds with DA 15% caused a macrophage M1 pro-inflammatory response.

  9. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  10. Early hematopoiesis and macrophage development.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Kathleen E; Frame, Jenna M; Palis, James

    2015-12-01

    The paradigm that all blood cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been challenged by two findings. First, there are tissue-resident hematopoietic cells, including subsets of macrophages that are not replenished by adult HSCs, but instead are maintained by self-renewal of fetal-derived cells. Second, during embryogenesis, there is a conserved program of HSC-independent hematopoiesis that precedes HSC function and is required for embryonic survival. The presence of waves of HSC-independent hematopoiesis as well as fetal HSCs raises questions about the origin of fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages. In the murine embryo, historical examination of embryonic macrophage and monocyte populations combined with recent reports utilizing genetic lineage-tracing approaches has led to a model of macrophage ontogeny that can be integrated with existing models of hematopoietic ontogeny. The first wave of hematopoiesis contains primitive erythroid, megakaryocyte and macrophage progenitors that arise in the yolk sac, and these macrophage progenitors are the source of early macrophages throughout the embryo, including the liver. A second wave of multipotential erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) also arises in the yolk sac. EMPs colonize the fetal liver, initiating myelopoiesis and forming macrophages. Lineage tracing indicates that this second wave of macrophages are distributed in most fetal tissues, although not appreciably in the brain. Thus, fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages, other than microglia, appear to predominately derive from EMPs. While HSCs emerge at midgestation and colonize the fetal liver, the relative contribution of fetal HSCs to tissue macrophages at later stages of development is unclear. The inclusion of macrophage potential in multiple waves of hematopoiesis is consistent with reports of their functional roles throughout development in innate immunity, phagocytosis, and tissue morphogenesis and remodeling

  11. Emodin Bidirectionally Modulates Macrophage Polarization and Epigenetically Regulates Macrophage Memory.

    PubMed

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Altomare, Diego; Hui, Yvonne; Fan, Daping

    2016-05-27

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells capable of performing a broad spectrum of functions. Macrophage phenotypes are classified along a continuum between the extremes of proinflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. The seemingly opposing functions of M1 and M2 macrophages must be tightly regulated for an effective and proper response to foreign molecules or damaged tissue. Excessive activation of either M1 or M2 macrophages contributes to the pathology of many diseases. Emodin is a Chinese herb-derived compound and has shown potential to inhibit inflammation in various settings. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin to modulate the macrophage response to both M1 and M2 stimuli. Primary mouse macrophages were stimulated with LPS/IFNγ or IL4 with or without emodin, and the effects of emodin on gene transcription, cell signaling pathways, and histone modifications were examined by a variety of approaches, including microarray, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and functional assays. We found that emodin bidirectionally tunes the induction of LPS/IFNγ- and IL4-responsive genes through inhibiting NFκB/IRF5/STAT1 signaling and IRF4/STAT6 signaling, respectively. Thereby, emodin modulates macrophage phagocytosis, migration, and NO production. Furthermore, emodin inhibited the removal of H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27m3) marks and the addition of H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac) marks on genes required for M1 or M2 polarization of macrophages. In conclusion, our data suggest that emodin is uniquely able to suppress the excessive response of macrophages to both M1 and M2 stimuli and therefore has the potential to restore macrophage homeostasis in various pathologies.

  12. Epigenomics of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, David; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages play essential roles in tissue homeostasis, pathogen elimination, and tissue repair. A defining characteristic of these cells is their ability to efficiently adapt to a variety of abruptly changing and complex environments. This ability is intrinsically linked to a capacity to quickly alter their transcriptome, and this is tightly associated with the epigenomic organization of these cells and, in particular, their enhancer repertoire. Indeed, enhancers are genomic sites that serve as platforms for the integration of signaling pathways with the mechanisms that regulate mRNA transcription. Notably, transcription is pervasive at active enhancers and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are tightly coupled to regulated transcription of protein-coding genes. Furthermore, given that each cell type possesses a defining enhancer repertoire, studies on enhancers provide a powerful method to study how specialization of functions among the diverse macrophage subtypes may arise. Here, we review recent studies providing insights into the distinct mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of enhancers and their role in the regulation of transcription in macrophages.

  13. Epigenomics of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, David; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages play essential roles in tissue homeostasis, pathogen elimination, and tissue repair. A defining characteristic of these cells is their ability to efficiently adapt to a variety of abruptly changing and complex environments. This ability is intrinsically linked to a capacity to quickly alter their transcriptome, and this is tightly associated with the epigenomic organization of these cells and, in particular, their enhancer repertoire. Indeed, enhancers are genomic sites that serve as platforms for the integration of signaling pathways with the mechanisms that regulate mRNA transcription. Notably, transcription is pervasive at active enhancers and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are tightly coupled to regulated transcription of protein-coding genes. Furthermore, given that each cell type possesses a defining enhancer repertoire, studies on enhancers provide a powerful method to study how specialization of functions among the diverse macrophage subtypes may arise. Here, we review recent studies providing insights into the distinct mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of enhancers and their role in the regulation of transcription in macrophages. PMID:25319330

  14. Replication-induced DNA damage after PARP inhibition causes G2 delay, and cell line-dependent apoptosis, necrosis and multinucleation.

    PubMed

    Dale Rein, Idun; Solberg Landsverk, Kirsti; Micci, Francesca; Patzke, Sebastian; Stokke, Trond

    2015-01-01

    PARP inhibitors have been approved for treatment of tumors with mutations in or loss of BRCA1/2. The molecular mechanisms and particularly the cellular phenotypes resulting in synthetic lethality are not well understood and varying clinical responses have been observed. We have investigated the dose- and time-dependency of cell growth, cell death and cell cycle traverse of 4 malignant lymphocyte cell lines treated with the PARP inhibitor Olaparib. PARP inhibition induced a severe growth inhibition in this cell line panel and increased the levels of phosphorylated H2AX-associated DNA damage in S phase. Repair of the remaining replication related damage caused a G2 phase delay before entry into mitosis. The G2 delay, and the growth inhibition, was more pronounced in the absence of functional ATM. Further, Olaparib treated Reh and Granta-519 cells died by apoptosis, while U698 and JVM-2 cells proceeded through mitosis with aberrant chromosomes, skipped cytokinesis, and eventually died by necrosis. The TP53-deficient U698 cells went through several rounds of DNA replication and mitosis without cytokinesis, ending up as multinucleated cells with DNA contents of up to 16c before dying. In summary, we report here for the first time cell cycle-resolved DNA damage induction, and cell line-dependent differences in the mode of cell death caused by PARP inhibition. PMID:26312527

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor Differentiation in Solid Sporulating Cultures: First Compartmentalized and Second Multinucleated Mycelia Have Different and Distinctive Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María T.; Martín, Juan F.; Rioseras, Beatriz; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes are very important industrial bacteria, which produce two thirds of all clinically relevant secondary metabolites. They have a complex developmental-cycle in which an early compartmentalized mycelium (MI) differentiates to a multinucleated mycelium (MII) that grows inside the culture medium (substrate mycelium) until it starts to growth into the air (aerial mycelium) and ends up forming spores. Streptomyces developmental studies have focused mainly on the later stages of MII differentiation (aerial mycelium and sporulation), with regulation of pre-sporulation stages (MI/MII transition) essentially unknown. This work represents the first study of the Streptomyces MI transcriptome, analyzing how it differs from the MII transcriptome. We have used a very conservative experimental approach to fractionate MI from MII and quantify gene expressions. The expression of well characterized key developmental/metabolic genes involved in bioactive compound production (actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, cpk, geosmin) or hydrophobic cover formation-sporulation (bld, whi, wbl, rdl, chp, ram) was correlated with MII differentiation. Additionally, 122 genes conserved in the Streptomyces genus, whose biological function had not been previously characterized, were found to be differentially expressed (more than 4-fold) in MI or MII. These genes encoded for putative regulatory proteins (transcriptional regulators, kinases), as well as hypothetical proteins. Knowledge about differences between the MI (vegetative) and MII (reproductive) transcriptomes represents a huge advance in Streptomyces biology that will make future experiments possible aimed at characterizing the biochemical pathways controlling pre-sporulation developmental stages and activation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces. PMID:23555999

  16. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  17. A transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression controls macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Anup; Bose, Mainak; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2013-11-01

    In mammalian macrophages, the expression of a number of cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Upon macrophage activation, proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs are translated, although the expression of miRNAs targeting these mRNAs remains largely unaltered. We show that there is a transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression during the early phase of the inflammatory response in macrophages, which leads to the protection of cytokine mRNAs from miRNA-mediated repression. This derepression occurs through Ago2 phosphorylation, which results in its impaired binding to miRNAs and to the corresponding target mRNAs. Macrophages expressing a mutant, non-phosphorylatable AGO2--which remains bound to miRNAs during macrophage activation--have a weakened inflammatory response and fail to prevent parasite invasion. These findings highlight the relevance of the transient relief of miRNA repression for macrophage function.

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates hypoxic cancer cells induced m2-polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Shrivastava, R; Tripathi, C; Jain, N K; Tewari, B N; Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kumar, V; Misra, S; Bhadauria, S; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-09-12

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), represent a major subpopulation of tumor infiltrating immune cells. These alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages are well known for their pro-tumor functions. Owing to their established role in potentiating tumor-neovasculogenesis and metastasis, TAMs have emerged as promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. One of the key TAMs related phenomenon that is amenable to therapeutic intervention is their phenotype switching into alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages. Hindering macrophage polarization towards a pro-tumor M2 phenotype, or better still reprogramming the M2 like TAMs towards M1 subtype is being considered a beneficial anti-cancer strategy. Hypoxic tumor milieu has been proposed as one of the most plausible factor governing M2-polarization of macrophages. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic tumor cells imparted a pro—angiogenic M2 skewed phenotype to macrophages. Furthermore, sizeable body of data indicates for participation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage polarization. Concordantly, inhibition of COX-2 is associated with impaired macrophage polarization. Prompted by this in the current study we decided to explore if inhibition of COX-2 activity via chemical inhibitors may prevent hypoxic cancer cell induced M2-polarization of macrophages. We observed that treatment with Flunixin meglumine, an established preferential inhibitor of COX-2 activity markedly inhibited hypoxic cancer cell induced of M2-polarization of macrophages thereby indicating for usage of COX-2 inhibition as possible anti-cancer treatment modality.

  19. Nicotinamide: a vitamin able to shift macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with restricted inflammatory features.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ronald; Schilling, Erik; Grahnert, Anja; Kölling, Valeen; Dorow, Juliane; Ceglarek, Uta; Sack, Ulrich; Hauschildt, Sunna

    2015-11-01

    The differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages is influenced by environmental signals. Here we asked in how far nicotinamide (NAM), a vitamin B3 derivative known to play a major role in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-mediated signaling events, is able to modulate monocyte differentiation into macrophages developed in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MØ) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-MØ). We found that GM-MØ undergo biochemical, morphological and functional modifications in response to NAM, whereas M-MØ were hardly affected. GM-MØ exposed to NAM acquired an M-MØ-like structure while the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and COX-derived eicosanoids were down-regulated. In contrast, NAM had no effect on the production of IL-10 or the cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids. Administration of NAM enhanced intracellular NAD concentrations; however, it did not prevent the LPS-mediated drain on NAD pools. In search of intracellular molecular targets of NAM known to be involved in LPS-induced cytokine and eicosanoid synthesis, we found NF-κB activity to be diminished. In conclusion, our data show that vitamin B3, when present during the differentiation of monocytes into GM-MØ, interferes with biochemical pathways resulting in strongly reduced pro-inflammatory features. PMID:26385774

  20. Macrophage Roles Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jessica M.; Lopez, Elizabeth F.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2010-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), circulating blood monocytes respond to chemotactic factors, migrate into the infarcted myocardium, and differentiate into macrophages. At the injury site, macrophages remove necrotic cardiac myocytes and apoptotic neutrophils; secrete cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors; and modulate phases of the angiogenic response. As such, the macrophage is a primary responder cell type that is involved in the regulation of post-MI wound healing at multiple levels. This review summarizes what is currently known about macrophage functions post-MI and borrows literature from other injury and inflammatory models to speculate on additional roles. Basic science and clinical avenues that remain to be explored are also discussed. PMID:18656272

  1. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  2. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J; Müller, Dominik N; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  3. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  4. Hydroxyapatite and urate crystal induced cytokine release by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, W H; Dieppe, P A; Elson, C J; Bradfield, J W

    1989-01-01

    Destructive osteoarthritis is characterised by rapidly progressive joint destruction associated with intra-articular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. The possible role of such crystals in the pathogenesis of this condition was investigated by testing the ability of hydroxyapatite crystals to stimulate the production of bone resorbing activity from mouse peritoneal macrophages. Urate crystals were used for comparison. Culture supernatants were tested for bone resorbing activity using the mouse calvarial bone resorption assay, for interleukin 1 using a standard lymphocyte activation assay, and for prostaglandin E2 by radioimmunoassay. Culture supernatants from macrophages incubated with hydroxyapatite crystals contained dialysable bone resorbing activity, high concentrations of prostaglandin E2, but no interleukin 1 like activity. The production of the bone resorbing agent was prevented by culturing macrophages with hydroxyapatite crystals in the presence of indomethacin. By contrast, culture supernatants from macrophages incubated with urate crystals contained bone resorbing activity, which was only partly removed by dialysis, and interleukin 1 like activity. The latter was shown to be increased in culture supernatants from macrophages incubated with urate crystals in the presence of indomethacin, while production of bone resorbing activity was partially inhibited. It is considered that the bone resorbing activity liberated from macrophages stimulated by hydroxyapatite crystals can be explained by the presence of prostaglandin E2 alone, whereas the activity liberated by urate crystals is due to both prostaglandin E2 and interleukin 1. PMID:2545171

  5. Trafficking of Estrella lausannensis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new member of the Chlamydiales order. Like other Chlamydia-related bacteria, it is able to replicate in amoebae and in fish cell lines. A preliminary study investigating the pathogenic potential of Chlamydia-related bacteria found a correlation between antibody response to E. lausannensis and pneumonia in children. To further investigate the pathogenic potential of E. lausannensis, we determined its ability to grow in human macrophages and its intracellular trafficking. The replication in macrophages resulted in viable E. lausannensis; however, it caused a significant cytopathic effect. The intracellular trafficking of E. lausannensis was analyzed by determining the interaction of the Estrella-containing inclusions with various endocytic markers as well as host organelles. The E. lausannensis inclusion escaped the endocytic pathway rapidly avoiding maturation into phagolysosomes by preventing both EEA-1 and LAMP-1 accumulation. Compared to Waddlia chondrophila, another Chlamydia-related bacteria, the recruitment of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was minimal for E. lausannensis inclusions. Estrella lausannensis appears to use a distinct source of nutrients and energy compared to other members of the Chlamydiales order. In conclusion, we hypothesize that E. lausannensis has a restricted growth in human macrophages, due to its reduced capacity to control programmed cell death. PMID:25857735

  6. MicroRNA-155 facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nie, M; Liu, J; Yang, Q; Seok, H Y; Hu, X; Deng, Z-L; Wang, D-Z

    2016-06-09

    Skeletal muscle has remarkable regeneration capacity and regenerates in response to injury. Muscle regeneration largely relies on muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells normally remain quiescent, but in response to injury or exercise they become activated and proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myofibers. Interestingly, the inflammatory process following injury and the activation of the myogenic program are highly coordinated, with myeloid cells having a central role in modulating satellite cell activation and regeneration. Here, we show that genetic deletion of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in mice substantially delays muscle regeneration. Surprisingly, miR-155 does not appear to directly regulate the proliferation or differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, miR-155 is highly expressed in myeloid cells, is essential for appropriate activation of myeloid cells, and regulates the balance between pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, we found that miR-155 suppresses SOCS1, a negative regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, during the initial inflammatory response upon muscle injury. Our findings thus reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating initial immune responses during muscle regeneration and provide a novel miRNA target for improving muscle regeneration in degenerative muscle diseases.

  7. MicroRNA-155 facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nie, M; Liu, J; Yang, Q; Seok, H Y; Hu, X; Deng, Z-L; Wang, D-Z

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has remarkable regeneration capacity and regenerates in response to injury. Muscle regeneration largely relies on muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells normally remain quiescent, but in response to injury or exercise they become activated and proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myofibers. Interestingly, the inflammatory process following injury and the activation of the myogenic program are highly coordinated, with myeloid cells having a central role in modulating satellite cell activation and regeneration. Here, we show that genetic deletion of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in mice substantially delays muscle regeneration. Surprisingly, miR-155 does not appear to directly regulate the proliferation or differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, miR-155 is highly expressed in myeloid cells, is essential for appropriate activation of myeloid cells, and regulates the balance between pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, we found that miR-155 suppresses SOCS1, a negative regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, during the initial inflammatory response upon muscle injury. Our findings thus reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating initial immune responses during muscle regeneration and provide a novel miRNA target for improving muscle regeneration in degenerative muscle diseases. PMID:27277683

  8. Adipose tissue macrophages: amicus adipem?

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Justin I.; Ganeshan, Kirthana; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Chronic overnutrition drives complex adaptations within both professional metabolic and bystander tissues that, despite intense investigation, are still poorly understood. Xu et al. (2013) now describe the unexpected ability of adipose tissue macrophages to buffer lipids released from obese adipocytes in a manner independent of inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:24315364

  9. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  10. CIL-102 binds to tubulin at colchicine binding site and triggers apoptosis in MCF-7 cells by inducing monopolar and multinucleated cells.

    PubMed

    Gireesh, K K; Rashid, Aijaz; Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Panda, Dulal; Manna, Tapas

    2012-09-01

    A plant dictamine analog, 1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone (CIL-102) has been shown to exert potent anti-tumor activity. In this study, we examined the mode of interaction of CIL-102 with tubulin and unraveled the cellular mechanism responsible for its anti-tumor activity. CIL-102 bound to tubulin at a single site with a dissociation constant ~0.4 μM. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that CIL-102-tubulin interaction is highly enthalpy driven and that the binding affords a large negative heat capacity change (ΔC(p) = -790 cal mol(-1) K(-1)) with an enthalpy-entropy compensation. An analysis of the modified Dixon plot suggested that CIL-102 competitively inhibited the binding of podophyllotoxin, a colchicine-binding site agent, to tubulin. Computational modeling indicated that CIL-102 binds exclusively at the β-subunit of tubulin and that CIL-102 and colchicine partially share their binding sites on tubulin. It bound to tubulin reversibly and the binding was estimated to be ~1000 times faster than that of colchicine. CIL-102 potently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells, induced monopolar spindle formation and multi-nucleation. At half-maximal inhibitory concentration, the spindle microtubules were visibly depolymerized and disorganized. CIL-102 reduced the inter-polar distances of bipolar mitotic cells indicating that it impaired microtubule-kinetochore attachments. CIL-102-treatment induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells in association with increased nuclear accumulation of p53 and p21 suggesting that apoptosis is triggered through a p53-p21 dependent pathway. The results indicated that CIL-102 exerted anti-proliferative activity by disrupting microtubule functions through tubulin binding and provided important insights into the differential mode of tubulin binding by CIL-102 and colchicine. PMID:22705644

  11. Effect of KCA-098 on the function of osteoblast-like cells and the formation of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells in a mouse bone marrow cell population.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, K; Inoue, T; Tsutsumi, N; Endo, H

    1996-01-26

    KCA-098 (3,9-bis(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyloxy)-5H-benzofuro[3,2-c]quinol ine-6-one), an analogue of coumestrol (a naturally occurring weak phytoestrogen), dose-dependently increased alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblastic ROS 17/2.8 cells and freshly-isolated osteoblasts from neonatal mouse calvaria, and reduced cell proliferation. In addition, KCA-098 increased the synthesis of collagenese-digestible protein (CDP) of ROS 17/2.8 cells. On the other hand, KCA-098 had no effect on the basal synthesis of osteocalcin but reduced the 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1 alpha,25(OH)(2)D3)-induced increase in osteocalcin synthesized by ROS 17/2.8 cells. Therefore, KCA-098 had a bidirectional effect on the differentiation of osteoblasts (i.e., stimulating both alkaline phosphatase activity and synthesis of CDP and inhibiting osteocalcin synthesis). However, as KCA-098 stimulated the mineralization of chick embryonic bone in organ culture and recovered the bone density reduced by ovariectomy of rats, it would serve overall to stimulate the differentiation of osteoblasts. On the other hand, KCA-098 inhibited the formation of tartrate-resistant, acid phosphate-positive multinucleated cells (TRAP(+)MNC) induced by 1 alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in cultures of mouse bone marrow cells, showing that it inhibits the formation of osteoclast-like cells. Coumestrol and 17beta-estradiol had no effect on the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of ROS 17/2.8 cells. They did, however, dose-dependently inhibit osteoclast-like cell formation as well as KCA-098 did, indicating that the main action of coumestrol and 17beta-estradiol on bone tissue is the inhibition of bone resorption.

  12. An M1-like Macrophage Polarization in Decidual Tissue during Spontaneous Preterm Labor That Is Attenuated by Rosiglitazone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Romero, Roberto; Miller, Derek; Kadam, Leena; Mial, Tara N; Plazyo, Olesya; Garcia-Flores, Valeria; Hassan, Sonia S; Xu, Zhonghui; Tarca, Adi L; Drewlo, Sascha; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2016-03-15

    Decidual macrophages are implicated in the local inflammatory response that accompanies spontaneous preterm labor/birth; however, their role is poorly understood. We hypothesized that decidual macrophages undergo a proinflammatory (M1) polarization during spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via rosiglitazone (RSG) would attenuate the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, preventing preterm birth. In this study, we show that: 1) decidual macrophages undergo an M1-like polarization during spontaneous term and preterm labor; 2) anti-inflammatory (M2)-like macrophages are more abundant than M1-like macrophages in decidual tissue; 3) decidual M2-like macrophages are reduced in preterm pregnancies compared with term pregnancies, regardless of the presence of labor; 4) decidual macrophages express high levels of TNF and IL-12 but low levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) during spontaneous preterm labor; 5) decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor display plasticity by M1↔M2 polarization in vitro; 6) incubation with RSG reduces the expression of TNF and IL-12 in decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor; and 7) treatment with RSG reduces the rate of LPS-induced preterm birth and improves neonatal outcomes by reducing the systemic proinflammatory response and downregulating mRNA and protein expression of NF-κB, TNF, and IL-10 in decidual and myometrial macrophages in C57BL/6J mice. In summary, we demonstrated that decidual M1-like macrophages are associated with spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via RSG can attenuate the macrophage-mediated proinflammatory response, preventing preterm birth and improving neonatal outcomes. These findings suggest that the PPARγ pathway is a new molecular target for future preventative strategies for spontaneous preterm labor/birth.

  13. A unique role for p53 in the regulation of M2 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Ng, D S W; Mah, W-C; Almeida, F F; Rahmat, S A; Rao, V K; Leow, S C; Laudisi, F; Peh, M T; Goh, A M; Lim, J S Y; Wright, G D; Mortellaro, A; Taneja, R; Ginhoux, F; Lee, C G; Moore, P K; Lane, D P

    2015-07-01

    P53 is critically important in preventing oncogenesis but its role in inflammation in general and in the function of inflammatory macrophages in particular is not clear. Here, we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages exhibit endogenous p53 activity, which is increased when macrophages are polarized to the M2 (alternatively activated macrophage) subtype. This leads to reduced expression of M2 genes. Nutlin-3a, which destabilizes the p53/MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) complex, promotes p53 activation and further downregulates M2 gene expression. In contrast, increased expression of M2 genes was apparent in M2-polarized macrophages from p53-deficient and p53 mutant mice. Furthermore, we show, in mice, that p53 also regulates M2 polarization in peritoneal macrophages from interleukin-4-challenged animals and that nutlin-3a retards the development of tolerance to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. P53 acts via transcriptional repression of expression of c-Myc (v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog) gene by directly associating with its promoter. These data establish a role for the p53/MDM2/c-MYC axis as a physiological 'brake' to the M2 polarization process. This work reveals a hitherto unknown role for p53 in macrophages, provides further insight into the complexities of macrophage plasticity and raises the possibility that p53-activating drugs, many of which are currently being trialled clinically, may have unforeseen effects on macrophage function. PMID:25526089

  14. A unique role for p53 in the regulation of M2 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Ng, D S W; Mah, W-C; Almeida, F F; Rahmat, S A; Rao, V K; Leow, S C; Laudisi, F; Peh, M T; Goh, A M; Lim, J S Y; Wright, G D; Mortellaro, A; Taneja, R; Ginhoux, F; Lee, C G; Moore, P K; Lane, D P

    2015-07-01

    P53 is critically important in preventing oncogenesis but its role in inflammation in general and in the function of inflammatory macrophages in particular is not clear. Here, we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages exhibit endogenous p53 activity, which is increased when macrophages are polarized to the M2 (alternatively activated macrophage) subtype. This leads to reduced expression of M2 genes. Nutlin-3a, which destabilizes the p53/MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) complex, promotes p53 activation and further downregulates M2 gene expression. In contrast, increased expression of M2 genes was apparent in M2-polarized macrophages from p53-deficient and p53 mutant mice. Furthermore, we show, in mice, that p53 also regulates M2 polarization in peritoneal macrophages from interleukin-4-challenged animals and that nutlin-3a retards the development of tolerance to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. P53 acts via transcriptional repression of expression of c-Myc (v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog) gene by directly associating with its promoter. These data establish a role for the p53/MDM2/c-MYC axis as a physiological 'brake' to the M2 polarization process. This work reveals a hitherto unknown role for p53 in macrophages, provides further insight into the complexities of macrophage plasticity and raises the possibility that p53-activating drugs, many of which are currently being trialled clinically, may have unforeseen effects on macrophage function.

  15. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1β (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NFκB pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  16. Metabolic Reprograming in Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Peña, Silvia; O’Neill, Luke A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the metabolism of immune cells in recent years has emphasized the tight link existing between the metabolic state and the phenotype of these cells. Macrophages in particular are a good example of this phenomenon. Whether the macrophage obtains its energy through glycolysis or through oxidative metabolism can give rise to different phenotypes. Classically activated or M1 macrophages are key players of the first line of defense against bacterial infections and are known to obtain energy through glycolysis. Alternatively activated or M2 macrophages on the other hand are involved in tissue repair and wound healing and use oxidative metabolism to fuel their longer-term functions. Metabolic intermediates, however, are not just a source of energy but can be directly implicated in a particular macrophage phenotype. In M1 macrophages, the Krebs cycle intermediate succinate regulates HIF1α, which is responsible for driving the sustained production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β. In M2 macrophages, the sedoheptulose kinase carbohydrate kinase-like protein is critical for regulating the pentose phosphate pathway. The potential to target these events and impact on disease is an exciting prospect. PMID:25228902

  17. The Tuberculosis Necrotizing Toxin kills macrophages by hydrolyzing NAD

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jim; Siroy, Axel; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Speer, Alexander; Doornbos, Kathryn S.; Cingolani, Gino; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces necrosis of infected cells to evade immune responses. Recently, we found that Mtb utilizes the protein CpnT to kill human macrophages by secreting its C-terminal domain, named tuberculosis necrotizing toxin (TNT) that induces necrosis by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TNT gains access to the cytosol of Mtb-infected macrophages, where it hydrolyzes the essential co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Expression or injection of a non-catalytic TNT mutant showed no cytotoxicity in macrophages or zebrafish zygotes, respectively, demonstrating that the NAD+-glycohydrolase activity is required for TNT-induced cell death. To prevent self-poisoning, Mtb produces an immunity factor for TNT (IFT) that binds TNT and inhibits its activity. The crystal structure of the TNT-IFT complex revealed a novel NAD+-glycohydrolase fold of TNT, which constitutes the founding member of a toxin family wide-spread in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26237511

  18. Correlation of antitumor chemoimmunotherapy with bone marrow macrophage precursor cell stimulation and macrophage cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fisher, B; Wolmark, N

    1976-07-01

    The present investigations have assessed the effects of prolonged cyclophosphamide (CY) and Corynebacterium (CP) treatment on the production of bone marrow macrophage precursors [colony-forming cells (CFC)] and on the cytotoxicity of macrophages comprising colonies produced by the CFC. The findings have been correlated with tumor growth in animals receiving the immunochemotherapy. In addition, studies have been directed toward ascertaining whether the administration of CP with CY might lessen the myelosuppressive effects of the latter. Following each consecutive weekly dose of CY (even after as many as 11), there was a significant depression in the number of bone marrow cells (BMC's) but, by the next injection, marrow cellularity had returned to normal. When the number of BMC's was reduced, the proportion of the remaining cells, which consisted of CFC, was increased. Upon reconstitution of the marrow, the proportion of CFC returned to the level of the controls. The total number of CFC in marrow was at no time following CY therapy significantly less than the number in marrow of untreated mice. The addition of CP to the treatment regimen with CY resulted in an absolute as well as relative increase in CFC at all times during administration of the combined therapy, i.e., when there was a depression in total numbers of marrow cells, as well as when marrow restoration had occurred. Although CP stimulated the number of cells entering into differentiation, it failed to affect the total numbers of marrow cells, as well as when marrow restoration had occurred. Although CP stimulated the number of cells entering into differentiation, it failed to affect the total BMC's had been neither increased nor prevented from decreasing, by CP administration, indicating that the use of total cellularity as an index of the CP marrow-sparing effect is without merit. The present results relative to cytotoxicity of macrophages derived from the CFC concur with and extend our previous findings

  19. Morphine Modulates Interleukin-4- or Breast Cancer Cell-induced Pro-metastatic Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment play a key role in the control of invasiveness, metastasis and angiogenesis. Macrophages display a range of activation states in specific pathological contexts and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages can promote tumour aggressiveness. Opioids are able to modulate tumour growth and metastasis. We tested whether morphine modulates the activation of macrophages induced by (i) interleukin-4 (IL-4), the prototypical M2 polarization-inducing cytokine, or (ii) coculture with breast cancer cells. We showed that IL-4 causes increased MMP-9 production and expression of the alternative activation markers arginase-1 and MRC-1. Morphine prevented IL-4-induced increase in MMP-9 in a naloxone- and methylnaltrexone-reversible fashion. Morphine also prevented IL-4-elicited alternative activation of RAW264.7 macrophages. Expression of MMP-9 and arginase-1 were increased when RAW264.7 were subjected to paracrine activation by 4T1 cells, and this effect was prevented by morphine via an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism. Morphine further decreased 4T1 breast cancer cell invasion elicited by co-culture with RAW264.7. Reduction of MMP-9 expression and alternative activation of macrophages by morphine was confirmed using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that morphine may modulate tumour aggressiveness by regulating macrophage protease production and M2 polarization within the tumour microenvironment.

  20. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  1. Cellular metabolism and macrophage functional polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linnan; Zhao, Qingjie; Yang, Tao; Ding, Wenjun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a functionally heterogeneous cell population that is mainly shaped by a variety of microenvironmental stimuli. Interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induce a classical activation of macrophages (M1), whereas IL-4 and IL-13 induce an alternative activation program in macrophages (M2). Reprogramming of intracellular metabolisms is required for the proper polarization and functions of activated macrophages. Similar to the Warburg effect observed in tumor cells, M1 macrophages increase glucose consumption and lactate release and decreased oxygen consumption rate. In comparison, M2 macrophages mainly employ oxidative glucose metabolism pathways. In addition, fatty acids, vitamins, and iron metabolisms are also related to macrophage polarization. However, detailed metabolic pathways involved in macrophages have remained elusive. Understanding the bidirectional interactions between cellular metabolism and macrophage functions in physiological and pathological situations and the regulatory pathways involved may offer novel therapies for macrophage-associated diseases.

  2. Staphylococcal enterotoxins bind H-2Db molecules on macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We screened a panel of monoclonal antibodies against selected macrophage cell surface molecules for their ability to inhibit enterotoxin binding to major histocompatibility complex class II-negative C2D (H-2b) macrophages. Two monoclonal antibodies, HB36 and TIB126, that are specific for the alpha 2 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I, blocked staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB, respectively) binding to C2D macrophages in a specific and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitory activities were haplotype-specific in that SEA and SEB binding to H-2k or H-2d macrophages was not inhibited by either monoclonal antibody. HB36, but not TIB126, inhibited enterotoxin-induced secretion of cytokines by H-2b macrophages. Lastly, passive protection of D-galactosamine-sensitized C2D mice by injection with HB36 antibody prevented SEB-induced death. Therefore, SEA and SEB binding to the alpha 2 domain of the H-2Db molecule induces biological activity and has physiological consequences.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3. PMID:27277074

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3.

  5. Serum amyloid A inhibits osteoclast differentiation to maintain macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiseon; Yang, Jihyun; Park, Ok-Jin; Kang, Seok-Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Serum amyloid A is an acute phase protein that is elevated under inflammatory conditions. Additionally, the serum levels of serum amyloid A are associated with the progression of inflammatory arthritis; thus, serum amyloid A might be involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation. In the present study, we examined the effects of serum amyloid A on osteoclast differentiation and function. When bone marrow-derived macrophages, as osteoclast precursors, were stimulated with serum amyloid A in the presence of M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, osteoclast differentiation and its bone-resorption activity were substantially inhibited. TLR2 was important in the inhibitory effect of serum amyloid A on osteoclast differentiation, because serum amyloid A stimulated TLR2. The inhibitory effect was absent in bone marrow-derived macrophages obtained from TLR2-deficient mice. Furthermore, serum amyloid A inhibited the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1, which are crucial transcription factors for osteoclast differentiation, but prevented downregulation of IFN regulatory factor-8, a negative regulator of osteoclast differentiation. In contrast, serum amyloid A sustained the endocytic capacity of bone marrow-derived macrophages and their ability to induce the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α. Taken together, these results suggest that serum amyloid A, when increased by inflammatory conditions, inhibits differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts, likely to maintain macrophage function for host defense.

  6. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  7. Use of enzymatic assay to evaluate UV-induced DNA repair in human and embryonic chick fibroblasts and multinucleate heterokaryons derived from both.

    PubMed

    Paterson, M C; Lohman, P H

    1975-01-01

    A sensitive enzymatic assay has been utilized to monitor repair of UV-induced damage to DNA in primary human and embryonic chick cells and in multinucleate heterokaryons artificially derived from both. The assay exploits the unique ability of a purified repair endonuclease to attack UV-irradiated DNA at sites containing pyrimidine dimers. These nuclease-susceptible sites are subsequently observed as single-strand scissions by velocity sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients. Incubation of UV-damaged cultures followed by extraction and enzymatic analysis of the radioactively labeled DNA enables one to trace the disappearance of such sites in vivo and hence to monitor endogenous repair activity. When UV-irradiated human cells are incubated in the dark, the curve for site removal exhibits a two-phase exponetial decline; i.e. there exists a fast component responsible for elimination of 60% of the initial damage and a second one approximately 7 times slower in rate. The removal of sites is not further enhanced by exposing cells to blacklight during post-UV incubation. Conversely, UV-damaged chick cells rid their DNA of all nuclease-susceptible sites rapidly (i.e. at an exponential rate approximately 13 times faster than the fast component of site removal in human cells) when incubated under blacklight but not when kept in the dark. These data indicate the presence in human and embryonic chick cells of distinct enzymatic mechanisms for the elimination of dimer-containing sites. Wheneras human fibroblasts rely heavily on a light-independent process, excision-repair, chick fibroblasts possess a light-dependent mechanism, presumably photoenzymatic repair. Advantage has been taken of the contrasting repair properties of the human and embryonic chick fibroblasts to evaluate the extent to which each can assist the other in the removal of UV-induced damage from its DNA. The two cell types were fused to form giant human/chick heterokaryons containing a number of intact

  8. [Biological effect of fine atmospheric dust extracts. IX. Quantitative cytologic study of the cytotoxic effect of fine atmospheric dust extracts on macrophages].

    PubMed

    Sugiri, D; Behrendt, H; Seemayer, N H

    1985-12-01

    Macrophages of cell line IC-21 were exposed to extracts and fractions of two samples of city smog (CSE 16 and 17) from the heavy industrialized Rhine-Ruhr-area. Cytotoxic effects of extracts and fractions were analysed in various concentrations and periods of incubation. As cytotoxic parameters were determined frequencies of mitosis and pycnosis of nuclei as well as occurrence of multinucleated giant cells. An increasing dosage of noxae showed a reduction of mitotic rate, a rise of pycnosis of nuclei and of multinucleated giant cells. For both city smog extracts these effects depended on incubation period and concentration of noxae. While the global extract of city smog no. 16 was always more effective than its fractions, with city smog no. 17 the strongest alterations were demonstrable by its cyclohexane-fraction and partly by its methanol-fraction. Based on air volume of collection both samples of city smog revealed a comparable cytotoxic effect. In relation to benzo(a)pyrene-content, however, city smog no. 17 was considerable more cytotoxic than city smog no. 16. These results confirm again cytotoxicity of city smog. It can be assumed that both samples of city smog impair defense mechanisms of the lung. PMID:4096144

  9. The prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 identifies proinflammatory macrophages and its expression is regulated by activin A.

    PubMed

    Escribese, María M; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Nieto, Concha; Samaniego, Rafael; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen; Matsuyama, Takami; Calderon-Gómez, Elisabeth; Vega, Miguel A; Salas, Azucena; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Corbí, Angel L

    2012-08-15

    Modulation of macrophage polarization underlies the onset and resolution of inflammatory processes, with polarization-specific molecules being actively sought as potential diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Based on their cytokine profile upon exposure to pathogenic stimuli, human monocyte-derived macrophages generated in the presence of GM-CSF or M-CSF are considered as proinflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, respectively. We report in this study that the prolyl hydroxylase PHD3-encoding EGLN3 gene is specifically expressed by in vitro-generated proinflammatory M1(GM-CSF) human macrophages at the mRNA and protein level. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of PHD3 in CD163(+) lung macrophages under basal homeostatic conditions, whereas PHD3(+) macrophages were abundantly found in tissues undergoing inflammatory responses (e.g., Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) and in tumors. In the case of melanoma, PHD3 expression marked a subset of tumor-associated macrophages that exhibit a weak (e.g., CD163) or absent (e.g., FOLR2) expression of typical M2-polarization markers. EGLN3 gene expression in proinflammatory M1(GM-CSF) macrophages was found to be activin A dependent and could be prevented in the presence of an anti-activin A-blocking Ab or inhibitors of activin receptor-like kinase receptors. Moreover, EGLN3 gene expression was upregulated in response to hypoxia only in M2(M-CSF) macrophages, and the hypoxia-mediated upregulation of EGLN3 expression was significantly impaired by activin A neutralization. These results indicate that EGLN3 gene expression in macrophages is dependent on activin A both under basal and hypoxic conditions and that the expression of the EGLN3-encoded PHD3 prolyl hydroxylase identifies proinflammatory macrophages in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22778395

  10. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  11. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (TgDNMT1) or PPAR-γ (TgPPAR-γ) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that TgDNMT1 significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional TgPPAR-γ or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented TgDNMT1-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  12. Murine cytotoxic activated macrophages inhibit aconitase in tumor cells. Inhibition involves the iron-sulfur prosthetic group and is reversible.

    PubMed

    Drapier, J C; Hibbs, J B

    1986-09-01

    Previous studies show that cytotoxic activated macrophages cause inhibition of DNA synthesis, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, and loss of intracellular iron from tumor cells. Here we examine aconitase, a citric acid cycle enzyme with a catalytically active iron-sulfur cluster, to determine if iron-sulfur clusters are targets for activated macrophage-induced iron removal. Results show that aconitase activity declines dramatically in target cells after 4 h of co-cultivation with activated macrophages. Aconitase inhibition occurs simultaneously with arrest of DNA synthesis, another early activated macrophage-induced metabolic change in target cells. Dithionite partially prevents activated macrophage induced aconitase inhibition. Furthermore, incubation of injured target cells in medium supplemented with ferrous ion plus a reducing agent causes near-complete reconstitution of aconitase activity. The results show that removal of a labile iron atom from the [4Fe-4S] cluster, by a cytotoxic activated macrophage-mediated mechanism, is causally related to aconitase inhibition. PMID:3745439

  13. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  14. Human macrophage activation. Modulation of mannosyl, fucosyl receptor activity in vitro by lymphokines, gamma and alpha interferons, and dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Mokoena, T; Gordon, S

    1985-01-01

    We describe a sensitive assay to measure immune activation of human macrophages in cell culture. Freshly isolated blood monocytes from normal subjects lack the ability to endocytose and degrade mannosyl-terminated glycoconjugates via specific receptors, but acquired this activity after cultivation in autologous serum for approximately 3 d. Addition of specific antigen, purified protein derivative, or T cell mitogens to mononuclear cells prevented the appearance of macrophage mannosyl receptor activity and lymphokine, gamma-, and alpha-interferons selectively down-regulated receptor activity in monocyte-macrophage targets. The effects of antigen challenge and gamma-interferon on mannosyl receptors can be prevented by 10(-8) M dexamethasone. Dexamethasone also inhibited release of another macrophage activation marker, plasminogen activator, which was increased by both gamma- and alpha-interferons. These studies show that activation of human macrophages is regulated by opposing actions of lymphokines and glucocorticoids. PMID:2579101

  15. Macrophage functions in Biozzi mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dockrell, H M; Taverne, J; Lelchuk, R; Depledge, P; Brown, I N; Playfair, J H

    1985-01-01

    The faster degradation of antigen by macrophages in Biozzi low (L) responder mice, compared to Biozzi high (H) responder mice, is thought to be responsible for their lower antibody response. We have measured four functions associated with macrophages to see whether macrophages from L mice were generally more active than those from H mice. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from normal mice were compared with those from groups of mice given Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Propionibacterium acnes. Cells from normal H mice gave a stronger oxidative burst when triggered with phorbol myristate acetate, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells than cells from L mice. Cells from all mice injected with BCG or P. acnes gave a stronger oxidative burst, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells; again, both responses were higher in H mice than in L mice. By contrast, when groups of mice that had received P. acnes were given endotoxin and bled, higher titres of tumour necrosis factor were found in the sera of L mice. Spleen cells from both lines of mice released similar levels of interleukin-1, both spontaneously and in response to lipopolysaccharide. Our results suggest that these various macrophage responses are expressed independently in H and L mice. PMID:3894222

  16. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  17. Phenotypic Transitions of Macrophages Orchestrate Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Margaret L.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are essential for the efficient healing of numerous tissues, and they contribute to impaired healing and fibrosis. Tissue repair proceeds through overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and macrophages are present throughout this progression. Macrophages exhibit transitions in phenotype and function as tissue repair progresses, although the precise factors regulating these transitions remain poorly defined. In efficiently healing injuries, macrophages present during a given stage of repair appear to orchestrate transition into the next phase and, in turn, can promote debridement of the injury site, cell proliferation and angiogenesis, collagen deposition, and matrix remodeling. However, dysregulated macrophage function can contribute to failure to heal or fibrosis in several pathological situations. This review will address current knowledge of the origins and functions of macrophages during the progression of tissue repair, with emphasis on skin and skeletal muscle. Dysregulation of macrophages in disease states and therapies targeting macrophage activation to promote tissue repair are also discussed. PMID:24091222

  18. Macrophage-induced thymic lymphocyte maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Van den Tweel, J G; Walker, W S

    1977-01-01

    Guinea-pig peritoneal macrophages were found to influence the functional maturation of thymic lymphocytes. Autologous thymic lymphocytes obtained from macrophage co-cultures responded to three different mitogens and were reduced in their ability to reassociate spontaneously with macrophages. Neither of these properties were found in thymic lymphocytes that had not been cultured with macrophages. These functional changes appeared to be specific for macrophages since thymic lymphocytes incubated with skin fibroblasts failed to respond to the test mitogens. Furthermore, they were not the result of either the inactivation, by macrophages, of a putative suppressor thymocyte or a soluble macrophage product. In addition to influencing the functional maturation of thymic lymphocytes, macrophages also appeared to play a direct role in inducing the mitogen response of functionally mature cells. PMID:304037

  19. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  20. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Suhua

    2016-08-01

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

  1. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  2. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S.; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T.; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.; Wright, Samuel D.; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L.; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Since cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) triggers a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility, in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. Here we show that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load, and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques, and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Since CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  3. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Björkhem, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R; Wright, Samuel D; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  4. Effect of amorphous silica nanoparticles on in vitro RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Akase, Takanori; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tochigi, Saeko; Hirai, Toshiro; Uji, Miyuki; Ichihashi, Ko-Ichi; Yamashita, Takuya; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Morishita, Yuki; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Norio; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2011-07-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSP) have been used as a polishing agent and/or as a remineralization promoter for teeth in the oral care field. The present study investigates the effects of nSP on osteoclast differentiation and the relationship between particle size and these effects. Our results revealed that nSP exerted higher cytotoxicity in macrophage cells compared with submicron-sized silica particles. However, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and the number of osteoclast cells (TRAP-positive multinucleated cells) were not changed by nSP treatment in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) at doses that did not induce cytotoxicity by silica particles. These results indicated that nSP did not cause differentiation of osteoclasts. Collectively, the results suggested that nanosilica exerts no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells, although a detailed mechanistic examination of the nSP70-mediated cytotoxic effect is needed.

  5. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Palmar, Jim; Bautista, Jordan; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gómez, Alexis; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD. PMID:26491604

  6. Investigation of macrophage polarization using bone marrow derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei; Cheruku, Patali S; Bazer, Fuller W; Safe, Stephen H; Zhou, Beiyan

    2013-06-23

    The article describes a readily easy adaptive in vitro model to investigate macrophage polarization. In the presence of GM-CSF/M-CSF, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow are directed into monocytic differentiation, followed by M1 or M2 stimulation. The activation status can be tracked by changes in cell surface antigens, gene expression and cell signaling pathways.

  7. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko; Takeya, Motohiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup –/–}) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE{sup –/–} mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE{sup –/–} mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  8. Tissue macrophage identity and self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Gentek, Rebecca; Molawi, Kaaweh; Sieweke, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages are cellular components of the innate immune system that reside in virtually all tissues and contribute to immunity, repair, and homeostasis. The traditional view that all tissue-resident macrophages derive from the bone marrow through circulating monocyte intermediates has dramatically shifted recently with the observation that macrophages from embryonic progenitors can persist into adulthood and self-maintain by local proliferation. In several tissues, however, monocytes also contribute to the resident macrophage population, on which the local environment can impose tissue-specific macrophage functions. These observations have raised important questions: What determines resident macrophage identity and function, ontogeny or environment? How is macrophage proliferation regulated? In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the identity, proliferation, and turnover of tissue-resident macrophages and how they differ from freshly recruited short-lived monocyte-derived cells. We examine whether macrophage proliferation can be qualified as self-renewal of mature differentiated cells and whether the concepts and molecular pathways are comparable to self-renewal mechanisms in stem cells. Finally, we discuss how improved understanding of macrophage identity and self-renewal could be exploited for therapeutic intervention of macrophage-mediated pathologies by selectively targeting freshly recruited or resident macrophages.

  9. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone.

  10. Regulation of angiogenesis, mural cell recruitment and adventitial macrophage behavior by Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Alfred C; Ligresti, Giovanni; Fogel, Eric; Zorzi, Penelope; Smith, Kelly; Nicosia, Roberto F

    2014-01-01

    The angiogenic response to injury can be studied by culturing rat or mouse aortic explants in collagen gels. Gene expression studies show that aortic angiogenesis is preceded by an immune reaction with overexpression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-inducible genes. TLR1, 3, and 6 are transiently upregulated at 24 h whereas TLR2, 4, and 8 expression peaks at 24 h but remains elevated during angiogenesis and vascular regression. Expression of TLR5, 7 and 9 steadily increases over time and is highest during vascular regression. Studies with isolated cells show that TLRs are expressed at higher levels in aortic macrophages compared to endothelial or mural cells with the exception of TLR2 and TLR9 which are more abundant in the aortic endothelium. LPS and other TLR ligands dose dependently stimulate angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor production. TLR9 ligands also influence the behavior of nonendothelial cell types by blocking mural cell recruitment and inducing formation of multinucleated giant cells by macrophages. TLR9-induced mural cell depletion is associated with reduced expression of the mural cell recruiting factor PDGFB. The spontaneous angiogenic response of the aortic rings to injury is reduced in cultures from mice deficient in myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule of TLRs, and following treatment with an inhibitor of the NFκB pathway. These results suggest that the TLR system participates in the angiogenic response of the vessel wall to injury and may play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory angiogenesis in reactive and pathologic processes.

  11. Modulating macrophage response to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, Toral

    Macrophages recruited to the site of biomaterial implantation are the primary mediators of the chronic foreign body response to implanted materials. Since foreign body response limits performance and functional life of numerous implanted biomaterials/medical devices, various approaches have been investigated to modulate macrophage interactions with biomaterial surfaces to mitigate this response. In this work we have explored two independent approaches to modulate the macrophage inflammatory response to biomaterials. The first approach targets surface integrins, cell surface receptors that mediate cell adhesion to biomaterials through adhesive proteins spontaneously adsorbed on biomaterial surfaces. The second approach involves surface modification of biomaterials using nanotopographic features since nanotopography has been reported to modulate cell adhesion and viability in a cell type-dependent manner. More specifically, Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod surface was investigated for its role in modulating macrophage adhesion and survival in vitro and foreign body response in vivo. For the first approach, we have investigated the role of integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins in the in-vivo osteolysis response and macrophage inflammatory processes of phagocytosis as well as inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to particulate biomaterials. We have also investigated the in vivo foreign body response (FBR) to subcutaneously implanted biomaterials by evaluating the thickness of fibrous capsule formed around the implants after 2 weeks of implantation. The role of Mac-1 integrin was isolated using a Mac-1 KO mouse and comparing it to a WT control. The role of RGD binding integrins in FBR was investigated by coating the implanted biomaterial with ELVAX(TM) polymer loaded with Echistatin which contains the RGD sequence. For the in-vivo osteolysis study and to study the in-vitro macrophage response to particulate biomaterials, we used the RGD peptide encapsulated in ELVAX

  12. MicroRNA-155 in exosomes secreted from helicobacter pylori infection macrophages immunomodulates inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Deng, Zhiyong; Wang, Zeyou; Wu, Jianhong; Gu, Tao; Jiang, Yibiao; Li, Guangxin

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes containing microRNA-155 act as molecule carriers during immune cell-cell communication and play an important role in the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages. Previous reports have found that miR-155 was over-expressed in H. pylori infection macrophages, but the significance of which is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the impact of miR-155 loaded in exosomes derived from macrophages to the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages and possible mechanisms. We found that miR-155 promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-a, IL-6, IL-23, but also increased the expression of CD40, CD63, CD81, and MCH-I. Meanwhile, inflammatory signal pathways proteins, such as MyD88, NF-κB in H. pylori infection macrophages were down-regulated due to the over-expression of miR-155. Experiments in vitro or in vivo revealed that miR-155 promoted macrophages to inhibit or kill H. pylori by regulating the inflammatory response of cells to prevent the gastritis caused by H. pylori infection. These findings contribute to the understanding of miR-155 contained in exosomes in inflammatory responses of H. pylori infection macrophages. PMID:27725852

  13. The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is a discriminator of macrophage function in the inflamed lung

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas J; Fujino, Naoya; Cook, Peter C; Svedberg, Freya R; MacDonald, Andrew S; Maciewicz, Rose A; Singh, Dave; Hussell, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Much of the biology surrounding macrophage functional specificity has arisen through examining inflammation-induced polarising signals, but this also occurs in homeostasis, requiring tissue-specific environmental triggers that influence macrophage phenotype and function. The TAM receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl and MerTK) mediates the non-inflammatory removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes through the bridging phosphatidylserine-binding molecules Gas6 or Protein S. We show that one such TAM receptor (Axl) is exclusively expressed on mouse airway macrophages, but not interstitial macrophages and other lung leukocytes, under homeostatic conditions and is constitutively ligated to Gas6. Axl expression is potently induced by GM-CSF expressed in the healthy and inflamed airway, and by type I interferon or TLR3 stimulation on human and mouse macrophages, indicating potential involvement of Axl in apoptotic cell removal under inflammatory conditions. Indeed, an absence of Axl does not cause sterile inflammation in health, but leads to exaggerated lung inflammatory disease upon influenza infection. These data imply that Axl allows specific identification of airway macrophages, and that its expression is critical for macrophage functional compartmentalisation in the airspaces or lung interstitium. We propose that this may be a critical feature to prevent excessive inflammation due to secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells that have not been cleared by efferocytosis. PMID:25603826

  14. Specific calcineurin targeting in macrophages confers resistance to inflammation via MKP-1 and p38.

    PubMed

    Escolano, Amelia; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Urso, Katia; Izquierdo, Helena M; Delgado, Mario; Martín, Francisco; Sabio, Guadalupe; Sancho, David; Gómez-del Arco, Pablo; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2014-05-16

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis and influence inflammatory responses by modulating their phenotype in response to the local environment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing this plasticity would open new avenues for the treatment for inflammatory disorders. We show that deletion of calcineurin (CN) or its inhibition with LxVP peptide in macrophages induces an anti-inflammatory population that confers resistance to arthritis and contact hypersensitivity. Transfer of CN-targeted macrophages or direct injection of LxVP-encoding lentivirus has anti-inflammatory effects in these models. Specific CN targeting in macrophages induces p38 MAPK activity by downregulating MKP-1 expression. However, pharmacological CN inhibition with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 did not reproduce these effects and failed to induce p38 activity. The CN-inhibitory peptide VIVIT also failed to reproduce the effects of LxVP. p38 inhibition prevented the anti-inflammatory phenotype of CN-targeted macrophages, and mice with defective p38-activation were resistant to the anti-inflammatory effect of LxVP. Our results identify a key role for CN and p38 in the modulation of macrophage phenotype and suggest an alternative treatment for inflammation based on redirecting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory status.

  15. M2 Macrophage Polarization Mediates Anti-inflammatory Effects of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Je; Tateya, Sanshiro; Cheng, Andrew M.; Rizzo-DeLeon, Norma; Wang, Nicholas F.; Handa, Priya; Wilson, Carole L.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Sweet, Ian R.; Bomsztyk, Karol; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a physiological role in limiting obesity-associated insulin resistance and inflammation. This study was undertaken to investigate whether this NO effect involves polarization of macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. Mice with transgenic endothelial NO synthase overexpression were protected against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic inflammation and insulin resistance, and this effect was associated with reduced proinflammatory M1 and increased anti-inflammatory M2 activation of Kupffer cells. In cell culture studies, exposure of macrophages to endothelial NO similarly reduced inflammatory (M1) and increased anti-inflammatory (M2) gene expression. Similar effects were induced by macrophage overexpression of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a key downstream mediator of intracellular NO signaling. Conversely, VASP deficiency induced proinflammatory M1 macrophage activation, and the transplantation of bone marrow from VASP-deficient donor mice into normal recipients caused hepatic inflammation and insulin resistance resembling that induced in normal mice by consumption of an HFD. These data suggest that proinflammatory macrophage M1 activation and macrophage-mediated inflammation are tonically inhibited by NO → VASP signal transduction, and that reduced NO → VASP signaling is involved in the effect of HFD feeding to induce M1 activation of Kupffer cells and associated hepatic inflammation. Our data implicate endothelial NO → VASP signaling as a physiological determinant of macrophage polarization and show that signaling via this pathway is required to prevent hepatic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:25845662

  16. Identification of Neutral Cholesterol Ester Hydrolase, a Key Enzyme Removing Cholesterol from Macrophages*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Masaki; Nishi, Makiko; Sekiya, Motohiro; Tajima, Makiko; Takase, Satoru; Takanashi, Mikio; Ohta, Keisuke; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Sachiko; Yahagi, Naoya; Ohashi, Ken; Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun

    2008-01-01

    Unstable lipid-rich plaques in atherosclerosis are characterized by the accumulation of macrophage foam cells loaded with cholesterol ester (CE). Although hormone-sensitive lipase and cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) have been proposed to mediate the hydrolysis of CE in macrophages, circumstantial evidence suggests the presence of other enzymes with neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (nCEH) activity. Here we show that the murine orthologue of KIAA1363, designated as neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH), is a microsomal nCEH with high expression in murine and human macrophages. The effect of various concentrations of NaCl on its nCEH activity resembles that on endogenous nCEH activity of macrophages. RNA silencing of NCEH decreases nCEH activity at least by 50%; conversely, its overexpression inhibits the CE formation in macrophages. Immunohistochemistry reveals that NCEH is expressed in macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. These data indicate that NCEH is responsible for a major part of nCEH activity in macrophages and may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:18782767

  17. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  18. Macrophage depletion reduces postsurgical tumor recurrence and metastatic growth in a spontaneous murine model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Muly; Khoo, Karen; Yeo, Kim Pin; Kato, Masashi; Prevost-Blondel, Amelle; Angeli, Veronique; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection of tumors is often followed by regrowth at the primary site and metastases may emerge rapidly following removal of the primary tumor. Macrophages are important drivers of tumor growth, and here we investigated their involvement in postoperative relapse as well as explore macrophage depletion as an adjuvant to surgical resection. RETAAD mice develop spontaneous metastatic melanoma that begins in the eye. Removal of the eyes as early as 1 week of age did not prevent the development of metastases; rather, surgery led to increased proliferation of tumor cells locally and in distant metastases. Surgery-induced increase in tumor cell proliferation correlated with increased macrophage density within the tumor. Moreover, macrophages stimulate tumor sphere formation from tumor cells of post-surgical but not control mice. Macrophage depletion with a diet containing the CSF-1R specific kinase inhibitor Ki20227 following surgery significantly reduced postoperative tumor recurrence and abrogated enhanced metastatic outgrowth. Our results confirm that tumor cells disseminate early, and show that macrophages contribute both to post-surgical tumor relapse and growth of metastases, likely through stimulating a population of tumor-initiating cells. Thus macrophage depletion warrants exploration as an adjuvant to surgical resection. PMID:25762633

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael J.; Eastman, Alison J.; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R.; Osterholzer, John J.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Swanson, Joel A.; Olszewski, Michal A.

    2015-01-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms which allow classical activation to counteract replication. Cn-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow-cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in Cn-containing lung cells compared to Cn–free cells. Among Cn-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased Cn replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased Cn replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of Cn. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important Cn survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies which decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections. PMID:25637026

  20. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-05-19

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence.

  1. S-Allylcysteine, a garlic compound, increases ABCA1 expression in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Malekpour-Dehkordi, Zahra; Javadi, Ebrahim; Doosti, Mahmood; Paknejad, Maliheh; Nourbakhsh, Mitra; Yassa, Narguess; Gerayesh-Nejad, Siavash; Heshmat, Ramin

    2013-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a key mediator of cholesterol efflux to apoA-I in lipid-loaded macrophages, which is the first step of reverse cholesterol transport in vivo and a critical step in preventing atherosclerosis. Enhanced ABCA1 expression may inhibit foam cell formation and consequently reduce atherogenic risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC), the most abundant organosulfur compound in aged garlic extract, on the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in human THP-1 macrophages. The human monocyte THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophage cells in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA). Macrophage cells were then treated with different concentrations (10, 20 and 40 mM) of SAC for 24 h. Total RNA of treated macrophages was extracted and analyzed with real-time RT-PCR. ABCA1 protein expression was also analyzed with western blotting. Results showed that SAC increased the ABCA1 mRNA (1.82-, 2.07- and 2.23-fold) and protein (1.37-, 1.55- and 2.08-fold) expression in macrophage THP-1 cells compared with control (untreated cells). Results suggested that SAC can increase ABCA1 expression in macrophages and may be beneficial in promoting reverse cholesterol efflux. PMID:22610793

  2. Serum from patients with systemic vasculitis induces alternatively activated macrophage M2c polarization.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Susanne M; Linge, Carl Petrus; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lood, Christian; Johansson, Asa; Ohlsson, Sophie; Lundqvist, Andrea; Bengtsson, Anders A; Carlsson, Fredric; Hellmark, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitides (AAV) are conditions defined by an autoimmune small vessel inflammation. Dying neutrophils are found around the inflamed vessels and the balance between infiltrating neutrophils and macrophages is important to prevent autoimmunity. Here we investigate how sera from AAV patients may regulate macrophage polarization and function. Macrophages from healthy individuals were differentiated into M0, M1, M2a, M2b or M2c macrophages using a standardized protocol, and phenotyped according to their expression surface markers and cytokine production. These phenotypes were compared with those of macrophages stimulated with serum from AAV patients or healthy controls. While the healthy control sera induced a M0 macrophage, AAV serum promoted polarization towards the M2c subtype. No sera induced M1, M2a or M2b macrophages. The M2c subtype showed increased phagocytosis capacity compared with the other subtypes. The M2c polarization found in AAV is consistent with previous reports of increased levels of M2c-associated cytokines.

  3. Specific calcineurin targeting in macrophages confers resistance to inflammation via MKP-1 and p38

    PubMed Central

    Escolano, Amelia; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Urso, Katia; Izquierdo, Helena M; Delgado, Mario; Martín, Francisco; Sabio, Guadalupe; Sancho, David; Gómez-del Arco, Pablo; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis and influence inflammatory responses by modulating their phenotype in response to the local environment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing this plasticity would open new avenues for the treatment for inflammatory disorders. We show that deletion of calcineurin (CN) or its inhibition with LxVP peptide in macrophages induces an anti-inflammatory population that confers resistance to arthritis and contact hypersensitivity. Transfer of CN-targeted macrophages or direct injection of LxVP-encoding lentivirus has anti-inflammatory effects in these models. Specific CN targeting in macrophages induces p38 MAPK activity by downregulating MKP-1 expression. However, pharmacological CN inhibition with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 did not reproduce these effects and failed to induce p38 activity. The CN-inhibitory peptide VIVIT also failed to reproduce the effects of LxVP. p38 inhibition prevented the anti-inflammatory phenotype of CN-targeted macrophages, and mice with defective p38-activation were resistant to the anti-inflammatory effect of LxVP. Our results identify a key role for CN and p38 in the modulation of macrophage phenotype and suggest an alternative treatment for inflammation based on redirecting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory status. PMID:24596247

  4. [Progresses on macrophages of male reproductive tract].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Jing; Wang, Tao; Wang, Geng-Xin

    2002-12-01

    The review summarized the recent progress on macrophages of male reproductive tract and the action of macrophages on male reproductive physiology and pathology. The close correlation and effect between testicular macrophages and Leydig cells, Sertoli cells, germ cells, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were introduced, respectively. At the same time, it pointed out the changes of macrophages' morphology and function in immune orchitis, and their regulation on the development of orchitis. So the complex immune regulation network in testes and testicular macrophages playing an important role on spermatogenesis and the stableness of spermatogenetic microenvironment in testes were further illuminated, which can provide theoretical basis for clinic therapy.

  5. Contribution of Macrophage Polarization to Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ohnishi, Koji; Shiraishi, Daisuke; Takeya, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation is one of the major immunological events in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Recent studies have disclosed that complicated mechanisms are involved in macrophage activation and polarization, and many published research articles have been based on the M1/M2 polarization concept. It is considered that M1- and M2-like macrophages are associated with T helper (Th)1-type and Th2-type immune responses, respectively, via several immune mediators. In this article, we summarize the correlations between macrophage polarization and metabolic disorders in both humans and mice and discuss the contribution of macrophage polarization to the pathogenic process of metabolic diseases.

  6. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  7. Compound C inhibits macrophage chemotaxis through an AMPK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngyi; Park, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-01-15

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue is a well-established cause of obesity-linked insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue has beneficial effects on the protection against obesity-induced insulin resistance, which is mainly mediated by prevention of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation. In examining the role of AMPK on adipose tissue inflammation, we unexpectedly found that compound C (CC), despite its inhibition of AMPK, robustly inhibited macrophage chemotaxis in RAW 264.7 cells when adipocyte conditioned medium (CM) was used as a chemoattractant. Here, we report that CC inhibition of macrophage migration occurred independently of AMPK. Mechanistically, this inhibitory effect of cell migration by CC was mediated by inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase, AKT, nuclear factor κB pathways. Moreover, the expression of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and pro-inflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were prevented by CC treatment in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with either adipocyte CM or lipopolysaccharide. Lastly, in accord with the findings of the anti-inflammatory effect of CC, we demonstrated that CC functioned as a repressor of macrophage CM-mediated insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that CC serves as a useful inhibitory molecule against macrophage chemotaxis into adipose tissue and thus might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-linked adipose inflammation.

  8. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  9. Macrophage Polarization during Murine Lyme Borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Carrie E; Olson, Rachel M; Brown, Charles R

    2015-07-01

    Infection of C3H mice with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, reliably produces an infectious arthritis and carditis that peak around 3 weeks postinfection and then spontaneously resolve. Macrophage polarization has been suggested to drive inflammation, the clearance of bacteria, and tissue repair and resolution in a variety of infectious disease models. During Lyme disease it is clear that macrophages are capable of clearing Borrelia spirochetes and exhausted neutrophils; however, the role of macrophage phenotype in disease development or resolution has not been studied. Using classical (NOS2) and alternative (CD206) macrophage subset-specific markers, we determined the phenotype of F4/80(+) macrophages within the joints and heart throughout the infection time course. Within the joint, CD206(+) macrophages dominated throughout the course of infection, and NOS2(+) macrophage numbers became elevated only during the peak of inflammation. We also found dual NOS2(+) CD206(+) macrophages which increased during resolution. In contrast to findings for the ankle joints, numbers of NOS2(+) and CD206(+) macrophages in the heart were similar at the peak of inflammation. 5-Lipoxygenase-deficient (5-LOX(-/-)) mice, which display a failure of Lyme arthritis resolution, recruited fewer F4/80(+) cells to the infected joints and heart, but macrophage subset populations were unchanged. These results highlight differences in the inflammatory infiltrates during Lyme arthritis and carditis and demonstrate the coexistence of multiple macrophage subsets within a single inflammatory site.

  10. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges

    2015-01-01

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa+ and tnfa− macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa+ macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07288.001 PMID:26154973

  11. Macrophages and cellular immunity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gold, Katrina S; Brückner, Katja

    2015-12-01

    The invertebrate Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful model for understanding blood cell development and immunity. Drosophila is a holometabolous insect, which transitions through a series of life stages from embryo, larva and pupa to adulthood. In spite of this, remarkable parallels exist between Drosophila and vertebrate macrophages, both in terms of development and function. More than 90% of Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes) are macrophages (plasmatocytes), making this highly tractable genetic system attractive for studying a variety of questions in macrophage biology. In vertebrates, recent findings revealed that macrophages have two independent origins: self-renewing macrophages, which reside and proliferate in local microenvironments in a variety of tissues, and macrophages of the monocyte lineage, which derive from hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses two macrophage lineages with a conserved dual ontogeny. These parallels allow us to take advantage of the Drosophila model when investigating macrophage lineage specification, maintenance and amplification, and the induction of macrophages and their progenitors by local microenvironments and systemic cues. Beyond macrophage development, Drosophila further serves as a paradigm for understanding the mechanisms underlying macrophage function and cellular immunity in infection, tissue homeostasis and cancer, throughout development and adult life. PMID:27117654

  12. Tissue-Resident Macrophage Ontogeny and Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ginhoux, Florent; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-03-15

    Defining the origins and developmental pathways of tissue-resident macrophages should help refine our understanding of the role of these cells in various disease settings and enable the design of novel macrophage-targeted therapies. In recent years the long-held belief that macrophage populations in the adult are continuously replenished by monocytes from the bone marrow (BM) has been overturned with the advent of new techniques to dissect cellular ontogeny. The new paradigm suggests that several tissue-resident macrophage populations are seeded during waves of embryonic hematopoiesis and self-maintain independently of BM contribution during adulthood. However, the exact nature of the embryonic progenitors that give rise to adult tissue-resident macrophages is still debated, and the mechanisms enabling macrophage population maintenance in the adult are undefined. Here, we review the emergence of these concepts and discuss current controversies and future directions in macrophage biology. PMID:26982352

  13. Macrophages in Tissue Repair, Regeneration, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Thomas A; Vannella, Kevin M

    2016-03-15

    Inflammatory monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. After tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, such that uncontrolled production of inflammatory mediators and growth factors, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contribute to a state of persistent injury, and this could lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound-healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue-regenerating phenotypes after injury, and we highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically.

  14. Platelet microparticles reprogram macrophage gene expression and function.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Benoit; Corduan, Aurélie; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lee, Chan Ho C; Boilard, Eric; Provost, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Platelet microparticles (MPs) represent the most abundant MPs subtype in the circulation, and can mediate intercellular communication through delivery of bioactives molecules, such as cytokines, proteins, lipids and RNAs. Here, we show that platelet MPs can be internalised by primary human macrophages and deliver functional miR-126-3p. The increase in macrophage miR-126-3p levels was not prevented by actinomycin D, suggesting that it was not due to de novo gene transcription. Platelet MPs dose-dependently downregulated expression of four predicted mRNA targets of miR-126-3p, two of which were confirmed also at the protein level. The mRNA downregulatory effects of platelet MPs were abrogated by expression of a neutralising miR-126-3p sponge, implying the involvement of miR-126-3p. Transcriptome-wide, microarray analyses revealed that as many as 66 microRNAs and 653 additional RNAs were significantly and differentially expressed in macrophages upon exposure to platelet MPs. More specifically, platelet MPs induced an upregulation of 34 microRNAs and a concomitant downregulation of 367 RNAs, including mRNAs encoding for cytokines/chemokines CCL4, CSF1 and TNF. These changes were associated with reduced CCL4, CSF1 and TNF cytokine/chemokine release by macrophages, and accompanied by a marked increase in their phagocytic capacity. These findings demonstrate that platelet MPs can modify the transcriptome of macrophages, and reprogram their function towards a phagocytic phenotype. PMID:26333874

  15. Neuron-macrophage crosstalk in the intestine: a “microglia” perspective

    PubMed Central

    Verheijden, Simon; Schepper, Sebastiaan De; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages are strategically located in different layers of the intestine, including the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis externa, where they perform complex tasks to maintain intestinal homeostasis. As the gastrointestinal tract is continuously challenged by foreign antigens, macrophage activation should be tightly controlled to prevent chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Unraveling the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue-specific control of macrophage activation is crucial to get more insight into intestinal immune regulation. Two recent reports provide unanticipated evidence that the enteric nervous system (ENS) acts as a critical regulator of macrophage function in the myenteric plexus. Both studies clearly illustrate that enteric neurons reciprocally interact with intestinal macrophages and are actively involved in shaping their phenotype. This concept has striking parallels with the central nervous system (CNS), where neuronal signals maintain microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, in a quiescent, anti-inflammatory state. This inevitably evokes the perception that the ENS and CNS share mechanisms of neuroimmune interaction. In line, intestinal macrophages, both in the muscularis externa and (sub)mucosa, express high levels of CX3CR1, a feature that was once believed to be unique for microglia. CX3CR1 is the sole receptor of fractalkine (CX3CL1), a factor mainly produced by neurons in the CNS to facilitate neuron-microglia communication. The striking parallels between resident macrophages of the brain and intestine might provide a promising new line of thought to get more insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling macrophage activation in the gut. PMID:26528133

  16. Requirement for non-regulated, constitutive calcium influx in macrophage survival signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Tano, Jean-Yves; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the role of constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx in macrophage survival. {yields} Survival signaling exhibits a mandatory requirement for constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx. {yields} CAM/CAMKII couples constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx to survival signaling. -- Abstract: The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT axis and the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) pathway play critical roles in macrophage survival. In cells other than macrophages proper operation of those two pathways requires Ca{sup 2+} influx into the cell, but if that is the case in macrophages remains unexplored. In the present work we used THP-1-derived macrophages and a pharmacological approach to examine for the first time the role of constitutive, non-regulated Ca{sup 2+} influx in PI3K/AKT and NF{kappa}B signaling. Blocking constitutive function of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channels with the organic channel blocker SKF96365 completely prevented phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, AKT and its downstream target BAD in TNF{alpha}-treated macrophages. A similar effect was observed upon treating macrophages with the calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor W-7 or the calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor KN-62. In addition, pre-treating macrophages with SKF96365 significantly enhanced TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that in THP-1-derived macrophages survival signaling depends, to a significant extent, on constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx presumably through a mechanism that involves the CAM/CAMKII axis as a coupling component between constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx and activation of survival signaling.

  17. Macrophages and dendritic cells: the usual suspects in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kassiteridi, Christina; Monaco, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the leading cause of death worldwide, is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease, which, clinically manifests from early lipid-rich lesions to plaque rupture and/or thrombosis in the arterial wall. The myeloid cell compartment, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is long known to contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However their complex phenotypic heterogeneity hampers our full understanding of their role. Here, we review the biological and functional versatility of the myeloid cells in atherosclerosis. Several distinct subsets of macrophages and myeloid cells have been identified in atherosclerotic plaques, including subsets that are specific to atherosclerosis itself. Our ability to target them therapeutically is still limited. The challenge for the future will be the definition of treatments that target specific myeloid subsets to prevent the activation of pro-atherogenic myeloid cell subsets while preserving the anti-atherogenic and repairable function of myeloid cells.

  18. HIF-1α-PDK1 axis-induced active glycolysis plays an essential role in macrophage migratory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Hiroaki; Takeda, Norihiko; Isagawa, Takayuki; Sugiura, Yuki; Honda, Kurara; Wake, Masaki; Miyazawa, Hidenobu; Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki; Jenkins, Dana M. R.; Choi, Hyunsung; Kim, Jung-whan; Asagiri, Masataka; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Abe, Hajime; Soma, Katsura; Koyama, Katsuhiro; Katoh, Manami; Sayama, Keimon; Goda, Nobuhito; Johnson, Randall S.; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    In severely hypoxic condition, HIF-1α-mediated induction of Pdk1 was found to regulate glucose oxidation by preventing the entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic cycle. Monocyte-derived macrophages, however, encounter a gradual decrease in oxygen availability during its migration process in inflammatory areas. Here we show that HIF-1α-PDK1-mediated metabolic changes occur in mild hypoxia, where mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity is unimpaired, suggesting a mode of glycolytic reprogramming. In primary macrophages, PKM2, a glycolytic enzyme responsible for glycolytic ATP synthesis localizes in filopodia and lammelipodia, where ATP is rapidly consumed during actin remodelling processes. Remarkably, inhibition of glycolytic reprogramming with dichloroacetate significantly impairs macrophage migration in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inhibition of the macrophage HIF-1α-PDK1 axis suppresses systemic inflammation, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for regulating inflammatory processes. Our findings thus demonstrate that adaptive responses in glucose metabolism contribute to macrophage migratory activity. PMID:27189088

  19. Independent mechanisms for macrophage binding and macrophage phagocytosis of damaged erythrocytes. Evidence of receptor cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, G R; Terpstra, V; Steinberg, D

    1997-12-01

    The binding and phagocytosis of oxidatively damaged red blood cells (OxRBCs) by mouse peritoneal macrophages can be inhibited by oxidatively modified LDL (OxLDL), implying some commonality at their receptor-binding domains. Studies from many different laboratories support the view that OxRBC binding is due to the disruption of plasma membrane phospholipid asymmetry and the subsequent exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer membrane leaflet. Presumably, oxidation of LDL creates a surface structure on it in some way homologous to the PS-rich domain on OxRBCs. Apoptotic cells in some instances are also recognized because of PS exposure on the outer leaflet of the membrane, and apoptotic cells are a common feature of atherosclerotic lesions. In the present studies, the mechanisms of binding and internalization of cells recognized by virtue of their membrane PS were studied using OxRBCs or vanadate-treated erythrocytes (VaRBCs) as models. Disruption of phospholipid asymmetry with vanadate produced cells that were bound by macrophages in the same divalent cation-dependent manner as OxRBCs. However, whereas OxRBCs were rapidly phagocytosed, VaRBCs were not. Stimulation of mouse macrophages with phorbol myristate acetate resulted in a concentration-dependent induction of phagocytosis of bound VaRBCs, an effect that could be prevented by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. Because phagocytosis of OxRBCs occurred unassisted, we speculated that there must be additional membrane changes induced by oxidation (over and above the disruption of phospholipid asymmetry) that contribute to phagocytosis of OxRBCs, possibly resulting in the ligation of a distinct receptor that does not necessarily contribute to adherence. This proposal is supported by the finding that ligation of macrophage Fc gamma receptors by the anti-Fc gamma RII/RIII antibody 2.4G2 triggers the phagocytosis of bound VaRBCs. Phagocytosis is also triggered by subthreshold opsonization of VaRBC, i

  20. THE PARTICULATE HYDROLASES OF MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Zanvil A.; Wiener, Edith

    1963-01-01

    The influence of phagocytosis on the morphological and biochemical properties of macrophage hydrolase-containing granules has been studied in vitro. Following the uptake of large numbers of heat-killed bacteria, an intracellular rearrangement of hydrolytic enzymes occurred. This was associated with the solubilization of 50 to 60 per cent of the total cell content of acid phosphatase, cathepsin, lysozyme, beta glucuronidase, acid ribonuclease, and acid desoxyribonuclease and with a corresponding decrease in granule-bound enzyme. With more prolonged incubation the majority of the soluble intracellular pool of acid ribonuclease and lysozyme was lost to the extracellular medium. No change in the total content of any of the hydrolases was noted during 180 minutes of incubation in vitro. The morphological fate of the granules was studied by a histochemical method for acid phosphatase. After the phagocytosis of yeast cell walls there was a disappearance of acid phosphatase-positive granules and an accumulation of reaction product about the ingested particle. Experiments employing macrophages which were supravitally stained with neutral red also demonstrated the loss of neutral red-positive granules and the accumulation of the dye about the yeast cell walls. These results strongly suggest that lysis of macrophage granules occurs following phagocytosis and that a portion of the granule contents are then resegregated within the newly formed phagocytic vacuole. PMID:14112262

  1. Macrophages in resistance to candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Torres, A; Balish, E

    1997-01-01

    Candida albicans, an increasingly common opportunistic pathogenic fungus, frequently causes disease in immunodeficient but not immunocompetent hosts. Clarifying the role of the phagocytic cells that participate in resistance to candidiasis not only is basic to understanding how the host copes with this dimorphic pathogen but also will expedite the development of innovative prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for treating the multiple clinical presentations that candidiasis encompasses. In this review, we present evidence that a diverse population of mononuclear phagocytes, in different states of activation and differentiation and from a variety of host species, can phagocytize C. albicans blastoconidia via an array of opsonic and nonopsonic mechanisms and can kill C. albicans blastoconidia and hyphae by means of oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Reactive nitrogen intermediates should now be added to the well-established candidacidal reactive oxygen intermediates of macrophages. Furthermore, what were thought to be two independent pathways, i.e., nitric oxide and superoxide anion, have now been shown to combine to form a potent macrophage candidacidal molecule, peroxynitrite. In contrast to monocytes and neutrophils, which are important in resistance to early stages of C. albicans infections, more differentiated macrophages activated by cytokines such as gamma interferon participate in the acquired resistance of hosts with C. albicans-specific, cell-mediated immunity. Evidence presented in this review demonstrates that mononuclear phagocytes, in some instances in the absence of other professional phagocytes such as neutrophils, play an import role in resistance to systemic and mucosal candidiasis. PMID:9184009

  2. Interferon-γ inhibits nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages via an mTORC1-c/EBPβ pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengfu; Zhou, Shuping; Sun, Chenming; Lei, Tong; Peng, Jianxia; Li, Weiguo; Ding, Pengbo; Lu, Jun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection often follows virus infection due to pulmonary interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production during virus infection, which down-regulates macrophage phagocytosis. The molecular mechanisms for this process are still poorly understood. In the present study, IFN-γ treatment significantly inhibited the ability of mouse macrophages to phagocytize nonopsonized chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), bacteria and beads in vitro, while it enhanced IgG- and complement-opsonized phagocytosis. IFN-γ treatment decreased the expression of MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) in macrophages. Macrophages showed lower binding to and phagocytic ability of cRBCs when MARCO was blocked with antibody. In addition, IFN-γ induced high activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and decreased the expression of c/EBPβ (CCAAT enhancer-binding protein β) in macrophages. Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages and restored c/EBPβ and MARCO expression. Biochemical assays showed that c/EBPβ directly bound to the MARCO gene promoter. Rapamycin significantly hampered the viral-bacterial synergy and protected influenza-infected mice from subsequent bacterial infection. Thus, IFN-γ inhibited the nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages through the mTOR-c/EBPβ-MARCO pathway. The present study offered evidence indicating that mTOR may be one of the key target molecules for the prevention of secondary bacterial infection caused by primary virus infection.

  3. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 with hemin reduces obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation via adipose macrophage phenotype switching.

    PubMed

    Tu, Thai Hien; Joe, Yeonsoo; Choi, Hye-Seon; Chung, Hun Taeg; Yu, Rina

    2014-01-01

    Adipose macrophages with the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype protect against obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which elicits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, modulates macrophage phenotypes and thus is implicated in various inflammatory diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the HO-1 inducer, hemin, protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation by inducing macrophages to switch to the M2 phenotype. HO-1 induction by hemin reduced the production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) from cocultured adipocytes and macrophages by inhibiting the activation of inflammatory signaling molecules (JNK and NF-κB) in both cell types. Hemin enhanced transcript levels of M2 macrophage marker genes (IL-4, Mrc1, and Clec10a) in the cocultures, while reducing transcripts of M1 macrophage markers (CD274 and TNF-α). The protective effects of hemin on adipose inflammation and macrophage phenotype switching were confirmed in mice fed a high-fat diet, and these were associated with PPARγ upregulation and STAT6 activation. These findings suggest that induction of HO-1 with hemin protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation through M2 macrophage phenotype switching, which is induced by the PPARγ and STAT6 pathway. HO-1 inducers such as hemin may be useful for preventing obesity-induced adipose inflammation.

  4. Early differential molecular response of a macrophage cell line to yeast and hyphal forms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Pitzurra, L; Puliti, M; Lanfrancone, L; Bistoni, F

    1992-01-01

    The dimorphic transition of Candida albicans from the yeast (Y-Candida) to the hyphal (H-Candida) form is a complex event; the relevance of this transition in fungal pathogenicity is still poorly understood. By using a cloned macrophage cell line (ANA-1), we questioned whether the interaction between macrophages and Y-Candida or H-Candida could affect specific cell functions, i.e., tumor necrosis factor and lysozyme production. We found that ANA-1 macrophages selectively responded to H-Candida with increased tumor necrosis factor and downregulated lysozyme, as assessed by measurement of relative mRNA levels and secreted biological activities. The H-Candida-mediated effects were (i) dependent upon the ratio between ANA-1 macrophages and H-Candida, (ii) detectable after 1 h of coincubation, and (iii) accomplished without fungal ingestion. Conversely, Y-Candida, which was found inside the ANA-1 macrophages, did not affect tumor necrosis factor and lysozyme production, nor did it prevent the macrophage response to other stimuli. Overall, these results indicate that a macrophage can distinguish between Y-Candida and H-Candida and that only the latter is able to modulate specific functions. H-Candida is recognized and probably processed as an extracellular target. The possible implication of macrophages as autocrine and paracrine regulatory cells during Candida infections is discussed. Images PMID:1541557

  5. Interferon-γ inhibits nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages via an mTORC1-c/EBPβ pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengfu; Zhou, Shuping; Sun, Chenming; Lei, Tong; Peng, Jianxia; Li, Weiguo; Ding, Pengbo; Lu, Jun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection often follows virus infection due to pulmonary interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production during virus infection, which down-regulates macrophage phagocytosis. The molecular mechanisms for this process are still poorly understood. In the present study, IFN-γ treatment significantly inhibited the ability of mouse macrophages to phagocytize nonopsonized chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), bacteria and beads in vitro, while it enhanced IgG- and complement-opsonized phagocytosis. IFN-γ treatment decreased the expression of MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) in macrophages. Macrophages showed lower binding to and phagocytic ability of cRBCs when MARCO was blocked with antibody. In addition, IFN-γ induced high activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and decreased the expression of c/EBPβ (CCAAT enhancer-binding protein β) in macrophages. Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages and restored c/EBPβ and MARCO expression. Biochemical assays showed that c/EBPβ directly bound to the MARCO gene promoter. Rapamycin significantly hampered the viral-bacterial synergy and protected influenza-infected mice from subsequent bacterial infection. Thus, IFN-γ inhibited the nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages through the mTOR-c/EBPβ-MARCO pathway. The present study offered evidence indicating that mTOR may be one of the key target molecules for the prevention of secondary bacterial infection caused by primary virus infection. PMID:25277143

  6. Tissue-resident macrophages: then and now.

    PubMed

    Davies, Luke C; Taylor, Philip R

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages have been at the heart of immune research for over a century and are an integral component of innate immunity. Macrophages are often viewed as terminally differentiated monocytic phagocytes. They infiltrate tissues during inflammation, and form polarized populations that perform pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory functions. Tissue-resident macrophages were regarded as differentiated monocytes, which seed the tissues to perform immune sentinel and homeostatic functions. However, tissue-resident macrophages are not a homogeneous population, but are in fact a grouping of cells with similar functions and phenotypes. In the last decade, it has been revealed that many of these cells are not terminally differentiated and, in most cases, are not derived from haematopoiesis in the adult. Recent research has highlighted that tissue-resident macrophages cannot be grouped into simple polarized categories, especially in vivo, when they are exposed to complex signalling events. It has now been demonstrated that the tissue environment itself is a major controller of macrophage phenotype, and can influence the expression of many genes regardless of origin. This is consistent with the concept that cells within different tissues have diverse responses in inflammation. There is still a mountain to climb in the field, as it evolves to encompass not only tissue-resident macrophage diversity, but also categorization of specific tissue environments and the plasticity of macrophages themselves. This knowledge provides a new perspective on therapeutic strategies, as macrophage subsets can potentially be manipulated to control the inflammatory environment in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25684236

  7. Development and maintainance of resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Perdiguero, Elisa Gomez; Geissmann, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the many roles of macrophages in health and disease states in vivo remain poorly understood. The purpose of this Review is to present and discuss current knowledge on the developmental biology of macrophages, as it underlies the concept of a layered myeloid system composed of ‘resident’ macrophages that mostly originate from yolk sac progenitors and of ‘passenger’ or ‘transitory’ myeloid cells that originate and renew from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and to provide a framework to investigate the functions of macrophages in vivo. PMID:26681456

  8. The inhibition by diphenyleneiodonium and its analogues of superoxide generation by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, J T; Jones, O T

    1987-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages were elicited in rats by using casein as a stimulus; when stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) they produced O2.-. Nearly 60% of the total cytochrome b had a low Em,7.0 of -247 mV, typical of the cytochrome b component found in the NADPH-dependent O2(.-)-generating oxidase of neutrophils. The rate of O2.- generation by macrophages was 1.23 mol of O2.-/s per mol of cytochrome b. Treatment of intact macrophages with diphenyleniodonium (DPI) at 0.9 microM caused 50% inhibition of PMA-induced O2.- generation, with little effect on mitochondrial respiratory activity; KCN inhibited respiratory activity without affecting PMA-induced O2.- generation. A similar specificity of inhibition was found for di-2-thienyliodonium (50% inhibition of O2.- generation at 0.5 microM) and, at higher concentrations, for diphenyl iodonium. When macrophage suspensions were incubated with [125I]DPI followed by autoradiography of SDS/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis-separated polypeptides, radioactivity was most strongly associated with a band of Mr 45,000, similar to that found in neutrophils [Cross & Jones (1986) Biochem. J. 237, 111-116]. The O2(.-)-generating oxidase of macrophages appears to have components in common with the NADPH oxidase of neutrophils, despite differences in activity. Its sensitivity to DPI suggests that selective prevention of radical generation by macrophages in vivo is possible. PMID:3036079

  9. Macrophage ABHD5 promotes colorectal cancer growth by suppressing spermidine production by SRM

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongming; Ou, Juanjuan; Peng, Yuan; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Hao, Lijun; Xie, Ganfeng; Wang, Zhe; Pang, Xueli; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jianjun; Yu, Liqing; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Shi, Chunmeng; Liang, Houjie

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming in stromal cells plays an essential role in regulating tumour growth. The metabolic activities of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) in colorectal cancer (CRC) are incompletely characterized. Here, we identify TAM-derived factors and their roles in the development of CRC. We demonstrate that ABHD5, a lipolytic co-activator, is ectopically expressed in CRC-associated macrophages. We demonstrate in vitro and in mouse models that macrophage ABHD5 potentiates growth of CRC cells. Mechanistically, ABHD5 suppresses spermidine synthase (SRM)-dependent spermidine production in macrophages by inhibiting the reactive oxygen species-dependent expression of C/EBPɛ, which activates transcription of the srm gene. Notably, macrophage-specific ABHD5 transgene-induced CRC growth in mice can be prevented by an additional SRM transgene in macrophages. Altogether, our results show that the lipolytic factor ABHD5 suppresses SRM-dependent spermidine production in TAMs and potentiates the growth of CRC. The ABHD5/SRM/spermidine axis in TAMs might represent a potential target for therapy. PMID:27189574

  10. Regulation of Macrophage, Dendritic Cell, and Microglial Phenotype and Function by the SOCS Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sarah M.; Heller, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells of dynamic phenotype that rapidly respond to external stimuli in the microenvironment by altering their phenotype to respond to and to direct the immune response. The ability to dynamically change phenotype must be carefully regulated to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory responses and subsequently to promote resolution of inflammation. The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins play a key role in regulating macrophage phenotype. In this review, we summarize research to date from mouse and human studies on the role of the SOCS proteins in determining the phenotype and function of macrophages. We will also touch on the influence of the SOCS on dendritic cell (DC) and microglial phenotype and function. The molecular mechanisms of SOCS function in macrophages and DCs are discussed, along with how dysregulation of SOCS expression or function can lead to alterations in macrophage/DC/microglial phenotype and function and to disease. Regulation of SOCS expression by microRNA is discussed. Novel therapies and unanswered questions with regard to SOCS regulation of monocyte–macrophage phenotype and function are highlighted. PMID:26579124

  11. Effect of cortisol and/or DHEA on THP1-derived macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Bettina; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; D'Attilio, Luciano; Leon-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Bottasso, Oscar; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Bay, María Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem requiring an appropriate cell immune response to be controlled. Macrophages play a central role in the response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Given our prior studies in which adrenal steroids were found to modify the cellular immune responses from TB patients, it was sensible to analyze the immunomodulatory capability of cortisol and DHEA on macrophages infected with Mtb. The human macrophage-like THP-1 cells were infected with the H37Rv strain of Mtb and treated with Cortisol and DHEA at different doses. We monitored phagocytosis, intracellular-bacterial growth, autophagosoma formation, as well as cytokine gene expression and production. Cultures exposed to cortisol showed a decreased production of IL-1β, TNF-α, with DHEA being unable to modify the pattern of cytokine production or to reverse the cortisol inhibitory effects. Interestingly the intra-macrophagic bacterial burden was found reduced by DHEA treatment. While this effect was not related to a different cytokine pattern, in terms their production or mRNA expression, DHEA treatment did promote autophagy in Mtb-infected macrophages, irrespective of Cortisol presence. In essence, the better control of Mtb load by DHEA-treated macrophages seems to be dependent on an autophagic mechanism. The present results are relevant for two reasons as autophagy is not only important for clearance of mycobacteria but also for the prevention of tissue damage.

  12. Multianalyte Microphysiometry of Macrophage Responses to Phorbol Myristate Acetate, Lipopolysaccharide, and Lipoarabinomannan

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Danielle W.; Meschievitz, Mika E.; Hiatt, Leslie A.; Cliffel, David E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that mycobacterial antigens generate different metabolic responses in macrophages as compared to gram-negative effectors and macrophage activators. The metabolic activation of macrophages by PMA is a useful tool for studying virulent agents and can be compared to other effectors. While phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is commonly used to study macrophage activation, the concentration used to create this physiological response varies. The response of RAW-264.7 macrophages is concentration-dependent, where the metabolic response to high concentrations of PMA decreases suggesting deactivation. The gram-negative effector, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was seen to promote glucose and oxygen production which were used to produce a delayed onset of oxidative burst. Pre-incubation with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increased the effect on cell metabolism, where the synergistic effects of IFN-γ and LPS immediately initiated oxidative burst. These studies exhibited a stark contrast with lipoarabinomannan (LAM), an antigenic glycolipid component associated with the bacterial genus Mycobacterium. The presence of LAM effectively inhibits any metabolic response preventing consumption of glucose and oxygen for the promotion of oxidative burst and to ensure pathogenic proliferation. This study demonstrates for the first time the immediate inhibitory metabolic effects LAM has on macrophages, suggesting implications for future intervention studies with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25798034

  13. Diplomatic Assistance: Can Helminth-Modulated Macrophages Act as Treatment for Inflammatory Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Steinfelder, Svenja; O’Regan, Noëlle Louise; Hartmann, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Helminths have evolved numerous pathways to prevent their expulsion or elimination from the host to ensure long-term survival. During infection, they target numerous host cells, including macrophages, to induce an alternatively activated phenotype, which aids elimination of infection, tissue repair, and wound healing. Multiple animal-based studies have demonstrated a significant reduction or complete reversal of disease by helminth infection, treatment with helminth products, or helminth-modulated macrophages in models of allergy, autoimmunity, and sepsis. Experimental studies of macrophage and helminth therapies are being translated into clinical benefits for patients undergoing transplantation and those with multiple sclerosis. Thus, helminths or helminth-modulated macrophages present great possibilities as therapeutic applications for inflammatory diseases in humans. Macrophage-based helminth therapies and the underlying mechanisms of their therapeutic or curative effects represent an under-researched area with the potential to open new avenues of treatment. This review explores the application of helminth-modulated macrophages as a new therapy for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27101372

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae survives within macrophages by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Cano, Victoria; March, Catalina; Insua, Jose Luis; Aguiló, Nacho; Llobet, Enrique; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Brennan, Gerard P; Millán-Lou, Maria Isabel; Martín, Carlos; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that Klebsiella might be able to persist intracellularly within a vacuolar compartment. This study was designed to investigate the interaction between Klebsiella and macrophages. Engulfment of K. pneumoniae was dependent on host cytoskeleton, cell plasma membrane lipid rafts and the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Microscopy studies revealed that K. pneumoniae resides within a vacuolar compartment, the Klebsiella-containing vacuole (KCV), which traffics within vacuoles associated with the endocytic pathway. In contrast to UV-killed bacteria, the majority of live bacteria did not co-localize with markers of the lysosomal compartment. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae triggers a programmed cell death in macrophages displaying features of apoptosis. Our efforts to identify the mechanism(s) whereby K. pneumoniae prevents the fusion of the lysosomes to the KCV uncovered the central role of the PI3K-Akt-Rab14 axis to control the phagosome maturation. Our data revealed that the capsule is dispensable for Klebsiella intracellular survival if bacteria were not opsonized. Furthermore, the environment found by Klebsiella within the KCV triggered the down-regulation of the expression of cps. Altogether, this study proves evidence that K. pneumoniae survives killing by macrophages by manipulating phagosome maturation that may contribute to Klebsiella pathogenesis.

  15. IL-10 regulates Il12b expression via histone deacetylation: implications for intestinal macrophage homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Taku; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Sheikh, Shehzad Z; Russo, Steven M; Mishima, Yoshiyuki; Collins, Colm; deZoeten, Edwin F; Karp, Christopher L; Ting, Jenny P Y; Sartor, R Balfour; Plevy, Scott E

    2012-08-15

    To prevent excessive inflammatory responses to commensal microbes, intestinal macrophages, unlike their systemic counterparts, do not produce inflammatory cytokines in response to enteric bacteria. Consequently, loss of macrophage tolerance to the enteric microbiota plays a central role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. Therefore, we examined whether the hyporesponsive phenotype of intestinal macrophages is programmed by prior exposure to the microbiota. IL-10, but not in vivo exposure to the microbiota, programs intestinal macrophage tolerance, because wild-type (WT) colonic macrophages from germ-free and specific pathogen-free (SPF)-derived mice produce IL-10, but not IL-12 p40, when activated with enteric bacteria. Basal and activated IL-10 expression is mediated through a MyD88-dependent pathway. Conversely, colonic macrophages from germ-free and SPF-derived colitis-prone Il10(-/-) mice demonstrated robust production of IL-12 p40. Next, mechanisms through which IL-10 inhibits Il12b expression were investigated. Although Il12b mRNA was transiently induced in LPS-activated WT bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), expression persisted in Il10(-/-) BMDMs. There were no differences in nucleosome remodeling, mRNA stability, NF-κB activation, or MAPK signaling to explain prolonged transcription of Il12b in Il10(-/-) BMDMs. However, acetylated histone H4 transiently associated with the Il12b promoter in WT BMDMs, whereas association of these factors was prolonged in Il10(-/-) BMDMs. Experiments using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and HDAC3 short hairpin RNA indicate that HDAC3 is involved in histone deacetylation of the Il12b promoter by IL-10. These results suggest that histone deacetylation on the Il12b promoter by HDAC3 mediates homeostatic effects of IL-10 in macrophages.

  16. Hypoxia Potentiates Palmitate-induced Pro-inflammatory Activation of Primary Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Ryan G; Boß, Marcel; Zezina, Ekaterina; Weigert, Andreas; Dehne, Nathalie; Fleming, Ingrid; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation and obesity-induced insulin resistance. Recent studies have shown that adipose tissue hypoxia promotes an inflammatory phenotype in ATMs. However, our understanding of how hypoxia modulates the response of ATMs to free fatty acids within obese adipose tissue is limited. We examined the effects of hypoxia (1% O2) on the pro-inflammatory responses of human monocyte-derived macrophages to the saturated fatty acid palmitate. Compared with normoxia, hypoxia significantly increased palmitate-induced mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β. Although palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and nuclear factor κB pathway activation were not enhanced by hypoxia, hypoxia increased the activation of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in palmitate-treated cells. Inhibition of JNK blocked the hypoxic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, whereas knockdown of hypoxia-induced transcription factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α alone or in combination failed to reduce IL-6 and only modestly reduced IL-1β gene expression in palmitate-treated hypoxic macrophages. Enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and JNK activity under hypoxia were prevented by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, silencing of dual-specificity phosphatase 16 increased normoxic levels of IL-6 and IL-1β and reduced the hypoxic potentiation in palmitate-treated macrophages. The secretome of hypoxic palmitate-treated macrophages promoted IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 expression in primary human adipocytes, which was sensitive to macrophage JNK inhibition. Our results reveal that the coexistence of hypoxia along with free fatty acids exacerbates macrophage-mediated inflammation. PMID:26578520

  17. IRAK regulates macrophage foam cell formation by modulating genes involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux.

    PubMed

    Rana, Minakshi; Kumar, Amit; Tiwari, Rajiv Lochan; Singh, Vishal; Chandra, Tulika; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK1) is linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; however, its role in macrophage foam cell formation is not known. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of IRAK1 in lipid uptake, biosynthesis, and efflux in THP-1 derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). Ox-LDL (40 μg/mL, 15 minutes-48 hours) treatment induced time-dependent increase in IRAK1, IRAK4, and Stat1 activation in THP-1 derived macrophages. IRAK1/4 inhibitor (INH) or IRAK1 siRNA significantly attenuated cholesterol accumulation, DiI-Ox-LDL binding, and uptake while cholesterol efflux to apoAI and HDL was enhanced in THP-1 derived macrophages and HMDMs. Ox-LDL treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of CD36, LOX-1, SR-A, ABCA1, ABCG1, Caveolin-1, CYP27A1 while that of SR-BI was decreased. IRAK1/4 inhibition or IRAK1 knockdown, however, attenuated Ox-LDL-induced CD36 expression; augmented ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression while expression of others was unaffected in THP-1 derived macrophages and HMDMs. Moreover, IRAK1/4 inhibition had no significant effect on genes involved in lipid biosynthesis. In IRAK1/4 INH pre-treated THP-1 derived macrophages Ox-LDL-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and its binding to CD36 promoter was significantly attenuated while LXRα expression and its binding to the ABCA1/ABCG1 locus, NFATc2 activation and its binding to ABCA1 locus was enhanced. The present study thus demonstrates that IRAK regulates lipid accumulation by modulating CD36-mediated uptake and ABCA1-, ABCG1-dependent cholesterol efflux. Therefore, IRAK1 can be a potential target for preventing macrophage foam cell formation. PMID:27270491

  18. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. PMID:23978445

  19. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages.

  20. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis.

  1. Effect of alveolar macrophages on Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Ryning, F W; Remington, J S

    1977-01-01

    As pulmonary involvement can occur in disseminated toxoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients, studies were initiated to define local mechanisms of resistance of the lung to Toxoplasma gondii. Alveolar macrophages were obtained from normal mice and mice chronically infected with T. gondii by bronchopulmonary lavage and cultured in vitro. Although normal alveolar macrophages were difficult to infect with Toxoplasma, they supported intracellular multiplication of this organism. When exposed to Toxoplasma that had been pretreated with heat-inactivated serum containing specific antibody, the number of intracellular organisms increased remarkably, and the macrophages destroyed the coated parasites. After development of chronic infections with Toxoplasma, there was a transient period during which a striking increase in numbers of alveolar macrophages was observed in lavage specimens. These macrophages differed from those of normal alveolar macrophages. There was a greater percentage of large cells, a greater tendency to spread on glass, and an increased number of intracellular Toxoplasma, and the cells were activated to kill or inhibit multiplication of the parasite. During the period when activated macrophages were demonstrable in bronchopulmonary washings, histological changes in the lungs revealed a marked mononuclear cell infiltrate. These studies support a role for the activated alveolar macrophage as an effector in resistance of the lung to infection with Toxoplasma. PMID:591065

  2. A broken krebs cycle in macrophages.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-17

    Macrophages undergo metabolic rewiring during polarization but details of this process are unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Jha et al. (2015) report a systems approach for unbiased analysis of cellular metabolism that reveals key metabolites and metabolic pathways required for distinct macrophage polarization states.

  3. Interaction of Chlamydiae with human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Herweg, Jo-Ana; Rudel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The phylum Chlamydiae contains several members that are well-known human pathogens, like Chlamydia trachomatis and C. pneumoniae. Establishing a chronic bacterial infection requires the active evasion of the host immune response. A major arm of the innate immune defence is constituted by macrophages, which fight infections by removing bacteria and triggering an adaptive immune response. However, some pathogenic Chlamydia infect and survive in macrophages at least for a certain period of time. Therefore, macrophages can serve as vehicles for the dissemination of bacterial infections from the primary infection site via the urogenital or respiratory tract to distant sites in the body. The capacity to infect macrophages seems to depend on the chlamydial strain and the source of macrophages. In vitro infections of macrophages with C. trachomatis, C. psittaci and C. pneumoniae reveal low efficiency of infection and progeny formation, as well as failure to develop mature inclusions. In contrast, the emerging pathogen, Simkania negevensis, actively replicates in macrophages. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the intracellular and molecular key mechanisms of C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae and S. negevensis infections in human macrophages. PMID:26613554

  4. Macrophage polarization in virus-host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage involvement in viral infections and antiviral states is common. However, this involvement has not been well-studied in the paradigm of macrophage polarization, which typically has been categorized by the dichotomy of classical (M1) and alternative (M2) statuses. Recent studies have reveal...

  5. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  6. Macrophagic myofasciitis: characterization and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, Romain K.; Authier, François-Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aluminium oxyhydroxide (alum), a nano-crystaline compound forming agglomerates, has been introduced in vaccine for its immunologic adjuvant effect in 1927. Alum is the most commonly used adjuvant in human and veterinary vaccines but mechanisms by which it stimulates immune responses remains incompletely understood. Although generally well tolerated, alum may occasionally cause disabling health problems in presumably susceptible individuals. A small proportion of vaccinated people present with delayed onset of diffuse myalgia, chronic fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, and exhibit very long-term persistence of alum-loaded macrophages at site of previous intra-muscular (i.m.) immunization, forming a granulomatous lesion called macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF). Clinical symptoms associated with MMF are paradigmatic of the recently delineated “autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants” (ASIA). The stereotyped cognitive dysfunction is reminiscent of cognitive deficits described in foundry workers exposed to inhaled Al particles. Alum safety concerns will largely depend on whether the compound remains localized at site of injection or may diffuse and accumulate in distant organs. Animal experiments indicate that biopersistent nanomaterials taken-up by monocytes-lineage cells in tissues, e.g. fluorescent alum surrogates, can first translocate to draining lymph nodes, and thereafter circulate in blood within phagocytes and reach the spleen, and, eventually, slowly accumulate in brain. PMID:22235051

  7. ROCK inhibition impedes macrophage polarity and functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yianzhu; Tejpal, Neelam; You, Junping; Li, Xian C; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play an important role in immune responses including allograft rejection and they are one of the potential targets of anti-rejection therapies in organ transplantation. Macrophage alloreactivity relies on their phenotype/polarity, motility, phagocytosis and matrix degradation, which in turn depend on proper functioning of actin cytoskeleton and its regulators, the small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effector the Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Several laboratories showed that administration of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 to the graft recipient inhibits chronic rejection or rodent cardiac allografts. Here we studied the effect of Y-27632 on mouse peritoneal macrophage structure, polarity and functions in in vitro assays. We show that Y-27632 inhibitor affects macrophage phenotype/polarity, phagocytosis, migration, and matrix degradation. These novel findings suggest that the impediment of macrophage structure and function via interference with the RhoA/ROCK pathway has a potential to be therapeutically effective in organ transplantation.

  8. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    PubMed

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  9. Preadipocyte conversion to macrophage. Evidence of plasticity.

    PubMed

    Charrière, Guillaume; Cousin, Béatrice; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; André, Mireille; Bacou, Francis; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis

    2003-03-14

    Preadipocytes are present throughout adult life in adipose tissues and can proliferate and differentiate into mature adipocytes according to the energy balance. An increasing number of reports demonstrate that cells from adipose lineages (preadipocytes and adipocytes) and macrophages share numerous functional or antigenic properties. No large scale comparison reflecting the phenotype complexity has been performed between these different cell types until now. We used profiling analysis to define the common features shared by preadipocyte, adipocyte, and macrophage populations. Our analysis showed that the preadipocyte profile is surprisingly closer to the macrophage than to the adipocyte profile. From these data, we hypothesized that in a macrophage environment preadipocytes could effectively be converted into macrophages. We injected labeled stroma-vascular cells isolated from mouse white adipose tissue or 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice and investigated changes in their phenotype. Preadipocytes rapidly and massively acquired high phagocytic activity and index. 60-70% of preadipocytes also expressed five macrophage-specific antigens: F4/80, Mac-1, CD80, CD86, and CD45. These values were similar to those observed for peritoneal macrophages. In vitro experiments showed that cell-to-cell contact between preadipocytes and peritoneal macrophages partially induced this preadipocyte phenotype conversion. Overall, these results suggest that preadipocyte and macrophage phenotypes are very similar and that preadipocytes have the potential to be very efficiently and rapidly converted into macrophages. This work emphasizes the great cellular plasticity of adipose precursors and reinforces the link between adipose tissue and innate immunity processes. PMID:12519759

  10. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  11. Morphine decreases the pro-angiogenic interaction between breast cancer cells and macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Nassar, Zeyad D; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the various cell types that constitute a solid tumour are essential to the biology of the tumour. We evaluated the effect of morphine on the proangiogenic interaction taking place between macrophages and breast cancer cells in vitro. The conditioned medium (CM) from breast cancer cells co-cultured with macrophages elicited endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. This effect was inhibited if the co-culture occurred in the presence of morphine. The CM from breast cancer cells or macrophages grown individually, whether or not prepared in the presence of morphine, was ineffective in stimulating EC proliferation or tube formation. Using a mouse antibody array, we identified several angiogenesis-regulating factors differentially expressed in the CM of co-cultured cells prepared in the presence or absence of morphine, amongst which interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. VEGF was induced in both cell types by the co-culture and this was prevented by morphine in a non-naloxone reversible fashion. The effect of CM from co-cultured cells on endothelial tube formation, but not proliferation, was prevented by anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody. Our results indicate that morphine prevents, in part via modulating VEGF-A expression, the pro-angiogenic interaction between macrophages and breast cancer cells. PMID:27514308

  12. Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXRα activation in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Wakabayashi, Hideyuki; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Aruto

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXRα. •Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXRα activation in macrophages. •Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. •N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXRα in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin.

  13. Morphine decreases the pro-angiogenic interaction between breast cancer cells and macrophages in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khabbazi, Samira; Nassar, Zeyad D.; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the various cell types that constitute a solid tumour are essential to the biology of the tumour. We evaluated the effect of morphine on the proangiogenic interaction taking place between macrophages and breast cancer cells in vitro. The conditioned medium (CM) from breast cancer cells co-cultured with macrophages elicited endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. This effect was inhibited if the co-culture occurred in the presence of morphine. The CM from breast cancer cells or macrophages grown individually, whether or not prepared in the presence of morphine, was ineffective in stimulating EC proliferation or tube formation. Using a mouse antibody array, we identified several angiogenesis-regulating factors differentially expressed in the CM of co-cultured cells prepared in the presence or absence of morphine, amongst which interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. VEGF was induced in both cell types by the co-culture and this was prevented by morphine in a non-naloxone reversible fashion. The effect of CM from co-cultured cells on endothelial tube formation, but not proliferation, was prevented by anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody. Our results indicate that morphine prevents, in part via modulating VEGF-A expression, the pro-angiogenic interaction between macrophages and breast cancer cells. PMID:27514308

  14. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury. PMID:25650776

  15. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  16. Changing pattern of the subcellular distribution of erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) during macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells, Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion, however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data show that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture shows that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data show that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation and suggest that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions.

  17. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    PubMed

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes macrophage apoptosis through stimulation of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT).

    PubMed

    Petreaca, Melissa L; Yao, Min; Ware, Carl; Martins-Green, Manuela M

    2008-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is critical for normal wound healing. Inflammation is prolonged and fails to resolve properly in chronic wounds. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces macrophage apoptosis and to delineate mechanisms involved in this process. VEGF inhibition during wound healing leads to an increased number of macrophages remaining in wounds, suggesting the involvement of VEGF in removal of these cells from the wound. If this effect has physiological relevance, it likely occurs via apoptosis. We show that VEGF increases apoptosis of macrophages in vitro using Annexin V-FITC staining and caspase activation. Microarray analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting showed that VEGF increases the expression of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT) in macrophages. We also show that in macrophages LIGHT promotes apoptosis through the lymphotoxin beta receptor. Moreover, inhibition of LIGHT prevents VEGF-induced death, suggesting that LIGHT mediates VEGF-induced macrophage apoptosis. Taken together, our results identify a novel role for VEGF and for LIGHT in macrophage apoptosis during wound healing, an event critical in the resolution of inflammation. This finding may lead to the development of new strategies to improve resolution of inflammation in problematic wounds. PMID:19128255

  19. Tumor-associated macrophages exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory properties by which they impact on pancreatic tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Helm, Ole; Held-Feindt, Janka; Grage-Griebenow, Evelin; Reiling, Norbert; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Vogel, Ilka; Krüger, Uwe; Becker, Thomas; Ebsen, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Kabelitz, Dieter; Schäfer, Heiner; Sebens, Susanne

    2014-08-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) still ranking 4th in the order of fatal tumor diseases is characterized by a profound tumor stroma with high numbers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Driven by environmental factors, monocytes differentiate into M1- or M2-macrophages, the latter commonly regarded as being protumorigenic. Because a detailed analysis of TAMs in human PDAC development is still lacking, freshly isolated PDAC-derived TAMs were analyzed for their phenotype and impact on epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) of benign (H6c7) and malignant (Colo357) pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. TAMs exhibited characteristics of M1-macrophages (expression of HLA-DR, IL-1β, or TNF-α) and M2-macrophages (expression of CD163 and IL-10). In the presence of TAMs, H6c7, and Colo357 cells showed an elongated cell shape along with an increased expression of mesenchymal markers such as vimentin and reduced expression of epithelial E-cadherin. Similar to TAMs, in vitro generated M1- and M2-macrophages both mediated EMT in H6c7 and Colo357 cells. M1-macrophages acquired M2-characteristics during coculture that could be prevented by GM-CSF treatment. However, M1-macrophages still potently induced EMT in H6c7 and Colo357 cells although lacking M2-characteristics. Overall, these data demonstrate that TAMs exhibit anti- as well as proinflammatory properties that equally contribute to EMT induction in PDAC initiation and development. PMID:24458546

  20. Inhibition of bleomycin-induced cell death in rat alveolar macrophages and human lung epithelial cells by ambroxol.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun Sik; Ko, Hyun Hee; Han, Eun Sook; Lee, Chung Soo

    2003-10-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition is recognized to be involved in toxic and oxidative forms of cell injury. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ambroxol against the cytotoxicity of bleomycin (BLM) by looking at the effect on the mitochondrial membrane permeability in alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells. Alveolar macrophages or lung epithelial cells exposed to BLM revealed the loss of cell viability and increase in caspase-3 activity. Ambroxol (10-100 microM) reduced the 75 mU/mL BLM-induced cell death and activation of caspase-3 in macrophages or epithelial cells. It reduced the condensation and fragmentation of nuclei caused by BLM in macrophages. Ambroxol alone did not significantly cause cell death. Treatment of alveolar macrophages with BLM resulted in the decrease in transmembrane potential in mitochondria, cytosolic accumulation of cytochrome c, increase in formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of GSH. Ambroxol (10-100 microM) inhibited the increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability, ROS formation and decrease in GSH contents due to BLM in macrophages. Ambroxol exerted a scavenging effect on hydroxyl radicals and nitric oxide and reduced the iron-mediated formation of malondialdehyde and carbonyls in liver mitochondria. It prevented cell death due to SIN-1 in lung epithelial cells. The results demonstrate that ambroxol attenuates the BLM-induced viability loss in alveolar macrophages or lung epithelial cells. This effect may be due to inhibition of mitochondrial damage and due to the scavenging action on free radicals.

  1. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-GuC)rin) activates disabled naC/ve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-N1), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1N2), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-N2) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions.

  2. Specific Neuropilins Expression in Alveolar Macrophages among Tissue-Specific Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Naing Ye; Ohe, Rintaro; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    In the immune system, neuropilins (NRPs), including NRP-1 and NRP-2, are expressed in thymocytes, dendritic cells, regulatory T cells and macrophages. Their functions on immune cells around the neoplastic cells vary into pro-angiogenesis, tumor progression and anti-angiogenesis according to their ligands. Even though NRPs expression on malignant tumors and immune system has studied, a PubMed-based literature query did not yield any articles describing NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages. The aims of this study were (i) to detect NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages in the brain, liver, spleen, lymph node and lung; (ii) to observe NRPs expression in classes of macrophages, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), bronchial macrophages (BMs), interstitial macrophages (IMs), intravascular macrophages (IVMs) and macrophage subsets (M1, M2 and Mox) in lung; and (iii) to detect the co-expression of NRPs and dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in AMs. Both NRPs were specifically detected in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages by immunohistochemistry (IHC). NRPs mRNA expression levels were characterized in normal lung by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ-polymerase chain reaction (in situ-PCR). The expression of both NRPs was detected in AMs, BMs and IVMs by IHC. The frequency of NRPs+ AMs in lung tissue adjacent to the cancer margin was significantly higher than the frequencies in inflamed and normal lung tissue. Double and triple IHC demonstrated that NRPs are expressed on all macrophage subsets in lung. Double IHC showed co-expression of DC-SIGN and NRPs in AMs. This study demonstrated for the first time the specific expression of both NRPs in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages and their expression on M1, M2 and Mox macrophages. Furthermore, the possible origin of AMs from blood monocytes could be suggested from a co-expression of NRPs and DC-SIGN. PMID:26900851

  3. Ontogeny of Tissue-Resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-01-01

    The origin of tissue-resident macrophages, crucial for homeostasis and immunity, has remained controversial until recently. Originally described as part of the mononuclear phagocyte system, macrophages were long thought to derive solely from adult blood circulating monocytes. However, accumulating evidence now shows that certain macrophage populations are in fact independent from monocyte and even from adult bone marrow hematopoiesis. These tissue-resident macrophages derive from sequential seeding of tissues by two precursors during embryonic development. Primitive macrophages generated in the yolk sac (YS) from early erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs), independently of the transcription factor c-Myb and bypassing monocytic intermediates, first give rise to microglia. Later, fetal monocytes, generated from c-Myb+ EMPs that initially seed the fetal liver (FL), then give rise to the majority of other adult macrophages. Thus, hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors transiently present in the YS and the FL give rise to long-lasting self-renewing macrophage populations. PMID:26441990

  4. Macrophages in diabetic gastroparesis– the missing link?

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic gastroparesis results in significant morbidity for patients and major economic burden for society. Treatment options for diabetic gastroparesis are currently directed at symptom control rather than the underlying disease and are limited. The pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis includes damage to intrinsic and extrinsic neurons, smooth muscle and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Oxidative damage in diabetes appears to be one of the primary insults involved in the pathogenesis of several complications of diabetes, including gastroparesis. Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of macrophages as key cellular elements in the pathogenesis of diabetic gastroparesis. Macrophages are important for both homeostasis and defense against a variety of pathogens. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), an enzyme expressed in a subset of macrophages has emerged as a major protective mechanism against oxidative stress. Activation of macrophages with high levels of HO1 expression protects against development of delayed gastric emptying in animal models of diabetes, while activation of macrophages that do not express HO1 are linked to neuromuscular cell injury. Targeting macrophages and HO1 may therefore be a therapeutic option in diabetic gastroparesis. Purpose This report briefly reviews the pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis with a focus on oxidative damage and how activation and polarization of different subtypes of macrophages in the muscularis propria determines development of delay in gastric emptying or protects against its development. PMID:25168158

  5. Developmental origin of lung macrophage diversity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Serena Y. S.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are specialized phagocytic cells, present in all tissues, which engulf and digest pathogens, infected and dying cells, and debris, and can recruit and regulate other immune cells and the inflammatory response and aid in tissue repair. Macrophage subpopulations play distinct roles in these processes and in disease, and are typically recognized by differences in marker expression, immune function, or tissue of residency. Although macrophage subpopulations in the brain have been found to have distinct developmental origins, the extent to which development contributes to macrophage diversity between tissues and within tissues is not well understood. Here, we investigate the development and maintenance of mouse lung macrophages by marker expression patterns, genetic lineage tracing and parabiosis. We show that macrophages populate the lung in three developmental waves, each giving rise to a distinct lineage. These lineages express different markers, reside in different locations, renew in different ways, and show little or no interconversion. Thus, development contributes significantly to lung macrophage diversity and targets each lineage to a different anatomical domain. PMID:26952982

  6. Auto-protective redox buffering systems in stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferret, Pierre-Jacques; Soum, Emmanuelle; Negre, Olivier; Fradelizi, Didier

    2002-01-01

    Background Macrophages, upon encounter with micro-organisms or stimulated by cytokines, produce various effector molecules aimed at destroying the foreign agents and protecting the organism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are front line molecules exerting strong cytotoxic activities against micro-organisms and many cells, including macrophages themselves. Using cells of the murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or interferon (IFN-γ), which induce strong endogenous NO production, we examined by which mechanisms a fraction of activated macrophages protect themselves from nitrosative stress and manage to escape destruction? Results We observed that survivors (10–50% depending on the experiments) had acquired a resistant phenotype being capable to survive when further exposed in vitro to an apoptosis inducing dose of the NO donor compound DETA-NO. These cells expressed an increased steady-state levels of Mn SOD, CuZn SOD and catalase mRNA (130–200%), together with an increased activity of the corresponding enzymes. Intracellular concentration of glutathione was also increased (× 3.5 fold at 6 hours, still maintained × 5.2 fold at 48 hours). Neither mRNA for glutathione peroxydase, γ-glutamylcysteine synthase and glutathione reductase, nor thioredoxine and thioredoxine reductase, were significantly modified. Additional experiments in which RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS and/or IFN-γ in the presence of relatively specific inhibitors of both Mn and Cu/Zn SOD, aminotriazol (ATZ) catalase inhibitor and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) glutathione inhibitor, showed that inhibiting LPS-induced up-regulation of intracellular redox buffering systems also prevented acquisition of the resistant phenotype. Conclusions Our data suggest a direct causal relationship between survival of a fraction of macrophages and a up-regulation of key sets of auto-protective intracellular

  7. Pioglitazone Suppresses CXCR7 Expression To Inhibit Human Macrophage Chemotaxis through Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Duo; Zhu, Zhicheng; Li, Dan; Xu, Rihao; Wang, Tiance; Liu, Kexiang

    2015-11-17

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pioglitazone, the widely used thiazolidinedione, is shown to be efficient in the prevention of cardiovascular complications of T2DM. In this study, we report that pioglitazone inhibits CXCR7 expression and thus blocks chemotaxis in differentiated macrophage without perturbing cell viability or macrophage differentiation. In addition, pioglitazone-mediated CXCR7 suppression and chemotaxis inhibition occur via activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) but not PPARα in differentiated macrophage. More importantly, pioglitazone therapy-induced PPARγ activation suppresses CXCR7 expression in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pioglitazone suppresses CXCR7 expression to inhibit human macrophage chemotaxis through PPARγ.

  8. Effective Inhibition of Kb- and Db-Restricted Antigen Presentation in Primary Macrophages by Murine Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    LoPiccolo, Diane M.; Gold, Marielle C.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Wagner, Markus; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.; Hill, Ann B.

    2003-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection in vivo, both in disseminating infection and in harboring latent virus. MCMV encodes three immune evasion genes (m4, m6, and m152) that interfere with the ability of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) to detect virus-infected fibroblasts, but the efficacy of immune evasion in macrophages has been controversial. Here we show that MCMV immune evasion genes function in H-2b primary bone marrow macrophages (BMMφ) in the same way that they do in fibroblasts. Metabolic labeling experiments showed that class I is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by MCMV infection and associates with m4/gp34 to a similar extent in fibroblasts and BMMφ. We tested a series of Kb- and Db-restricted CTL clones specific for MCMV early genes against a panel of MCMV wild-type virus and mutants lacking m152, m4, or m6. MCMV immune evasion genes effectively inhibited antigen presentation. m152 appeared sufficient to abolish Db-restricted presentation in infected macrophages, as has been previously observed in infected fibroblasts. However, for inhibition of recognition of infected macrophages by Kb-restricted CTL, m4, m6, and m152 were all required. The contribution of m4 to inhibition of recognition appeared much more important in macrophages than in fibroblasts. Thus, MCMV immune evasion genes function effectively in primary macrophages to prevent CTL recognition of early antigens and show the same pattern of major histocompatibility complex class I allele discrimination as is seen in fibroblasts. Furthermore, for inhibition of Kb-restricted presentation, a strong synergistic effect was noted among m152, m4, and m6. PMID:12477835

  9. Targeting mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux and lipid phenotype.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janice M W; Allen, Anne-Marie; Graham, Annette

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as a potential therapeutic target, capable of increasing macrophage cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. Expression and activity of TSPO in human (THP-1) macrophages were manipulated genetically and by the use of selective TSPO ligands. Cellular responses were analysed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), immunoblotting and radiolabelling, including [3H]cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and human serum. Induction of macrophage cholesterol deposition by acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL) increased expression of TSPO mRNA and protein, reflecting findings in human carotid atherosclerosis. Transient overexpression of TSPO enhanced efflux (E%) of [3H]cholesterol to apoA-I, HDL and human serum compared with empty vector (EV) controls, whereas gene knockdown of TSPO achieved the converse. Ligation of TSPO (using PK11195, FGIN-1-27 and flunitrazepam) triggered increases in [3H]cholesterol efflux, an effect that was amplified in TSPO-overexpressing macrophages. Overexpression of TSPO induced the expression of genes [PPARA (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α), NR1H3 (nuclear receptor 1H3/liver X receptor α), ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette A1), ABCG4 (ATP-binding cassette G4) and APOE (apolipoprotein E)] and proteins (ABCA1 and PPARα) involved in cholesterol efflux, reduced macrophage neutral lipid mass and lipogenesis and limited cholesterol esterification following exposure to AcLDL. Thus, targeting TSPO reduces macrophage lipid content and prevents macrophage foam cell formation, via enhanced cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors.

  10. Household Air Pollution Causes Dose-Dependent Inflammation and Altered Phagocytosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Duncan G.; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N.; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K. A.; Wootton, Daniel G.; Glennie, Sarah J.; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke–exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions. PMID:25254931

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulates Macrophage Polarization and the Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA+ H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased Mreg response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decreased of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1. PMID:25108023

  12. Household air pollution causes dose-dependent inflammation and altered phagocytosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rylance, Jamie; Fullerton, Duncan G; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K A; Wootton, Daniel G; Glennie, Sarah J; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke-exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

  13. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  14. ERK Signaling Is Essential for Macrophage Development

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Edward T.; Shukla, Supriya; Nagy, Nancy; Boom, W. Henry; Beck, Rose C.; Zhou, Lan; Landreth, Gary E.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages depend on colony stimulating factor 1 (also known as M-CSF) for their growth and differentiation, but the requirements for intracellular signals that lead to macrophage differentiation and function remain unclear. M-CSF is known to activate ERK1 and ERK2, but the importance of this signaling pathway in macrophage development is unknown. In these studies, we characterized a novel model of Erk1-/- Erk2flox/flox Lyz2Cre/Cre mice in which the ERK2 isoform is deleted from macrophages in the background of global ERK1 deficiency. Cultures of M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow precursors from these mice yielded reduced numbers of macrophages. Whereas macrophages developing from M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow of Erk2flox/flox Lyz2Cre/Cre mice showed essentially complete loss of ERK2 expression, the reduced number of macrophages that develop from Erk1-/- Erk2flox/flox Lyz2Cre/Cre bone marrow show retention of ERK2 expression, indicating selective outgrowth of a small proportion of precursors in which Cre-mediated deletion failed to occur. The bone marrow of Erk1-/- Erk2flox/flox Lyz2Cre/Cre mice was enriched for CD11b+ myeloid cells, CD11bhi Gr-1hi neutrophils, Lin- c-Kit+ Sca–1+ hematopoietic stem cells, and Lin- c-Kit+ CD34+ CD16/32+ granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Culture of bone marrow Lin- cells under myeloid-stimulating conditions yielded reduced numbers of monocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the defect in production of macrophages is not due to a reduced number of progenitors, but rather due to reduced ability of progenitors to proliferate and produce macrophages in response to M-CSF-triggered ERK signaling. Macrophages from Erk1-/- Erk2flox/flox Lyz2Cre/Cre bone marrow showed reduced induction of M-CSF-regulated genes that depend on the ERK pathway for their expression. These data demonstrate that ERK1/ERK2 play a critical role in driving M-CSF-dependent proliferation of bone marrow progenitors for production of macrophages. PMID:26445168

  15. Macrophage cell death upon intracellular bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Xu, Yunsheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-pathogen interaction is a complex process and the outcome of this tag-of-war for both sides is to live or die. Without attempting to be comprehensive, this review will discuss the complexity and significance of the interaction outcomes between macrophages and some facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens as exemplified by Francisella, Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia. Upon bacterial infection, macrophages can die by a variety of ways, such as apoptosis, autophagic cell death, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, pyronecrosis, pyroptosis etc, which is the focus of this review. PMID:26690967

  16. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, Salvador; Palacios, Elena; Bosch-Morell, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution. PMID:26078494

  17. ERK Signaling Is Essential for Macrophage Development.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Edward T; Shukla, Supriya; Nagy, Nancy; Boom, W Henry; Beck, Rose C; Zhou, Lan; Landreth, Gary E; Harding, Clifford V

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages depend on colony stimulating factor 1 (also known as M-CSF) for their growth and differentiation, but the requirements for intracellular signals that lead to macrophage differentiation and function remain unclear. M-CSF is known to activate ERK1 and ERK2, but the importance of this signaling pathway in macrophage development is unknown. In these studies, we characterized a novel model of Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) mice in which the ERK2 isoform is deleted from macrophages in the background of global ERK1 deficiency. Cultures of M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow precursors from these mice yielded reduced numbers of macrophages. Whereas macrophages developing from M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow of Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) mice showed essentially complete loss of ERK2 expression, the reduced number of macrophages that develop from Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) bone marrow show retention of ERK2 expression, indicating selective outgrowth of a small proportion of precursors in which Cre-mediated deletion failed to occur. The bone marrow of Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) mice was enriched for CD11b+ myeloid cells, CD11b(hi) Gr-1(hi) neutrophils, Lin- c-Kit+ Sca-1+ hematopoietic stem cells, and Lin- c-Kit+ CD34+ CD16/32+ granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Culture of bone marrow Lin- cells under myeloid-stimulating conditions yielded reduced numbers of monocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the defect in production of macrophages is not due to a reduced number of progenitors, but rather due to reduced ability of progenitors to proliferate and produce macrophages in response to M-CSF-triggered ERK signaling. Macrophages from Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) bone marrow showed reduced induction of M-CSF-regulated genes that depend on the ERK pathway for their expression. These data demonstrate that ERK1/ERK2 play a critical role in driving M-CSF-dependent proliferation of bone marrow progenitors for production of

  18. The equine alveolar macrophage: Functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages☆

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Anna E.; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C.; Hume, David A.; Pirie, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  19. Protective Role of Raf-1 in Salmonella-Induced Macrophage Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jesenberger, Veronika; Procyk, Katarzyna J.; Rüth, Jochen; Schreiber, Martin; Theussl, Hans-Christian; Wagner, Erwin F.; Baccarini, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    Invasive Salmonella induces macrophage apoptosis via the activation of caspase-1 by the bacterial protein SipB. Here we show that infection of macrophages with Salmonella causes the activation and degradation of Raf-1, an important intermediate in macrophage proliferation and activation. Raf-1 degradation is SipB- and caspase-1–dependent, and is prevented by proteasome inhibitors. To study the functional significance of Raf-1 in this process, the c-raf-1 gene was inactivated by Cre-loxP–mediated recombination in vivo. Macrophages lacking c-raf-1 are hypersensitive towards pathogen-induced apoptosis. Surprisingly, activation of the antiapoptotic mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor κB pathways is normal in Raf-1–deficient macrophages, and mitochondrial fragility is not increased. Instead, pathogen-mediated activation of caspase-1 is enhanced selectively, implying that Raf-1 antagonizes stimulus-induced caspase-1 activation and apoptosis. PMID:11157055

  20. Type I interferon induces necroptosis in macrophages during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nirmal; McComb, Scott; Mulligan, Rebecca; Dudani, Renu; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Sad, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a virulent pathogen that induces rapid host death. Here we observed that host survival after infection with S. Typhimurium was enhanced in the absence of type I interferon signaling, with improved survival of mice deficient in the receptor for type I interferons (Ifnar1−/− mice) that was attributed to macrophages. Although there was no impairment in cytokine expression or inflammasome activation in Ifnar1−/− macrophages, they were highly resistant to S. Typhimurium–induced cell death. Specific inhibition of the kinase RIP1or knockdown of the gene encoding the kinase RIP3 prevented the death of wild-type macrophages, which indicated that necroptosis was a mechanism of cell death. Finally, RIP3-deficient macrophages, which cannot undergo necroptosis, had similarly less death and enhanced control of S. Typhimurium in vivo. Thus, we propose that S. Typhimurium induces the production of type I interferon, which drives necroptosis of macrophages and allows them to evade the immune response. PMID:22922364

  1. Cholesterol efflux monitoring in macrophage form cells by using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Sik; Lee, Sang Hak; Park, Byoung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyeok; Hwang, Won Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and rupture, since they accumulate large amounts of lipid through the uptake of modified lipoproteins which results in foam cell formation. Cholesterol efflux is the process of removing cholesterol from macrophages in the subintima of the vessel wall, and efflux mechanism in a cell is one of the critical issues for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. High density lipoproteins (HDL) stimulate cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol analysis method is well known conventional method for observing cholesterol efflux. The major drawback of this method is its long and complicated process. Fluorescence intensity imaging schemes are replacing the radioisotope-labeled method in recent years for cholesterol efflux monitoring. Various spectroscopic methods are also adapted for cholesterol efflux imaging. Here we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging method for more quantitative observation of cholesterol efflux process in macrophages, which enables us to observe cholesterol level changes with various conditions. We used J774 macrophage cell and 25-NBD-cholesterol which is a famous cholesterol specific dye. Our lifetime imaging results clearly show cholesterol efflux rate very effectively. We believe that fluorescence lifetime analysis is new and very powerful for cholesterol imaging or monitoring.

  2. Vessel-associated myogenic precursors control macrophage activation and clearance of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Bosurgi, L; Brunelli, S; Rigamonti, E; Monno, A; Manfredi, A A; Rovere-Querini, P

    2015-01-01

    Swift and regulated clearance of apoptotic cells prevents the accumulation of cell remnants in injured tissues and contributes to the shift of macrophages towards alternatively activated reparatory cells that sustain wound healing. Environmental signals, most of which are unknown, in turn control the efficiency of the clearance of apoptotic cells and as such determine whether tissues eventually heal. In this study we show that vessel-associated stem cells (mesoangioblasts) specifically modulate the expression of genes involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells and in macrophage alternative activation, including those of scavenger receptors and of molecules that bridge dying cells and phagocytes. Mesoangioblasts, but not immortalized myoblasts or neural precursor cells, enhance CD163 membrane expression in vitro as assessed by flow cytometry, indicating that the effect is specific. Mesoangioblasts transplanted in acutely or chronically injured skeletal muscles determine the expansion of the population of CD163(+) infiltrating macrophages and increase the extent of CD163 expression. Conversely, macrophages challenged with mesoangioblasts engulf significantly better apoptotic cells in vitro. Collectively, the data reveal a feed-forward loop between macrophages and vessel-associated stem cells, which has implications for the skeletal muscle homeostatic response to sterile injury and for diseases in which homeostasis is jeopardized, including muscle dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies. PMID:24749786

  3. Escherichia coli and Candida albicans Induced Macrophage Extracellular Trap-Like Structures with Limited Microbicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chengshui; Liu, Xiaolei; Du, Jing; Shi, Haining; Wang, Xuelin; Bai, Xue; Peng, Peng; Yu, Lu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) has recently been recognized as a novel defense mechanism in several types of innate immune cells. It has been suggested that these structures are toxic to microbes and contribute significantly to killing several pathogens. However, the role of ETs formed by macrophages (METs) in defense against microbes remains little known. In this study, we demonstrated that a subset of murine J774A.1 macrophage cell line (8% to 17%) and peritoneal macrophages (8.5% to 15%) form METs-like structures (METs-LS) in response to Escherichia coli and Candida albicans challenge. We found only a portion of murine METs-LS, which are released by dying macrophages, showed detectable killing effects on trapped E. coli but not C. albicans. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that, in vitro, both microorganisms were entrapped in J774A.1 METs-LS composed of DNA and microbicidal proteins such as histone, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. DNA components of both nucleus and mitochondrion origins were detectable in these structures. Additionally, METs-LS formation occurred independently of ROS produced by NADPH oxidase, and this process did not result in cell lysis. In summary, our results emphasized that microbes induced METs-LS in murine macrophage cells and that the microbicidal activity of these METs-LS differs greatly. We propose the function of METs-LS is to contain invading microbes at the infection site, thereby preventing the systemic diffusion of them, rather than significantly killing them. PMID:24587206

  4. Stimulatory Effects of Polysaccharide Fraction from Solanum nigrum on RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Faizan Naeem; Ismail, Amirah; Abidin, Nurhayati Zainal; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza

    2014-01-01

    The polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum Linne has been shown to have antitumor activity by enhancing the CD4+/CD8+ ratio of the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. In this study, we analyzed a polysaccharide extract of S. nigrum to determine its modulating effects on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells since macrophages play a key role in inducing both innate and adaptive immune responses. Crude polysaccharide was extracted from the stem of S. nigrum and subjected to ion-exchange chromatography to partially purify the extract. Five polysaccharide fractions were then subjected to a cytotoxicity assay and a nitric oxide production assay. To further analyze the ability of the fractionated polysaccharide extract to activate macrophages, the phagocytosis activity and cytokine production were also measured. The polysaccharide fractions were not cytotoxic, but all of the fractions induced nitric oxide in RAW 264.7 cells. Of the five fractions tested, SN-ppF3 was the least toxic and also induced the greatest amount of nitric oxide, which was comparable to the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression detected in the cell lysate. This fraction also significantly induced phagocytosis activity and stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Our study showed that fraction SN-ppF3 could classically activate macrophages. Macrophage induction may be the manner in which polysaccharides from S. nigrum are able to prevent tumor growth. PMID:25299340

  5. Identification of novel transcriptional regulators involved in macrophage differentiation and activation in U937 cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Young-Sook; Haas, Stefan; Hackstein, Holger; Bein, Gregor; Hernandez-Santana, Maria; Lehrach, Hans; Sauer, Sascha; Seitz, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages play essential role in innate immunity. Understanding the underlying mechanism of macrophage differentiation and the identification of regulatory mechanisms will help to find new strategies to prevent their harmful effects in chronic inflammatory diseases and sepsis. Results Maturation of blood monocytes into tissue macrophages and subsequent inflammatory response was mimicked in U937 cells of human histocytic lymphoma origin. Whole genome array analysis was employed to evaluate gene expression profile to identify underlying transcriptional networks implicated during the processes of differentiation and inflammation. In addition to already known transcription factors (i.e. MAFB, EGR, IRF, BCL6, NFkB, AP1, Nur77), gene expression analysis further revealed novel genes (i.e. MEF2, BRI, HLX, HDAC5, H2AV, TCF7L2, NFIL3) previously uncharacterized to be involved in the differentiation process. A total of 58 selected genes representing cytokines, chemokines, surface antigens, signaling molecules and transcription factors were validated by real time PCR and compared to primary monocyte-derived macrophages. Beside the verification of several new genes, the comparison reveals individual heterogeneity of blood donors. Conclusion Up regulation of MEF2 family, HDACs, and H2AV during cell differentiation and inflammation sheds new lights onto regulation events on transcriptional and epigenetic level controlling these processes. Data generated will serve as a source for further investigation of macrophages differentiation pathways and related biological responses. PMID:19341462

  6. Malaria inhibits surface expression of complement receptor-1 in monocyte/macrophages causing decreased immunecomplex internalization

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Lopez, Jean Pierre; Hernandez-Perez, Jean Nikolae; Bautista-Ojeda, Maria Dolores; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) expressed on the surface of phagocytic cells binds complement-bound IC playing an important role in the clearance of circulating immunecomplexes (IC). This receptor is critical to prevent accumulation of IC, which can contribute to inflammatory pathology. Accumulation of circulating IC is frequently observed during malaria, although the factors contributing to this accumulation are not clearly understood. We have observed that the surface expression of CR1 on monocyte/macrophages and B cells is strongly reduced in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model. Monocyte/macrophages from these infected mice present a specific inhibition of complement-mediated internalization of IC caused by the decreased CR1 expression. Accordingly, mice show accumulation of circulating IC and deposition of IC in the kidneys that inversely correlates with the decrease in CR1 surface expression. Our results indicate that malaria induces a significant decrease on surface CR1 expression in the monocyte/macrophage population that results in deficient internalization of IC by monocyte/macrophages. To determine whether this phenomenon is found in human malaria patients, we have analyzed 92 patients infected with either P. falciparum (22) or P. vivax (70), the most prevalent human malaria parasites. The levels of surface CR1 on peripheral monocyte/macrophages and B cells of these patients show a significant decrease compared to uninfected control individuals in the same area. We propose that this decrease in CR1 plays an essential role in impaired IC clearance during malaria. PMID:23440418

  7. Lentivirus delivery of IL-10 to promote and sustain macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Boehler, R M; Kuo, R; Shin, S; Goodman, A G; Pilecki, M A; Gower, R M; Leonard, J N; Shea, L D

    2014-06-01

    Gene delivery from biomaterials can create an environment that promotes and guides tissue formation. However, the immune response induced upon biomaterial implantation can be detrimental to tissue regeneration. Macrophages play a central role in mediating early phases of this response, and functional "polarization" of macrophages towards M1 (inflammatory) or M2 (anti-inflammatory) phenotypes may bias the local immune state at the implant site. Since gene delivery from biomaterial scaffolds can confer transgene expression in macrophages in vivo, we investigated whether transduction of macrophages with an IL-10 encoding lentivirus can (1) induce macrophage polarization toward an M2 phenotype even in an pro-inflammatory environment, and (2) prevent a shift in polarization from M2 to M1 following exposure to pro-inflammatory stimuli. IL-10 lentivirus delivery to pre-polarized M1 macrophages reduced TNF-α production 1.5-fold when compared to cells treated with either a control virus or a bolus delivery of recombinant IL-10 protein. IL-10 lentivirus delivery to naïve macrophages reduced the amount of TNF-α produced following an inflammatory challenge by 2.5-fold compared to cells treated with both the control virus and recombinant IL-10. At a mechanistic level, IL-10 lentivirus delivery mediated sustained reduction in NF-κB activation and, accordingly, reduced transcription of TNF-α. In sum, lentiviral delivery of IL-10 to macrophages represents a promising strategy for directing and sustaining macrophage polarization towards an M2 phenotype in order to promote local immune responses that facilitate tissue engineering.

  8. Phosphorylation of CRTC3 by the salt-inducible kinases controls the interconversion of classically activated and regulatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kristopher; MacKenzie, Kirsty F; Petkevicius, Kasparas; Kristariyanto, Yosua; Zhang, Jiazhen; Choi, Hwan Geun; Peggie, Mark; Plater, Lorna; Pedrioli, Patrick G A; McIver, Ed; Gray, Nathanael S; Arthur, J Simon C; Cohen, Philip

    2012-10-16

    Macrophages acquire strikingly different properties that enable them to play key roles during the initiation, propagation, and resolution of inflammation. Classically activated (M1) macrophages produce proinflammatory mediators to combat invading pathogens and respond to tissue damage in the host, whereas regulatory macrophages (M2b) produce high levels of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, and low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, like IL-12, and are important for the resolution of inflammatory responses. A central problem in this area is to understand how the formation of regulatory macrophages can be promoted at sites of inflammation to prevent and/or alleviate chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) restrict the formation of regulatory macrophages and that their inhibition induces striking increases in many of the characteristic markers of regulatory macrophages, greatly stimulating the production of IL-10 and other anti-inflammatory molecules. We show that SIK inhibitors elevate IL-10 production by inducing the dephosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC) 3, its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins and its translocation to the nucleus where it enhances a gene transcription program controlled by CREB. Importantly, the effects of SIK inhibitors on IL-10 production are lost in macrophages that express a drug-resistant mutant of SIK2. These findings identify SIKs as a key molecular switch whose inhibition reprograms macrophages to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. The remarkable effects of SIK inhibitors on macrophage function suggest that drugs that target these protein kinases may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  9. The response of macrophages to titanium particles is determined by macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Pajarinen, Jukka; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Jämsen, Eemeli; Li, Tian-Fang; Mandelin, Jami; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2013-11-01

    Aseptic loosening of total joint replacements is driven by the reaction of macrophages to foreign body particles released from the implant. It was hypothesized that the macrophages' response to these particles is dependent, in addition to particle characteristics and contaminating biomolecules, on the state of macrophage polarization as determined by the local cytokine microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we differentiated M1 and M2 macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes and compared their responses to titanium particles using genome-wide microarray analysis and a multiplex cytokine assay. In comparison to non-activated M0 macrophages, the overall chemotactic and inflammatory responses to titanium particles were greatly enhanced in M1 macrophages and effectively suppressed in M2 macrophages. In addition, the genome-wide approach revealed several novel, potentially osteolytic, particle-induced mediators, and signaling pathway analysis suggested the involvement of toll-like and nod-like receptor signaling in particle recognition. It is concluded that the magnitude of foreign body reaction caused by titanium particles is dependent on the state of macrophage polarization. Thus, by limiting the action of M1 polarizing factors, e.g. bacterial biofilm formation, in peri-implant tissues and promoting M2 macrophage polarization by biomaterial solutions or pharmacologically, it might be possible to restrict wear-particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis.

  10. Antiviral macrophage responses in flavivirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ashhurst, Thomas Myles; Vreden, Caryn van; Munoz-Erazo, Luis; Niewold, Paula; Watabe, Kanami; Terry, Rachael L; Deffrasnes, Celine; Getts, Daniel R; Cole King, Nicholas Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are a major current and emerging threat, affecting millions of people worldwide. Global climate change, combined with increasing proximity of humans to animals and mosquito vectors by expansion into natural habitats, coupled with the increase in international travel, have resulted in significant spread and concomitant increase in the incidence of infection and severe disease. Although neuroinvasive disease has been well described for some viral infections such as Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV), others such as dengue virus (DENV) have recently displayed an emerging pattern of neuroinvasive disease, distinct from the previously observed, systemically-induced encephalomyelopathy. In this setting, the immune response is a crucial component of host defence, in preventing viral dissemination and invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). However, subversion of the anti-viral activities of macrophages by flaviviruses can facilitate viral replication and spread, enhancing the intensity of immune responses, leading to severe immune-mediated disease which may be further exacerbated during the subsequent infection with some flaviviruses. Furthermore, in the CNS myeloid cells may be responsible for inducing specific inflammatory changes, which can lead to significant pathological damage during encephalitis. The interaction of virus and cells of the myeloid lineage is complex, and this interaction is likely responsible at least in part, for crucial differences between viral clearance and pathology. Recent studies on the role of myeloid cells in innate immunity and viral control, and the mechanisms of evasion and subversion used by flaviviruses are rapidly advancing our understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in flavivirus encephalitis and will lead to the development of therapeutic strategies previously not considered. PMID:24434318

  11. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation: Origins and Functions.

    PubMed

    Decano, Julius L; Mattson, Peter C; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages influence various processes of cardiovascular inflammation. Whether they are of embryonic or post-natal hematopoietic origin, their balance in differential activation may direct the course of inflammation. Accelerated macrophage activation and accumulation through a pro-inflammatory signaling pathway may result in extensive tissue damage, adverse repair, and worsened clinical outcomes. Attenuation of such a mechanism and/or promotion of the anti-inflammatory macrophage activation may lead to early resolution of inflammation. Elucidating multiple novel mechanisms of monocyte and macrophage activation leads to a better understanding of their roles in vascular inflammation. In turn, this begets better therapeutic target identification and biomarker discovery. Combined with increasingly sensitive and specific imaging techniques, we continue to push back early detection and monitoring to provide us with a greater window for disease modification. The potential success of cytokine-targeted therapy will be solid proof of the inflammatory hypothesis of atherothrombosis. PMID:27125207

  12. Amphibian macrophage development and antiviral defenses.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage lineage cells represent the cornerstone of vertebrate physiology and immune defenses. In turn, comparative studies using non-mammalian animal models have revealed that evolutionarily distinct species have adopted diverse molecular and physiological strategies for controlling macrophage development and functions. Notably, amphibian species present a rich array of physiological and environmental adaptations, not to mention the peculiarity of metamorphosis from larval to adult stages of development, involving drastic transformation and differentiation of multiple new tissues. Thus it is not surprising that different amphibian species and their respective tadpole and adult stages have adopted unique hematopoietic strategies. Accordingly and in order to establish a more comprehensive view of these processes, here we review the hematopoietic and monopoietic strategies observed across amphibians, describe the present understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving amphibian, an in particular Xenopus laevis macrophage development and functional polarization, and discuss the roles of macrophage-lineage cells during ranavirus infections.

  13. Macrophage diversity in renal injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Sharon D.; van Goor, Harry; Eddy, Allison A.

    2008-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages can determine the outcome of the immune response and whether this response contributes to tissue repair or mediates tissue destruction. In addition to their important role in immune-mediated renal disease and host defense, macrophages play a fundamental role in tissue remodeling during embryonic development, acquired kidney disease, and renal allograft responses. This review summarizes macrophage phenotype and function in the orchestration of kidney repair and replacement of specialized renal cells following injury. Recent advances in our understanding of macrophage heterogeneity in response to their microenvironment raise new and exciting therapeutic possibilities to attenuate or conceivably reverse progressive renal disease in the context of fibrosis. Furthermore, parallels with pathological processes in many other organs also exist. PMID:18982158

  14. Generation and Characterization of Mouse Regulatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Iglesia, Laura; Hill, Marcelo; Cuturi, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, cell therapy has become a promising approach to therapeutically manipulate immune responses in autoimmunity, cancer, and transplantation. Several types of lymphoid and myeloid cells origin have been generated in vitro and tested in animal models. Their efficacy to decrease pharmacological treatment has successfully been established. Macrophages play an important role in physiological and pathological processes. They represent an interesting cell population due to their high plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we describe a protocol to differentiate murine regulatory macrophages in vitro from bone marrow precursors. We also describe several methods to assess macrophage classical functions, as their bacterial killing capacity and antigen endocytosis and degradation. Importantly, regulatory macrophages also display suppressive characteristics, which are addressed by the study of their hypostimulatory T lymphocyte capacity and polyclonal T lymphocyte activation suppression.

  15. Trophic macrophages in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Specialized phagocytes are found in the most primitive multicellular organisms. Their roles in homeostasis and in distinguishing self from non-self have evolved with the complexity of organisms and their immune systems. Equally important, but often overlooked, are the roles of macrophages in tissue development. As discussed in this Review, these include functions in branching morphogenesis, neuronal patterning, angiogenesis, bone morphogenesis and the generation of adipose tissue. In each case, macrophage depletion impairs the formation of the tissue and compromises its function. I argue that in several diseases, the unrestrained acquisition of these developmental macrophage functions exacerbates pathology. For example, macrophages enhance tumour progression and metastasis by affecting tumour-cell migration and invasion, as well as angiogenesis. PMID:19282852

  16. Senescence and quiescence induced compromised function in cultured macrophages.

    PubMed

    Holt, Dolly J; Grainger, David W

    2012-10-01

    Implants are predisposed to infection even years after implantation, despite ostensibly being surrounded by innumerable macrophages as part of the host foreign body response. The local implant environment could adversely influence the implant-associated macrophage phenotype, proliferative capacity, activation states, and ability to neutralize pathogens. This study monitored cultured macrophage proliferative states and phagocytotic competence on tissue culture plastic to address the hypothesis that extended contact with foreign materials alters macrophage phenotype. That such macrophage alterations might also occur around implants has significance to the foreign body response, infection, cancer, autoimmune and other diseases. Specifically, multiple indicators of macrophage proliferation in various culture conditions, including cell confluence, long-term culture (21 days), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, passaging, and mitogenic stimulation are reported. Importantly, primary murine macrophages became quiescent at high confluence and senescent during long-term culture. Senescent macrophages significantly reduced their ability to phagocytose particles, while quiescent macrophages did not. Cell senescence and quiescence were not observed with repeated passaging. Primary macrophage stimulation with LPS delayed senescence but did not eliminate it. These results prompt the conclusion that both cell quiescence and senescence are observed under common macrophage culture conditions and could alter macrophage behavior and phenotypes in extended in vitro culture, such as the ability to phagocytose. Such macrophage transitions around foreign bodies in vivo are not documented: quiescence and senescence reported here in macrophage culture could be relevant to macrophage behavior both in vitro in bioassays and in vivo in the foreign body response and implant-centered infection.

  17. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  18. Macrophages modulate adult zebrafish tail fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Timothy A; Strand, Nicholas S; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Tsung-Yang, Chao; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S; Moon, Randall T

    2014-07-01

    Neutrophils and macrophages, as key mediators of inflammation, have defined functionally important roles in mammalian tissue repair. Although recent evidence suggests that similar cells exist in zebrafish and also migrate to sites of injury in larvae, whether these cells are functionally important for wound healing or regeneration in adult zebrafish is unknown. To begin to address these questions, we first tracked neutrophils (lyzC(+), mpo(+)) and macrophages (mpeg1(+)) in adult zebrafish following amputation of the tail fin, and detailed a migratory timecourse that revealed conserved elements of the inflammatory cell response with mammals. Next, we used transgenic zebrafish in which we could selectively ablate macrophages, which allowed us to investigate whether macrophages were required for tail fin regeneration. We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. Moreover, we also sought to detail molecular regulators of inflammation in adult zebrafish and identified Wnt/β-catenin as a signaling pathway that regulates the injury microenvironment, inflammatory cell migration and macrophage phenotype. These results provide a cellular and molecular link between components of the inflammation response and regeneration in adult zebrafish. PMID:24961798

  19. Immunological characterization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitko-McKown, C. G.; Reddy, D. N.; Chapes, S. K.; McKown, R. D.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are lung macrophages found apposed to the endothelium of pulmonary capillaries. In many species, they are responsible for the clearance of blood-borne particulates and pathogens; however, little else is known about their roles as immunologic effector cells. We compared PIMs with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to determine the relative immunological activities of these two cell populations. Our results suggested that both populations possess similar phagocytic and bactericidal activities. In assays measuring cytotoxicity, PIMs were more cytotoxic than PAMs against virally infected target cells; however, differences between these macrophage populations were not as marked when noninfected targets were used. LPS-stimulated PIMs produced more T-cell proliferative cytokines than PAMs, and both populations of nonstimulated macrophages produced similar amounts of the cytokines. In contrast, PAMs produced more TNF alpha and NO2- than PIMs when both populations were stimulated with LPS; however, nonstimulated PAMs and PIMs produced similar amounts of TNF alpha and NO2. These data suggest that bovine PIMs are immunologically active. Differences between the degrees of activity of PIMs and PAMs indicate that these macrophage populations may have different roles in lung surveillance.

  20. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  1. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-07-06

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach.

  2. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells. PMID:26493158

  3. Salmonella acquires ferrous iron from haemophagocytic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2014-09-01

    Bacteria harbour both ferrous and ferric iron transporters. We now report that infection of macrophages and mice with a Salmonella enterica Typhimurium strain containing an inactivated feoB-encoded ferrous iron transporter results in increased bacterial replication, compared to infection with wild type. Inactivation of other cation transporters, SitABCD or MntH, did not increase bacterial replication. The feoB mutant strain does not have an intrinsically faster growth rate. Instead, increased replication correlated with increased expression in macrophages of the fepB-encoded bacterial ferric iron transporter and also required siderophores, which capture ferric iron. Co-infection of mice with wild type and a feoB mutant strain yielded a different outcome: FeoB is clearly required for tissue colonization. In co-infected primary mouse macrophages, FeoB is required for S. Typhimurium replication if the macrophages were IFNγ treated and contain phagocytosed erythrocytes, a model for haemophagocytosis. Haemophagocytes are macrophages that have engulfed erythrocytes and/or leucocytes and can harbour Salmonella in mice. These observations suggest that Salmonella acquires ferrous iron from haemophagocytic macrophages.

  4. Endometriosis, a disease of the macrophage.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Annalisa; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Endometriosis, a common cause of pelvic pain and female infertility, depends on the growth of vascularized endometrial tissue at ectopic sites. Endometrial fragments reach the peritoneal cavity during the fertile years: local cues decide whether they yield endometriotic lesions. Macrophages are recruited at sites of hypoxia and tissue stress, where they clear cell debris and heme-iron and generate pro-life and pro-angiogenesis signals. Macrophages are abundant in endometriotic lesions, where are recruited and undergo alternative activation. In rodents macrophages are required for lesions to establish and to grow; bone marrow-derived Tie-2 expressing macrophages specifically contribute to lesions neovasculature, possibly because they concur to the recruitment of circulating endothelial progenitors, and sustain their survival and the integrity of the vessel wall. Macrophages sense cues (hypoxia, cell death, iron overload) in the lesions and react delivering signals to restore the local homeostasis: their action represents a necessary, non-redundant step in the natural history of the disease. Endometriosis may be due to a misperception of macrophages about ectopic endometrial tissue. They perceive it as a wound, they activate programs leading to ectopic cell survival and tissue vascularization. Clearing this misperception is a critical area for the development of novel medical treatments of endometriosis, an urgent and unmet medical need.

  5. Endometriosis, a disease of the macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Annalisa; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Endometriosis, a common cause of pelvic pain and female infertility, depends on the growth of vascularized endometrial tissue at ectopic sites. Endometrial fragments reach the peritoneal cavity during the fertile years: local cues decide whether they yield endometriotic lesions. Macrophages are recruited at sites of hypoxia and tissue stress, where they clear cell debris and heme-iron and generate pro-life and pro-angiogenesis signals. Macrophages are abundant in endometriotic lesions, where are recruited and undergo alternative activation. In rodents macrophages are required for lesions to establish and to grow; bone marrow-derived Tie-2 expressing macrophages specifically contribute to lesions neovasculature, possibly because they concur to the recruitment of circulating endothelial progenitors, and sustain their survival and the integrity of the vessel wall. Macrophages sense cues (hypoxia, cell death, iron overload) in the lesions and react delivering signals to restore the local homeostasis: their action represents a necessary, non-redundant step in the natural history of the disease. Endometriosis may be due to a misperception of macrophages about ectopic endometrial tissue. They perceive it as a wound, they activate programs leading to ectopic cell survival and tissue vascularization. Clearing this misperception is a critical area for the development of novel medical treatments of endometriosis, an urgent and unmet medical need. PMID:23372570

  6. Comparison of the effect of lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine to alter macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Y; Ohura, K

    2001-05-01

    In vitro treatment of macrophages with lidocaine-epinephrine or prilocaine-felypressine resulted in inhibition of their adhesion, chemotaxis and phagocytosis. However, prilocaine-felypressine was a much more potent inhibitor of adhesion and phagocytosis than lidocaine-epinephrine. On the other hand, lidocaine-epinephrine induced transient potentiation of superoxide anion production by macrophages, while prilocaine-felypressine consistently inhibited this. Moreover, lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine both inhibited the production of hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, epinephrine strongly potentiated superoxide anion production, while markedly inhibiting hydrogen peroxide production. This potentiation by epinephrine was not prevented by adrenergic antagonists. In addition, superoxide dismutase potentiated the production of hydrogen peroxide, which was in part prevented by epinephrine. These results suggest that lidocaine-epinephrine and prilocaine-felypressine inhibit adhesion, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and the production of hydrogen peroxide by macrophages. In addition, lidocaine-epinephrine evidently differs from prilocaine-felypressine regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of superoxide anion production by macrophages.

  7. Excess Lymphangiogenesis Cooperatively Induced by Macrophages and CD4(+) T Cells Drives the Pathogenesis of Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fusa; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Matsumoto, Sahohime; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Shibata, Munehiko; Oike, Yuichi; Koshima, Isao; Watabe, Tetsuro; Nagai, Ryozo; Manabe, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Lymphedema is a debilitating progressive condition that severely restricts quality of life and is frequently observed after cancer surgery. The mechanism underlying lymphedema development remains poorly understood, and no effective pharmacological means to prevent or alleviate the ailment is currently available. Using a mouse model of lymphedema, we show here that excessive generation of immature lymphatic vessels is essential for initial edema development and that this early process is also important for later development of lymphedema pathology. We found that CD4(+) T cells interact with macrophages to promote lymphangiogenesis, and that both lymphangiogenesis and edema were greatly reduced in macrophage-depleted mice, lymphocyte-deficient Rag2(?/?) mice or CD4(+) T-cell-deficient mice. Mechanistically, T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cells activate lesional macrophages to produce vascular endothelial growth factor-C, which promotes lymphangiogenesis, and inhibition of this mechanism suppressed not only early lymphangiogenesis, but also later development of lymphedema. Finally, we show that atorvastatin suppresses excessive lymphangiogenesis and lymphedema by inhibiting T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cell activation. These results demonstrate that the interaction between CD4(+) T cells and macrophages is a potential therapeutic target for prevention of lymphedema after surgery.

  8. Glucocorticoid-induced impairment of macrophage antimicrobial activity: mechanisms and dependence on the state of activation.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, A; Schaffner, T

    1987-01-01

    Experimental observations indicate that tissue macrophages deployed in great numbers at critical anatomic sites such as the liver, spleen, and lung are major targets for glucocorticoids compromising natural resistance of the host. Therapeutic concentrations of glucocorticoids appear to prevent destruction of microorganisms ingested by macrophages without interfering with phagocytosis, phagolysosomal fusion, and/or secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates. These findings indicate that at the cellular level the glucocorticoid target should be sought for in the nonoxidative armature of the phagocyte and that nonoxidative killing systems of resident tissue macrophages play an important role in natural resistance to opportunistic pathogens. Glucocorticoids do not prevent lymphokine-induced activation of oxidative killing systems. Thus, lymphokines such as interferon-gamma can restore the microbicidal activity of macrophages functionally impaired by glucocorticoids. Counterbalance of the suppressive effect of glucocorticoids by lymphokines might only be possible, however, for pathogens susceptible to oxidative killing and not for microorganisms that are more resistant to reactive oxygen intermediates such as Aspergillus spores and Nocardia, opportunists that appear to be particularly associated with hypercortisolism.

  9. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannan antagonizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis by altering Ca+2-dependent cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, M; García, L F; Nigou, J; Puzo, G; Olivier, M

    2000-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis can be inhibited by mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), although it induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and NO production, which participate in apoptosis induction. ManLAM also modulates Ca(+2)-dependent intracellular events, and Ca(+2) participates in apoptosis in different systems. Ca(+2) was assessed for involvement in M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis and for modulation by ManLAM. The role of Ca(+2) was supported by the blockade of apoptosis by cAMP inhibitors and the Ca(+2) chelator, BAPTA/AM. These agents also inhibited caspase-1 activation and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein translocation without affecting TNF-alpha production. Infection of macrophages with M. tuberculosis induced an influx of Ca(+2) that was prevented by ManLAM. Similarly, M. tuberculosis infection-altered mitochondrial permeability transition was prevented by ManLAM and BAPTA/AM. Finally, ManLAM and BAPTA/AM reversed the effects of M. tuberculosis on p53 and Bcl-2 expression. ManLAM counteracts the alterations of calcium-dependent intracellular events that occur during M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

  10. Excess Lymphangiogenesis Cooperatively Induced by Macrophages and CD4(+) T Cells Drives the Pathogenesis of Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fusa; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Matsumoto, Sahohime; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Shibata, Munehiko; Oike, Yuichi; Koshima, Isao; Watabe, Tetsuro; Nagai, Ryozo; Manabe, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Lymphedema is a debilitating progressive condition that severely restricts quality of life and is frequently observed after cancer surgery. The mechanism underlying lymphedema development remains poorly understood, and no effective pharmacological means to prevent or alleviate the ailment is currently available. Using a mouse model of lymphedema, we show here that excessive generation of immature lymphatic vessels is essential for initial edema development and that this early process is also important for later development of lymphedema pathology. We found that CD4(+) T cells interact with macrophages to promote lymphangiogenesis, and that both lymphangiogenesis and edema were greatly reduced in macrophage-depleted mice, lymphocyte-deficient Rag2(?/?) mice or CD4(+) T-cell-deficient mice. Mechanistically, T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cells activate lesional macrophages to produce vascular endothelial growth factor-C, which promotes lymphangiogenesis, and inhibition of this mechanism suppressed not only early lymphangiogenesis, but also later development of lymphedema. Finally, we show that atorvastatin suppresses excessive lymphangiogenesis and lymphedema by inhibiting T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cell activation. These results demonstrate that the interaction between CD4(+) T cells and macrophages is a potential therapeutic target for prevention of lymphedema after surgery. PMID:27015456

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor-associated macrophages promotes breast cancer cell survival by triggering a positive-feedback loop between macrophages and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhong; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jing; Lin, Yong; Xiang, Tingxiu; Wan, Jingyuan; Li, Hongyuan; Chouaib, Salem; Ren, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in cancer cell survival, however, the mechanism of which remains elusive. In this study, we found that COX-2 was abundantly expressed in breast TAMs, which was correlated to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Ectopic over-expression of COX-2 in TAMs enhanced breast cancer cell survival both in vitro and in vivo. COX-2 in TAMs was determined to be essential for the induction and maintenance of M2-phenotype macrophage polarity. COX-2+ TAMs promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and survival by increasing Bcl-2 and P-gp and decreasing Bax in cancer cells. Furthermore, COX-2 in TAMs induced the expression of COX-2 in breast cancer cells, which in turn promoted M2 macrophage polarization. Inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in cancer cells suppressed COX-2+ TAMs-induced cancer cell survival. These findings suggest that COX-2, functions as a key cancer promoting factor by triggering a positive-feedback loop between macrophages and cancer cells, which could be exploited for breast cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26359357

  12. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol

  13. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  14. Colonic macrophage polarization in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Raymond A; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-07-01

    Our review focuses on the colonic macrophage, a monocyte-derived, tissue-resident macrophage, and the role it plays in health and disease, specifically in inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and cancer of the colon and rectum. We give special emphasis to macrophage polarization, or phenotype, in these different states. We focus on macrophages because they are one of the most numerous leukocytes in the colon, and because they normally contribute to homeostasis through an anti-inflammatory phenotype. However, in conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, proinflammatory macrophages are increased in the colon and have been linked to disease severity and progression. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells may employ anti-inflammatory macrophages to promote tumor growth and dissemination, whereas proinflammatory macrophages may antagonize tumor growth. Given the key roles that this cell type plays in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, the colonic macrophage is an intriguing therapeutic target. As such, potential macrophage-targeting strategies are discussed.

  15. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  16. Macrophage iron homeostasis and polarization in the context of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Michaela; Mertens, Christina; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    Macrophages are central in regulating iron homeostasis, which is tightly linked to their versatile role during innate immunity. They sequester iron by phagocytosis of senescent erythrocytes and represent a major source of available iron in the body. Macrophage iron homeostasis is coupled to the functional heterogeneity and plasticity of these cells, with their extreme roles during inflammation, immune modulation, and resolution of inflammation. It is now appreciated that the macrophage polarization process dictates expression profiles of genes involved in iron metabolism. Therefore, macrophages have evolved a multitude of mechanisms to sequester, transport, store, and release iron. A new, enigmatic protein entering the iron scene and affecting the macrophage phenotype is lipocalin-2. Iron sequestration in macrophages depletes the microenvironment, thereby limiting extracellular pathogen or tumor growth, while fostering inflammation. In contrast, iron release from macrophages contributes to bystander cell proliferation, which is important for tissue regeneration and repair. This dichotomy is also reflected by the dual role of lipocalin-2 in macrophages. Unfortunately, the iron release macrophage phenotype is also a characteristic of tumor-associated macrophages and stimulates tumor cell survival and growth. Iron sequestration versus its release is now appreciated to be associated with the macrophage polarization program and can be used to explain a number of biological functions attributed to distinct macrophage phenotypes. Here we discuss macrophage iron homeostasis with a special focus on lipocalin-2 related to the formation and function of tumor-associated macrophages.

  17. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Macrophage Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  18. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  19. Probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens mediate M1 macrophage polarization in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Hu, Sheng-Lan; Cui, Zhi-Wen; Li, Wei-Fen

    2013-05-01

    Depending on the microenvironment, macrophages can acquire distinct functional phenotypes, referred to as classically activated M1 and M2. M1 macrophages are considered potent effector cells that kill intracellular pathogens, and M2 macrophages promote the resolution of wound healing. In this study, we are interested to know whether probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (Ba) can induce macrophages polarization. Real-time fluorescence PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of IL-1β, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 genes for M1 macrophages was significantly increased at 1.5 h after probiotic Ba treatment compared to the probiotic Ba-free treatment (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of M2 macrophage marker genes (Arg1, Fizz1, MR, Ym1) was decreased (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the phagocytic activity was dramatically increased in the Ba-treated BMDMs using a FITC-dextran endocytosis assay. Together, these findings indicated that probiotic Ba facilitated polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytic capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about probiotic function-involved macrophage polarization.

  20. Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin cause macrophage extracellular trap formation by bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Hellenbrand, Katrina M; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2012-05-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  1. Macrophage Polarisation: an Immunohistochemical Approach for Identifying M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Mário Henrique M.; Hauck, Franziska; Dreyer, Johannes H.; Kempkes, Bettina; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage polarization is increasingly recognised as an important pathogenetic factor in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages promote T helper (Th) 1 responses and show tumoricidal activity. M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. CD68 and CD163 are used to identify macrophages in tissue sections. However, characterisation of polarised macrophages in situ has remained difficult. Macrophage polarisation is regulated by transcription factors, pSTAT1 and RBP-J for M1, and CMAF for M2. We reasoned that double-labelling immunohistochemistry for the detection of macrophage markers together with transcription factors may be suitable to characterise macrophage polarisation in situ. To test this hypothesis, we have studied conditions associated with Th1- and Th2-predominant immune responses: infectious mononucleosis and Crohn’s disease for Th1 and allergic nasal polyps, oxyuriasis, wound healing and foreign body granulomas for predominant Th2 response. In all situations, CD163+ cells usually outnumbered CD68+ cells. Moreover, CD163+ cells, usually considered as M2 macrophages, co-expressing pSTAT1 and RBP-J were found in all conditions examined. The numbers of putative M1 macrophages were higher in Th1- than in Th2-associated diseases, while more M2 macrophages were seen in Th2- than in Th1 related disorders. In most Th1-related diseases, the balance of M1 over M2 cells was shifted towards M1 cells, while the reverse was observed for Th2-related conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: cluster I included Th1 diseases together with cases with high numbers of CD163+pSTAT1+, CD68+pSTAT1+, CD163+RBP-J+ and CD68+RBP-J+ macrophages; cluster II comprised Th2 conditions together with cases displaying high numbers of CD163+CMAF+ and CD68+CMAF+ macrophages. These results suggest that the detection of pSTAT1, RBP-J, and CMAF in the context of CD68 or CD163 expression is a suitable tool

  2. Depletion of Bone Marrow-derived Macrophages Perturbs the Innate Immune Response to Surgery and Reduces Postoperative Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Degos, Vincent; Vacas, Susana; Han, Zhenying; van Rooijen, Nico; Gressens, Pierre; Su, Hua; Young, William L.; Maze, Mervyn

    2013-01-01

    Background According to rodent models of postoperative cognitive decline, activation of the innate immune response following aseptic surgical trauma results in the elaboration of hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines, which are capable of disrupting long-term potentiation, the neurobiologic correlate of memory. We hypothesize that hippocampal recruitment of bone marrow-derived (BMD) macrophages plays a causal role in these processes, resulting in memory dysfunction. Methods Clodrolip injection (liposomal formulation of clodronate) prior to stabilized tibial fracture under general anesthesia was used to deplete BMD macrophages. Systemic and neuroinflammation were studied on postoperative day 1, and memory in a fear-trace conditioning paradigm was assessed on postoperative day 3. CX3CR1GFP/+ CCR2RFP/+ mice were used to identify BMD macrophages. Results Clodrolip effectively depleted splenic CCR2+ BMD macrophages. It also attenuated the surgery-induced increase of interleukin-6 in the serum and the hippocampus, and prevented hippocampal infiltration of CCR2+ cells without affecting the number of CX3CR1+ microglia. It did not alter the surgery-induced increase in hippocampal MCP-1, the recruitment signal for CCR2+ cells. Clodrolip prevented surgery-induced memory dysfunction, as evidenced by a significant increase in freezing time (29%, 95% CI: 21 to 38% vs. 48%, 95% CI: 38 to 58%, n= 20, P = 0.004), but did not affect memory in nonsurgical mice. Conclusion Depletion of BMD macrophages prevents hippocampal neuroinflammation and memory dysfunction after experimental tibial fracture. These data suggest that the hippocampal recruitment of BMD macrophages is a necessary mechanism in murine postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Interventions designed to prevent its activation and/or migration into the brain may represent a feasible preemptive strategy. PMID:23426204

  3. Macrophage Stimulating Protein Is a Novel Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Maria Cristina; Vercelli, Alessandro; Repici, Mariaelena; Follenzi, Antonia; Comoglio, Paolo M.

    2001-01-01

    Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP), also known as hepatocyte growth factor-like, is a soluble cytokine that belongs to the family of the plasminogen-related growth factors (PRGFs). PRGFs are α/β heterodimers that bind to transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors. MSP was originally isolated as a chemotactic factor for peritoneal macrophages. Through binding to its receptor, encoded by the RON gene, it stimulates dissociation of epithelia and works as an inflammatory mediator by repressing the production of nitric oxide (NO). Here, we identify a novel role for MSP in the central nervous system. As a paradigm to analyze this function we chose the hypoglossal system of adult mice. We demonstrate in vivo that either administration of exogenous MSP or transplantation of MSP-producing cells at the proximal stump of the resected nerve is sufficient to prevent motoneuron atrophy upon axotomy. We also show that the MSP gene is expressed in the tongue, the target of the hypoglossal nerve, and that MSP induces biosynthesis of Ron receptor in the motoneuron somata. Finally, we show that MSP suppresses NO production in the injured hypoglossal nuclei. Together, these data suggest that MSP is a novel neurotrophic factor for cranial motoneurons and, by regulating the production of NO, may have a role in brain plasticity and regeneration. PMID:11359926

  4. Endothelial cells and macrophages, partners in atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Antohe, Felicia

    2006-01-01

    Heart disease and stroke, the main cardiovascular diseases (CVD), have become global epidemics in our days. High levels of cholesterol and other abnormal lipids are among the main risk factors of atherosclerosis, the number one killer in the world. However, recent advances in CVD treatment together with improvements in surgical techniques have increased the quality of life and reduced premature death rates and disabilities. Nevertheless, they still add a heavy burden to the rising global costs of health care. The medical priorities highlight not only the need for early recognition of the warning signs of a heart attack, but also the need for early biomarkers for prevention. Two active partners in the development and progression of atherosclerotic plaques are the macrophages and endothelial cells that influence each other and modify the microenvironment composition of the plaque leading to either rapid progression or regression of individual lesions in patients. In this review we address two specific aspects related to atherosclerosis: i) the way in which folic acid and folic acid conjugates may be helpful to identify activated macrophages and ii) the high potential of proteomic analysis to evidence and identify the multiple changes induced in activated vascular cells. PMID:17178598

  5. Interaction of Mycoplasma dispar with bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, R A; Wannemuehler, M J; Rosenbusch, R F

    1992-01-01

    The capacity to avoid phagocytosis and the activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) by encapsulated Mycoplasma dispar or purified M. dispar capsule was investigated. Encapsulated and unencapsulated M. dispar were cocultured with BAM in the presence or absence of antisera prepared against unencapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule antiserum. Unopsonized mycoplasmas resisted phagocytosis, while only anti-capsule antibodies enhanced the phagocytosis of encapsulated mycoplasmas. BAM were cultured in the presence of purified M. dispar capsule or either live or heat-killed encapsulated or unencapsulated M. dispar. These BAM were then activated with Escherichia coli endotoxin or left without further activation. The supernatants of these cultures were assayed for tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and glucose consumption as indicators of macrophage activation. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 were produced by BAM stimulated with unencapsulated M. dispar but not when encapsulated M. dispar or its purified capsule was used. Similarly, glucose consumption was increased in the presence of unencapsulated M. dispar, but not when BAM were cocultured with encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule. When BAM were treated with purified capsule or encapsulated mycoplasmas, they could not be subsequently activated by endotoxin. These results indicate that encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule exerts an inhibitory effect on the activity of BAM and prevents the activation of these cells. PMID:1612758

  6. Mast cells aggravate sepsis by inhibiting peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Albert; Gautier, Gregory; Attout, Tarik; Fiore, Frédéric; Lebourdais, Emeline; Msallam, Rasha; Daëron, Marc; Monteiro, Renato C.; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Davoust, Jean; Blank, Ulrich; Malissen, Bernard; Launay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the overwhelming inflammatory reaction associated with polymicrobial sepsis remains a prevalent clinical challenge with few treatment options. In septic peritonitis, blood neutrophils and monocytes are rapidly recruited into the peritoneal cavity to control infection, but the role of resident sentinel cells during the early phase of infection is less clear. In particular, the influence of mast cells on other tissue-resident cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a mouse model that allows both visualization and conditional ablation of mast cells and basophils to investigate the role of mast cells in severe septic peritonitis. Specific depletion of mast cells led to increased survival rates in mice with acute sepsis. Furthermore, we determined that mast cells impair the phagocytic action of resident macrophages, thereby allowing local and systemic bacterial proliferation. Mast cells did not influence local recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes or the release of inflammatory cytokines. Phagocytosis inhibition by mast cells involved their ability to release prestored IL-4 within 15 minutes after bacterial encounter, and treatment with an IL-4–neutralizing antibody prevented this inhibitory effect and improved survival of septic mice. Our study uncovers a local crosstalk between mast cells and macrophages during the early phase of sepsis development that aggravates the outcome of severe bacterial infection. PMID:25180604

  7. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  8. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  9. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Notari, Luigi; Riera, Diana C; Sun, Rex; Bohl, Jennifer A; McLean, Leon P; Madden, Kathleen B; van Rooijen, Nico; Vanuytsel, Tim; Urban, Joseph F; Zhao, Aiping; Shea-Donohue, Terez

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic enteric nematodes induce a type 2 immune response characterized by increased production of Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (M2) to the site of infection. Nematode infection is associated with changes in epithelial permeability and inhibition of sodium-linked glucose absorption, but the role of M2 in these effects is unknown. Clodronate-containing liposomes were administered prior to and during nematode infection to deplete macrophages and prevent the development of M2 in response to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. The inhibition of epithelial glucose absorption that is associated with nematode infection involved a macrophage-dependent reduction in SGLT1 activity, with no change in receptor expression, and a macrophage-independent down-regulation of GLUT2 expression. The reduced transport of glucose into the enterocyte is compensated partially by an up-regulation of the constitutive GLUT1 transporter consistent with stress-induced activation of HIF-1α. Thus, nematode infection results in a "lean" epithelial phenotype that features decreased SGLT1 activity, decreased expression of GLUT2 and an emergent dependence on GLUT1 for glucose uptake into the enterocyte. Macrophages do not play a role in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in epithelial barrier function. There is a greater contribution, however, of paracellular absorption of glucose to supply the energy demands of host resistance. These data provide further evidence of the ability of macrophages to alter glucose metabolism of neighboring cells.

  10. Elastin-Derived Peptides Promote Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Dale, Matthew A; Xiong, Wanfen; Carson, Jeffrey S; Suh, Melissa K; Karpisek, Andrew D; Meisinger, Trevor M; Casale, George P; Baxter, B Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a dynamic vascular disease characterized by inflammatory cell invasion and extracellular matrix degradation. Damage to elastin in the extracellular matrix results in release of elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), which are chemotactic for inflammatory cells such as monocytes. Their effect on macrophage polarization is less well known. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages initially are recruited to sites of injury, but, if their effects are prolonged, they can lead to chronic inflammation that prevents normal tissue repair. Conversely, anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages reduce inflammation and aid in wound healing. Thus, a proper M1/M2 ratio is vital for tissue homeostasis. Abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue reveals a high M1/M2 ratio in which proinflammatory cells and their associated markers dominate. In the current study, in vitro treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with EDPs induced M1 macrophage polarization. By using C57BL/6 mice, Ab-mediated neutralization of EDPs reduced aortic dilation, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and proinflammatory cytokine expression at early and late time points after aneurysm induction. Furthermore, direct manipulation of the M1/M2 balance altered aortic dilation. Injection of M2-polarized macrophages reduced aortic dilation after aneurysm induction. EDPs promoted a proinflammatory environment in aortic tissue by inducing M1 polarization, and neutralization of EDPs attenuated aortic dilation. The M1/M2 imbalance is vital to aneurysm formation. PMID:27183603

  11. β Common Receptor Mediates Erythropoietin-Conferred Protection on OxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Yun; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Feng-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the key factor for erythropoiesis, also protects macrophage foam cells from lipid accumulation, yet the definitive mechanisms are not fully understood. β common receptor (βCR) plays a crucial role in the nonhematopoietic effects of EPO. In the current study, we investigated the role of βCR in EPO-mediated protection in macrophages against oxidized low-density lipoprotein- (oxLDL-) induced deregulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here, we show that βCR expression was mainly in foamy macrophages of atherosclerotic aortas from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Results of confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that βCR was colocalized and interacted with EPO receptor (EPOR) in macrophages. Inhibition of βCR activation by neutralizing antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the EPO-conferred protection in oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation. Furthermore, EPO-promoted cholesterol efflux and upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were prevented by pretreatment with βCR neutralizing antibody or βCR siRNA. Additionally, blockage of βCR abrogated the EPO-conferred anti-inflammatory action on oxLDL-induced production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Collectively, our findings suggest that βCR may play an important role in the beneficial effects of EPO against oxLDL-elicited dysfunction of macrophage foam cells. PMID:26101463

  12. Macrophage Repolarization with Targeted Alginate Nanoparticles Containing IL-10 Plasmid DNA for the Treatment of Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shardool; Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have shown for the first time the effectiveness of a non-viral gene transfection strategy to re-polarize macrophages from M1 to M2 functional sub-type for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine encoding plasmid DNA was successfully encapsulated into non-condensing alginate based nanoparticles and the surface of the nano-carriers was modified with tuftsin peptide to achieve active macrophage targeting. Enhanced localization of tuftsin-modified alginate nanoparticles was observed in the inflamed paws of arthritic rats upon intraperitoneal administration. Importantly, targeted nanoparticle treatment was successful in reprogramming macrophage phenotype balance as ~66% of total synovial macrophages from arthritic rats treated with the IL-10 plasmid DNA loaded tuftsin/alginate nanoparticles were in the M2 state compared to ~9% of macrophages in the M2 state from untreated arthritic rats. Treatment significantly reduced systemic and joint tissue pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) expression and prevented the progression of inflammation and joint damage as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and histology. Treatment enabled animals to retain their mobility throughout the course of study, whereas untreated animals suffered from impaired mobility. Overall, this study demonstrates that targeted alginate nanoparticles loaded with IL-10 plasmid DNA can efficiently re-polarize macrophages from an M1 to an M2 state, offering a novel treatment paradigm for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26004232

  13. Cytolytic activity against tumor cells by macrophage cell lines and augmentation by macrophage stimulants.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, T; Holden, H T

    1980-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that macrophage cell lines retained the ability to phagocytize, to secrete lysosomal enzymes, and to function as effector cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity. In this paper, the cytolytic activity of murine macrophage cell lines against tumor target cells was assessed using an 18-h 51Cr release assay. Of the macrophage cell lines tested, RAW 264, PU5-1.8 and IC-21 had intermediate to high levels of spontaneous cytolytic activity, P388D, and J774 had low to intermediate levels, while /WEHI-3 showed little or no cytolytic activity against RBL-5, MBL-2 and TU-5 target cells. Tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines could be augmented by the addition of macrophage stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C, indicating that the activation of macrophages by these stimulants does not require the participation of other cell types. Treatment with interferon also augmented the tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines. Although the mechanism by which these cell lines exert their spontaneous or boosted cytotoxic activity is not clear, it does not appear to be due to depletion of nutrients since cell lines with high metabolic and proliferative activities, such as WEHI-3 and RBL-5, showed little or no cytotoxicity and supernatants from the macrophage cell lines did not exert any cytotoxic effects in their essay. Thus, it appears that the different macrophage cell lines represent different levels of activation and/or differentiation and may be useful for studying the development of these processes as well as providing a useful tool for analyzing the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:6165690

  14. Much More than M1 and M2 Macrophages, There are also CD169+ and TCR+ Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Olleros, Maria L.; Vesin, Dominique; Garcia, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are considered to be precursor cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system, and macrophages are one of the leading members of this cellular system. Macrophages play highly diverse roles in maintaining an organism’s integrity by either directly participating in pathogen elimination or repairing tissue under sterile inflammatory conditions. There are different subpopulations of macrophages and each one has its own characteristics and functions. In this review, we summarize present knowledge on the polarization of macrophages that allows the generation of subpopulations called classically activated macrophages or M1 and alternative activated macrophages or M2. Furthermore, there are macrophages that their origin and characterization still remain unclear but have been involved as main players in some human pathologies. Thus, we also review three other categories of macrophages: tumor-associated macrophages, CD169+ macrophages, and the recently named TCR+ macrophages. Based on the literature, we provide information on the molecular characterization of these macrophage subpopulations and their specific involvement in several human pathologies such as cancer, infectious diseases, obesity, and asthma. The refined characterization of the macrophage subpopulations can be useful in designing new strategies, supplementing those already established for the treatment of diseases using macrophages as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074923

  15. The role of iron metabolism as a mediator of macrophage inflammation and lipid handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Habib, Anwer; Finn, Aloke V

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential mineral needed for normal physiologic processes. While its function in oxygen transport and other important physiologic processes is well known, less is understood about its role in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Existing paradigms suggest iron as a driver of atherosclerosis through its actions as a pro-oxidant capable of causing lipid oxidation and tissue damage. Recently we and others have identified hemoglobin (Hb) derived iron as an important factor in determining macrophage differentiation and function in areas of intraplaque hemorrhage within human atherosclerosis. Hb associated macrophages, M(Hb), are distinct from traditional macrophage foam cells because they do not contain large amounts of lipid or inflammatory cytokines, are characterized by high levels of expression of mannose receptor (CD206) and CD163 in addition to producing anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. Despite the well-known role of iron as an catalyst capable of producing lipid peroxidation through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical, we and others have shown that macrophages in areas of intraplaque hemorrhage demonstrate reduced intracellular iron and ROS which triggers production of anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as genes involved in cholesterol efflux. These data suggest that manipulation of macrophage iron itself may be a promising pharmacologic target for atherosclerosis prevention through its effects on macrophage inflammation and lipid metabolism. In this review we will summarize the current understanding of iron as it relates to plaque inflammation and discuss how further exploration of this subject may lead to new therapies for atherosclerosis.

  16. Inflammation stimulates niacin receptor (GPR109A/HCA2) expression in adipose tissue and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Kenneth R.; Moser, Arthur; Shigenaga, Judy K.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Many of the beneficial and adverse effects of niacin are mediated via a G protein receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 109A/hydroxycarboxylic acid 2 receptor (GPR109A/HCA2), which is highly expressed in adipose tissue and macrophages. Here we demonstrate that immune activation increases GPR109A/HCA2 expression. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), TNF, and interleukin (IL) 1 increase GPR109A/HCA2 expression 3- to 5-fold in adipose tissue. LPS also increased GPR109A/HCA2 mRNA levels 5.6-fold in spleen, a tissue rich in macrophages. In peritoneal macrophages and RAW cells, LPS increased GPR109A/HCA2 mRNA levels 20- to 80-fold. Zymosan, lipoteichoic acid, and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid, other Toll-like receptor activators, and TNF and IL-1 also increased GPR109A/HCA2 in macrophages. Inhibition of the myeloid differentiation factor 88 or TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing IFNβ pathways both resulted in partial inhibition of LPS stimulation of GPR109A/HCA2, suggesting that LPS signals an increase in GPR109A/HCA2 expression by both pathways. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB reduced the ability of LPS to increase GPR109A/HCA2 expression by ∼50% suggesting that both NF-κB and non-NF-κB pathways mediate the LPS effect. Finally, preventing the LPS-induced increase in GPR109A/HCA2 resulted in an increase in TG accumulation and the expression of enzymes that catalyze TG synthesis. These studies demonstrate that inflammation stimulates GPR109A/HCA2 and there are multiple intracellular signaling pathways that mediate this effect. The increase in GPR109A/HCA2 that accompanies macrophage activation inhibits the TG accumulation stimulated by macrophage activation. PMID:25320346

  17. Rape prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. Updated June 4, 2015. www.cdc.gov/ ...

  18. On the role of macrophages in anthrax.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, P C; Acosta, D; Collier, R J

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, produces systemic shock and death in susceptible animals, primarily through the action of its lethal toxin. This toxin, at high concentrations, induces lysis of macrophages in vitro but shows little or no effect on other cells. We found that when mice were specifically depleted of macrophages by silica injections, they became resistant to the toxin. Sensitivity could be restored by coinjection of toxin-sensitive cultured macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells) but not by coinjection of other cell lines tested. These results implied that macrophages mediate the action of lethal toxin in vivo and led us to investigate their role in death of the mammalian host. Sublytic concentrations of lethal toxin, orders of magnitude lower than those required to induce lysis of RAW 264.7 cells, were found to induce these cells to express interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor in vitro. Passive immunization against IL-1 or injection of an IL-1 receptor antagonist protected mice from toxin challenge, whereas anti-tumor necrosis factor provided little, if any, protection. These results imply that systemic shock and death from anthrax result primarily from the effects of high levels of cytokines, principally IL-1, produced by macrophages that have been stimulated by the anthrax lethal toxin. PMID:8234277

  19. Macrophages: important accessory cells for reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P E; Nishimura, K; Zhu, L; Pollard, J W

    1999-11-01

    Macrophages are found throughout reproductive tissues. To determine their role(s), we have studied mice homozygous for a null mutation (Csfm(op)) in the gene encoding the major macrophage growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). Both male and female Csfm(op)/Csfm(op) mice have fertility defects. Males have low sperm number and libido as a consequence of dramatically reduced circulating testosterone. Females have extended estrous cycles and poor ovulation rates. CSF-1 is the principal growth factor regulating macrophage populations in the testis, male accessory glands, ovary, and uterus. However, analyses of CSF-1 nullizygous mice suggest that the primary reproductive defect is in the development of feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Although not correlating with deficiencies of microglia populations, electrophysiological investigations indicate an impairment of neuronal responses. This suggests that microglia, under the influence of CSF-1, act to organize neuronal connectivity during development and that the absence of this function results in a perturbation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Macrophages also appear to have functions in the differentiated tissues of the reproductive system, including having a positive influence on steroidogenic cells. These data suggest that macrophages, through their trophic functions, can be considered as essential accessory cells for normal reproductive functioning.

  20. Tumor Associated Macrophages in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, Olga V.; Samoilova, Daria V.; Shitova, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are an important element of tumor stroma. They originate from blood monocytes attracted by chemokines and cytokines produced by tumor cells and, being instructed by tumor microenvironment, develop into potent tumor-supporting cell population. TAMs were demonstrated to directly stimulate tumor cell proliferation and to promote angiogenesis. Further TAMs provide for efficient immune escape by producing immunosuppressive cytokines and facilitate tumor dissemination by producing extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes. In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), numerous studies were performed for elucidation of the role of TAM in tumor progression. Using pan-macrophages marker CD68 and type 2 macrophage (M2) markers CD163 and CD206, it was demonstrated that increased density of TAMs is associated with poor survival of patients. Although most of the studies are focused on M2 population in RCC, several markers rather typical for type 1 macrophages (M1) were also characterized. Macrophages isolated from RCC tumors were shown to produce proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and CCL2. It can be concluded that RCC is an excellent example of a tumor with hybrid phenotype of TAMs that share both M1 and M2 properties. Moreover, TAMs seem to be an attractive therapeutic target as well. Further investigations are needed for identification of RCC-specific TAM markers with high predictive capacity and/or suitable for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27807511

  1. Modulation of macrophage apoptosis by antimycobacterial therapy: physiological role of apoptosis in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Diana; Garcia, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2003-07-15

    Apoptosis is a form of cell death that avoids inflammatory responses. We had previously reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Purified Protein Derivative (PPD) induce apoptosis in murine macrophages. The production of TNFalpha and IL-10 in response to Mtb infection modulates apoptosis by controlling nitric oxide production and caspase activation. Furthermore, Mtb triggers calcium influx responsible for mitochondrial alterations, an early pathway of apoptosis, independently of TNFalpha and IL-10. In tuberculosis patients apoptotic macrophages are found in granulomas and bronchoalveolar lavages, suggesting that apoptosis may participate in the control of Mtb. To further explore the role of macrophage apoptosis in tuberculosis, we studied the capacity of standard antimycobacterial drugs to modulate different events associated with the induction of apoptosis. The B10R murine macrophage line was infected or not with Mtb (5:1 bacteria to macrophage ratio) or exposed to PPD (10 microg/ml), in the presence or absence of varying concentrations (1-20 microg/ml) of anti mycobacterial drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, thiacetazone, streptomycin, and ethambutol). Inhibition of the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis by all drugs studied/correlated with inhibition of permeability transition (PT) alterations; TNFalpha, IL-10, and nitric oxide production, and caspase-1 activation. However, these drugs did not affect PPD-induced apoptosis or its associated events, suggesting that the ability of antimycobacterial drugs to block macrophage apoptosis could be explained by their effects on the metabolic activities of Mtb. All drugs, except isoniazid, at higher concentrations, induced PT alterations in noninfected macrophages in a way that appears to be dependent of calcium, since a calcium chelator prevented it. The results presented herein suggest that the pharmacological manipulation of pathways associated with macrophage apoptosis may affect the intracellular growth of

  2. In vitro modulation of macrophage phenotype and inhibition of polymer degradation by dexamethasone in a human macrophage/Fe/stress system.

    PubMed

    Casas, J; Zhao, Q; Donovan, M; Schroeder, P; Stokes, K; Untereker, D

    1999-09-15

    A new in vitro accelerated biological model, the macrophage-FeCl2-stress system was used for the evaluation of dexamethasone (DEX)-polymer formulations. This model combines the effects of cells (macrophages), transition metal ions (Fe2+), and polymer stress to promote material biodegradation. The cell and material effects of DEX, either in solution or incorporated into a polyetherurethane matrix (DEX/PEU), were monitored. Cell morphology and hydroperoxide formation in the polymer during cell culturing were characterized. After a subsequent treatment with FeCl2 the development of environmental stress cracking in the polymer was evaluated. We attempted to duplicate the biodegradation of PEU in terms of environmental stress cracking (ESC). Our results support the direct involvement of macrophages in polyetherurethane oxidation, probably by inducing hydroperoxide formation in the polymer structure. Under the influence of stress or strain, polymers with sufficient hydroperoxides degrade in the presence of Fe2+ metal ions in a manner that closely resembles the stress cracking that is observed in vivo. By contrast, polymers treated with either agents that inhibit cell activation and/or the oxidative burst, or with cells with no oxidative burst did not show signs of the biodegradative process. We demonstrated a reduction in hydroperoxide formation and no later ESC development in macrophage-cultured PEU in the presence of DEX in solution or in DEX-loaded PEU. We believe the prevention of initial polymer oxidation by reducing the cell's potential to produce oxidative stress at the tissue-biomaterial interface can directly inhibit the ESC degradation of chronically implanted polymers. The in vitro macrophage-Fe-stress system is a valuable tool for reliable assessment and cost-effective evaluation of biomaterials. PMID:10398008

  3. Early Macrophage Recruitment and Alternative Activation Are Critical for the Later Development of Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vergadi, Eleni; Chang, Mun Seog; Lee, Changjin; Liang, Olin; Liu, Xianlan; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation precedes the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH); however its role in the pathogenesis of HPH is poorly understood. We sought to characterize the hypoxic inflammatory response and elucidate its role in the development of HPH. We also aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an anti-inflammatory enzyme, is protective in HPH. Methods and Results We generated bitransgenic mice that overexpress human HO-1 under doxycycline (dox) control in an inducible, lung-specific manner. Hypoxic exposure of mice in the absence of dox resulted in early transient accumulation of monocytes/macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophages acquired an alternatively activated phenotype (M2) in response to hypoxia, characterized by the expression of Found in Inflammatory Zone-1, Arginase-1 and Chitinase-3-like-3. A brief, two-day pulse of dox delayed but did not prevent the peak of hypoxic inflammation, and could not protect from HPH. In contrast, a seven-day dox treatment sustained high HO-1 levels during the entire period of hypoxic inflammation, inhibited macrophage accumulation and activation, induced macrophage IL-10 expression, and prevented the development of HPH. Supernatants from hypoxic M2 macrophages promoted proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells while treatment with carbon monoxide, a HO-1 enzymatic product, abrogated this effect. Conclusions Early recruitment and alternative activation of macrophages in hypoxic lungs is critical for the later development of HPH. HO-1 may confer protection from HPH by effectively modifing macrophage activation state in hypoxia. PMID:21518986

  4. Binding of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and alveolar macrophages: relationship between binding affinity and antifibrogenic potential of these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, J K; Mo, C G; Malanga, C J; Ma, J Y; Castranova, V

    1991-01-01

    A group of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been shown to exhibit various degrees of effectiveness in preventing silica-induced fibrosis in animal models. The objective of the present study was to characterize the binding of several of these alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and rat alveolar macrophages using fluorometric and equilibrium dialysis methods, respectively. The lipid binding affinity of these alkaloids was found to depend upon several structural factors including hydrophobic substitutions, chiral configurations, and double oxygen bridge-restricted confirmation of the benzylisoquinoline moieties. Tetrandrine, which is a highly effective agent in preventing fibrosis, showed strong binding to both lipid vesicles and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, certain analogues of tetrandrine such as curine and tubocurine, which have little or no effect on silicosis, exhibited only weak binding to lipid vesicles and almost no binding to cells. The moderate binding affinity of fangchinoline to vesicles and cells corresponded to a moderate effectiveness of the compound as an antifibrogenic agent. Methoxyadiantifoline, an alkaloid of unknown antifibrogenic potential, also exhibited high binding affinities for lipid and cells. In conclusion, the results of these studies indicate that alveolar macrophages exhibit large binding capacities for certain members of this class of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. A positive correlation was observed between binding affinity to alveolar macrophages and the reported antifibrotic potency of these compounds. These data also suggest that the ability of these drugs to interact with alveolar macrophages may be a key step in inhibition of the progression of silica-induced pulmonary disease. PMID:1663032

  5. Resveratrol Interferes with IL1-β-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Paracrine Interaction between Primary Chondrocytes and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Limagne, Emeric; Lançon, Allan; Delmas, Dominique; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    State of the art. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic articular disease characterized by cartilage degradation and osteophyte formation. OA physiopathology is multifactorial and involves mechanical and hereditary factors. So far, there is neither preventive medicine to delay cartilage breakdown nor curative treatment. Objectives. To investigate pro-inflammatory paracrine interactions between human primary chondrocytes and macrophages following interleukin-1-β (IL-1β) treatment; to evaluate the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of resveratrol. Results. The activation of NF-κB in chondrocytes by IL-1β induced IL-6 secretion. The latter will then activate STAT3 protein in macrophages. Moreover, STAT3 was able to positively regulate IL-6 secretion, as confirmed by the doubling level of IL-6 in the coculture compared to macrophage monoculture. These experiments confirm the usefulness of the coculture model in the inflammatory arthritis-linked process as a closer biological situation to the synovial joint than separated chondrocytes and macrophages. Il also demonstrated the presence of an inflammatory amplification loop induced by IL-1β. Resveratrol showed a strong inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory marker secretion. The decrease of IL-6 secretion is dependent on the NFκB inhibition in the chondrocytes. Such reduction of the IL-6 level can limit STAT3 activation in the macrophages, leading to the interruption of the inflammatory amplification loop. Conclusion. These results increase our understanding of the anti-inflammatory actions of resveratrol and open new potential approaches to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. PMID:27187448

  6. Resveratrol Interferes with IL1-β-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Paracrine Interaction between Primary Chondrocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Limagne, Emeric; Lançon, Allan; Delmas, Dominique; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    State of the art. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic articular disease characterized by cartilage degradation and osteophyte formation. OA physiopathology is multifactorial and involves mechanical and hereditary factors. So far, there is neither preventive medicine to delay cartilage breakdown nor curative treatment. Objectives. To investigate pro-inflammatory paracrine interactions between human primary chondrocytes and macrophages following interleukin-1-β (IL-1β) treatment; to evaluate the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of resveratrol. Results. The activation of NF-κB in chondrocytes by IL-1β induced IL-6 secretion. The latter will then activate STAT3 protein in macrophages. Moreover, STAT3 was able to positively regulate IL-6 secretion, as confirmed by the doubling level of IL-6 in the coculture compared to macrophage monoculture. These experiments confirm the usefulness of the coculture model in the inflammatory arthritis-linked process as a closer biological situation to the synovial joint than separated chondrocytes and macrophages. Il also demonstrated the presence of an inflammatory amplification loop induced by IL-1β. Resveratrol showed a strong inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory marker secretion. The decrease of IL-6 secretion is dependent on the NFκB inhibition in the chondrocytes. Such reduction of the IL-6 level can limit STAT3 activation in the macrophages, leading to the interruption of the inflammatory amplification loop. Conclusion. These results increase our understanding of the anti-inflammatory actions of resveratrol and open new potential approaches to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. PMID:27187448

  7. Naringenin suppresses macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue in an early phase of high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hideaki; Ishida, Akiko; Watanabe, Wataru; Narumi, Keiko; Atsumi, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Chihiro; Kurokawa, Masahiko

    2014-11-01

    Obese adipose tissue is characterized by increased macrophage infiltration, which results in chronic inflammation in adipose tissue and leads to obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. The regulation of macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue is an important strategy for preventing and treating obesity-related diseases. In this study, we report that naringenin, a citrus flavonoid, suppressed macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue induced by short-term (14 days) feeding of a high-fat diet in mice; although naringenin did not show any differences in high-fat diet-induced changes of serum biochemical parameters in this short administration period. Naringenin suppressed monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in adipose tissue, and this effect was mediated in part through inhibition of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway. Naringenin also inhibited MCP-1 expression in adipocytes, macrophages, and a co-culture of adipocytes and macrophages. Our results suggest a mechanism by which daily consumption of naringenin may exhibit preventive effects on obesity-related diseases.

  8. Double immunofluorescent staining of rat macrophages in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue using two monoclonal mouse antibodies.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Raymond A; Isidro, Angel A; Cruz, Myrella L; Hernandez, Siomara; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach of double immunostaining to visualize more than one protein in tissues or cells using antibodies from two different host species is not always feasible due to limitations with antibody availability. Previously reported methodologies for performing multiple immunostains on the same tissue or cells with antibodies originating from the same species are varied in their complexity, sensitivity, and approach to prevent unwanted interactions between antibodies. In the ever-expanding field of macrophage biology, much more is known about mouse and human macrophages than their rat counterparts. The limited availability of validated and well-characterized monoclonal antibodies from different species is one factor responsible for preventing advances in rat macrophage biology. Here we describe an immunostaining method for identifying and examining rat macrophages that is sufficiently sensitive for use in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and that uses only commercially available reagents and antibodies. This method can be used to help characterize both physiological and pathophysiological processes in rat macrophages and can be adapted for use with any two antibodies from the same species of origin as long as one of the antibodies is biotinylated. PMID:26403093

  9. Macrophage phenotype controls long-term AKI outcomes--kidney regeneration versus atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lech, Maciej; Gröbmayr, Regina; Ryu, Mi; Lorenz, Georg; Hartter, Ingo; Mulay, Shrikant R; Susanti, Heni Eka; Kobayashi, Koichi S; Flavell, Richard A; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-02-01

    The mechanisms that determine full recovery versus subsequent progressive CKD after AKI are largely unknown. Because macrophages regulate inflammation as well as epithelial recovery, we investigated whether macrophage activation influences AKI outcomes. IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M) is a macrophage-specific inhibitor of Toll-like receptor (TLR) and IL-1 receptor signaling that prevents polarization toward a proinflammatory phenotype. In postischemic kidneys of wild-type mice, IRAK-M expression increased for 3 weeks after AKI and declined thereafter. However, genetic depletion of IRAK-M did not affect immunopathology and renal dysfunction during early postischemic AKI. Regarding long-term outcomes, wild-type kidneys regenerated completely within 5 weeks after AKI. In contrast, IRAK-M(-/-) kidneys progressively lost up to two-thirds of their original mass due to tubule loss, leaving atubular glomeruli and interstitial scarring. Moreover, M1 macrophages accumulated in the renal interstitial compartment, coincident with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Injection of bacterial CpG DNA induced the same effects in wild-type mice, and TNF-α blockade with etanercept partially prevented renal atrophy in IRAK-M(-/-) mice. These results suggest that IRAK-M induction during the healing phase of AKI supports the resolution of M1 macrophage- and TNF-α-dependent renal inflammation, allowing structural regeneration and functional recovery of the injured kidney. Conversely, IRAK-M loss-of-function mutations or transient exposure to bacterial DNA may drive persistent inflammatory mononuclear phagocyte infiltrates, which impair kidney regeneration and promote CKD. Overall, these results support a novel role for IRAK-M in the regulation of wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:24309188

  10. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Graham, Joseph G.; Onyilagha, Frances I.; MacDonald, Laura J.; Doeppler, Heike R.; Storz, Peter; Kurten, Richard C.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E) mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E) mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E) expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A) in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA in human

  11. Antioxidant Defenses of Francisella tularensis Modulate Macrophage Function and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, Seham M; Sanchez, Belkys C; Varanat, Mrudula; Ma, Zhuo; Catlett, Sally V; Melendez, Juan Andres; Malik, Meenakshi; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-03-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia, has been used in the bioweapon programs of several countries in the past, and now it is considered a potential bioterror agent. Extreme infectivity and virulence of F. tularensis is due to its ability to evade immune detection and to suppress the host's innate immune responses. However, Francisella-encoded factors and mechanisms responsible for causing immune suppression are not completely understood. Macrophages and neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species as a defense mechanism for the clearance of phagocytosed microorganisms. ROS serve a dual role; at high concentrations they act as microbicidal effector molecules that destroy intracellular pathogens, and at low concentrations they serve as secondary signaling messengers that regulate the expression of various inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that the antioxidant defenses of F. tularensis maintain redox homeostasis in infected macrophages to prevent activation of redox-sensitive signaling components that ultimately result in suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and macrophage microbicidal activity. We demonstrate that antioxidant enzymes of F. tularensis prevent the activation of redox-sensitive MAPK signaling components, NF-κB signaling, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the accumulation of ROS in infected macrophages. We also report that F. tularensis inhibits ROS-dependent autophagy to promote its intramacrophage survival. Collectively, this study reveals novel pathogenic mechanisms adopted by F. tularensis to modulate macrophage innate immune functions to create an environment permissive for its intracellular survival and growth. PMID:26644475

  12. Adipocyte Fetuin-A Contributes to Macrophage Migration into Adipose Tissue and Polarization of Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Ray, Sukanta; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue during obesity and their phenotypic conversion from anti-inflammatory M2 to proinflammatory M1 subtype significantly contributes to develop a link between inflammation and insulin resistance; signaling molecule(s) for these events, however, remains poorly understood. We demonstrate here that excess lipid in the adipose tissue environment may trigger one such signal. Adipose tissue from obese diabetic db/db mice, high fat diet-fed mice, and obese diabetic patients showed significantly elevated fetuin-A (FetA) levels in respect to their controls; partially hepatectomized high fat diet mice did not show noticeable alteration, indicating adipose tissue to be the source of this alteration. In adipocytes, fatty acid induces FetA gene and protein expressions, resulting in its copious release. We found that FetA could act as a chemoattractant for macrophages. To simulate lipid-induced inflammatory conditions when proinflammatory adipose tissue and macrophages create a niche of an altered microenvironment, we set up a transculture system of macrophages and adipocytes; the addition of fatty acid to adipocytes released FetA into the medium, which polarized M2 macrophages to M1. This was further confirmed by direct FetA addition to macrophages. Taken together, lipid-induced FetA from adipocytes is an efficient chemokine for macrophage migration and polarization. These findings open a new dimension for understanding obesity-induced inflammation. PMID:23943623

  13. Adipocyte fetuin-A contributes to macrophage migration into adipose tissue and polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Ray, Sukanta; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Majumdar, Subeer S; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2013-09-27

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue during obesity and their phenotypic conversion from anti-inflammatory M2 to proinflammatory M1 subtype significantly contributes to develop a link between inflammation and insulin resistance; signaling molecule(s) for these events, however, remains poorly understood. We demonstrate here that excess lipid in the adipose tissue environment may trigger one such signal. Adipose tissue from obese diabetic db/db mice, high fat diet-fed mice, and obese diabetic patients showed significantly elevated fetuin-A (FetA) levels in respect to their controls; partially hepatectomized high fat diet mice did not show noticeable alteration, indicating adipose tissue to be the source of this alteration. In adipocytes, fatty acid induces FetA gene and protein expressions, resulting in its copious release. We found that FetA could act as a chemoattractant for macrophages. To simulate lipid-induced inflammatory conditions when proinflammatory adipose tissue and macrophages create a niche of an altered microenvironment, we set up a transculture system of macrophages and adipocytes; the addition of fatty acid to adipocytes released FetA into the medium, which polarized M2 macrophages to M1. This was further confirmed by direct FetA addition to macrophages. Taken together, lipid-induced FetA from adipocytes is an efficient chemokine for macrophage migration and polarization. These findings open a new dimension for understanding obesity-induced inflammation.

  14. The roles of macrophage autophagy in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Bo-zong; Han, Bin-ze; Zeng, Yan-xia; Su, Ding-feng; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Although various types of drugs and therapies are available to treat atherosclerosis, it remains a major cause of mortality throughout the world. Macrophages are the major source of foam cells, which are hallmarks of atherosclerotic lesions. Consequently, the roles of macrophages in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis are increasingly investigated. Autophagy is a self-protecting cellular catabolic pathway. Since its discovery, autophagy has been found to be associated with a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumors, neurodegenerative diseases, and immune system disorders. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that autophagy plays an important role in inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis, and in promoting efferocytosis and cholesterol efflux. These facts suggest the induction of autophagy may be exploited as a potential strategy for the treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we mainly discuss the relationship between macrophage autophagy and atherosclerosis and the molecular mechanisms, as well as the recent advances in targeting the process of autophagy to treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26750103

  15. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-01

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  16. Macrophages and Their Role in Atherosclerosis: Pathophysiology and Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Nikiforov, Nikita G.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis can be regarded as a chronic inflammatory state, in which macrophages play different and important roles. Phagocytic proinflammatory cells populate growing atherosclerotic lesions, where they actively participate in cholesterol accumulation. Moreover, macrophages promote formation of complicated and unstable plaques by maintaining proinflammatory microenvironment. At the same time, anti-inflammatory macrophages contribute to tissue repair and remodelling and plaque stabilization. Macrophages therefore represent attractive targets for development of antiatherosclerotic therapy, which can aim to reduce monocyte recruitment to the lesion site, inhibit proinflammatory macrophages, or stimulate anti-inflammatory responses and cholesterol efflux. More studies are needed, however, to create a comprehensive classification of different macrophage phenotypes and to define their roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on macrophage diversity, activation, and plasticity in atherosclerosis and describe macrophage-based cellular tests for evaluation of potential antiatherosclerotic substances. PMID:27493969

  17. Accelerated vascular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus: role of macrophage.

    PubMed

    Al Gadban, Mohammed M; Alwan, Mohamed M; Smith, Kent J; Hammad, Samar M

    2015-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition that is considered a major cause of death worldwide. Striking phenomena of atherosclerosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is its high incidence in young patients. Macrophages are heterogeneous cells that differentiate from hematopoietic progenitors and reside in different tissues to preserve tissue integrity. Macrophages scavenge modified lipids and play a major role in the development of atherosclerosis. When activated, macrophages secret inflammatory cytokines. This activation triggers apoptosis of cells in the vicinity of macrophages. As such, macrophages play a significant role in tissue remodeling including atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture. In spite of studies carried on identifying the role of macrophages in atherosclerosis, this role has not been studied thoroughly in SLE-associated atherosclerosis. In this review, we address factors released by macrophages as well as extrinsic factors that may control macrophage behavior and their effect on accelerated development of atherosclerosis in SLE. PMID:25638414

  18. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the

  19. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of colonic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, G; Hausmann, M; Vogl, D; Aschenbrenner, E; Andus, T; Falk, W; Andreesen, R; SchÖlmerich, J; Gross, V

    1998-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the intestinal mucosal immune system. However, they are a poorly defined cell population. We therefore determined their phenotype in normal colonic mucosa. Macrophages were isolated from colonic biopsies and surgical specimens by collagenase digestion. Colonic macrophages were positively sorted by anti-CD33 magnetic beads. Flow cytometric triple fluorescence analysis was applied to study CD14, CD16, CD33, CD44, CD11b, CD11c, CD64, HLA-DR, CD80, CD86 and CD3/CD19 expression. CD33 was evaluated as a positive marker for intestinal macrophages. CD33+ cells isolated from normal colonic mucosa showed co-expression of the established intracellular macrophage marker CD68 in FACS analysis. CD33+ cells were capable of phagocytosis. Isolation of this cell population by magnetic anti-CD33 beads and culture resulted in a 4.2–40-fold increase in IL-1β and 4.5–44-fold increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion compared with unsorted lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC). Of the CD33+ cells, 90.9 ± 6.9% (mean ± s.d.) were CD44+. However, macrophages from colonic mucosa showed only a low expression of CD14 (10.5 ± 3.8%), CD16 (10.1 ± 3.9%), HLA-DR (27.3 ± 9.2%), CD11b (17.4 ± 6.8%), CD11c (17.8 ± 10.4%). Furthermore, expression of CD80 (9.2 ± 4.2%) and CD86 (15.1 ± 7.3%) was low, suggesting a low ability of normal intestinal macrophages to activate T cells and T cell-mediated immune responses. We conclude that CD33 is useful for the isolation and flow cytometric characterization of colonic macrophages. These cells exhibit a single phenotype in normal mucosa (CD33++, CD44++, CD14−, CD16−, CD11b−, CD11c−, HLA-DRlow, CD80−, CD86−) lacking lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor and costimulatory molecules. PMID:9649182

  20. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages-An in vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Visagie, Amcois; Kasonga, Abe; Deepak, Vishwa; Moosa, Shaakirah; Marais, Sumari; Kruger, Marlena C; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-10-28

    Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone.

  1. Raman microscopy of phagocytosis: shedding light on macrophage foam cell formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2006-02-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in the innate immune response of leukocytes against invading microorganisms. The superoxide (O II -) that is generated by this enzyme upon infection is directly and indirectly used in bacterial killing. The catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase, the membrane-bound protein heterodimer flavocytochrome b 558, contains two heme moieties. Here, we first briefly discuss our recent confocal resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy and microscopy experiments on flavocytochrome b 558 in both resting and phagocytosing neutrophilic granulocytes. Such experiments allow the determination of the redox state of flavocytochrome b 558 inside the cell, which directly reflects the electron transporting activity of NADPH oxidase. Subsequently, we report that incubation of murine RAW 264.7 macrophages with PolyActive microspheres for 1 week in culture medium leads to morphological and biochemical changes in the macrophages that are characteristic for the generation of macrophage-derived foam cells. Lipid-laden foam cells are the hallmark of early atherosclerotic lesions. Using nonresonant Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, we demonstrate that the numerous intracellular droplets in macrophages exposed to microspheres are rich in cholesteryl esters. The finding that phagocytic processes may trigger foam cell formation reinforces the current belief that (chronic) infection and inflammation are linked to the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. The study of such a connection may reveal new therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis treatment or prevention.

  2. Acute exposure to methamphetamine alters TLR9-mediated cytokine expression in human macrophage.

    PubMed

    Burns, Ariel; Ciborowski, Pawel

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies show that methamphetamine (Meth) use leads to higher susceptibility to and progression of infections, which suggests impairment of the immune system. The first line of defense against infections is the innate immune system and the macrophage is a key player in preventing and fighting infections. So we profiled cytokines over time in Meth treated THP-1 cells, as a human macrophage model, at a relevant concentration using high throughput screening to find a signaling target. We showed that after a single exposure, the effect of Meth on macrophage cytokine production was rapid and time dependent and shifted the balance of expression of cytokines to pro-inflammatory. Our results were analogous to previous reports in that Meth up-regulates TNF-α and IL-8 after two hours of exposure. However, global screening led to the novel identification of CXCL16, CXCL1 and many other up-regulated cytokines. We also showed CCL7 as the most down-regulated chemokine due to Meth exposure, which led us to hypothesize that Meth dysregulates the MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) signaling pathway. In conclusion, altered cytokine expression in macrophages suggests it could lead to a suppressed innate immunity in people who use Meth.

  3. Mycobacterial p(1)-type ATPases mediate resistance to zinc poisoning in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Botella, Hélène; Peyron, Pascale; Levillain, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Poquet, Yannick; Brandli, Irène; Wang, Chuan; Tailleux, Ludovic; Tilleul, Sylvain; Charrière, Guillaume M; Waddell, Simon J; Foti, Maria; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Gao, Qian; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Butcher, Philip D; Castagnoli, Paola Ricciardi; Gicquel, Brigitte; de Chastellier, Chantal; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2011-09-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis thrives within macrophages by residing in phagosomes and preventing them from maturing and fusing with lysosomes. A parallel transcriptional survey of intracellular mycobacteria and their host macrophages revealed signatures of heavy metal poisoning. In particular, mycobacterial genes encoding heavy metal efflux P-type ATPases CtpC, CtpG, and CtpV, and host cell metallothioneins and zinc exporter ZnT1, were induced during infection. Consistent with this pattern of gene modulation, we observed a burst of free zinc inside macrophages, and intraphagosomal zinc accumulation within a few hours postinfection. Zinc exposure led to rapid CtpC induction, and ctpC deficiency caused zinc retention within the mycobacterial cytoplasm, leading to impaired intracellular growth of the bacilli. Thus, the use of P(1)-type ATPases represents a M. tuberculosis strategy to neutralize the toxic effects of zinc in macrophages. We propose that heavy metal toxicity and its counteraction might represent yet another chapter in the host-microbe arms race.

  4. Neutrophil-derived alpha defensins control inflammation by inhibiting macrophage mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Brook, Matthew; Tomlinson, Gareth H; Miles, Katherine; Smith, Richard W P; Rossi, Adriano G; Hiemstra, Pieter S; van 't Wout, Emily F A; Dean, Jonathan L E; Gray, Nicola K; Lu, Wuyuan; Gray, Mohini

    2016-04-19

    Neutrophils are the first and most numerous cells to arrive at the site of an inflammatory insult and are among the first to die. We previously reported that alpha defensins, released from apoptotic human neutrophils, augmented the antimicrobial capacity of macrophages while also inhibiting the biosynthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. In vivo, alpha defensin administration protected mice from inflammation, induced by thioglychollate-induced peritonitis or following infection withSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium. We have now dissected the antiinflammatory mechanism of action of the most abundant neutrophil alpha defensin, Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 (HNP1). Herein we show that HNP1 enters macrophages and inhibits protein translation without inducing the unfolded-protein response or affecting mRNA stability. In a cell-free in vitro translation system, HNP1 powerfully inhibited both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation while maintaining mRNA polysomal association. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a peptide released from one cell type (neutrophils) directly regulating mRNA translation in another (macrophages). By preventing protein translation, HNP1 functions as a "molecular brake" on macrophage-driven inflammation, ensuring both pathogen clearance and the resolution of inflammation with minimal bystander tissue damage. PMID:27044108

  5. Down-regulation of interleukin 1 production by macrophages of sarcoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Moldawer, L L; Lonnroth, C; Mizel, S B; Lundholm, K G

    1987-06-15

    Peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing a transplantable methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma produced progressively less IL 1 as tumor burden increased. The loss of activity was not explained by the production of any inhibitor of the mouse thymocyte comitogen bioassay. Immune precipitation with a polyclonal antibody confirmed the decline in IL 1 appearance. Although tumor-bearing animals lost approximately 17% of their carcass mass, the reduced production of IL 1 was not satisfactorily explained by coexistent malnutrition, since similarly depleted non-tumor-bearing mice were capable of producing IL 1. In addition to an altered IL 1 production by macrophages of tumor-bearing mice, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography revealed that the pattern of secretory protein synthesis from LPS-stimulated and unstimulated peritoneal macrophages differed between tumor-bearing and control animals. Administration of LPS to tumor-bearing mice early after tumor transplantation resulted in reduced tumor growth and prevented the down-regulation of in vitro IL 1 production by peritoneal macrophages. These findings demonstrate a specific defect in IL 1 production associated with increasing tumor burden. Further studies are required to determine whether this defect in IL 1 synthesis contributes to the increased tumor growth.

  6. Resistance of LPS-activated bone marrow derived macrophages to apoptosis mediated by dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Haim, Yasmin Ohana; Unger, Naamit Deshet; Souroujon, Miriam C.; Mittelman, Moshe; Neumann, Drorit

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) display pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Macrophages are a major target for GC action. Here we show that dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic GC, decreased viability of naïve bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), involving an apoptotic mechanism. Administration of DEX together with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) protected BMDM against DEX-mediated cell death, suggesting that activated BMDM respond to DEX differently than naïve BMDM. An insight to the molecular basis of LPS actions was provided by a 7 fold increase in mRNA levels of glucocorticoid receptor beta (GRβ), a GR dominant-negative splice variant which inhibits GRα's transcriptional activity. LPS did not inhibit all DEX-mediated effects on BMDM; DEX significantly reduced the percentage of BMDM expressing high levels of the cell surface markers F4/80 and CD11b and led to a decrease in macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1-α) mRNA and protein levels. These two DEX-mediated effects were not prevented by LPS. Our finding that LPS did not reduce the DEX-induced elevation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a mediator of GCs anti-inflammatory actions, may provide an underlying mechanism. These findings enable a better understanding of clinical states, such as sepsis, in which macrophages are activated by endotoxins and treatment by GCs is considered. PMID:24608810

  7. Uptake of apoptotic cells drives the growth of a pathogenic trypanosome in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Nascimento, Danielle O.; Soares, Milena B. P.; Bozza, Patricia T.; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; de Mello, Fernando G.; Dosreis, George A.; Lopes, Marcela F.

    2000-01-01

    After apoptosis, phagocytes prevent inflammation and tissue damage by the uptake and removal of dead cells. In addition, apoptotic cells evoke an anti-inflammatory response through macrophages. We have previously shown that there is intense lymphocyte apoptosis in an experimental model of Chagas' disease, a debilitating cardiac illness caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we show that the interaction of apoptotic, but not necrotic T lymphocytes with macrophages infected with T. cruzi fuels parasite growth in a manner dependent on prostaglandins, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and polyamine biosynthesis. We show that the vitronectin receptor is critical, in both apoptotic-cell cytoadherence and the induction of prostaglandin E2/TGF-β release and ornithine decarboxylase activity in macrophages. A single injection of apoptotic cells in infected mice increases parasitaemia, whereas treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors almost completely ablates it in vivo. These results suggest that continual lymphocyte apoptosis and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages have a role in parasite persistence in the host, and that cyclooxygenase inhibitors have potential therapeutic application in the control of parasite replication and spread in Chagas' disease.

  8. Bone marrow macrophages support prostate cancer growth in bone

    PubMed Central

    Soki, Fabiana N.; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Yeo Won; Jones, Jacqueline D.; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J.; Entezami, Payam; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K.

    2015-01-01

    Resident macrophages in bone play important roles in bone remodeling, repair, and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, yet their role in skeletal metastasis remains under investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of macrophages in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis, using two in vivo mouse models of conditional macrophage depletion. RM-1 syngeneic tumor growth was analyzed in an inducible macrophage (CSF-1 receptor positive cells) ablation model (MAFIA mice). There was a significant reduction in tumor growth in the tibiae of macrophage-ablated mice, compared with control non-ablated mice. Similar results were observed when macrophage ablation was performed using liposome-encapsulated clodronate and human PC-3 prostate cancer cells where tumor-bearing long bones had increased numbers of tumor associated-macrophages. Although tumors were consistently smaller in macrophage-depleted mice, paradoxical results of macrophage depletion on bone were observed. Histomorphometric and micro-CT analyses demonstrated that clodronate-treated mice had increased bone volume, while MAFIA mice had reduced bone volume. These results suggest that the effect of macrophage depletion on tumor growth was independent of its effect on bone responses and that macrophages in bone may be more important to tumor growth than the bone itself. In conclusion, resident macrophages play a pivotal role in prostate cancer growth in bone. PMID:26459393

  9. Monoclonal antibody to macrophages (EMB/11) labels macrophages and microglial cells in human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M M; McGee, J O

    1986-01-01

    Normal and diseased human central nervous system (CNS) tissues were studied immunohistochemically by a monoclonal antibody to human macrophages (EBM/11), antisera to glial fibrillary acidic protein (anti-GFAP), and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (alpha 1-ACT). EBM/11 reacted with brain macrophages located mainly around blood vessels in normal brain; it also reacted with resting microglia in normal brain and with numerous reactive microglia and macrophages in brain tumours and inflammatory lesions. Microglia did not react with anti-GFAP or alpha 1-ACT. An EBM/11 positive phenotype, therefore, is shared by microglia and macrophages and suggests that microglial cells form a specialised part of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Images PMID:3755142

  10. MiR-146a modulates macrophage polarization by inhibiting Notch1 pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Liu, Xue-jiao; QunZhou; Xie, Juan; Ma, Tao-tao; Meng, Xiao-ming; Li, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and plastic cells which are able to undergo dynamic transition between M1 and M2 polarized phenotypes in response to the microenvironment signals. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization are still obscure. In the current study, it was revealed that miR-146a might play a pivotal role in macrophage polarization. As our results indicated, miR-146a was highly expressed in M2 macrophages rather than M1 macrophages. Over-expression of miR-146a resulted in significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including iNOS and TNF-α in M1 macrophages, while increased production of M2 marker genes such as Arg1 and CD206 in M2 macrophages. In contrast, knockdown of miR-146a promoted M1 macrophage polarization but diminished M2 macrophage polarization. Mechanistically, it was revealed that miR-146a modulated macrophage polarization by targeting Notch1. Of note, PPARγ was responsible as another target for miR-146a-mediated macrophage polarization. Taken together, it was suggested that miR-146a might serve as a molecular regulator in macrophage polarization and is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases.

  11. Macrophage plasticity and polarization: in vivo veritas

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to IFNs, Toll-like receptor engagement, or IL-4/IL-13 signaling, macrophages undergo M1 (classical) or M2 (alternative) activation, which represent extremes of a continuum in a universe of activation states. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1-M2 or M2-like polarized activation. Functional skewing of mononuclear phagocytes occurs in vivo under physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy) and in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer). However, in selected preclinical and clinical conditions, coexistence of cells in different activation states and unique or mixed phenotypes have been observed, a reflection of dynamic changes and complex tissue-derived signals. The identification of mechanisms and molecules associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage-centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:22378047

  12. Analysis of Ebola Virus Entry Into Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, Franziska; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Babler, Anne; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Karsten, Christina B; Gnirß, Kerstin; Schneider, Heike; Wrensch, Florian; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Bertram, Stephanie; Herrler, Georg; Becker, Stephan; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike

    2015-10-01

    Ebolaviruses constitute a public health threat, particularly in Central and Western Africa. Host cell factors required for spread of ebolaviruses may serve as targets for antiviral intervention. Lectins, TAM receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl, Mer), T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins, integrins, and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) have been reported to promote entry of ebolaviruses into certain cellular systems. However, the factors used by ebolaviruses to invade macrophages, major viral targets, are poorly defined. Here, we show that mannose-specific lectins, TIM-1 and Axl augment entry into certain cell lines but do not contribute to Ebola virus (EBOV)-glycoprotein (GP)-driven transduction of macrophages. In contrast, expression of Mer, integrin αV, and NPC1 was required for efficient GP-mediated transduction and EBOV infection of macrophages. These results define cellular factors hijacked by EBOV for entry into macrophages and, considering that Mer and integrin αV promote phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, support the concept that EBOV relies on apoptotic mimicry to invade target cells.

  13. Analysis of Ebola Virus Entry Into Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmann, Franziska; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Babler, Anne; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Karsten, Christina B.; Gnirß, Kerstin; Schneider, Heike; Wrensch, Florian; O'Callaghan, Christopher A.; Bertram, Stephanie; Herrler, Georg; Becker, Stephan; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses constitute a public health threat, particularly in Central and Western Africa. Host cell factors required for spread of ebolaviruses may serve as targets for antiviral intervention. Lectins, TAM receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl, Mer), T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins, integrins, and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) have been reported to promote entry of ebolaviruses into certain cellular systems. However, the factors used by ebolaviruses to invade macrophages, major viral targets, are poorly defined. Here, we show that mannose-specific lectins, TIM-1 and Axl augment entry into certain cell lines but do not contribute to Ebola virus (EBOV)-glycoprotein (GP)–driven transduction of macrophages. In contrast, expression of Mer, integrin αV, and NPC1 was required for efficient GP-mediated transduction and EBOV infection of macrophages. These results define cellular factors hijacked by EBOV for entry into macrophages and, considering that Mer and integrin αV promote phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, support the concept that EBOV relies on apoptotic mimicry to invade target cells. PMID:25877552

  14. Macrophages as a Battleground for Toxoplasma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary sentence In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Jensen et al. show clonal lineages of Toxoplasma gondii have evolved distinct ways of subverting their favored host cell, the macrophage. The results suggest that T. gondii and the ROP kinases can be used to probe immune signaling pathways. PMID:21669391

  15. Degradation of parathyroid hormone in macrophage endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Diment, S.; Martin, K.J.; Stahl, P.D.

    1986-05-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is secreted as an 84 amino acid protein that is rapidly cleaved between amino acids 34 and 35 by Kupffer cells in liver. The resulting amino terminal peptide (1-34) is active at PTH target organs (kidney and bone). Cathepsin D can process PTH to 1-34 in vitro, and a cathepsin D-like protease, which may rapidly process proteins, is present in endosomes of alveolar macrophages. The authors set out to determine whether PTH is degraded to 1-34 in endosomes, and to elucidate the mechanism of hormone processing in vivo. Intracellular transport of /sup 125/I-PTH was assessed by binding to alveolar macrophages at 4/sup 0/C, followed by internalization at 37/sup 0/C. Distribution of PTH among plasma membranes, endosomes and lysosomes was determined by subcellular fractionation. Degradation of the ligand to TCA-soluble fragments in each compartment was assayed at neutral and acid pH. 1-34 in supernatants was separated from undergraded PTH by gel filtration and detected by bioassay on kidney membranes. The authors data suggest that: 1) macrophages rapidly degrade PTH to TCA-soluble fragments. 2) macrophages do not secrete proteases that degrade extracellular PTH. 3) PTH is internalized into endocytic vesicles after 5 mins, but not delivered to lysosomes within 30 mins. 4) A bioactive peptide is released into the extracellular medium after 20 mins. 5) PTH is degraded in endosomes at acid pH by a pepstatin-sensitive protease.

  16. Analysis of Ebola Virus Entry Into Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, Franziska; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Babler, Anne; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Karsten, Christina B; Gnirß, Kerstin; Schneider, Heike; Wrensch, Florian; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Bertram, Stephanie; Herrler, Georg; Becker, Stephan; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike

    2015-10-01

    Ebolaviruses constitute a public health threat, particularly in Central and Western Africa. Host cell factors required for spread of ebolaviruses may serve as targets for antiviral intervention. Lectins, TAM receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl, Mer), T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins, integrins, and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) have been reported to promote entry of ebolaviruses into certain cellular systems. However, the factors used by ebolaviruses to invade macrophages, major viral targets, are poorly defined. Here, we show that mannose-specific lectins, TIM-1 and Axl augment entry into certain cell lines but do not contribute to Ebola virus (EBOV)-glycoprotein (GP)-driven transduction of macrophages. In contrast, expression of Mer, integrin αV, and NPC1 was required for efficient GP-mediated transduction and EBOV infection of macrophages. These results define cellular factors hijacked by EBOV for entry into macrophages and, considering that Mer and integrin αV promote phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, support the concept that EBOV relies on apoptotic mimicry to invade target cells. PMID:25877552

  17. Phenotypic Correlates of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Arrildt, Kathryn T.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Joseph, Sarah B.; Dukhovlinova, Elena N.; Graham, William D.; Ping, Li-Hua; Schnell, Gretja; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Kincer, Laura P.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Heyderman, Robert S.; Van Rie, Annelies; Cohen, Myron S.; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W.; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 is typically CCR5 using (R5) and T cell tropic (T-tropic), targeting memory CD4+ T cells throughout acute and chronic infections. However, viruses can expand into alternative cells types. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 variants have evolved to infect macrophages, which have only low levels of surface CD4. Most M-tropic variants have been isolated from the central nervous system during late-stage chronic infection. We used the HIV-1 env genes of well-defined, subject-matched M-tropic and T-tropic viruses to characterize the phenotypic features of the M-tropic Env protein. We found that, compared to T-tropic viruses, M-tropic viruses infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) on average 28-fold more efficiently, use low-density CD4 more efficiently, have increased sensitivity to soluble CD4 (sCD4), and show trends toward sensitivity to some CD4 binding site antibodies but no difference in sensitivity to antibodies targeting the CD4-bound conformation. M-tropic viruses also displayed a trend toward resistance to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies targeting the V1/V2 region of Env, suggesting subtle changes in Env protein conformation. The paired M- and T-tropic viruses did not differ in autologous serum neutralization, temperature sensitivity, entry kinetics, intrinsic infectivity, or Env protein incorporation. We also examined viruses with modestly increased CD4 usage. These variants have significant sensitivity to sCD4 and may represent evolutionary intermediates. CD4 usage is strongly correlated with infectivity of MDMs over a wide range of CD4 entry phenotypes. These data suggest that emergence of M-tropic HIV-1 includes multiple steps in which a phenotype of increased sensitivity to sCD4 and enhanced CD4 usage accompany subtle changes in Env conformation. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 typically replicates in CD4+ T cells. However, HIV-1 can evolve to infect macrophages, especially within the brain. Understanding how CCR5-using macrophage-tropic viruses

  18. Origin, Development, and Homeostasis of Tissue-resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are versatile cells of the hematopoietic system that display remarkable functional diversity encompassing innate immune responses, tissue development, and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages are present in almost all tissues of the body and display distinct location-specific phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Recent studies also demonstrate distinct origins of tissue-resident macrophages. This emerging picture of ontological, functional, and phenotypic heterogeneity within tissue macrophages has altered our understanding of these cells, which play important roles in many human diseases. In this review, we discuss the different origins of tissue macrophages, the transcription factors regulating their development, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis at steady state. PMID:25319325

  19. Effects of nanoparticles on murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallet, M.; Aude-Garcia, C.; Lelong, C.; Candéias, S.; Luche, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Triboulet, S.; Diallo, D.; Diemer, H.; van Dorsselaer, A.; Rabilloud, T.

    2011-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are more and more widely used in an increasing number of applications. Consequently, they are more and more present in the environment, and the risk that they may represent for human health must be evaluated. This requires to increase our knowledge of the cellular responses to nanoparticles. In this context, macrophages appear as an attractive system. They play a major role in eliminating foreign matter, e.g. pathogens or infectious agents, by phagocytosis and inflammatory responses, and are thus highly likely to react to nanoparticles. We have decided to study their responses to nanoparticles by a combination of classical and wide-scope approaches such as proteomics. The long term goal of this study is the better understanding of the responses of macrophages to nanoparticles, and thus to help to assess their possible impact on human health. We chose as a model system bone marrow-derived macrophages and studied the effect of commonly used nanoparticles such as TiO2 and Cu. Classical responses of macrophage were characterized and proteomic approaches based on 2D gels of whole cell extracts were used. Preliminary proteomic data resulting from whole cell extracts showed different effects for TiO2-NPs and Cu-NPs. Modifications of the expression of several proteins involved in different pathways such as, for example, signal transduction, endosome-lysosome pathway, Krebs cycle, oxidative stress response have been underscored. These first results validate our proteomics approach and open a new wide field of investigation for NPs impact on macrophages.

  20. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163

    PubMed Central

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches. PMID:26111002

  1. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy.

  2. Murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, R M; Hinsdill, R D; Sandok, P L; Horowitz, S D

    1978-01-01

    Light and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions involving the initial contact of peritoneal, spleen, or thymus lymphocytes with peritoneal macrophage processes or microprocesses followed by clustering of lymphocytes over the central nuclear area of the macrophages. Lymphocyte-lymphocyte clustering was not observed in the absence of macrophages. Attachment and subsequent clustering appeared not to require the presence of serum or antigen; the attachment of allogeneic or xenogeneic lymphocytes was comparable to that seen in the syngeneic system, but central clustering of these lymphocytes failed to occur. No attachment or clustering was observed when thymic lymphocytes were cultured with thymus derived fibroblasts rather than with peritoneal macrophages. Lymphocyte attachment to immune, antigen-activated, syngeneic macrophages occurred more rapidly than that to normal unstimulated syngeneic macrophages; however, lymphocytes attached to the "activated" macrophages appeared to be killed by a nonphagocytic mechanism. A similar increase in the rate of lymphocyte attachment to macrophages occurred in the presence of migration inhibitory factor. Subsequent lymphocyte clustering on macrophages was observed in the migration inhibitory factor-stimulated cultures. In addition, lymphocyte-macrophage interactions similar to those in vitro were observed to occur in vivo on intraperitoneally implanted cover slips. Images PMID:101458

  3. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC-paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC-PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy.

  4. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  5. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC-paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC-PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  6. Lysosomal Disorders Drive Susceptibility to Tuberculosis by Compromising Macrophage Migration

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Russell D.; Levitte, Steven; O’Sullivan, Mary P.; O’Leary, Seónadh M.; Cambier, C.J.; Cameron, James; Takaki, Kevin K.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Tobin, David M.; Keane, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Summary A zebrafish genetic screen for determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum identified a hypersusceptible mutant deficient in lysosomal cysteine cathepsins that manifests hallmarks of human lysosomal storage diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, mutant macrophages accumulate undigested lysosomal material, which disrupts endocytic recycling and impairs their migration to, and thus engulfment of, dying cells. This causes a buildup of unengulfed cell debris. During mycobacterial infection, macrophages with lysosomal storage cannot migrate toward infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis in the tuberculous granuloma. The unengulfed apoptotic macrophages undergo secondary necrosis, causing granuloma breakdown and increased mycobacterial growth. Macrophage lysosomal storage similarly impairs migration to newly infecting mycobacteria. This phenotype is recapitulated in human smokers, who are at increased risk for tuberculosis. A majority of their alveolar macrophages exhibit lysosomal accumulations of tobacco smoke particulates and do not migrate to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incapacitation of highly microbicidal first-responding macrophages may contribute to smokers’ susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:27015311

  7. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  8. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  9. Inhibition of the Plasma-Membrane-Associated Serine Protease Cathepsin G by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3364c Suppresses Caspase-1 and Pyroptosis in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Danelishvili, Lia; Everman, Jamie L.; McNamara, Michael J.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease associated with the infection of a great part of the world’s population and is responsible for the death of two to three million people annually. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects macrophages and subverts its mechanisms of killing. The pathogen suppresses macrophage apoptosis by many different mechanisms. We describe that, upon uptake by macrophages, M. tuberculosis overexpresses an operon Rv3361c-Rv3365c and secretes Rv3364c. The Rv3365c knockout strain is deficient in apoptosis inhibition. The Rv3364c protein binds to the serine protease cathepsin G on the membrane, inhibiting its enzymatic activity and the downstream activation of caspase-1-dependent apoptosis. In summary, M. tuberculosis prevents macrophage pyroptosis by a novel mechanism involving cytoplasmic surveillance proteins. PMID:22275911

  10. Protective role of G-CSF in dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis through generating gut-homing macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meshkibaf, Shahab; Martins, Andrew J; Henry, Garth T; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine best known for its role in promoting the generation and function of neutrophils. G-CSF is also found to be involved in macrophage generation and immune regulation; however, its in vivo role in immune homeostasis is largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of G-CSF in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis using G-CSF receptor-deficient (G-CSFR(-/-)) mice. Mice were administered with 1.5% DSS in drinking water for 5days, and the severity of colitis was measured for the next 5days. GCSFR(-/-) mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis than G-CSFR(+/+) or G-CSFR(-/+) mice. G-CSFR(-/-) mice harbored less F4/80(+) macrophages, but a similar number of neutrophils, in the intestine. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared in the presence of both G-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) (G-BMDM) expressed higher levels of regulatory macrophage markers such as programmed death ligand 2 (PDL2), CD71 and CD206, but not in arginase I, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, Ym1 (chitinase-like 3) and FIZZ1 (found in inflammatory zone 1), and lower levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CD80 and CD86 than bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared in the presence of M-CSF alone (BMDM), in response to interleukin (IL)-4/IL-13 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon (IFN)-γ, respectively. Adoptive transfer of G-BMDM, but not BMDM, protected G-CSFR(-/-) mice from DSS-induced colitis, and suppressed expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β and iNOS in the intestine. These results suggest that G-CSF plays an important role in preventing colitis, likely through populating immune regulatory macrophages in the intestine.

  11. Drowning Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Drowning Prevention: Information for Parents Page Content Article Body Drowning ... in very cold water for lengthy periods. Drowning Prevention: Know the Warning Signs These signs may signal ...

  12. Preventing Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... The top three methods used in suicides include firearms (49.9%), suffocation (26.7%), and poisoning (15. ... Content source: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention Page maintained by: Office ...

  13. Leptomeningeal Cells Transduce Peripheral Macrophages Inflammatory Signal to Microglia in Reponse to Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinwen; Ni, Junjun; Yu, Weixian; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We report here that the leptomeningeal cells transduce inflammatory signals from peripheral macrophages to brain-resident microglia in response to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) LPS. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase was mainly detected in the gingival macrophages of chronic periodontitis patients. In in vitro studies, P.g. LPS induced the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β from THP-1 human monocyte-like cell line and RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. Surprisingly, the mean mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in leptomeningeal cells after treatment with the conditioned medium from P.g. LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were significantly higher than those after treatment with P.g. LPS alone. Furthermore, the mean mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in microglia after treatment with the conditioned medium from P.g. LPS-stimulated leptomeningeal cells were significantly higher than those after P.g. LPS alone. These observations suggest that leptomeninges serve as an important route for transducing inflammatory signals from macrophages to microglia by secretion of proinflammatory mediators during chronic periodontitis. Moreover, propolis significantly reduced the P.g. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1 β production by leptomeningeal cells through inhibiting the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. Together with the inhibitory effect on microglial activation, propolis may be beneficial in preventing neuroinflammation during chronic periodontitis. PMID:24363500

  14. Purple corn anthocyanins inhibit diabetes-associated glomerular monocyte activation and macrophage infiltration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Kyung; Li, Jing; Kim, Jung-Lye; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Kwak, Su-Nam; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major diabetic complications and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In early DN, renal injury and macrophage accumulation take place in the pathological environment of glomerular vessels adjacent to renal mesangial cells expressing proinflammatory mediators. Purple corn utilized as a daily food is rich in anthocyanins exerting disease-preventive activities as a functional food. This study elucidated whether anthocyanin-rich purple corn extract (PCA) could suppress monocyte activation and macrophage infiltration. In the in vitro study, human endothelial cells and THP-1 monocytes were cultured in conditioned media of human mesangial cells exposed to 33 mM glucose (HG-HRMC). PCA decreased the HG-HRMC-conditioned, media-induced expression of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and monocyte integrins-β1 and -β2 through blocking the mesangial Tyk2 pathway. In the in vivo animal study, db/db mice were treated with 10 mg/kg PCA daily for 8 wk. PCA attenuated CXCR2 induction and the activation of Tyk2 and STAT1/3 in db/db mice. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that PCA alleviated mesangial expansion-elicited renal injury in diabetic kidneys. In glomeruli, PCA attenuated the induction of intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and CD11b. PCA diminished monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 transcription in the diabetic kidney, inhibiting the induction of the macrophage markers CD68 and F4/80. These results demonstrate that PCA antagonized the infiltration and accumulation of macrophages in diabetic kidneys through disturbing the mesangial IL-8-Tyk-STAT signaling pathway. Therefore, PCA may be a potential renoprotective agent treating diabetes-associated glomerulosclerosis.

  15. Concentration-dependent Diversification Effects of Free Cholesterol Loading on Macrophage Viability and Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningjun; Li, Pin-Lan; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of free cholesterol in atherosclerotic lesions has been well documented in both animals and humans. In studying the relevance of free cholesterol buildup in atherosclerosis, contradictory results have been generated, indicating that free cholesterol produces both pro- and anti-atherosclerosis effects in macrophages. This inconsistency might stem from the examination of only select concentrations of free cholesterol. In the present study, we sought to investigate the implication of excess free cholesterol loading in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis across a broad concentration range from (in μg/ml) 0 to 60. Macrophage metabolite measurements and viable cell counting showed that the cell viability increased at lower concentrations of free cholesterol from (in μg/ml) 0 to 20, but gradually decreased at higher concentrations from 20 to 60. FACS (Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting) found that lower free cholesterol loading induced anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage polarization. The activation of the PPARγ (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma) nuclear factor underscored the stimulation of this M2 phenotype. Nevertheless, higher levels of free cholesterol resulted in pro-inflammatory M1 activation. Moreover, with the application of higher free cholesterol concentrations, macrophage apoptosis and secretion of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β (Interleukin-1 beta) increased significantly as determined by flow cytometry and ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) assay, respectively. These results for the first time have demonstrated that free cholesterol could render concentration-dependent diversification effects on macrophage viability, polarization, apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine secretions, thereby reconciling the pros and cons of free cholesterol buildup in atherosclerosis. Understanding these concentration-dependent effects of cholesterol on atherosclerosis will facilitate the development of a free cholesterol-based therapy

  16. Erythrocyte Catabolism by Macrophages In Vitro THE EFFECT OF HYDROCORTISONE ON ERYTHROPHAGOCYTOSIS AND ON THE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Gemsa, Diethard; Woo, C. H.; Fudenberg, H. Hugh; Schmid, Rudi

    1973-01-01

    Phagocytosis of erythrocytes was studied in vitro in an incubation system consisting of rat peritoneal macrophages and antibody-coated 59Fe-labeled erythrocytes. The system was characterized in terms of the rate and magnitude of erythrophagocytosis, determined by the interiorization of the 59Fe label. On incubation of 150 × 106 macrophages with 75 × 106 antibodycoated erythrocytes, erythrophagocytosis began within a few minutes and was essentially completed after 2 h when 50% of the offered red cells had been ingested by the macrophages. Heme oxygenase (HO) activity, which is very low in native macrophages, increased 4- to 10- fold in response to the ingested erythrocytes; this enzyme stimulation occurred with a delay of 3 h in relation to erythrophagocytosis. Actinomycin D or puromycin prevented the increase of HO activity without affecting erythrophagocytosis, which suggests that the enzyme stimulation was due to substrate-mediated enzyme induction. Hydrocortisone (HC) (0.1 mg/ml medium) dissociated erythrophagocytosis from HO induction, leaving the former unimpaired but completely suppressing the latter. The suppressive effect of HC on the enzyme induction was completely prevented by 5 mg glucose and 0.02 U insulin/ml of the medium. In macrophages engaged in erythrophagocytosis. HC also lowered glucose removal from the medium and reduced formation of 14CO2 from [1-14C]glucose. These results suggest that induction of HO in macrophages by the hemoglobin of ingested erythrocytes requires intact transport or metabolism of glucose. Glucose utilization appears to be impaired by HC, but is restored by additional glucose and insulin. The findings suggest that plasma steroid concentrations in the pharmacological range could reduce bilirubin formation in phagocytic cells in vivo without affecting the sequestration and degradation of erythrocytes. This provides a possible explanation for the observation that in patients with hepatogenous jaundice, steroids often lower

  17. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  18. Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Essential Oil Exerts Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Macrophage Mediated Immune Response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, D; Gismondi, A; Basso, A; Canuti, L; Braglia, R; Canini, A; Mariani, F; Cappelli, G

    2016-01-01

    Different studies described the antibacterial properties of Lavandula angustifolia (Mill.) essential oil and its anti-inflammatory effects. Besides, no data exist on its ability to activate human macrophages during the innate response against Staphylococcus aureus. The discovery of promising regulators of macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, without side effects, could be useful for the prevention of, or as therapeutic remedy for, various inflammation-mediated diseases. This study investigated, by transcriptional analysis, how a L. angustifolia essential oil treatment influences the macrophage response to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The results showed that the treatment increases the phagocytic rate and stimulates the containment of intracellular bacterial replication by macrophages. Our data showed that this stimulation is coupled with expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species production (i.e., CYBB and NCF4). Moreover, the essential oil treatment balanced the inflammatory signaling induced by S. aureus by repressing the principal pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors and inducing the heme oxygenase-1 gene transcription. These data showed that the L. angustifolia essential oil can stimulate the human innate macrophage response to a bacterium which is responsible for one of the most important nosocomial infection and might suggest the potential development of this plant extract as an anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory coadjutant drug. PMID:26730790

  19. SCAR/WAVE-mediated processing of engulfed apoptotic corpses is essential for effective macrophage migration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Evans, I R; Ghai, P A; Urbančič, V; Tan, K-L; Wood, W

    2013-05-01

    In vitro studies have shown that SCAR/WAVE activates the Arp2/3 complex to generate actin filaments, which in many cell types are organised into lamellipodia that are thought to have an important role in cell migration. Here we demonstrate that SCAR is utilised by Drosophila macrophages to drive their developmental and inflammatory migrations and that it is regulated via the Hem/Kette/Nap1-containing SCAR/WAVE complex. SCAR is also important in protecting against bacterial pathogens and in wound repair as SCAR mutant embryos succumb more readily to both sterile and infected wounds. However, in addition to driving the formation of lamellipodia in macrophages, SCAR is required cell autonomously for the correct processing of phagocytosed apoptotic corpses by these professional phagocytes. Removal of this phagocytic burden by preventing apoptosis rescues macrophage lamellipodia formation and partially restores motility. Our results show that efficient processing of phagosomes is critical for effective macrophage migration in vivo. These findings have important implications for the resolution of macrophages from chronic wounds and the behaviour of those associated with tumours, because phagocytosis of debris may serve to prolong the presence of these cells at these sites of pathology. PMID:23328632

  20. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R.; dos Santos, Claudia T.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A. M.; Souza, Felipe O.; Soares, Christiane P.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a “crown.” This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  1. Nitric oxide-mediated regulation of ferroportin-1 controls macrophage iron homeostasis and immune function in Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Schleicher, Ulrike; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Ludwiczek, Susanne; Talasz, Heribert; Brandacher, Gerald; Moser, Patrizia L; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Fang, Ferric C; Bogdan, Christian; Weiss, Günter

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible NO synthase 2 (NOS2) affects cellular iron homeostasis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and implications for NOS2-dependent pathogen control are incompletely understood. In this study, we found that NO up-regulated the expression of ferroportin-1 (Fpn1), the major cellular iron exporter, in mouse and human cells. Nos2(-/-) macrophages displayed increased iron content due to reduced Fpn1 expression and allowed for an enhanced iron acquisition by the intracellular bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. Nos2 gene disruption or inhibition of NOS2 activity led to an accumulation of iron in the spleen and splenic macrophages. Lack of NO formation resulted in impaired nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, resulting in reduced Fpn1 transcription and diminished cellular iron egress. After infection of Nos2(-/-) macrophages or mice with S. typhimurium, the increased iron accumulation was paralleled by a reduced cytokine (TNF, IL-12, and IFN-γ) expression and impaired pathogen control, all of which were restored upon administration of the iron chelator deferasirox or hyperexpression of Fpn1 or Nrf2. Thus, the accumulation of iron in Nos2(-/-) macrophages counteracts a proinflammatory host immune response, and the protective effect of NO appears to partially result from its ability to prevent iron overload in macrophages.

  2. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells precondition lung monocytes/macrophages to produce tolerance against allo- and autoimmunity in the eye.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Yoon, Sun-Ok; Choi, Hosoon; Prockop, Darwin J; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Intravenously administered mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) engraft only transiently in recipients, but confer long-term therapeutic benefits in patients with immune disorders. This suggests that MSCs induce immune tolerance by long-lasting effects on the recipient immune regulatory system. Here, we demonstrate that i.v. infusion of MSCs preconditioned lung monocytes/macrophages toward an immune regulatory phenotype in a TNF-α-stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6-dependent manner. As a result, mice were protected against subsequent immune challenge in two models of allo- and autoimmune ocular inflammation: corneal allotransplantation and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The monocytes/macrophages primed by MSCs expressed high levels of MHC class II, B220, CD11b, and IL-10, and exhibited T-cell-suppressive activities independently of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Adoptive transfer of MSC-induced B220(+)CD11b(+) monocytes/macrophages prevented corneal allograft rejection and EAU. Deletion of monocytes/macrophages abrogated the MSC-induced tolerance. However, MSCs with TSG-6 knockdown did not induce MHC II(+)B220(+)CD11b(+) cells, and failed to attenuate EAU. Therefore, the results demonstrate a mechanism of the MSC-mediated immune modulation through induction of innate immune tolerance that involves monocytes/macrophages.

  3. Macrophage TCF-4 co-activates p65 to potentiate chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xia; Hou, Along; Wang, Rui; Liu, Da; Xiang, Wei; Xie, Qingyun; Zhang, Bo; Gan, Lixia; Zheng, Wei; Miao, Hongming

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factor 4 (TCF-4) was recently identified as a candidate gene for the cause of type 2 diabetes, although the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the TCF-4 transgene in macrophages aggravated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, characterized by the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood, liver and white adipose tissue, as well as a proinflammatory profile of immune cells in visceral fats in mice. Mechanistically, TCF-4 functioned as a co-activator of p65 to amplify the saturated free fatty acid (FFA)-stimulated promoter activity, mRNA transcription and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in primary macrophages. Blockage of p65 with a specific interfering RNA or inhibitor could prevent TCF-4-enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in FFA/lipopolysaccharide-treated primary macrophages. The p65 inhibitor could abolish macrophage TCF-4 transgene-aggravated systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in HFD-treated mice. In addition, we demonstrated that the mRNA expression of TCF-4 in the peripheral blood monocytes from humans was positively correlated to the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor α, IL-6 and fasting plasma glucose. In summary, we identified TCF-4 as a co-activator of p65 in the potentiation of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and aggravation of HFD-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:27129186

  4. Macrophage-derived IL-18 and increased fibrinogen deposition are age-related inflammatory signatures of vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Martinez, Laisel; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Duque, Juan C.; Wei, Yuntao; Mesa, Annia; Pena, Angela; Gupta, Vineet; Pham, Si M.

    2014-01-01

    Aging has been associated with pathological vascular remodeling and increased neointimal hyperplasia. The understanding of how aging exacerbates this process is fundamental to prevent cardiovascular complications in the elderly. This study proposes a mechanism by which aging sustains leukocyte adhesion, vascular inflammation, and increased neointimal thickness after injury. The effect of aging on vascular remodeling was assessed in the rat balloon injury model using microarray analysis, immunohistochemistry, and LINCOplex assays. The injured arteries in aging rats developed thicker neointimas than those in younger animals, and this significantly correlated with a higher number of tissue macrophages and increased vascular IL-18. Indeed, IL-18 was 23-fold more abundant in the injured vasculature of aged animals compared with young rats, while circulating levels were similar in both groups of animals. The depletion of macrophages in aged rats with clodronate liposomes ameliorated vascular accumulation of IL-18 and significantly decreased neointimal formation. IL-18 was found to inhibit apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and macrophages, thus favoring both the formation and inflammation of the neointima. In addition, injured arteries of aged rats accumulated 18-fold more fibrinogen-γ than those of young animals. Incubation of rat peritoneal macrophages with immobilized IL-18 increased leukocyte adhesion to fibrinogen and suggested a proinflammatory positive feedback loop among macrophages, VSMC, and the deposition of fibrinogen during neointimal hyperplasia. In conclusion, our data reveal that concentration changes in vascular cytokine and fibrinogen following injury in aging rats contribute to local inflammation and postinjury neointima formation. PMID:24414074

  5. CTLA-4Ig immunotherapy of obesity-induced insulin resistance by manipulation of macrophage polarization in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masakazu; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Sugiyama, Naonobu; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-08-16

    It has been established that obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue and, together with accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have reported that shifting the polarization of macrophages from M1 to M2 can alleviate adipose tissue inflammation, manipulation of macrophage polarization has not been considered as a specific therapy. Here, we determined whether cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4IgG1 (CTLA-4Ig) can ameliorate insulin resistance by induction of macrophages from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 polarization in the adipose tissues of high fat diet-induced insulin-resistant mice. CTLA4-Ig treatment prevented insulin resistance by changing gene expression to M2 polarization, which increased the levels of arginase 1. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the alteration of polarization from CD11c (M1)- to CD206 (M2)-positive cells. Concomitantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in weight reductions of epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissues, which may be closely related to overexpression of apoptosis inhibitors in macrophages. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels decreased significantly. In contrast, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and adiponectin expression increased significantly in subcutaneous adipose tissue. This novel mechanism of CTLA-4lg immunotherapy may lead to an ideal anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent.

  6. Colonic Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Cause Insulin Resistance in an Intestinal Ccl2/Ccr2-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yoshinaga; Nakae, Jun; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kikuchi, Tetsuhiro; Tateya, Sanshiro; Tamori, Yoshikazu; Kaneko, Mari; Abe, Takaya; Onodera, Masafumi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) induces low-grade chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying HFD-induced chronic inflammation in peripheral insulin-responsive tissues. Here, we show that colonic pro-inflammatory macrophages regulate insulin sensitivity under HFD conditions. To investigate the pathophysiological role of colonic macrophages, we generated macrophage-specific chemokine (C-C Motif) receptor 2 (Ccr2) knockout (M-Ccr2KO) and intestinal epithelial cell-specific tamoxifen-inducible Ccl2 knockout (Vil-Ccl2KO) mice. Both strains exhibited similar body weight to control under HFD. However, they exhibited decreased infiltration of colonic pro-inflammatory macrophages, decreased intestinal permeability, and inactivation of the colonic inflammasome. Interestingly, they showed significantly improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity with decreased chronic inflammation of adipose tissue. Therefore, inhibition of pro-inflammatory macrophage infiltration prevents HFD-induced insulin resistance and could be a novel therapeutic approach for type 2 diabetes. PMID:27508875

  7. Identification and Analysis of the Porcine MicroRNA in Porcine Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages Using Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Liao, Shan; Xu, Zhiwen; Zhu, Ling; Yang, Fan; Guo, Wanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV; genus Cytomegalovirus, subfamily Betaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae) is an immunosuppressive virus that mainly inhibits the immune function of T lymphocytes and macrophages, which has caused substantial damage in the farming industry. In this study, we obtained the miRNA expression profiles of PCMV-infected porcine macrophages via high-throughput sequencing. The comprehensive analysis of miRNA profiles showed that 239 miRNA database-annotated and 355 novel pig-encoded miRNAs were detected. Of these, 130 miRNAs showed significant differential expression between the PCMV-infected and uninfected porcine macrophages. The 10 differentially expressed pig-encoded miRNAs were further determined by stem-loop reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the results were consistent with the high-throughput sequencing. Gene Ontology analysis of the target genes of miRNAs in PCMV-infected porcine macrophages showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs are mainly involved in immune and metabolic processes. This is the first report of the miRNA transcriptome in porcine macrophages and an analysis of the miRNA regulatory mechanisms during PCMV infection. Further research into the regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs during immunosuppressive viral infections should contribute to the treatment and prevention of immunosuppressive viruses. PMID:26943793

  8. Isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid from licorice, blocks M2 macrophage polarization in colitis-associated tumorigenesis through downregulating PGE{sub 2} and IL-6

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haixia; Zhang, Xinhua; Chen, Xuewei; Li, Ying; Ke, Zunqiong; Tang, Tian; Chai, Hongyan; Guo, Austin M.; Chen, Honglei; Yang, Jing

    2014-09-15

    M2 macrophage polarization is implicated in colorectal cancer development. Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid from licorice, has been reported to prevent azoxymethane (AOM) induced colon carcinogenesis in animal models. Here, in a mouse model of colitis-associated tumorigenesis induced by AOM/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we investigated the chemopreventive effects of ISL and its mechanisms of action. Mice were treated with AOM/DSS and randomized to receive either vehicle or ISL (3, 15 and 75 mg/kg). Tumor load, histology, immunohistochemistry, and gene and protein expressions were determined. Intragastric administration of ISL for 12 weeks significantly decreased colon cancer incidence, multiplicity and tumor size by 60%, 55.4% and 42.6%, respectively. Moreover, ISL inhibited M2 macrophage polarization. Such changes were accompanied by downregulation of PGE{sub 2} and IL-6 signaling. Importantly, depletion of macrophages by clodronate (Clod) or zoledronic acid (ZA) reversed the effects of ISL. In parallel, in vitro studies also demonstrated that ISL limited the M2 polarization of RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages with concomitant inactivation of PGE{sub 2}/PPARδ and IL-6/STAT3 signaling. Conversely, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or IL-6, or overexpression of constitutively active STAT3 reversed ISL-mediated inhibition of M2 macrophage polarization. In summary, dietary flavonoid ISL effectively inhibits colitis-associated tumorigenesis through hampering M2 macrophage polarization mediated by the interplay between PGE{sub 2} and IL-6. Thus, inhibition of M2 macrophage polarization is likely to represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) prevents colitis-associated tumorigenesis. • ISL inhibits M2 macrophage polarization in vivo and in vitro. • ISL inhibits PGE{sub 2} and IL-6 signaling in colitis-associated tumorigenesis. • ISL may be an attractive candidate agent for

  9. Role of protein kinase R in the killing of Leishmania major by macrophages in response to neutrophil elastase and TLR4 via TNFα and IFNβ.

    PubMed

    Faria, Marilia S; Calegari-Silva, Tereza C; de Carvalho Vivarini, Aislan; Mottram, Jeremy C; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2014-07-01

    In cutaneous leishmaniasis, Leishmania amazonensis activates macrophage double-stranded, RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) to promote parasite growth. In our study, Leishmania major grew normally in RAW cells, RAW-expressing dominant-negative PKR (PKR-DN) cells, and macrophages of PKR-knockout mice, revealing that PKR is dispensable for L. major growth in macrophages. PKR activation in infected macrophages with poly I:C resulted in parasite death. Fifty percent of L. major-knockout lines for the ecotin-like serine peptidase inhibitor (ISP2; Δisp2/isp3), an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE), died in RAW cells or macrophages from 129Sv mice, as a result of PKR activation. Inhibition of PKR or NE or neutralization of Toll-like receptor 4 or 2(TLR4 or TLR2) prevented the death of Δisp2/isp3. Δisp2/isp3 grew normally in RAW-PKR-DN cells or macrophages from 129Sv pkr(-/-), tlr2(-/-), trif(-/-), and myd88(-/-) mice, associating NE activity, PKR, and TLR responses with parasite death. Δisp2/isp3 increased the expression of mRNA for TNF-α by 2-fold and of interferon β (IFNβ) in a PKR-dependent manner. Antibodies to TNF-α reversed the 95% killing by Δisp2/isp3, whereas they grew normally in macrophages from IFN receptor-knockout mice. We propose that ISP2 prevents the activation of PKR via an NE-TLR4-TLR2 axis to control innate responses that contribute to the killing of L. major.-Faria, M. S., Calegari-Silva, T. C., de Carvalho Vivarini, A., Mottram, J. C., Lopes, U. G., Lima, A. P. C. A. Role of protein kinase R in the killing of Leishmania major by macrophages in response to neutrophil elastase and TLR4 via TNFα and IFNβ. PMID:24732131

  10. IL-17 expression by breast-cancer-associated macrophages: IL-17 promotes invasiveness of breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, XingWu; Mulcahy, Lori A; Mohammed, Rabab AA; Lee, Andrew HS; Franks, Hester A; Kilpatrick, Laura; Yilmazer, Acelya; Paish, E Claire; Ellis, Ian O; Patel, Poulam M; Jackson, Andrew M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction IL-17 plays an important role in autoimmunity, promoting autoimmunity, inflammation and invasion in multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and type I diabetes. The role of IL-17 in cancer is unclear, however, as there are few studies examining IL-17 protein expression in cancer. We therefore examined IL-17 protein expression in human breast cancer and modelled its potential biological significance in vitro. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to determine IL-17 expression in breast cancers. Matrigel invasion assays were employed to examine the effect of IL-17 on cancer cell invasion by a panel of breast cancer cell lines. The role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was investigated with selective antagonists and immunoassays for MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of MMP. Results IL-17-expressing cells with macrophage morphology were identified in the peritumoural area of a proportion of patients (8/19 patients). Macrophages were confirmed by CD68 staining on serial sections. With the exception of occasional lymphocytes, one patient with rare multinucleate giant cells and one patient with occasional expression of IL-17 in tumour cells, no other IL-17-positive cells were detected. Addition of IL-17 to cell lines in vitro stimulated marked invasion of Matrigel. In contrast, IL-17 did not promote the invasion of MCF7 or T47D cell lines. Invasion was initially thought to be dependent on MMPs, as evidenced by the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 and selective antagonists of MMP-2/MMP-9 and MMP-3. Measurement of MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP 1 secretion, failed to reveal any changes in expression following IL-17 exposure. In contrast, TNF promoted secretion of MMPs but IL-17 did not augment TNF, indicating that IL-17 acts via an independent mechanism. Conclusions The present study is the first to describe in situ expression of IL-17 protein in human breast tumours and to propose a direct association between IL-17 and breast

  11. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates cross-talk between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and nuclear factor-κB in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Necela, Brian M; Su, Weidong; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is expressed in macrophages and plays an important role in suppressing the inflammatory response. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), reduced PPARγ expression and function in peritoneal macrophages and macrophage cell lines. Moreover, pretreatment with the synthetic PPARγ ligand, rosiglitazone did not prevent LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. Inhibition of PPARγ expression was not blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that de novo protein synthesis is not required for LPS-mediated suppression of PPARγ. Destabilization of PPARγ messenger RNA (mRNA) was not observed in LPS-stimulated macrophages, suggesting that LPS regulates the synthesis of PPARγ mRNA. LPS had no effect on PPARγ expression in macrophages from TLR4 knockout mice, whereas LPS inhibited PPARγ expression in cells that had been reconstituted to express functional TLR4. Targeting the TLR4 pathway with inhibitors of MEK1/2, p38, JNK and AP-1 had no effect on PPARγ downregulation by LPS. However, inhibitors that target NEMO, IκB and NF-κB abolished LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Our data indicate that activation of TLR4 inhibits PPARγ mRNA synthesis by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Low-density genomic profiling of macrophage-specific PPARγ knockout cells indicated that PPARγ suppresses inflammation under basal conditions, and that loss of PPARγ expression is sufficient to induce a proinflammatory state. Our data reveal a regulatory feedback loop in which PPARγ represses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory signalling in unstimulated macrophages; however, upon activation of TLR4, NF-κB drives down PPARγ expression and thereby obviates any potential anti-inflammatory effects of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:18422969

  12. Killing of Leishmania parasites in activated murine macrophages is based on an L-arginine-dependent process that produces nitrogen derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Maul, J.R.; Ransijn, A.; Buchmueller-Rouiller, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    The experiments described in this report were aimed at determining whether L-arginine (L-arg)-derived nitrogen oxidation products (nitric oxide, nitrous acid, nitrites) are involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania parasites by activated murine macrophages in vitro. Peritoneal or bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected with L. enriettii or L. major, then activated by exposure to recombinant murine interferon-gamma or to macrophage activating factor (MAF)-rich media in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Activation of macrophages in regular (i.e., arginine-containing) culture medium led to complete destruction of the microorganisms within 24 h (L. enriettii) or 48 h (L. major), concomitant with accumulation of nitrites (NO2-) in the culture fluids. When macrophage activation was carried out in L-arg-free medium, however, neither parasite killing nor NO2- production was obtained. A similar inhibition of macrophage leishmanicidal activity and of NO2- release was observed using media treated with arginase (which converts L-arg to urea and ornithine), or supplemented with NG-monomethyl-L-arg or guanidine (which inhibit the conversion of L-arg to nitrogen oxidation products). In all these situations, an excellent correlation between the levels of NO2- production by macrophages and intracellular killing of Leishmania was observed, whereas no strict correlation was detectable between leishmanicidal activity and superoxide production. Intracellular parasite killing by activated macrophages could be prevented by addition of iron salts to the incubation fluids. Incubation of free parasites with NaNO2 at acid pH led to immobilisation, multiplication arrest, and morphological degeneration of the microorganisms. Similarly, exposure of infected cells to NaNO2 led to killing of the intracellular parasite without affecting macrophage viability.

  13. Immunoactivating peptide p4 augments alveolar macrophage phagocytosis in two diverse human populations.

    PubMed

    Bangert, Mathieu; Wright, Adam K; Rylance, Jamie; Kelly, Matthew J; Wright, Angela D; Carlone, George M; Sampson, Jacquelyn S; Rajam, Gowrisankar; Ades, Edwin W; Kadioglu, Aras; Gordon, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    New treatment strategies are urgently needed to overcome early mortality in acute bacterial infections. Previous studies have shown that administration of a novel immunoactivating peptide (P4) alongside passive immunotherapy prevents the onset of septicemia and rescues mice from lethal invasive disease models of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. In this study, using two diverse populations of adult volunteers, we determined whether P4 treatment of human alveolar macrophages would upregulate phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae ex vivo. We also measured macrophage intracellular oxidation, cytokine secretion, and surface marker expression following stimulation. Peptide treatment showed enhanced bacterial killing in the absence of nonspecific inflammation, consistent with therapeutic potential. This is the first demonstration of P4 efficacy on ex vivo-derived human lung cells.

  14. Contrasting Roles of Islet Resident Immunoregulatory Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thornley, Thomas B.; Ma, Lingzhi; Chipashvili, Vaja; Aker, Jonathan E.; Korniotis, Sarantis; Csizmadia, Eva; Strom, Terry B.; Koulmanda, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system critically shapes diabetogenic adaptive immunity during type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. While the role of tissue-infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages in T1D is well established, the role of their tissue-resident counterparts remains undefined. We now demonstrate that islet resident macrophages (IRMs) from non-autoimmune mice have an immunoregulatory phenotype and powerfully induce FoxP3+ Tregs in vitro. The immunoregulatory phenotype and function of IRMs is compromised by TLR4 activation in vitro. Moreover, as T1D approaches in NOD mice, the immunoregulatory phenotype of IRMs is diminished as is their relative abundance compared to immunostimulatory DCs. Our findings suggest that maintenance of IRM abundance and their immunoregulatory phenotype may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent and/or cure T1D. PMID:26943809

  15. Macrophages in Immunopathology of Atherosclerosis: A Target for Diagnostics and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Orekhov, Alexander N; Sobenin, Igor A; Gavrilin, Mikhail A; Gratchev, Alexei; Kotyashova, Svetlana Y; Nikiforov, Nikita G; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Immunopathology plays important roles in the development of different life-threatening diseases, such as atherosclerosis and its consequences (acute myocardial infarction and stroke), cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases. Effective modulation of the immune system may significantly increase the efficacy of prevention and therapy efforts. Currently there are no marketed drugs capable of normalizing immune system function in an intrinsic and comprehensive way. Here, we describe a test system designed for complex analysis of monocyte activity in individuals to diagnose immunopathology and monitor treatment efficacy. This cell-based test system may also be useful for screening compounds with an immune-correcting effects. Both diagnostic and screening systems are based on primary culture of human monocytes and/or monocyte-derived macrophages. This is the first step in creating a method for assessment of macrophage activity, which is required for further development of immune-correcting drugs. The existing preliminary data provide the basis for realization of this idea. PMID:25312739

  16. The ineffectiveness of coumarin treatment on thermal oedema of macrophage-free rats.

    PubMed Central

    Piller, N. B.

    1976-01-01

    The administration of silica prevents coumarin-stimulated lysis of accumulated abnormal protein. This impairs the resolution of thermal oedema which is normally increased with coumarin administration. Evidence suggests that there is a rapid differentiation and infiltration of monocytes into the tissues and that these are selectively retained. This is aided by coumarin which increases tissue permeability. Coumarin also injures the vascular endothelium of some vessels, allowing extra protein and fluid into the tissues. Death of recently differentiated macrophages and subsequent release of their lysosomal contents into the extra-cellular spaces may be responsible for the changes in serum enzyme levels. It would seem that macrophages are the only cells in which coumarin stimulates increased phagocytosis, enzyme production and proteolysis. PMID:178336

  17. Mst1 participates in the atherosclerosis progression through macrophage autophagy inhibition and macrophage apoptosis enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Jianqiang; Duan, Yu; Zhang, Mingming; Lin, Jie; Man, Wanrong; Pan, Xietian; Jiang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Guoyong; Gao, Beilei; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence favors the notion that macrophage autophagy plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of vulnerable plaque, suggesting the therapeutic potential of targeting autophagy in atherosclerosis. Here ApoE(-/-) mice were crossed with Mst1 knockout or Mst1 Tg mice to generate ApoE(-/-):Mst1(-/-) and ApoE(-/-):Mst1Tg mice. All animals were fed high-fat-diet for 4months to induce arterial atherosclerosis. Murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were subjected to ox-LDL (50μg/mL) in an effort to examine the cellular mechanisms. A significant increase in the levels of Mst1 and p-Mst1 was observed in the aorta of ApoE(-/-) mice. Mst1 knockout significantly reduced atherosclerotic area, decreased lipid core area and macrophage accumulation as compared with ApoE(-/-) mice. Along the same line, Mst1 overexpression increased plaque area, lipid core and macrophage accumulation as compared with ApoE(-/-) mice. Mst1 deficiency significantly increased levels of Beclin1 and LC3II, while decreased that of p62 in aortic atherosclerosis. Moreover, in vitro data indicated that Mst1 knockdown prompted more typical autophagosomes upon ox-LDL challenge. Mst1 knockdown also enhanced autophagic flux as evidenced by GFP-mRFP-LC3 staining, increased LC3-II expression and decreased p62 expression in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Mst1 knockdown decreased, while Mst1 overexpression increased macrophage apoptosis upon ox-LDL exposure. In conclusion, Mst1 deficiency diminishes atherosclerosis and stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE(-/-) mice. Mst1 may participate in atherosclerosis progression through inhibition of macrophage autophagy and promotion of macrophage apoptosis. PMID:27496379

  18. Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP) evokes superoxide anion production by human macrophages of different origin

    PubMed Central

    Brunelleschi, Sandra; Penengo, Lorenza; Lavagno, Luisa; Santoro, Claudio; Colangelo, Donato; Viano, Ilario; Gaudino, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP), a serum factor related to Hepatocyte Growth Factor, was originally discovered to stimulate chemotaxis of murine resident peritoneal macrophages. MSP is the ligand for Ron, a member of the Met subfamily of tyrosine kinase receptors. The effects of MSP on human macrophages and the role played in human pathophysiology have long been elusive.We show here that human recombinant MSP (hrMSP) evokes a dose-dependent superoxide anion production in human alveolar and peritoneal macrophages as well as in monocyte-derived macrophages, but not in circulating human monocytes. Consistently, the mature Ron protein is expressed by the MSP responsive cells but not by the unresponsive monocytes. The respiratory burst evoked by hrMSP is quantitatively higher than the one induced by N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and similar to phorbol myristate acetate-evoked one.To investigate the mechanisms involved in NADPH oxidase activation, leading to superoxide anion production, different signal transduction inhibitors were used. By using the non selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, the selective c-Src inhibitor PP1, the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, the p38 inhibitor SB203580, the MEK inhibitor PD098059, we demonstrate that hrMSP-evoked superoxide production is mediated by tyrosine kinase activity, requires the activation of Src but not of PI 3-kinase. We also show that MAP kinase and p38 signalling pathways are involved.These results clearly indicate that hrMSP induces the respiratory burst in human macrophages but not in monocytes, suggesting for the MSP/Ron complex a role of activator as well as of possible marker for human mature macrophages. PMID:11704649

  19. Vocal Fold Fibroblasts Immunoregulate Activated Macrophage Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N.; Chen, Fei; Jetté, Marie E.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that fibroblasts play a critical role in regulating inflammation during wound healing because they express several inflammatory mediators in response to bacteria. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) on the immunomodulatory properties of vocal fold fibroblasts (VFF) derived from polyps, scar and normal tissue co-cultured with macrophages, to provide insight into their interactions during the inflammatory process. Fibroblasts were co-cultured with CD14+ monocytes and after 7 days, wells were treated with LPS for 24 and 72 hours. Culture supernatants were collected and concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-1β, and MCP-1 were quantified by ELISA. Normal VFF and CD14+ monocultures were used as controls. Twenty-four hours after LPS activation, macrophages co-cultured with polyp VFF had significantly increased expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 compared to controls (p<0.0001). In contrast, macrophages co-cultured with scar VFF had significantly lower expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-12 with significantly higher IL-10 compared to control (p<0.0001). After 72 hours, macrophages co-cultured with polyp VFF increased expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and TGF-β (p<0.01) and macrophages co-cultured with scar VFF significantly decreased their expression of IL-1β and IL-12 compared to control (p<0.0001). Scar VFF at both time points produced significantly lower levels of IL-8, MCP-1, IL-6 and TGF-β compared to controls (p<0.05). Based on our findings, VFF and macrophages secrete several inflammatory mediators that modify their diverse functions. Polyp and scar VFF may play a role in regulating abnormal inflammatory responses, which could result in excessive ECM deposition that disrupts the function of the vocal folds. PMID:23123198

  20. Palmitoleate Reverses High Fat-induced Proinflammatory Macrophage Polarization via AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK)*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kenny L.; Pillon, Nicolas J.; Sivaloganathan, Darshan M.; Costford, Sheila R.; Liu, Zhi; Théret, Marine; Chazaud, Benedicte; Klip, Amira

    2015-01-01

    A rise in tissue-embedded macrophages displaying “M1-like” proinflammatory polarization is a hallmark of metabolic inflammation during a high fat diet or obesity. Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from high fat-fed mice retain a memory of their dietary environment in vivo (displaying the elevated proinflammatory genes Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2) despite 7-day differentiation and proliferation ex vivo. Notably, 6-h incubation with palmitoleate (PO) reversed the proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion seen in BMDM from high fat-fed mice. BMDM from low fat-fed mice exposed to palmitate (PA) for 18 h ex vivo also showed elevated expression of proinflammatory genes (Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2, and Il12b) associated with M1 polarization. Conversely, PO treatment increased anti-inflammatory genes (Mrc1, Tgfb1, Il10, Mgl2) and oxidative metabolism, characteristic of M2 macrophages. Therefore, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids bring about opposite macrophage polarization states. Coincubation of BMDM with both fatty acids counteracted the PA-induced Nos2 expression in a PO dose-dependent fashion. PO also prevented PA-induced IκBα degradation, RelA nuclear translocation, NO production, and cytokine secretion. Mechanistically, PO exerted its anti-inflammatory function through AMP-activated protein kinase as AMP kinase knockout or inhibition by Compound C offset the PO-dependent prevention of PA-induced inflammation. These results demonstrate a nutritional memory of BMDM ex vivo, highlight the plasticity of BMDM polarization in response to saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and identify the potential to reverse diet- and saturated fat-induced M1-like polarization by administering palmitoleate. These findings could have applicability to reverse obesity-linked inflammation in metabolically relevant tissues. PMID:25987561

  1. Palmitoleate Reverses High Fat-induced Proinflammatory Macrophage Polarization via AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK).

    PubMed

    Chan, Kenny L; Pillon, Nicolas J; Sivaloganathan, Darshan M; Costford, Sheila R; Liu, Zhi; Théret, Marine; Chazaud, Benedicte; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    A rise in tissue-embedded macrophages displaying "M1-like" proinflammatory polarization is a hallmark of metabolic inflammation during a high fat diet or obesity. Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from high fat-fed mice retain a memory of their dietary environment in vivo (displaying the elevated proinflammatory genes Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2) despite 7-day differentiation and proliferation ex vivo. Notably, 6-h incubation with palmitoleate (PO) reversed the proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion seen in BMDM from high fat-fed mice. BMDM from low fat-fed mice exposed to palmitate (PA) for 18 h ex vivo also showed elevated expression of proinflammatory genes (Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2, and Il12b) associated with M1 polarization. Conversely, PO treatment increased anti-inflammatory genes (Mrc1, Tgfb1, Il10, Mgl2) and oxidative metabolism, characteristic of M2 macrophages. Therefore, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids bring about opposite macrophage polarization states. Coincubation of BMDM with both fatty acids counteracted the PA-induced Nos2 expression in a PO dose-dependent fashion. PO also prevented PA-induced IκBα degradation, RelA nuclear translocation, NO production, and cytokine secretion. Mechanistically, PO exerted its anti-inflammatory function through AMP-activated protein kinase as AMP kinase knockout or inhibition by Compound C offset the PO-dependent prevention of PA-induced inflammation. These results demonstrate a nutritional memory of BMDM ex vivo, highlight the plasticity of BMDM polarization in response to saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and identify the potential to reverse diet- and saturated fat-induced M1-like polarization by administering palmitoleate. These findings could have applicability to reverse obesity-linked inflammation in metabolically relevant tissues.

  2. Managing Macrophages in Rheumatoid Arthritis by Reform or Removal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Hsu, Hui-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is an imbalance of inflammatory and antiinflammatory macrophages in RA synovium. Although the polarization and heterogeneity of macrophages in RA have not been fully uncovered, the identity of macrophages in RA can potentially be defined by their products, including the co-stimulatory molecules, scavenger receptors, different cytokines/chemokines and receptors, and transcription factors. In the last decade, efforts to understand the polarization, apoptosis regulation, and novel signaling pathways in macrophages, as well as how distinct activated macrophages influence disease progression, have led to strategies that target macrophages with varied specificity and selectivity. Major targets that are related to macrophage development and apoptosis include TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, GM-CSF, M-CSF, death receptor 5 (DR5), Fas, and others, as listed in Table 1. Combined data from clinical, preclinical, and animal studies of inhibitors of these targets have provided valuable insights into their roles in the disease progression and, subsequently, have led to the evolving therapeutic paradigms in RA. In this review, we propose that reestablishment of macrophage equilibrium by inhibiting the development of, and/or eliminating, the proinflammatory macrophages will be an effective therapeutic approach for RA and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:22855296

  3. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-02-19

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for >50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and proresolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge.

  4. Macrophage heterogeneity in the context of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Udalova, Irina A; Mantovani, Alberto; Feldmann, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages are very important in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The increase in the number of sublining macrophages in the synovium is an early hallmark of active rheumatic disease, and high numbers of macrophages are a prominent feature of inflammatory lesions. The degree of synovial macrophage infiltration correlates with the degree of joint erosion, and depletion of these macrophages from inflamed tissue has a profound therapeutic benefit. Research has now uncovered an unexpectedly high level of heterogeneity in macrophage origin and function, and has emphasized the role of environmental factors in their functional specialization. Although the heterogeneous populations of macrophages in RA have not been fully characterized, preliminary results in mouse models of arthritis have contributed to our understanding of the phenotype and ontogeny of synovial macrophages, and to deciphering the properties of monocyte-derived infiltrating and tissue-resident macrophages. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive polarization of macrophages towards proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes could lead to identification of signalling pathways that inform future therapeutic strategies. PMID:27383913

  5. Purinergic Signaling to Terminate TLR Responses in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Mosser, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages undergo profound physiological alterations when they encounter pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). These alterations can result in the elaboration of cytokines and mediators that promote immune responses and contribute to the clearance of pathogens. These innate immune responses by myeloid cells are transient. The termination of these secretory responses is not due to the dilution of stimuli, but rather to the active downregulation of innate responses induced by the very PAMPs that initiated them. Here, we describe a purinergic autoregulatory program whereby TLR-stimulated macrophages control their activation state. In this program, TLR-stimulated macrophages undergo metabolic alterations that result in the production of ATP and its release through membrane pannexin channels. This purine nucleotide is rapidly hydrolyzed to adenosine by ectoenzymes on the macrophage surface, CD39 and CD73. Adenosine then signals through the P1 class of seven transmembrane receptors to induce a regulatory state that is characterized by the downregulation of inflammatory cytokines and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This purinergic autoregulatory system mitigates the collateral damage that would be caused by the prolonged activation of macrophages and rather allows the macrophage to maintain homeostasis. The transient activation of macrophages can be prolonged by treating macrophages with IFN-γ. IFN-γ-treated macrophages become less sensitive to the regulatory effects of adenosine, allowing them to sustain macrophage activation for the duration of an adaptive immune response. PMID:26973651

  6. Purinergic Signaling to Terminate TLR Responses in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Mosser, David M

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages undergo profound physiological alterations when they encounter pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). These alterations can result in the elaboration of cytokines and mediators that promote immune responses and contribute to the clearance of pathogens. These innate immune responses by myeloid cells are transient. The termination of these secretory responses is not due to the dilution of stimuli, but rather to the active downregulation of innate responses induced by the very PAMPs that initiated them. Here, we describe a purinergic autoregulatory program whereby TLR-stimulated macrophages control their activation state. In this program, TLR-stimulated macrophages undergo metabolic alterations that result in the production of ATP and its release through membrane pannexin channels. This purine nucleotide is rapidly hydrolyzed to adenosine by ectoenzymes on the macrophage surface, CD39 and CD73. Adenosine then signals through the P1 class of seven transmembrane receptors to induce a regulatory state that is characterized by the downregulation of inflammatory cytokines and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This purinergic autoregulatory system mitigates the collateral damage that would be caused by the prolonged activation of macrophages and rather allows the macrophage to maintain homeostasis. The transient activation of macrophages can be prolonged by treating macrophages with IFN-γ. IFN-γ-treated macrophages become less sensitive to the regulatory effects of adenosine, allowing them to sustain macrophage activation for the duration of an adaptive immune response. PMID:26973651

  7. Macrophages regulate corpus luteum development during embryo implantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Care, Alison S.; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Jasper, Melinda J.; Brown, Hannah M.; Ingman, Wendy V.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are prominent in the uterus and ovary at conception. Here we utilize the Cd11b-Dtr mouse model of acute macrophage depletion to define the essential role of macrophages in early pregnancy. Macrophage depletion after conception caused embryo implantation arrest associated with diminished plasma progesterone and poor uterine receptivity. Implantation failure was alleviated by administration of bone marrow–derived CD11b+F4/80+ monocytes/macrophages. In the ovaries of macrophage-depleted mice, corpora lutea were profoundly abnormal, with elevated Ptgs2, Hif1a, and other inflammation and apoptosis genes and with diminished expression of steroidogenesis genes Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1. Infertility was rescued by exogenous progesterone, which confirmed that uterine refractoriness was fully attributable to the underlying luteal defect. In normally developing corpora lutea, macrophages were intimately juxtaposed with endothelial cells and expressed the proangiogenic marker TIE2. After macrophage depletion, substantial disruption of the luteal microvascular network occurred and was associated with altered ovarian expression of genes that encode vascular endothelial growth factors. These data indicate a critical role for macrophages in supporting the extensive vascular network required for corpus luteum integrity and production of progesterone essential for establishing pregnancy. Our findings raise the prospect that disruption of macrophage-endothelial cell interactions underpinning corpus luteum development contributes to infertility in women in whom luteal insufficiency is implicated. PMID:23867505

  8. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology.

  9. Macrophages, dendritic cells, and regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Feig, Jonathan E; Feig, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other cellular elements present in the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the focus of this review will be primarily on the macrophages and DCs. The role of these two cell types in atherosclerosis is discussed, with a particular emphasis on their involvement in atherosclerosis regression.

  10. Macrophagic myofasciitis and vaccination: consequence or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Santiago, Tânia; Rebelo, Olinda; Negrão, Luís; Matos, Anabela

    2015-01-01

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) characterized by specific muscle lesions assessing long-term persistence of aluminum hydroxide within macrophages at the site of previous immunization has been reported with increasing frequency in the past 10 years. We describe clinical and laboratory findings in patients with MMF. We did a retrospective analysis of 16 cases observed in our Neuropathology Laboratory, between January 2000 and July 2013. The mean age of the 16 patients was 48.8 ± 18.0 years; 80.0 % were female. Chronic fatigue syndrome was found in 8 of 16 patients. Half of the patients had elevated creatinine kinase levels, and 25.0 % had a myopathic electromyogram. Thirteen patients received intramuscular administration of aluminum-containing vaccine prior to the onset of symptoms. MMF may mirror a distinctive pattern of an inflammatory myopathy. The vaccines containing this adjuvant may trigger MMF in some patients.

  11. Nontransformed, GM-CSF-dependent macrophage lines are a unique model to study tissue macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Fejer, György; Wegner, Mareike Dorothee; Györy, Ildiko; Cohen, Idan; Engelhard, Peggy; Voronov, Elena; Manke, Thomas; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Dölken, Lars; Prazeres da Costa, Olivia; Branzk, Nora; Huber, Michael; Prasse, Antje; Schneider, Robert; Apte, Ron N; Galanos, Chris; Freudenberg, Marina A

    2013-06-11

    Macrophages are diverse cell types in the first line of antimicrobial defense. Only a limited number of primary mouse models exist to study their function. Bone marrow-derived, macrophage-CSF-induced cells with a limited life span are the most common source. We report here a simple method yielding self-renewing, nontransformed, GM-CSF/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5-dependent macrophages (Max Planck Institute cells) from mouse fetal liver, which reflect the innate immune characteristics of alveolar macrophages. Max Planck Institute cells are exquisitely sensitive to selected microbial agents, including bacterial LPS, lipopeptide, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cord factor, and adenovirus and mount highly proinflammatory but no anti-inflammatory IL-10 responses. They show a unique pattern of innate responses not yet observed in other mononuclear phagocytes. This includes differential LPS sensing and an unprecedented regulation of IL-1α production upon LPS exposure, which likely plays a key role in lung inflammation in vivo. In conclusion, Max Planck Institute cells offer an useful tool to study macrophage biology and for biomedical science.

  12. Particle-macrophage relationships during the clearance of particles from the alveolar macrophage compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Toevs, K.E.; Valdez, Y.E.; Sebring, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterized the distributions of particles among lavageable AM over a 30 day period after the acute intratracheal instillation of /approximately/3 mg of 1.9 ..mu..m dia. polystyrene microspheres into the lungs of rats. Information obtained for particles retained in the lavageable AM compartment and particle-AM distribution data were collectively examined using a simple, first order kinetic model for AM removal from the lung. The results of our analyses suggest that a volume load of particles in a macrophage up to at least /approximately/450 ..mu..m/sup 3/ does not inhibit the mobilization of macrophages from the alveolar compartment. Additionally, the kinetic analyses of the particle-macrophage distributions suggest that macrophages that replenish those AM that are translocated from the lung on a continual basis during alveolar clearance are not and/or do not remain particle-free in the alveoli. This latter observation can be explained by: (1) the influx of particle-bearing macrophages into the alveoli, or (2) the in situ proliferation of particle bearing AM, or (3) the release of particles by AM and the subsequent phagocytosis of the particles by newly arrived cells, or (4) a combination of these possibilities. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The Macrophage Inhibitor CNI-1493 Blocks Metastasis in a Mouse Model of Ewing Sarcoma through Inhibition of Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Anthony J.; Maloney, Caroline; Behr, Christopher A.; Edelman, Morris C.; Glick, Richard D.; Al-Abed, Yousef; Symons, Marc; Soffer, Samuel Z.; Steinberg, Bettie M.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma carries a poor prognosis, and novel therapeutics to prevent and treat metastatic disease are greatly needed. Recent evidence demonstrates that tumor-associated macrophages in Ewing Sarcoma are associated with more advanced disease. While some macrophage phenotypes (M1) exhibit anti-tumor activity, distinct phenotypes (M2) may contribute to malignant progression and metastasis. In this study, we show that M2 macrophages promote Ewing Sarcoma invasion and extravasation, pointing to a potential target of anti-metastatic therapy. CNI-1493 is a selective inhibitor of macrophage function and has shown to be safe in clinical trials as an anti-inflammatory agent. In a xenograft mouse model of metastatic Ewing Sarcoma, CNI-1493 treatment dramatically reduces metastatic tumor burden. Furthermore, metastases in treated animals have a less invasive morphology. We show in vitro that CNI-1493 decreases M2-stimulated Ewing Sarcoma tumor cell invasion and extravasation, offering a functional mechanism through which CNI-1493 attenuates metastasis. These data indicate that CNI-1493 may be a safe and effective adjuvant agent for the prevention and treatment of metastatic Ewing Sarcoma. PMID:26709919

  14. Macrophage phagocytosis of polyethylene particulate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Voronov, I; Santerre, J P; Hinek, A; Callahan, J W; Sandhu, J; Boynton, E L

    1998-01-01

    In this study, an in vitro model has been developed to examine the interactions of macrophages with ultrahigh molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) particles. Polyethylene particles are the major constituent of the material debris formed as a result of orthopedic implant wear. However, the study of polyethylene particle interactions with cells has been limited. UHMWPE (18-20 microns) and HDPE (4-10 microns) were suspended in soluble collagen type I and subsequently solidified on glass coverslips. The particle chemistry was characterized by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Mouse cell line macrophages (IC-21) were established on the collagen-particle substrata and maintained for up to 24 h. The response of the cells to the particles was examined by light and transmission electron microscopy (LM and TEM), as well as by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and compared to cells on control collagen surfaces without particles. Histological analysis of the samples revealed that the macrophages surrounded larger particles (18-20 microns) and the cells appeared to be attached to the surface of the particles, and the smaller particles (4-10 microns) had been phagocytosed within 2 h. Inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6), lysosomal enzymes (beta-galactosidase and hexosaminidase), and prostaglandin E2 were released into the medium, a