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Sample records for prevents macrophage multinucleation

  1. Giant multinucleated macrophages occur in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leskovar, A; Turek, J; Borgens, R B

    2001-05-01

    Using a cell-isolation and -culture procedure specific for macrophages, we report the existence of giant (more than 50 microm diameter), multinucleated macrophages within an acute, 5-day-old adult rat spinal cord injury. The size and multinuclearity of these isolated giant cells was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Giant macrophages are markers for long-term infection, disease, and chronic injury in other soft tissues and are unexpected in the acute inflammatory stage of central nervous system injury. To our knowledge, this descriptive report is the first confirming the existence of giant macrophages in any injured nervous tissue, with additional data suggesting some of these cells to be multinucleated.

  2. The tumoricidal properties of inflammatory tissue macrophages and multinucleate giant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Poste, G.

    1979-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells from C3H/HeN mice infected with bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) and subcutaneous inflammatory macrophages from uninfected mice exhibit spontaneous cytotoxicity for tumor cells in vitro, but their tumoricidal activity can be increased by incubation in vitro with lymphokines released by mitogen- or antigen-stimulated lymphocytes. Inflammatory macrophages from these sites are only susceptible to activation in vitro by lymphokines for a short period (less than 4 days) following their initial emigration from the circulation to the site of inflammation. The expression of tumoricidal activity by activated macrophages is similarly short-lived (less than 4 days). Once the tumoricidal state is lost it cannot be restored by further incubation with lymphokines in vitro. Fusion of macrophages to form multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) accompanies the loss of tumoricidal activity and the onset of resistance to activation by lymphokines, but the fusion process is not responsible for these changes, since unfused macrophages are similarly affected. Activation and acquisition of tumoricidal properties is confined to young macrophages recruited from the circulation during acute inflammation. Older macrophages and MGCs in chronic inflammatory lesions in which recruitment of new macrophages has ceased are nontumoricidal and are refractory to activation by lymphokines in vitro. These findings are discussed in relation to the efficiency of macrophage-mediated destruction of tumors in vivo and the amplification of macrophage antitumor activity by immunotherapeutic agents. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:382866

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 induces cellular polarization, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 redistribution, and multinucleated giant cell generation in human primary monocytes but not in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fais, S; Borghi, P; Gherardi, G; Logozzi, M; Belardelli, F; Gessani, S

    1996-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on some morphologic and functional changes in cultured human monocytes/macrophages at different stages of differentiation. Freshly isolated monocytes infected with HIV-1 24 hours after seeding exhibited marked morphologic changes such as uropod formation, polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on the cytoplasmic projection, the redistribution of alpha-actinin on cell-membrane dots, and an increased release of soluble ICAM-1. These changes preceded the increase in monocyte-monocyte fusion and the formation of multinucleated giant cells. In contrast, HIV-1 infection did not affect monocyte-derived macrophages in terms of either cellular polarization or multinucleated giant cell formation. Immunocytochemistry showed that HIV-1 matrix protein was present mostly in bi- and trinucleated cells, which suggests that multinucleated giant cells may represent a long-lived and highly productive cellular source of HIV. The treatment of the HIV-1-infected monocytes with azidodeoxythymidine virtually abolished all viral-induced morphofunctional changes. On the whole, these results indicate that blood monocytes and differentiated macrophages may be affected differently by HIV infection, as monocytes seem to be much more prone to polarize, undergo homotypic fusion, and form multinucleated giant cells. These changes may confer to HIV-infected monocytes an increased ability to transmigrate through endothelia into tissues, whereas differentiated macrophages may have a predominant role as a widespread reservoir of HIV.

  4. p120-catenin prevents multinucleation through control of MKLP1-dependent RhoA activity during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Robert A.H.; de Groot, Jolien S.; Park, Danielle; van Domselaar, Robert; de Jong, Danielle; Szuhai, Karoly; van der Wall, Elsken; Rueda, Oscar M.; Ali, H. Raza; Caldas, Carlos; van Diest, Paul J.; Hetzer, Martin W.; Sahai, Erik; Derksen, Patrick W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal activation of RhoA and actomyosin contraction underpins cellular adhesion and division. Loss of cell–cell adhesion and chromosomal instability are cardinal events that drive tumour progression. Here, we show that p120-catenin (p120) not only controls cell–cell adhesion, but also acts as a critical regulator of cytokinesis. We find that p120 regulates actomyosin contractility through concomitant binding to RhoA and the centralspindlin component MKLP1, independent of cadherin association. In anaphase, p120 is enriched at the cleavage furrow where it binds MKLP1 to spatially control RhoA GTPase cycling. Binding of p120 to MKLP1 during cytokinesis depends on the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of p120 isoform 1A. Importantly, clinical data show that loss of p120 expression is a common event in breast cancer that strongly correlates with multinucleation and adverse patient survival. In summary, our study identifies p120 loss as a driver event of chromosomal instability in cancer. PMID:28004812

  5. Tritrichomonas foetus: budding from multinucleated pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Benchimol, Marlene

    2009-11-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, a major sexually transmitted disease in cattle. T. foetus presents a simple life cycle, exhibiting only the trophozoitic form. However, under unfavorable growth conditions, the trophozoites, which are polar and flagellated, can round up and internalize their flagella forming pseudocysts. In this form no cyst wall surrounds the cell and it also displays a distinct mitosis when compared with the trophozoite form. In pseudocyst mitosis, the cell proceeds with duplication of cytoskeletal and mastigont structures; nuclear division occurs but without the corresponding cytoplasm division. Thus, giant multinucleated cells which present many mastigont structures are formed (approximately 62% of the population). These polymastigont/multinucleated cells are maintained when the cells are under stress conditions. When environmental conditions become favorable, the flagella are externalized and new flagellated trophozoites one by one, gradually bud from the multinucleated cell. Thus, in order to better understand the pseudocyst mitosis, the polymastigont formation and the generation of new cells by this budding process, video microscopy and other complementary techniques, such as immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy were used.

  6. Depolymerization of macrophage microfilaments prevents induction and inhibits activity of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P D; Araujo, H M; Riveros-Moreno, V; Assreuy, J

    1996-12-01

    We have investigated the relationship between peritoneal murine macrophage cytoskeleton and nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS). Activation of the cells with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma (LI) induced iNOS, detected by nitrite or by labeled L-citrulline production and by a specific antibody against macrophage iNOS. Addition of cytochalasin B (a microfilament-depolymerizing agent) caused a dose-dependent inhibition in NO production by macrophages, whereas colchicine (a microtubule depolymerizing agent) inhibited it only by 20% and not dose-dependently. Addition of cytochalasin B together with LI abolished nitrite and L-citrulline accumulation as well as the amount of iNOS antigen in activated macrophage. Moreover, addition of cytochalasin B 6 or 12 h after stimulus, also decreased the nitrite and L-citrulline production by macrophages although iNOS antigen content by Western blot was the same in the presence or in the absence of cytochalasin B added 12 h after activation. Since cytochalasin B failed to inhibit iNOS activity directly, its inhibitory effects on NO production by macrophages is likely to be indirect, through microfilament network in central regions of cells, but not in filaments seen at pseudopodia or edging processes. Our findings demonstrate that disruption of microfilaments but not of microtubules prevents the iNOS induction process and inhibits its enzymatic activity in activated macrophages.

  7. Mechanism of nuclear movements in a multinucleated cell.

    PubMed

    Gibeaux, Romain; Politi, Antonio Z; Philippsen, Peter; Nédélec, François

    2017-03-01

    Multinucleated cells are important in many organisms, but the mechanisms governing the movements of nuclei sharing a common cytoplasm are not understood. In the hyphae of the plant pathogenic fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei move back and forth, occasionally bypassing each other, preventing the formation of nuclear clusters. This is essential for genetic stability. These movements depend on cytoplasmic microtubules emanating from the nuclei that are pulled by dynein motors anchored at the cortex. Using three-dimensional stochastic simulations with parameters constrained by the literature, we predict the cortical anchor density from the characteristics of nuclear movements. The model accounts for the complex nuclear movements seen in vivo, using a minimal set of experimentally determined ingredients. Of interest, these ingredients power the oscillations of the anaphase spindle in budding yeast, but in A. gossypii, this system is not restricted to a specific nuclear cycle stage, possibly as a result of adaptation to hyphal growth and multinuclearity.

  8. Novel phosphate-activated macrophages prevent ectopic calcification by increasing extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Hamczyk, Magda R.; Andrés, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus is an essential nutrient involved in many pathobiological processes. Less than 1% of phosphorus is found in extracellular fluids as inorganic phosphate ion (Pi) in solution. High serum Pi level promotes ectopic calcification in many tissues, including blood vessels. Here, we studied the effect of elevated Pi concentration on macrophage polarization and calcification. Macrophages, present in virtually all tissues, play key roles in health and disease and display remarkable plasticity, being able to change their physiology in response to environmental cues. Methods and results High-throughput transcriptomic analysis and functional studies demonstrated that Pi induces unpolarized macrophages to adopt a phenotype closely resembling that of alternatively-activated M2 macrophages, as revealed by arginine hydrolysis and energetic and antioxidant profiles. Pi-induced macrophages showed an anti-calcifying action mediated by increased availability of extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate. Conclusion We conclude that the ability of Pi-activated macrophages to prevent calcium-phosphate deposition is a compensatory mechanism protecting tissues from hyperphosphatemia-induced pathologic calcification. PMID:28362852

  9. Inhibition of macrophage function prevents intestinal inflammation and postoperative ileus in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Sven; Behrendt, Florian F; Lyutenski, Boris N; Lysson, Mariola; Bauer, Anthony J; Hirner, Andreas; Kalff, Jörg C

    2007-01-01

    muscularis macrophage network prevents postoperative ileus. PMID:16809419

  10. IFN-γ prevents adenosine receptor (A2bR) upregulation to sustain the macrophage activation response

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Heather B.; Ward, Amanda; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ravid, Katya; Mosser, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The priming of macrophages with IFN-γ prior to TLR stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged inflammatory cytokine production. Here, we demonstrate that following TLR stimulation, macrophages up regulate the adenosine 2b receptor (A2bR) to enhance their sensitivity to immunosuppressive extracellular adenosine. This up-regulation of A2bR leads to the induction of a macrophage with an immunoregulatory phenotype and the down regulation of inflammation. IFN-γ priming of macrophages, selectively prevents the induction of the A2bR in macrophages to mitigate sensitivity to adenosine and prevent this regulatory transition. IFN-γ-mediated A2bR blockade leads to a prolonged production of TNFα and IL-12 in response to TLR ligation. The pharmacological inhibition or the genetic deletion of the A2bR results in a hyper-inflammatory response to TLR ligation, similar to IFN-γ treatment of macrophages. Conversely, the overexpression of A2bR on macrophages blunts the IFN-γ effects and promotes the development of immunoregulatory macrophages. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism whereby IFN-γ contributes to host defense, by desensitizing macrophages to the immunoregulatory effects of adenosine. This mechanism overcomes the transient nature of TLR activation, and prolongs the anti-microbial state of the classically activated macrophage. This study may offer promising new targets to improve the clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases in which macrophage activation is dysregulated. PMID:26355158

  11. MicroRNA 21 Is a Homeostatic Regulator of Macrophage Polarization and Prevents Prostaglandin E2-Mediated M2 Generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Brandt, Stephanie; Medeiros, Alexandra; Wang, Soujuan; Wu, Hao; Dent, Alexander; Serezani, C. Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages dictate both initiation and resolution of inflammation. During acute inflammation classically activated macrophages (M1) predominate, and during the resolution phase alternative macrophages (M2) are dominant. The molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage polarization are understudied. MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in M1 and M2 macrophages that influence macrophage polarization. We identified a role of miR-21 in macrophage polarization, and found that cross-talk between miR-21 and the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a determining factor in macrophage polarization. miR-21 inhibition impairs expression of M2 signature genes but not M1 genes. PGE2 and its downstream effectors PKA and Epac inhibit miR-21 expression and enhance expression of M2 genes, and this effect is more pronounced in miR-21-/- cells. Among potential targets involved in macrophage polarization, we found that STAT3 and SOCS1 were enhanced in miR-21-/- cells and further enhanced by PGE2. We found that STAT3 was a direct target of miR-21 in macrophages. Silencing the STAT3 gene abolished PGE2-mediated expression of M2 genes in miR-21-/- macrophages. These data shed light on the molecular brakes involved in homeostatic macrophage polarization and suggest new therapeutic strategies to prevent inflammatory responses. PMID:25706647

  12. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  13. Macrophage skewing by Phd2 haplodeficiency prevents ischaemia by inducing arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukiji; Costa, Sandra; Delamarre, Estelle; Roncal, Carmen; Leite de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Finisguerra, Veronica; Deschoemaeker, Sofie; Bruyère, Françoise; Wenes, Mathias; Hamm, Alexander; Serneels, Jens; Magat, Julie; Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Anisimov, Andrey; Jordan, Benedicte F; Alitalo, Kari; Maxwell, Patrick; Gallez, Bernard; Zhuang, Zhen W; Saito, Yoshihiko; Simons, Michael; De Palma, Michele; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2011-10-09

    PHD2 serves as an oxygen sensor that rescues blood supply by regulating vessel formation and shape in case of oxygen shortage. However, it is unknown whether PHD2 can influence arteriogenesis. Here we studied the role of PHD2 in collateral artery growth by using hindlimb ischaemia as a model, a process that compensates for the lack of blood flow in case of major arterial occlusion. We show that Phd2 (also known as Egln1) haplodeficient (Phd2(+/-)) mice displayed preformed collateral arteries that preserved limb perfusion and prevented tissue necrosis in ischaemia. Improved arteriogenesis in Phd2(+/-) mice was due to an expansion of tissue-resident, M2-like macrophages and their increased release of arteriogenic factors, leading to enhanced smooth muscle cell (SMC) recruitment and growth. Both chronic and acute deletion of one Phd2 allele in macrophages was sufficient to skew their polarization towards a pro-arteriogenic phenotype. Mechanistically, collateral vessel preconditioning relied on the activation of canonical NF-κB pathway in Phd2(+/-) macrophages. These results unravel how PHD2 regulates arteriogenesis and artery homeostasis by controlling a specific differentiation state in macrophages and suggest new treatment options for ischaemic disorders.

  14. Lipocalin 2 prevents intestinal inflammation by enhancing phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Toyonaga, Takahiko; Matsuura, Minoru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Honzawa, Yusuke; Minami, Naoki; Yamada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Taku; Hibi, Toshifumi; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2016-10-13

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), also called neutrophil gelatinase B-associated lipocalin (NGAL), is an anti-microbial peptide originally identified in neutrophil granules. Although Lcn2/NGAL expression is increased in the inflamed intestinal tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the role of Lcn2/NGAL in the development of intestinal inflammation remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of Lcn2/NGAL in intestinal inflammation using a spontaneous mouse colitis model, interleukin-10 knock out (IL-10 KO) mice. Lcn2 expression in the colonic tissues of IL-10 KO mice increased with the development of colitis. Lcn2/IL-10 double-KO mice showed a more rapid onset and development of colitis compared to IL-10 KO mice. Lcn2 enhanced phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages in vitro after infection with Escherichia coli. Transfer of Lcn2-repleted macrophages prevented the development of colitis in Lcn2/IL-10 double-KO mice in vivo. Our findings revealed that Lcn2 prevents the development of intestinal inflammation. One crucial factor seems to be the enhancement of phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages by Lcn2.

  15. Lipocalin 2 prevents intestinal inflammation by enhancing phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Toyonaga, Takahiko; Matsuura, Minoru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Honzawa, Yusuke; Minami, Naoki; Yamada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Taku; Hibi, Toshifumi; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), also called neutrophil gelatinase B-associated lipocalin (NGAL), is an anti-microbial peptide originally identified in neutrophil granules. Although Lcn2/NGAL expression is increased in the inflamed intestinal tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the role of Lcn2/NGAL in the development of intestinal inflammation remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of Lcn2/NGAL in intestinal inflammation using a spontaneous mouse colitis model, interleukin-10 knock out (IL-10 KO) mice. Lcn2 expression in the colonic tissues of IL-10 KO mice increased with the development of colitis. Lcn2/IL-10 double-KO mice showed a more rapid onset and development of colitis compared to IL-10 KO mice. Lcn2 enhanced phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages in vitro after infection with Escherichia coli. Transfer of Lcn2-repleted macrophages prevented the development of colitis in Lcn2/IL-10 double-KO mice in vivo. Our findings revealed that Lcn2 prevents the development of intestinal inflammation. One crucial factor seems to be the enhancement of phagocytic bacterial clearance in macrophages by Lcn2. PMID:27734904

  16. Blocking Macrophage Leukotriene B4 Prevents Endothelial Injury and Reverses Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wen; Jiang, Xinguo; Tamosiuniene, Rasa; Sung, Yon K.; Qian, Jin; Dhillon, Gundeep; Gera, Lajos; Farkas, Laszlo; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Zamanian, Roham T.; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Fridlib, Marina; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Peters-Golden, Marc; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious condition that affects mainly young and middle-aged women, and its etiology is poorly understood. A prominent pathological feature of PH is accumulation of macrophages near the arterioles of the lung. In both clinical tissue and the SU5416 (SU)/athymic rat model of severe PH, we found that the accumulated macrophages expressed high levels of leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H), the biosynthetic enzyme for leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Moreover, macrophage-derived LTB4 directly induced apoptosis in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs). Further, LTB4 induced proliferation and hypertrophy of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. We found that LTB4 acted through its receptor, BLT1, to induce PAEC apoptosis by inhibiting the protective endothelial sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1)–endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway. Blocking LTA4H decreased in vivo LTB4 levels, prevented PAEC apoptosis, restored Sphk1-eNOS signaling, and reversed fulminant PH in the SU/athymic rat model of PH. Antagonizing BLT1 similarly reversed established PH. Inhibition of LTB4 biosynthesis or signal transduction in SU-treated athymic rats with established disease also improved cardiac function and reopened obstructed arterioles; this approach was also effective in the monocrotaline model of severe PH. Human plexiform lesions, one hallmark of PH, showed increased numbers of macrophages, which expressed LTA4H, and patients with connective tissue disease–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension exhibited significantly higher LTB4 concentrations in the systemic circulation than did healthy subjects. These results uncover a possible role for macrophage-derived LTB4 in PH pathogenesis and identify a pathway that may be amenable to therapeutic targeting. PMID:23986401

  17. Vitamin D prevents podocyte injury via regulation of macrophage M1/M2 phenotype in diabetic nephropathy rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Guo, Yin-Feng; Song, Zhi-Xia; Zhou, Min

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the heterogeneity of macrophage phenotype and function ultimately determines the outcome of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study aimed to investigate the effects of vitamin D on macrophage M1/M2 phenotype and its role in preventing podocyte impairment in streptozotocin-induced DN rats. Calcitriol, a bioactive 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, ameliorated proteinuria and renal damage as well as reversed the decline of both nephrin and podocin, crucial structural proteins in podocytes. DN rats showed increased infiltrating macrophages with M1 phenotype characterized by elevated expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α in glomeruli and interstitium, which were inhibited after calcitriol treatment. Interestingly, calcitriol promoted M2 macrophage activation with enhanced expression of CD163, arginase-1, and mannose receptor at week 18 but not at week 8 or 14. The ratio of CD163 to CD68, considered as the proportion of M2 macrophages, was about 2.9-fold higher at week 18 after calcitriol treatment. Furthermore, the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a crucial marker of M1 macrophages, was negatively correlated with the expression of either nephrin or podocin, whereas CD163, indicating M2 macrophages, was positively correlated. In vitro, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 switched high-glucose-induced M1 macrophages toward an M2 phenotype in either U937-derived macrophages or RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest that vitamin D not only reduces macrophage infiltration and inhibits M1 macrophage activation but also enhances M2 macrophage phenotype to protect against podocyte injury.

  18. The tumor-educated-macrophage increase of malignancy of human pancreatic cancer is prevented by zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Hassanein, Mohamed K; Menen, Rhiana; Momiyama, Masashi; Murakami, Takashi; Miwa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Mako; Uehara, Fuminari; Yano, Shuya; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    We previously defined macrophages harvested from the peritoneal cavity of nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic tumors as "tumor-educated-macrophages" (Edu) and macrophages harvested from mice without tumors as "naïve-macrophages" (Naïve), and demonstrated that Edu-macrophages promoted tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, Edu- and Naïve-macrophages were compared for their ability to enhance pancreatic cancer malignancy at the cellular level in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory efficacy of Zoledronic acid (ZA) on Edu-macrophage-enhanced metastasis was also determined. XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cells in Gelfoam co-cultured with Edu-macrophages proliferated to a greater extent compared to XPA1 cells cultured with Naïve-macrophages (P = 0.014). XPA1 cells exposed to conditioned medium harvested from Edu culture significantly increased proliferation (P = 0.016) and had more migration stimulation capability (P<0.001) compared to cultured cancer cells treated with the conditioned medium from Naïve. The mitotic index of the XPA1 cells, expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, significantly increased in vivo in the presence of Edu- compared to Naïve-macrophages (P = 0.001). Zoledronic acid (ZA) killed both Edu and Naïve in vitro. Edu promoted tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of the XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cell line. ZA reduced primary tumor growth (P = 0.006) and prevented metastasis (P = 0.025) promoted by Edu-macrophages. These results indicate that ZA inhibits enhanced primary tumor growth and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer induced by Edu-macrophages.

  19. The Lineage-Specific Transcription Factor PU.1 Prevents Polycomb-Mediated Heterochromatin Formation at Macrophage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tagore, Mohita; McAndrew, Michael J.; Gjidoda, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) are important determinants of cellular identity, but their exact mode of action has remained unclear. Here we show using a macrophage differentiation system that the lineage-specific TF PU.1 keeps macrophage-specific genes accessible during differentiation by preventing Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding to transcriptional regulatory elements. We demonstrate that the distal enhancer of a gene becomes bound by PRC2 as cells differentiate in the absence of PU.1 binding and that the gene is wrapped into heterochromatin, which is characterized by increased nucleosome occupancy and H3K27 trimethylation. This renders the gene inaccessible to the transcriptional machinery and prevents induction of the gene in response to an external signal in mature cells. In contrast, if PU.1 is bound at the transcriptional regulatory region of a gene during differentiation, PRC2 is not recruited, nucleosome occupancy is kept low, and the gene can be induced in mature macrophages. Similar results were obtained at the enhancers of other macrophage-specific genes that fail to bind PU.1 as an estrogen receptor fusion (PUER) in this system. These results show that one role of PU.1 is to exclude PRC2 and to prevent heterochromatin formation at macrophage-specific genes. PMID:26012552

  20. An analysis of multinucleated blastomere formation in human embryos.

    PubMed

    Pickering, S J; Taylor, A; Johnson, M H; Braude, P R

    1995-07-01

    Human embryos were disaggregated into component blastomeres 42-72 h after insemination. The blastomeres were scored for the number of nuclei present and blastomeres of known nuclear morphology were returned to individual culture drops for 16-20 h, after which they were scored for cleavage and nuclear morphology. In all, 48% of mononucleated blastomeres cleaved during this period, but only 76% of these produced two mononucleated daughter blastomeres; in the remainder, one or more of the blastomeres was abnormally nucleated. During overnight culture, 30% of multinucleated blastomeres and 30% of anucleate blastomeres cleaved, the majority producing abnormally nucleated daughter blastomeres. The majority of blastomeres which showed no sign of cleavage after overnight culture retained the same nuclear morphology as when originally disaggregated. However, a small number of mononucleated blastomeres contained two nuclei after culture, indicating that karyokinesis may have taken place in the absence of cytokinesis. Overall, approximately 30% of blastomeres with more than one nucleus seemed to arise by this mechanism, the remainder probably arising by errors of chromosome segregation and/or packaging at mitosis. In addition, 25/111 mononucleated daughter cells arose either after abnormal division of mononucleated parent cells or after division of multinucleated cells, suggesting that approximately 23% of newly formed mononucleated cells might be chromosomally abnormal. The results of DNA quantitation indicated that very few (12/131, 9.2%) blastomeres (whether uni- or multinucleated) had a DNA content outside the 2-4C range. The embryos used for these studies had been cultured in one of three commonly used in-vitro fertilization (IVF) media: modified T6, Earle's balanced salts or Universal IVF medium (a commercial medium from Medi-Cult). A retrospective analysis was carried out of the number of embryos containing multinucleated blastomeres at disaggregation and of the total

  1. Dynamics of the Establishment of Multinucleate Compartments in Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shermineh; Beerens, Bas; Manders, Erik M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics can vary widely between fungal species and between stages of development of fungal colonies. Here we compared nuclear dynamics and mitotic patterns between germlings and mature hyphae in Fusarium oxysporum. Using fluorescently labeled nuclei and live-cell imaging, we show that F. oxysporum is subject to a developmental transition from a uninucleate to a multinucleate state after completion of colony initiation. We observed a special type of hypha that exhibits a higher growth rate, possibly acting as a nutrient scout. The higher growth rate is associated with a higher nuclear count and mitotic waves involving 2 to 6 nuclei in the apical compartment. Further, we found that dormant nuclei of intercalary compartments can reenter the mitotic cycle, resulting in multinucleate compartments with up to 18 nuclei in a single compartment. PMID:25398376

  2. Rab27A Regulates Transport of Cell Surface Receptors Modulating Multinucleation and Lysosome-Related Organelles in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada-Sugawara, Megumi; Sakai, Eiko; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Izumi, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Noriaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Rab27A regulates transport of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and release of secretory granules in various types of cells. Here, we identified up-regulation of Rab27A during differentiation of osteoclasts (OCLs) from bone-marrow macrophages (BMMs), by DNA microarray analysis. Rab27A deficiency in OCLs, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown in RAW-D cell line or BMMs derived from ashen mice, which display genetic defects in Rab27A expression, induced multinucleated and giant cells. Upon stimulation with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), essential cytokines for OCL differentiation, phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src), and p-38 were slightly enhanced in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs. The cell surface level of c-fms, an M-CSF receptor, was slightly higher in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs, and down-regulation of RANK, a RANKL receptor, was delayed. In addition to receptors, OCLs derived from ashen mice exhibited aberrant actin ring formation, abnormal subcellular localization of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP2) and cathepsin K (CTSK), and marked reduction in resorbing activity. Thus, these findings suggest that Rab27A regulates normal transport of cell surface receptors modulating multinucleation and LROs in OCLs. PMID:25882854

  3. Platelets Direct Monocyte Differentiation Into Epithelioid-Like Multinucleated Giant Foam Cells With Suppressive Capacity Upon Mycobacterial Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yonghong; Dorhoi, Anca; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Yin, Hongyun; Dong, Zhengwei; Mao, Ling; Zhou, Jun; Bi, Aixiao; Weber, Stephan; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Chen, Gang; Chen, Yang; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Epithelioid, foam, and multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) are characteristics of tuberculosis granulomas, yet the precise genesis and functions of these transformed macrophages are unclear. We evaluated the role of platelets as drivers of macrophage transformation in mycobacterial infection. Methods. We employed flow cytometry and microscopy to assess cellular phenotype and phagocytosis. Immune assays allowed quantification of cytokines and chemokines, whereas gene microarray technology was applied to estimate global transcriptome alterations. Immunohistochemical investigations of tuberculosis granulomas substantiated our findings at the site of infection. Results. Monocytes differentiated in presence of platelets (MP-Macs) acquired a foamy, epithelioid appearance and gave rise to MNGCs (MP-MNGCs). MP-Macs up-regulated activation markers, phagocytosed mycobacteria, and released abundant interleukin 10. Upon extended culture, MP-Macs shared transcriptional features with epithelioid cells and M2 macrophages and up-regulated CXCL5 transcripts. In line with this, CXCL5 concentrations were significantly increased in airways of active tuberculosis patients. The platelet-specific CD42b antigen was detected in MP-Macs, likewise in macrophages, MNGCs, and epithelioid cells within tuberculosis granulomas, along with the platelet aggregation-inducing factor PDPN. Conclusions. Platelets drive macrophage differentiation into MNGCs with characteristics of epithelioid, foam, and giant cells observed in tuberculosis granulomas. Our data define platelets as novel participants in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24987031

  4. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M.; Choera, Tsokyi; Yun Lim, Fang; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D.; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A.; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P.; Fahy, John V.

    2016-01-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. PMID:27058347

  5. Regular physical activity prevents chronic pain by altering resident muscle macrophage phenotype and increasing IL-10 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Audrey; Gregory, Nicholas S.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity in healthy individuals prevents development of chronic musculoskeletal pain; however, the mechanisms underlying this exercise-induced analgesia are not well understood. Interleukin-10(IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine which can reduce nociceptor sensitization, increases during regular physical activity. Since macrophages play a major role in cytokine production and are present in muscle tissue, we propose that physical activity alters macrophage phenotype to increase IL-10 and prevent chronic pain. Physical activity was induced by allowing C57BL/6J mice free access to running wheels for 8 weeks and compared to sedentary mice with no running wheels. Using immunohistochemical staining of the gastrocnemius muscle to label regulatory (M2, secretes anti-inflammatory cytokines) and classical (M1, secretes proinflammatory cytokines) macrophages, the percentage of M2-macrophages increased significantly in physically active mice (68.5±4.6% of total) compared to sedentary mice (45.8±7.1% of total). Repeated acid injections into the muscle enhanced mechanical sensitivity of the muscle and paw in sedentary animals that does not occur in physically active mice; no sex differences occur in either sedentary or physically active mice. Blockade of IL-10 systemically or locally prevented the analgesia in physically active mice, i.e. mice developed hyperalgesia. Conversely, sedentary mice pretreated systemically or locally with IL-10 had reduced hyperalgesia after repeated acid injections. Thus, these results suggest that regular physical activity increases the percentage of regulatory macrophages in muscle and that IL-10 is an essential mediator in the analgesia produced by regular physical activity. PMID:26230740

  6. Glutathione prevents preterm parturition and fetal death by targeting macrophage-induced reactive oxygen species production in the myometrium.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Tarik; Bardou, Marc; Mace, Guillaume; Sicard, Pierre; Wendremaire, Maeva; Barrichon, Marina; Richaud, Sarah; Demidov, Oleg; Sagot, Paul; Garrido, Carmen; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Preterm birth is an inflammatory process resulting from the massive infiltration of innate immune cells and the production of proinflammatory cytokines in the myometrium. However, proinflammatory cytokines, which induce labor in vivo, fail to induce labor-associated features in human myometrial cells (MCs). We thus aimed to investigate if reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could be the missing step between immune cell activation and MC response. Indeed, we found that ROS production is increased in the human preterm laboring myometrium (27% ROS producing cells, respectively, versus 2% in nonlaboring controls), with 90% ROS production in macrophages. Using LPS-stimulated myometrial samples and cell coculture experiments, we demonstrated that ROS production is required for labor onset. Furthermore, we showed that ROS are required first in the NADPH oxidase (NADPHox)-2/NF-κB-dependent macrophage response to inflammatory stimuli but, more importantly, to trigger macrophage-induced MCs transactivation. Remarkably, in a murine model of LPS-induced preterm labor (inducing delivery within 17 hours, with no pup survival), cotreatment with glutathione delayed labor onset up to 94 hours and prevented in utero fetal distress, allowing 46% pups to survive. These results suggest that targeting ROS production with the macrophage-permeable antioxidant glutathione could constitute a promising strategy to prevent preterm birth.

  7. Ploidy variation in multinucleate cells changes under stress

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cori A.; Roberts, Samantha; Zhang, Huaiying; Kelly, Courtney M.; Kendall, Alexxy; Lee, ChangHwan; Gerstenberger, John; Koenig, Aaron B.; Kabeche, Ruth; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Ploidy variation is found in contexts as diverse as solid tumors, drug resistance in fungal infection, and normal development. Altering chromosome or genome copy number supports adaptation to fluctuating environments but is also associated with fitness defects attributed to protein imbalances. Both aneuploidy and polyploidy can arise from multinucleate states after failed cytokinesis or cell fusion. The consequences of ploidy variation in syncytia are difficult to predict because protein imbalances are theoretically buffered by a common cytoplasm. We examined ploidy in a naturally multinucleate fungus, Ashbya gossypii. Using integrated lac operator arrays, we found that chromosome number varies substantially among nuclei sharing a common cytoplasm. Populations of nuclei range from 1N to >4N, with different polyploidies in the same cell and low levels of aneuploidy. The degree of ploidy variation increases as cells age. In response to cellular stress, polyploid nuclei diminish and haploid nuclei predominate. These data suggest that mixed ploidy is tolerated in these syncytia; however, there may be costs associated with variation as stress homogenizes the genome content of nuclei. Furthermore, the results suggest that sharing of gene products is limited, and thus there is incomplete buffering of ploidy variation despite a common cytosol. PMID:25631818

  8. Macrophage IL-12p70 Signaling Prevents HSV-1–Induced CNS Autoimmunity Triggered by Autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Kevin R.; Gate, David; Zandian, Mandana; Allen, Sariah J.; Rajasagi, Naveen Kumar; van Rooijen, Nico; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Rouse, Barry T.; Flavell, Richard A.; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self-tolerance and function to suppress overly exuberant immune responses. However, it is unclear whether innate immune cells modulate Treg function. Here the authors examined the role of innate immunity in lymphomyeloid homeostasis. Methods. The involvement of B cells, dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, and T cells in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in different strains of mice infected ocularly with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was investigated. Results. The authors found that depletion of macrophages, but not DCs, B cells, NK cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+ T cells, induced CNS demyelination irrespective of virus or mouse strain. As with macrophage depletion, mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-12p35 or IL-12p40 showed CNS demyelination after HSV-1 infection, whereas demyelination was undetectable in HSV-1–infected, IL-23p19–deficient, or Epstein-Barr virus–induced gene 3-deficient mice. Demyelination could be rescued in macrophage-depleted mice after the injection of IL-12p70 DNA and in IL-12p35−/− or IL-12p40−/− mice after injection with IL-12p35 or IL-12p40 DNA or with recombinant viruses expressing IL-12p35 or IL-12p40. Using FoxP3-, CD4-, CD8-, or CD25-depletion and gene-deficient mouse approaches, the authors demonstrated that HSV-1–induced demyelination was blocked in the absence of CD4, CD25, or FoxP3 in macrophage-depleted mice. Flow cytometry showed an elevation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells in the spleens of infected macrophage-depleted mice, and adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells to infected macrophage-depleted severe combined immunodeficient mice induced CNS demyelination. Conclusions. The authors demonstrated that macrophage IL-12p70 signaling plays an important role in maintaining immune homeostasis in the CNS by preventing the development of autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs. PMID:21220560

  9. Mertk on tumor macrophages is a therapeutic target to prevent tumor recurrence following radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Marka R.; Baird, Jason; Friedman, David; Savage, Talicia; Uhde, Lauren; Alice, Alejandro; Cottam, Benjamin; Young, Kristina; Newell, Pippa; Nguyen, Cynthia; Bambina, Shelly; Kramer, Gwen; Akporiaye, Emmanuel; Malecka, Anna; Jackson, Andrew; Gough, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy provides a means to kill large numbers of cancer cells in a controlled location resulting in the release of tumor-specific antigens and endogenous adjuvants. However, by activating pathways involved in apoptotic cell recognition and phagocytosis, irradiated cancer cells engender suppressive phenotypes in macrophages. We demonstrate that the macrophage-specific phagocytic receptor, Mertk is upregulated in macrophages in the tumor following radiation therapy. Ligation of Mertk on macrophages results in anti-inflammatory cytokine responses via NF-kB p50 upregulation, which in turn limits tumor control following radiation therapy. We demonstrate that in immunogenic tumors, loss of Mertk is sufficient to permit tumor cure following radiation therapy. However, in poorly immunogenic tumors, TGFb inhibition is also required to result in tumor cure following radiation therapy. These data demonstrate that Mertk is a highly specific target whose absence permits tumor control in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:27602953

  10. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    PubMed

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans.

  11. miR-142-3p prevents macrophage differentiation during cancer-induced myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Sonda, Nada; Simonato, Francesca; Peranzoni, Elisa; Calì, Bianca; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Bisognin, Andrea; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Naldini, Luigi; Gentner, Bernhard; Trautwein, Christian; Sackett, Sara Dutton; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2013-06-27

    Tumor progression is accompanied by an altered myelopoiesis causing the accumulation of immunosuppressive cells. Here, we showed that miR-142-3p downregulation promoted macrophage differentiation and determined the acquisition of their immunosuppressive function in tumor. Tumor-released cytokines signaling through gp130, the common subunit of the interleukin-6 cytokine receptor family, induced the LAP∗ isoform of C/EBPβ transcription factor, promoting macrophage generation. miR-142-3p downregulated gp130 by canonical binding to its messenger RNA (mRNA) 3' UTR and repressed C/EBPβ LAP∗ by noncanonical binding to its 5' mRNA coding sequence. Enforced miR expression impaired macrophage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Mice constitutively expressing miR-142-3p in the bone marrow showed a marked increase in survival following immunotherapy with tumor-specific T lymphocytes. By modulating a specific miR in bone marrow precursors, we thus demonstrated the feasibility of altering tumor-induced macrophage differentiation as a potent tool to improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Multinucleated Giant Cancer Cells Produced in Response to Ionizing Radiation Retain Viability and Replicate Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Scott, April; Wang, Ying W.; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2017-01-01

    Loss of wild-type p53 function is widely accepted to be permissive for the development of multinucleated giant cells. However, whether therapy-induced multinucleation is associated with cancer cell death or survival remains controversial. Herein, we demonstrate that exposure of p53-deficient or p21WAF1 (p21)-deficient solid tumor-derived cell lines to ionizing radiation (between 2 and 8 Gy) results in the development of multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent to the culture dish for long times post-irradiation. Somewhat surprisingly, single-cell observations revealed that virtually all multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent for the duration of the experiments (up to three weeks post-irradiation) retain viability and metabolize 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and the majority (>60%) exhibit DNA synthesis. We further report that treatment of multinucleated giant cells with pharmacological activators of apoptosis (e.g., sodium salicylate) triggers their demise. Our observations reinforce the notion that radiation-induced multinucleation may reflect a survival mechanism for p53/p21-deficient cancer cells. With respect to evaluating radiosensitivity, our observations underscore the importance of single-cell experimental approaches (e.g., single-cell MTT) as the creation of viable multinucleated giant cells complicates the interpretation of the experimental data obtained by commonly-used multi-well plate colorimetric assays. PMID:28208747

  13. Vitamin E prevents NRF2 suppression by allergens in asthmatic alveolar macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dworski, Ryszard; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S; Hoskins, Aimee; Freeman, Michael L

    2011-07-15

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease associated with increased generation of reactive oxidant species and disturbed antioxidant defenses. NRF2 is the master transcription factor that regulates the expression of Phase II antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. Disruption of NRF2 augments oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of asthma, suggesting a protective role for NRF2 in the lungs in vivo. Yet, little is known about the regulation and function of NRF2 in human asthmatics. Using segmental allergen challenge, a well-established experimental model of IgE-mediated asthma exacerbation in human atopic asthmatics, we investigated the effects of a specific allergen and the modulatory role of vitamin E on NRF2 and a NRF2-target gene, superoxide dismutase, in alveolar macrophages recovered from the airways at 24h after allergen instillation in vivo. Allergen-provoked airway inflammation in sensitive asthmatics caused a profound inhibition of macrophage NRF2 activity and superoxide dismutase, rendering them incapable of responding to the NRF2 inducers. Prolonged treatment with high doses of the antioxidant vitamin E lessened this allergen-induced drop in alveolar macrophage NRF2. These results are the first to demonstrate that NRF2 expression in human asthmatics is compromised upon allergen challenge but can be rescued by vitamin E in vivo.

  14. Assessing cell fusion and cytokinesis failure as mechanisms of clone 9 hepatocyte multinucleation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simic, Damir; Euler, Catherine; Thurby, Christina; Peden, Mike; Tannehill-Gregg, Sarah; Bunch, Todd; Sanderson, Thomas; Van Vleet, Terry

    2012-08-01

    In this in vitro model of hepatocyte multinucleation, separate cultures of rat Clone 9 cells are labeled with either red or green cell tracker dyes (Red Cell Tracker CMPTX or Vybrant CFDA SE Cell Tracer), plated together in mixed-color colonies, and treated with positive or negative control agents for 4 days. The fluorescent dyes become cell-impermeant after entering cells and are not transferred to adjacent cells in a population, but are inherited by daughter cells after fusion. The mixed-color cultures are then evaluated microscopically for multinucleation and analysis of the underlying mechanism (cell fusion/cytokinesis). Multinucleated cells containing only one dye have undergone cytokinesis failure, whereas dual-labeled multinucleated cells have resulted from fusion.

  15. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Galvano, Fabio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Masella, Roberta; Giovannini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power. PMID:26180584

  16. Interferon-gamma reverses the immunosuppressive and protumoral properties and prevents the generation of human tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Duluc, Dorothée; Corvaisier, Murielle; Blanchard, Simon; Catala, Laurent; Descamps, Philippe; Gamelin, Erick; Ponsoda, Stéphane; Delneste, Yves; Hebbar, Mohamed; Jeannin, Pascale

    2009-07-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are M2d-polarized cells (IL-10(high), IL-12(low), ILT3(high), CD86(low)) that accumulate in tumor microenvironment. TAM inhibit antitumor T lymphocyte generation and function, contribute to tumor tolerance and are trophic for tumors. In this study, we investigated whether some immunological factors may reverse TAM immunosuppressive properties. Among 32 cytokines, we have identified IFNgamma on its ability to switch immunosuppressive TAM into immunostimulatory cells. Upon IFNgamma exposure, TAM purified from ovarian cancer ascites recover a M1 phenotype (IL-10(low), IL-12(high)), express high levels of CD86 and low levels of ILT3, enhance the proliferation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes and potentiate the cytotoxic properties of a MelanA-specific CD8(+) T cell clone. IFNgamma-treated TAM also secreted reduced levels of mediators promoting suppressive T cell accumulation (CCL18) and trophic for tumors (VEGF and MMP9). As TAM derive from the local differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes, we investigated whether IFNgamma may also affect TAM generation. In the presence of ovarian ascites, IFNgamma skewed monocyte differentiation from TAM-like cells to M1-polarized immunostimulatory macrophages. Together, these data show that IFNgamma overcomes TAM-induced immunosuppression by preventing TAM generation and functions. These data highlight that IFNgamma used locally at the tumor site could potentiate the efficacy of antitumor immunotherapies based on the generation of effector T cells.

  17. Lycopene, quercetin and tyrosol prevent macrophage activation induced by gliadin and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Daniela; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Simeon, Vittorio; Grassia, Gianluca; Soscia, Antonio; Cinelli, Maria Pia; Carnuccio, Rosa

    2007-07-02

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in inflammatory process of celiac disease. We have studied the effect of the lycopene, quercetin and tyrosol natural antioxidants on the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated by gliadin in association with IFN-gamma. The IFN-gamma plus gliadin combination treatment was capable of enhancing iNOS and COX-2 gene expression and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1alpha (STAT-1alpha) activation induced by reactive oxygen species generation at 24 h. Lycopene, quercetin and tyrosol inhibited all these effects. The results here reported suggest that these compounds may represent non toxic agents for the control of pro-inflammatory genes involved in celiac disease.

  18. Prevention of in vitro oxidant-mediated alveolar macrophage injury by cellular glutathione and precursors.

    PubMed

    Voisin, C; Aerts, C; Wallaert, B

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the toxic effects of various oxidants on alveolar macrophages (O2, NO2, tobacco smoke and silica), we used an original method of cell culture in aerobiosis, which permitted direct contact between the atmosphere and the target cells. Our results demonstrated that the variations of cell sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of oxidants were associated with various levels in cellular antioxidant equipment. A significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and/or cellular glutathione. Addition of N-acetylcysteine, a polypeptide known to have an antioxidant activity and to be a precursor of glutathione, was responsible for a decrease of oxidant-mediated cytotoxicity. Whether this protective effect was due to an increase in glutathione cell content or to a scavenger effect of N-acetylcysteine still needs to be elucidated.

  19. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  20. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  1. Multinucleate Giant Cells in FNAC of Benign Breast Lesions: Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    R, Kalyani; Murthy V, Srinivasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleate giant cells are described in breast aspirates. However, due to its rarity very few cases have been described cytologically. Hence recognition and correct interpretation of their presence is difficult, yet crucial for accurate diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The prospective study of FNAC (fine needle aspirate cytology) of breast lumps was conducted for a period of six months. Direct smears were prepared from the material aspirated. In case of fluid aspirates, centrifuge done and cell sediment was used for making smears. Smears were alcohol fixed and stained with PAP/H&E or air dried smears were stained with Leishman stain. Further smears were subjected to immunocytochemistry using vimentin and CD34 markers to know the origin of multinucleate giant cells. Results: We have reported 11 cases of breast lesions, which showed multinucleate giant cells on FNAC. Out of the 11 cases, Cytologically six cases showed granuloma debris with relative proportion of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells. Two cases were diagnosed as acute suppurative granulomatous mastitis. Two cases of fibroadenoma and one case of fat necrosis showed multinucleate giant cells. Immunocytochemistry showed vimentin positivity in both stromal and histiocytic type of multinucleate giant cells and in isolated histiocytes. CD34 was focally positive in histiocytic type of giant cells. Conclusion: An effort is made to distinguish between the stromal and histiocytic type giant cells in non-neoplastic breast lesions. Further molecular studies have to be done to know the exact histogenesis and role of these multinucleate giant cells in benign lesions. PMID:25653953

  2. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma

    PubMed Central

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E

    2014-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation. PMID:25504013

  3. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2015-07-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation.

  4. Alveolar Macrophages Prevent Lethal Influenza Pneumonia By Inhibiting Infection Of Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardani, Amber; Boulton, Adam; Kim, Taeg S.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major human pathogen that produces significant morbidity and mortality. To explore the contribution of alveolar macrophages (AlvMΦs) in regulating the severity of IAV infection we employed a murine model in which the Core Binding Factor Beta gene is conditionally disrupted in myeloid cells. These mice exhibit a selective deficiency in AlvMΦs. Following IAV infection these AlvMΦ deficient mice developed severe diffuse alveolar damage, lethal respiratory compromise, and consequent lethality. Lethal injury in these mice resulted from increased infection of their Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells (T1AECs) and the subsequent elimination of the infected T1AECs by the adaptive immune T cell response. Further analysis indicated AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of the cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) pathway genes in T1AECs in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes in a T1AECs cell line reduced the susceptibility of T1AECs to IAV infection, suggesting that AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of this pathway contributes to the resistance of T1AECs to IAV infection. Furthermore, inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes, as well as blockade of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptors in the AlvMΦ deficient mice reduced the susceptibility of their T1AECs to IAV infection and protected these mice from lethal infection. These results suggest that AlvMΦs may utilize a previously unappreciated mechanism to protect T1AECs against IAV infection, and thereby reduce the severity of infection. The findings further suggest that the cysLT pathway and the receptors for cysLT metabolites represent potential therapeutic targets in severe IAV infection. PMID:28085958

  5. Resveratrol prevents the impairment of advanced glycosylation end products (AGE) on macrophage lipid homeostasis by suppressing the receptor for AGE via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihua; Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Liqun; Xu, Qiang; Yang, Qihong; Si, Liangyi

    2010-05-01

    Advanced glycosylation end products (AGE) and its receptor (RAGE) axis is involved in the regulation of lipid homeostasis and is critical in the pathogenesis of diabetic atherosclerosis. We investigated the protective role of resveratrol against the AGE-induced impairment on macrophage lipid homeostasis. In THP-1-derived macrophages, RAGE was dose-dependently induced by AGE and played a key role in the AGE-induced cholesterol accumulation. Resveratrol markedly reduced RAGE expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma but not PPARalpha or AMP-activated protein kinase. Importantly, pretreatment with resveratrol significantly ameliorated AGE-induced up-regulation of scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) and down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1 and ABCG1 and thus effectively prevented the cholesterol accumulation in macrophages as shown by cellular cholesterol analysis and oil red O staining. Moreover, blockade of PPARgamma abolished all these effects of resveratrol. Collectively, our results indicate that resveratrol prevents the impairment of AGE on macrophage lipid homeostasis partially by suppressing RAGE via PPARgamma activation, which might provide new insight into the protective role of resveratrol against diabetic atherosclerosis.

  6. IL-4 induces the formation of multinucleated giant cells and expression of β5 integrin in central giant cell lesion

    PubMed Central

    Aghbali, Amirala; Rafieyan, Sona; Mohamed-Khosroshahi, Leila; Baradaran, Behzad; Shanehbandi, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Background It is now well established that IL-4 has a central role in the development of monocytes to multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) by inducing the expression of integrins on the surface of monocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of IL-4 in induction of β5 integrin expression in the peripheral blood samples of patients with giant cell granuloma. Material and Methods Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood samples of patients with central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) and healthy controls using human Monocyte Isolation Kit II. Isolated monocytes were then cultured in the absence or presence of IL-4 (10 and 20 ng/mL), and following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, Real-time PCR was performed to determine the level of β5 integrin expression. The formation of CGCGs and morphological analyses were done under light microscopy. For confirmation of CGCGs, immunocytochemistry technique was also carried out by anti-RANK (receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand) antibody. Results In both patient and control groups, β5 levels were significantly enhanced by increasing the IL-4 dose from 10 to 20 ng/mL. In addition, these differences were significant between patient and control groups without IL-4 treatment. On the other hand, the number of cells which expressed RANK and therefore the number of giant cells were significantly higher in the patient group in comparison to controls, as assessed by immunohistochemistry evaluations. Conclusions In this study, we showed an elevation in the expression levels of β5 integrin when stimulated by IL-4. It is strongly indicated that this integrin acts as an important mediator during macrophage to macrophage fusion and development of giant cells. Key words:β5 integrin, giant cell, Il-4, monocyte, rank. PMID:27918730

  7. Inhibition of NOS-NO System Prevents Autoimmune Orchitis Development in Rats: Relevance of NO Released by Testicular Macrophages in Germ Cell Apoptosis and Testosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jarazo Dietrich, Sabrina; Fass, Mónica Irina; Jacobo, Patricia Verónica; Sobarzo, Cristian Marcelo Alejandro; Lustig, Livia; Theas, María Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the testis is considered an immunoprivileged organ it can orchestrate immune responses against pathological insults such as infection and trauma. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a model of chronic inflammation whose main histopathological features it shares with human orchitis. In EAO an increased number of macrophages infiltrate the interstitium concomitantly with progressive germ cell degeneration and impaired steroidogenesis. Up-regulation of nitric oxide (NO)-NO synthase (NOS) system occurs, macrophages being the main producers of NO. Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of NO-NOS system in orchitis development and determine the involvement of NO released by testicular macrophages on germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion. Method and Results EAO was induced in rats by immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants (E group) and a group of untreated normal rats (N) was also studied. Blockage of NOS by i.p. injection of E rats with a competitive inhibitor of NOS, L-NAME (8mg/kg), significantly reduced the incidence and severity of orchitis and lowered testicular nitrite content. L-NAME reduced germ cell apoptosis and restored intratesticular testosterone levels, without variations in serum LH. Co-culture of N testicular fragments with testicular macrophages obtained from EAO rats significantly increased germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion, whereas addition of L-NAME lowered both effects and reduced nitrite content. Incubation of testicular fragments from N rats with a NO donor DETA-NOnoate (DETA-NO) induced germ cell apoptosis through external and internal apoptotic pathways, an effect prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). DETA-NO inhibited testosterone released from Leydig cells, whereas NAC (from 2.5 to 15 mM) did not prevent this effect. Conclusions We demonstrated that NO-NOS system is involved in the impairment of testicular function in orchitis. NO secreted mainly by testicular

  8. The evo-devo of multinucleate cells, tissues, and organisms, and an alternative route to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Cobb, Edward D; Crawford, David R

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleate cells, tissues, or organisms occur in 60 families of land plants and in five otherwise diverse algal lineages (Rhodophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Charophyceae). Inspection of a morphospace constructed out of eight developmental processes reveals a large number of possible variants of multinucleate cells and organisms that, with two exceptions, are represented by one or more plant species in one or more clades. Thus, most of these permutations of developmental processes exist in nature. Inspection of the morphospace also shows how the siphonous body plan (a multinucleate cell with the capacity for indeterminate growth in size) can theoretically serve as the direct progenitor of a multicellular organism by a process similar to segregative cell division observed in siphonocladean algae. Using molecular phylogenies of algal clades, different evolutionary scenarios are compared to see how the multicellular condition may have evolved from a multinucleate unicellular progenitor. We also show that the siphonous progenitor of a multicellular organism has previously passed through the alignment-of-fitness phase (in which genetic similarity among cells/nuclei minimizes internal genomic conflict) and the export-of-fitness phase (in which genetically similar cells/nuclei collaborate to achieve a reproductively integrated multicellular organism). All that is theoretically required is the evolutionary acquisition of the capacity to compartmentalize its cytoplasm.

  9. CD169+ macrophages regulate PD-L1 expression via type I interferon and thereby prevent severe immunopathology after LCMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaabani, Namir; Duhan, Vikas; Khairnar, Vishal; Gassa, Asmae; Ferrer-Tur, Rita; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Liu, Jia; Dittmer, Ulf; Trilling, Mirko; Scheu, Stefanie; Hardt, Cornelia; Lang, Philipp A; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Karl S

    2016-01-01

    Upon infection with persistence-prone virus, type I interferon (IFN-I) mediates antiviral activity and also upregulates the expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), and this upregulation can lead to CD8+ T-cell exhaustion. How these very diverse functions are regulated remains unknown. This study, using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, showed that a subset of CD169+ macrophages in murine spleen and lymph nodes produced high amounts of IFN-I upon infection. Absence of CD169+ macrophages led to insufficient production of IFN-I, lower antiviral activity and persistence of virus. Lack of CD169+ macrophages also limited the IFN-I-dependent expression of PD-L1. Enhanced viral replication in the absence of PD-L1 led to persistence of virus and prevented CD8+ T-cell exhaustion. As a consequence, mice exhibited severe immunopathology and died quickly after infection. Therefore, CD169+ macrophages are important contributors to the IFN-I response and thereby influence antiviral activity, CD8+ T-cell exhaustion and immunopathology. PMID:27809306

  10. Cross-Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Interleukin-10 and miR-155 in Orientia tsutsugamushi-Infected Human Macrophages Prevents Cytokine Storm.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Hong, Yi-Ren; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Fan, Kan-Tang; Peng, Chi-Wen; Wu, Ching-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Li; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Chen, Li-Kuang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-07-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi. Macrophages are host cells for its replication and clearance. Severe complications in patients are mainly caused by a cytokine storm resulting from overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines; nevertheless, the molecular mechanism for the occurrence remains obscure. Herein, we investigate the interactive regulation of cytokines and micro-RNA (miR) in human macrophages infected with low and high doses of O. tsutsugamushi. During low dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of IL-10 through extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, which inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and facilitates pathogen replication. Increasing levels of pathogen results in reduced levels of IL-10, and macrophages begin to generate high levels of proinflammatory cytokines through NF-κB activation. However, during a high dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of miR-155 to slow the proinflammatory response. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/IL-10 axis suppresses the NF-κB/tumor necrosis factor alpha axis via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Both IL-10 and miR-155 inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, IL-10 is a potent inhibitor of miR-155. Patients susceptible to a cytokine storm, peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed significantly lower IL-10 and miR-155 responses to O. tsutsugamushi challenge. Thus, IL-10 and miR-155 operate inhibitory mechanisms to achieve a proper defense mechanism and prevent a cytokine storm.

  11. Stabilin-1 expression defines a subset of macrophages that mediate tissue homeostasis and prevent fibrosis in chronic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Rantakari, Pia; Patten, Daniel A.; Valtonen, Joona; Karikoski, Marika; Gerke, Heidi; Dawes, Harriet; Laurila, Juha; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Elima, Kati; Hübscher, Stefan G.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Adams, David H.; Salmi, Marko; Shetty, Shishir

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of fibrosis development and resolution. Elucidating the mechanisms by which they mediate this process is crucial for establishing their therapeutic potential. Here, we use experimental models of liver fibrosis to show that deficiency of the scavenger receptor, stabilin-1, exacerbates fibrosis and delays resolution during the recovery phase. We detected a subset of stabilin-1+ macrophages that were induced at sites of cellular injury close to the hepatic scar in mouse models of liver fibrosis and in human liver disease. Stabilin-1 deficiency abrogated malondialdehyde-LDL (MDA-LDL) uptake by hepatic macrophages and was associated with excess collagen III deposition. Mechanistically, the lack of stabilin-1 led to elevated intrahepatic levels of the profibrogenic chemokine CCL3 and an increase in GFAP+ fibrogenic cells. Stabilin-1−/− macrophages demonstrated a proinflammatory phenotype during liver injury and the normal induction of Ly6Clo monocytes during resolution was absent in stabilin-1 knockouts leading to persistence of fibrosis. Human stabilin-1+ monocytes efficiently internalized MDA-LDL and this suppressed their ability to secrete CCL3, suggesting that loss of stabilin-1 removes a brake to CCL3 secretion. Experiments with cell-lineage–specific knockouts revealed that stabilin-1 expression in myeloid cells is required for the induction of this subset of macrophages and that increased fibrosis occurs in their absence. This study demonstrates a previously unidentified regulatory pathway in fibrogenesis in which a macrophage scavenger receptor protects against organ fibrosis by removing fibrogenic products of lipid peroxidation. Thus, stabilin-1+ macrophages shape the tissue microenvironment during liver injury and healing. PMID:27474165

  12. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Raquel; To, Joyce; Lund, Maria E; Pinar, Anita; Mansell, Ashley; Robinson, Mark W; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Dalton, John P; Donnelly, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex that controls the production of IL-1β, a cytokine that influences the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Helminth parasites secrete molecules that interact with innate immune cells, modulating their activity to ultimately determine the phenotype of differentiated T cells, thus creating an immune environment that is conducive to sustaining chronic infection. We show that one of these molecules, FhHDM-1, a cathelicidin-like peptide secreted by the helminth parasite, Fasciola hepatica, inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β by macrophages. FhHDM-1 had no effect on the synthesis of pro-IL-1β. Rather, the inhibitory effect was associated with the capacity of the peptide to prevent acidification of the endolysosome. The activation of cathepsin B protease by lysosomal destabilization was prevented in FhHDM-1-treated macrophages. By contrast, peptide derivatives of FhHDM-1 that did not alter the lysosomal pH did not inhibit secretion of IL-1β. We propose a novel immune modulatory strategy used by F. hepatica, whereby secretion of the FhHDM-1 peptide impairs the activation of NLRP3 by lysosomal cathepsin B protease, which prevents the downstream production of IL-1β and the development of protective T helper 1 type immune responses that are detrimental to parasite survival.-Alvarado, R., To, J., Lund, M. E., Pinar, A., Mansell, A., Robinson, M. W., O'Brien, B. A., Dalton, J. P., Donnelly, S. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

  13. Palmitoleic acid prevents palmitic acid-induced macrophage activation and consequent p38 MAPK-mediated skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nicola A; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-08-05

    Obesity and saturated fatty acid (SFA) treatment are both associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR) and increased macrophage infiltration. However, the relative effects of SFA and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-activated macrophages on muscle are unknown. Here, macrophages were treated with palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid or both and the effects of the conditioned medium (CM) on C2C12 myotubes investigated. CM from palmitic acid-treated J774s (palm-mac-CM) impaired insulin signalling and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, reduced Inhibitor κBα and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in myotubes. p38 MAPK inhibition or siRNA partially ameliorated these defects, as did addition of tumour necrosis factor-α blocking antibody to the CM. Macrophages incubated with both FAs generated CM that did not induce IR, while palmitoleic acid-mac-CM alone was insulin sensitising. Thus UFAs may improve muscle insulin sensitivity and counteract SFA-mediated IR through an effect on macrophage activation.

  14. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF MITOSIS AND CYTOKINESIS IN THE MULTINUCLEATE GREEN ALGA ACROSIPHONIA

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Peggy R.; Waaland, J. Robert

    1974-01-01

    The processes of mitosis and cytokinesis in the multinucleate green alga Acrosiphonia have been examined in the light and electron microscopes. The course of events in division includes thickening of the chloroplast and migration of numerous nuclei and other cytoplasmic incusions to form a band in which mitosis occurs, while other nuclei in the same cell but not in the band do not divide. Centrioles and microtubules are associated with migrated and dividing nuclei but not with nonmigrated, nondividing nuclei. Cytokinesis is accomplished in the region of the band, by means of an annular furrow which is preceded by a hoop of microtubules. No other microtubules are associated with the furrow. Characteristics of nuclear and cell division in Acrosiphonia are compared with those of other multinucleate cells and with those of other green algae. PMID:4139161

  15. Kid depletion in mouse oocytes associated with multinucleated blastomere formation and inferior embryo development.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Akiyoshi; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Islam, Md Rashedul; Yamagami, Kazuki; Tanaka, Asami; Suyama, Hikaru; El-Sayed, El-Sharawy Mohamed; Tabata, Shoji; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the knockdown (KD) of Kid on maturation developmental competence and multinucleation of mouse germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes after parthenogenetic activation. Data revealed that Kid messenger RNA (mRNA) was expressed in GV and MII stage oocyte and 1- and 2-cell embryos. Additionally, Kid mRNA expression in the Kid KD group decreased by nearly 46% compared to the control small interfering RNA (siRNA) groups. The rate of multinucleated embryos in the Kid KD group (52.4%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the control siRNA group (4.7%). Finally, the developmental rates were significantly lower in the Kid siRNA group at > 4-cell stage (28.6% vs. 53.5%) and the blastocyst stage (2.4% vs. 23.3%) compared to the control siRNA groups. Suppression of Kid using siRNA caused multinucleation in early embryos with high frequency and it may increase 2- to 4-cell arrested embryos and reduce the developmental competence to blastocyst.

  16. Inhibition of VDAC1 prevents Ca²⁺-mediated oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid mediated sonodynamic therapy in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haibo; Gao, Weiwei; Yang, Yang; Guo, Shuyuan; Wang, Huan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shuisheng; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Haobo; Yao, Jianting; Tian, Zhen; Li, Bicheng; Cao, Wenwu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Tian, Ye

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound combined with endogenous protoporphyrin IX derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-SDT) is known to induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells and macrophages. Persistent retention of macrophages in the plaque has been implicated in the pathophysiology and progression of atherosclerosis. Here we investigated the effects of inhibition of voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) on ALA-SDT-induced THP-1 macrophages apoptosis. Cells were pre-treated with VDAC1 inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) disodium salt for 1 h or downregulated VDAC1 expression by small interfering RNA and exposed to ultrasound. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay, and cell apoptosis along with necrosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. Levels of cytochrome c release was assessed by confocal microscope and Western blot. The levels of full length caspases, caspase activation, and VDAC isoforms were analyzed by Western blot. Intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and intracellular Ca(2+) [Ca(2+)]i levels were measured with fluorescent probes. We confirmed that the pharmacological inhibition of VDAC1 by DIDS notably prevented ALA-SDT-induced cell apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages. Additionally, DIDS significantly inhibited intracellular ROS generation and apoptotic biochemical changes such as inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, ALA-SDT elevated the [Ca(2+)]i levels and it was also notably reduced by DIDS. Furthermore, both of intracellular ROS generation and cell apoptosis were predominately inhibited by Ca(2+) chelating reagent BAPTA-AM. Intriguingly, ALA-treatment markedly augmented VDAC1 protein levels exclusively, and the downregulation of VDAC1 expression by specific siRNA also significantly abolished cell apoptosis. Altogether, these

  17. Rb-dependent cellular senescence, multinucleation and susceptibility to oncogenic transformation through PKC scaffolding by SSeCKS/AKAP12

    PubMed Central

    Akakura, Shin; Nochajski, Peter; Gao, Lingqiu; Sotomayor, Paul; Matsui, Sei-ichi

    2010-01-01

    A subset of AKAPs (A Kinase Anchoring Proteins) regulate signaling and cytoskeletal pathways through the spaciotemporal scaffolding of multiple protein kinases (PK), such as PKC and PKA, and associations with the plasma membrane and the actin-based cytoskeleton. SSeCKS/Gravin/Akap12 expression is severely downregulated in many advanced cancers and exhibits tumor- and metastasis-suppressing activity. akap12-null (KO) mice develop prostatic hyperplasia with focal dysplasia, but the precise mechanism how Akap12 prevents oncogenic progression remains unclear. Here, we show that KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) exhibit premature senescence marked by polyploidy and multinucleation, and by increased susceptibility to oncogenic transformation. Although p53 and Rb pathways are activated in the absence of Akap12, senescence is dependent on Rb. Senescence is driven by the activation of PKCα, which induces p16Ink4a/Rb through a MEK-dependent downregulation of Id1, and PKCδ, which downregulates Lats1/Warts, a mitotic exit network kinase required for cytokinesis. Our data strongly suggest that Akap12 controls Rb-mediated cell aging and oncogenic progression by directly scaffolding and attenuating PKCα/δ. PMID:21099353

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in Association With Pancreatic Recruitment of M2-Like Macrophages, Mesenchymal Cells, and Fibrocytes.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Mahmoud; Wang, Gen-Sheng; Patrick, Christopher; Crookshank, Jennifer A; MacFarlane, Amanda J; Noel, J Ariana; Strom, Alexander; Scott, Fraser W

    2015-11-01

    Immunoregulatory and regenerative processes are activated in the pancreas during the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) but are insufficient to prevent the disease. We hypothesized that the induction of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by cobalt protophoryrin (CoPP) would prevent T1D by promoting anti-inflammatory and pro-repair processes. Diabetes-prone BioBreeding rats received ip CoPP or saline twice per week for 3 weeks, starting at 30 days and were monitored for T1D. Immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and microarrays were used to evaluate postinjection pancreatic changes at 51 days, when islet inflammation is first visible. T1D was prevented in CoPP-treated rats (29% vs 73%). Pancreatic Hmox1 was up-regulated along with islet-associated CD68(+)HO-1(+) cells, which were also observed in a striking peri-lobular interstitial infiltrate. Most interstitial cells expressed the mesenchymal marker vimentin and the hematopoietic marker CD34. Spindle-shaped, CD34(+)vimentin(+) cells coexpressed collagen V, characteristic of fibrocytes. M2 macrophage factors Krüppel-like factor 4, CD163, and CD206 were expressed by interstitial cells, consistent with pancreatic upregulation of several M2-associated genes. CoPP upregulated islet-regenerating REG genes and increased neogenic REG3β(+) and insulin(+) clusters. Thus, short-term induction of HO-1 promoted a protective M2-like milieu in the pancreas and recruited mesenchymal cells, M2 macrophages, and fibrocytes that imparted immunoregulatory and pro-repair effects, preventing T1D.

  19. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  20. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia presenting multinucleated cells in histology: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, F; Hashimoto, T; Takenouchi, T; Ito, M; Nitto, H

    1998-07-01

    A case of angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia arising on the face of a woman is reported. Histologically, the uniqueness of this case is the presence of multinucleated cells (MNCs), besides the conventional dermal changes. Electron microscopy showed that some of the apparent MNCs are clusters of endothelial cells forming immature vascular lumens with numerous microvilli, and the other MNCs displayed the recognized features of fibrohistiocytic or myofibroblastic cells. Immunohistochemically, some MNCs were positive for Ulex europaeus agglutinin and Factor VIII-related antigen. From these findings, some of the MNCs are histologically endothelial sprouts, and the others are fibrohistiocytic cells in the present case.

  1. Macrophage deficiency in osteopetrotic (op/op) mice inhibits activation of satellite cells and prevents hypertrophy in single soleus fibers.

    PubMed

    Ohira, T; Wang, X D; Ito, T; Kawano, F; Goto, K; Izawa, T; Ohno, H; Kizaki, T; Ohira, Y

    2015-05-15

    Effects of macrophage on the responses of soleus fiber size to hind limb unloading and reloading were studied in osteopetrotic homozygous (op/op) mice with inactivated mutation of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) gene and in wild-type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/op) mice. The basal levels of mitotically active and quiescent satellite cell (-46 and -39% vs. +/+, and -40 and -30% vs. +/op) and myonuclear number (-29% vs. +/+ and -28% vs. +/op) in fibers of op/op mice were significantly less than controls. Fiber length and sarcomere number in op/op were also less than +/+ (-22%) and +/op (-21%) mice. Similar trend was noted in fiber cross-sectional area (CSA, -15% vs. +/+, P = 0.06, and -14% vs. +/op, P = 0.07). The sizes of myonuclear domain, cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus, were identical in all types of mice. The CSA, length, and the whole number of sarcomeres, myonuclei, and mitotically active and quiescent satellite cells, as well as myonuclear domain, in single muscle fibers were decreased after 10 days of unloading in all types of mice, although all of these parameters in +/+ and +/op mice were increased toward the control values after 10 days of reloading. However, none of these levels in op/op mice were recovered. Data suggest that M-CSF and/or macrophages are important to activate satellite cells, which cause increase of myonuclear number during fiber hypertrophy. However, it is unclear why their responses to general growth and reloading after unloading are different.

  2. Overproduction of acyloxyacyl hydrolase by macrophages and dendritic cells prevents prolonged reactions to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ojogun, Noredia; Kuang, Tang-Yong; Shao, Baomei; Greaves, David R; Munford, Robert S; Varley, Alan W

    2009-12-01

    Although recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by the myeloid differentiation factor 2-Toll-like receptor 4 complex is important for triggering protective inflammatory responses in animals, terminating many of these responses requires LPS inactivation by a host lipase, acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH). To test whether endogenously produced recombinant AOAH can modulate responses to LPS and gram-negative bacteria, we engineered transgenic mice that overexpress AOAH in dendritic cells and macrophages, cell types that normally produce it. Transgenic mice deacylated LPS more rapidly than did wild-type controls. They also were protected from LPS-induced hepatosplenomegaly, recovered more quickly from LPS-induced weight loss, and were more likely to survive when challenged with live Escherichia coli. Constitutive overexpression of AOAH in vivo hastened recovery from LPS exposure without interfering with the normal acute inflammatory response to this important microbial signal molecule. Our results suggest that the extent to which macrophages and dendritic cells produce AOAH may influence the outcome of many gram-negative bacterial diseases.

  3. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  4. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  5. Macrophage fusion is controlled by the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST/PTPN12.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Inmoo; Davidson, Dominique; Souza, Cleiton Martins; Vacher, Jean; Veillette, André

    2013-06-01

    Macrophages can undergo cell-cell fusion, leading to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and osteoclasts. This process is believed to promote the proteolytic activity of macrophages toward pathogens, foreign bodies, and extracellular matrices. Here, we examined the role of PTP-PEST (PTPN12), a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, in macrophage fusion. Using a macrophage-targeted PTP-PEST-deficient mouse, we determined that PTP-PEST was not needed for macrophage differentiation or cytokine production. However, it was necessary for interleukin-4-induced macrophage fusion into multinucleated giant cells in vitro. It was also needed for macrophage fusion following implantation of a foreign body in vivo. Moreover, in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, PTP-PEST was required for receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-triggered macrophage fusion into osteoclasts. PTP-PEST had no impact on expression of fusion mediators such as β-integrins, E-cadherin, and CD47, which enable macrophages to become fusion competent. However, it was needed for polarization of macrophages, migration induced by the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), and integrin-induced spreading, three key events in the fusion process. PTP-PEST deficiency resulted in specific hyperphosphorylation of the protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 and the adaptor paxillin. Moreover, a fusion defect was induced upon treatment of normal macrophages with a Pyk2 inhibitor. Together, these data argue that macrophage fusion is critically dependent on PTP-PEST. This function is seemingly due to the ability of PTP-PEST to control phosphorylation of Pyk2 and paxillin, thereby regulating cell polarization, migration, and spreading.

  6. Nanosilica induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity and cell type-dependent multinucleation in HepG2 and L-02 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongbo; Duan, Junchao; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Hu, Hejing; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Yannan; Li, Yanbo; CaixiaGuo; Zhou, Xianqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-11-01

    The prevalent exposure to nanosilica gained concerns about health effects of these particles on human beings. Although nanosilica-induced multinucleation has been confirmed previously, the underlying mechanism was still not clear; this study was to investigate the origination of multinucleated cells caused by nanosilica (62 nm) in both HepG2 and L-02 cells. Cell viability and cellular uptake was determined by MTT assay and transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Giemsa staining was applied to detect multinucleation. To clarify the origination of multinucleated cells, fluorescent probes, PKH26 and PKH67, time-lapse observation were further conducted by confocal microscopy. Results indicated that nanosilica particles were internalized into cells and induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Quantification analysis showed that nanosilica significantly increased the rates of binucleated and multinucleated cells, which suggested mitotic catastrophe induction. Moreover, dynamic visualization verified that multinucleation resulted from cell fusion in HepG2 cells not in L-02 cells after nanosilica exposure, suggesting cell type-dependent multinucleation formation. Both multinucleation and cell fusion were involved in genetic instability, which emphasized the significance to explore the multinucleation induced by nanosilica via environmental, occupational and consumer product exposure.

  7. SIV encephalitis lesions are composed of CD163(+) macrophages present in the central nervous system during early SIV infection and SIV-positive macrophages recruited terminally with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nowlin, Brian T; Burdo, Tricia H; Midkiff, Cecily C; Salemi, Marco; Alvarez, Xavier; Williams, Kenneth C

    2015-06-01

    Macrophage recruitment to the central nervous system (CNS) during AIDS pathogenesis is poorly understood. We measured the accumulation of brain perivascular (CD163(+)) and inflammatory (MAC387(+)) macrophages in SIV-infected monkeys. Monocyte progenitors were 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled in bone marrow, and CNS macrophages were labeled serially with fluorescent dextrans injected into the cisterna magna. MAC387(+) macrophages accumulated in the meninges and choroid plexus in early inflammation and in the perivascular space and SIV encephalitis (SIVE) lesions late. CD163(+) macrophages accumulated in the perivascular space and SIVE lesions with late inflammation. Most of the BrdU(+) cells were MAC387(+); however, CD163(+)BrdU(+) macrophages were present in the meninges and choroid plexus with AIDS. Most (81.6% ± 1.8%) of macrophages in SIVE lesions were present in the CNS before SIVE lesion formation. There was a 2.9-fold increase in SIVp28(+) macrophages entering the CNS late compared with those entering early (P < 0.05). The rate of CD163(+) macrophage recruitment to the CNS inversely correlated with time to death (P < 0.03) and increased with SIVE. In SIVE animals, soluble CD163 correlated with CD163(+) macrophage recruitment (P = 0.02). Most perivascular macrophages that comprise SIVE lesions and multinucleated giant cells are present in the CNS early, before SIVE lesions are formed. Most SIV-infected macrophages traffic to the CNS terminally with AIDS.

  8. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  9. The unique low-Reynolds-number spinning hydrodynamics of release of a giant multinucleate multiflagellate zoospore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzay, Javier; Ott, Donald; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Asexual reproduction in aquatic algal species of Vaucheria occurs by the formation of large multinucleate zoospores formed within elongated club-shaped zoosporangia at the tips of young branches. During development, the zoosporangia are separated from the rest of the thallus by membranes, resulting in multiple chambers hosting zoospores which will be released and dispersed in the surrounding aqueous environment. The apical gelatinization of the zoosporangial tip, together with the turgor pressure in the segregated portion of the filament, lead to a narrow aperture through which the zoospore escapes. However ordinary this may seem, Vaucheria zoospores have a unique multiflagellated patterned surface that warrants helicoidal flow entrainment at relatively high speeds, and which enables them to undergo a spinning motion that elastohydrodynamically assists the rather unfavorable escape maneuver. Experimental observations of this phenomenon, together with quantitative interpretations, are provided in this talk.

  10. Filter Paper Degrading Ability of a Trichoderma Strain With Multinucleate Conidia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Hideo; Yano, Makiko; Hotta, Takeshi; Toyama, Nobuo

    The multinucleate conidia were produced from the green mature conidia of Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 strain by colchicine treatment. The strain with higher Filter paper degrading ability was selected among those conidia using a double layer selection medium. The selected strain, JS-2 was able to collapse the filter paper within 15 min but the original strain took 25 min to collapse it completely. Moreover, the amount of reducing sugar in the L-type glass tube of the strain, JS-2, was greater than that of the original strain. The Avicel, CMC-Na, and Salicin hydrolyzing activity of the strain, JS-2, increased 2.1 times, 1.2 times, and 3.6 times higher than that of the original strain.

  11. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Olga Hernández de la; Marchat, Laurence A.; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; Rosas, Itzel López; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  12. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Hernández de la Cruz, Olga; Marchat, Laurence A; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; López Rosas, Itzel; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-21

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica.

  13. Silica nanoparticles induce multinucleation through activation of PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and downregulation of chromosomal passenger proteins in L-02 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Weijia; Li, Yang; Yu, Yongbo; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Jiang, Lizhen; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-04-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are applicable in various fields due to their unique physicochemical characteristics. However, concerns over their potential adverse effects have been raised. In our previous studies, we reported that SNPs could induce abnormal high incidence of multinucleation. The aim of this study is to further investigate the mechanisms of multinucleation induced by SNPs (68 nm) in human normal liver L-02 cells (L-02 cells). In order to determine the cytotoxicity of SNPs, MTT assay was performed, and the cell viability was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected by flow cytometry and multinucleation observed by Giemsa stain showed that ROS generation and rate of multinucleated cells increased after SNPs exposure. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a glutathione precursor against SNP-induced toxicity, was used as a ROS inhibitor to elucidate the relationship between ROS and multinucleation. The presence of NAC resulted in inhibition of both ROS generation and rate of multinucleation. Moreover, Western blot analysis showed that the protein levels of Cdc20, Aurora B, and Survivin were down-regulated, and the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway was activated by SNPs. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggested that multinucleation induced by SNPs was related to PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signal pathway activation and downregulation of G2/M phase-related protein and chromosomal passenger proteins.

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Type 1 Signaling Prevents Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetes by Attenuating the Production of IL-1β by Recruited Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okizaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ito, Yoshiya; Hosono, Kanako; Oba, Kazuhito; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Kojo, Ken; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Shibuya, Masabumi; Shichiri, Masayoshi; Majima, Masataka

    2016-06-01

    The persistence of proinflammatory macrophages, which are recruited to the granulation tissue, impairs the healing of diabetic wounds. Herein, we examined the role of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 1 (VEGFR1) signaling in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic wound healing. Angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and the healing of full-thickness skin wounds were impaired in STZ-treated wild-type (WT) mice compared with vehicle-treated WT mice, with attenuated recruitment of VEGFR1-positive macrophages expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D to the wound granulation tissue. These phenomena were even more prevalent in STZ-treated VEGFR1 tyrosine kinase knockout mice (VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice). STZ-treated WT mice, but not STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice, showed accelerated wound healing when treated with placenta growth factor. Compared with that of STZ-treated WT mice, the wound granulation tissue of STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice contained more VEGFR1-positive cells expressing IL-1β [a classic (M1) activated macrophage marker] and fewer VEGFR1-positive cells expressing the mannose receptor [CD206; an alternatively activated (M2) macrophage marker]. Treatment of STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice with an IL-1β-neutralizing antibody restored impaired wound healing and angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis and induced macrophages in the wound granulation tissue to switch to an M2 phenotype. Taken together, these results suggest that VEGFR1 signaling plays a role in regulating the balance between macrophage phenotypes in STZ-induced diabetic wounds, prevents impaired diabetic wound healing, and promotes angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis.

  15. Intracellular and surface distribution of a membrane protein (CD8) derived from a single nucleus in multinucleated myotubes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the contribution of an individual nucleus to intracellular and surface membranes in multinucleated muscle fibers. Using a retroviral vector, we introduced the gene encoding the human T- lymphocyte antigen CD8 into C2 mouse muscle cells to form a stable line expressing the human protein on its surface. The intracellular and surface distributions of the protein were then investigated by immunocytochemistry in hybrid myotubes containing a single nucleus expressing CD8. We show that the intracellular distribution of CD8 is limited to a local area surrounding the nucleus encoding it and several neighboring nuclei. On the cell surface, however, the protein is distributed over the entire myotube. Widespread distribution of a surface membrane protein in multinucleated myotubes can thus result from localized synthesis and processing. PMID:2509483

  16. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  17. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J.; Mason, Susan M.; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A.; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N.; Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D.G.; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W.; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P.; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L.; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  18. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells.

  19. Multinucleated giant cells in the implant bed of bone substitutes are foreign body giant cells-New insights into the material-mediated healing process.

    PubMed

    Barbeck, Mike; Booms, Patrick; Unger, Ronald; Hoffmann, Verena; Sader, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2017-04-01

    In addition to macrophages, multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) are involved in the tissue reaction to a variety of biomaterials. Especially in the case of bone substitute materials it has been assumed that the MNGCs are osteoclasts, based on the chemical and physical similarity of many materials to the calcified matrix and the bony environment in which they are used. However, many studies indicate that these cells belong to the cell line of the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs), which are of "inflammatory origin", although they have been shown to possess both a pro- and also anti-inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, no information is available about their role in the tissue reaction to bone substitute materials. The present study was conducted to analyze the origin of MNGCs in the implant beds of a synthetic and a xenogeneic bone substitute and focused on the application of immunohistochemical methods. Two antibodies against integrin molecules specific for osteoclasts (β-3 integrin) or FBGCs (β-2 integrin) were used to distinguish both giant cell types. The results of the present study indicate that the MNGCs induced by both kinds of bone substitutes are FBGCs, as they express only β-2 integrin in contrast to the osteoclasts outside of the immediate implantation areas, which only demonstrate β-3 integrin expression. These data give new insight into the tissue reaction to both xenogeneic and synthetic bone substitutes. Based on this new knowledge further research concerning the proteomic profile of the FBGCs especially based on the different physicochemical properties of bone substitutes is necessary. This may show that specific characteristics of bone substitutes may exhibit a substantial influence on the regeneration process via the expression of anti-inflammatory molecules by FBGCs. Based on this information it may be possible to formulate and choose bone substitutes that can guide the process of bone tissue regeneration on the molecular level. © 2017 Wiley

  20. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-05

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  1. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors.

  2. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor.

  3. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  4. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  5. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Strong Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... to avoid secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  6. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  7. Multinucleation and Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial-Transition Alleviate Resistance to Combined Cabazitaxel and Antiandrogen Therapy in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sarah K.; Pu, Hong; Penticuff, Justin C.; Cao, Zheng; Horbinski, Craig; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) frequently develop therapeutic resistance to taxane chemotherapy and antiandrogens. Cabazitaxel (CBZ) is a second-line taxane chemotherapeutic agent that provides additional survival benefits to patients with advanced disease. In this study we sought to identify the mechanism of action of combined CBZ and androgen receptor (AR) targeting, in pre-clinical models of advanced prostate cancer. We found tha CBZ induced mitotic spindle collapse and multi-nucleation by targeting the microtubule de-polymerizing kinesins and inhibiting AR. In androgen responsive tumors, treatment with the AR inhibitor, Enzalutamide, overcame resistance to CBZ. Combination treatment of human CRPC xenografts with CBZ and Enzalutamide reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to mesenchymal-epithelial-transition (MET) and led to multi-nucleation, while retaining nuclear AR. In a transgenic mouse model of androgen-responsive prostate cancer, CBZ treatment induced MET, glandular re-differentiation and AR nuclear localization that was inhibited by androgen deprivation. Collectively, our pre-clinical studies demonstrate that prostate tumor resistance to Cabazitaxel can be overcome by antiandrogen-mediated EMT-MET cycling in androgen-sensitive tumors, but not in CRPC. Moreover, AR splice variants may preclude patients with advanced disease from responding to Cabazitaxel chemotherapy and antiandrogen combination therapy. This evidence enables a significant insight into therapeutic cross-resistance to taxane chemotherapy and androgen-deprivation therapy in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26645563

  8. Switch-like reprogramming of gene expression after fusion of multinucleate plasmodial cells of two Physarum polycephalum sporulation mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Pauline; Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Ebeling, Britta; Haas, Markus; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •We investigate reprogramming of gene expression in multinucleate single cells. •Cells of two differentiation control mutants are fused. •Fused cells proceed to alternative gene expression patterns. •The population of nuclei damps stochastic fluctuations in gene expression. •Dynamic processes of cellular reprogramming can be observed by repeated sampling of a cell. -- Abstract: Nonlinear dynamic processes involving the differential regulation of transcription factors are considered to impact the reprogramming of stem cells, germ cells, and somatic cells. Here, we fused two multinucleate plasmodial cells of Physarum polycephalum mutants defective in different sporulation control genes while being in different physiological states. The resulting heterokaryons established one of two significantly different expression patterns of marker genes while the plasmodial halves that were fused to each other synchronized spontaneously. Spontaneous synchronization suggests that switch-like control mechanisms spread over and finally control the entire plasmodium as a result of cytoplasmic mixing. Regulatory molecules due to the large volume of the vigorously streaming cytoplasm will define concentrations in acting on the population of nuclei and in the global setting of switches. Mixing of a large cytoplasmic volume is expected to damp stochasticity when individual nuclei deliver certain RNAs at low copy number into the cytoplasm. We conclude that spontaneous synchronization, the damping of molecular noise in gene expression by the large cytoplasmic volume, and the option to take multiple macroscopic samples from the same plasmodium provide unique options for studying the dynamics of cellular reprogramming at the single cell level.

  9. Intracellular multiplication of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in macrophages: killing and restriction of multiplication by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brummer, E; Hanson, L H; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of coculturing yeast-form Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with murine cells was studied. Coculture of resident peritoneal or pulmonary macrophages with P. brasiliensis for 72 h dramatically enhanced fungal multiplication 19.3 +/- 2.4- and 4.7 +/- 0.8-fold, respectively, compared with cocultures with lymph node cells or complete tissue culture medium alone. Support of P. brasiliensis multiplication by resident peritoneal macrophages was macrophage dose dependent. Lysates of macrophages, supernatants from macrophage cultures, or McVeigh-Morton broth, like complete tissue culture medium, did not support multiplication of P. brasiliensis in 72-h cultures. Time course microscopic studies of cocultures in slide wells showed that macrophages ingested P. brasiliensis cells and that the ingested cells multiplied intracellularly. In sharp contrast to resident macrophages, lymphokine-activated peritoneal and pulmonary macrophages not only prevented multiplication but reduced inoculum CFU by 96 and 100%, respectively, in 72 h. Microscopic studies confirmed killing and digestion of P. brasiliensis ingested by activated macrophages in 48 h. These findings indicate that resident macrophages are permissive for intracellular multiplication of P. brasiliensis and that this could be a factor in pathogenicity. By contrast, activated macrophages are fungicidal for P. brasiliensis. Images PMID:2744848

  10. Macrophage Polarization in Virus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Miller, Laura C; Blecha, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage involvement in viral infections and antiviral states is common. However, this involvement has not been well-studied in the paradigm of macrophage polarization, which typically has been categorized by the dichotomy of classical (M1) and alternative (M2) statuses. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of macrophage polarization in response to various cellular mediators and exogenous stimuli by adopting a multipolar view to revisit the differential process of macrophages, especially those re-polarized during viral infections. Here, through examination of viral infections targeting macrophages/monocytic cells, we focus on the direct involvement of macrophage polarization during viral infections. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are critical in regulation of viral pathogenesis and host antiviral infection; thus, we propose to incorporate IFN-mediated antiviral states into the framework of macrophage polarization. This view is supported by the multifunctional properties of type I IFNs, which potentially elicit and regulate both M1- and M2-polarization in addition to inducing the antiviral state, and by the discoveries of viral mechanisms to adapt and modulate macrophage polarization. Indeed, several recent studies have demonstrated effective prevention of viral diseases through manipulation of macrophage immune statuses. PMID:26213635

  11. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox Vaccine Guidance Infection Control: Hospital Infection Control: Home ... Mouth Infection) Poxvirus and Rabies Branch Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Prevention Recommend on ...

  12. Endocytosis of indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles by macrophages provokes pyroptosis requiring NLRP3-ASC-Caspase1 axis that can be prevented by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Abderrahim; Muzembo, Basilua André; Yagyu, Ken-ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensebé, Luc; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) are of considerable importance because workers exposed to indium compounds have been diagnosed with interstitial lung disease or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; however, the pathophysiology of these diseases is undefined. Here, mice intraperitoneally inoculated with ITO-nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) resulted in peritonitis dependent in NLRP3 inflammasome, with neutrophils recruitment and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Withal peritoneal macrophages exposed ex vivo to ITO-NPs caused IL-1β secretion and cytolysis. Further, alveolar macrophages exposed to ITO-NPs in vitro showed ITO-NP endocytosis and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, ensued cell death by cytolysis. This cell death was RIPK1-independent but caspase1-dependent, and thus identified as pyroptosis. Endocytosis of ITO-NPs by activated THP-1 cells induced pyroptosis with IL-1β/TNF-α production and cytolysis, but not in activated THP-1 cells with knockdown of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1. However, exposing activated THP-1 cells with NLRP3 or ASC knockdown to ITO-NPs resulted in cell death but without cytolysis, with deficiency in IL-1β/TNF-α, and revealing features of apoptosis. While, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with macrophages impaired both inflammation and cell death induced by ITO-NPs. Together, our findings provide crucial insights to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases caused by ITO particles, and identify MSCs as a potent therapeutic. PMID:27194621

  13. Induction of multinucleated giant cells in response to small sized bovine bone substitute (Bio-Oss™) results in an enhanced early implantation bed vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Barbeck, M.; Udeabor, S. E.; Lorenz, J.; Kubesch, A.; Choukroun, J.; Sader, R. A.; Kirkpatrick, C. J.; Ghanaati, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The host tissue reaction to the xenogeneic bone substitute Bio-Oss™ (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhousen, Switzerland) was investigated focusing on the participating inflammatory cells and implantation bed vascularization. Materials and Methods: Bio-Oss™ was implanted subcutaneously into CD1 mice for up to 60 days and analyzed by means of specialized histological and histomorphometrical techniques after explantation. Results: Bio-Oss™ induced within the first 15 days an early high vascularization combined with a marked presence of multinucleated giant cells. The latter cells were associated mainly with the smaller sized granules within the implantation bed. Toward the end of the study the number of multinucleated giant cells decreased while the tissue reaction to the larger granules was mainly mononuclear. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that smaller xenogeneic bone substitute granules induce multinucleated giant cells, whereas the larger-sized ones became integrated within the implantation bed by means of a mononuclear cell-triggered granulation tissue. Obviously, the presence of multinucleated giant cells within biomaterial implantation beds is not only related to the type of synthetic bone substitute material, but also to the granule size of the natural-based xenogeneic bone substitute material. PMID:25593863

  14. Induction of multinucleation by beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent in regenerated cells from Marchantia polymorpha protoplasts and involvement of arabinogalactan proteins in cell plate formation.

    PubMed

    Shibaya, Taeko; Sugawara, Yasutake

    2009-08-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are abundant plant cell surface proteoglycans widely distributed in plant species. Since high concentrations of beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent (betaglcY), which binds selectively to AGPs, inhibited cell division of protoplast-regenerated cells of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L. (Shibaya and Sugawara in Physiol Plant 130:271-279, 2007), we investigated the mechanism underlying the inability of the cells to divide normally by staining nuclei, cell walls and beta-1,3-glucan. Microscopic observation showed that the diameter of regenerated cells cultured with betaglcY was about 2.8-fold larger than that of cells cultured without betaglcY. The cells cultured with betaglcY were remarkably multinucleated. These results indicated that betaglcY did not inhibit mitosis but induced multinucleation. In the regenerated cells cultured with low concentrations of betaglcY (5 and 1 microg ml(-1)), the cell plate was stained strongly by betaglcY, suggesting abundant AGPs in the forming cell plate. In these cell plates, beta-1,3-glucan was barely detectable or not detected. In multinucleated cells, cell plate-like fragments, which could not reach the cell wall, were frequently observed and they were also stained strongly by betaglcY. Our results indicated that AGPs might have an important role in cell plate formation, and perturbation of AGPs with betaglcY might result in remarkable multinucleation in protoplast-regenerated cells of M. polymorpha.

  15. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  16. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection.

  17. Macrophage Phenotype Modulation by CXCL4 in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gleissner, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    During atherogenesis, blood monocytes transmigrate into the subendothelial space and differentiate toward macrophages and foam cells. The major driver of monocyte–macrophage differentiation is macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). M-CSF-induced macrophages are important promoters of atherogenesis as demonstrated in M-CSF and M-CSF receptor knock out mice. However, M-CSF is not the only relevant promoter of macrophage differentiation. The platelet chemokine CXCL4 also prevents monocyte apoptosis and promotes macrophage differentiation in vitro. It is secreted from activated platelets and has effects on various cell types relevant in atherogenesis. Knocking out the Pf4 gene coding for CXCL4 in Apoe−/− mice leads to reduced atherogenesis. Thus, it seems likely that CXC4-induced macrophages may have specific pro-atherogenic capacities. We have studied CXC4-induced differentiation of human macrophages using gene chips, systems biology, and functional in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Our data indicate that CXCL4-induced macrophages are distinct from both their M-CSF-induced counterparts and other known macrophage polarizations like M1 macrophages (induced by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma) or M2 macrophages (induced by interleukin-4). CXCL4-induced macrophages have distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics, e.g., the complete loss of the hemoglobin–haptoglobin (Hb–Hp) scavenger receptor CD163 which is necessary for effective hemoglobin clearance after plaque hemorrhage. Lack of CD163 is accompanied by the inability to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in response to Hb–Hp complexes. This review covers the current knowledge about CXCL4-induced macrophages. Based on their unique properties, we have suggested to call these macrophages “M4.” CXCL4 may represent an important orchestrator of macrophage heterogeneity within atherosclerotic lesions. Further dissecting its effects on macrophage differentiation may

  18. Anthemis wiedemanniana essential oil prevents LPS-induced production of NO in RAW 264.7 macrophages and exerts antiproliferative and antibacterial activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Filomena; Menichini, Federica; Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Senatore, Felice; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Celik, Sezgin

    2012-01-01

    Anthemis wiedemanniana is known in folk medicine for the treatment of microbial infections, cancer and also urinary and pulmonary problems. In this study, the chemical composition of the essential oil from A. wiedemanniana was evaluated and its antibacterial activity was tested against 10 bacterial strains. The oil was also tested for its potentiality to inhibit nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and for its cytotoxicity against four human cancer cell lines. A. wiedemanniana oil, rich of oxygenated monoterpenes (25.4%), showed a good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and a good activity against the two Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris. Besides that, it exhibited a high inhibitory effect on the LPS-induced nitrite production and a strong cytotoxic activity, especially against amelanotic melanoma (C32) and large lung cell carcinoma (COR-L23) cell lines.

  19. The human alveolar macrophage: isolation, cultivation in vitro, and studies of morphologic and functional characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.; Cline, Martin J.

    1971-01-01

    Human alveolar macrophages were lavaged from surgically resected lungs and from lungs of normal subjects. Macrophages that had been purified by glass adherence were maintained in tissue culture for as long as 54 days. After 3-4 wk in vitro they underwent transformation into multinucleated giant cells. These aged cells had more than 30 times the phagocytic capacity that the same group of cells had had after 1 day in vitro. Phagocytosis of heat-killed Candida albicans was inhibited by iodoacetate, sodium fluoride, potassium cyanide, and low partial pressures of oxygen, suggesting that these cells require both oxidative and glycolytic energy sources for maximal particle ingestion. Alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages killed Listeria monocytogenes with similar efficiency, but neutrophils were more efficient than either of the other cell types. Bacterial killing is probably not dependent upon myeloperoxidase in the monocyte-derived macrophage or in the alveolar macrophage since histochemical stains for peroxidase do not stain either cell type. C. albicans blastospores, which are killed by neutrophils and monocytes that contain myeloperoxidase, were not killed by human alveolar macrophages during the 4 hr of observation. Large cells with supernormal phagocytic capacity were recovered from patients with postobstructive pheumonia and from one patient with recurrent bacterial pneumonia, indicating that macrophage function can be altered in certain disease states. Human alveolar macrophages are unique human phagocytes in their dependence on an oxygen tension greater than 25 mm HG for maximal phagocytosis. Carbon dioxide tensions as high as 70 mm Hg did not alter phagocytosis when the pH of the medium was held constant. These data suggest that the increased susceptibility to pneumonia of patients with chronic bronchitis or atelectasis may be in part related to suboptimal phagocytosis by macrophages in areas of the lung with depressed oxygen tension. Images

  20. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype.

  1. Structural Mutants of the Spindle Pole Body Cause Distinct Alteration of Cytoplasmic Microtubules and Nuclear Dynamics in Multinucleated Hyphae

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Claudia; Grava, Sandrine; Finlayson, Mark; Trimble, Rhonda; Philippsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In the multinucleate fungus Ashbya gossypii, cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) emerge from the spindle pole body outer plaque (OP) in perpendicular and tangential directions. To elucidate the role of cMTs in forward/backward movements (oscillations) and bypassing of nuclei, we constructed mutants potentially affecting cMT nucleation or stability. Hyphae lacking the OP components AgSpc72, AgNud1, AgCnm67, or the microtubule-stabilizing factor AgStu2 grew like wild- type but showed substantial alterations in the number, length, and/or nucleation sites of cMTs. These mutants differently influenced nuclear oscillation and bypassing. In Agspc72Δ, only long cMTs were observed, which emanate tangentially from reduced OPs; nuclei mainly moved with the cytoplasmic stream but some performed rapid bypassing. Agnud1Δ and Agcnm67Δ lack OPs; short and long cMTs emerged from the spindle pole body bridge/half-bridge structures, explaining nuclear oscillation and bypassing in these mutants. In Agstu2Δ only very short cMTs emanated from structurally intact OPs; all nuclei moved with the cytoplasmic stream. Therefore, long tangential cMTs promote nuclear bypassing and short cMTs are important for nuclear oscillation. Our electron microscopy ultrastructural analysis also indicated that assembly of the OP occurs in a stepwise manner, starting with AgCnm67, followed by AgNud1 and lastly AgSpc72. PMID:20053682

  2. Switch-like reprogramming of gene expression after fusion of multinucleate plasmodial cells of two Physarum polycephalum sporulation mutants.

    PubMed

    Walter, Pauline; Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Ebeling, Britta; Haas, Markus; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-05-24

    Nonlinear dynamic processes involving the differential regulation of transcription factors are considered to impact the reprogramming of stem cells, germ cells, and somatic cells. Here, we fused two multinucleate plasmodial cells of Physarum polycephalum mutants defective in different sporulation control genes while being in different physiological states. The resulting heterokaryons established one of two significantly different expression patterns of marker genes while the plasmodial halves that were fused to each other synchronized spontaneously. Spontaneous synchronization suggests that switch-like control mechanisms spread over and finally control the entire plasmodium as a result of cytoplasmic mixing. Regulatory molecules due to the large volume of the vigorously streaming cytoplasm will define concentrations in acting on the population of nuclei and in the global setting of switches. Mixing of a large cytoplasmic volume is expected to damp stochasticity when individual nuclei deliver certain RNAs at low copy number into the cytoplasm. We conclude that spontaneous synchronization, the damping of molecular noise in gene expression by the large cytoplasmic volume, and the option to take multiple macroscopic samples from the same plasmodium provide unique options for studying the dynamics of cellular reprogramming at the single cell level.

  3. Gall-forming root-knot nematodes hijack key plant cellular functions to induce multinucleate and hypertrophied feeding cells.

    PubMed

    Favery, Bruno; Quentin, Michaël; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Abad, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Among plant-parasitic nematodes, the root-knot nematodes (RKNs) of the Meloidogyne spp. are the most economically important genus. RKN are root parasitic worms able to infect nearly all crop species and have a wide geographic distribution. During infection, RKNs establish and maintain an intimate relationship with the host plant. This includes the creation of a specialized nutritional structure composed of multinucleate and hypertrophied giant cells, which result from the redifferentiation of vascular root cells. Giant cells constitute the sole source of nutrients for the nematode and are essential for growth and reproduction. Hyperplasia of surrounding root cells leads to the formation of the gall or root-knot, an easily recognized symptom of plant infection by RKNs. Secreted effectors produced in nematode salivary glands and injected into plant cells through a specialized feeding structure called the stylet play a critical role in the formation of giant cells. Here, we describe the complex interactions between RKNs and their host plants. We highlight progress in understanding host plant responses, focusing on how RKNs manipulate key plant processes and functions, including cell cycle, defence, hormones, cellular scaffold, metabolism and transport.

  4. Mulberry fruit prevents LPS-induced NF-κB/pERK/MAPK signals in macrophages and suppresses acute colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhengjiang; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Lian; Qiu, Huiling; Wang, Liyan; Li, Li; Yao, Lijun; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Wu, Yonghou; Luo, Jun; Liu, Johnson J.; Yang, Yi; Yang, Wancai; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the impact of mulberry fruit (MBF) extracts on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the therapeutic efficacy of MBF diet in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis and MUC2−/− mice with colorectal cancer. In vitro, LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly inhibited by MBF extracts via suppressing the expression of proinflammatory molecules, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-β) and IL-6. Particularly, a dose-dependent inhibition on LPS-induced inflammatory responses was observed following treatment with MBF dichloromethane extract (MBF-DE), in which linoleic acid and ethyl linolenate were identified as two active compounds. Moreover, we elucidated that MBF-DE attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses by blocking activation of both NF-κB/p65 and pERK/MAPK pathways. In vivo, DSS-induced acute colitis was significantly ameliorated in MBF-fed mice as gauged by weight loss, colon morphology and histological damage. In addition, MBF-fed MUC2−/− mice displayed significant decrease in intestinal tumor and inflammation incidence compared to control diet-fed group. Overall, our results demonstrated that MBF suppressed the development of intestinal inflammation and tumorgenesis both in vitro and in vivo, and supports the potential of MBF as a therapeutic functional food for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:26615818

  5. Inhibition of Caspase 3 Abrogates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Preventing Activation of NF-κB and c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase/Stress-Activated Protein Kinase in RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Kato, Yutaka; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Koide, Naoki; Mu, Mya Mya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    The effect of caspase inhibitors on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 267.4 murine macrophage cells was investigated. Pretreatment of RAW cells with a broad caspase inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK), resulted in a striking reduction in LPS-induced NO production. Z-VAD-FMK inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation. Furthermore, it blocked phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK) but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Similarly, a caspase 3-specific inhibitor, Z-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-fluoromethylketone, inhibited NO production, NF-κB activation, and JNK/SAPK phosphorylation in LPS-stimulated RAW cells. The attenuated NO production was due to inhibition of the expression of an inducible-type NO synthase (iNOS). The overexpression of the dominant negative mutant of JNK/SAPK and the addition of a JNK/SAPK inhibitor blocked iNOS expression but did not block LPS-induced caspase 3 activation. It was therefore suggested that the inhibition of caspase 3 might abrogate LPS-induced NO production by preventing the activation of NF-κB and JNK/SAPK. The caspase family, especially caspase 3, is likely to play an important role in the signal transduction for iNOS-mediated NO production in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophages. PMID:11179293

  6. Epigallocatechin gallate prevents inflammation by reducing macrophage infiltration and inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α signaling in the pancreas of rats on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanli; Bao, Suqing; Yang, Wanli; Zhang, Jin; Li, Lin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) would suppress inflammation in the pancreas, and thus, we investigated the effects that EGCG administration had in the pancreas of rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). To test our hypothesis, 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups: normal diet (control) group and HFD group. When there was a significant difference in body weight between the 2 groups (P < .05), the HFD group was further divided into 2 subgroups: the HFD group (HFD, n = 10, 16 weeks) and the EGCG group (HFD + 3.2 g/kg EGCG, n = 10, 16 weeks). Metabolite levels and the expression of inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin 6 [IL-6], and toll-like receptor 4) were measured using standard biochemical techniques. Insulin secretion and pancreatic histology were also evaluated. Epigallocatechin gallate significantly decreased fasting insulin levels as well as the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index. In the HFD group, the average glucose infusion rate and the TNF-α and IL-6 levels increased, whereas toll-like receptor 4 and TNF receptor-associated factor-6 did not. A pathologic analysis of pancreatic tissue revealed an increase in inflammatory TNF-α and infiltrating CD68+ macrophages in the islets of the HFD rats, but rarely is this observed in the in the HFD + EGCG rats. Overall, these data suggest that EGCG suppresses inflammation, partially reverses metabolic abnormalities, and ultimately increases insulin sensitivity in the pancreas of HFD rats.

  7. The plant cell inhibitor KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and cytokinesis disruption in giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2015-01-01

    The plant cell cycle inhibitor gene KRP6 has been investigated in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Unexpectedly, KRP6 overexpressing lines revealed a distinct role for this specific KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. This function was confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures ectopically expressing KRP6. A blockage in the mitotic exit was observed in cell suspensions and in giant cells resulted in the appearance of multi-nucleated cells. KRP6 expression during nematode infection and the similarity in phenotypes among KRP6 overexpressing cell cultures and giant-cell morphology strongly suggest that KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and acytokinesis occurring in giant-cells. Once again nematodes have been shown to manipulate the plant cell cycle machinery in order to promote gall establishment.

  8. Autophagy Controls Acquisition of Aging Features in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Stranks, Amanda J.; Hansen, Anne Louise; Panse, Isabel; Mortensen, Monika; Ferguson, David J.P.; Puleston, Daniel J.; Shenderov, Kevin; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Veldhoen, Marc; Phadwal, Kanchan; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages provide a bridge linking innate and adaptive immunity. An increased frequency of macrophages and other myeloid cells paired with excessive cytokine production is commonly seen in the aging immune system, known as ‘inflamm-aging’. It is presently unclear how healthy macrophages are maintained throughout life and what connects inflammation with myeloid dysfunction during aging. Autophagy, an intracellular degradation mechanism, has known links with aging and lifespan extension. Here, we show for the first time that autophagy regulates the acquisition of major aging features in macrophages. In the absence of the essential autophagy gene Atg7, macrophage populations are increased and key functions such as phagocytosis and nitrite burst are reduced, while the inflammatory cytokine response is significantly increased – a phenotype also observed in aged macrophages. Furthermore, reduced autophagy decreases surface antigen expression and skews macrophage metabolism toward glycolysis. We show that macrophages from aged mice exhibit significantly reduced autophagic flux compared to young mice. These data demonstrate that autophagy plays a critical role in the maintenance of macrophage homeostasis and function, regulating inflammation and metabolism and thereby preventing immunosenescence. Thus, autophagy modulation may prevent excess inflammation and preserve macrophage function during aging, improving immune responses and reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with inflamm-aging. PMID:25764971

  9. Incomplete cytokinesis and re-fusion of small mononucleated Hodgkin cells lead to giant multinucleated Reed–Sternberg cells

    PubMed Central

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Newrzela, Sebastian; Heinrich, Tim; Weiser, Christian; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Schmid, Frederike; Warner, Kathrin; Hartmann, Sylvia; Schroeder, Timm; Küppers, Ralf; Rieger, Michael A.; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleated Reed–Sternberg (RS) cells are pathognomonic for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and their presence is essential for diagnosis. How these giant tumor cells develop is controversial, however. It has been postulated that RS cells arise from mononucleated Hodgkin cells via endomitosis. Conversely, continuous single-cell tracking of HL cell lines by long-term time-lapse microscopy has identified cell fusion as the main route of RS cell formation. In contrast to growth-induced formation of giant Hodgkin cells, fusion of small mononuclear cells followed by a size increase gives rise to giant RS cells. Of note, fusion of cells originating from the same ancestor, termed re-fusion, is seen nearly exclusively. In the majority of cases, re-fusion of daughter cells is preceded by incomplete cytokinesis, as demonstrated by microtubule bonds among the cells. We confirm at the level of individual tracked cells that giant Hodgkin and RS cells have little proliferative capacity, further supporting small mononuclear Hodgkin cells as the proliferative compartment of the HL tumor clone. In addition, sister cells show a shared propensity for re-fusion, providing evidence of early RS cell fate commitment. Thus, RS cell generation is related neither to cell fusion of unrelated Hodgkin cells nor to endomitosis, but rather is mediated by re-fusion of daughter cells that underwent mitosis. This surprising finding supports the existence of a unique mechanism for the generation of multinuclear RS cells that may have implications beyond HL, given that RS-like cells are frequently observed in several other lymphoproliferative diseases as well. PMID:24302766

  10. Multi-nucleate retinal pigment epithelium cells of the human macula exhibit a characteristic and highly specific distribution

    PubMed Central

    Starnes, Austin C; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Sloan, Kenneth R; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Curcio, Christine A; Ach, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is reportedly 3% bi-nucleated. The importance to human vision of multi-nucleated (MN)-RPE cells could be clarified with more data about their distribution in central retina. Methods Nineteen human RPE-flatmounts (9≤51years, 10>80 years) were imaged at 12 locations: 3 eccentricities (fovea, perifovea, near periphery) in 4 quadrants (superior, inferior, temporal, nasal). Image stacks of lipofuscin-attributable autofluorescence and phalloidin labeled F-actin cytoskeleton were obtained using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Nuclei were devoid of autofluorescence and were marked using morphometric software. Cell areas were approximated by Voronoi regions. Mean number of nuclei per cell among eccentricity/quadrant groups and by age were compared using Poisson and binominal regression models. Results A total of 11403 RPE cells at 200 locations were analyzed: 94.66 % mono-, 5.31% bi-, 0.02% tri-nucleate, and 0.01% with 5 nuclei. Age had no effect on number of nuclei. There were significant regional differences: highest frequencies of MN-cells were found at the perifovea (9.9%) and near periphery (6.8%). The fovea lacked MN-cells almost entirely. The nasal quadrant had significantly more MN-cells compared to other quadrants, at all eccentricities. Conclusion This study demonstrates MN-RPE cells in human macula. MN-cells may arise due to endoreplication, cell fusion, or incomplete cell division. The topography of MN-RPE cells follows the topography of photoreceptors; with near-absence at the fovea (cones only) and high frequency at perifovea (highest rod density). This distribution might reflect specific requirements of retinal metabolism or other mechanisms addressable in further studies. PMID:26923500

  11. Late stages of the synchronized macrophage fusion in osteoclast formation depend on dynamin.

    PubMed

    Verma, Santosh K; Leikina, Evgenia; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2014-12-15

    Macrophage fusion that leads to osteoclast formation is one of the most important examples of cell-cell fusion in development, tissue homoeostasis and immune response. Protein machinery that fuses macrophages remains to be identified. In the present study, we explored the fusion stage of osteoclast formation for RAW macrophage-like murine cells and for macrophages derived from human monocytes. To uncouple fusion from the preceding differentiation processes, we accumulated fusion-committed cells in the presence of LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) that reversibly blocks membrane merger. After 16 h, we removed LPC and observed cell fusion events that would normally develop within 16 h develop instead within 30-90 min. Thus, whereas osteoclastogenesis, generally, takes several days, our approach allowed us to focus on an hour in which we observe robust fusion between the cells. Complementing syncytium formation assay with a novel membrane merger assay let us study the synchronized fusion events downstream of a local merger between two plasma membranes, but before expansion of nascent membrane connections and complete unification of the cells. We found that the expansion of membrane connections detected as a growth of multinucleated osteoclasts depends on dynamin activity. In contrast, a merger between the plasma membranes of the two cells was not affected by inhibitors of dynamin GTPase. Thus dynamin that was recently found to control late stages of myoblast fusion also controls late stages of macrophage fusion, revealing an intriguing conserved mechanistic motif shared by diverse cell-cell fusion processes.

  12. Macrophage elastase kills bacteria within murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Houghton, A McGarry; Hartzell, William O; Robbins, Clinton S; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-07-30

    Macrophages are aptly positioned to function as the primary line of defence against invading pathogens in many organs, including the lung and peritoneum. Their ability to phagocytose and clear microorganisms has been well documented. Macrophages possess several substances with which they can kill bacteria, including reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and antimicrobial proteins. We proposed that macrophage-derived proteinases may contribute to the antimicrobial properties of macrophages. Macrophage elastase (also known as matrix metalloproteinase 12 or MMP12) is an enzyme predominantly expressed in mature tissue macrophages and is implicated in several disease processes, including emphysema. Physiological functions for MMP12 have not been described. Here we show that Mmp12(-/-) mice exhibit impaired bacterial clearance and increased mortality when challenged with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria at macrophage-rich portals of entry, such as the peritoneum and lung. Intracellular stores of MMP12 are mobilized to macrophage phagolysosomes after the ingestion of bacterial pathogens. Once inside phagolysosomes, MMP12 adheres to bacterial cell walls where it disrupts cellular membranes resulting in bacterial death. The antimicrobial properties of MMP12 do not reside within its catalytic domain, but rather within the carboxy-terminal domain. This domain contains a unique four amino acid sequence on an exposed beta loop of the protein that is required for the observed antimicrobial activity. The present study represents, to our knowledge, the first report of direct antimicrobial activity by a matrix metallopeptidase, and describes a new antimicrobial peptide that is sequentially and structurally unique in nature.

  13. A Novel in vitro Human Macrophage Model to Study the Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Vitamin D(3) and Retinoic Acid Activated THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Jaymie L; Kan-Sutton, Celestine; Gong, Xing; Rajagopalan, Malini; Lewis, Dorothy E; Hunter, Robert L; Eissa, N Tony; Jagannath, Chinnaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) replicates within the human macrophages and we investigated the activating effects of retinoic acid (RA) and vitamin D(3) (VD) on macrophages in relation to the viability of intracellular Mtb. A combination of these vitamins (RAVD) enhanced the levels of DC-SIGN and mannose receptors on THP-1 macrophages that increased mycobacterial uptake but inhibited the subsequent intracellular growth of Mtb by inducing reactive oxygen species and autophagy. RAVD also enhanced antigen presenting and chemotactic receptors on THPs suggesting an activated phenotype for RAVD activated THPs. RAVD mediated activation was also associated with a marked phenotypic change in Mtb infected THPs that fused with adjacent THPs to form multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Typically, MNGCs occurred over 30 days of in vitro culture and contained non-replicating persisting Mtb for more than 60 days in culture. Latent tuberculosis occurs in over a third of mankind and we propose that RAVD mediated induction of persistent Mtb within human macrophages provides a novel model to develop therapeutic approaches and investigate pathogenesis of latency.

  14. Tumor-associated macrophages: from mechanisms to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Roy; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex ecology of cells that evolves with and provides support to tumor cells during the transition to malignancy. Among the innate and adaptive immune cells recruited to the tumor site, macrophages are particularly abundant and are present at all stages of tumor progression. Clinical studies and experimental mouse models indicate these macrophages generally play a pro-tumoral role. In the primary tumor, macrophage can stimulate angiogenesis and enhance tumor cell invasion, motility and intravasation. During metastasis, macrophages prime the pre-metastatic site and promote tumor cell extravasation, survival and persistent growth. Macrophages are also immunosuppressive preventing tumor cell attack by natural killer and T cells during tumor progression and after recovery from chemo- or immuno-therapy. Therapeutic success in targeting these pro-tumoral roles in pre-clinical models and in early clinical trials suggests that macrophages are attractive targets as part of combination therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:25035953

  15. Mechanisms that regulate macrophage burden in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) relevant to atherosclerosis include monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs). A decade ago, studies on macrophage behavior in atherosclerotic lesions were often limited to quantification of total macrophage area in cross-sections of plaques. While technological advances are still needed to examine plaque MP populations in an increasingly dynamic and informative manner, innovative methods to interrogate the biology of MPs in atherosclerotic plaques developed in the last few years point to a number of mechanisms that regulate the accumulation and function of MPs within plaques. Here, I review the evolution of atherosclerotic plaques with respect to changes in the MP compartment from the initiation of plaque to its progression and regression, discussing the roles that recruitment, proliferation, and retention of MPs play at these different disease stages. Additional work in the future will be needed to better distinguish macrophages and DCs in plaque and to address some basic unknowns in the field, including just how cholesterol drives accumulation of macrophages in lesions to build plaques in the first place and how macrophages as major effectors of innate immunity work together with components of the adaptive immune response to drive atherosclerosis. Answers to these questions are sought with the goal in mind of reversing disease where it exists and preventing its development where it does not. PMID:24855200

  16. Macrophage polarization and HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Edana; Cassetta, Luca; Alfano, Massimo; Poli, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Polarization of MP into classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2a, M2b, and M2c) macrophages is critical in mediating an effective immune response against invading pathogens. However, several pathogens use these activation pathways to facilitate dissemination and pathogenesis. Viruses generally induce an M1-like phenotype during the acute phase of infection. In addition to promoting the development of Th1 responses and IFN production, M1 macrophages often produce cytokines that drive viral replication and tissue damage. As shown for HIV-1, polarization can also alter macrophage susceptibility to infection. In vitro polarization into M1 cells prevents HIV-1 infection, and M2a polarization inhibits viral replication at a post-integration level. M2a cells also express high levels of C-type lectins that can facilitate macrophage-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to CD4(+) T cells. Macrophages are particularly abundant in mucosal membranes and unlike DCs, do not usually migrate to distal tissues. As a result, macrophages are likely to contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis in mucosal rather than lymphatic tissues. In vivo polarization of MP is likely to span a spectrum of activation phenotypes that may change the permissivity to and alter the outcome of HIV-1 and other viral infections.

  17. Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    multinucleated cells were observed in tissues from mice that received cells in collagen gels + CID, demonstrating that engineered RAW iRANK cells can...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0435 TITLE: Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification PRINCIPAL...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 09/30/2014 – 09/29/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of

  18. Analysis of embryo morphokinetics, multinucleation and cleavage anomalies using continuous time-lapse monitoring in blastocyst transfer cycles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    incidence of multinucleation and reverse cleavage amongst the embryos observed was 25% and 7%, respectively. Over 40% of embryos exhibiting these characteristics did however form blastocysts meeting our criteria for freezing. Conclusions These data provide us with a platform with which to potentially enhance embryo selection for transfer. PMID:24951056

  19. T Cell–Macrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophage–T cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cell–macrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Loci Encoding Anti-Macrophage Factors in the Human Pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Andrea J.; Wilkinson, Paul A.; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Quail, Michael A.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Reger, Julia; Waterfield, Nicholas R.; Titball, Richard W.; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important human pathogen whose infection biology is still poorly understood. The bacterium is endemic to tropical regions, including South East Asia and Northern Australia, where it causes melioidosis, a serious disease associated with both high mortality and antibiotic resistance. B. pseudomallei is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to replicate in macrophages. However despite the critical nature of its interaction with macrophages, few anti-macrophage factors have been characterized to date. Here we perform a genome-wide gain of function screen of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 to identify loci encoding factors with anti-macrophage activity. We identify a total of 113 such loci scattered across both chromosomes, with positive gene clusters encoding transporters and secretion systems, enzymes/toxins, secondary metabolite, biofilm, adhesion and signal response related factors. Further phenotypic analysis of four of these regions shows that the encoded factors cause striking cellular phenotypes relevant to infection biology, including apoptosis, formation of actin ‘tails’ and multi-nucleation within treated macrophages. The detailed analysis of the remaining host of loci will facilitate genetic dissection of the interaction of this important pathogen with host macrophages and thus further elucidate this critical part of its infection cycle. PMID:21203527

  1. Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Aisling; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J.; Godson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Synovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage–pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished. Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarization in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarization, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype, and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm. PMID:22566842

  2. A composite neoplastic lesion of the vulva with mixed features of fibroadenoma and hidradenoma papilliferum combined with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia containing multinucleated giant cells.

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2014-10-01

    Anogenital mammary-like glands (AGMLG) are nowadays considered a normal component of the anogenital area. Lesions affecting AGMLG are similar to those seen in breast. We present a case of a complex neoplastic lesion of the AGMLG with mixed features of fibroadenoma and hidradenoma papilliferum combined with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. Multinucleated cells were detected in the pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia areas as seen in some patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. The neoplasm is similar to rare mammary composite neoplasms that feature simultaneously patterns of a fibroepithelial neoplasms and intraductal papilloma.

  3. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  4. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  5. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  6. Measuring autophagy in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Harris, James; Hanrahan, Orla; De Haro, Sergio A

    2009-11-01

    Macroautophagy is a conserved intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the degradation of cytosolic constituents. Autophagy can promote cell survival by providing essential amino acids from the breakdown of macromolecules during periods of nutrient deprivation, and can remove damaged or excess organelles, such as mitochondria and peroxisomes. More recently, autophagy has been shown to play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic bacteria in macrophages and dendritic cells. This unit presents protocols for the measurement of autophagy in macrophages.

  7. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S. S.; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  8. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies.

  9. CALCIUM OXALATE STONE FRAGMENT AND CRYSTAL PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Dominguez-Gutierrez, Paul R.; Canales, Benjamin K.; Bird, Vincent G.; Vieweg, Johannes; Khan, Saeed R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In murine and human hyperoxaluric conditions, macrophages can be seen surrounding renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal deposits. We hypothesize that macrophages play a role in degrading and destroying these deposits and investigated inflammatory response and phagocytic mechanisms when macrophages are exposed to human kidney stones and inorganic crystals. Materials and Methods Human monocytes were differentiated into resting, fully-differentiated macrophages by treating with recombinant human M-CSF or GM-CSF for 6 days. After confirming phenotype by flow cytometry, macrophages were exposed for 20 hours to fragments of sterile human CaOx stones or CaOx crystals. Crystal uptake was determined, and supernatant cytokine and chemokine profiles were analyzed using antibody arrays. qRT-PCR was used to validate mRNA profile expression. Results Under direct-vision fluorescent microscopy, activated human macrophages were noted to surround both stone fragments and synthesized crystals and destroy them in a step-by-step process that involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis. An inflammatory cascade was released by macrophages, including chemokines CCL2, CCL3, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), complement component C5/C5a and IL-8. The response patterns to stone and crystal material was dependent on macrophage phenotype and activation status. Conclusions In our in vitro study, macrophages differentiated with M-CSF displayed a greater ability to phagocytize crystal deposits than those treated with GM-CSF. Following clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macrophages released a number of cytokines crucial for inflammatory immune response, suggesting that tissue macrophages play an important role in preventing kidney stone disease by removing and digesting interstitial renal crystal deposits. PMID:26626217

  10. Macrophage polarization in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  11. The interaction of Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts with macrophages and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Michael; Proy, Vincent; Niederkorn, Jerry Y; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2003-06-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii, a free-living amoeba, causes a sight-threatening form of keratitis. Even after extensive therapies, corneal damage can be severe, often requiring corneal transplantation to restore vision. However, A. castellanii cysts are not eliminated from the conjunctiva and stroma of humans and can excyst, resulting in infection of the corneal transplant. The aim of this study was to determine whether elements of the innate immune apparatus, neutrophils and macrophages, were capable of detecting and eliminating A. castellanii cysts and to examine the mechanism by which they kill the cysts. Results show that neither innate immune cell is attracted chemotactically to intact cysts, yet both were attracted to lysed cysts. Both macrophages and neutrophils were capable of killing significant numbers of cysts, yet neutrophils were 3-fold more efficient than macrophages. Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma did not increase their cytolytic ability. Conditioned medium isolated from macrophages did not lyse the cysts; however, prevention of phagocytosis by cytochalasin D inhibited 100% of macrophage-mediated killing of the cysts. Conditioned medium from neutrophils did kill significant numbers of the cysts, and this killing was blocked by quercetin, a potent inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). These results indicate that neither macrophages nor neutrophils are chemoattracted to intact cysts, yet both are capable of killing the cysts. Macrophages killed the cysts by phagocytosis, whereas neutrophils killed cysts through the secretion of MPO.

  12. Mycobacteria, Metals, and the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies. PMID:25703564

  13. Integrating Immunometabolism and Macrophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Artyomov, Maxim; Sergushichev, Alexey; Schilling, Joel D.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous cells that play a key role in inflammatory and tissue reparative responses. Over the past decade it has become clear that shifts in cellular metabolism are important determinants of macrophage function and phenotype. At the same time, our appreciation of macrophage diversity in vivo has also been increasing. Factors such as cell origin and tissue localization are now recognized as important variables that influence macrophage biology. Whether different macrophage populations also have unique metabolic phenotypes has not been extensively explored. In this article, we will discuss the importance of understanding how macrophage origin can modulate metabolic programming and influence inflammatory responses. PMID:27771140

  14. Hypercholesterolemia boosts joint destruction in chronic arthritis. An experimental model aggravated by foam macrophage infiltration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether hypercholesterolemia increases articular damage in a rabbit model of chronic arthritis. Methods Hypercholesterolemia was induced in 18 rabbits by administrating a high-fat diet (HFD). Fifteen rabbits were fed normal chow as controls. Chronic antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was induced in half of the HFD and control rabbits, previously immunized, by intra-articular injections of ovalbumin. After sacrifice, lipid and systemic inflammation markers were analyzed in blood serum. Synovium was analyzed by Krenn score, multinucleated cell counting, immunohistochemistry of RAM11 and CD31, and TNF-α and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) gene expression. Active bone resorption was assessed by protein expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and quantification of cathepsin K, contact surface and the invasive area of pannus into bone. Results Rabbits receiving the HFD showed higher total serum cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides and CRP levels than rabbits fed a normal diet. Synovitis score was increased in HFD, and particularly in AIA and AIA + HFD groups. AIA + HFD synovium was characterized by a massive infiltration of RAM11+ cells, higher presence of multinucleated foam cells and bigger vascularization than AIA. Cathepsin K+ osteoclasts and the contact surface of bone resorbing pannus were also increased in rabbits with AIA + HFD compared with AIA alone. Synovial TNF-α and MCP-1 gene expression was increased in AIA and HFD rabbits compared with healthy animals. RANKL protein expression in AIA and AIA + HFD groups was higher compared with either HFD or normal groups. Conclusions This experimental model demonstrates that hypercholesterolemia increments joint tissue damage in chronic arthritis, with foam macrophages being key players in this process. PMID:23941259

  15. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  16. [Macrophages in asthma].

    PubMed

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  17. miRNA in Macrophage Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control cellular gene expression via primarily binding to 3′ or 5′ untranslated region of the target transcript leading to translational repression or mRNA degradation. In most cases, miRNAs have been observed to fine-tune the cellular responses and, therefore, act as a rheostat rather than an on/off switch. Transcription factor PU.1 is a master switch that controls monocyte/macrophage development from hematopoietic stem cells. Recent Advances: PU.1 induces a specific set of miRNAs while suppressing the miR17-92 cluster to regulate monocyte/macrophage development. In addition to development, miRNAs tightly control the macrophage polarization continuum from proinflammatory M1 or proreparative M2 by regulating expression of key transcription factors involved in the process of polarization. Critical Issues: miRNAs are intricately involved with fine-tuning fundamental macrophage functions such as phagocytosis, efferocytosis, inflammation, tissue repair, and tumor promotion. Macrophages are secretory cells that participate in intercellular communication by releasing regulatory molecules and microvesicles (MVs). MVs are bilayered lipid membranes packaging a hydrophilic cargo, including proteins and nucleic acids. Macrophage-derived MVs carry functionally active miRNAs that suppress gene expression in target cells via post-transcriptional gene silencing, thus regulating cell function. In summary, miRNAs fine-tune several major facets of macrophage development and function. Such fine-tuning is critical in preventing exaggerated macrophage response to endogenous or exogenous stimuli. Future Directions: A critical role of miRNAs in the regulation of innate immune response and macrophage biology, including development, differentiation, and activation, has emerged. A clear understanding of such regulation on macrophage function remains to be elucidated. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 795–804. PMID:27353423

  18. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Suppress Phagolysosome Activation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric; Choe, Yoona; Ng, Tat Fong; Taylor, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The eye is an immune-privileged microenvironment that has adapted several mechanisms of immune regulation to prevent inflammation. One of these potential mechanisms is retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) altering phagocytosis in macrophages. Methods The conditioned media of RPE eyecups from eyes of healthy mice and mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) were used to treat primary macrophage phagocytizing pHrodo bacterial bioparticles. In addition, the neuropeptides were depleted from the conditioned media of healthy RPE eyecups and used to treat phagocytizing macrophages. The conditioned media from healthy and EAU RPE eyecups were assayed for IL-6, and IL-6 was added to the healthy conditioned media, and neutralized in the EAU conditioned media. The macrophages were treated with the conditioned media and assayed for fluorescence. The macrophages were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity, relative to active phagolysosomes, was measured. Also, the macrophages were assayed using fluorescent viability dye staining. Results The conditioned media from healthy, but not from EAU RPE eyecups suppressed phagolysosome activation. Depletion of the neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y from the healthy RPE eyecup conditioned media resulted in macrophage death. In the EAU RPE eyecup conditioned media was 0.96 ± 0.18 ng/mL of IL-6, and when neutralized the conditioned media suppressed phagolysosome activation. Conclusions The healthy RPE through soluble molecules, including alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y, suppresses the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages. In EAU, the IL-6 produced by the RPE promotes the activation of phagolysosomes in macrophages. These results demonstrate that under healthy conditions, RPE promotes an altered pathway of phagocytized material in macrophages with implications on antigen processing and clearance. PMID:28241314

  19. The equine alveolar macrophage: functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Anna E; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C; Hume, David A; Pirie, Scott R

    2013-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  20. Monocyte-derived macrophages from Zebu (Bos taurus indicus) are more efficient to control Brucella abortus intracellular survival than macrophages from European cattle (Bos taurus taurus).

    PubMed

    Macedo, A A; Costa, E A; Silva, A P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2013-02-15

    Brucellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases in the world. Considering its strict zoonotic nature, understanding of the pathogenesis and immunity of Brucella spp. in natural animal hosts is essential to prevent human infections. Natural resistance against brucellosis has been demonstrated in cattle, and it is associated with the ability of macrophages to prevent intracellular replication of Brucella abortus. Identification of breeds that are resistant to B. abortus may contribute for controlling and eradicating brucellosis in cattle. This study aimed to compare macrophages from Nelore (Bos taurus indicus) or Holstein (Bos taurus taurus) regarding their resistance to B. abortus infection. Macrophages from Nelore were significantly more efficient in controlling intracellular growth of B. abortus when compared to Holstein macrophages even under intralysosomal iron restricting conditions. Furthermore, Nelore macrophages had higher transcription levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α at 12h post-infection (hpi) and higher levels of IL-12 at 24 hpi when compared to Holstein macrophages. Conversely, Holstein macrophages had higher levels of IL-10 transcripts at 24 hpi. Macrohages from Nelore also generated more nitric oxide (NO) in response to B. abortus infection when compared to Holstein macrophages. In conclusion, cultured Nelore macrophages are more effective in controlling intracellular replication of B. abortus, suggesting that Nelore cattle is likely to have a higher degree of natural resistance to brucellosis than Holstein.

  1. Macrophage recognition of ICAM-3 on apoptotic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, O D; Devitt, A; Bell, E D; Simmons, D L; Gregory, C D

    1999-06-01

    Cells undergoing apoptosis are cleared rapidly by phagocytes, thus preventing tissue damage caused by loss of plasma membrane integrity. In this study, we show that the surface of leukocytes is altered during apoptosis such that the first Ig-like domain of ICAM-3 (CD50) can participate in the recognition and phagocytosis of the apoptotic cells by macrophages. Macrophage recognition of apoptotic cell-associated ICAM-3 was demonstrated both on leukocytes and, following transfection of exogenous ICAM-3, on nonleukocytes. The change in ICAM-3 was a consistent consequence of apoptosis triggered by various stimuli, suggesting that it occurs as part of a final common pathway of apoptosis. Alteration of ICAM-3 on apoptotic cells permitting recognition by macrophages resulted in a switch in ICAM-3-binding preference from the prototypic ICAM-3 counterreceptor, LFA-1, to an alternative macrophage receptor. Using mAbs to block macrophage/apoptotic cell interactions, we were unable to obtain evidence that either the alternative ICAM-3 counterreceptor alpha d beta 2 or the apoptotic cell receptor alpha v beta 3 was involved in the recognition of ICAM-3. By contrast, mAb blockade of macrophage CD14 inhibited ICAM-3-dependent recognition of apoptotic cells. These results show that ICAM-3 can function as a phagocytic marker of apoptotic leukocytes on which it acquires altered macrophage receptor-binding activity.

  2. Macrophage in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major health problem worldwide. This review describes the role of macrophages in CKD and highlights the importance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage activation in both renal fibrosis and wound healing processes. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which M2 macrophages induce renal repair and regeneration are still under debate and currently demand more attention. The M1/M2 macrophage balance is related to the renal microenvironment and could influence CKD progression. In fact, an inflammatory renal environment and M2 plasticity can be the major hurdles to establishing macrophage cell-based therapies in CKD. M2 macrophage cell-based therapy is promising if the M2 phenotype remains stable and is ‘fixed’ by in vitro manipulation. However, a greater understanding of phenotype polarization is still required. Moreover, better strategies and targets to induce reparative macrophages in vivo should guide future investigations in order to abate kidney diseases. PMID:27994852

  3. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  4. Macrophage polarization in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaojiang; Chen, Shi-You

    Macrophage accumulation associates closely with the degree of renal structural injury and renal dysfunction in human kidney diseases. Depletion of macrophages reduces while adoptive transfer of macrophages worsens inflammation in animal models of the renal injury. However, emerging evidence support that macrophage polarization plays a critical role in the progression of a number of kidney diseases including obstructive nephropathy, ischemia-reperfusion injury, glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, and other kidney diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the macrophage infiltration and polarization in these inflammatory and fibrotic kidney diseases, discussing the results mostly from studies in animal models. In view of the critical role of macrophage in the progression of these diseases, manipulating macrophage phenotype may be a potential effective strategy to treat various kidney diseases.

  5. DC-SIGN(+) Macrophages Control the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Conde, Patricia; Rodriguez, Mercedes; van der Touw, William; Jimenez, Ana; Burns, Matthew; Miller, Jennifer; Brahmachary, Manisha; Chen, Hui-ming; Boros, Peter; Rausell-Palamos, Francisco; Yun, Tae Jin; Riquelme, Paloma; Rastrojo, Alberto; Aguado, Begoña; Stein-Streilein, Joan; Tanaka, Masato; Zhou, Lan; Zhang, Junfeng; Lowary, Todd L; Ginhoux, Florent; Park, Chae Gyu; Cheong, Cheolho; Brody, Joshua; Turley, Shannon J; Lira, Sergio A; Bronte, Vincenzo; Gordon, Siamon; Heeger, Peter S; Merad, Miriam; Hutchinson, James; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Ochando, Jordi

    2015-06-16

    Tissue effector cells of the monocyte lineage can differentiate into different cell types with specific cell function depending on their environment. The phenotype, developmental requirements, and functional mechanisms of immune protective macrophages that mediate the induction of transplantation tolerance remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that costimulatory blockade favored accumulation of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages that inhibited CD8(+) T cell immunity and promoted CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell expansion in numbers. Mechanistically, that simultaneous DC-SIGN engagement by fucosylated ligands and TLR4 signaling was required for production of immunoregulatory IL-10 associated with prolonged allograft survival. Deletion of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages in vivo, interfering with their CSF1-dependent development, or preventing the DC-SIGN signaling pathway abrogated tolerance. Together, the results provide new insights into the tolerogenic effects of costimulatory blockade and identify DC-SIGN(+) suppressive macrophages as crucial mediators of immunological tolerance with the concomitant therapeutic implications in the clinic.

  6. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  7. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  8. Macrophage polarization following chitosan implantation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniela P; Fonseca, Ana C; Costa, Madalena; Amaral, Isabel F; Barbosa, Mário A; Águas, Artur P; Barbosa, Judite N

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages are a key cell in the host response to implants and can be polarized into different phenotypes capable of inducing both detrimental and beneficial outcomes in tissue repair and remodeling, being important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the macrophage response to 3D porous chitosan (Ch) scaffolds with different degrees of acetylation (DA, 5% and 15%). The M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages was investigated in vivo using a rodent air-pouch model. Our results show that the DA affects the macrophage response. Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced the adhesion of lower numbers of inflammatory cells, being the M2 the predominant phenotypic profile among the adherent macrophages. In the inflammatory exudates F4/80(+)/CD206(+) cells (M2 macrophages) appeared in higher numbers then F4/80(+)/CCR7(+) cells (M1 macrophages), in addition, lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines together with higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines were found. Ch scaffolds with DA 15% showed opposite results, since M1 were the predominant macrophages both adherent to the scaffold and in the exudates, together with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced a benign M2 anti-inflammatory macrophage response, whereas Ch scaffolds with DA 15% caused a macrophage M1 pro-inflammatory response.

  9. Epigenomics of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, David; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages play essential roles in tissue homeostasis, pathogen elimination, and tissue repair. A defining characteristic of these cells is their ability to efficiently adapt to a variety of abruptly changing and complex environments. This ability is intrinsically linked to a capacity to quickly alter their transcriptome, and this is tightly associated with the epigenomic organization of these cells and, in particular, their enhancer repertoire. Indeed, enhancers are genomic sites that serve as platforms for the integration of signaling pathways with the mechanisms that regulate mRNA transcription. Notably, transcription is pervasive at active enhancers and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are tightly coupled to regulated transcription of protein-coding genes. Furthermore, given that each cell type possesses a defining enhancer repertoire, studies on enhancers provide a powerful method to study how specialization of functions among the diverse macrophage subtypes may arise. Here, we review recent studies providing insights into the distinct mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of enhancers and their role in the regulation of transcription in macrophages.

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor Differentiation in Solid Sporulating Cultures: First Compartmentalized and Second Multinucleated Mycelia Have Different and Distinctive Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María T.; Martín, Juan F.; Rioseras, Beatriz; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes are very important industrial bacteria, which produce two thirds of all clinically relevant secondary metabolites. They have a complex developmental-cycle in which an early compartmentalized mycelium (MI) differentiates to a multinucleated mycelium (MII) that grows inside the culture medium (substrate mycelium) until it starts to growth into the air (aerial mycelium) and ends up forming spores. Streptomyces developmental studies have focused mainly on the later stages of MII differentiation (aerial mycelium and sporulation), with regulation of pre-sporulation stages (MI/MII transition) essentially unknown. This work represents the first study of the Streptomyces MI transcriptome, analyzing how it differs from the MII transcriptome. We have used a very conservative experimental approach to fractionate MI from MII and quantify gene expressions. The expression of well characterized key developmental/metabolic genes involved in bioactive compound production (actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, cpk, geosmin) or hydrophobic cover formation-sporulation (bld, whi, wbl, rdl, chp, ram) was correlated with MII differentiation. Additionally, 122 genes conserved in the Streptomyces genus, whose biological function had not been previously characterized, were found to be differentially expressed (more than 4-fold) in MI or MII. These genes encoded for putative regulatory proteins (transcriptional regulators, kinases), as well as hypothetical proteins. Knowledge about differences between the MI (vegetative) and MII (reproductive) transcriptomes represents a huge advance in Streptomyces biology that will make future experiments possible aimed at characterizing the biochemical pathways controlling pre-sporulation developmental stages and activation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces. PMID:23555999

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor differentiation in solid sporulating cultures: first compartmentalized and second multinucleated mycelia have different and distinctive transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María T; Martín, Juan F; Rioseras, Beatriz; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes are very important industrial bacteria, which produce two thirds of all clinically relevant secondary metabolites. They have a complex developmental-cycle in which an early compartmentalized mycelium (MI) differentiates to a multinucleated mycelium (MII) that grows inside the culture medium (substrate mycelium) until it starts to growth into the air (aerial mycelium) and ends up forming spores. Streptomyces developmental studies have focused mainly on the later stages of MII differentiation (aerial mycelium and sporulation), with regulation of pre-sporulation stages (MI/MII transition) essentially unknown. This work represents the first study of the Streptomyces MI transcriptome, analyzing how it differs from the MII transcriptome. We have used a very conservative experimental approach to fractionate MI from MII and quantify gene expressions. The expression of well characterized key developmental/metabolic genes involved in bioactive compound production (actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, cpk, geosmin) or hydrophobic cover formation-sporulation (bld, whi, wbl, rdl, chp, ram) was correlated with MII differentiation. Additionally, 122 genes conserved in the Streptomyces genus, whose biological function had not been previously characterized, were found to be differentially expressed (more than 4-fold) in MI or MII. These genes encoded for putative regulatory proteins (transcriptional regulators, kinases), as well as hypothetical proteins. Knowledge about differences between the MI (vegetative) and MII (reproductive) transcriptomes represents a huge advance in Streptomyces biology that will make future experiments possible aimed at characterizing the biochemical pathways controlling pre-sporulation developmental stages and activation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces.

  12. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  13. Brucella infection inhibits macrophages apoptosis via Nedd4-dependent degradation of calpain2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guimei; Wei, Pan; Zhao, Yuxi; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Wanchun; Wang, Shuangxi; Peng, Qisheng

    2014-11-07

    The calcium-dependent protease calpain2 is involved in macrophages apoptosis. Brucella infection-induced up-regulation of intracellular calcium level is an essential factor for the intracellular survival of Brucella within macrophages. Here, we hypothesize that calcium-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 ubiquitinates calpain2 and inhibits Brucella infection-induced macrophage apoptosis via degradation of calpain2.Our results reveal that Brucella infection induces increases in Nedd4 activity in an intracellular calcium dependent manner. Furthermore, Brucella infection-induced degradation of calpain2 is mediated by Nedd4 ubiquitination of calpain2. Brucella infection-induced calpain2 degradation inhibited macrophages apoptosis. Treatment of Brucella infected macrophages with calcium chelator BAPTA or Nedd4 knock-down decreased Nedd4 activity, prevented calpain2 degradation, and resulted in macrophages apoptosis.

  14. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2016-02-12

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells' resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  15. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  16. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  17. Macrophage Cryptococcus interactions: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Michael K.; Reedy, Jennifer L.; Tam, Jenny M.; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus species are fungal pathogens that are a leading cause of mortality. Initial inoculation is through the pulmonary route and, if disseminated, results in severe invasive infection including meningoencephalitis. Macrophages are the dominant phagocytic cell that interacts with Cryptococcus. Emerging theories suggest that Cryptococcus microevolution in macrophages is linked to survival and virulence within the host. In addition, Cryptococcus elaborates virulence factors as well as usurps host machinery to establish macrophage activation states that are permissive to intracellular survival and replication. In this review, we provide an update of the recent findings pertaining to macrophage interaction with Cryptococcus and focus on new avenues for biomedical research. PMID:24660045

  18. PHD2 regulates arteriogenic macrophages through TIE2 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Alexander; Veschini, Lorenzo; Takeda, Yukiji; Costa, Sandra; Delamarre, Estelle; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Henze, Anne-Theres; Wenes, Mathias; Serneels, Jens; Pucci, Ferdinando; Roncal, Carmen; Anisimov, Andrey; Alitalo, Kari; De Palma, Michele; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Occlusion of the main arterial route redirects blood flow to the collateral circulation. We previously reported that macrophages genetically modified to express low levels of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) display an arteriogenic phenotype, which promotes the formation of collateral vessels and protects the skeletal muscle from ischaemic necrosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that femoral artery occlusion induces a switch in macrophage phenotype through angiopoietin-1 (ANG1)-mediated Phd2 repression. ANG blockade by a soluble trap prevented the downregulation of Phd2 expression in macrophages and their phenotypic switch, thus inhibiting collateral growth. ANG1-dependent Phd2 repression initiated a feed-forward loop mediated by the induction of the ANG receptor TIE2 in macrophages. Gene silencing and cell depletion strategies demonstrate that TIE2 induction in macrophages is required to promote their proarteriogenic functions, enabling collateral vessel formation following arterial obstruction. These results indicate an indispensable role for TIE2 in sustaining in situ programming of macrophages to a proarteriogenic, M2-like phenotype, suggesting possible new venues for the treatment of ischaemic disorders. PMID:23616286

  19. MicroRNA-155 facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Nie, M; Liu, J; Yang, Q; Seok, H Y; Hu, X; Deng, Z-L; Wang, D-Z

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has remarkable regeneration capacity and regenerates in response to injury. Muscle regeneration largely relies on muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells normally remain quiescent, but in response to injury or exercise they become activated and proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myofibers. Interestingly, the inflammatory process following injury and the activation of the myogenic program are highly coordinated, with myeloid cells having a central role in modulating satellite cell activation and regeneration. Here, we show that genetic deletion of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in mice substantially delays muscle regeneration. Surprisingly, miR-155 does not appear to directly regulate the proliferation or differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, miR-155 is highly expressed in myeloid cells, is essential for appropriate activation of myeloid cells, and regulates the balance between pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, we found that miR-155 suppresses SOCS1, a negative regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, during the initial inflammatory response upon muscle injury. Our findings thus reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating initial immune responses during muscle regeneration and provide a novel miRNA target for improving muscle regeneration in degenerative muscle diseases. PMID:27277683

  20. Trafficking of Estrella lausannensis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new member of the Chlamydiales order. Like other Chlamydia-related bacteria, it is able to replicate in amoebae and in fish cell lines. A preliminary study investigating the pathogenic potential of Chlamydia-related bacteria found a correlation between antibody response to E. lausannensis and pneumonia in children. To further investigate the pathogenic potential of E. lausannensis, we determined its ability to grow in human macrophages and its intracellular trafficking. The replication in macrophages resulted in viable E. lausannensis; however, it caused a significant cytopathic effect. The intracellular trafficking of E. lausannensis was analyzed by determining the interaction of the Estrella-containing inclusions with various endocytic markers as well as host organelles. The E. lausannensis inclusion escaped the endocytic pathway rapidly avoiding maturation into phagolysosomes by preventing both EEA-1 and LAMP-1 accumulation. Compared to Waddlia chondrophila, another Chlamydia-related bacteria, the recruitment of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was minimal for E. lausannensis inclusions. Estrella lausannensis appears to use a distinct source of nutrients and energy compared to other members of the Chlamydiales order. In conclusion, we hypothesize that E. lausannensis has a restricted growth in human macrophages, due to its reduced capacity to control programmed cell death.

  1. Selective suppression of interleukin-12 induction after macrophage receptor ligation.

    PubMed

    Sutterwala, F S; Noel, G J; Clynes, R; Mosser, D M

    1997-06-02

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is a monocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokine that plays a crucial role in both the innate and the acquired immune response. In this study, we examined the effects that ligating specific macrophage receptors had on the induction of IL-12 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We report that ligation of the macrophage Fcgamma, complement, or scavenger receptors inhibited the induction of IL-12 by LPS. Both mRNA synthesis and protein secretion were diminished to near-undetectable levels following receptor ligation. Suppression was specific to IL-12 since IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production were not inhibited by ligating macrophage receptors. The results of several different experimental approaches suggest that IL-12 downregulation was due to extracellular calcium influxes that resulted from receptor ligation. First, preventing extracellular calcium influxes, by performing the assays in EGTA, abrogated FcgammaR-mediated IL-12(p40) mRNA suppression. Second, exposure of macrophages to the calcium ionophores, ionomycin or A23187, mimicked receptor ligation and inhibited IL-12(p40) mRNA induction by LPS. Finally, bone marrow-derived macrophages from FcR gamma chain-deficient mice, which fail to flux calcium after receptor ligation, failed to inhibit IL-12(p40) mRNA induction. These results indicate that the calcium influxes that occur as a result of receptor ligation are responsible for inhibiting the induction of IL-12 by LPS. Hence, the ligation of phagocytic receptors on macrophages can lead to a dramatic decrease in IL-12 induction. This downregulation may be a way of limiting proinflammatory responses of macrophages to extracellular pathogens, or suppressing the development of cell-mediated immunity to intracellular pathogens.

  2. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  3. Inhibition of adipocyte inflammation and macrophage chemotaxis by butein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Lee, Youngyi; Eun, Jae Soon; Bae, Eun Ju

    2014-09-05

    Adipose tissue inflammation has been proposed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Butein, a polyphenol of vegetal origin, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages but it was not reported whether butein prevents adipocyte inflammation. Here, we investigated the effects of butein on adipocyte inflammation in 3T3-L1 cells and performed functional macrophage migration assays. Butein opposed the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression and of nitric oxide production by simultaneous treatment of adipocytes with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and interferon gamma (TLI). In addition, butein inhibited mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory genes and chemokines in adipocytes stimulated with TLI or conditioned medium from RAW 264.7 macrophages treated with LPS. These effects were associated with suppression of inhibitor of kappa B alpha degradation induced by TNFα and with nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation and acetylation. Moreover, butein prevented phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38. These results suggest that butein suppresses adipocyte inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB/MAPK-dependent transcriptional activity. Furthermore, conditioned media from adipocytes stimulated macrophage chemotaxis, whereas media from adipocytes treated with butein blocked macrophage migration, an effect that was consistent with suppression of MCP-1 secretion by adipocytes treated with butein. In addition, macrophages treated with butein exhibited a reduced ability to migrate toward adipocyte CM. In conclusion, butein may represent a therapeutic agent to prevent adipose tissue inflammation and the obesity-linked insulin resistance.

  4. mTORC2 signalling regulates M2 macrophage differentiation in response to helminth infection and adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hallowell, R. W.; Collins, S. L.; Craig, J. M.; Zhang, Y.; Oh, M.; Illei, P. B.; Chan-Li, Y.; Vigeland, C. L.; Mitzner, W.; Scott, A. L.; Powell, J. D.; Horton, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) have an important function in innate immune responses to parasitic helminths, and emerging evidence also indicates these cells are regulators of systemic metabolism. Here we show a critical role for mTORC2 signalling in the generation of M2 macrophages. Abrogation of mTORC2 signalling in macrophages by selective conditional deletion of the adaptor molecule Rictor inhibits the generation of M2 macrophages while leaving the generation of classically activated macrophages (M1) intact. Selective deletion of Rictor in macrophages prevents M2 differentiation and clearance of a parasitic helminth infection in mice, and also abrogates the ability of mice to regulate brown fat and maintain core body temperature. Our findings define a role for mTORC2 in macrophages in integrating signals from the immune microenvironment to promote innate type 2 immunity, and also to integrate systemic metabolic and thermogenic responses. PMID:28128208

  5. Ginsenoside Re Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation in Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages and Zebrafish Scale Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan-Mi; Kim, Hye-Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Han, Ho-Jin; Noh, Haneul; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Park, Soo-Hyun; Chae, Han-Jung; Chae, Soo-Wan; Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Sangku; Liu, Kangdong; Liu, Haidan; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Kim, Young Ock; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Soung, Nak-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenosides, which are the active materials of ginseng, have biological functions that include anti-osteoporotic effects. Aqueous ginseng extract inhibits osteoclast differentiation induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). Aqueous ginseng extract produces chromatography peaks characteristic of ginsenosides. Among these peaks, ginsenoside Re is a major component. However, the preventive effects of ginsenoside Re against osteoclast differentiation are not known. We studied the effect of ginsenoside Re on osteoclast differentiation, RANKL-induced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity, and formation of multinucleated osteoclasts in vitro. Ginsenoside Re hampered osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo zebrafish model, aqueous ginseng extract and ginsenoside Re had anti-osteoclastogenesis effects. These findings suggest that both aqueous ginseng extract and ginsenoside Re prevent bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation. Ginsenoside Re could be important for promoting bone health. PMID:27927007

  6. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  7. An M1-like Macrophage Polarization in Decidual Tissue during Spontaneous Preterm Labor That Is Attenuated by Rosiglitazone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Romero, Roberto; Miller, Derek; Kadam, Leena; Mial, Tara N; Plazyo, Olesya; Garcia-Flores, Valeria; Hassan, Sonia S; Xu, Zhonghui; Tarca, Adi L; Drewlo, Sascha; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2016-03-15

    Decidual macrophages are implicated in the local inflammatory response that accompanies spontaneous preterm labor/birth; however, their role is poorly understood. We hypothesized that decidual macrophages undergo a proinflammatory (M1) polarization during spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via rosiglitazone (RSG) would attenuate the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, preventing preterm birth. In this study, we show that: 1) decidual macrophages undergo an M1-like polarization during spontaneous term and preterm labor; 2) anti-inflammatory (M2)-like macrophages are more abundant than M1-like macrophages in decidual tissue; 3) decidual M2-like macrophages are reduced in preterm pregnancies compared with term pregnancies, regardless of the presence of labor; 4) decidual macrophages express high levels of TNF and IL-12 but low levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) during spontaneous preterm labor; 5) decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor display plasticity by M1↔M2 polarization in vitro; 6) incubation with RSG reduces the expression of TNF and IL-12 in decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor; and 7) treatment with RSG reduces the rate of LPS-induced preterm birth and improves neonatal outcomes by reducing the systemic proinflammatory response and downregulating mRNA and protein expression of NF-κB, TNF, and IL-10 in decidual and myometrial macrophages in C57BL/6J mice. In summary, we demonstrated that decidual M1-like macrophages are associated with spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via RSG can attenuate the macrophage-mediated proinflammatory response, preventing preterm birth and improving neonatal outcomes. These findings suggest that the PPARγ pathway is a new molecular target for future preventative strategies for spontaneous preterm labor/birth.

  8. An M1-like macrophage polarization in decidual tissue during spontaneous preterm labor that is attenuated by rosiglitazone treatment1

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Leena; Mial, Tara N.; Plazyo, Olesya; Garcia-Flores, Valeria; Hassan, Sonia S.; Xu, Zhonghui; Tarca, Adi L.; Drewlo, Sascha; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are implicated in the local inflammatory response that accompanies spontaneous preterm labor/birth; however, their role is poorly understood. We hypothesized that decidual macrophages undergo an M1 polarization during spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via rosiglitazone would attenuate the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, preventing preterm birth. Herein, we show that: 1) decidual macrophages undergo an M1-like polarization during spontaneous term and preterm labor; 2) M2-like macrophages are more abundant than M1-like macrophages in decidual tissue; 3) decidual M2-like macrophages are reduced in preterm pregnancies compared to term pregnancies, regardless of the presence of labor; 4) decidual macrophages express high levels of TNF and IL12, but low levels of PPARγ, during spontaneous preterm labor; 5) decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor display plasticity by M1↔M2 polarization in vitro; 6) incubation with rosiglitazone reduces the expression of TNF and IL12 in decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor; and 7) treatment with rosiglitazone reduces the rate of LPS-induced preterm birth and improves neonatal outcomes by reducing the systemic pro-inflammatory response in B6 mice and down-regulating mRNA and protein expression of NFκB, TNF, and IL10 in decidual and myometrial macrophages. In summary, we demonstrated that decidual M1-like macrophages are associated with spontaneous preterm labor, and that PPARγ activation via rosiglitazone can attenuate the macrophage-mediated pro-inflammatory response, preventing preterm birth and improving neonatal outcomes. These findings suggest that the PPARγ pathway is a new molecular target for future preventative strategies for spontaneous preterm labor/birth. PMID:26889045

  9. Nuclear Autonomy in Multinucleate Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Samantha E.; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Within many fungal syncytia, nuclei behave independently despite sharing a common cytoplasm. Creation of independent nuclear zones of control in one cell is paradoxical considering random protein synthesis sites, predicted rapid diffusion rates, and well-mixed cytosol. In studying the surprising fungal nuclear autonomy, new principles of cellular organization are emerging. We discuss the current understanding of nuclear autonomy, focusing on asynchronous cell cycle progression where most work has been directed. Mechanisms underlying nuclear autonomy are diverse including mRNA localization, ploidy variability, and nuclear spacing control. With the challenges fungal syncytia face due to cytoplasmic size and shape, they serve as powerful models for uncovering new subcellular organization modes, variability sources among isogenic uninucleate cells, and the evolution of multicellularity. PMID:26379197

  10. The Dipeptidyl Peptidases 4, 8, and 9 in Mouse Monocytes and Macrophages: DPP8/9 Inhibition Attenuates M1 Macrophage Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Waumans, Yannick; Vliegen, Gwendolyn; Maes, Lynn; Rombouts, Miche; Declerck, Ken; Van Der Veken, Pieter; Vanden Berghe, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Schrijvers, Dorien; De Meester, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death in Western countries. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) 4 has emerged as a novel target for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. Family members DPP8 and 9 are abundantly present in macrophage-rich regions of atherosclerotic plaques, and DPP9 inhibition attenuates activation of human M1 macrophages in vitro. Studying this family in a mouse model for atherosclerosis would greatly advance our knowledge regarding their potential as therapeutic targets. We found that DPP4 is downregulated during mouse monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. DPP8 and 9 expression seems relatively low in mouse monocytes and macrophages. Viability of primary mouse macrophages is unaffected by DPP4 or DPP8/9 inhibition. Importantly, DPP8/9 inhibition attenuates macrophage activation as IL-6 secretion is significantly decreased. Mouse macrophages respond similarly to DPP inhibition, compared to human macrophages. This shows that the mouse could become a valid model species for the study of DPPs as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis.

  11. The Role of Toll-Like Receptor 9 in Chronic Stress-Induced Apoptosis in Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yanxiao; Yan, Hui; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Qi; Hanley, Gregory; Caudle, Yi; LeSage, Gene; Zhang, Xiumei; Yin, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence implied that chronic stress has been exerting detrimental impact on immune system functions in both humans and animals. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to play an essential role in modulating immune responses and cell survival. We have recently shown that TLR9 deficiency protects against lymphocyte apoptosis induced by chronic stress. However, the exact role of TLR9 in stress-mediated change of macrophage function remains unclear. The results of the current study showed that when BALB/c mice were treated with restraint stress (12 h daily for 2 days), the number of macrophages recruited to the peritoneal cavity was obviously increased. Results also demonstrated that the sustained effects of stress elevated cytokine IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10 production yet diminished IFN-γ production from macrophage, which led to apoptotic cell death. However, TLR9 deficiency prevented the chronic stress-mediated accumulation of macrophages. In addition, knocking out TLR9 significantly abolished the chronic stress-induced imbalance of cytokine levels and apoptosis in macrophage. TLR9 deficiency was also found to reverse elevation of plasma IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-17 levels and decrease of plasma IFN-γ level under the condition of chronic stress. These results indicated that TLR9-mediated macrophage responses were required for chronic stress-induced immunosuppression. Further exploration showed that TLR9 deficiency prevented the increment of p38 MAPK phosphorylation and reduction of Akt/Gsk-3β phosphorylation; TLR9 deficiency also attenuated the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm, caused upregulation of Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio, downregulation of cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, as well as decreased TUNEL-positive cells in macrophage of stressed mice. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that deficiency of TLR9 maintained macrophage function by modulating macrophage accumulation and attenuating macrophage apoptosis, thus preventing

  12. Metabolic Reprograming in Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Peña, Silvia; O’Neill, Luke A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the metabolism of immune cells in recent years has emphasized the tight link existing between the metabolic state and the phenotype of these cells. Macrophages in particular are a good example of this phenomenon. Whether the macrophage obtains its energy through glycolysis or through oxidative metabolism can give rise to different phenotypes. Classically activated or M1 macrophages are key players of the first line of defense against bacterial infections and are known to obtain energy through glycolysis. Alternatively activated or M2 macrophages on the other hand are involved in tissue repair and wound healing and use oxidative metabolism to fuel their longer-term functions. Metabolic intermediates, however, are not just a source of energy but can be directly implicated in a particular macrophage phenotype. In M1 macrophages, the Krebs cycle intermediate succinate regulates HIF1α, which is responsible for driving the sustained production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β. In M2 macrophages, the sedoheptulose kinase carbohydrate kinase-like protein is critical for regulating the pentose phosphate pathway. The potential to target these events and impact on disease is an exciting prospect. PMID:25228902

  13. Morphine Modulates Interleukin-4- or Breast Cancer Cell-induced Pro-metastatic Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2015-06-16

    Interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment play a key role in the control of invasiveness, metastasis and angiogenesis. Macrophages display a range of activation states in specific pathological contexts and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages can promote tumour aggressiveness. Opioids are able to modulate tumour growth and metastasis. We tested whether morphine modulates the activation of macrophages induced by (i) interleukin-4 (IL-4), the prototypical M2 polarization-inducing cytokine, or (ii) coculture with breast cancer cells. We showed that IL-4 causes increased MMP-9 production and expression of the alternative activation markers arginase-1 and MRC-1. Morphine prevented IL-4-induced increase in MMP-9 in a naloxone- and methylnaltrexone-reversible fashion. Morphine also prevented IL-4-elicited alternative activation of RAW264.7 macrophages. Expression of MMP-9 and arginase-1 were increased when RAW264.7 were subjected to paracrine activation by 4T1 cells, and this effect was prevented by morphine via an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism. Morphine further decreased 4T1 breast cancer cell invasion elicited by co-culture with RAW264.7. Reduction of MMP-9 expression and alternative activation of macrophages by morphine was confirmed using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that morphine may modulate tumour aggressiveness by regulating macrophage protease production and M2 polarization within the tumour microenvironment.

  14. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  15. Regulation of the macrophage oxytocin receptor in response to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Angela; Sun-Suslow, Ni; Mendez, Armando J; Hernandez, Rosa I; Wagner, Klaus V; McCabe, Philip M

    2017-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation in macrophages. In the current study, we examined the role of inflammation on the expression of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR). We hypothesized that OXTR expression is increased during the inflammation through a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-mediated pathway, thus responding as an acute-phase protein. Inflammation was induced by treating macrophages (human primary, THP-1, and murine) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and monitored by expression of IL-6. Expression of OXTR and vasopressin receptors was assessed by qPCR, and OXTR expression was confirmed by immunoblotting. Inflammation upregulated OXTR transcription 10- to 250-fold relative to control in THP-1 and human primary macrophages and increased OXTR protein expression. In contrast, vasopressin receptor-2 mRNA expression was reduced following LPS treatment. Blocking NF-κB activation prevented the increase in OXTR transcription. OT treatment of control cells and LPS-treated cells increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, demonstrating activation of the OXTR/Gαq/11 signaling pathway. OT activation of OXTR reduced secretion of IL-6 in LPS-activated macrophages. Collectively, these findings suggest that OXTR is an acute-phase protein and that its increased expression is regulated by NF-κB and functions to attenuate cellular inflammatory responses in macrophages.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3.

  17. Staphylococcal enterotoxins bind H-2Db molecules on macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We screened a panel of monoclonal antibodies against selected macrophage cell surface molecules for their ability to inhibit enterotoxin binding to major histocompatibility complex class II-negative C2D (H-2b) macrophages. Two monoclonal antibodies, HB36 and TIB126, that are specific for the alpha 2 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I, blocked staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB, respectively) binding to C2D macrophages in a specific and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitory activities were haplotype-specific in that SEA and SEB binding to H-2k or H-2d macrophages was not inhibited by either monoclonal antibody. HB36, but not TIB126, inhibited enterotoxin-induced secretion of cytokines by H-2b macrophages. Lastly, passive protection of D-galactosamine-sensitized C2D mice by injection with HB36 antibody prevented SEB-induced death. Therefore, SEA and SEB binding to the alpha 2 domain of the H-2Db molecule induces biological activity and has physiological consequences.

  18. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  19. The Macrophage Switch in Obesity Development

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Angela; Naffah de Souza, Cristiane; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell infiltration in (white) adipose tissue (AT) during obesity is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In AT, the main population of leukocytes are macrophages. Macrophages can be classified into two major populations: M1, classically activated macrophages, and M2, alternatively activated macrophages, although recent studies have identified a broad range of macrophage subsets. During obesity, AT M1 macrophage numbers increase and correlate with AT inflammation and insulin resistance. Upon activation, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages induce aerobic glycolysis. By contrast, in lean humans and mice, the number of M2 macrophages predominates. M2 macrophages secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and utilize oxidative metabolism to maintain AT homeostasis. Here, we review the immunologic and metabolic functions of AT macrophages and their different facets in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26779183

  20. ROS sets the stage for macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony; Byles, Vanessa; Horng, Tiffany

    2013-08-01

    While M1 macrophages are highly pro-inflammatory and microbicidal, M2 macrophages and the related tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) regulate tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and can display immunomodulatory activity. In July issue of Cell Research, Zhang et al. show that ROS production, critical for the activation and functions of M1 macrophages, is necessary for the differentiation of M2 macrophages and TAMs, and that antioxidant therapy blocks TAM differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse models of cancer.

  1. Macrophages as Cell-Based Delivery Systems for Nanoshells in Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Steen J.; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Makkouk, Amani R.; Krasieva, Tatiana; Hirschberg, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of nanoparticles poses a significant challenge, especially in the brain where the blood–brain barrier prevents the entry of most therapeutic compounds including nanoparticle-based anti-cancer agents. In this context, the use of macrophages as vectors for the delivery of gold–silica nanoshells to infiltrating gliomas will be reviewed in this article. Gold–silica nanoshells are readily phagocytosed by macrophages without any apparent toxic effects, and the results of in vitro studies have demonstrated the migratory potential of nanoshell-loaded macrophages in human glioma spheroids. Of particular interest is the observation that, after near-infrared exposure of spheroids containing nanoshell-loaded macrophages, sufficient heat was generated to suppress spheroid growth. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of macrophages as nanoshell delivery vectors for photothermal therapy of gliomas, and they certainly provide the basis for future animal studies. PMID:21979168

  2. Macrophages as cell-based delivery systems for nanoshells in photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Steen J; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Makkouk, Amani R; Krasieva, Tatiana; Hirschberg, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Site-specific delivery of nanoparticles poses a significant challenge, especially in the brain where the blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of most therapeutic compounds including nanoparticle-based anti-cancer agents. In this context, the use of macrophages as vectors for the delivery of gold-silica nanoshells to infiltrating gliomas will be reviewed in this article. Gold-silica nanoshells are readily phagocytosed by macrophages without any apparent toxic effects, and the results of in vitro studies have demonstrated the migratory potential of nanoshell-loaded macrophages in human glioma spheroids. Of particular interest is the observation that, after near-infrared exposure of spheroids containing nanoshell-loaded macrophages, sufficient heat was generated to suppress spheroid growth. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of macrophages as nanoshell delivery vectors for photothermal therapy of gliomas, and they certainly provide the basis for future animal studies.

  3. Host response. Inflammation-induced disruption of SCS macrophages impairs B cell responses to secondary infection.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Mauro; Castello, Angelo; Montaner, Beatriz; Rogers, Neil; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Batista, Facundo D

    2015-02-06

    The layer of macrophages at the subcapsular sinus (SCS) captures pathogens entering the lymph node, preventing their global dissemination and triggering an immune response. However, how infection affects SCS macrophages remains largely unexplored. Here we show that infection and inflammation disrupt the organization of SCS macrophages in a manner that involves the migration of mature dendritic cells to the lymph node. This disrupted organization reduces the capacity of SCS macrophages to retain and present antigen in a subsequent secondary infection, resulting in diminished B cell responses. Thus, the SCS macrophage layer may act as a sensor or valve during infection to temporarily shut down the lymph node to further antigenic challenge. This shutdown may increase an organism's susceptibility to secondary infections.

  4. Macrophage Responses to B. Anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-14

    LPS were reflective of a profound rophage responses to close relatives like Bacillus cereus as well change in cellular signaling, and in general these...published (attached) in 2005 [Bergman, et al. Murine Macrophage Transcriptional Responses to Bacillus I Final Report anthracis Infection and Intoxication...Macrophage Transcriptional Responses to Bacillus anthracis Infection and Intoxication. Infection & Immunity. 73:1069-1079. Parallel to the mRNA data

  5. Fibronectin induces macrophage migration through a SFK-FAK/CSF-1R pathway.

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Graziana; Tusa, Ignazia; Bacci, Marina; Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Rovida, Elisabetta

    2016-09-02

    Integrins, following binding to proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) including collagen, laminin and fibronectin (FN), are able to transduce molecular signals inside the cells and to regulate several biological functions such as migration, proliferation and differentiation. Besides activation of adaptor molecules and kinases, integrins transactivate Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). In particular, adhesion to the ECM may promote RTK activation in the absence of growth factors. The Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) is a RTK that supports the survival, proliferation, and motility of monocytes/macrophages, which are essential components of innate immunity and cancer development. Macrophage interaction with FN is recognized as an important aspect of host defense and wound repair. The aim of the present study was to investigate on a possible cross-talk between FN-elicited signals and CSF-1R in macrophages. FN induced migration in BAC1.2F5 and J774 murine macrophage cell lines and in human primary macrophages. Adhesion to FN determined phosphorylation of the Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Src Family Kinases (SFK) and activation of the SFK/FAK complex, as witnessed by paxillin phosphorylation. SFK activity was necessary for FAK activation and macrophage migration. Moreover, FN-induced migration was dependent on FAK in either murine macrophage cell lines or human primary macrophages. FN also induced FAK-dependent/ligand-independent CSF-1R phosphorylation, as well as the interaction between CSF-1R and β1. CSF-1R activity was necessary for FN-induced macrophage migration. Indeed, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of CSF-1R prevented FN-induced macrophage migration. Our results identified a new SFK-FAK/CSF-1R signaling pathway that mediates FN-induced migration of macrophages.

  6. Chronic hepatitis C infection–induced liver fibrogenesis is associated with M2 macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Bility, Moses T.; Nio, Kouki; Li, Feng; McGivern, David R.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Feeney, Eoin R.; Chung, Raymond T.; Su, Lishan

    2016-01-01

    The immuno-pathogenic mechanisms of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remain to be elucidated and pose a major hurdle in treating or preventing chronic HCV-induced advanced liver diseases such as cirrhosis. Macrophages are a major component of the inflammatory milieu in chronic HCV–induced liver disease, and are generally derived from circulating inflammatory monocytes; however very little is known about their role in liver diseases. To investigate the activation and role of macrophages in chronic HCV–induced liver fibrosis, we utilized a recently developed humanized mouse model with autologous human immune and liver cells, human liver and blood samples and cell culture models of monocyte/macrophage and/or hepatic stellate cell activation. We showed that M2 macrophage activation was associated with liver fibrosis during chronic HCV infection in the livers of both humanized mice and patients, and direct-acting antiviral therapy attenuated M2 macrophage activation and associated liver fibrosis. We demonstrated that supernatant from HCV-infected liver cells activated human monocytes/macrophages with M2-like phenotypes. Importantly, HCV-activated monocytes/macrophages promoted hepatic stellate cell activation. These results suggest a critical role for M2 macrophage induction in chronic HCV-associated immune dysregulation and liver fibrosis. PMID:28000758

  7. Macrophages promote the progression of premalignant mammary lesions to invasive cancer.

    PubMed

    Carron, Emily C; Homra, Samuel; Rosenberg, Jillian; Coffelt, Seth B; Kittrell, Frances; Zhang, Yiqun; Creighton, Chad J; Fuqua, Suzanne A; Medina, Daniel; Machado, Heather L

    2017-01-31

    Breast cancer initiation, progression and metastasis rely on a complex interplay between tumor cells and their surrounding microenvironment. Infiltrating immune cells, including macrophages, promote mammary tumor progression and metastasis; however, less is known about the role of macrophages in early stage lesions. In this study, we utilized a transplantable p53-null model of early progression to characterize the immune cell components of early stage lesions. We show that macrophages are recruited to ductal hyperplasias with a high tumor-forming potential where they are differentiated and polarized toward a tumor-promoting phenotype. These macrophages are a unique subset of macrophages, characterized by pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive factors. Macrophage ablation studies showed that macrophages are required for both early stage progression and primary tumor formation. These studies suggest that therapeutic targeting of tumor-promoting macrophages may not only be an effective strategy to block tumor progression and metastasis, but may also have critical implications for breast cancer prevention.

  8. Selective and specific macrophage ablation is detrimental to wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Rita; DiPietro, Luisa A; Koh, Timothy J

    2009-12-01

    Macrophages are thought to play important roles during wound healing, but definition of these roles has been hampered by our technical inability to specifically eliminate macrophages during wound repair. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that specific depletion of macrophages after excisional skin wounding would detrimentally affect healing by reducing the production of growth factors important in the repair process. We used transgenic mice that express the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the CD11b promoter (DTR mice) to specifically ablate macrophages during wound healing. Mice without the transgene are relatively insensitive to DT, and administration of DT to wild-type mice does not alter macrophage or other inflammatory cell accumulation after injury and does not influence wound healing. In contrast, treatment of DTR mice with DT prevented macrophage accumulation in healing wounds but did not affect the accumulation of neutrophils or monocytes. Such macrophage depletion resulted in delayed re-epithelialization, reduced collagen deposition, impaired angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation in the healing wounds. These adverse changes were associated with increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and reduced levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the wound. In summary, macrophages seem to promote both wound closure and dermal healing, in part by regulating the cytokine environment of the healing wound.

  9. Chronic hepatitis C infection-induced liver fibrogenesis is associated with M2 macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Nio, Kouki; Li, Feng; McGivern, David R; Lemon, Stanley M; Feeney, Eoin R; Chung, Raymond T; Su, Lishan

    2016-12-21

    The immuno-pathogenic mechanisms of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remain to be elucidated and pose a major hurdle in treating or preventing chronic HCV-induced advanced liver diseases such as cirrhosis. Macrophages are a major component of the inflammatory milieu in chronic HCV-induced liver disease, and are generally derived from circulating inflammatory monocytes; however very little is known about their role in liver diseases. To investigate the activation and role of macrophages in chronic HCV-induced liver fibrosis, we utilized a recently developed humanized mouse model with autologous human immune and liver cells, human liver and blood samples and cell culture models of monocyte/macrophage and/or hepatic stellate cell activation. We showed that M2 macrophage activation was associated with liver fibrosis during chronic HCV infection in the livers of both humanized mice and patients, and direct-acting antiviral therapy attenuated M2 macrophage activation and associated liver fibrosis. We demonstrated that supernatant from HCV-infected liver cells activated human monocytes/macrophages with M2-like phenotypes. Importantly, HCV-activated monocytes/macrophages promoted hepatic stellate cell activation. These results suggest a critical role for M2 macrophage induction in chronic HCV-associated immune dysregulation and liver fibrosis.

  10. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (TgDNMT1) or PPAR-γ (TgPPAR-γ) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that TgDNMT1 significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional TgPPAR-γ or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented TgDNMT1-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  11. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  12. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-06-24

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis.

  13. M1 macrophages promote aortic valve calcification mediated by microRNA-214/TWIST1 pathway in valvular interstitial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Dong-Dong; Xu, Hai-Xia; Wang, Teng; Pan, Min; Shi, Jia-Hai; Zhu, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The identification of the biological function of M1 macrophages and the mechanism underlying their role in valvular interstitial cell (VIC) calcification may provide therapeutic targets for the prevention of aortic valve calcification (AVC). This study investigated the mechanism by which M1 macrophages and macrophage-derived microvesicles (MVs) affected the calcification of VICs. An additional aim was to investigate the involvement of the miR-214 pathway in this process. Methods: The M1 or M2 macrophage phenotype in human calcific aortic valve was confirmed by gene expression analysis of M1 or M2 macrophage markers. Two macrophage cell lines (BMDMs and RAW 264.7 macrophages) were transformed into M1 macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. To investigate the mechanism by which M1 macrophages promoted VIC calcification, the generated M1 macrophages and macrophage-derived MVs were co-cultured with VICs and VICs were then used for calcification or signals analysis. In addition, a hypercholesterolemic apoE-/- AVC murine model was used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of miR-214 specific-siRNA (miR-214 inhibitor). Results: Macrophages in calcific aortic valves showed M1-directed polarization. In the VICs co-cultured with LPS-stimulated M1 macrophages and macrophage-derived MVs, VIC calcification was enhanced, and the expression of TWIST1, a direct target of miR-214, was downregulated. We showed that knockdown of TWIST1 serves as a responding molecule for miR-214 and reversed the anti-calcification action of miR-214 inhibitor, mediating signal delivery by the M1 macrophage-derived MVs to VICs and promoting VIC calcification. When M1 macrophages co-cultured with VICs, TWIST1 overexpression in M1 macrophages had no effect on the expression of TWIST1 in VICs. As shown by intravenous therapy, knockdown of miR-214 in mice seemed to improve AVC in apoE-/- mice with high-cholesterol (HC)-diet induced AVC. Conclusions: These findings suggested that M1

  14. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  15. Macrophages largely contribute to heterologous anti-Propionibacterium acnes antibody-mediated protection from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuyue; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Feng; Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Xia, Xiaojing; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-03-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of acute and chronic pleuropneumonia. Propionibacterium acnes is a facultative anaerobic gram-positive corynebacterium. We have previously found that anti-P. acnes antibodies can prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infections in mice. To investigate the role of macrophages in this process, affinity-purified anti-P. acnes IgG and anti-A. pleuropneumoniae IgG were used in opsonophagocytosis assays. Additionally, the efficacy of passive immunization with P. acnes serum against A. pleuropneumoniae was tested in macrophage-depleted mice. It was found that anti-P. acnes IgG had an effect similar to that of anti-A. pleuropneumoniae IgG (P > 0.05), which significantly promotes phagocytosis of A. pleuropneumoniae by macrophages (P < 0.01). It was also demonstrated that, after passive immunization with anti-P. acnes serum, macrophage-replete mice had the highest survival rate (90%), whereas the survival rate of macrophage-depleted mice was only 40% (P < 0.05). However, macrophage-depleted mice that had been passively immunized with naïve serum had the lowest survival rate (20%), this rate being lower than that of macrophage-replete mice that had been passively immunized with naïve serum. Overall, anti-P. acnes antibodies did not prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infection under conditions of macrophage depletion (P > 0.05). Furthermore, in mice that had been passively immunized with anti-P. acnes serum, macrophage depletion resulted in a greater A. pleuropneumoniae burden and more severe pathological features of pneumonia in lung tissues than occurred in macrophage-replete mice. It was concluded that macrophages are essential for the process by which anti-P. acnes antibody prevents A. pleuropneumoniae infection in mice.

  16. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Draijer, Christina; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis), and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases. PMID:23533311

  17. Effect of amorphous silica nanoparticles on in vitro RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSP) have been used as a polishing agent and/or as a remineralization promoter for teeth in the oral care field. The present study investigates the effects of nSP on osteoclast differentiation and the relationship between particle size and these effects. Our results revealed that nSP exerted higher cytotoxicity in macrophage cells compared with submicron-sized silica particles. However, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and the number of osteoclast cells (TRAP-positive multinucleated cells) were not changed by nSP treatment in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) at doses that did not induce cytotoxicity by silica particles. These results indicated that nSP did not cause differentiation of osteoclasts. Collectively, the results suggested that nanosilica exerts no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells, although a detailed mechanistic examination of the nSP70-mediated cytotoxic effect is needed. PMID:21777482

  18. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S.; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T.; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.; Wright, Samuel D.; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L.; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Since cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) triggers a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility, in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. Here we show that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load, and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques, and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Since CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  19. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Björkhem, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R; Wright, Samuel D; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-04-06

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis.

  20. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-09

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  1. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Palmar, Jim; Bautista, Jordan; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gómez, Alexis; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD. PMID:26491604

  2. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko; Takeya, Motohiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup –/–}) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE{sup –/–} mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE{sup –/–} mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  3. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs.

  4. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone.

  5. Murine macrophages response to iron.

    PubMed

    Polati, Rita; Castagna, Annalisa; Bossi, Alessandra Maria; Alberio, Tiziana; De Domenico, Ivana; Kaplan, Jerry; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Gevi, Federica; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Brunch, Ryan; Olivieri, Oliviero; Girelli, Domenico

    2012-12-05

    Macrophages play a critical role at the crossroad between iron metabolism and immunity, being able to store and recycle iron derived from the phagocytosis of senescent erythrocytes. The way by which macrophages manage non-heme iron at physiological concentration is still not fully understood. We investigated protein changes in mouse bone marrow macrophages incubated with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC 10 μM iron). Differentially expressed spots were identified by nano RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Transcriptomic, metabolomics and western immunoblotting analyses complemented the proteomic approach. Pattern analysis was also used for identifying networks of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. FAC treatment resulted in higher abundance of several proteins including ferritins, cytoskeleton related proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) at the membrane level, vimentin, arginase, galectin-3 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Interestingly, GAPDH has been recently proposed to act as an alternative transferrin receptor for iron acquisition through internalization of the GAPDH-transferrin complex into the early endosomes. FAC treatment also induced the up-regulation of oxidative stress-related proteins (PRDX), which was further confirmed at the metabolic level (increase in GSSG, 8-isoprostane and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates) through mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics approaches. This study represents an example of the potential usefulness of "integarated omics" in the field of iron biology, especially for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis in normal and disease conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  6. Modulating macrophage response to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, Toral

    Macrophages recruited to the site of biomaterial implantation are the primary mediators of the chronic foreign body response to implanted materials. Since foreign body response limits performance and functional life of numerous implanted biomaterials/medical devices, various approaches have been investigated to modulate macrophage interactions with biomaterial surfaces to mitigate this response. In this work we have explored two independent approaches to modulate the macrophage inflammatory response to biomaterials. The first approach targets surface integrins, cell surface receptors that mediate cell adhesion to biomaterials through adhesive proteins spontaneously adsorbed on biomaterial surfaces. The second approach involves surface modification of biomaterials using nanotopographic features since nanotopography has been reported to modulate cell adhesion and viability in a cell type-dependent manner. More specifically, Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod surface was investigated for its role in modulating macrophage adhesion and survival in vitro and foreign body response in vivo. For the first approach, we have investigated the role of integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins in the in-vivo osteolysis response and macrophage inflammatory processes of phagocytosis as well as inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to particulate biomaterials. We have also investigated the in vivo foreign body response (FBR) to subcutaneously implanted biomaterials by evaluating the thickness of fibrous capsule formed around the implants after 2 weeks of implantation. The role of Mac-1 integrin was isolated using a Mac-1 KO mouse and comparing it to a WT control. The role of RGD binding integrins in FBR was investigated by coating the implanted biomaterial with ELVAX(TM) polymer loaded with Echistatin which contains the RGD sequence. For the in-vivo osteolysis study and to study the in-vitro macrophage response to particulate biomaterials, we used the RGD peptide encapsulated in ELVAX

  7. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Eastman, Alison J; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R; Osterholzer, John J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Swanson, Joel A; Olszewski, Michal A

    2015-03-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms that allow classical activation to counteract replication. C. neoformans-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time, and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in C. neoformans-containing lung cells compared with C. neoformans-free cells. Among C. neoformans-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased C. neoformans replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased C. neoformans replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of C. neoformans. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important C. neoformans survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies that decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections.

  9. Serum from patients with systemic vasculitis induces alternatively activated macrophage M2c polarization.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Susanne M; Linge, Carl Petrus; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lood, Christian; Johansson, Asa; Ohlsson, Sophie; Lundqvist, Andrea; Bengtsson, Anders A; Carlsson, Fredric; Hellmark, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitides (AAV) are conditions defined by an autoimmune small vessel inflammation. Dying neutrophils are found around the inflamed vessels and the balance between infiltrating neutrophils and macrophages is important to prevent autoimmunity. Here we investigate how sera from AAV patients may regulate macrophage polarization and function. Macrophages from healthy individuals were differentiated into M0, M1, M2a, M2b or M2c macrophages using a standardized protocol, and phenotyped according to their expression surface markers and cytokine production. These phenotypes were compared with those of macrophages stimulated with serum from AAV patients or healthy controls. While the healthy control sera induced a M0 macrophage, AAV serum promoted polarization towards the M2c subtype. No sera induced M1, M2a or M2b macrophages. The M2c subtype showed increased phagocytosis capacity compared with the other subtypes. The M2c polarization found in AAV is consistent with previous reports of increased levels of M2c-associated cytokines.

  10. Specific calcineurin targeting in macrophages confers resistance to inflammation via MKP-1 and p38

    PubMed Central

    Escolano, Amelia; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Urso, Katia; Izquierdo, Helena M; Delgado, Mario; Martín, Francisco; Sabio, Guadalupe; Sancho, David; Gómez-del Arco, Pablo; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis and influence inflammatory responses by modulating their phenotype in response to the local environment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing this plasticity would open new avenues for the treatment for inflammatory disorders. We show that deletion of calcineurin (CN) or its inhibition with LxVP peptide in macrophages induces an anti-inflammatory population that confers resistance to arthritis and contact hypersensitivity. Transfer of CN-targeted macrophages or direct injection of LxVP-encoding lentivirus has anti-inflammatory effects in these models. Specific CN targeting in macrophages induces p38 MAPK activity by downregulating MKP-1 expression. However, pharmacological CN inhibition with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 did not reproduce these effects and failed to induce p38 activity. The CN-inhibitory peptide VIVIT also failed to reproduce the effects of LxVP. p38 inhibition prevented the anti-inflammatory phenotype of CN-targeted macrophages, and mice with defective p38-activation were resistant to the anti-inflammatory effect of LxVP. Our results identify a key role for CN and p38 in the modulation of macrophage phenotype and suggest an alternative treatment for inflammation based on redirecting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory status. PMID:24596247

  11. Functional macrophage heterogeneity in a mouse model of autoimmune CNS pathology

    PubMed Central

    London, Anat; Benhar, Inbal; Mattapallil, Mary J.; Mack, Matthias; Caspi, Rachel R.; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Functional macrophage heterogeneity is well appreciated outside the CNS in wound healing and cancer, and was recently also demonstrated in several CNS compartments following “sterile” insults. Yet, such heterogeneity was largely overlooked in the context of inflammatory autoimmune pathology, in which macrophages were mainly associated with disease induction and propagation. Here, we show the diversity of monocyte-derived macrophages along the course of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), an inflammatory condition affecting the ocular system, serving a model for CNS autoimmune pathology. Disease induction resulted in the appearance of a distinct myeloid population in the retina, and in the infiltration of monocyte-derived macrophages that were absent from control eyes. During the disease course, the frequency of CX3CR1high infiltrating macrophages that express markers associated with inflammation-resolving activity was increased, along with a decrease in the frequency of inflammation-associated, Ly6C+ macrophages. Inhibition of monocyte infiltration at the induction phase of EAU prevented disease onset, while monocyte depletion at the resolution phase resulted in a decrease in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, and in exacerbated disease. Thus, monocyte-derived macrophages display distinct phenotypes throughout the disease course, even in an immune-induced pathology, reflecting their differential roles in disease induction and resolution. PMID:23447691

  12. DHA Suppresses Primary Macrophage Inflammatory Responses via Notch 1/ Jagged 1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mehboob; Heyob, Kathryn; Rogers, Lynette K.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent macrophages were observed in the lungs of murine offspring exposed to maternal LPS and neonatal hyperoxia. Maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation prevented the accumulation of macrophages and improved lung development. We hypothesized that these macrophages are responsible for pathologies observed in this model and the effects of DHA supplementation. Primary macrophages were isolated from adult mice fed standard chow, control diets, or DHA supplemented diets. Macrophages were exposed to hyperoxia (O2) for 24 h and LPS for 6 h or 24 h. Our data demonstrate significant attenuation of Notch 1 and Jagged 1 protein levels in response to DHA supplementation in vivo but similar results were not evident in macrophages isolated from mice fed standard chow and supplemented with DHA in vitro. Co-culture of activated macrophages with MLE12 epithelial cells resulted in the release of high mobility group box 1 and leukotriene B4 from the epithelial cells and this release was attenuated by DHA supplementation. Collectively, our data indicate that long term supplementation with DHA as observed in vivo, resulted in deceased Notch 1/Jagged 1 protein expression however, DHA supplementation in vitro was sufficient to suppress release LTB4 and to protect epithelial cells in co-culture. PMID:26940787

  13. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  14. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies. PMID:27833923

  15. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis; Garcia, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  16. The journey from stem cell to macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Mikael J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2014-01-01

    Essential protectors against infection and injury, macrophages can also contribute to many common and fatal diseases. Here we discuss the mechanisms that control different types of macrophage activities in mice. We follow the cells’ maturational pathways over time and space, and elaborate on events that influence the type of macrophage eventually settling a particular destination. The nature of the precursor cells, developmental niches, tissues, environmental cues, and other connecting processes appear to contribute to the identity of macrophage type. Together, the spatial and developmental relationships of macrophages comprise a topo-ontogenic map that can guide our understanding of their biology. PMID:24673186

  17. Compound C inhibits macrophage chemotaxis through an AMPK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngyi; Park, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-01-15

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue is a well-established cause of obesity-linked insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue has beneficial effects on the protection against obesity-induced insulin resistance, which is mainly mediated by prevention of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation. In examining the role of AMPK on adipose tissue inflammation, we unexpectedly found that compound C (CC), despite its inhibition of AMPK, robustly inhibited macrophage chemotaxis in RAW 264.7 cells when adipocyte conditioned medium (CM) was used as a chemoattractant. Here, we report that CC inhibition of macrophage migration occurred independently of AMPK. Mechanistically, this inhibitory effect of cell migration by CC was mediated by inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase, AKT, nuclear factor κB pathways. Moreover, the expression of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and pro-inflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were prevented by CC treatment in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with either adipocyte CM or lipopolysaccharide. Lastly, in accord with the findings of the anti-inflammatory effect of CC, we demonstrated that CC functioned as a repressor of macrophage CM-mediated insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that CC serves as a useful inhibitory molecule against macrophage chemotaxis into adipose tissue and thus might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-linked adipose inflammation.

  18. TREM-2 promotes macrophage survival and lung disease after respiratory viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kangyun; Byers, Derek E; Jin, Xiaohua; Agapov, Eugene; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Patel, Anand C; Cella, Marina; Gilfilan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Kober, Daniel L; Brett, Tom J; Holtzman, Michael J

    2015-05-04

    Viral infections and type 2 immune responses are thought to be critical for the development of chronic respiratory disease, but the link between these events needs to be better defined. Here, we study a mouse model in which infection with a mouse parainfluenza virus known as Sendai virus (SeV) leads to long-term activation of innate immune cells that drive IL-13-dependent lung disease. We find that chronic postviral disease (signified by formation of excess airway mucus and accumulation of M2-differentiating lung macrophages) requires macrophage expression of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2). Analysis of mechanism shows that viral replication increases lung macrophage levels of intracellular and cell surface TREM-2, and this action prevents macrophage apoptosis that would otherwise occur during the acute illness (5-12 d after inoculation). However, the largest increases in TREM-2 levels are found as the soluble form (sTREM-2) long after clearance of infection (49 d after inoculation). At this time, IL-13 and the adapter protein DAP12 promote TREM-2 cleavage to sTREM-2 that is unexpectedly active in preventing macrophage apoptosis. The results thereby define an unprecedented mechanism for a feed-forward expansion of lung macrophages (with IL-13 production and consequent M2 differentiation) that further explains how acute infection leads to chronic inflammatory disease.

  19. Adoptive transfer of genetically modified macrophages elucidated TGF-beta-mediated 'self-defence' of the glomerulus against local action of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, M

    1999-01-01

    TGF-beta has several anti-inflammatory properties which may be relevant to prevention of or recovery from acute glomerular inflammation. Using genetically modified mesangial cells and a technique for in vivo macrophage transfer, this article provides evidence for TGF-beta-mediated 'self-defence' of the glomerulus against macrophages. Rat mesangial cells stably transfected with TGF-beta1 showed a blunted response to the macrophage-derived, proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta. In contrast, mesangial cells expressing the dominant-interfering TGF-beta receptor showed an enhanced response to IL-1. Similarly, externally added TGF-beta1 inhibited the cytokine response of normal glomeruli, and isolated nephritic glomeruli producing active TGF-beta1 showed a depressed response to IL-1beta, compared to normal glomeruli. Consistent with these in vitro results, in vivo transfer of activated macrophages revealed that the TGF-beta-producing glomeruli are insensitive to the effector action of macrophages. These results indicate that TGF-beta1 functions as an endogenous 'defender' that counteracts local action of activated macrophages in the glomerulus.

  20. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges; Jorgensen, Christian; Djouad, Farida

    2015-07-08

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa(+) and tnfa(-) macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa(+) macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic.

  1. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges

    2015-01-01

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa+ and tnfa− macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa+ macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07288.001 PMID:26154973

  2. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik; Astudillo, Yaritzy M; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P; Strijkers, Gustav J; Stroes, Erik S G; Swirski, Filip K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E deficient mice (Apoe(-/-) ) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an eight-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  3. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  4. Macrophages in tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Vannella, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocytes and resident tissue macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. Following tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, with uncontrolled inflammatory mediator and growth factor production, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contributing to a state of persistent injury, which may lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue regenerating phenotypes following injury, and highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26982353

  5. Platelet microparticles reprogram macrophage gene expression and function.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Benoit; Corduan, Aurélie; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lee, Chan Ho C; Boilard, Eric; Provost, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Platelet microparticles (MPs) represent the most abundant MPs subtype in the circulation, and can mediate intercellular communication through delivery of bioactives molecules, such as cytokines, proteins, lipids and RNAs. Here, we show that platelet MPs can be internalised by primary human macrophages and deliver functional miR-126-3p. The increase in macrophage miR-126-3p levels was not prevented by actinomycin D, suggesting that it was not due to de novo gene transcription. Platelet MPs dose-dependently downregulated expression of four predicted mRNA targets of miR-126-3p, two of which were confirmed also at the protein level. The mRNA downregulatory effects of platelet MPs were abrogated by expression of a neutralising miR-126-3p sponge, implying the involvement of miR-126-3p. Transcriptome-wide, microarray analyses revealed that as many as 66 microRNAs and 653 additional RNAs were significantly and differentially expressed in macrophages upon exposure to platelet MPs. More specifically, platelet MPs induced an upregulation of 34 microRNAs and a concomitant downregulation of 367 RNAs, including mRNAs encoding for cytokines/chemokines CCL4, CSF1 and TNF. These changes were associated with reduced CCL4, CSF1 and TNF cytokine/chemokine release by macrophages, and accompanied by a marked increase in their phagocytic capacity. These findings demonstrate that platelet MPs can modify the transcriptome of macrophages, and reprogram their function towards a phagocytic phenotype.

  6. Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumors of anogenital mammary-like glands: a series of 13 neoplasms in 12 cases, including mammary-type juvenile fibroadenoma, fibroadenoma with lactation changes, and neurofibromatosis-associated pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated giant cells.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Dmitry V; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Stewart, Colin J; Thompson, Jane; Agaimy, Abbas; Magro, Gaetano; Bisceglia, Michele; Vazmitel, Marina; Kacerovska, Denisa; Kutzner, Heinz; Mukensnabl, Petr; Michal, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a series of 13 fibroepithelial neoplasms involving anogenital mammary-like glands, all occurring in 12 female patients, whose age at diagnosis ranged from 30 to 51 years (mean, 38 y; median, 42 y). All women presented with a solitary asymptomatic nodule in the vulva (n=8), perineum (n=2), or near the anus (n=2) ranging in size from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. Microscopically, 8 lesions were classified as fibroadenoma, and 5, including 1 recurrent tumor, as phyllodes tumor, of which 1 was benign and 4 low-grade malignant. In addition to conventional findings, we describe several hitherto unreported features including juvenile fibroadenoma-like proliferation, fibroadenoma with lactation change, and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells in a patient with neurofibromatosis, type 1 all constituting potential diagnostic pitfalls, which are best averted by using the same approach to diagnosis as for their analogous mammary counterparts.

  7. Atypical Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) presenting as a perforated corneal ulcer with a large infiltrate in a contact lens wearer: multinucleated giant cells in the Giemsa smear offered a clue to the diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Athmanathan, Sreedharan; Pranesh, Veenashree M; Pasricha, Gunisha; Garg, Prashant; Vemuganti, Geeta K; Sharma, Savitri

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of atypical herpes simplex keratitis initially diagnosed as bacterial keratitis, in a contact lens wearer. Results Case report of an 18-year-old woman using contact lenses who presented with pain, redness and gradual decrease in vision in the right eye. Examination revealed a paracentral large stromal infiltrate with a central 2-mm perforation. Corneal and conjunctival scrapings were collected for microbiological investigations. Corneal tissue was obtained following penetrating keratoplasty. Corneal scraping revealed no microorganisms. Giemsa stained smear showed multinucleated giant cells. Conjunctival, corneal scrapings and tissue were positive for herpes simplex virus - 1 (HSV) antigen. Corneal tissue was positive for HSV DNA by PCR. Conclusions Atypical HSV keratitis can occur in contact lens wearers. A simple investigation like Giemsa stain may offer a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:11325340

  8. Pathways of macrophage apoptosis within the interface membrane in aseptic loosening of prostheses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Wu, Wen; Cao, Lei; Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zhenan; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong

    2011-12-01

    therapeutic target to modulate the apoptotic pathways in macrophages may be a strategy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening.

  9. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

    PubMed

    Staples, Karl J; Nicholas, Ben; McKendry, Richard T; Spalluto, C Mirella; Wallington, Joshua C; Bragg, Craig W; Robinson, Emily C; Martin, Kirstin; Djukanović, Ratko; Wilkinson, Tom M A

    2015-01-01

    Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly increased cell surface expression of PDL1 on explant macrophages, lung macrophages and MDM but not explant epithelial cells. Infected MDM induced IFNγ release from autologous CD8+ T cells, an effect enhanced by PDL1 blockade. We observed increases in PDL1 mRNA and IFNβ mRNA and protein release by MDM in response to influenza infection. Knockdown of IFNβ by siRNA, resulted in a 37.5% reduction in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection, and a significant decrease in PDL1 mRNA. Furthermore, when MDM were incubated with IFNβ, this cytokine caused increased expression of PDL1 mRNA. These data indicate that human macrophage PDL1 expression modulates CD8+ cell IFNγ release in response to virus and that this expression is regulated by autologous IFNβ production.

  10. Requirement for non-regulated, constitutive calcium influx in macrophage survival signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Tano, Jean-Yves; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the role of constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx in macrophage survival. {yields} Survival signaling exhibits a mandatory requirement for constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx. {yields} CAM/CAMKII couples constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx to survival signaling. -- Abstract: The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT axis and the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) pathway play critical roles in macrophage survival. In cells other than macrophages proper operation of those two pathways requires Ca{sup 2+} influx into the cell, but if that is the case in macrophages remains unexplored. In the present work we used THP-1-derived macrophages and a pharmacological approach to examine for the first time the role of constitutive, non-regulated Ca{sup 2+} influx in PI3K/AKT and NF{kappa}B signaling. Blocking constitutive function of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channels with the organic channel blocker SKF96365 completely prevented phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, AKT and its downstream target BAD in TNF{alpha}-treated macrophages. A similar effect was observed upon treating macrophages with the calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor W-7 or the calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor KN-62. In addition, pre-treating macrophages with SKF96365 significantly enhanced TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that in THP-1-derived macrophages survival signaling depends, to a significant extent, on constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx presumably through a mechanism that involves the CAM/CAMKII axis as a coupling component between constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx and activation of survival signaling.

  11. HIF-1α-PDK1 axis-induced active glycolysis plays an essential role in macrophage migratory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Hiroaki; Takeda, Norihiko; Isagawa, Takayuki; Sugiura, Yuki; Honda, Kurara; Wake, Masaki; Miyazawa, Hidenobu; Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki; Jenkins, Dana M. R.; Choi, Hyunsung; Kim, Jung-whan; Asagiri, Masataka; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Abe, Hajime; Soma, Katsura; Koyama, Katsuhiro; Katoh, Manami; Sayama, Keimon; Goda, Nobuhito; Johnson, Randall S.; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    In severely hypoxic condition, HIF-1α-mediated induction of Pdk1 was found to regulate glucose oxidation by preventing the entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic cycle. Monocyte-derived macrophages, however, encounter a gradual decrease in oxygen availability during its migration process in inflammatory areas. Here we show that HIF-1α-PDK1-mediated metabolic changes occur in mild hypoxia, where mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity is unimpaired, suggesting a mode of glycolytic reprogramming. In primary macrophages, PKM2, a glycolytic enzyme responsible for glycolytic ATP synthesis localizes in filopodia and lammelipodia, where ATP is rapidly consumed during actin remodelling processes. Remarkably, inhibition of glycolytic reprogramming with dichloroacetate significantly impairs macrophage migration in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inhibition of the macrophage HIF-1α-PDK1 axis suppresses systemic inflammation, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for regulating inflammatory processes. Our findings thus demonstrate that adaptive responses in glucose metabolism contribute to macrophage migratory activity. PMID:27189088

  12. Macrophage physiology in the eye.

    PubMed

    Chinnery, Holly R; McMenamin, Paul G; Dando, Samantha J

    2017-04-01

    The eye is a complex sensory organ composed of a range of tissue types including epithelia, connective tissue, smooth muscle, vascular and neural tissue. While some components of the eye require a high level of transparency to allow light to pass through unobstructed, other tissues are characterized by their dense pigmentation, which functions to absorb light and thus control its passage through the ocular structures. Macrophages are present in all ocular tissues, from the cornea at the anterior surface through to the choroid/sclera at the posterior pole. This review will describe the current understanding of the distribution, phenotype, and physiological role of ocular macrophages, and provide a summary of evidence pertaining to their proposed role during pathological conditions.

  13. Pathophysiological relevance of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liberale, Luca; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico

    2017-01-05

    Macrophages are highly heterogeneous and plastic cells. They were shown to play a critical role in all stages of atherogenesis, from the initiation to the necrotic core formation and plaque rupture. Lesional macrophages primarily derive from blood monocyte, but local macrophage proliferation as well as differentiation from smooth muscle cells have also been described. Within atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages rapidly respond to changes in the microenvironment, shifting between pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) functional phenotypes. Furthermore, different stimuli have been associated with differentiation of newly discovered M2 subtypes: IL-4/IL-13 (M2a), immune-complex (M2b), IL-10/glucocorticoids (M2c), and adenosine receptor agonist (M2d). More recently, additional intraplaque macrophage phenotypes were also recognized in response to CXCL4 (M4), oxidized phospholipids (Mox), haemoglobin/haptoglobin complexes (HA-mac/M(Hb)), and heme (Mhem). Such macrophage polarization was described as a progression among multiple phenotypes, which reflect the activity of different transcriptional factors and the cross-talk between intracellular signalling. Finally, the distribution of macrophage subsets within different plaque areas was markedly associated with cardiovascular (CV) vulnerability. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge on the role of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage phenotypic shift will be summarised and discussed. Finally, the role of intraplaque macrophages as predictors of CV events and the therapeutic potential of these cells will be discussed.

  14. Macrophages: Their Emerging Roles in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Pettit, Allison R; McCauley, Laurie K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are present in nearly all tissues and are critical for development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Resident tissue macrophages of bone, termed osteal macrophages, are recently classified myeloid cells that are distinct from osteoclasts. Osteal macrophages are located immediately adjacent to osteoblasts, regulate bone formation, and play diverse roles in skeletal homeostasis. Genetic or pharmacological modulation of macrophages in vivo results in significant bone phenotypes, and these phenotypes depend on which macrophage subsets are altered. Macrophages are also key mediators of osseous wound healing and fracture repair, with distinct roles at various stages of the repair process. A central function of macrophages is their phagocytic ability. Each day, billions of cells die in the body and efferocytosis (phagocytosis of apoptotic cells) is a critical process in both clearing dead cells and recruitment of replacement progenitor cells to maintain homeostasis. Recent data suggest a role for efferocytosis in bone biology and these new mechanisms are outlined. Finally, although macrophages have an established role in primary tumors, emerging evidence suggests that macrophages in bone support cancers which preferentially metastasize to the skeleton. Collectively, this developing area of osteoimmunology raises new questions and promises to provide novel insights into pathophysiologic conditions as well as therapeutic and regenerative approaches vital for skeletal health. PMID:26531055

  15. Dual origin of mouse spleen macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The present study concerns the isolation, characterization, origin, and kinetics of spleen macrophages. The spleen was first perfused in situ to remove monocytes from the vascular bed and then dissected and treated with collagenase. The macrophages in the cell suspension thus obtained were characterized morphologically and cytochemically and then quantitated. The spleen cell suspension was incubated for 24 h in Leighton tubes to obtain an enriched glass-adherent population of macrophages for characterization and [3H]thymidine-labeling studies. Almost all of the adhering macrophages were esterase positive, had Fc and C3b receptors, and ingested EIgG and opsonized bacteria. In vitro labeling with [3H]thymidine showed that approximately 5% of the mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen synthesize DNA and must be considered to be dividing cells. The course of the number of labeled monocytes and macrophages after a single injection of [3H]thymidine indicates migration of monocytes into the spleen, where they become macrophages. Calculation of the influx of monocytes into the spleen and of the local production of macrophages by DNA-synthesizing mononuclear phagocytes showed that under steady-state conditions, 55% of the population of spleen macrophages is supplied by monocyte influx and 45% by local production. This means that there is a dual origin of spleen macrophages. The mean turnover time calculated with the value for the efflux of spleen macrophages is 6.0 d. PMID:6491600

  16. Macrophage Biochemistry, Activation and Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    glucoeidase +8 . . Sulfatase c +8 Modified from Morahan, 1980. b(+)Exhibit@ activity; (-) lacks activity; (+) weak or marginal activity. ’References: (1...endoplasmic reticulum enzymes, sulfatase c and alkaline a-glucosidase. Dissociation of the lysosomal enzyme patterns from sulfatase c and alkaline r...1974; Beaufay et al., 1974). Peritoneal macrophages are deficient or contain inauf- • -𔃼 :’- 41 ficient quantities of the classical constituents to be

  17. The M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder and promote mouse sensitivity to urethane-related lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, G-G; Guo, Z-Z; Ma, X-F; Cao, N; Geng, S-N; Zheng, Y-Q; Meng, M-J; Lin, H-H; Han, G; Du, G-J

    2016-06-01

    Tumor vessels are known to be abnormal, with typically aberrant, leaky and disordered vessels. Here, we investigated whether polarized macrophage phenotypes are involved in tumor abnormal angiogenesis and what is its mechanism. We found that there was no difference in chemotaxis of polarized M1 and M2 macrophages to lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that either M1 or M2 macrophage-conditioned media had no effect on LLC cell proliferation. Unexpectedly, the M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media promoted the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and simultaneously increased endothelial cell permeability in vitro and angiogenic index in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The treatment with M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media increased autophagosomes as well as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3-B) expression (a robust marker of autophagosomes) but decreased p62 protein expression (a selective autophagy substrate) in HUVECs, the treatment with chloroquine that blocked autophagy abrogated the abnormal angiogenic efficacy of M2 macrophage-conditioned media. These results were confirmed in urethane-induced lung carcinogenic progression. Urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis led to more M2 macrophage phenotype and increased abnormal angiogenesis concomitant with the upregulation of LC3-B and the downregulation of p62. Clodronate liposome-induced macrophage depletion, chloroquine-induced autophagic prevention or salvianolic acid B-induced vascular protection decreased abnormal angiogenesis and lung carcinogenesis. In addition, we found that the tendency of age-related M2 macrophage polarization also promoted vascular permeability and carcinogenesis in urethane carcinogenic progression. These findings indicate that the M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder to promote lung cancer progression, and the autophagy improvement represents an efficacious strategy for abnormal angiogenesis and cancer

  18. Diverse macrophages polarization in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Inmoo

    2016-11-01

    Macrophages are traditional innate immune cells that play critical roles in the clearance of pathogens and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Accumulating evidence proves that macrophages affect cancer initiation and malignancy. Macrophages can be categorized into two extreme subsets, classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages based on their distinct functional abilities in response to microenvironmental stimuli. In a tumor microenvironment, tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are considered to be of the polarized M2 phenotype that enhances tumor progression and represent a poor prognosis. Furthermore, TAMs enhance tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression by secreting a series of cytokines, chemokines, and proteases. The regulation of macrophage polarization is considered to be a potential future therapy for cancer management.

  19. Macrophage-mediated tumor cytotoxicity: role of macrophage surface sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D J

    1983-02-01

    Cell surface sialic acid levels were compared for monocytes and macrophages obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Equal quantities of sialic acid were found on the monocytes obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Approximately 60% more cell surface sialic acid was found on the macrophages from breast cancer patients than was found on the macrophages from normal volunteers. In order to determine whether cell surface sialic acid had any effect on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, macrophages were pretreated with neuraminidase (NANAse) prior to co-cultivation with tumor cells. The normal macrophages, after neuraminidase treatment, no longer retained their ability to kill tumor cells. However, when macrophages from breast cancer patients were treated with NANAse, no difference was observed in the ability of untreated and NANAse treated macrophages to kill tumor cells.

  20. Macrophage heterogeneity in liver injury and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Zimmermann, Henning W

    2014-05-01

    Hepatic macrophages are central in the pathogenesis of chronic liver injury and have been proposed as potential targets in combatting fibrosis. Recent experimental studies in animal models revealed that hepatic macrophages are a remarkably heterogeneous population of immune cells that fulfill diverse functions in homeostasis, disease progression, and regression from injury. These range from clearance of pathogens or cellular debris and maintenance of immunological tolerance in steady state conditions; central roles in initiating and perpetuating inflammation in response to injury; promoting liver fibrosis via activating hepatic stellate cells in chronic liver damage; and, finally, resolution of inflammation and fibrosis by degradation of extracellular matrix and release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Cellular heterogeneity in the liver is partly explained by the origin of macrophages. Hepatic macrophages can either arise from circulating monocytes, which are recruited to the injured liver via chemokine signals, or from self-renewing embryo-derived local macrophages, termed Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells appear essential for sensing tissue injury and initiating inflammatory responses, while infiltrating Ly-6C(+) monocyte-derived macrophages are linked to chronic inflammation and fibrogenesis. In addition, proliferation of local or recruited macrophages may possibly further contribute to their accumulation in injured liver. During fibrosis regression, monocyte-derived cells differentiate into Ly-6C (Ly6C, Gr1) low expressing 'restorative' macrophages and promote resolution from injury. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate hepatic macrophage heterogeneity, either by monocyte subset recruitment, by promoting restorative macrophage polarization or by impacting distinctive macrophage effector functions, may help to develop novel macrophage subset-targeted therapies for liver injury and fibrosis.

  1. Infection of murine macrophages with Toxoplasma gondii is associated with release of transforming growth factor beta and downregulation of expression of tumor necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, L E; Covaro, G; Remington, J

    1993-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is capable of invading and multiplying within murine peritoneal macrophages. Previous studies have shown that treatment of macrophage monolayers with recombinant gamma interferon but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is associated with intracellular killing of T. gondii by macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with T. gondii prevents their stimulation for mycobactericidal activity by TNF. Since transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is known to suppress a number of functions in macrophages, we investigated the influence of infection with T. gondii on macrophage TNF receptors and on production of TGF-beta. Infection with T. gondii was associated with increased production of TGF-beta and downregulation of TNF receptors. This effect was observed early after infection and was partially inhibited by anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody. PMID:8406801

  2. Changes in transcriptome of macrophages in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages display significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Two growth factors, macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 4, drive terminal differentiation of monocytes to M0 and M4 macrophages respectively. Compared to M0 macrophages, M4 cells have a unique transcriptome, with expression of surface markers such as S100A8, mannose receptor CD206 and matrix metalloproteinase 7. M4 macrophages did not express CD163, a scavenger receptor for haemoglobin/haptoglobin complex. Depending on the stimuli, M0 macrophages could polarize towards the proinflammatory M1 subset by treatment with lipopolysaccharide or interferon-γ. These macrophages produce a range of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species and exhibit high chemotactic and phagocytic activity. The alternative M2 type could be induced from M0 macrophage by stimulation with interleukin (IL)-4. M2 macrophages express high levels of CD206 and produce anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β. M1, M2 and M4 macrophages could be found in atherosclerotic plaques. In the plaque, macrophages are subjected to the intensive influence not only by cytokines and chemokines but also with bioactive lipids such as cholesterol and oxidized phospholipids. Oxidized phospholipids induce a distinct Mox phenotype in murine macrophages that express a unique panel of antioxidant enzymes under control of the redox-regulated transcription factor Klf2, resistant to lipid accumulation. In unstable human lesions, atheroprotective M(Hb) and HA-mac macrophage subsets could be found. These two subsets are induced by the haemoglobin/haptoglobin complex, highly express haeme oxygenase 1 and CD163, and are implicated in clearance of haemoglobin and erythrocyte remnants. In atherogenesis, the macrophage phenotype is plastic and could therefore be switched to proinflammatory (i.e. proatherogenic) and anti-inflammatory (i.e. atheroprotective). The aim of this review was to

  3. Macrophages in atherosclerosis: a dynamic balance

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn; Sheedy, Frederick; Fisher, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Preface Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease arising from an imbalance in lipid metabolism and a maladaptive immune response driven by the accumulation of cholesterol-laden macrophages in the artery wall. Through the analysis of animal models of atherosclerosis progression and regression, there is a growing understanding that the balance of macrophages in the plaque is dynamic, with both macrophage numbers and an inflammatory phenotype influencing plaque fate. Here we summarize recently identified pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways linking lipid and inflammation biology with the retention of macrophages in plaques, as well as factors with the potential to promote their egress from these sites. PMID:23995626

  4. Fate of conidia of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after ingestion by resident macrophages or cytokine-treated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-01-01

    Conidia ingested by resident macrophages had an enhanced percentage of transformation to yeast cells compared with those in culture medium without macrophages. The yeast cells subsequently grew intracellularly by budding. Macrophages treated with cytokines from antigen-stimulated spleen cells from immunized mice significantly inhibited transformation of ingested conidia. PMID:1563800

  5. Fate of conidia of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after ingestion by resident macrophages or cytokine-treated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-05-01

    Conidia ingested by resident macrophages had an enhanced percentage of transformation to yeast cells compared with those in culture medium without macrophages. The yeast cells subsequently grew intracellularly by budding. Macrophages treated with cytokines from antigen-stimulated spleen cells from immunized mice significantly inhibited transformation of ingested conidia.

  6. Effect of cortisol and/or DHEA on THP1-derived macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Bettina; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; D'Attilio, Luciano; Leon-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Bottasso, Oscar; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Bay, María Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem requiring an appropriate cell immune response to be controlled. Macrophages play a central role in the response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Given our prior studies in which adrenal steroids were found to modify the cellular immune responses from TB patients, it was sensible to analyze the immunomodulatory capability of cortisol and DHEA on macrophages infected with Mtb. The human macrophage-like THP-1 cells were infected with the H37Rv strain of Mtb and treated with Cortisol and DHEA at different doses. We monitored phagocytosis, intracellular-bacterial growth, autophagosoma formation, as well as cytokine gene expression and production. Cultures exposed to cortisol showed a decreased production of IL-1β, TNF-α, with DHEA being unable to modify the pattern of cytokine production or to reverse the cortisol inhibitory effects. Interestingly the intra-macrophagic bacterial burden was found reduced by DHEA treatment. While this effect was not related to a different cytokine pattern, in terms their production or mRNA expression, DHEA treatment did promote autophagy in Mtb-infected macrophages, irrespective of Cortisol presence. In essence, the better control of Mtb load by DHEA-treated macrophages seems to be dependent on an autophagic mechanism. The present results are relevant for two reasons as autophagy is not only important for clearance of mycobacteria but also for the prevention of tissue damage.

  7. Metformin-treated cancer cells modulate macrophage polarization through AMPK-NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-Fu; Chao, Ting-Ting; Su, Yu-Fu; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chien, Chu-Yen; Chiu, Kuo-Chou; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Shieh, Yi-Shing

    2017-02-01

    Accumulating evidence is indicating metformin to possess the potential ability in preventing tumor development and suppressing cancer growth. However, the exact mechanism of its antitumorigenic effects is still not clear. We found that metformin suppressed the ability of cancer to skew macrophage toward M2 phenotype. Metformin treated cancer cells increased macrophage expression of M1-related cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α and attenuated M2-related cytokines IL-8, IL-10, and TGF-β expression. Furthermore, metformin treated cancer cells displayed inhibited secretion of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13; cytokines important for inducing M2 macrophages. Conversely, M1 inducing cytokine IFN-γ was upper-regulated in cancer cells. Additionally, through increasing AMPK and p65 phosphorylation, metformin treatment activated AMPK-NF-κB signaling of cancer cells that participate in regulating M1 and M2 inducing cytokines expression. Moreover, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, significantly increased IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 expression while BAY-117082, an NF-κB inhibitor, decreased expression. In metformin-treated tumor tissue, the percentage of M2-like macrophages decreased while M1-like macrophages increased. These findings suggest that metformin activates cancer AMPK-NF-κB signaling, a pathway involved in regulating M1/M2 expression and inducing genes for macrophage polarization to anti-tumor phenotype.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Controls M2 Macrophage Differentiation and Foam Cell Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisu; Riek, Amy E.; Weng, Sherry; Petty, Marvin; Kim, David; Colonna, Marco; Cella, Marina; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are essential in atherosclerosis progression, but regulation of the M1 versus M2 phenotype and their role in cholesterol deposition are unclear. We demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key regulator of macrophage differentiation and cholesterol deposition. Macrophages from diabetic patients were classically or alternatively stimulated and then exposed to oxidized LDL. Alternative stimulation into M2 macrophages lead to increased foam cell formation by inducing scavenger receptor CD36 and SR-A1 expression. ER stress induced by alternative stimulation was necessary to generate the M2 phenotype through JNK activation and increased PPARγ expression. The absence of CD36 or SR-A1 signaling independently of modified cholesterol uptake decreased ER stress and prevented the M2 differentiation typically induced by alternative stimulation. Moreover, suppression of ER stress shifted differentiated M2 macrophages toward an M1 phenotype and subsequently suppressed foam cell formation by increasing HDL- and apoA-1-induced cholesterol efflux indicating suppression of macrophage ER stress as a potential therapy for atherosclerosis. PMID:22356914

  9. Effect of cinnamon water extract on monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and scavenger receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Water soluble cinnamon extract has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and modulate macrophage activation, a desirable trait for the management of obesity or atherosclerosis. Our present study investigated whether cinnamon water extract (CWE) may influence the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and the activity of macrophage scavenger receptors, commonly observed in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods We investigated the effect of CWE on the expression of various surface markers and the uptake of acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated THP-1 cells. The protein levels of PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)-stimulated type 1 macrophage scavenger receptor (SRA) were analyzed. Finally, the role of extracellar signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 in SRA synthesis and the effect of CWE on PMA-stimulated ERK1/2 were determined. Results CWE inhibited the differentiation of monocyte by decreasing the expression of CD11b, CD36 and SRA and the uptake of acetyl LDL. CWE suppressed the upregulation of SRA by M-CSF and modulated ERK1/2 activity, which was required for PMA-induced SRA synthesis. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that CWE was able to interfere with monocyte differentiation and macrophage scavenger activity, indicating its potential in preventing the development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24602512

  10. Diplomatic Assistance: Can Helminth-Modulated Macrophages Act as Treatment for Inflammatory Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Steinfelder, Svenja; O’Regan, Noëlle Louise; Hartmann, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Helminths have evolved numerous pathways to prevent their expulsion or elimination from the host to ensure long-term survival. During infection, they target numerous host cells, including macrophages, to induce an alternatively activated phenotype, which aids elimination of infection, tissue repair, and wound healing. Multiple animal-based studies have demonstrated a significant reduction or complete reversal of disease by helminth infection, treatment with helminth products, or helminth-modulated macrophages in models of allergy, autoimmunity, and sepsis. Experimental studies of macrophage and helminth therapies are being translated into clinical benefits for patients undergoing transplantation and those with multiple sclerosis. Thus, helminths or helminth-modulated macrophages present great possibilities as therapeutic applications for inflammatory diseases in humans. Macrophage-based helminth therapies and the underlying mechanisms of their therapeutic or curative effects represent an under-researched area with the potential to open new avenues of treatment. This review explores the application of helminth-modulated macrophages as a new therapy for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27101372

  11. Regulation of Macrophage, Dendritic Cell, and Microglial Phenotype and Function by the SOCS Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sarah M.; Heller, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells of dynamic phenotype that rapidly respond to external stimuli in the microenvironment by altering their phenotype to respond to and to direct the immune response. The ability to dynamically change phenotype must be carefully regulated to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory responses and subsequently to promote resolution of inflammation. The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins play a key role in regulating macrophage phenotype. In this review, we summarize research to date from mouse and human studies on the role of the SOCS proteins in determining the phenotype and function of macrophages. We will also touch on the influence of the SOCS on dendritic cell (DC) and microglial phenotype and function. The molecular mechanisms of SOCS function in macrophages and DCs are discussed, along with how dysregulation of SOCS expression or function can lead to alterations in macrophage/DC/microglial phenotype and function and to disease. Regulation of SOCS expression by microRNA is discussed. Novel therapies and unanswered questions with regard to SOCS regulation of monocyte–macrophage phenotype and function are highlighted. PMID:26579124

  12. CCR2 Antagonism Alters Brain Macrophage Polarization and Ameliorates Cognitive Dysfunction Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jopson, Timothy D.; Liu, Sharon; Riparip, Lara-Kirstie; Guandique, Cristian K.; Gupta, Nalin; Ferguson, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for the development of multiple neurodegenerative diseases. With respect to the increasing prevalence of TBI, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed that will prevent secondary damage to primarily unaffected tissue. Consistently, neuroinflammation has been implicated as a key mediator of secondary damage following the initial mechanical insult. Following injury, there is uncertainty regarding the role that accumulating CCR2+ macrophages play in the injury-induced neuroinflammatory sequelae and cognitive dysfunction. Using CX3CR1GFP/+CCR2RFP/+ reporter mice, we show that TBI initiated a temporally restricted accumulation of peripherally derived CCR2+ macrophages, which were concentrated in the hippocampal formation, a region necessary for learning and memory. Multivariate analysis delineated CCR2+ macrophages' neuroinflammatory response while identifying a novel therapeutic treatment window. As a proof of concept, targeting CCR2+ macrophages with CCX872, a novel Phase I CCR2 selective antagonist, significantly reduced TBI-induced inflammatory macrophage accumulation. Concomitantly, there was a significant reduction in multiple proinflammatory and neurotoxic mediators with this treatment paradigm. Importantly, CCR2 antagonism resulted in a sparing of TBI-induced hippocampal-dependent cognitive dysfunction and reduced proinflammatory activation profile 1 month after injury. Thus, therapeutically targeting the CCR2+ subset of monocytes/macrophages may provide a new avenue of clinical intervention following TBI. PMID:25589768

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae survives within macrophages by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Cano, Victoria; March, Catalina; Insua, Jose Luis; Aguiló, Nacho; Llobet, Enrique; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Brennan, Gerard P; Millán-Lou, Maria Isabel; Martín, Carlos; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that Klebsiella might be able to persist intracellularly within a vacuolar compartment. This study was designed to investigate the interaction between Klebsiella and macrophages. Engulfment of K. pneumoniae was dependent on host cytoskeleton, cell plasma membrane lipid rafts and the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Microscopy studies revealed that K. pneumoniae resides within a vacuolar compartment, the Klebsiella-containing vacuole (KCV), which traffics within vacuoles associated with the endocytic pathway. In contrast to UV-killed bacteria, the majority of live bacteria did not co-localize with markers of the lysosomal compartment. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae triggers a programmed cell death in macrophages displaying features of apoptosis. Our efforts to identify the mechanism(s) whereby K. pneumoniae prevents the fusion of the lysosomes to the KCV uncovered the central role of the PI3K-Akt-Rab14 axis to control the phagosome maturation. Our data revealed that the capsule is dispensable for Klebsiella intracellular survival if bacteria were not opsonized. Furthermore, the environment found by Klebsiella within the KCV triggered the down-regulation of the expression of cps. Altogether, this study proves evidence that K. pneumoniae survives killing by macrophages by manipulating phagosome maturation that may contribute to Klebsiella pathogenesis.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 dysregulates macrophage polarization and the immune response to Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gobert, Alain P; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P; Piazuelo, M Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G; Bravo, Luis E; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T

    2014-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during H. pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/NF (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA(+) H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased regulatory macrophage (Mreg) response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decrease of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1.

  15. CSF-1–dependant donor-derived macrophages mediate chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kylie A.; Flynn, Ryan; Lineburg, Katie E.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Teal, Bianca E.; Olver, Stuart D.; Lor, Mary; Raffelt, Neil C.; Koyama, Motoko; Leveque, Lucie; Le Texier, Laetitia; Melino, Michelle; Markey, Kate A.; Varelias, Antiopi; Engwerda, Christian; Serody, Jonathan S.; Janela, Baptiste; Ginhoux, Florent; Clouston, Andrew D.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is the major cause of late, nonrelapse death following stem cell transplantation and characteristically develops in organs such as skin and lung. Here, we used multiple murine models of cGVHD to investigate the contribution of macrophage populations in the development of cGVHD. Using an established IL-17–dependent sclerodermatous cGVHD model, we confirmed that macrophages infiltrating the skin are derived from donor bone marrow (F4/80+CSF-1R+CD206+iNOS–). Cutaneous cGVHD developed in a CSF-1/CSF-1R–dependent manner, as treatment of recipients after transplantation with CSF-1 exacerbated macrophage infiltration and cutaneous pathology. Additionally, recipients of grafts from Csf1r–/– mice had substantially less macrophage infiltration and cutaneous pathology as compared with those receiving wild-type grafts. Neither CCL2/CCR2 nor GM-CSF/GM-CSFR signaling pathways were required for macrophage infiltration or development of cGVHD. In a different cGVHD model, in which bronchiolitis obliterans is a prominent manifestation, F4/80+ macrophage infiltration was similarly noted in the lungs of recipients after transplantation, and lung cGVHD was also IL-17 and CSF-1/CSF-1R dependent. Importantly, depletion of macrophages using an anti–CSF-1R mAb markedly reduced cutaneous and pulmonary cGVHD. Taken together, these data indicate that donor macrophages mediate the development of cGVHD and suggest that targeting CSF-1 signaling after transplantation may prevent and treat cGVHD. PMID:25157821

  16. CXCL4 Downregulates the Atheroprotective Hemoglobin Receptor CD163 in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gleissner, Christian A.; Shaked, Iftach; Erbel, Christian; Böckler, Dittmar; Katus, Hugo A.; Ley, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rationale CXCL4 is a platelet-derived chemokine that promotes macrophage differentiation from monocytes. Deletion of the PF4 gene that encodes CXCL4 reduces atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE−/− mice. Objective We sought to study effects of CXCL4 on macrophage differentiation with possible relevance for atherogenesis. Methods and Results Flow cytometry for expression of surface markers in macrophage colony–stimulating factor (M-CSF)– and CXCL4-induced macrophages demonstrated virtually complete absence of the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in CXCL4-induced macrophages. mRNA for CD163 was downregulated as early as 2 hours after CXCL4. CD163 protein reached a minimum after 3 days, which was not reversed by treatment of cells with M-CSF. The CXCL4 effect was entirely neutralized by heparin, which bound CXCL4 and prevented CXCL4 surface binding to monocytes. Pretreatment of cells with chlorate, which inhibits glycosaminoglycan synthesis, strongly inhibited CXCL4-dependent downregulation of CD163. Similar to recombinant CXCL4, releasate from human platelets also reduced CD163 expression. CXCL4-differentiated macrophages were unable to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 at the RNA and protein level in response to hemoglobin–haptoglobin complexes. Immunofluorescence of human atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated presence of both CD68+CD163+ and CD68+CD163− macrophages. PF4 and CD163 gene expression within human atherosclerotic lesions were inversely correlated, supporting the in vivo relevance of CXCL4-induced downregulation of CD163. Conclusions CXCL4 may promote atherogenesis by suppressing CD163 in macrophages, which are then unable to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in response to hemoglobin. PMID:19910578

  17. Curcumin Attenuates Titanium Particle-Induced Inflammation by Regulating Macrophage Polarization In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Yaochao; Cheng, Mengqi; Qin, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Qiaojie; Peng, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2017-01-01

    Periprosthetic inflammatory osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening are commonly observed in total joint arthroplasty. Other than revision surgery, few approved treatments are available for this complication. Wear particle-induced inflammation and macrophage polarization state play critical roles in periprosthetic osteolysis. We investigated the effects of curcumin, a polyphenol extracted from Curcuma longa, on titanium (Ti) particle-induced inflammation and macrophage polarization in vitro using the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and in vivo using a murine air pouch model. The expression of specific macrophage markers was qualitatively analyzed by immunofluorescence (inducible nitric oxide synthase and CD206) and quantitatively analyzed by flow cytometry (CCR7 and CD206), representing M1 and M2 macrophages, respectively. Our results show that curcumin induced a higher percentage of M2 macrophages together with a higher concentration of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and a lower percentage of M1 macrophages with a lower concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6). The genes encoding CD86 (M1) and CD163 (M2), two additional markers, were shifted by curcumin toward an M2 phenotype. C57BL/J6 mice were injected with air and Ti particles to establish an air pouch model. Curcumin reduced cell infiltration in the pouch membrane and decreased membrane thickness. The analysis of exudates obtained from pouches demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on macrophage polarization and cytokine production were similar to those observed in vitro. These results prove that curcumin suppresses Ti particle-induced inflammation by regulating macrophage polarization. Thus, curcumin could be developed as a new therapeutic candidate for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory osteolysis and aseptic loosening. PMID:28197150

  18. Cytokine overproduction and crosslinker hypersensitivity are unlinked in Fanconi anemia macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garbati, Michael R; Hays, Laura E; Rathbun, R Keaney; Jillette, Nathaniel; Chin, Kathy; Al-Dhalimy, Muhsen; Agarwal, Anupriya; Newell, Amy E Hanlon; Olson, Susan B; Bagby, Grover C

    2016-03-01

    The Fanconi anemia proteins participate in a canonical pathway that repairs cross-linking agent-induced DNA damage. Cells with inactivated Fanconi anemia genes are universally hypersensitive to such agents. Fanconi anemia-deficient hematopoietic stem cells are also hypersensitive to inflammatory cytokines, and, as importantly, Fanconi anemia macrophages overproduce such cytokines in response to TLR4 and TLR7/8 agonists. We questioned whether TLR-induced DNA damage is the primary cause of aberrantly regulated cytokine production in Fanconi anemia macrophages by quantifying TLR agonist-induced TNF-α production, DNA strand breaks, crosslinker-induced chromosomal breakage, and Fanconi anemia core complex function in Fanconi anemia complementation group C-deficient human and murine macrophages. Although both M1 and M2 polarized Fanconi anemia cells were predictably hypersensitive to mitomycin C, only M1 macrophages overproduced TNF-α in response to TLR-activating signals. DNA damaging agents alone did not induce TNF-α production in the absence of TLR agonists in wild-type or Fanconi anemia macrophages, and mitomycin C did not enhance TLR responses in either normal or Fanconi anemia cells. TLR4 and TLR7/8 activation induced cytokine overproduction in Fanconi anemia macrophages. Also, although TLR4 activation was associated with induced double strand breaks, TLR7/8 activation was not. That DNA strand breaks and chromosome breaks are neither necessary nor sufficient to account for the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines by Fanconi anemia cells suggests that noncanonical anti-inflammatory functions of Fanconi anemia complementation group C contribute to the aberrant macrophage phenotype and suggests that suppression of macrophage/TLR hyperreactivity might prevent cytokine-induced stem cell attrition in Fanconi anemia.

  19. PGC-1β suppresses saturated fatty acid-induced macrophage inflammation by inhibiting TAK1 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongen; Liu, Yan; Li, Di; Song, Jiayi; Xia, Min

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation of infiltrated macrophages in adipose tissue is a key contributor to the initiation of adipose insulin resistance. These macrophages are exposed to high local concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) and can be proinflammatory activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). However, the regulatory mechanisms on SFA-induced macrophage inflammation are still elusive. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1β (PGC-1β) is a member of the PGC-1 family of transcriptional coactivators and has been reported to play a key role in SFAs metabolism and in the regulation of inflammatory signaling. However, it remains unclear whether PGC-1β is involved in SFA-induced macrophage inflammation. In this study, we found that PGC-1β expression was significantly decreased in response to palmitic acid (PA) in macrophages in a dose dependent manner. PGC-1β inhibited PA induced TNFα, MCP-1, and IL-1β mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, PGC-1β significantly antagonized PA induced macrophage nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 and JUN N-terminal kinase activation. Mechanistically, we revealed that TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its adaptor protein TAK1 binding protein 1 (TAB1) played a dominant role in the regulatory effects of PGC-1β. We confirmed that PGC-1β inhibited downstream inflammatory signals via binding with TAB1 and thus preventing TAB1/TAK1 binding and TAK1 activation. Finally, we showed that PGC-1β overexpression in PA treated macrophages improved adipocytes PI3K-Akt insulin signaling in a paracrine fashion. Collectively, our results uncovered a novel mechanism on how macrophage inflammation induced by SFAs was regulated and suggest a potential target in the treatment of obesity induced insulin resistance.

  20. A Macrophage Subversion Factor Is Shared by Intracellular and Extracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Belon, Claudine; Soscia, Chantal; Bernut, Audrey; Laubier, Aurélie; Bleves, Sophie; Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed strategies to adapt to host environment and resist host immune response. Several intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, share the horizontally-acquired MgtC virulence factor that is important for multiplication inside macrophages. MgtC is also found in pathogenic Pseudomonas species. Here we investigate for the first time the role of MgtC in the virulence of an extracellular pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A P. aeruginosa mgtC mutant is attenuated in the systemic infection model of zebrafish embryos, and strikingly, the attenuated phenotype is dependent on the presence of macrophages. In ex vivo experiments, the P. aeruginosa mgtC mutant is more sensitive to macrophage killing than the wild-type strain. However, wild-type and mutant strains behave similarly toward macrophage killing when macrophages are treated with an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton ATPase. Importantly, P. aeruginosa mgtC gene expression is strongly induced within macrophages and phagosome acidification contributes to an optimal expression of the gene. Thus, our results support the implication of a macrophage intracellular stage during P. aeruginosa acute infection and suggest that Pseudomonas MgtC requires phagosome acidification to play its intracellular role. Moreover, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa MgtC is required for optimal growth in Mg2+ deprived medium, a property shared by MgtC factors from intracellular pathogens and, under Mg2+ limitation, P. aeruginosa MgtC prevents biofilm formation. We propose that MgtC shares a similar function in intracellular and extracellular pathogens, which contributes to macrophage resistance and fine-tune adaptation to host immune response in relation to the different bacterial lifestyles. In addition, the phenotypes observed with the mgtC mutant in infection models can be mimicked in wild-type P. aeruginosa strain by producing a MgtC antagonistic peptide, thus

  1. Curcumin Attenuates Titanium Particle-Induced Inflammation by Regulating Macrophage Polarization In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Yaochao; Cheng, Mengqi; Qin, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Qiaojie; Peng, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2017-01-01

    Periprosthetic inflammatory osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening are commonly observed in total joint arthroplasty. Other than revision surgery, few approved treatments are available for this complication. Wear particle-induced inflammation and macrophage polarization state play critical roles in periprosthetic osteolysis. We investigated the effects of curcumin, a polyphenol extracted from Curcuma longa, on titanium (Ti) particle-induced inflammation and macrophage polarization in vitro using the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and in vivo using a murine air pouch model. The expression of specific macrophage markers was qualitatively analyzed by immunofluorescence (inducible nitric oxide synthase and CD206) and quantitatively analyzed by flow cytometry (CCR7 and CD206), representing M1 and M2 macrophages, respectively. Our results show that curcumin induced a higher percentage of M2 macrophages together with a higher concentration of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and a lower percentage of M1 macrophages with a lower concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6). The genes encoding CD86 (M1) and CD163 (M2), two additional markers, were shifted by curcumin toward an M2 phenotype. C57BL/J6 mice were injected with air and Ti particles to establish an air pouch model. Curcumin reduced cell infiltration in the pouch membrane and decreased membrane thickness. The analysis of exudates obtained from pouches demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on macrophage polarization and cytokine production were similar to those observed in vitro. These results prove that curcumin suppresses Ti particle-induced inflammation by regulating macrophage polarization. Thus, curcumin could be developed as a new therapeutic candidate for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory osteolysis and aseptic loosening.

  2. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Mendez, Armando J; Jaimes, Edgar A; Silverstein, Roy L; Webster, Keith; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-08-15

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. CD36 mediates oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake and contributes to macrophage foam cell formation. We investigated a role for the CD36 pathway in nicotine-induced activation of macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine in the same plasma concentration range found in smokers increased the CD36(+)/CD14(+) cell population in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, increased CD36 expression of human THP1 macrophages, and increased macrophage production of reactive oxygen species, PKCδ phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Nicotine-induced CD36 expression was suppressed by antioxidants and by specific PKCδ and PPARγ inhibitors, implicating mechanistic roles for these intermediates. Nicotine synergized with oxLDL to increase macrophage expression of CD36 and cytokines TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-6, and CXCL9, all of which were prevented by CD36 small interfering (si)RNA. Incubation with oxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 72 h resulted in lipid deposition in macrophages and foam cell formation. Preincubation with nicotine further increased oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation, which was also prevented by CD36 siRNA. Treatment of apoE-/- mice with nicotine markedly exacerbated inflammatory monocyte levels and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation, effects that were not seen in CD36-/- apoE-/- mice. Our results show that physiological levels of nicotine increase CD36 expression in macrophages, a pathway that may account at least in part for the known proinflammatory and proatherogenic properties of nicotine. These results identify such enhanced CD36 expression as a novel nicotine-mediated pathway that may constitute an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in smokers. The results also suggest that exacerbated atherogenesis by this pathway may be an adverse side effect of extended use

  3. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gondorf, Fabian; Berbudi, Afiat; Buerfent, Benedikt C; Ajendra, Jesuthas; Bloemker, Dominique; Specht, Sabine; Schmidt, David; Neumann, Anna-Lena; Layland, Laura E; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P

    2015-01-01

    Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s.) and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases, but may also

  4. Antioxidant Defenses of Francisella tularensis Modulate Macrophage Function and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, Seham M; Sanchez, Belkys C; Varanat, Mrudula; Ma, Zhuo; Catlett, Sally V; Melendez, Juan Andres; Malik, Meenakshi; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-03-04

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia, has been used in the bioweapon programs of several countries in the past, and now it is considered a potential bioterror agent. Extreme infectivity and virulence of F. tularensis is due to its ability to evade immune detection and to suppress the host's innate immune responses. However, Francisella-encoded factors and mechanisms responsible for causing immune suppression are not completely understood. Macrophages and neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species as a defense mechanism for the clearance of phagocytosed microorganisms. ROS serve a dual role; at high concentrations they act as microbicidal effector molecules that destroy intracellular pathogens, and at low concentrations they serve as secondary signaling messengers that regulate the expression of various inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that the antioxidant defenses of F. tularensis maintain redox homeostasis in infected macrophages to prevent activation of redox-sensitive signaling components that ultimately result in suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and macrophage microbicidal activity. We demonstrate that antioxidant enzymes of F. tularensis prevent the activation of redox-sensitive MAPK signaling components, NF-κB signaling, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the accumulation of ROS in infected macrophages. We also report that F. tularensis inhibits ROS-dependent autophagy to promote its intramacrophage survival. Collectively, this study reveals novel pathogenic mechanisms adopted by F. tularensis to modulate macrophage innate immune functions to create an environment permissive for its intracellular survival and growth.

  5. Sufficient production of geranylgeraniol is required to maintain endotoxin tolerance in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyong; Lee, Joon No; Ye, James; Hao, Rosy; Debose-Boyd, Russell; Ye, Jin

    2013-12-01

    Endotoxin tolerance allows macrophages to produce large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines immediately after their contact with lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), but prevents their further production after repeated exposure to LPSs. While this response is known to prevent overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines, the mechanism through which endotoxin tolerance is established has not been identified. In the current study, we demonstrate that sufficient production of geranylgeraniol (GGOH) in macrophages is required to maintain endotoxin tolerance. We show that increased synthesis of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) protein following LPS treatment is required to produce enough GGOH to inhibit expression of Malt1, a protein known to stimulate expression of proinflammatory cytokines, in macrophages repeatedly exposed to LPSs. Depletion of GGOH caused by inhibition of HMGCR led to increased Malt1 expression in macrophages subjected to repeated exposure to LPSs. Consequently, endotoxin tolerance was impaired, and production of interleukin 1-β and other proinflammatory cytokines was markedly elevated in these cells. These results suggest that insufficient production of GGOH in macrophages may cause autoinflammatory diseases.

  6. Contrary to BCG, MLM fails to induce the production of TNF alpha and NO by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Wek-Rodríguez, Kendy; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Aguilar-Torrentera, Fabiola; Truyens, Carine; Carlier, Yves

    2002-06-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must possess efficient survival mechanisms to resist the harsh conditions of the intraphagosomal milieu. In this sense, Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) is one of the most evolved intracellular parasites of murine macrophages; this microorganism has developed a series of properties that allows it not only to resist, but also to multiply within the inhospitable environment of the phagolysosome. Inside the macrophages, MLM appears surrounded by a thick lipid-envelope that protects the microorganism from the digestive effect of the phagosomal hydrolases and the acid pH. MLM produces a disease in which the loss of specific cell-mediated immunity ensues, thus preventing activation of macrophages. In vitro, and possibly also in vivo, MLM infects macrophages without triggering the oxidative (respiratory burst) response of these cells, thus preventing the production of the toxic reactive oxygen intermediaries (ROI). Supporting the idea that MLM is within the most evolved pathogenic microorganisms, in the present study we found, that contrary to BCG, M. lepraemurium infects macrophages without stimulating these cells to produce meaningful levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) or nitric oxide (NO). Thus, the ability of the microorganisms to stimulate in their cellular hosts, the production of ROI and RNI (reactive nitrogen intermediates), seems to be an inverse correlate of their pathogenicity; the lesser their ability, the greater their pathogenicity.

  7. Protective effect of natural flavonoids on rat peritoneal macrophages injury caused by asbestos fibers.

    PubMed

    Kostyuk, V A; Potapovich, A I; Speransky, S D; Maslova, G T

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of macrophages to asbestos fibers resulted in enhancement of the production of oxygen radicals, determined by a lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence (LEC) assay, a formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), a LDH release into the incubation mixture, and a rapid lysis of the cells. Rutin (Rut) and quercetin (Qr) were effective in inhibiting LEC, TBARS formation, and reducing peritoneal macrophages injury caused by asbestos. The concentrations pre-treatment of antioxidants that were required to prevent the injury of peritoneal macrophages caused by asbestos by 50% (IC50) were 90 microM and 290 microM for Qr and Rut, respectively. Both flavonoids were found to be oxidized during exposure of peritoneal macrophages to asbestos and the oxidation was SOD sensitive. The efficacy of flavonoids as antioxidant agents as well as superoxide ion scavengers was also evaluated using appropriate model systems, and both quercetin and rutin were found to be effective in scavenging O2.-. These findings indicate that flavonoids are able to prevent the respiratory burst in rat peritoneal macrophages exposed to asbestos at the stage of activated oxygen species generation, mainly as superoxide scavengers. On the basis of this study it was concluded that natural flavonoids quercetin and rutin would be promising drug candidates for a prophylactic asbestos-induced disease.

  8. Actions of Interferons on Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    host’s defense against bacterial infection. 1. IFN Responses of Listeria -Infected Mice The serum IFN titers in endotoxin-injected and non-injected... Listeria monocytogenes, macrophages, T cells, antiviral activity, purifi- cation. 1.5. A 9TRACT (Cootew o m- w󈨚 &ode M nwe~em en fd"M1..Asaa Mice...pase of the anti- Listeria immue S o In addit 0 S inducing M I , the Listeria also dramatically altered e at’s responsiv us t( IFIin cng ageniT._ Within

  9. IFN-ε protects primary macrophages against HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Carley; Subbian, Selvakumar; Gao, Pan; Couret, Jennifer; Levine, Carly; Ghanny, Saleena; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Zhao, Xilin; Landau, Nathaniel; Lu, Wuyuan

    2016-01-01

    IFN-ε is a unique type I IFN that is not induced by pattern recognition response elements. IFN-ε is constitutively expressed in mucosal tissues, including the female genital mucosa. Although the direct antiviral activity of IFN-ε was thought to be weak compared with IFN-α, IFN-ε controls Chlamydia muridarum and herpes simplex virus 2 in mice, possibly through modulation of immune response. We show here that IFN-ε induces an antiviral state in human macrophages that blocks HIV-1 replication. IFN-ε had little or no protective effect in activated CD4+ T cells or transformed cell lines unless activated CD4+ T cells were infected with replication-competent HIV-1 at a low MOI. The block to HIV infection of macrophages was maximal after 24 hours of treatment and was reversible. IFN-ε acted on early stages of the HIV life cycle, including viral entry, reverse transcription, and nuclear import. The protection did not appear to operate through known type I IFN-induced HIV host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3A and SAMHD1. IFN-ε–stimulated immune mediators and pathways had the signature of type I IFNs but were distinct from IFN-α in macrophages. IFN-ε induced significant phagocytosis and ROS, which contributed to the block to HIV replication. These findings indicate that IFN-ε induces an antiviral state in macrophages that is mediated by different factors than those induced by IFN-α. Understanding the mechanism of IFN-ε–mediated HIV inhibition through immune modulation has implications for prevention. PMID:27942584

  10. Macrophage response to cross-linked and conventional UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Rajiv K; Neavyn, Mark J; Rubash, Harry E; Shanbhag, Arun S

    2003-07-01

    To prevent wear debris-induced osteolysis and aseptic loosening, cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene's (UHMWPE) with improved wear resistance have been developed. Hip simulator studies have demonstrated very low wear rates with these new materials leading to their widespread clinical use. However, the biocompatibility of this material is not known. We studied the macrophage response to cross-linked UHMWPE (XLPE) and compared it to conventional UHMWPE (CPE) as well as other clinically used orthopaedic materials such as titanium-alloy (TiAlV) and cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr). Human peripheral blood monocytes and murine macrophages, as surrogates for cells mediating peri-implant inflammation, were cultured onto custom designed lipped disks fabricated from the test materials to isolate cells. Culture supernatants were collected at 24 and 48h and analyzed for cytokines such as IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6. Total RNA was extracted from adherent cells and gene expression was analyzed using qualitative RT-PCR. In both in vitro models, macrophages cultured on cross-linked and conventional polyethylene released similar levels of cytokines, which were also similar to levels on control tissue culture dishes. Macrophages cultured on TiAlV and CoCr-alloy released significantly higher levels of cytokines. Human monocytes from all donors varied in the magnitude of cytokines released when cultured on identical surfaces. The variability in individual donor responses to TiAlV and CoCr surfaces may reflect how individuals respond differently to similar stimuli and perhaps reveal a predisposed sensitivity to particular materials.

  11. Kinetics and ultrastructural studies of the induction of rat alveolar macrophage fusion by mediators released from mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sone, S.; Bucana, C.; Hoyer, L. C.; Fidler, I. J.

    1981-01-01

    Treatment of F344 rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro with cell-free supernatant fluids obtained from concanavalin-A (Con A)-stimulated syngeneic lymphocytes induced extensive fusion. The lymphokine responsible for the fusion of AMs (but not other cells) is here referred to as AM fusion factor (Con-A-MFF). Fusion is dependent on the dose of Con-A-MFF and the population density of AM cultures and occurred 10 hours after Con-A-MFF was added to cultures of normal AMs. Con-A-MFF must interact with AMs for more than 8 hours before full expression of fusion is reached at 24 hours. Using a technique allowing for sequential scanning to transmission electron microscopy analysis of cells, the authors determined the relationship of the morphologic characteristics of the surface and the internal structure of cells fusing to form multinucleate giant cells (MGCs). The process of AM fusion begins with the aggregation of AMs, followed by interdigitation of cell processes. Serial sections of MGCs showed lysosomes associated with remnants of plasma membrane in the cytoplasm. The MGCs contained numerous organelles associated with increased secretory activity of cells. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7234965

  12. A broken krebs cycle in macrophages.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-17

    Macrophages undergo metabolic rewiring during polarization but details of this process are unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Jha et al. (2015) report a systems approach for unbiased analysis of cellular metabolism that reveals key metabolites and metabolic pathways required for distinct macrophage polarization states.

  13. Macrophage subpopulations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Orme, Jacob; Mohan, Chandra

    2012-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous group of autoimmune disorders defined by a consensus of clinical and laboratory criteria. Much of the pathophysiology and therapy of SLE has focused on autoimmune B and T cells of the adaptive immune system. Recently, the role of macrophages, part of the innate immune system, in SLE pathogenesis has gained attention. The field of immunology in general has recently changed in the way that it approaches macrophages. Rather than viewing them as a single, concrete whole, it has become clear that different subpopulations of macrophages contribute to various immune and non-immune processes. Such a nomenclature may provide an ideal framework from which to study macrophage pathogenesis in SLE. Studies suggest that M1 subtype macrophages play an important inflammatory role in SLE pathogenesis. Further, apparently reduced populations of M2a and M2c subtype macrophages may contribute to the lack of anti-inflammatory activity apparent in the disease. M2b subtype macrophages may actually have a role in causing disease directly. Regulatory macrophages have yet to be explored thoroughly in SLE, though the presence of a few of their markers may mean that they are active in suppressing SLE-related inflammation.

  14. Macrophage polarization in virus-host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage involvement in viral infections and antiviral states is common. However, this involvement has not been well-studied in the paradigm of macrophage polarization, which typically has been categorized by the dichotomy of classical (M1) and alternative (M2) statuses. Recent studies have reveal...

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  16. Macrophage Phenotype in Liver Injury and Repair.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y-Y; Li, X-F; Meng, X-M; Huang, C; Zhang, L; Li, J

    2017-03-01

    Macrophages hold a critical position in the pathogenesis of liver injury and repair, in which their infiltrations is regarded as a main feature for both acute and chronic liver diseases. It is noted that, based on the distinct phenotypes and origins, hepatic macrophages are capable of clearing pathogens, promoting/or inhibiting liver inflammation, while regulating liver fibrosis and fibrolysis through interplaying with hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) via releasing different types of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Macrophages are typically categorized into M1 or M2 phenotypes by adapting to local microenvironment during the progression of liver injury. In most occasions, M1 macrophages play a pro-inflammatory role in liver injury, while M2 macrophages exert an anti-inflammatory or pro-fibrotic role during liver repair and fibrosis. In this review, we focused on the up-to-date information about the phenotypic and functional plasticity of the macrophages and discussed the detailed mechanisms through which the phenotypes and functions of macrophages are regulated in different stages of liver injury and repair. Moreover, their roles in determining the fate of liver diseases were also summarized. Finally, the macrophage-targeted therapies against liver diseases were also be evaluated.

  17. Macrophagic myofasciitis: characterization and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, Romain K.; Authier, François-Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aluminium oxyhydroxide (alum), a nano-crystaline compound forming agglomerates, has been introduced in vaccine for its immunologic adjuvant effect in 1927. Alum is the most commonly used adjuvant in human and veterinary vaccines but mechanisms by which it stimulates immune responses remains incompletely understood. Although generally well tolerated, alum may occasionally cause disabling health problems in presumably susceptible individuals. A small proportion of vaccinated people present with delayed onset of diffuse myalgia, chronic fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, and exhibit very long-term persistence of alum-loaded macrophages at site of previous intra-muscular (i.m.) immunization, forming a granulomatous lesion called macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF). Clinical symptoms associated with MMF are paradigmatic of the recently delineated “autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants” (ASIA). The stereotyped cognitive dysfunction is reminiscent of cognitive deficits described in foundry workers exposed to inhaled Al particles. Alum safety concerns will largely depend on whether the compound remains localized at site of injection or may diffuse and accumulate in distant organs. Animal experiments indicate that biopersistent nanomaterials taken-up by monocytes-lineage cells in tissues, e.g. fluorescent alum surrogates, can first translocate to draining lymph nodes, and thereafter circulate in blood within phagocytes and reach the spleen, and, eventually, slowly accumulate in brain. PMID:22235051

  18. High glucose activates Raw264.7 macrophages through RhoA kinase-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng-I; Chen, Po-Han; Lin, Yu-Chun; Kao, Ying-Hsien

    2015-02-01

    Hyperglycemia has been shown to accelerate atherogenesis, an inflammation process resulting from macrophage activation. Although high glucose (HG) was previously demonstrated to accentuate ROCK activity in macrophages and enhance their activation in vitro, the role of ROCK signaling in HG-mediated macrophage activation remains unclear. This study aimed to elucidate potential signal transduction pathways of HG-mediated ROCK upregulation and macrophage activation, including c-Jun or NF-κB pathways. A macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, was used to investigate the atherogenic effects of HG on RhoA/ROCK activity and macrophage functions. Exposure to HG significantly induced RhoA membrane translocation, RhoA-kinase activity, and phosphorylation of myosin-binding subunit, a RhoA-kinase substrate. Macrophage behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and TNF-α de novo synthesis, were also increased by HG exposure. However, pharmacological ROCK inhibition by hydroxyfasudil attenuated the HG-enhanced adhesion and TNF-α production. Nuclear translocation of c-Jun and transcription factor NF-κB was simultaneously noted after HG stimulation. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition by hydroxyfasudil and siRNA-mediated ROCK1 or ROCK2 gene silencing confirmed the ROCK-dependent JNK and ERK phosphorylation, but not NF-κB activation in macrophages. In addition, both interventions effectively ameliorated the HG-mediated macrophage activation under the conditions mimicking diabetes. These findings suggest that hyperglycemia activates macrophages mainly through ROCK/JNK and ROCK/ERK pathways, which results in a more pro-inflammatory phenotype and eventually contributes to atherogenesis. In conclusion, ROCK inhibition might become a novel therapeutic strategy in atherosclerosis treatment and prevention in diabetic patients.

  19. Inhibition of P-Glycoprotein by HIV Protease Inhibitors Increases Intracellular Accumulation of Berberine in Murine and Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Weibin; Wang, Guangji; Xu, Weiren; Liu, Xuyuan; Wang, Yun; Zha, Beth S.; Shi, Jian; Zhao, Qijin; Gerk, Phillip M.; Studer, Elaine; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Pandak, William M.; Zhou, Huiping

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV protease inhibitor (PI)-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR), a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages. Methodology and Principal Findings Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT) and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp) cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123) efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp. Conclusion and Significance HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic. PMID:23372711

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma is accelerated by NASH involving M2 macrophage polarization mediated by hif-1αinduced IL-10.

    PubMed

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Saha, Banishree; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Kodys, Karen; Catalano, Donna; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related inflammation promotes cancer development. Tissue resident macrophages affect tumor progression and the tumor micro-environment favors polarization into alternatively activated macrophages (M2) that facilitate tumor invasiveness. Here, we dissected the role of western diet-induced NASH in inducing macrophage polarization in a carcinogen initiated model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Adult C57BL/6 male mice received diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 24 weeks of high fat-high cholesterol-high sugar diet (HF-HC-HSD). We assessed liver MRI and histology, serum ALT, AFP, liver triglycerides, and cytokines. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-12/TNFα (M1) and CD163/CD206 (M2) expression using flow cytometry. Role of hif-1α-induced IL-10 was dissected in hepatocyte specific hif-1αKO and hif-1αdPA (over-expression) mice. The western diet-induced features of NASH and accelerated HCC development after carcinogen exposure. Liver fibrosis and serum AFP were significantly increased in DEN + HF-HC-HSD mice compared to controls. Western diet resulted in macrophage (F4/80(+)CD11b(+)) infiltration to liver and DEN + HF-HC-HSD mice showed preferential increase in M2 macrophages. Isolated hepatocytes from western diet fed mice showed significant upregulation of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, hif-1α, and livers from hif-1α over-expressing mice had increased proportion of M2 macrophages. Primary hepatocytes from wild-type mice treated with DEN and palmitic acid in vitro showed activation of hif-1α and induction of IL-10, a M2 polarizing cytokine. IL-10 neutralization in hepatocyte-derived culture supernatant prevented M2 macrophage polarization and silencing hif-1α in macrophages blocked their M2 polarization. Therefore, our data demonstrate that NASH accelerates HCC progression via upregulation of hif-1α mediated IL-10 polarizing M2 macrophages.

  1. Hepatic CD206-positive macrophages express amphiregulin to promote the immunosuppressive activity of regulatory T cells in HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kai; Huang, Ling; Sun, Xiaomei; Yang, Lihua; Gong, Zuojiong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a major cause of chronic liver inflammation worldwide. Innate and adaptive immune responses work together to restrain or eliminate hepatitis B virus in the liver. Compromised or failed adaptive immune response results in persistent virus replication and spread. How to promote antiviral immunity is a research focus for hepatitis B virus prevention and therapy. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in the regulation of antiviral immunity. We found that F4/80(+)CD206(+)CD80(lo/+) macrophages were a particular hepatic macrophage subset that expressed amphiregulin in our mouse hepatitis B virus infection model. CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin promoted the immunosuppressive activity of intrahepatic regulatory T cells, demonstrated by higher expression of CTLA-4, ICOS, and CD39, as well as stronger inhibition of antiviral function of CD8(+) T cells. Amphiregulin-neutralizing antibody diminished the effect of CD206(+) macrophages on regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin activated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in regulatory T cells, and this mammalian target of rapamycin activation was essential for promotion of regulatory T cell activity by CD206(+) macrophages. Adoptive transfer of CD206(+) macrophages into hepatitis B virus-infected mice increased cytoplasmic hepatitis B virus DNA in hepatocytes and also increased serum hepatitis B surface antigen. The antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells was decreased after macrophage transfer. Therefore, our research indicated that amphiregulin produced by CD206(+) macrophages plays an important role in modulating regulatory T cell function and subsequently restrains the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells. Our study offers new insights into the immunomodulation in hepatitis B virus infection.

  2. Candida albicans Chitin Increases Arginase-1 Activity in Human Macrophages, with an Impact on Macrophage Antimicrobial Functions

    PubMed Central

    MacCallum, Donna M.; Brown, Gordon D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can cause a variety of diseases, ranging from superficial mucosal infections to life-threatening systemic infections. Phagocytic cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophages, are important first-line responders to an infection and generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as part of their protective antimicrobial response. During an infection, host cells generate nitric oxide through the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to kill the invading pathogen. Inside the phagocyte, iNOS competes with the enzyme arginase-1 for a common substrate, the amino acid l-arginine. Several pathogenic species, including bacteria and parasitic protozoans, actively modulate the production of nitric oxide by inducing their own arginases or the host’s arginase activity to prevent the conversion of l-arginine to nitric oxide. We report here that C. albicans blocks nitric oxide production in human-monocyte-derived macrophages by induction of host arginase activity. We further determined that purified chitin (a fungal cell wall polysaccharide) and increased chitin exposure at the fungal cell wall surface induces this host arginase activity. Blocking the C. albicans-induced arginase activity with the arginase-specific substrate inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-arginine (nor-NOHA) or the chitinase inhibitor bisdionin F restored nitric oxide production and increased the efficiency of fungal killing. Moreover, we determined that C. albicans influences macrophage polarization from a classically activated phenotype toward an alternatively activated phenotype, thereby reducing antimicrobial functions and mediating fungal survival. Therefore, C. albicans modulates l-arginine metabolism in macrophages during an infection, potentiating its own survival. PMID:28119468

  3. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  4. Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXRα activation in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Wakabayashi, Hideyuki; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Aruto

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXRα. •Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXRα activation in macrophages. •Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. •N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXRα in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin.

  5. Morphine decreases the pro-angiogenic interaction between breast cancer cells and macrophages in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khabbazi, Samira; Nassar, Zeyad D.; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the various cell types that constitute a solid tumour are essential to the biology of the tumour. We evaluated the effect of morphine on the proangiogenic interaction taking place between macrophages and breast cancer cells in vitro. The conditioned medium (CM) from breast cancer cells co-cultured with macrophages elicited endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. This effect was inhibited if the co-culture occurred in the presence of morphine. The CM from breast cancer cells or macrophages grown individually, whether or not prepared in the presence of morphine, was ineffective in stimulating EC proliferation or tube formation. Using a mouse antibody array, we identified several angiogenesis-regulating factors differentially expressed in the CM of co-cultured cells prepared in the presence or absence of morphine, amongst which interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. VEGF was induced in both cell types by the co-culture and this was prevented by morphine in a non-naloxone reversible fashion. The effect of CM from co-cultured cells on endothelial tube formation, but not proliferation, was prevented by anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody. Our results indicate that morphine prevents, in part via modulating VEGF-A expression, the pro-angiogenic interaction between macrophages and breast cancer cells. PMID:27514308

  6. ER stress is associated with reduced ABCA-1 protein levels in macrophages treated with advanced glycated albumin - reversal by a chemical chaperone.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Gabriela; Okuda, Ligia S; Pinto, Raphael S; Iborra, Rodgiro T; Nakandakare, Edna R; Santos, Celio X; Laurindo, Francisco R; Passarelli, Marisa

    2012-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 mediates the export of excess cholesterol from macrophages, contributing to the prevention of atherosclerosis. Advanced glycated albumin (AGE-alb) is prevalent in diabetes mellitus and is associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Independently of changes in ABCA-1 mRNA levels, AGE-alb induces oxidative stress and reduces ABCA-1 protein levels, which leads to macrophage lipid accumulation. These metabolic conditions are known to elicit endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We sought to determine if AGE-alb induces ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) in macrophages and how disturbances to the ER could affect ABCA-1 content and cholesterol efflux in macrophages. AGE-alb induced a time-dependent increase in ER stress and UPR markers. ABCA-1 content and cellular cholesterol efflux were reduced by 33% and 47%, respectively, in macrophages treated with AGE-alb, and both were restored by treatment with 4-phenyl butyric acid (a chemical chaperone that alleviates ER stress), but not MG132 (a proteasome inhibitor). Tunicamycin, a classical ER stress inductor, also impaired ABCA-1 expression and cholesterol efflux (showing a decrease of 61% and 82%, respectively), confirming the deleterious effect of ER stress in macrophage cholesterol accumulation. Glycoxidation induces macrophage ER stress, which relates to the reduction in ABCA-1 and in reverse cholesterol transport, endorsing the adverse effect of macrophage ER stress in atherosclerosis. Thus, chemical chaperones that alleviate ER stress may represent a useful tool for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis in diabetes.

  7. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury. PMID:25650776

  8. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  9. Macrophages protect against muscle atrophy and promote muscle recovery in vivo and in vitro: a mechanism partly dependent on the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nicolas; Frenette, Jérôme

    2010-05-01

    Hindlimb unloading and reloading are characterized by a major loss of muscle force and are associated with classic leukocyte infiltration during recovery from muscle atrophy. Macrophages act as a cellular cornerstone by playing both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles during muscle recovery from atrophy. In the present study, we investigated the role of macrophages in muscle atrophy and regrowth using in vivo and in vitro models. Mice depleted in monocytes/macrophages and submitted to a hindlimb unloading and reloading protocol experienced a significant delay in muscle force recovery compared with matched placebo mice at 7 and 14 days after reloading. Furthermore, an in vitro myotube/macrophage coculture showed that anti-inflammatory macrophages, which contain apoptotic neutrophils and express low levels of cyclooxygenase-2, completely prevented the loss of protein content and the myotube atrophy observed after 2 days in low serum medium. The presence of macrophages also protected against the decrease in myosin heavy chain content in myotubes exposed to low serum medium for 1 day. Interestingly, the addition of an anti-IGF-1 antibody to the coculture significantly decreased the ability of macrophages to protect against myotube atrophy and myosin heavy chain loss after 2 days in low serum medium. These results clearly indicate that macrophages and, more precisely, the release of IGF-1 by macrophages, play an important role in recovery from muscle atrophy.

  10. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-GuC)rin) activates disabled naC/ve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-N1), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1N2), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-N2) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions.

  11. Genetic engineering alveolar macrophages for host resistance to PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Prather, Randall S; Whitworth, Kristin M; Schommer, Susan K; Wells, Kevin D

    2017-02-10

    Standard strategies for control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have not been effective, as vaccines have not reduced the prevalence of disease and many producers depopulate after an outbreak. Another method of control would be to prevent the virus from infecting the pig. The virus was thought to infect alveolar macrophages by interaction with a variety of cell surface molecules. One popular model had PRRSV first interacting with heparin sulfate followed by binding to sialoadhesin and then being internalized into an endosome. Within the endosome, PRRSV was thought to interact with CD163 to uncoat the virus so the viral genome could be released into the cytosol and infect the cell. Other candidate receptors have included vimentin, CD151 and CD209. By using genetic engineering, it is possible to test the importance of individual entry mediators by knocking them out. Pigs engineered by knockout of sialoadhesin were still susceptible to infection, while CD163 knockout resulted in pigs that were resistant to infection. Genetic engineering is not only a valuable tool to determine the role of specific proteins in infection by PRRSV (in this case), but also provides a means to create animals resistant to disease. Genetic engineering of alveolar macrophages can also illuminate the role of other proteins in response to infection. We suggest that strategies to prevent infection be pursued to reduce the reservoir of virus.

  12. Staining of intracellular deposits of uranium in cultured murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kalinich, J F; McClain, D E

    2001-01-01

    In our studies of the health effects of internalized depleted uranium, we developed a simple and rapid light microscopic method to stain specifically intracellular uranium deposits. Using J774 cells, a mouse macrophage line, treated with uranyl nitrate and the pyridylazo dye 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol, uranium uptake by the cells was followed. Specificity of the stain for uranium was accomplished by using masking agents to prevent the interaction of the stain with other metals. Prestaining wash consisting of a mixture of sodium citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid eliminated staining of metals other than uranium. The staining solution consisted of the pyridylazo dye in borate buffer along with a quaternary ammonium salt, ethylhexadecyldimethylammonium bromide, and the aforementioned sodium citrate/ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid mixture. The buffer was essential for maintaining the pH within the optimum range of 8 to 12, and the quaternary ammonium salt prevented precipitation of the dye. Staining was conducted at room temperature and was complete in 30 min. Staining intensity correlated with both uranyl nitrate concentration and incubation time. Our method provides a simple procedure for detecting intracellular uranium deposits in macrophages.

  13. Activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome in infiltrating macrophages by endocannabinoids mediates beta cell loss in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Tony; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Cinar, Resat; Bertola, Adeline; Szanda, Gergő; Liu, Jie; Tam, Joseph; Han, Tiffany; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Skarulis, Monica C; Ju, Cynthia; Aouadi, Myriam; Czech, Michael P; Kunos, George

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) progresses from compensated insulin resistance to beta cell failure resulting in uncompensated hyperglycemia, a process replicated in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat. The Nlrp3 inflammasome has been implicated in obesity-induced insulin resistance and beta cell failure. Endocannabinoids contribute to insulin resistance through activation of peripheral CB1 receptors (CB₁Rs) and also promote beta cell failure. Here we show that beta cell failure in adult ZDF rats is not associated with CB₁R signaling in beta cells, but rather in M1 macrophages infiltrating into pancreatic islets, and that this leads to activation of the Nlrp3-ASC inflammasome in the macrophages. These effects are replicated in vitro by incubating wild-type human or rodent macrophages, but not macrophages from CB₁R-deficient (Cnr1(-/-)) or Nlrp3(-/-) mice, with the endocannabinoid anandamide. Peripheral CB₁R blockade, in vivo depletion of macrophages or macrophage-specific knockdown of CB₁R reverses or prevents these changes and restores normoglycemia and glucose-induced insulin secretion. These findings implicate endocannabinoids and inflammasome activation in beta cell failure and identify macrophage-expressed CB₁R as a therapeutic target in T2DM.

  14. A primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture model to investigate mucosal gut physiology and host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Gaelle; Baetz, Nicholas W.; Staab, Janet F.; Donowitz, Mark; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Zachos, Nicholas C.

    2017-01-01

    Integration of the intestinal epithelium and the mucosal immune system is critical for gut homeostasis. The intestinal epithelium is a functional barrier that secludes luminal content, senses changes in the gut microenvironment, and releases immune regulators that signal underlying immune cells. However, interactions between epithelial and innate immune cells to maintain barrier integrity and prevent infection are complex and poorly understood. We developed and characterized a primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture model for in-depth studies of epithelial and macrophage interactions. Human intestinal stem cell-derived enteroid monolayers co-cultured with human monocyte-derived macrophages were used to evaluate barrier function, cytokine secretion, and protein expression under basal conditions and following bacterial infection. Macrophages enhanced barrier function and maturity of enteroid monolayers as indicated by increased transepithelial electrical resistance and cell height. Communication between the epithelium and macrophages was demonstrated through morphological changes and cytokine production. Intraepithelial macrophage projections, efficient phagocytosis, and stabilized enteroid barrier function revealed a coordinated response to enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic E. coli infections. In summary, we have established the first primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture system, defined conditions that allow for a practical and reproducible culture model, and demonstrated its suitability to study gut physiology and host responses to enteric pathogens. PMID:28345602

  15. Human macrophages chronically exposed to LPS can be reactivated by stimulation with MDP to acquire an antimicrobial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Torres, Martha; Arellano, Monserrat; Juárez, Esmeralda

    2017-02-21

    Macrophages are important in host defense and can differentiate into functionally distinct subsets named classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated. In several inflammatory disorders, macrophages become tolerized to prevent deleterious consequences. This tolerization reduces the ability of macrophages to respond to bacterial components (e.g., LPS) maintaining a low level of inflammation but compromising the ability of macrophages to mount an effective immune response during subsequent pathogen encounters. In this study, we aimed to reactivate human monocyte-derived macrophages chronically exposed to LPS by re-stimulation with muramyl dipeptide (MDP). We observed an undefined profile of cell surface marker expression during endotoxin tolerance and absence of TNFα production. Stimulating macrophages chronically exposed to LPS with LPS+MDP restored TNFα, production together with an increased production of IL1, IL6, IFNγ, IL4, IL5 and IL10. These results suggest that macrophages chronically exposed to LPS possess a mixed M1-M2 phenotype with sufficient antimicrobial and homeostatic potential.

  16. Lung Macrophage Diversity and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages (MPs) are one of the most prominent leukocyte populations in the lung and, in many ways, a forgotten player in asthma pathogenesis. Diverse functions in asthma initiation and maintenance in chronic disease have been demonstrated, which has led to confusion as to if pulmonary MPs are agents of good or evil in asthma. Much of this is due to the wide diversity of MP populations in the lung, many of which are inaccessible experimentally in most clinical studies. This review frames lung MP biology in the context of location, phenotype, function, and response phase in asthma pathogenesis. It also assesses new findings regarding MP diversity that have challenged old dogmas and generates new ways to understand how MPs function. PMID:27027949

  17. Schistosoma japonicum infection induces macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingwei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Donghui; Ji, Minjun; Wu, Haiwei; Wu, Guanling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The role of macrophages (Mφ) as the first line of host defense is well accepted. These cells play a central role in orchestrating crucial functions during schistosomal infection. Thus, understanding the functional diversity of these cells in the process of infection as well as the mechanisms underlying these events is crucial for developing disease control strategies. In this study, we adopted a Mφ polarization recognition system. M1 macrophage was characterized by expressing CD16/32, IL-12 and iNOS. M2 macrophage was characterized by expressing CD206, IL-10 and arg-1. In vivo (mouse peritoneal macrophages of different infection stages were obtained) and in vitro (different S. japonicum antigens were used to stimulate RAW264.7) were characterized by using the above mentioned system. NCA and ACA stimulated RAW264.7 express significantly higher levels of IL-12 while significantly higher levels of IL-10 were detected after soluble egg antigen (SEA) stimulation. The results showed that dramatic changes of antigen in the microenvironment before and after egg production led to macrophage polarization. Furthermore, through TLR blocking experiments, the TLR4 signaling pathway was found to play a role in the process of macrophage polarization toward M1. Our data suggest that macrophage polarization during S. japonicum infection had significant effects on host immune responses to S. japonicum. PMID:25050114

  18. Macrophages in diabetic gastroparesis– the missing link?

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic gastroparesis results in significant morbidity for patients and major economic burden for society. Treatment options for diabetic gastroparesis are currently directed at symptom control rather than the underlying disease and are limited. The pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis includes damage to intrinsic and extrinsic neurons, smooth muscle and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Oxidative damage in diabetes appears to be one of the primary insults involved in the pathogenesis of several complications of diabetes, including gastroparesis. Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of macrophages as key cellular elements in the pathogenesis of diabetic gastroparesis. Macrophages are important for both homeostasis and defense against a variety of pathogens. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), an enzyme expressed in a subset of macrophages has emerged as a major protective mechanism against oxidative stress. Activation of macrophages with high levels of HO1 expression protects against development of delayed gastric emptying in animal models of diabetes, while activation of macrophages that do not express HO1 are linked to neuromuscular cell injury. Targeting macrophages and HO1 may therefore be a therapeutic option in diabetic gastroparesis. Purpose This report briefly reviews the pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis with a focus on oxidative damage and how activation and polarization of different subtypes of macrophages in the muscularis propria determines development of delay in gastric emptying or protects against its development. PMID:25168158

  19. Developmental origin of lung macrophage diversity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Serena Y. S.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are specialized phagocytic cells, present in all tissues, which engulf and digest pathogens, infected and dying cells, and debris, and can recruit and regulate other immune cells and the inflammatory response and aid in tissue repair. Macrophage subpopulations play distinct roles in these processes and in disease, and are typically recognized by differences in marker expression, immune function, or tissue of residency. Although macrophage subpopulations in the brain have been found to have distinct developmental origins, the extent to which development contributes to macrophage diversity between tissues and within tissues is not well understood. Here, we investigate the development and maintenance of mouse lung macrophages by marker expression patterns, genetic lineage tracing and parabiosis. We show that macrophages populate the lung in three developmental waves, each giving rise to a distinct lineage. These lineages express different markers, reside in different locations, renew in different ways, and show little or no interconversion. Thus, development contributes significantly to lung macrophage diversity and targets each lineage to a different anatomical domain. PMID:26952982

  20. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  1. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  2. Auto-protective redox buffering systems in stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferret, Pierre-Jacques; Soum, Emmanuelle; Negre, Olivier; Fradelizi, Didier

    2002-01-01

    Background Macrophages, upon encounter with micro-organisms or stimulated by cytokines, produce various effector molecules aimed at destroying the foreign agents and protecting the organism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are front line molecules exerting strong cytotoxic activities against micro-organisms and many cells, including macrophages themselves. Using cells of the murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or interferon (IFN-γ), which induce strong endogenous NO production, we examined by which mechanisms a fraction of activated macrophages protect themselves from nitrosative stress and manage to escape destruction? Results We observed that survivors (10–50% depending on the experiments) had acquired a resistant phenotype being capable to survive when further exposed in vitro to an apoptosis inducing dose of the NO donor compound DETA-NO. These cells expressed an increased steady-state levels of Mn SOD, CuZn SOD and catalase mRNA (130–200%), together with an increased activity of the corresponding enzymes. Intracellular concentration of glutathione was also increased (× 3.5 fold at 6 hours, still maintained × 5.2 fold at 48 hours). Neither mRNA for glutathione peroxydase, γ-glutamylcysteine synthase and glutathione reductase, nor thioredoxine and thioredoxine reductase, were significantly modified. Additional experiments in which RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS and/or IFN-γ in the presence of relatively specific inhibitors of both Mn and Cu/Zn SOD, aminotriazol (ATZ) catalase inhibitor and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) glutathione inhibitor, showed that inhibiting LPS-induced up-regulation of intracellular redox buffering systems also prevented acquisition of the resistant phenotype. Conclusions Our data suggest a direct causal relationship between survival of a fraction of macrophages and a up-regulation of key sets of auto-protective intracellular

  3. Pioglitazone Suppresses CXCR7 Expression To Inhibit Human Macrophage Chemotaxis through Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Duo; Zhu, Zhicheng; Li, Dan; Xu, Rihao; Wang, Tiance; Liu, Kexiang

    2015-11-17

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pioglitazone, the widely used thiazolidinedione, is shown to be efficient in the prevention of cardiovascular complications of T2DM. In this study, we report that pioglitazone inhibits CXCR7 expression and thus blocks chemotaxis in differentiated macrophage without perturbing cell viability or macrophage differentiation. In addition, pioglitazone-mediated CXCR7 suppression and chemotaxis inhibition occur via activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) but not PPARα in differentiated macrophage. More importantly, pioglitazone therapy-induced PPARγ activation suppresses CXCR7 expression in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pioglitazone suppresses CXCR7 expression to inhibit human macrophage chemotaxis through PPARγ.

  4. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 small interfering RNA were administered to alveolar macrophage-depleted mice via a jugular venous cannula 30 min before the start of the ventilation protocol. In some experiments, mice were ventilated in the absence and presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (15 mg/kg ip) or trichostatin A (1 mg/kg ip). Mechanical ventilation with a high tidal volume caused rapid (within minutes) activation of autophagy in the lung. Conventional transmission electron microscopic examination of lung sections showed that mechanical ventilation-induced autophagy activation mainly occurred in lung macrophages. Autophagy activation in the lungs during mechanical ventilation was dramatically attenuated in alveolar macrophage-depleted mice. Selective silencing of autophagy-related protein 5 in lung macrophages abolished mechanical ventilation-induced nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and lung inflammatory injury. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also significantly attenuated the inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. The activation of autophagy in macrophages mediates early lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation via NLRP3 inflammasome signaling. Inhibition of autophagy activation in lung macrophages may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury.

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulates Macrophage Polarization and the Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA+ H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased Mreg response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decreased of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1. PMID:25108023

  6. Tacaribe Virus but Not Junin Virus Infection Induces Cytokine Release from Primary Human Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Groseth, Allison; Hoenen, Thomas; Weber, Michaela; Wolff, Svenja; Herwig, Astrid; Kaufmann, Andreas; Becker, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV) and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV), in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation. PMID:21572983

  7. Household air pollution causes dose-dependent inflammation and altered phagocytosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rylance, Jamie; Fullerton, Duncan G; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K A; Wootton, Daniel G; Glennie, Sarah J; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke-exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

  8. Household Air Pollution Causes Dose-Dependent Inflammation and Altered Phagocytosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Duncan G.; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N.; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K. A.; Wootton, Daniel G.; Glennie, Sarah J.; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke–exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions. PMID:25254931

  9. Chemotherapeutic agent CPT-11 eliminates peritoneal resident macrophages by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Yun; Pan, Hao; Liang, Yi-Dan; Wei, Hong-Xia; Xu, Li-Hui; Zha, Qing-Bing; He, Xian-Hui; Ouyang, Dong-Yun

    2016-02-01

    CPT-11 (Irinotecan) is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent in clinic, but it may induce side effects including diarrhea and enteritis in patients. The underlying mechanism of CPT-11's intestinal toxicity is unclear. Peritoneal resident macrophages have been reported to be important for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of CPT-11 on mouse peritoneal resident macrophages. CPT-11 was administered intraperitoneally to mice and their peritoneal exudate cells were isolated for evaluation. CPT-11 treatment strikingly decreased the ratio of F4/80(hi)MHCII(low) large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs), which are regarded as prenatally-originated peritoneal resident macrophages. Consistent with this, the transcription factor GATA6 specifically expressed in LPMs was barely detectable in the macrophages from CPT-11-treated mice, indicative of elimination of LPMs. Such elimination of LPMs was at least partly due to CPT-induced apoptosis in macrophages, because inhibition of apoptosis by caspase-3 inhibitor z-DEVD-fmk significantly diminished the loss of GATA6(+) LPMs. As GATA6 is a transcription factor that controls expression of multiple genes regulating peritoneal B-1 cell development and translocation, elimination of GATA6(+) LPMs led to a great reduction in B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity after CPT-11 treatment. These results indicated that CPT-11-induced apoptosis contributed to the elimination of peritoneal resident macrophages, which might in turn impair the function of peritoneal B-1 cells in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Our findings may at least partly explain why CPT-11 treatment in cancer patients induces diarrhea and enteritis, which may provide a novel avenue to prevent such side effects.

  10. Macrophage induced gelsolin in response to Group B Streptococcus (GBS) infection.

    PubMed

    Fettucciari, Katia; Ponsini, Pamela; Palumbo, Camilla; Rosati, Emanuela; Mannucci, Roberta; Bianchini, Rodolfo; Modesti, Andrea; Marconi, Pierfrancesco

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) has evolved several strategies to avoid host defences. We have shown that interaction of macrophages with GBS causes macrophage calpain activation, cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis, consequences of intracellular calcium increase induced by membrane permeability alterations provoked by GBS-β-haemolysin. Open question remains about what effect calcium influx has on other calcium-sensing proteins such as gelsolin, involved in cytoskeleton modulation and apoptosis. Therefore we analysed the effect of GBS-III-COH31:macrophage interaction on gelsolin expression. Here we demonstrate that an early macrophage response to GBS-III-COH31 is a very strong gelsolin increase, which occurs in a time- and infection-ratio-dependent manner. This is not due to transcriptional events, translation events, protein turnover alterations, or protein-kinase activation, but to calcium influx, calpain activation and caspase-3 degradation. In fact, EGTA and PD150606 (calpain inhibitor) prevented gelsolin increase while BAF (caspase inhibitor) enhanced it. Since gelsolin increase is induced by highly β-haemolytic GBS-III-NEM316 and GBS-V-10/84, but not by weakly β-haemolytic GBS, or GBS-III-COH31 in conditions suppressing β-haemolysin expression/activity and the presence of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (β-haemolysin inhibitor), GBS-β-haemolysin is solely responsible for gelsolin increase causing, through membrane permeability defects, calcium influx and calpain activation. Early gelsolin increase could represent a macrophage response to antagonize apoptosis since gelsolin knockdown increases macrophage susceptibility to GBS-induced apoptosis. This response seems to be GBS specific because macrophage apoptosis by Staurosporine or Cycloeximide does not induce gelsolin.

  11. The Role of Macrophages in Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Elhelu, Mohamed A.

    1983-01-01

    Macrophages play a significant part in immunity and immune responses. They assume a defensive role exhibited by their ability to carry on phagocytosis of parasites and microbes. They regulate lymphocyte activation and proliferation and they are essential in the activation process of T- and B-lymphocytes by antigens and allogenic cells. Enhanced bactericidal activity of “activated macrophages” is based on immunologically linked mechanisms involving lymphocytes. Macrophages kill ingested microbes but the mechanism by which this is accomplished is not completely understood. This paper discusses the role of macrophages in relation to immunity. PMID:6343621

  12. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  13. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, Salvador; Palacios, Elena; Bosch-Morell, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution. PMID:26078494

  14. Macrophages and therapeutic resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ruffell, Brian; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    How neoplastic cells respond to therapy is not solely dependent on the complexity of genomic aberrations they harbor, but is also regulated by numerous dynamic properties of the tumor microenvironment. Identifying and targeting critical pathways that improve therapeutic efficacy by bolstering anti-tumor immune responses holds great potential for improving outcomes and impacting long-term patient survival. Macrophages are key regulators of homeostatic tissue and tumor microenvironments; thus therapeutics impacting macrophage presence and/or bioactivity have shown promise in preclinical models, and are now being evaluated in the clinic. This review discusses the molecular/cellular pathways thus far identified whereby macrophages mediate therapeutic responses. PMID:25858805

  15. Migration Inhibitory Factor and Macrophage Bactericidal Function

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Harvey B.; Sheagren, John N.

    1972-01-01

    A homogeneous population of immunologically active lymphocytes was obtained from peritoneal exudates of guinea pigs with delayed hypersensitivity to bovine gamma globulin (BGG). The lymphocytes were cultured with and without BGG for 24 hr, and cell-free supernatant fluids were then assayed simultaneously for their ability to influence two in vitro parameters of macrophage function: migration from capillary tubes and bactericidal capacity. In four consecutive experiments, supernatants from antigenically stimulated lymphocytes exhibited substantial migration-inhibitory-factor activity without enhancing the ability of macrophages to kill Listeria monocytogenes. Lymphocyte lysates were inactive in both assays. Possible mechanisms of lymphocyte-macrophage interactions are discussed. PMID:4120244

  16. The equine alveolar macrophage: Functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages☆

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Anna E.; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C.; Hume, David A.; Pirie, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of low molecular weight polysialic acid on human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shahraz, Anahita; Kopatz, Jens; Mathy, Rene; Kappler, Joachim; Winter, Dominic; Kapoor, Shoba; Schütza, Vlad; Scheper, Thomas; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Neumann, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Oligosialic and polysialic acid (oligoSia and polySia) of the glycocalyx of neural and immune cells are linear chains, in which the sialic acid monomers are α2.8-glycosidically linked. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin-11 (SIGLEC-11) is a primate-lineage specific receptor of human tissue macrophages and microglia that binds to α2.8-linked oligoSia. Here, we show that soluble low molecular weight polySia with an average degree of polymerization 20 (avDP20) interacts with SIGLEC-11 and acts anti-inflammatory on human THP1 macrophages involving the SIGLEC-11 receptor. Soluble polySia avDP20 inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene transcription and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Member 2, TNFSF2). In addition, polySia avDP20 neutralized the LPS-triggered increase in macrophage phagocytosis, but did not affect basal phagocytosis or endocytosis. Moreover, polySia avDP20 prevented the oxidative burst of human macrophages triggered by neural debris or fibrillary amyloid-β1–42. In a human macrophage-neuron co-culture system, polySia avDP20 also reduced loss of neurites triggered by fibrillary amyloid-β1–42. Thus, treatment with polySia avDP20 might be a new anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategy that also prevents the oxidative burst of macrophages. PMID:26582367

  18. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth. PMID:27683110

  19. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  20. Cholesterol efflux monitoring in macrophage form cells by using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Sik; Lee, Sang Hak; Park, Byoung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyeok; Hwang, Won Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and rupture, since they accumulate large amounts of lipid through the uptake of modified lipoproteins which results in foam cell formation. Cholesterol efflux is the process of removing cholesterol from macrophages in the subintima of the vessel wall, and efflux mechanism in a cell is one of the critical issues for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. High density lipoproteins (HDL) stimulate cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol analysis method is well known conventional method for observing cholesterol efflux. The major drawback of this method is its long and complicated process. Fluorescence intensity imaging schemes are replacing the radioisotope-labeled method in recent years for cholesterol efflux monitoring. Various spectroscopic methods are also adapted for cholesterol efflux imaging. Here we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging method for more quantitative observation of cholesterol efflux process in macrophages, which enables us to observe cholesterol level changes with various conditions. We used J774 macrophage cell and 25-NBD-cholesterol which is a famous cholesterol specific dye. Our lifetime imaging results clearly show cholesterol efflux rate very effectively. We believe that fluorescence lifetime analysis is new and very powerful for cholesterol imaging or monitoring.

  1. Escherichia coli and Candida albicans Induced Macrophage Extracellular Trap-Like Structures with Limited Microbicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chengshui; Liu, Xiaolei; Du, Jing; Shi, Haining; Wang, Xuelin; Bai, Xue; Peng, Peng; Yu, Lu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) has recently been recognized as a novel defense mechanism in several types of innate immune cells. It has been suggested that these structures are toxic to microbes and contribute significantly to killing several pathogens. However, the role of ETs formed by macrophages (METs) in defense against microbes remains little known. In this study, we demonstrated that a subset of murine J774A.1 macrophage cell line (8% to 17%) and peritoneal macrophages (8.5% to 15%) form METs-like structures (METs-LS) in response to Escherichia coli and Candida albicans challenge. We found only a portion of murine METs-LS, which are released by dying macrophages, showed detectable killing effects on trapped E. coli but not C. albicans. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that, in vitro, both microorganisms were entrapped in J774A.1 METs-LS composed of DNA and microbicidal proteins such as histone, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. DNA components of both nucleus and mitochondrion origins were detectable in these structures. Additionally, METs-LS formation occurred independently of ROS produced by NADPH oxidase, and this process did not result in cell lysis. In summary, our results emphasized that microbes induced METs-LS in murine macrophage cells and that the microbicidal activity of these METs-LS differs greatly. We propose the function of METs-LS is to contain invading microbes at the infection site, thereby preventing the systemic diffusion of them, rather than significantly killing them. PMID:24587206

  2. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-11-23

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown.

  3. Specific susceptibility to mucormycosis in murine diabetes and bronchoalveolar macrophage defense against Rhizopus.

    PubMed Central

    Waldorf, A R; Ruderman, N; Diamond, R D

    1984-01-01

    To assess the influence of diabetes mellitus in predisposing to pulmonary mucormycosis, a murine model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes was used. Intranasal inoculation of Rhizopus oryzae into diabetic mice resulted in mucormycotic infection with histopathology resembling pulmonary mucormycosis observed in humans. There was no mortality nor infection in inoculated normal mice. Diabetic mice had fatal infections caused by R. oryzae but significantly reduced mortality following inoculation with Aspergillus fumigatus. These findings reflect the specific enhanced susceptibility to mucormycosis observed in human diabetics. Normal bronchoalveolar macrophages formed part of an efficient defense against R. oryzae by inhibiting germination, the critical step in the conversion of R. oryzae to its tissue invasive phase. Bronchoalveolar macrophages inhibited spore germination in vitro and appeared to help prevent germination in vivo. In contrast, spore germination occurred in diabetic mice following intranasal inoculation. Diabetic bronchoalveolar macrophages had a decreased ability to attach to hyphae. In diabetic mice, bronchoalveolar macrophages could damage spores or hyphae of R. oryzae, but serum factors appeared to both promote spore germination and impair attachment of macrophages to spores. This murine model of diabetes mellitus provides an opportunity for evaluation of the relative importance of cell and serum-mediated host factors in the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Images PMID:6736246

  4. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-11-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth.

  5. Impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells causes accumulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Kim, Hyojung; Kang, Jinku; Yang, Dongki; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Lee, Dae Ho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Park, Sang Chul; Oh, Byung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of tissue macrophages is a significant characteristic of disease-associated chronic inflammation, and facilitates the progression of disease pathology. However, the functional roles of these bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in aging are unclear. Here, we identified age-dependent macrophage accumulation in the bone marrow, showing that aging significantly increases the number of M1 macrophages and impairs polarization of BMDMs. We found that age-related dysregulation of BMDMs is associated with abnormal overexpression of the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. BMDM dysregulation in aging impairs the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in B-cell maturation and activation. Phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by BMDMs was reduced because of low expression of phagocytic receptor CD14, indicating that increased apoptotic cells may result from defective phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in the BM of aged mice. Therefore, CD14 may represent a promising target for preventing BMDM dysregulation, and macrophage accumulation may provide diagnostic and therapeutic clues. PMID:27866511

  6. The Metabolic Prospective and Redox Regulation of Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; Carter, A Brent

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage plasticity is an important feature of these innate immune cells. Macrophage phenotypes are divided into two categories, the classically activated macrophages (CAM, M1 phenotype) and the alternatively activated macrophages (AAM, M2 phenotype). M1 macrophages are commonly associated with the generation of proinflammatory cytokines, whereas M2 macrophages are anti-inflammatory and often associated with tumor progression and fibrosis development. Macrophages produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent evidence suggests ROS can potentially regulate macrophage phenotype. In addition, macrophages phenotypes are closely related to their metabolic patterns, particularly fatty acid/cholesterol metabolism. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in macrophage polarization with special attention to their relevance to specific disease conditions and metabolic regulation of polarization. Understanding these metabolic switches can facilitate the development of targeted therapies for various diseases. PMID:26962470

  7. Inhibition of SIK2 and SIK3 during differentiation enhances the anti-inflammatory phenotype of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Nicola J.; Toth, Rachel; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2017-01-01

    The salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) control a novel molecular switch regulating macrophage polarization. Pharmacological inhibition of the SIKs induces a macrophage phenotype characterized by the secretion of high levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-10, and the secretion of very low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor α. The SIKs, therefore, represent attractive new drug targets for the treatment of macrophage-driven diseases, but which of the three isoforms, SIK1, SIK2 or SIK3, would be appropriate to target remains unknown. To address this question, we developed knock-in (KI) mice for SIK1, SIK2 and SIK3, in which we introduced a mutation that renders the enzymes catalytically inactive. Characterization of primary macrophages from the single and double KI mice established that all three SIK isoforms, and in particular SIK2 and SIK3, contribute to macrophage polarization. Moreover, we discovered that inhibition of SIK2 and SIK3 during macrophage differentiation greatly enhanced the production of IL-10 compared with their inhibition in mature macrophages. Interestingly, macrophages differentiated in the presence of SIK inhibitors, MRT199665 and HG-9-91-01, still produced very large amounts of IL-10, but very low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, even after the SIKs had been reactivated by removal of the drugs. Our data highlight an integral role for SIK2 and SIK3 in innate immunity by preventing the differentiation of macrophages into a potent and stable anti-inflammatory phenotype. PMID:27920213

  8. Macrophage differentiation and function in atherosclerosis; opportunities for therapeutic intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Howell J.; Fisher, Edward A.; Greaves, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The macrophage is exquisitely sensitive to its microenvironment, as demonstrated primarily through in vitro study. Changes in macrophage phenotype and function within the atherosclerotic plaque have profound consequences for plaque biology, including rupture and arterial thrombosis leading to clinical events such as myocardial infarction. We review the evidence for dynamic changes in macrophage numbers and macrophage differentiation within the atherosclerotic plaque microenvironment and discuss potential approaches to target macrophage differentiation for therapeutic benefit in cardiovascular disease. PMID:22572544

  9. Amphibian macrophage development and antiviral defenses.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage lineage cells represent the cornerstone of vertebrate physiology and immune defenses. In turn, comparative studies using non-mammalian animal models have revealed that evolutionarily distinct species have adopted diverse molecular and physiological strategies for controlling macrophage development and functions. Notably, amphibian species present a rich array of physiological and environmental adaptations, not to mention the peculiarity of metamorphosis from larval to adult stages of development, involving drastic transformation and differentiation of multiple new tissues. Thus it is not surprising that different amphibian species and their respective tadpole and adult stages have adopted unique hematopoietic strategies. Accordingly and in order to establish a more comprehensive view of these processes, here we review the hematopoietic and monopoietic strategies observed across amphibians, describe the present understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving amphibian, an in particular Xenopus laevis macrophage development and functional polarization, and discuss the roles of macrophage-lineage cells during ranavirus infections.

  10. L-arginine independent macrophage tumor cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Klostergaard, J.; Leroux, M.E. )

    1989-12-29

    We have investigated the role of L-arginine in macrophage tumor cytotoxicity in coculture. L929, EMT-6, MCA-26, and P815 targets were all susceptible to cytolysis by activated macrophages when cocultured in medium containing L-arginine. When cocultured in arginine-free medium, these targets displayed comparable or even higher levels of lysis. L1210 targets were lytically resistant under either condition. However, 59Fe release from this target did reflect strong dependence on the presence of arginine. The structural analogue, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, was an effective inhibitor of iron-release from L1210 targets cocultured with activated macrophages, whereas it had minimal inhibitory effects on release of 51Cr from cocultured L929 cells. These results suggest that the L-arginine requiring cytotoxic pathway of activated macrophage is independent of major effector mechanisms involved in tumor cell lysis.

  11. Generation and Characterization of Mouse Regulatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Iglesia, Laura; Hill, Marcelo; Cuturi, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, cell therapy has become a promising approach to therapeutically manipulate immune responses in autoimmunity, cancer, and transplantation. Several types of lymphoid and myeloid cells origin have been generated in vitro and tested in animal models. Their efficacy to decrease pharmacological treatment has successfully been established. Macrophages play an important role in physiological and pathological processes. They represent an interesting cell population due to their high plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we describe a protocol to differentiate murine regulatory macrophages in vitro from bone marrow precursors. We also describe several methods to assess macrophage classical functions, as their bacterial killing capacity and antigen endocytosis and degradation. Importantly, regulatory macrophages also display suppressive characteristics, which are addressed by the study of their hypostimulatory T lymphocyte capacity and polyclonal T lymphocyte activation suppression.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prevents inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Master, Sharon S; Rampini, Silvana K; Davis, Alexander S; Keller, Christine; Ehlers, Stefan; Springer, Burkhard; Timmins, Graham S; Sander, Peter; Deretic, Vojo

    2008-04-17

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) parasitizes host macrophages and subverts host innate and adaptive immunity. Several cytokines elicited by Mtb are mediators of mycobacterial clearance or are involved in tuberculosis pathology. Surprisingly, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a major proinflammatory cytokine, has not been implicated in host-Mtb interactions. IL-1beta is activated by processing upon assembly of the inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory caspase-activating protein complex. Here, we show that Mtb prevents inflammasome activation and IL-1beta processing. An Mtb gene, zmp1, which encodes a putative Zn(2+) metalloprotease, is required for this process. Infection of macrophages with zmp1-deleted Mtb triggered activation of the inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1beta secretion, enhanced maturation of Mtb containing phagosomes, improved mycobacterial clearance by macrophages, and lower bacterial burden in the lungs of aerosol-infected mice. Thus, we uncovered a previously masked role for IL-1beta in the control of Mtb and a mycobacterial system that prevents inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1beta activation.

  13. Redox Control of Inflammation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dehne, Nathalie; Grossmann, Nina; Jung, Michaela; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Schmid, Tobias; von Knethen, Andreas; Weigert, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Macrophages are present throughout the human body, constitute important immune effector cells, and have variable roles in a great number of pathological, but also physiological, settings. It is apparent that macrophages need to adjust their activation profile toward a steadily changing environment that requires altering their phenotype, a process known as macrophage polarization. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), derived from NADPH-oxidases, mitochondria, or NO-producing enzymes, are not necessarily toxic, but rather compose a network signaling system, known as redox regulation. Formation of redox signals in classically versus alternatively activated macrophages, their action and interaction at the level of key targets, and the resulting physiology still are insufficiently understood. We review the identity, source, and biological activities of ROS produced during macrophage activation, and discuss how they shape the key transcriptional responses evoked by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors, nuclear-erythroid 2-p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. We summarize the mechanisms how redox signals add to the process of macrophage polarization and reprogramming, how this is controlled by the interaction of macrophages with their environment, and addresses the outcome of the polarization process in health and disease. Future studies need to tackle the option whether we can use the knowledge of redox biology in macrophages to shape their mediator profile in pathophysiology, to accelerate healing in injured tissue, to fight the invading pathogens, or to eliminate settings of altered self in tumors. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 595–637. PMID:23311665

  14. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  15. Dakin Solution Alters Macrophage Viability and Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    significantly reduced at all tested concentrations by macrophages pretreated with DS. H2O2 production was reduced by 8% 38% following treatment with 0.00025... product information for all four di lutions are similar: once daily for lightly to moderately exudative wounds, and twice daily for heavily exudative...was evaluated by measuring the extracellular production of H2O2 following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimu lation in macrophages using the Amplex Red

  16. Lack of RNase L Attenuates Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Zeng, Chun; Liu, Hongli; Chen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ping; Yun, Boo Seok; Jin, Ge; Zhou, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Background Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL–6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN) inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown. Methodology Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were generated from RNase L+/+and −/− mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays. Conclusions/Findings Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2). Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions. PMID:24324683

  17. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells.

  18. Monocyte and Macrophage Dynamics during Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus; Miller, Yury I.; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is associated with and in large part driven by changes in the leukocyte compartment of the vessel wall. Here, we focus on monocyte influx during atherosclerosis, the most common form of vascular inflammation. Although the arterial wall contains a large number of resident macrophages and some resident dendritic cells, atherosclerosis drives a rapid influx of inflammatory monocytes (Ly-6C+ in mice) and other monocytes (Ly-6C− in mice, also known as patrolling monocytes). Once in the vessel wall, Ly-6C+ monocytes differentiate to a phenotype consistent with inflammatory macrophages and inflammatory dendritic cells. The phenotype of these cells is modulated by lipid uptake, Toll-like receptor ligands, hematopoietic growth factors, cytokines and chemokines. In addition to newly recruited macrophages, it is likely that resident macrophages also change their phenotype. Monocyte-derived inflammatory macrophages have a short half-life. After undergoing apoptosis, they may be taken up by surrounding macrophages or, if the phagocytic capacity is overwhelmed, can undergo secondary necrosis, a key event in forming the necrotic core of atherosclerotic lesions. In this review, we discuss these and other processes associated with monocytic cell dynamics in the vascular wall and their role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:21677293

  19. A Breakthrough: Macrophage-Directed Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mills, Charles D; Lenz, Laurel L; Harris, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Successful immunotherapy of cancer is becoming a reality aided by the realization that macrophages play an important role in the growth or regression of tumors. Specifically, M2/repair-type macrophages predominate in human cancers and produce growth-promoting molecules that actively stimulate tumor growth in much the same way they help wounds heal. However, modulating M2/repair-type macrophages to M1/kill-type can slow or stop cancer growth. The effects involve direct activity of M1 kill-type as well as the ability of M1-type macrophages to stimulate Th1-type cytotoxic T cells and other effector cells. Macrophage responses can also predict cancer susceptibility; individuals with a high M1/kill to M2/repair ratio are less prone. That macrophages/innate immunity can be modulated to play a central role in directly or indirectly combating cancer is a breakthrough that seems likely to finally make successful immunotherapy of cancer a reality.

  20. Plasminogen promotes macrophage phagocytosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Riku; Ganapathy, Swetha; Settle, Megan; Plow, Edward F

    2014-07-31

    The phagocytic function of macrophages plays a pivotal role in eliminating apoptotic cells and invading pathogens. Evidence implicating plasminogen (Plg), the zymogen of plasmin, in phagocytosis is extremely limited with the most recent in vitro study showing that plasmin acts on prey cells rather than on macrophages. Here, we use apoptotic thymocytes and immunoglobulin opsonized bodies to show that Plg exerts a profound effect on macrophage-mediated phagocytosis in vitro and in vivo. Plg enhanced the uptake of these prey by J774A.1 macrophage-like cells by 3.5- to fivefold Plg receptors and plasmin proteolytic activity were required for phagocytosis of both preys. Compared with Plg(+/+) mice, Plg(-/-) mice exhibited a 60% delay in clearance of apoptotic thymocytes by spleen and an 85% reduction in uptake by peritoneal macrophages. Phagocytosis of antibody-mediated erythrocyte clearance by liver Kupffer cells was reduced by 90% in Plg(-/-) mice compared with Plg(+/+) mice. A gene array of splenic and hepatic tissues from Plg(-/-) and Plg(+/+) mice showed downregulation of numerous genes in Plg(-/-) mice involved in phagocytosis and regulation of phagocytic gene expression was confirmed in macrophage-like cells. Thus, Plg may play an important role in innate immunity by changing expression of genes that contribute to phagocytosis.

  1. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  2. Immunological characterization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitko-McKown, C. G.; Reddy, D. N.; Chapes, S. K.; McKown, R. D.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are lung macrophages found apposed to the endothelium of pulmonary capillaries. In many species, they are responsible for the clearance of blood-borne particulates and pathogens; however, little else is known about their roles as immunologic effector cells. We compared PIMs with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to determine the relative immunological activities of these two cell populations. Our results suggested that both populations possess similar phagocytic and bactericidal activities. In assays measuring cytotoxicity, PIMs were more cytotoxic than PAMs against virally infected target cells; however, differences between these macrophage populations were not as marked when noninfected targets were used. LPS-stimulated PIMs produced more T-cell proliferative cytokines than PAMs, and both populations of nonstimulated macrophages produced similar amounts of the cytokines. In contrast, PAMs produced more TNF alpha and NO2- than PIMs when both populations were stimulated with LPS; however, nonstimulated PAMs and PIMs produced similar amounts of TNF alpha and NO2. These data suggest that bovine PIMs are immunologically active. Differences between the degrees of activity of PIMs and PAMs indicate that these macrophage populations may have different roles in lung surveillance.

  3. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannan antagonizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis by altering Ca+2-dependent cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, M; García, L F; Nigou, J; Puzo, G; Olivier, M

    2000-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis can be inhibited by mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), although it induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and NO production, which participate in apoptosis induction. ManLAM also modulates Ca(+2)-dependent intracellular events, and Ca(+2) participates in apoptosis in different systems. Ca(+2) was assessed for involvement in M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis and for modulation by ManLAM. The role of Ca(+2) was supported by the blockade of apoptosis by cAMP inhibitors and the Ca(+2) chelator, BAPTA/AM. These agents also inhibited caspase-1 activation and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein translocation without affecting TNF-alpha production. Infection of macrophages with M. tuberculosis induced an influx of Ca(+2) that was prevented by ManLAM. Similarly, M. tuberculosis infection-altered mitochondrial permeability transition was prevented by ManLAM and BAPTA/AM. Finally, ManLAM and BAPTA/AM reversed the effects of M. tuberculosis on p53 and Bcl-2 expression. ManLAM counteracts the alterations of calcium-dependent intracellular events that occur during M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor-associated macrophages promotes breast cancer cell survival by triggering a positive-feedback loop between macrophages and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhong; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jing; Lin, Yong; Xiang, Tingxiu; Wan, Jingyuan; Li, Hongyuan; Chouaib, Salem; Ren, Guosheng

    2015-10-06

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in cancer cell survival, however, the mechanism of which remains elusive. In this study, we found that COX-2 was abundantly expressed in breast TAMs, which was correlated to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Ectopic over-expression of COX-2 in TAMs enhanced breast cancer cell survival both in vitro and in vivo. COX-2 in TAMs was determined to be essential for the induction and maintenance of M2-phenotype macrophage polarity. COX-2(+) TAMs promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and survival by increasing Bcl-2 and P-gp and decreasing Bax in cancer cells. Furthermore, COX-2 in TAMs induced the expression of COX-2 in breast cancer cells, which in turn promoted M2 macrophage polarization. Inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in cancer cells suppressed COX-2(+) TAMs-induced cancer cell survival. These findings suggest that COX-2, functions as a key cancer promoting factor by triggering a positive-feedback loop between macrophages and cancer cells, which could be exploited for breast cancer prevention and therapy.

  5. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines and its relationship with virus infection in the brain of macaques inoculated with macrophage-tropic simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Xing, Hui Qin; Moritoyo, Takashi; Mori, Kazuyasu; Sugimoto, Chie; Ono, Fumiko; Izumo, Shuji

    2009-02-01

    The pathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia complex (ADC) is still poorly understood. Many studies suggest that proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha released by microglia/macrophages or astrocytes play a role in CNS injury. A microscopic finding of a microglial nodule with multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) is a histopathologic hallmark of ADC and named HIV encephalitis. However, in vivo expression of these cytokines in this microenvironment of HIV encephalitis is not yet clarified. One of the main reasons is complexities of brain pathology in patients who have died from terminal AIDS. In this study, we infected two macaques with macrophage-tropic Simian immunodeficiency virus SIV239env/MERT and examined expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in inflammatory lesions with MNGCs and its relation to virus-infected cells using immunohistochemistry. One macaque showed typical inflammatory lesions with MNGCs in the frontal white matter. Small microglial nodules were also detected in the basal ganglia and the spinal cord. SIVenv positive cells were detected mainly in inflammatory lesions, and seemed to be microglia/macrophages and MNGCs based on their morphology. Expression of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were detected in the inflammatory lesions with MNGCs, and these positive cells were found to be negative for SIVenv by double-labeling immunohistochemistry or immunohistochemistry of serial sections. There were a few TNF-alpha positive cells and almost no IL-1beta positive cells in the area other than inflammatory lesions. Another macaque showed scattered CD3+ cells and CD68+ cells in the perivascular regions of the white matter. SIVenv and TNF-alpha was demonstrated in a few perivascular macrophages. These findings indicate that virus-infected microglia/macrophages do not always express IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, which suggests an indirect role of HIV-1-infected cells in cytokine-mediated pathogenesis of ADC. Our macaque model for human ADC

  6. Genetically Engineered Macrophages: A Potential Platform for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Kara W; Lieberman, Nicole A P; Kreuser, Shannon A; Chinn, Harrison; Winter, Conrad; Deutsch, Gail; Hoglund, Virginia; Watson, Reid; Crane, Courtney A

    2017-02-01

    In spite of their successes against hematologic malignancies, immunotherapeutic interventions for the treatment of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) have thus far been unsuccessful. This is in part due to the presence of a tumor microenvironment that fosters neoplastic growth and protects the tumor from destruction by the immune system. A novel genetically engineered macrophage-based platform has been developed with the potential to minimize the effects of the suppressive tumor microenvironment and improve innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses. A newly described lentiviral expression system was validated for the generation of transduced monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages, and transgene expression was shown to be stable over the course of weeks to months, both in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model of GBM. Furthermore, the genetically engineered macrophages (GEMs) neither caused morbidity in animals nor contributed to accelerated tumor growth. The versatility of GEMs is also highlighted by showing that they can be engineered to secrete proteins that either reduce immune suppression, such as the soluble transforming growth factor beta receptor II, or promote immune cell activation, by expressing interleukin 21. There is also the potential to prevent GEM-mediated immune suppression by using the CRISPR system to knock out genes responsible for dysfunction of cytotoxic cells, including interleukin 10 and programmed death-ligand 1. Together, these results suggest that GEMs are an ideal cell type for transforming the tumor microenvironment and enhancing antitumor immunity. Importantly, it is anticipated that these findings will have broad applicability to other types of tumors with microenvironments that currently preclude successful immunotherapeutic approaches.

  7. Advanced glycation end-products produced systemically and by macrophages: A common contributor to inflammation and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyunghee; Yoo, YongCheol; Son, Myeongjoo; Lee, Jaesuk; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Park, Young Mok; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Lee, Bonghee

    2017-02-13

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor have been implicated in the progressions of many intractable diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, and are also critical for pathologic changes in chronic degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and alcoholic brain damage. Recently activated macrophages were found to be a source of AGEs, and the most abundant form of AGEs, AGE-albumin excreted by macrophages has been implicated in these diseases and to act through common pathways. AGEs inhibition has been shown to prevent the pathogenesis of AGEs-related diseases in human, and therapeutic advances have resulted in several agents that prevent their adverse effects. Recently, anti-inflammatory molecules that inhibit AGEs have been shown to be good candidates for ameliorating diabetic complications as well as degenerative diseases. This review was undertaken to present, discuss, and clarify current understanding regarding AGEs formation in association with macrophages, different diseases, therapeutic and diagnostic strategy and links with RAGE inhibition.

  8. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol

  9. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  10. Titanium particles that have undergone phagocytosis by macrophages lose the ability to activate other macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhiqing; Schwab, Luciana P; Alley, Carie F; Hasty, Karen A; Smith, Richard A

    2008-04-01

    Titanium particles derived from the wear of the orthopaedic implant surfaces can activate macrophages to secrete cytokines and stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption, causing osteolysis around orthopaedic implants. However, what happens to the titanium particles after being phagocytosed by macrophages is not known. We prepared titanium particles (as received, clean, and LPS-coated), and exposed them to macrophages in culture. Free particles were washed away after 24 h and the intracellular particles were kept in culture for additional 48 h until being harvested by lysing the cells. Particles that had been cell treated or noncell treated were examined by scanning electronic microscopy to analyze the shape, size, and concentration of the particles. The cell treated and noncell treated particles were exposed to macrophages in culture with a particle to cell ratio of 300:1. After 18 h, the levels of TNF-alpha in culture medium and the viability of the cells were examined. Clean particles did not stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages, while LPS-coated particles dramatically increased that response. Phagocytosis by macrophages did not change the shape and size of the particles, but depleted the ability of the particles to stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages. This indicates that macrophages are capable of rendering titanium particles inactive without degrading the particles, possibly by altering the surface chemistry of the particles.

  11. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  12. Rape prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. Updated June 4, 2015. www.cdc.gov/ ...

  13. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  14. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  15. Interaction of Mycoplasma dispar with bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, R A; Wannemuehler, M J; Rosenbusch, R F

    1992-01-01

    The capacity to avoid phagocytosis and the activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) by encapsulated Mycoplasma dispar or purified M. dispar capsule was investigated. Encapsulated and unencapsulated M. dispar were cocultured with BAM in the presence or absence of antisera prepared against unencapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule antiserum. Unopsonized mycoplasmas resisted phagocytosis, while only anti-capsule antibodies enhanced the phagocytosis of encapsulated mycoplasmas. BAM were cultured in the presence of purified M. dispar capsule or either live or heat-killed encapsulated or unencapsulated M. dispar. These BAM were then activated with Escherichia coli endotoxin or left without further activation. The supernatants of these cultures were assayed for tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and glucose consumption as indicators of macrophage activation. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 were produced by BAM stimulated with unencapsulated M. dispar but not when encapsulated M. dispar or its purified capsule was used. Similarly, glucose consumption was increased in the presence of unencapsulated M. dispar, but not when BAM were cocultured with encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule. When BAM were treated with purified capsule or encapsulated mycoplasmas, they could not be subsequently activated by endotoxin. These results indicate that encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule exerts an inhibitory effect on the activity of BAM and prevents the activation of these cells. PMID:1612758

  16. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  17. Effects of Ex Vivo y-Tocopherol on Airway Macrophage ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Elevated inflammation and altered immune responses are features found in atopic asthmatic airways. Recent studies indicate y-tocopherol (GT) supplementation can suppress airway inflammation in allergic asthma. We studied the effects of in vitro GT supplementation on receptor-mediated phagocytosis and expression of cell surface molecules associated with innate and adaptive immunity on sputum-derived macrophages. Cells from nonsmoking healthy (n = 6)and mild house dust mite-sensitive allergic asthmatics (n =6) were treated ex vivo with GT (300 uM) or saline (control). Phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan A bioparticles (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and expression of surface molecules associated with innate and adaptive immunity were assessed using flow cytometry. GT caused significantly decreased (p < 0.05) internalization of attached zymosan bioparticles and decreased (p < 0.05) macrophage expression of CD206,CD36 and CD86 in allergic asthmatics but not in corntrols. Overall, GT caused down regulation of both innate and adaptive immune response elements, and atopic status appears to be an important factor. Recent studies on the effects of the fat-soluble steriod hormone vitamins D and E suggest that dietary suplementation with these vitamins may be helpful for the prevention or in the treatment of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases, including atopic asthma.

  18. Targeting Nrf2 signaling improves bacterial clearance by alveolar macrophages in patients with COPD and in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Christopher J; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Xiaoni; Yarmus, Lonny; Brown, Robert H; Feller-Kopman, David; Wise, Robert; Biswal, Shyam

    2011-04-13

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have innate immune dysfunction in the lung largely due to defective macrophage phagocytosis. This deficiency results in periodic bacterial infections that cause acute exacerbations of COPD, a major source of morbidity and mortality. Recent studies indicate that a decrease in Nrf2 (nuclear erythroid-related factor 2) signaling in patients with COPD may hamper their ability to defend against oxidative stress, although the role of Nrf2 in COPD exacerbations has not been determined. Here, we test whether activation of Nrf2 by the phytochemical sulforaphane restores phagocytosis of clinical isolates of nontypeable Haemophilus influenza (NTHI) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) by alveolar macrophages from patients with COPD. Sulforaphane treatment restored bacteria recognition and phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients. Furthermore, sulforaphane treatment enhanced pulmonary bacterial clearance by alveolar macrophages and reduced inflammation in wild-type mice but not in Nrf2-deficient mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months. Gene expression and promoter analysis revealed that Nrf2 increased phagocytic ability of macrophages by direct transcriptional up-regulation of the scavenger receptor MARCO. Disruption of Nrf2 or MARCO abrogated sulforaphane-mediated bacterial phagocytosis by COPD alveolar macrophages. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Nrf2 and its downstream target MARCO in improving antibacterial defenses and provide a rationale for targeting this pathway, via pharmacological agents such as sulforaphane, to prevent exacerbations of COPD caused by bacterial infection.

  19. Macrophage phagocytosis of neutrophils at inflammatory/infectious foci: a cooperative mechanism in the control of infection and infectious inflammation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manuel T

    2011-05-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils possess overlapping and complementary features associated to their common origin and subsequent specialization during myelopoiesis. That specialization results in macrophage lineage being limited in antimicrobial capacity and cytotoxicity comparatively with the neutrophil lineage. These and other features of mature macrophages and neutrophils, like different lifespan and tissue localization, promote their particular lifestyles and prompt a functional partnership for cooperation in the protective antimicrobial host defense. This partnership includes reciprocal recruitment to infected sites, cooperative effector antimicrobial activities, and pro-resolving anti-inflammatory effects. One modality of the cooperative effector antimicrobial activities involves the phagocytosis by the macrophage of apoptosing neutrophils and of nonapoptosing neutrophils expressing "eat-me" signals. This cooperative interaction results in the enhancement of the comparatively limited macrophage antimicrobial capacity by the acquisition and use of potent neutrophil microbicidal molecules. Here, data are reviewed that suggest that this is a process actively engaging the two professional phagocytes. Phagocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages at inflammatory/infectious foci accumulates two effects beneficial to the protective host immune response: help in the control of the infection and prevention of neutrophil autolysis, effects that converge to accelerate the resolution of the infection-associated inflammation.

  20. fliP influences Citrobacter koseri macrophage uptake, cytokine expression and brain abscess formation in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Stacy M; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Badger, Julie L

    2006-12-01

    Citrobacter koseri causes neonatal meningitis frequently complicated with multiple brain abscesses. During C. koseri central nervous system infection in the neonatal rat model, previous studies have documented many bacteria-filled macrophages within the neonatal rat brain and abscesses. Previous studies have also shown that C. koseri is taken up by, survives phagolysosomal fusion and replicates in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. In this study, in order to elucidate genetic and cellular factors contributing to C. koseri persistence, a combinatory technique of differential fluorescence induction and transposon mutagenesis was employed to isolate C. koseri genes induced while inside macrophages. Several banks of mutants were subjected to a series of enrichments to select for gfp : : transposon fusion into genes that are turned off in vitro but expressed when intracellular within macrophages. Further screening identified several mutants attenuated in their recovery from macrophages compared with the wild-type. A mutation within an Escherichia coli fliP homologue caused significant attenuation in uptake and hypervirulence in vivo, resulting in death within 24 h. Furthermore, analysis of the immunoregulatory interleukin (IL)-10/IL-12 cytokine response during infection suggested that C. koseri fliP expression may alter this response. A better understanding of the bacteria-macrophage interaction at the molecular level and its contribution to brain abscess formation will assist in developing preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  1. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Notari, Luigi; Riera, Diana C; Sun, Rex; Bohl, Jennifer A; McLean, Leon P; Madden, Kathleen B; van Rooijen, Nico; Vanuytsel, Tim; Urban, Joseph F; Zhao, Aiping; Shea-Donohue, Terez

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic enteric nematodes induce a type 2 immune response characterized by increased production of Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (M2) to the site of infection. Nematode infection is associated with changes in epithelial permeability and inhibition of sodium-linked glucose absorption, but the role of M2 in these effects is unknown. Clodronate-containing liposomes were administered prior to and during nematode infection to deplete macrophages and prevent the development of M2 in response to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. The inhibition of epithelial glucose absorption that is associated with nematode infection involved a macrophage-dependent reduction in SGLT1 activity, with no change in receptor expression, and a macrophage-independent down-regulation of GLUT2 expression. The reduced transport of glucose into the enterocyte is compensated partially by an up-regulation of the constitutive GLUT1 transporter consistent with stress-induced activation of HIF-1α. Thus, nematode infection results in a "lean" epithelial phenotype that features decreased SGLT1 activity, decreased expression of GLUT2 and an emergent dependence on GLUT1 for glucose uptake into the enterocyte. Macrophages do not play a role in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in epithelial barrier function. There is a greater contribution, however, of paracellular absorption of glucose to supply the energy demands of host resistance. These data provide further evidence of the ability of macrophages to alter glucose metabolism of neighboring cells.

  2. Chronic signaling via the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTORC1 induces macrophage granuloma formation and marks sarcoidosis progression.

    PubMed

    Linke, Monika; Pham, Ha Thi Thanh; Katholnig, Karl; Schnöller, Thomas; Miller, Anne; Demel, Florian; Schütz, Birgit; Rosner, Margit; Kovacic, Boris; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Niederreiter, Birgit; Blüml, Stephan; Kuess, Peter; Sexl, Veronika; Müller, Mathias; Mikula, Mario; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Haschemi, Arvand; Susani, Martin; Hengstschläger, Markus; Gambello, Michael J; Weichhart, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The aggregation of hypertrophic macrophages constitutes the basis of all granulomatous diseases, such as tuberculosis or sarcoidosis, and is decisive for disease pathogenesis. However, macrophage-intrinsic pathways driving granuloma initiation and maintenance remain elusive. We found that activation of the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTORC1 in macrophages by deletion of the gene encoding tuberous sclerosis 2 (Tsc2) was sufficient to induce hypertrophy and proliferation, resulting in excessive granuloma formation in vivo. TSC2-deficient macrophages formed mTORC1-dependent granulomatous structures in vitro and showed constitutive proliferation that was mediated by the neo-expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Moreover, mTORC1 promoted metabolic reprogramming via CDK4 toward increased glycolysis while simultaneously inhibiting NF-κB signaling and apoptosis. Inhibition of mTORC1 induced apoptosis and completely resolved granulomas in myeloid TSC2-deficient mice. In human sarcoidosis patients, mTORC1 activation, macrophage proliferation and glycolysis were identified as hallmarks that correlated with clinical disease progression. Collectively, TSC2 maintains macrophage quiescence and prevents mTORC1-dependent granulomatous disease with clinical implications for sarcoidosis.

  3. Histone Deacetylase 7 Promotes Toll-like Receptor 4-dependent Proinflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Shakespear, Melanie R.; Hohenhaus, Daniel M.; Kelly, Greg M.; Kamal, Nabilah A.; Gupta, Praveer; Labzin, Larisa I.; Schroder, Kate; Garceau, Valerie; Barbero, Sheila; Iyer, Abishek; Hume, David A.; Reid, Robert C.; Irvine, Katharine M.; Fairlie, David P.; Sweet, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Broad-spectrum inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) constrain Toll-like receptor (TLR)-inducible production of key proinflammatory mediators. Here we investigated HDAC-dependent inflammatory responses in mouse macrophages. Of the classical Hdacs, Hdac7 was expressed at elevated levels in inflammatory macrophages (thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages) as compared with bone marrow-derived macrophages and the RAW264 cell line. Overexpression of a specific, alternatively spliced isoform of Hdac7 lacking the N-terminal 22 amino acids (Hdac7-u), but not the Refseq Hdac7 (Hdac7-s), promoted LPS-inducible expression of Hdac-dependent genes (Edn1, Il-12p40, and Il-6) in RAW264 cells. A novel class IIa-selective HDAC inhibitor reduced recombinant human HDAC7 enzyme activity as well as TLR-induced production of inflammatory mediators in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages. Both LPS and Hdac7-u up-regulated the activity of the Edn1 promoter in an HDAC-dependent fashion in RAW264 cells. A hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 binding site in this promoter was required for HDAC-dependent TLR-inducible promoter activity and for Hdac7- and HIF-1α-mediated trans-activation. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that both Hdac7-u and Hdac7-s interacted with HIF-1α, whereas only Hdac7-s interacted with the transcriptional repressor CtBP1. Thus, Hdac7-u positively regulates HIF-1α-dependent TLR signaling in macrophages, whereas an interaction with CtBP1 likely prevents Hdac7-s from exerting this effect. Hdac7 may represent a potential inflammatory disease target. PMID:23853092

  4. Persistence versus Escape: Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus fumigatus Employ Different Strategies during Interactions with Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Slesiona, Silvia; Gressler, Markus; Mihlan, Michael; Zaehle, Christoph; Schaller, Martin; Barz, Dagmar; Hube, Bernhard; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Brock, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Invasive bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (IBPA) is a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Although Aspergillus terreus is frequently found in the environment, A. fumigatus is by far the main cause of IBPA. However, once A. terreus establishes infection in the host, disease is as fatal as A. fumigatus infections. Thus, we hypothesized that the initial steps of disease establishment might be fundamentally different between these two species. Since alveolar macrophages represent one of the first phagocytes facing inhaled conidia, we compared the interaction of A. terreus and A. fumigatus conidia with alveolar macrophages. A. terreus conidia were phagocytosed more rapidly than A. fumigatus conidia, possibly due to higher exposure of β-1,3-glucan and galactomannan on the surface. In agreement, blocking of dectin-1 and mannose receptors significantly reduced phagocytosis of A. terreus, but had only a moderate effect on phagocytosis of A. fumigatus. Once phagocytosed, and in contrast to A. fumigatus, A. terreus did not inhibit acidification of phagolysosomes, but remained viable without signs of germination both in vitro and in immunocompetent mice. The inability of A. terreus to germinate and pierce macrophages resulted in significantly lower cytotoxicity compared to A. fumigatus. Blocking phagolysosome acidification by the v-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin increased A. terreus germination rates and cytotoxicity. Recombinant expression of the A. nidulans wA naphthopyrone synthase, a homologue of A. fumigatus PksP, inhibited phagolysosome acidification and resulted in increased germination, macrophage damage and virulence in corticosteroid-treated mice. In summary, we show that A. terreus and A. fumigatus have evolved significantly different strategies to survive the attack of host immune cells. While A. fumigatus prevents phagocytosis and phagolysosome acidification and escapes from macrophages by germination, A. terreus is rapidly phagocytosed, but

  5. Tumor Associated Macrophages in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, Olga V.; Samoilova, Daria V.; Shitova, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are an important element of tumor stroma. They originate from blood monocytes attracted by chemokines and cytokines produced by tumor cells and, being instructed by tumor microenvironment, develop into potent tumor-supporting cell population. TAMs were demonstrated to directly stimulate tumor cell proliferation and to promote angiogenesis. Further TAMs provide for efficient immune escape by producing immunosuppressive cytokines and facilitate tumor dissemination by producing extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes. In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), numerous studies were performed for elucidation of the role of TAM in tumor progression. Using pan-macrophages marker CD68 and type 2 macrophage (M2) markers CD163 and CD206, it was demonstrated that increased density of TAMs is associated with poor survival of patients. Although most of the studies are focused on M2 population in RCC, several markers rather typical for type 1 macrophages (M1) were also characterized. Macrophages isolated from RCC tumors were shown to produce proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and CCL2. It can be concluded that RCC is an excellent example of a tumor with hybrid phenotype of TAMs that share both M1 and M2 properties. Moreover, TAMs seem to be an attractive therapeutic target as well. Further investigations are needed for identification of RCC-specific TAM markers with high predictive capacity and/or suitable for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27807511

  6. Macrophage adaptation in airway inflammatory resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas; Salek-Ardakani, Samira; Hussell, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial and viral infections (exacerbations) are particularly problematic in those with underlying respiratory disease, including post-viral infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Patients experiencing exacerbations tend to be at the more severe end of the disease spectrum and are often difficult to treat. Most of the unmet medical need remains in this patient group. Airway macrophages are one of the first cell populations to encounter airborne pathogens and, in health, exist in a state of reduced responsiveness due to interactions with the respiratory epithelium and specific factors found in the airway lumen. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, surfactant proteins and signalling via the CD200 receptor, for example, all raise the threshold above which airway macrophages can be activated. We highlight that following severe respiratory inflammation, the airspace microenvironment does not automatically re-set to baseline and may leave airway macrophages more restrained than they were at the outset. This excessive restraint is mediated in part by the clearance of apoptotic cells and components of extracellular matrix. This implies that one strategy to combat respiratory exacerbations would be to retune airway macrophage responsiveness to allow earlier bacterial recognition.

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Monocyte and Macrophage Function

    PubMed Central

    Hoeksema, Marten A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Monocytes and macrophages are key players in tissue homeostasis and immune responses. Epigenetic processes tightly regulate cellular functioning in health and disease. Recent Advances: Recent technical developments have allowed detailed characterizations of the transcriptional circuitry underlying monocyte and macrophage regulation. Upon differentiation and activation, enhancers are selected by lineage-determining and signal-dependent transcription factors. Enhancers are shown to be very dynamic and activation of these enhancers underlies the differences in gene transcription between monocytes and macrophages and their subtypes. Critical Issues: It has been shown that epigenetic enzymes regulate the functioning of these cells and targeting of epigenetic enzymes has been proven to be a valuable tool to dampen inflammatory responses. We give a comprehensive overview of recent developments and understanding of the epigenetic pathways that control monocyte and macrophage function and of the epigenetic enzymes involved in monocyte and macrophage differentiation and activation. Future Directions: The key challenges in the upcoming years will be to study epigenetic changes in human disease and to better understand how epigenetic pathways control the inflammatory repertoire in disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 758–774. PMID:26983461

  8. Macrophages: Master Regulators of Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Barron, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages are found in close proximity with collagen-producing myofibroblasts and indisputably play a key role in fibrosis. They produce profibrotic mediators that directly activate fibroblasts, including transforming growth factor-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor, and control extracellular matrix turnover by regulating the balance of various matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases. Macrophages also regulate fibrogenesis by secreting chemokines that recruit fibroblasts and other inflammatory cells. With their potential to act in both a pro- and antifibrotic capacity, as well as their ability to regulate the activation of resident and recruited myofibroblasts, macrophages and the factors they express are integrated into all stages of the fibrotic process. These various, and sometimes opposing, functions may be performed by distinct macrophage subpopulations, the identification of which is a growing focus of fibrosis research. Although collagen-secreting myofibroblasts once were thought of as the master “producers” of fibrosis, this review will illustrate how macrophages function as the master “regulators” of fibrosis. PMID:20665377

  9. The TLR4-Active Morphine Metabolite Morphine-3-Glucuronide Does Not Elicit Macrophage Classical Activation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khabbazi, Samira; Xie, Nan; Pu, Wenjun; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are abundant in the tumor microenvironment where they adopt a pro-tumor phenotype following alternative polarization induced by paracrine factors from cancer and stromal cells. In contrast, classically activated macrophages have tumoricidal activities, such that the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages has become a novel therapeutic target. Toll-like receptor 4 engagement promotes classical activation of macrophages, and recent literature suggests TLR4 agonism to prevent metastasis and promote survival in experimental metastasis models. A growing number of studies indicate that TLR4 can respond to opioids, including the opioid receptor-inactive morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). We measured the activation of TLR4 in a reporter cell line exogenously expressing TLR4 and TLR4 co-receptors, and confirmed that M3G weakly but significantly activates TLR4. We hypothesized that M3G would promote the expression of classical activation signature genes in macrophages in vitro. We exposed mouse and human macrophage cell lines to M3G or the TLR4 activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone or in combination with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The classical macrophage activation markers tested were iNOS, CD86, IL-6, or TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells and IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, CXCL10, and CXCL11 in THP1 cells. Our results show that despite exhibiting TLR4-activation ability, M3G does not elicit the expression of classical activation markers in LPS-responsive macrophages. PMID:27909407

  10. The TLR4-Active Morphine Metabolite Morphine-3-Glucuronide Does Not Elicit Macrophage Classical Activation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Xie, Nan; Pu, Wenjun; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are abundant in the tumor microenvironment where they adopt a pro-tumor phenotype following alternative polarization induced by paracrine factors from cancer and stromal cells. In contrast, classically activated macrophages have tumoricidal activities, such that the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages has become a novel therapeutic target. Toll-like receptor 4 engagement promotes classical activation of macrophages, and recent literature suggests TLR4 agonism to prevent metastasis and promote survival in experimental metastasis models. A growing number of studies indicate that TLR4 can respond to opioids, including the opioid receptor-inactive morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). We measured the activation of TLR4 in a reporter cell line exogenously expressing TLR4 and TLR4 co-receptors, and confirmed that M3G weakly but significantly activates TLR4. We hypothesized that M3G would promote the expression of classical activation signature genes in macrophages in vitro. We exposed mouse and human macrophage cell lines to M3G or the TLR4 activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone or in combination with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The classical macrophage activation markers tested were iNOS, CD86, IL-6, or TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells and IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, CXCL10, and CXCL11 in THP1 cells. Our results show that despite exhibiting TLR4-activation ability, M3G does not elicit the expression of classical activation markers in LPS-responsive macrophages.

  11. Modulation of macrophage apoptosis by antimycobacterial therapy: physiological role of apoptosis in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Diana; Garcia, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2003-07-15

    Apoptosis is a form of cell death that avoids inflammatory responses. We had previously reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Purified Protein Derivative (PPD) induce apoptosis in murine macrophages. The production of TNFalpha and IL-10 in response to Mtb infection modulates apoptosis by controlling nitric oxide production and caspase activation. Furthermore, Mtb triggers calcium influx responsible for mitochondrial alterations, an early pathway of apoptosis, independently of TNFalpha and IL-10. In tuberculosis patients apoptotic macrophages are found in granulomas and bronchoalveolar lavages, suggesting that apoptosis may participate in the control of Mtb. To further explore the role of macrophage apoptosis in tuberculosis, we studied the capacity of standard antimycobacterial drugs to modulate different events associated with the induction of apoptosis. The B10R murine macrophage line was infected or not with Mtb (5:1 bacteria to macrophage ratio) or exposed to PPD (10 microg/ml), in the presence or absence of varying concentrations (1-20 microg/ml) of anti mycobacterial drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, thiacetazone, streptomycin, and ethambutol). Inhibition of the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis by all drugs studied/correlated with inhibition of permeability transition (PT) alterations; TNFalpha, IL-10, and nitric oxide production, and caspase-1 activation. However, these drugs did not affect PPD-induced apoptosis or its associated events, suggesting that the ability of antimycobacterial drugs to block macrophage apoptosis could be explained by their effects on the metabolic activities of Mtb. All drugs, except isoniazid, at higher concentrations, induced PT alterations in noninfected macrophages in a way that appears to be dependent of calcium, since a calcium chelator prevented it. The results presented herein suggest that the pharmacological manipulation of pathways associated with macrophage apoptosis may affect the intracellular growth of

  12. ST6Gal-I Regulates Macrophage Apoptosis via α2-6 Sialylation of the TNFR1 Death Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyu; Swindall, Amanda F.; Kesterson, Robert A.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Bullard, Daniel C.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages play a central role in innate immunity, however mechanisms regulating macrophage survival are not fully understood. Herein we describe a novel apoptotic pathway involving α2-6 sialylation of the TNFR1 death receptor by the ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase. Variant glycosylation of TNFR1 has not previously been implicated in TNFR1 function, and little is known regarding the TNFR1 glycan composition. To study sialylation in macrophages, we treated U937 monocytic cells with PMA, which stimulates both macrophage differentiation and apoptosis. Interestingly, macrophage differentiation induces ST6Gal-I down-regulation, leading to reduced α2-6 sialylation of selected receptors. To prevent loss of α2-6 sialylation, we forced constitutive expression of ST6Gal-I, and found that this strongly inhibited PMA-induced apoptosis. Given that PMA-mediated apoptosis is thought to result from up-regulation of TNFα, which then activates TNFR1, we next evaluated the α2-6 sialylation of TNFR1. U937 cells with forced ST6Gal-I displayed TNFR1 with elevated α2-6 sialylation, and this was associated with diminished TNFα-stimulated apoptosis. Correspondingly, removal of α2-6 sialylation from TNFR1 through either neuraminidase treatment or expression of ST6Gal-I shRNA markedly enhanced TNFα-mediated apoptosis. To confirm the physiologic importance of TNFR1 sialylation, we generated overexpressing ST6Gal-I transgenic mice. Peritoneal macrophages from transgenic lines displayed TNFR1 with elevated α2-6 sialylation, and these cells were significantly protected against TNFα-stimulated apoptosis. Moreover, greater numbers of thioglycollate-induced peritoneal cells were observed in transgenic mice. These collective results highlight a new mechanism of TNFR1 regulation, and further intimate that loss of α2-6 sialylation during macrophage differentiation may limit macrophage lifespan by sensitizing cells to TNFα-stimulated apoptosis. PMID:21930713

  13. Double immunofluorescent staining of rat macrophages in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue using two monoclonal mouse antibodies.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Raymond A; Isidro, Angel A; Cruz, Myrella L; Hernandez, Siomara; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach of double immunostaining to visualize more than one protein in tissues or cells using antibodies from two different host species is not always feasible due to limitations with antibody availability. Previously reported methodologies for performing multiple immunostains on the same tissue or cells with antibodies originating from the same species are varied in their complexity, sensitivity, and approach to prevent unwanted interactions between antibodies. In the ever-expanding field of macrophage biology, much more is known about mouse and human macrophages than their rat counterparts. The limited availability of validated and well-characterized monoclonal antibodies from different species is one factor responsible for preventing advances in rat macrophage biology. Here we describe an immunostaining method for identifying and examining rat macrophages that is sufficiently sensitive for use in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and that uses only commercially available reagents and antibodies. This method can be used to help characterize both physiological and pathophysiological processes in rat macrophages and can be adapted for use with any two antibodies from the same species of origin as long as one of the antibodies is biotinylated.

  14. Resveratrol Interferes with IL1-β-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Paracrine Interaction between Primary Chondrocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Limagne, Emeric; Lançon, Allan; Delmas, Dominique; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    State of the art. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic articular disease characterized by cartilage degradation and osteophyte formation. OA physiopathology is multifactorial and involves mechanical and hereditary factors. So far, there is neither preventive medicine to delay cartilage breakdown nor curative treatment. Objectives. To investigate pro-inflammatory paracrine interactions between human primary chondrocytes and macrophages following interleukin-1-β (IL-1β) treatment; to evaluate the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of resveratrol. Results. The activation of NF-κB in chondrocytes by IL-1β induced IL-6 secretion. The latter will then activate STAT3 protein in macrophages. Moreover, STAT3 was able to positively regulate IL-6 secretion, as confirmed by the doubling level of IL-6 in the coculture compared to macrophage monoculture. These experiments confirm the usefulness of the coculture model in the inflammatory arthritis-linked process as a closer biological situation to the synovial joint than separated chondrocytes and macrophages. Il also demonstrated the presence of an inflammatory amplification loop induced by IL-1β. Resveratrol showed a strong inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory marker secretion. The decrease of IL-6 secretion is dependent on the NFκB inhibition in the chondrocytes. Such reduction of the IL-6 level can limit STAT3 activation in the macrophages, leading to the interruption of the inflammatory amplification loop. Conclusion. These results increase our understanding of the anti-inflammatory actions of resveratrol and open new potential approaches to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. PMID:27187448

  15. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Graham, Joseph G.; Onyilagha, Frances I.; MacDonald, Laura J.; Doeppler, Heike R.; Storz, Peter; Kurten, Richard C.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E) mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E) mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E) expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A) in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA in human

  16. Adipocyte fetuin-A contributes to macrophage migration into adipose tissue and polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Ray, Sukanta; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Majumdar, Subeer S; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2013-09-27

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue during obesity and their phenotypic conversion from anti-inflammatory M2 to proinflammatory M1 subtype significantly contributes to develop a link between inflammation and insulin resistance; signaling molecule(s) for these events, however, remains poorly understood. We demonstrate here that excess lipid in the adipose tissue environment may trigger one such signal. Adipose tissue from obese diabetic db/db mice, high fat diet-fed mice, and obese diabetic patients showed significantly elevated fetuin-A (FetA) levels in respect to their controls; partially hepatectomized high fat diet mice did not show noticeable alteration, indicating adipose tissue to be the source of this alteration. In adipocytes, fatty acid induces FetA gene and protein expressions, resulting in its copious release. We found that FetA could act as a chemoattractant for macrophages. To simulate lipid-induced inflammatory conditions when proinflammatory adipose tissue and macrophages create a niche of an altered microenvironment, we set up a transculture system of macrophages and adipocytes; the addition of fatty acid to adipocytes released FetA into the medium, which polarized M2 macrophages to M1. This was further confirmed by direct FetA addition to macrophages. Taken together, lipid-induced FetA from adipocytes is an efficient chemokine for macrophage migration and polarization. These findings open a new dimension for understanding obesity-induced inflammation.

  17. Adipocyte Fetuin-A Contributes to Macrophage Migration into Adipose Tissue and Polarization of Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Ray, Sukanta; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue during obesity and their phenotypic conversion from anti-inflammatory M2 to proinflammatory M1 subtype significantly contributes to develop a link between inflammation and insulin resistance; signaling molecule(s) for these events, however, remains poorly understood. We demonstrate here that excess lipid in the adipose tissue environment may trigger one such signal. Adipose tissue from obese diabetic db/db mice, high fat diet-fed mice, and obese diabetic patients showed significantly elevated fetuin-A (FetA) levels in respect to their controls; partially hepatectomized high fat diet mice did not show noticeable alteration, indicating adipose tissue to be the source of this alteration. In adipocytes, fatty acid induces FetA gene and protein expressions, resulting in its copious release. We found that FetA could act as a chemoattractant for macrophages. To simulate lipid-induced inflammatory conditions when proinflammatory adipose tissue and macrophages create a niche of an altered microenvironment, we set up a transculture system of macrophages and adipocytes; the addition of fatty acid to adipocytes released FetA into the medium, which polarized M2 macrophages to M1. This was further confirmed by direct FetA addition to macrophages. Taken together, lipid-induced FetA from adipocytes is an efficient chemokine for macrophage migration and polarization. These findings open a new dimension for understanding obesity-induced inflammation. PMID:23943623

  18. Macrophage mannose receptor-specific gene delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Yao, Xing-Lei; Du, Anariwa; Tang, Gu-Ping; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and they exhibit great functional diversity. They have been extensively applied in anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-cancer therapies. However, the application of macrophages is limited by the efficiency of their engineering. The macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206), a C-type lectin receptor, is ubiquitously expressed on macrophages and has a high affinity for mannose oligosaccharides. In the present study, we developed a novel non-viral vehicle with specific affinity for MMR. Mannan was cationized with spermine at a grafted ratio of ∼12% to deliver DNA and was characterized as a stable system for delivery. This spermine-mannan (SM)-based delivery system was evaluated as a biocompatible vehicle with superior transfection efficiency on murine macrophages, up to 28.5-fold higher than spermine-pullulan, 11.5-fold higher than polyethylenimine and 3.0-fold higher than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We confirmed that the SM-based delivery system for macrophages transfection was MMR-specific and we described the intracellular transport of the delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first study using SM to demonstrate a mannose receptor-specific gene delivery system, thereby highlighting the potential of a novel specific non-viral delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

  19. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen. PMID:26632348

  20. Skin wound healing modulation by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2010-07-25

    Skin wound healing is a multi stage phenomenon that requires the activation, recruitment or activity of numerous cell types as keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblast and inflammatory cells. Among the latter, macrophages appear to be central to this process. They colonize the wound at its very early stage and in addition to their protective immune role seem to organize the activity of other cell types at the following stages of the healing. Their benefit to this process is however controversial, as macrophages are described to promote the speed of healing but may also favour the fibrosis resulting from it in scars. Moreover wound healing defects are associated with abnormalities in the inflammatory phase. In this review, we summarise our knowledge on what are the Wound Associated Macrophages, and how they interact with the other cell types to control the reepithelisation, angiogenesis and the extracellular matrix remodelling. We believe this knowledge may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on skin wounds.

  1. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-02

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  2. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the

  3. Hypericin-mediated sonodynamic therapy induces autophagy and decreases lipids in THP-1 macrophage by promoting ROS-dependent nuclear translocation of TFEB

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuesong; Zhang, Xin; Zheng, Longbin; Kou, Jiayuan; Zhong, Zhaoyu; Jiang, Yueqing; Wang, Wei; Dong, Zengxiang; Liu, Zhongni; Han, Xiaobo; Li, Jing; Tian, Ye; Zhao, Yajun; Yang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Lipid catabolism disorder is the primary cause of atherosclerosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) prevents atherosclerosis by activating macrophage autophagy to promote lipid degradation. Hypericin-mediated sonodynamic therapy (HY-SDT) has been proved non-invasively inducing THP-1-derived macrophage apoptosis; however, it is unknown whether macrophage autophagy could be triggered by HY-SDT to influence cellular lipid catabolism via regulating TFEB. Here, we report that HY-SDT resulted in the time-dependent THP-1-derived macrophage autophagy activation through AMPK/AKT/mTOR pathway. Besides, TFEB nuclear translocation in macrophage was triggered by HY-SDT to promote autophagy activation and lysosome regeneration which enhanced lipid degradation in response to atherogenic lipid stressors. Moreover, following HY-SDT, the ABCA1 expression level was increased to promote lipid efflux in macrophage, and the expression levels of CD36 and SR-A were decreased to inhibit lipid uptake, both of which were prevented by TFEB knockdown. These results indicated that TFEB nuclear translocation activated by HY-SDT was not only the key regulator of autophagy activation and lysosome regeneration in macrophage to promote lipolysis, but also had a crucial role in reverse cholesterol transporters to decrease lipid uptake and increase lipid efflux. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were adequately generated in macrophage by HY-SDT. Further, ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine abolished HY-SDT-induced TFEB nuclear translocation and autophagy activation, implying that ROS were the primary upstream factors responsible for these effects during HY-SDT. In summary, our data indicate that HY-SDT decreases lipid content in macrophage by promoting ROS-dependent nuclear translocation of TFEB to influence consequent autophagy activation and cholesterol transporters. Thus, HY-SDT may be beneficial for atherosclerosis via TFEB regulation to ameliorate lipid overload in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:28005078

  4. Monocyte/macrophage differentiation in dermatomyositis and polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin M; Piepkorn, Martin; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Menck, Sylvia; Hanefeld, Folker; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J

    2004-08-01

    Recent advances have revealed significant differences in the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies. To determine whether different patterns of macrophage differentiation are a useful tool to delineate the major groups of inflammatory myopathies, the muscle biopsies of 11 patients with dermatomyositis and 12 patients with polymyositis were studied using different macrophage markers. In polymyositis, the early-activation markers MRP14 and 27E10 stained the majority of macrophages, which were recognized by the pan-macrophage marker Ki-M1P and which were located primarily in the endomysium. In dermatomyositis, macrophages predominantly expressed the late-activation marker 25F9 and were found mainly in the perimysium. Thus, the location and presence of different subsets of macrophages distinguish dermatomyositis and polymyositis. The predominance of early-activated macrophages in polymyositis indicates a more acute disease process. The findings in dermatomyositis, by contrast, suggest a role of persistent monocytes/macrophages in the disease process.

  5. Macrophages and Their Role in Atherosclerosis: Pathophysiology and Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Nikiforov, Nikita G.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis can be regarded as a chronic inflammatory state, in which macrophages play different and important roles. Phagocytic proinflammatory cells populate growing atherosclerotic lesions, where they actively participate in cholesterol accumulation. Moreover, macrophages promote formation of complicated and unstable plaques by maintaining proinflammatory microenvironment. At the same time, anti-inflammatory macrophages contribute to tissue repair and remodelling and plaque stabilization. Macrophages therefore represent attractive targets for development of antiatherosclerotic therapy, which can aim to reduce monocyte recruitment to the lesion site, inhibit proinflammatory macrophages, or stimulate anti-inflammatory responses and cholesterol efflux. More studies are needed, however, to create a comprehensive classification of different macrophage phenotypes and to define their roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on macrophage diversity, activation, and plasticity in atherosclerosis and describe macrophage-based cellular tests for evaluation of potential antiatherosclerotic substances. PMID:27493969

  6. Induction of tolerance in macrophages by cholera toxin B chain.

    PubMed

    Burkart, V; Kim, Y; Kauer, M; Kolb, H

    1999-01-01

    Model systems of human type 1 diabetes have revealed an important role of cellular immune reactions involving macrophages and T cells in the destruction of autologous insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Recently, the cholera toxin B chain (CTB) was found to suppress T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases including autoimmune diabetes of nonobese diabetic mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that CTB exerts much of its immunomodulatory activity by targeting macrophages. These studies are reviewed here. Cells of the human monocyte line Mono Mac 6 were exposed to CTB and subsequently tested for proinflammatory immunoreactivity in response to challenge with endotoxin (LPS from Escherichia coli, 10 ng/ml for 5 h). Incubation of monocytes with CTB (10 microgram/ml) suppressed a later proinflammatory response to LPS as demonstrated by suppression of TNFalpha release from 6.7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml in cultures without CTB preexposure to 1.8 +/- 1.1 ng/ml in CTB-pretreated cells (p < 0.001). In contrast, the release of IL-10 remained inducible after CTB pretreatment. RT-PCR analysis showed that the suppression of TNFalpha production occurred at the level of mRNA formation. Control experiments excluded a role of possible contamination of CTB by endotoxin or the intact cholera toxin. Tolerance induction was maximal after 5 h of CTB exposure and persisted for 24 h. The suppressive effect of CTB was dose-dependent and no more recognizable at prevented tolerization of macrophages. IFNgamma (1,200 U/ml) was found to antagonize actions of CTB. In contrast to desensitization by low doses of LPS, tolerance induction by CTB occurred 'silently', i.e. in the absence of a measurable proinflammatory response. In view of the potent instructive role of the innate immune system on T cell responses these findings are important in understanding how CTB prevents the development of autoimmune

  7. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species are essential for differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tominaga, Kumiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Tomoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2009-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from NADPH oxidase (Nox) homologues have been suggested to regulate osteoclast differentiation. However, no bone abnormalities have been documented in Nox1 deficient, Nox2 deficient, or Nox3 mutant mice. During receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts, mRNA levels of Nox enzymes (Nox1-4) and their adaptor proteins were monitored by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. RAW264.7 cells constitutively expressed abundant Nox2 mRNA and small amounts of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. RANKL markedly attenuated Nox2 mRNA expression in association with reciprocal up-regulation of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. Introduction of small interference RNA targeting p67(phox) or p22(phox) into RAW264.7 cells effectively down-regulated ROS generation and significantly suppressed the RANKL-stimulated differentiation, which was assessed by appearance of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive, multinucleated cells having an ability to form resorption pits on calcium phosphate thin film-coated disks, and by expression of osteoclast marker genes (TRAP, cathepsin K, Atp6i, ClC-7, and NFATc1). Our results suggest that RANKL may stimulate switching between Nox homologues during osteoclast differentiation, and Nox-derived ROS may be crucial for RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  8. Immunometabolism governs dendritic cell and macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on intracellular metabolism in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages provide new insights on the functioning of these critical controllers of innate and adaptive immunity. Both cell types undergo profound metabolic reprogramming in response to environmental cues, such as hypoxia or nutrient alterations, but importantly also in response to danger signals and cytokines. Metabolites such as succinate and citrate have a direct impact on the functioning of macrophages. Immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of DCs is also determined by anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. These findings provide new prospects for therapeutic manipulation in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:26694970

  9. Pneumolysin activates macrophage lysosomal membrane permeabilization and executes apoptosis by distinct mechanisms without membrane pore formation.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Martin A; Naughton, Michael; Preston, Julie; Mitchell, Andrea; Holmes, Ashleigh; Marriott, Helen M; Read, Robert C; Mitchell, Timothy J; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2014-10-07

    Intracellular killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae is complemented by induction of macrophage apoptosis. Here, we show that the toxin pneumolysin (PLY) contributes both to lysosomal/phagolysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), an upstream event programing susceptibility to apoptosis, and to apoptosis execution via a mitochondrial pathway, through distinct mechanisms. PLY is necessary but not sufficient for the maximal induction of LMP and apoptosis. PLY's ability to induce both LMP and apoptosis is independent of its ability to form cytolytic pores and requires only the first three domains of PLY. LMP involves TLR (Toll-like receptor) but not NLRP3/ASC (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [Nod]-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing protein 3/apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain) signaling and is part of a PLY-dependent but phagocytosis-independent host response that includes the production of cytokines, including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). LMP involves progressive and selective permeability to 40-kDa but not to 250-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran, as PLY accumulates in the cytoplasm. In contrast, the PLY-dependent execution of apoptosis requires phagocytosis and is part of a host response to intracellular bacteria that also includes NO generation. In cells challenged with PLY-deficient bacteria, reconstitution of LMP using the lysomotrophic detergent LeuLeuOMe favored cell necrosis whereas PLY reconstituted apoptosis. The results suggest that PLY contributes to macrophage activation and cytokine production but also engages LMP. Following bacterial phagocytosis, PLY triggers apoptosis and prevents macrophage necrosis as a component of a broad-based antimicrobial strategy. This illustrates how a key virulence factor can become the focus of a multilayered and coordinated innate response by macrophages, optimizing pathogen clearance and limiting inflammation. Importance: Streptococcus

  10. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Mendez, Armando J.; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Webster, Keith; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. CD36 mediates oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake and contributes to macrophage foam cell formation. We investigated a role for the CD36 pathway in nicotine-induced activation of macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine in the same plasma concentration range found in smokers increased the CD36+/CD14+ cell population in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, increased CD36 expression of human THP1 macrophages, and increased macrophage production of reactive oxygen species, PKCδ phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Nicotine-induced CD36 expression was suppressed by antioxidants and by specific PKCδ and PPARγ inhibitors, implicating mechanistic roles for these intermediates. Nicotine synergized with oxLDL to increase macrophage expression of CD36 and cytokines TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-6, and CXCL9, all of which were prevented by CD36 small interfering (si)RNA. Incubation with oxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 72 h resulted in lipid deposition in macrophages and foam cell formation. Preincubation with nicotine further increased oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation, which was also prevented by CD36 siRNA. Treatment of apoE−/− mice with nicotine markedly exacerbated inflammatory monocyte levels and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation, effects that were not seen in CD36−/− apoE−/− mice. Our results show that physiological levels of nicotine increase CD36 expression in macrophages, a pathway that may account at least in part for the known proinflammatory and proatherogenic properties of nicotine. These results identify such enhanced CD36 expression as a novel nicotine-mediated pathway that may constitute an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in smokers. The results also suggest that exacerbated atherogenesis by this pathway may be an adverse side effect of

  11. Clearance of Pneumococcal Colonization in Infants Is Delayed through Altered Macrophage Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Steven J.; Tamashiro, Edwin; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Infections are a common cause of infant mortality worldwide, especially due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Colonization is the prerequisite to invasive pneumococcal disease, and is particularly frequent and prolonged in children, though the mechanisms underlying this susceptibility are unknown. We find that infant mice exhibit prolonged pneumococcal carriage, and are delayed in recruiting macrophages, the effector cells of clearance, into the nasopharyngeal lumen. This lack of macrophage recruitment is paralleled by a failure to upregulate chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (Ccl2 or Mcp-1), a macrophage chemoattractant that is required in adult mice to promote clearance. Baseline expression of Ccl2 and the related chemokine Ccl7 is higher in the infant compared to the adult upper respiratory tract, and this effect requires the infant microbiota. These results demonstrate that signals governing macrophage recruitment are altered at baseline in infant mice, which prevents the development of appropriate innate cell infiltration in response to pneumococcal colonization, delaying clearance of pneumococcal carriage. PMID:26107875

  12. Raman microscopy of phagocytosis: shedding light on macrophage foam cell formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2006-02-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in the innate immune response of leukocytes against invading microorganisms. The superoxide (O II -) that is generated by this enzyme upon infection is directly and indirectly used in bacterial killing. The catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase, the membrane-bound protein heterodimer flavocytochrome b 558, contains two heme moieties. Here, we first briefly discuss our recent confocal resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy and microscopy experiments on flavocytochrome b 558 in both resting and phagocytosing neutrophilic granulocytes. Such experiments allow the determination of the redox state of flavocytochrome b 558 inside the cell, which directly reflects the electron transporting activity of NADPH oxidase. Subsequently, we report that incubation of murine RAW 264.7 macrophages with PolyActive microspheres for 1 week in culture medium leads to morphological and biochemical changes in the macrophages that are characteristic for the generation of macrophage-derived foam cells. Lipid-laden foam cells are the hallmark of early atherosclerotic lesions. Using nonresonant Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, we demonstrate that the numerous intracellular droplets in macrophages exposed to microspheres are rich in cholesteryl esters. The finding that phagocytic processes may trigger foam cell formation reinforces the current belief that (chronic) infection and inflammation are linked to the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. The study of such a connection may reveal new therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis treatment or prevention.

  13. Iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit tumour growth by inducing pro-inflammatory macrophage polarization in tumour tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Hutter, Gregor; Spitler, Ryan; Lenkov, Olga; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shaw, Aubie; Pajarinen, Jukka Sakari; Nejadnik, Hossein; Goodman, Stuart; Moseley, Michael; Coussens, Lisa Marie; Daldrup-Link, Heike Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Until now, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved iron supplement ferumoxytol and other iron oxide nanoparticles have been used for treating iron deficiency, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and as drug carriers. Here, we show an intrinsic therapeutic effect of ferumoxytol on the growth of early mammary cancers, and lung cancer metastases in liver and lungs. In vitro, adenocarcinoma cells co-incubated with ferumoxytol and macrophages showed increased caspase-3 activity. Macrophages exposed to ferumoxytol displayed increased mRNA associated with pro-inflammatory Th1-type responses. In vivo, ferumoxytol significantly inhibited growth of subcutaneous adenocarcinomas in mice. In addition, intravenous ferumoxytol treatment before intravenous tumour cell challenge prevented development of liver metastasis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histopathology studies showed that the observed tumour growth inhibition was accompanied by increased presence of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in the tumour tissues. Our results suggest that ferumoxytol could be applied ‘off label’ to protect the liver from metastatic seeds and potentiate macrophage-modulating cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27668795

  14. Mycobacterial p(1)-type ATPases mediate resistance to zinc poisoning in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Botella, Hélène; Peyron, Pascale; Levillain, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Poquet, Yannick; Brandli, Irène; Wang, Chuan; Tailleux, Ludovic; Tilleul, Sylvain; Charrière, Guillaume M; Waddell, Simon J; Foti, Maria; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Gao, Qian; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Butcher, Philip D; Castagnoli, Paola Ricciardi; Gicquel, Brigitte; de Chastellier, Chantal; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2011-09-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis thrives within macrophages by residing in phagosomes and preventing them from maturing and fusing with lysosomes. A parallel transcriptional survey of intracellular mycobacteria and their host macrophages revealed signatures of heavy metal poisoning. In particular, mycobacterial genes encoding heavy metal efflux P-type ATPases CtpC, CtpG, and CtpV, and host cell metallothioneins and zinc exporter ZnT1, were induced during infection. Consistent with this pattern of gene modulation, we observed a burst of free zinc inside macrophages, and intraphagosomal zinc accumulation within a few hours postinfection. Zinc exposure led to rapid CtpC induction, and ctpC deficiency caused zinc retention within the mycobacterial cytoplasm, leading to impaired intracellular growth of the bacilli. Thus, the use of P(1)-type ATPases represents a M. tuberculosis strategy to neutralize the toxic effects of zinc in macrophages. We propose that heavy metal toxicity and its counteraction might represent yet another chapter in the host-microbe arms race.

  15. Iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit tumour growth by inducing pro-inflammatory macrophage polarization in tumour tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Hutter, Gregor; Spitler, Ryan; Lenkov, Olga; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shaw, Aubie; Pajarinen, Jukka Sakari; Nejadnik, Hossein; Goodman, Stuart; Moseley, Michael; Coussens, Lisa Marie; Daldrup-Link, Heike Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Until now, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved iron supplement ferumoxytol and other iron oxide nanoparticles have been used for treating iron deficiency, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and as drug carriers. Here, we show an intrinsic therapeutic effect of ferumoxytol on the growth of early mammary cancers, and lung cancer metastases in liver and lungs. In vitro, adenocarcinoma cells co-incubated with ferumoxytol and macrophages showed increased caspase-3 activity. Macrophages exposed to ferumoxytol displayed increased mRNA associated with pro-inflammatory Th1-type responses. In vivo, ferumoxytol significantly inhibited growth of subcutaneous adenocarcinomas in mice. In addition, intravenous ferumoxytol treatment before intravenous tumour cell challenge prevented development of liver metastasis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histopathology studies showed that the observed tumour growth inhibition was accompanied by increased presence of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in the tumour tissues. Our results suggest that ferumoxytol could be applied 'off label' to protect the liver from metastatic seeds and potentiate macrophage-modulating cancer immunotherapies.

  16. Piperine inhibits ABCA1 degradation and promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limei; Palme, Veronika; Rotter, Susanne; Schilcher, Nicole; Cukaj, Malsor; Wang, Dongdong; Ladurner, Angela; Heiss, Elke H.; Stangl, Herbert; Dirsch, Verena M.; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2017-01-01

    Scope Increased macrophage cholesterol efflux (ChE) is considered to have anti-atherosclerotic effect counteracting cardiovascular disease. The principle pungent ingredient of the fruits of Piper nigrum, piperine, is identified in this study as a ChE inducer in THP-1-derived macrophages, and mechanisms underlying this effect are explored. Methods and results Without affecting cell viability, piperine concentration-dependently enhances ChE in THP-1-derived macrophages from 25 to 100 μM. The expression level of the key cholesterol transporter protein ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is significantly upregulated by piperine, as revealed by western blot analyses. However, two other ChE-mediating transporter proteins, ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) and scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-B1), remain unaffected. Piperine exerts no influence on ABCA1 mRNA levels, but significantly inhibits the degradation of ABCA1, as evident by an increased half-life of the protein in the presence of cycloheximide. Furthermore, it is found that piperine likely interferes with the calpain-mediated ABCA1 degradation pathway and exhibits significant inhibition of calpain activity. Conclusion Our findings suggest that piperine promotes ChE in THP-1-derived macrophages by upregulation of ABCA1, which might be mediated by inhibition of calpain activity. This novel bioactivity makes the dietary constituent piperine a good candidate to be further explored for therapeutic or preventive applications in the context of atherosclerosis. PMID:27862930

  17. Macrophage infiltration in the omental and subcutaneous adipose tissues of dairy cows with displaced abomasum.

    PubMed

    Contreras, G Andres; Kabara, Ed; Brester, Jill; Neuder, Louis; Kiupel, Matti

    2015-09-01

    cows compared with those from AS animals. Expression of M1 macrophage inflammatory phenotype-related genes CCL2, IL6, and TNFα in SVF from cows with DA was significantly higher than that in healthy cows (AS). Significant populations of ATM in OM and SC depots of cows with DA were localized in multiple cellular aggregates that included multinucleated cells. In contrast, ATM in AS cows were fewer and randomly localized in both SC and OM. Together, these results indicate that infiltration of classically activated ATM is a concurrent finding in DA cases and may be associated with metabolic stress around parturition contributing to the pro-inflammatory status of transition dairy cows. Future studies are needed to establish whether ATM infiltration is more pronounced in cows with DA compared with healthy dairy cows at the same lactation stage and if this increased mononuclear immune cell trafficking has any pathophysiological significance.

  18. Novel feedback loop between M2 macrophages/microglia and regulatory B cells in estrogen-protected EAE mice.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Gil; Zhang, Jun; Nguyen, Ha; Kent, Gail; Seifert, Hilary; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2017-04-15

    Immunoregulatory sex hormones, including estrogen and estriol, may prevent relapses in multiple sclerosis during pregnancy. Our previous studies have demonstrated that regulatory B cells are crucial for estrogen-mediated protection against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Herein, we demonstrate an estrogen-dependent induction of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages/microglia that results in an increased frequency of regulatory B cells in the spinal cord of estrogen treated mice with EAE. We further demonstrate that cultured M2-polarized microglia promote the induction of regulatory B cells. Our study suggests that estrogen neuroprotection induces a regulatory feedback loop between M2 macrophages/microglia and regulatory B cells.

  19. THE ENHANCEMENT OF MACROPHAGE BACTERIOSTASIS BY PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fowles, Robert E.; Fajardo, Ileana M.; Leibowitch, Jacques L.; David, John R.

    1973-01-01

    It was reported previously that the incubation of normal guinea pig macrophages with partially purified products of activated lymphocytes resulted in altered macrophage function including increased cell adherence to culture vessels, spreading, phagocytosis, and glucose carbon-1 oxidation. Studies reported here demonstrate that such macrophages also exhibit enhanced bacteriostasis. Lymphocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A, the culture supernatant was chromatographed over Sephadex G-100 and the fraction of mol wt 25,000–55,000, rich in lymphocyte mediators, was cultured with normal guinea pig macrophages for 1–3 days. Macrophages incubated with fractions from unstimulated lymphocyte cultures served as controls. The resulting macrophage monolayers were infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Macrophages incubated with mediator-rich fractions exhibited 2- to 10-fold enhanced bacteriostasis compared to controls. Further studies indicate that this enhancement was attributable to intrinsic changes in the macrophages and not simply a consequence of the number of macrophages on the monolayers. The studies support the concept that macrophage bacteriostasis can be enhanced by lymphocyte mediators. However, macrophages, which have been preincubated directly with sensitive lymphocytes and antigen exhibit even greater bacteriostasis and sometimes bactericidal capacity, suggesting that either a labile lymphocyte factor or direct lymphocyte macrophage interaction may also be involved in bactericidal activity. PMID:4200649

  20. Inhibition of neddylation represses lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Mei; Reyna, Sara M; Granados, Jose C; Wei, Sung-Jen; Innis-Whitehouse, Wendy; Maffi, Shivani K; Rodriguez, Edward; Slaga, Thomas J; Short, John D

    2012-10-12

    Cullin-RING E3 ligases (CRLs) are a class of ubiquitin ligases that control the proteasomal degradation of numerous target proteins, including IκB, and the activity of these CRLs are positively regulated by conjugation of a Nedd8 polypeptide onto Cullin proteins in a process called neddylation. CRL-mediated degradation of IκB, which normally interacts with and retains NF-κB in the cytoplasm, permits nuclear translocation and transactivation of the NF-κB transcription factor. Neddylation occurs through a multistep enzymatic process involving Nedd8 activating enzymes, and recent studies have shown that the pharmacological agent, MLN4924, can potently inhibit Nedd8 activating enzymes, thereby preventing neddylation of Cullin proteins and preventing the degradation of CRL target proteins. In macrophages, regulation of NF-κB signaling functions as a primary pathway by which infectious agents such as lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) cause the up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Here we have analyzed the effects of MLN4924, and compared the effects of MLN4924 with a known anti-inflammatory agent (dexamethasone), on certain proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and the NF-κB signaling pathway in LPS-stimulated macrophages. We also used siRNA to block neddylation to assess the role of this molecular process during LPS-induced cytokine responsiveness. Our results demonstrate that blocking neddylation, either pharmacologically or using siRNA, abrogates the increase in certain proinflammatory cytokines secreted from macrophages in response to LPS. In addition, we have shown that MLN4924 and dexamethasone inhibit LPS-induced cytokine up-regulation at the transcriptional level, albeit through different molecular mechanisms. Thus, neddylation represents a novel molecular process in macrophages that can be targeted to prevent and/or treat the LPS-induced up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and the disease processes associated with their up-regulation.

  1. Invasive breast carcinoma cells from patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G; Rohan, Thomas E; Pieri, Evan; Chen, Xiaoming; Adler, Esther; Cox, Dianne; Maleki, Sara; Bresnick, Anne; Gertler, Frank B; Condeelis, John S; Oktay, Maja H

    2014-11-25

    Metastasis is a complex, multistep process of cancer progression that has few treatment options. A critical event is the invasion of cancer cells into blood vessels (intravasation), through which cancer cells disseminate to distant organs. Breast cancer cells with increased abundance of Mena [an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-responsive cell migration protein] are present with macrophages at sites of intravasation, called TMEM sites (for tumor microenvironment of metastasis), in patient tumor samples. Furthermore, the density of these intravasation sites correlates with metastatic risk in patients. We found that intravasation of breast cancer cells may be prevented by blocking the signaling between cancer cells and macrophages. We obtained invasive breast ductal carcinoma cells of various subtypes by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from patients and found that, in an in vitro transendothelial migration assay, cells that migrated through a layer of human endothelial cells were enriched for the transcript encoding Mena(INV), an invasive isoform of Mena. This enhanced transendothelial migration required macrophages and occurred with all of the breast cancer subtypes. Using mouse macrophages and the human cancer cells from the FNAs, we identified paracrine and autocrine activation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). The paracrine or autocrine nature of the signal depended on the breast cancer cell subtype. Knocking down Mena(INV) or adding an antibody that blocks CSF-1R function prevented transendothelial migration. Our findings indicate that Mena(INV) and TMEM frequency are correlated prognostic markers and CSF-1 and Mena(INV) may be therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis of multiple breast cancer subtypes.

  2. Effects of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on the development, differentiation, and maturation of marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages in the spleen of osteopetrosis (op) mutant mice lacking functional M-CSF activity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Umeda, S; Shultz, L D; Hayashi, S; Nishikawa, S

    1994-05-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques using an anti-mouse panmacrophage monoclonal antibody and anti-mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for marginal metallophilic macrophages or marginal zone macrophages were used to detect red pulp macrophages, marginal metallophilic macrophages, and marginal zone macrophages in the spleen of op/op mice. In the mutant mice, the red pulp macrophages were reduced to about 60% of those in the normal littermates and the marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages were absent. After administration of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhM-CSF), numbers of red pulp macrophages increased rapidly, reaching levels found in normal littermates 1 week later. In contrast, the marginal metallophilic macrophages as well as the marginal zone macrophages appeared slowly after rhM-CSF administration and their numbers were less than half of the baseline level of normal littermates even at 12 weeks of administration. The distribution of marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages appearing after M-CSF administration was irregular in the spleen of the op/op mice. These splenic macrophage subpopulations differed in their responses to rhM-CSF, suggesting that distinct mechanisms may be involved in their development and differentiation. The splenic red pulp macrophages present in unmanipulated op/op mice are an M-CSF-independent macrophage population. Although the marginal metallophilic macrophages and marginal zone macrophages are thought to be M-CSF-dependent, their development and differentiation appear to be influenced by locally produced M-CSF or other cytokines.

  3. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Methods Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. Results ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1

  4. Molecular basis of mycobacterial survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Flo, Trude Helen

    2017-05-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the immune system by ingesting and degrading invading pathogens, initiating an inflammatory response and instructing adaptive immune cells, and resolving inflammation to restore homeostasis. More interesting is the fact that some bacteria have evolved to use macrophages as a natural habitat and tools of spread in the host, e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and some non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Mtb is considered one of humanity's most successful pathogens and is the causal agent of tuberculosis, while NTMs cause opportunistic infections all of which are of significant public health concern. Here, we describe mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens, with an emphasis on mycobacteria, manipulate macrophage functions to circumvent killing and live inside these cells even under considerable immunological pressure. Such macrophage functions include the selective evasion or engagement of pattern recognition receptors, production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, phagosome maturation, as well as other killing mechanisms like autophagy and cell death. A clear understanding of host responses elicited by a specific pathogen and strategies employed by the microbe to evade or exploit these is of significant importance for the development of effective vaccines and targeted immunotherapy against persistent intracellular infections like tuberculosis.

  5. Macrophages as a Battleground for Toxoplasma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary sentence In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Jensen et al. show clonal lineages of Toxoplasma gondii have evolved distinct ways of subverting their favored host cell, the macrophage. The results suggest that T. gondii and the ROP kinases can be used to probe immune signaling pathways. PMID:21669391

  6. Macrophages in Tuberculosis: Friend or Foe

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the greatest threats to human health. The causative bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is acquired by the respiratory route. It is exquisitely human-adapted and a prototypic intracellular pathogen of macrophages, with alveolar macrophages (AMs) being the primary conduit of infection and disease. The outcome of primary infection is most often a latently infected healthy human host, in whom the bacteria are held in check by the host immune response. Such individuals can develop active TB later in life with impairment in the immune system. In contrast, in a minority of infected individuals, the host immune response fails to control the growth of bacilli, and progressive granulomatous disease develops, facilitating spread of the bacilli via infectious aerosols coughed out into the environment and inhaled by new hosts. The molecular details of the Mtb-macrophage interaction continue to be elucidated. However, it is clear that a number of complex processes are involved at the different stages of infection that may benefit either the bacterium or the host. Macrophages demonstrate tremendous phenotypic heterogeneity and functional plasticity which, depending on the site and stage of infection, facilitate the diverse outcomes. Moreover, host responses vary depending on the specific characteristics of the infecting Mtb strain. In this chapter, we describe a contemporary view of the behavior of AMs and their interaction with various Mtb strains in generating unique immunologic lung specific responses. PMID:23864058

  7. Poison Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play On ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help ...

  8. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells communicate with the cells of their microenvironment via a series of molecular and cellular interactions to aid their progression to a malignant state and ultimately their metastatic spread. Of the cells in the microenvironment with a key role in cancer development, tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) are among the most notable. Tumour cells release a range of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors to attract macrophages, and these in turn release numerous factors (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9 and EGF) that are implicated in invasion-promoting processes such as tumour cell growth, flicking of the angiogenic switch and immunosuppression. TAM density has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer, suggesting that these cells may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, there are currently no agents that specifically target TAM's available for clinical use. Bisphosphonates (BPs), such as zoledronic acid, are anti-resorptive agents approved for treatment of skeletal complication associated with metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer. These agents act on osteoclasts, key cells in the bone microenvironment, to inhibit bone resorption. Over the past 30 years this has led to a great reduction in skeletal-related events (SRE's) in patients with advanced cancer and improved the morbidity associated with cancer-induced bone disease. However, there is now a growing body of evidence, both from in vitro and in vivo models, showing that zoledronic acid can also target tumour cells to increase apoptotic cell death and decrease proliferation, migration and invasion, and that this effect is significantly enhanced in combination with chemotherapy agents. Whether macrophages in the peripheral tumour microenvironment are exposed to sufficient levels of bisphosphonate to be affected is currently unknown. Macrophages belong to the same cell lineage as osteoclasts, the major target of BPs, and are highly phagocytic cells shown to be sensitive to

  9. Phenotypic Correlates of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Arrildt, Kathryn T.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Joseph, Sarah B.; Dukhovlinova, Elena N.; Graham, William D.; Ping, Li-Hua; Schnell, Gretja; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Kincer, Laura P.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Heyderman, Robert S.; Van Rie, Annelies; Cohen, Myron S.; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W.; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 is typically CCR5 using (R5) and T cell tropic (T-tropic), targeting memory CD4+ T cells throughout acute and chronic infections. However, viruses can expand into alternative cells types. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 variants have evolved to infect macrophages, which have only low levels of surface CD4. Most M-tropic variants have been isolated from the central nervous system during late-stage chronic infection. We used the HIV-1 env genes of well-defined, subject-matched M-tropic and T-tropic viruses to characterize the phenotypic features of the M-tropic Env protein. We found that, compared to T-tropic viruses, M-tropic viruses infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) on average 28-fold more efficiently, use low-density CD4 more efficiently, have increased sensitivity to soluble CD4 (sCD4), and show trends toward sensitivity to some CD4 binding site antibodies but no difference in sensitivity to antibodies targeting the CD4-bound conformation. M-tropic viruses also displayed a trend toward resistance to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies targeting the V1/V2 region of Env, suggesting subtle changes in Env protein conformation. The paired M- and T-tropic viruses did not differ in autologous serum neutralization, temperature sensitivity, entry kinetics, intrinsic infectivity, or Env protein incorporation. We also examined viruses with modestly increased CD4 usage. These variants have significant sensitivity to sCD4 and may represent evolutionary intermediates. CD4 usage is strongly correlated with infectivity of MDMs over a wide range of CD4 entry phenotypes. These data suggest that emergence of M-tropic HIV-1 includes multiple steps in which a phenotype of increased sensitivity to sCD4 and enhanced CD4 usage accompany subtle changes in Env conformation. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 typically replicates in CD4+ T cells. However, HIV-1 can evolve to infect macrophages, especially within the brain. Understanding how CCR5-using macrophage-tropic viruses

  10. Effects of nanoparticles on murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallet, M.; Aude-Garcia, C.; Lelong, C.; Candéias, S.; Luche, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Triboulet, S.; Diallo, D.; Diemer, H.; van Dorsselaer, A.; Rabilloud, T.

    2011-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are more and more widely used in an increasing number of applications. Consequently, they are more and more present in the environment, and the risk that they may represent for human health must be evaluated. This requires to increase our knowledge of the cellular responses to nanoparticles. In this context, macrophages appear as an attractive system. They play a major role in eliminating foreign matter, e.g. pathogens or infectious agents, by phagocytosis and inflammatory responses, and are thus highly likely to react to nanoparticles. We have decided to study their responses to nanoparticles by a combination of classical and wide-scope approaches such as proteomics. The long term goal of this study is the better understanding of the responses of macrophages to nanoparticles, and thus to help to assess their possible impact on human health. We chose as a model system bone marrow-derived macrophages and studied the effect of commonly used nanoparticles such as TiO2 and Cu. Classical responses of macrophage were characterized and proteomic approaches based on 2D gels of whole cell extracts were used. Preliminary proteomic data resulting from whole cell extracts showed different effects for TiO2-NPs and Cu-NPs. Modifications of the expression of several proteins involved in different pathways such as, for example, signal transduction, endosome-lysosome pathway, Krebs cycle, oxidative stress response have been underscored. These first results validate our proteomics approach and open a new wide field of investigation for NPs impact on macrophages.

  11. Origin, Development, and Homeostasis of Tissue-resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are versatile cells of the hematopoietic system that display remarkable functional diversity encompassing innate immune responses, tissue development, and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages are present in almost all tissues of the body and display distinct location-specific phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Recent studies also demonstrate distinct origins of tissue-resident macrophages. This emerging picture of ontological, functional, and phenotypic heterogeneity within tissue macrophages has altered our understanding of these cells, which play important roles in many human diseases. In this review, we discuss the different origins of tissue macrophages, the transcription factors regulating their development, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis at steady state. PMID:25319325

  12. Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Are Impaired in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background. The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) comprises a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell diseases characterized by cytopenia, dysplasia in one or more of the major myeloid lineages, ineffective hematopoiesis, and increased risk of development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Macrophages are innate immune cells that ingest and degrade abnormal cells, debris, and foreign material and orchestrate inflammatory processes. We analyzed the role of macrophages from MDS patients in vitro. Methods. Macrophages were induced from peripheral blood of patients with MDS via granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Phagocytic capacity of macrophages was measured with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester and fluorescent microspheres. CD206 and signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) on macrophages were detected by flow cytometry. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was measured by ELISA method. Results. Compared with normal control group, the number of monocytes increased in MDS patients. However, the monocytes showed impaired ability to induce macrophages and the number of macrophages induced from MDS samples was lower. Further, we demonstrated that the ex vivo phagocytic function of macrophages from MDS patients was impaired and levels of reorganization receptors CD206 and SIRPα were lower. Levels of iNOS secreted by macrophages in MDS were increased. Conclusions. Monocyte-derived macrophages are impaired in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:28074192

  13. The Heme Connection: Linking Erythrocytes and Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Zahidul; Devalaraja, Samir; Haldar, Malay

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid function and development is intimately linked to macrophages. The primary function of erythrocytes is oxygen delivery, which is mediated by iron-containing hemoglobin. The major source of this iron is a recycling pathway where macrophages scavenge old and damaged erythrocytes to release iron contained within the heme moiety. Macrophages also promote erythropoiesis by providing a supportive niche in the bone marrow as an integral component of “erythorblastic islands.” Importantly, inflammation leads to alterations in iron handling by macrophages with significant impact on iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis. The importance of macrophages in erythropoiesis and iron homeostasis is well established and has been extensively reviewed. However, this developmental relationship is not one way, and erythrocytes can also regulate macrophage development and function. Erythrocyte-derived heme can induce the development of iron-recycling macrophages from monocytes, engage pattern recognition receptors to activate macrophages, and act as ligand for specific nuclear receptors to modulate macrophage function. Here, we discuss the role of heme as a signaling molecule impacting macrophage homeostasis. We will review these actions of heme within the framework of our current understanding of the role of micro-environmental factors in macrophage development and function. PMID:28167947

  14. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  15. Regulation of macrophage functions by L-arginine

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Sites of inflammation with prominent macrophage infiltration, such as wounds and certain tumors, are uniquely deficient in free arginine. The effects of arginine availability on macrophage physiology were investigated. When cultured in media containing less than 0.1 mM L- arginine, rat resident peritoneal macrophages exhibited enhanced spreading, tumor cytotoxicity, superoxide production, phagocytosis, and protein synthesis. Thus, arginine concentrations similar to those found in sites of inflammation can augment macrophage functions, while those found in plasma (approximately 0.1 mM) and in commonly used culture media (0.4 to 1.2 mM) are inhibitory. Culture in homoarginine, but not D-arginine, ornithine, citrulline, urea, histidine, or lysine also inhibited macrophage tumor cytotoxicity, indicating the specificity of the effect. In contrast to resident macrophages, the tumor cytotoxicity of peritoneal macrophages obtained after C. parvum injection was suppressed by culture in arginine-deficient media. However, L-arginine- deficient media enhanced all other activation-associated functions in C. parvum-elicited macrophages as in resident cells. Arginine-free wound fluid promoted resident macrophage tumoricidal activity when compared with rat serum, and again, the addition of L-arginine was inhibitory. The marked effects of L-arginine availability on macrophage functions, together with the knowledge that these cells modify the extracellular arginine concentration in sites of inflammation through arginase, provide evidence for an autoregulatory mechanism of macrophage activation. PMID:2538541

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Higashimura, Yasuki

    2014-12-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting enzymatic step of heme degradation and produces carbon monoxide, free iron, and biliverdin. HO-1, a stress-inducible protein, is induced by various oxidative and inflammatory signals. Consequently, HO-1 expression has been regarded as an adaptive cellular response against inflammatory response and oxidative injury. Although several transcriptional factors and signaling cascades are involved in HO-1 regulation, the two main pathways of Nrf2/Bach1 system and IL-10/HO-1 axis exist in monocyte/macrophage. Macrophages are broadly divisible into two groups: pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. More recently, several novel macrophage subsets have been identified including Mhem, Mox, and M4 macrophages. Of these, M2 macrophages, Mhem, and Mox are HO-1 highly expressing macrophages. HO-1 has been recognized as having major immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been demonstrated in HO-1 deficient mice and human cases of genetic HO-1 deficiency. However, the mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory actions of HO-1 remains poorly defined. This review specifically addresses macrophage polarization. The present current evidence indicates that HO-1 induction mediated by multiple pathways can drive the phenotypic shift to M2 macrophages and suggests that HO-1 induction in macrophages is a potential therapeutic approach to immunomodulation in widely diverse human diseases.

  17. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC-paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC-PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy.

  18. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    PubMed

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  19. Exercise Prevents Mental Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnomo, K. I.; Doewes, M.; Giri, M. K. W.; Setiawan, K. H.; Wibowo, I. P. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple current studies show that neuroinflammation may contribute to mental illness such as depression, anxiety, and mood disorder. Chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues is indicated by the increase of inflammatory marker like cytokine IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Pro-inflammatory cytokine in peripheral tissues can reach brain tissues and activate microglia and it causes neuroinflammation. Psychological stress may led peripheral and central inflammation. Activated microglia will produce pro-inflammatory cytokine, ROS, RNS, and tryptophan catabolizes. This neuroinflammation can promote metabolism changes of any neurotransmitter, such as serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate that will influence neurocircuit in the brain including basal ganglia and anterior cingulated cortex. It leads to mental illness. Exercise give contribution to reduce tissue inflammation. When muscle is contracting in an exercise, muscle will produce the secretion of cytokine like IL-6, IL-1ra, and IL-10. It will react as anti-inflammation and influence macrophage, T cell, monosit, protein Toll-Like Receptor (TLR), and then reduce neuroinflammation, characterised by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokine and prevent the activation of microglia in the brain. The objective of the present study is to review scientific articles in the literature related to the contribution of exercise to prevent and ease mental illness.

  20. Francisella tularensis Antioxidants Harness Reactive Oxygen Species to Restrict Macrophage Signaling and Cytokine Production*

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Amanda A.; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar; Melendez, J. Andrés

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of the highly infectious animal and human disease tularemia. Its extreme infectivity and virulence are associated with its ability to evade immune detection, which we now link to its robust reactive oxygen species-scavenging capacity. Infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages with virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 prevented proinflammatory cytokine production in the presence or absence of IFN-γ compared with infection with the attenuated live vaccine strain. SchuS4 infection also blocked signals required for macrophage cytokine production, including Akt phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB nuclear localization and activation. Concomitant with SchuS4-mediated suppression of Akt phosphorylation was an increase in the levels of the Akt antagonist PTEN. Moreover, SchuS4 prevented the H2O2-dependent oxidative inactivation of PTEN compared with a virulent live vaccine strain. Mutation of catalase (katG) sensitized F. tularensis to H2O2 and enhanced PTEN oxidation, Akt phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and inflammatory cytokine production. Together, these findings suggest a novel role for bacterial antioxidants in restricting macrophage activation through their ability to preserve phosphatases that temper kinase signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:20558723

  1. Lysosomal Disorders Drive Susceptibility to Tuberculosis by Compromising Macrophage Migration

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Russell D.; Levitte, Steven; O’Sullivan, Mary P.; O’Leary, Seónadh M.; Cambier, C.J.; Cameron, James; Takaki, Kevin K.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Tobin, David M.; Keane, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Summary A zebrafish genetic screen for determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum identified a hypersusceptible mutant deficient in lysosomal cysteine cathepsins that manifests hallmarks of human lysosomal storage diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, mutant macrophages accumulate undigested lysosomal material, which disrupts endocytic recycling and impairs their migration to, and thus engulfment of, dying cells. This causes a buildup of unengulfed cell debris. During mycobacterial infection, macrophages with lysosomal storage cannot migrate toward infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis in the tuberculous granuloma. The unengulfed apoptotic macrophages undergo secondary necrosis, causing granuloma breakdown and increased mycobacterial growth. Macrophage lysosomal storage similarly impairs migration to newly infecting mycobacteria. This phenotype is recapitulated in human smokers, who are at increased risk for tuberculosis. A majority of their alveolar macrophages exhibit lysosomal accumulations of tobacco smoke particulates and do not migrate to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incapacitation of highly microbicidal first-responding macrophages may contribute to smokers’ susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:27015311

  2. Hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis: pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; You, Hong; Fan, Xu; Jia, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic macrophages account for the largest non-parenchymal cell population in the liver. Recent studies have found that hepatic macrophages have different functions in different stages of experimental liver fibrosis. Some studies found that there are different types of hepatic macrophages in the liver, although others have suggested that hepatic macrophages could switch to different phenotypes in different environments. Many studies demonstrated that while hepatic macrophages promoted fibrosis through the recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells, and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the early stages, these also promoted the resolution of hepatic fibrosis through the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in the late stages. This article will review the current role played by hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis and the potential therapeutic targets that modulate hepatic macrophages. PMID:27252881

  3. In vitro effect of parachlorophenol and camphorated parachlorophenol on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Llamas, R; Segura, J J; Jiménez-Rubio, A; Jiménez-Planas, A

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the "in vitro" effect of parachlorophenol and camphorated parachlorophenol, used in endodontics for the disinfection of root canals, on the substrate adherence capacity of macrophages. Inflammatory macrophages were obtained from Wistar rats and resuspended in RPMI-1640 medium. As a test of macrophage phagocytic function, the adherence capacity of macrophages to a plastic surface was determined. Assays were conducted in Eppendorf tubes for 15 min of incubation at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2. The adherence index was calculated. Results showed that parachlorophenol and camphorated parachlorophenol significantly decreased the substrate adherence capacity of inflammatory macrophages. Taking into account that adhesion is the first step in the phagocytic process of macrophages and in antigen presentation, parachlorophenol and camphorated parachlorophenol could inhibit macrophage function and modulate immune and inflammatory reactions in periapical tissues.

  4. Mechanisms of Organ Injury and Repair by Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Wynn, Thomas A

    2017-02-10

    Macrophages regulate tissue regeneration following injury. They can worsen tissue injury by producing reactive oxygen species and other toxic mediators that disrupt cell metabolism, induce apoptosis, and exacerbate ischemic injury. However, they also produce a variety of growth factors, such as IGF-1, VEGF-α, TGF-β, and Wnt proteins that regulate epithelial and endothelial cell proliferation, myofibroblast activation, stem and tissue progenitor cell differentiation, and angiogenesis. Proresolving macrophages in turn restore tissue homeostasis by functioning as anti-inflammatory cells, and macrophage-derived matrix metalloproteinases regulate fibrin and collagen turnover. However, dysregulated macrophage function impairs wound healing and contributes to the development of fibrosis. Consequently, the mechanisms that regulate these different macrophage activation states have become active areas of research. In this review, we discuss the common and unique mechanisms by which macrophages instruct tissue repair in the liver, nervous system, heart, lung, skeletal muscle, and intestine and illustrate how macrophages might be exploited therapeutically.

  5. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  6. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  7. Monocyte and Macrophage Plasticity in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amitava; Sinha, Mithun; Datta, Soma; Abas, Motaz; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and high versatility are the characteristic features of the cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The mononuclear phagocyte system, derived from the bone marrow progenitor cells, is primarily composed of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In regenerative tissues, a central role of monocyte-derived macrophages and paracrine factors secreted by these cells is indisputable. Macrophages are highly plastic cells. On the basis of environmental cues and molecular mediators, these cells differentiate to proinflammatory type I macrophage (M1) or anti-inflammatory or proreparative type II macrophage (M2) phenotypes and transdifferentiate into other cell types. Given a central role in tissue repair and regeneration, the review focuses on the heterogeneity of monocytes and macrophages with current known mechanisms of differentiation and plasticity, including microenvironmental cues and molecular mediators, such as noncoding RNAs. PMID:26118749

  8. Interrelationships between the Human Alveolar Macrophage and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.

    1973-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages lavaged from human lungs contain protease activity at an optimum pH of 3.0 and possibly a lesser peak of activity at pH 5.5. Protease activity measured at pH 4.1 is inhibited by purified alpha-1-antitrypsin. Fluorescent antibody studies of human alveolar macrophages showed that alpha-1-antitrypsin is present in normal alveolar macrophages. In addition, macrophages from a patient with a homozygous deficiency of alpha-1-antitrypsin exhibited less fluorescence when incubated in autologous serum than the same macrophages incubated in normal serum. Macrophages from normal subjects showed maximal fluorescence when removed from the lung and additional incubation with serum did not increase fluorescence. These results implicate the human alveolar macrophage as a possible source of an enzyme that may cause emphysema in patients deficient in alpha-1-antitrypsin. They also show that alpha-1-antitrypsin has access to the alveolus in normal subjects. Images PMID:4201266

  9. Non-opsonic phagocytosis of homologous non-toxigenic and toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains by human U-937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Cíntia Silva; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; de Souza, Monica Cristina; dos Santos Dourado, Fernanda; de Souza de Oliveira Dias, Alexandre Alves; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; Pereira, Gabriela Andrade; Cabral, Maulori Curié; Hirata Junior, Raphael; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2010-01-01

    As interactions between bacteria and macrophages dictate the outcome of most infectious diseases, analyses of molecular mechanisms of non-opsonic phagocytosis should lead to new approaches for the prevention of diphtheria and systemic Corynebacterium diphtheriae infections. The present study aimed to evaluate human macrophage-bacteria interactions in the absence of opsonin antibodies and the influence of the tox gene on this process. Homologous C. diphtheriae tox+ and tox- strains were evaluated for adhesion, entering and survival within U-937 human macrophages at different incubation periods. Higher numbers of viable bacteria associated with and internalized by macrophages were demonstrated for the tox+ strain. However, viable intracellular bacteria were detected at T-24 hr only for the tox- strain. Cytoskeletal inhibitors, cytochalasin E, genistein and colchicine, inhibited intracellular viability of both strains at different levels. Bacterial replication was evidenced at T-24 hr in supernatants of monolayers infected with the tox- strain. Host cell death and nuclear alterations were evidenced by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and DAPI fluorescence microscopy. ELISA of histone-associated DNA fragments allowed detection of apoptosis and necrosis induced by tox+ and tox- strains at T-1 hr and T-3 hr. In conclusion, human macrophages in the absence of opsonins may not be promptly effective at killing diphtheria bacilli. The presence of the tox gene influences the susceptibility of C. diphtheriae to human macrophages and the outcome of non-opsonic phagocytosis. C. diphtheriae strains exhibit strategies to survive within macrophages and to exert apoptosis and necrosis in human phagocytic cells, independent of the tox gene.

  10. Protective role of G-CSF in dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis through generating gut-homing macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meshkibaf, Shahab; Martins, Andrew J; Henry, Garth T; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine best known for its role in promoting the generation and function of neutrophils. G-CSF is also found to be involved in macrophage generation and immune regulation; however, its in vivo role in immune homeostasis is largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of G-CSF in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis using G-CSF receptor-deficient (G-CSFR(-/-)) mice. Mice were administered with 1.5% DSS in drinking water for 5days, and the severity of colitis was measured for the next 5days. GCSFR(-/-) mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis than G-CSFR(+/+) or G-CSFR(-/+) mice. G-CSFR(-/-) mice harbored less F4/80(+) macrophages, but a similar number of neutrophils, in the intestine. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared in the presence of both G-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) (G-BMDM) expressed higher levels of regulatory macrophage markers such as programmed death ligand 2 (PDL2), CD71 and CD206, but not in arginase I, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, Ym1 (chitinase-like 3) and FIZZ1 (found in inflammatory zone 1), and lower levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CD80 and CD86 than bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared in the presence of M-CSF alone (BMDM), in response to interleukin (IL)-4/IL-13 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon (IFN)-γ, respectively. Adoptive transfer of G-BMDM, but not BMDM, protected G-CSFR(-/-) mice from DSS-induced colitis, and suppressed expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β and iNOS in the intestine. These results suggest that G-CSF plays an important role in preventing colitis, likely through populating immune regulatory macrophages in the intestine.

  11. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V; Barr, Fiona D; Crist, Sarah G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+) T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+) T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+) T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  12. Transcriptional signature of human macrophages exposed to the environmental contaminant benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Sparfel, Lydie; Pinel-Marie, Marie-Laure; Boize, Magali; Koscielny, Serge; Desmots, Sophie; Pery, Alexandre; Fardel, Olivier

    2010-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed immunotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminants, known to affect macrophages. In order to identify their molecular targets in such cells, we have analyzed gene expression profile of primary human macrophages treated by the prototypical PAH benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), using pangenomic oligonucleotides microarrays. Exposure of macrophages to BaP for 8 and 24 h resulted in 96 and 1100 genes, differentially expressed by at least a twofold change factor, respectively. Some of these targets, including the chemokine receptor CXCR5, the G protein-coupled receptor 35 (GPR35), and the Ras regulator RASAL1, have not been previously shown to be affected by PAHs, in contrast to others, such as interleukin-1beta and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) repressor. These BaP-mediated gene regulations were fully validated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays for some selected genes. Their bioinformatic analysis indicated that biological functions linked to immunity, inflammation, and cell death were among the most affected by BaP in human macrophages and that the AhR and p53 signaling pathways were the most significant canonical pathways activated by the PAH. AhR and p53 implications were moreover fully confirmed by the prevention of BaP-related upregulation of some selected target genes by AhR silencing or the use of pifithrin-alpha, an inhibitor of PAH bioactivation-related DNA damage/p53 pathways. Overall, these data, through identifying genes and signaling pathways targeted by PAHs in human macrophages, may contribute to better understand the molecular basis of the immunotoxicity of these environmental contaminants.

  13. Neither classical nor alternative macrophage activation is required for Pneumocystis clearance during immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4(+) T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2(-/-) mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2(-/-) mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) nor RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice. RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4(+) T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8(+) T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8(+) T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of PcP-related IRIS.

  14. Estradiol Reduces Susceptibility of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages to HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V.; Barr, Fiona D.; Crist, Sarah G.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2–treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms. PMID:23614015

  15. Macrophages mediate colon carcinoma cell adhesion in the rat liver after exposure to lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Nuray; Grewal, Simran; Bögels, Marijn; van der Bij, Gerben J.; Koppes, Malika M.A.; Oosterling, Steven J.; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Hoeben, Kees A.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2012-01-01

    The surgical resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with an enhanced risk of liver metastases. Moreover, bacterial translocation or anastomic leakage during resection has been shown to correlate with a poor long-term surgical outcome, suggesting that bacterial products may contribute to the formation of metastases. Driven by these premises, we investigated the role of the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the generation of liver metastases. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS led to enhanced tumor-cell adhesion to the rat liver as early as 1.5 h post-administration. Furthermore, a rapid loss of the expression of the tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was observed, suggesting that LPS disrupts the integrity of the microvasculature. LPS addition to endothelial-macrophage co-cultures damaged endothelial monolayers and caused the formation of intercellular gaps, which was accompanied by increased tumor-cell adhesion. These results suggest that macrophages are involved in the endothelial damage resulting from exposure to LPS. Interestingly, the expression levels of of ZO-1 were not affected by LPS treatment in rats in which liver macrophages had been depleted as well as in rats that had been treated with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. In both settings, decreased tumor-cell adhesion was observed. Taken together, our findings indicate that LPS induces ROS release by macrophages, resulting in the damage of the vascular lining of the liver and hence allowing increased tumor-cell adherence. Thus, peri-operative treatments that prevent the activation of macrophages and—as a consequence—limit endothelial damage and tumor-cell adhesion may significantly improve the long-term outcome of cancer patients undergoing surgical tumor resection. PMID:23264898

  16. The CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis mediates macrophage recruitment and dissemination of mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Cui, Chao; Boland, Ralf; Bebelman, Jan-Paul; van der Sar, Astrid M; Smit, Martine J; Siderius, Marco; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2015-03-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes to infectious foci depends strongly on the local release of chemoattractant mediators. The human CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is an important node in the chemokine signaling network and is expressed by multiple leukocyte lineages, including T cells and macrophages. The ligands of this receptor originate from an ancestral CXCL11 gene in early vertebrates. Here, we used the optically accessible zebrafish embryo model to explore the function of the CXCR3-CXCL11 axis in macrophage recruitment and show that disruption of this axis increases the resistance to mycobacterial infection. In a mutant of the zebrafish ortholog of CXCR3 (cxcr3.2), macrophage chemotaxis to bacterial infections was attenuated, although migration to infection-independent stimuli was unaffected. Additionally, attenuation of macrophage recruitment to infection could be mimicked by treatment with NBI74330, a high-affinity antagonist of CXCR3. We identified two infection-inducible CXCL11-like chemokines as the functional ligands of Cxcr3.2, showing that the recombinant proteins exerted a Cxcr3.2-dependent chemoattraction when locally administrated in vivo. During infection of zebrafish embryos with Mycobacterium marinum, a well-established model for tuberculosis, we found that Cxcr3.2 deficiency limited the macrophage-mediated dissemination of mycobacteria. Furthermore, the loss of Cxcr3.2 function attenuated the formation of granulomatous lesions, the typical histopathological features of tuberculosis, and led to a reduction in the total bacterial burden. Prevention of mycobacterial dissemination by targeting the CXCR3 pathway, therefore, might represent a host-directed therapeutic strategy for treatment of tuberculosis. The demonstration of a conserved CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis in zebrafish extends the translational applicability of this model for studying diseases involving the innate immune system.

  17. Sialic acid mediates the initial binding of positively charged inorganic particles to alveolar macrophage membranes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; George, G; Brody, A R

    1987-06-01

    Pulmonary macrophages phagocytize inhaled particles and are postulated to play a role in the development of pulmonary interstitial fibrogenesis. The basic biologic mechanisms through which inhaled particles bind to macrophage membranes and subsequently are phagocytized remain unclear. We hypothesize that positively charged particles bind to negatively charged sialic acid (SA) residues on macrophage membranes. Alveolar Macrophages (AM) were collected by saline lavage from normal rat lungs. The cells adhered to plastic coverslips in serum-free phosphate buffered saline at 37 degrees C for 45 min and then were maintained at 4 degrees C for the binding experiments. Even distribution of SA groups on AM surfaces was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated to 50 nm gold spheres. The WGA is a lectin that binds specifically to sialic acid, and pretreatment of AM with this lectin prevented the binding of positively charged carbonyl iron (C-Fe) spheres, aluminum (Al) spheres, and chrysotile asbestos fibers to AM surfaces. Limulus protein, another lectin with binding specificity for SA, similarly blocked the binding of positively charged spheres and chrysotile asbestos fibers but not negatively charged glass spheres or crocidolite asbestos fibers. Con A and ricin, lectins that bind to mannose and galactose residues, respectively, did not block particle binding. When both positively charged iron spheres and negatively charged glass spheres were prebound to AM membranes, subsequent treatment with WGA displaced only the positively charged spheres from macrophage surfaces. Con A and ricin had no effect on prebound positively charged C-Fe and Al spheres.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Inhibitory effect of deferoxamine or macrophage activation on transformation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia ingested by macrophages: reversal by holotransferrin.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Gomez, B; Brummer, E; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1994-04-01

    Conidia of P. brasiliensis ingested by murine macrophages at 37 degrees C showed enhanced transformation to yeast cells and further intracellular growth compared with conidia in culture medium alone. Treatment of macrophages with the iron chelator deferoxamine inhibited the intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. Cytokine-activated macrophages could also exert this inhibitory effect. Holotransferrin reversed the inhibitory effect of either deferoxamine or activated macrophages on intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. These results indicate that iron restriction is one of the mechanisms by which activated macrophages control the intracellular transformation of ingested conidia and growth of yeast cells.

  19. Inhibitory effect of deferoxamine or macrophage activation on transformation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia ingested by macrophages: reversal by holotransferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Gomez, B; Brummer, E; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1994-01-01

    Conidia of P. brasiliensis ingested by murine macrophages at 37 degrees C showed enhanced transformation to yeast cells and further intracellular growth compared with conidia in culture medium alone. Treatment of macrophages with the iron chelator deferoxamine inhibited the intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. Cytokine-activated macrophages could also exert this inhibitory effect. Holotransferrin reversed the inhibitory effect of either deferoxamine or activated macrophages on intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. These results indicate that iron restriction is one of the mechanisms by which activated macrophages control the intracellular transformation of ingested conidia and growth of yeast cells. PMID:8132359

  20. Transplantation of allogeneic islets of Langerhans in the rat liver: effects of macrophage depletion on graft survival and microenvironment activation.

    PubMed

    Bottino, R; Fernandez, L A; Ricordi, C; Lehmann, R; Tsan, M F; Oliver, R; Inverardi, L

    1998-03-01

    Early impairment of islet function and graft loss limit the success of allogeneic islet transplantation. Nonspecific inflammatory events occurring at the transplant site immediately after grafting, involving the production of cytokines and free radicals and sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) activation, may contribute to islet cell damage. To evaluate whether Kupffer cell inactivation would result in prolonged allograft survival in a model system of intrahepatic islet transplantation in rats, we systemically administered either gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP) to assess the effects of macrophage inactivation on rejection and on the release of proinflammatory molecules, as well as to assess the functional profile of SEC. The results obtained were compared with those observed in untreated, sham-injected animals and in rats receiving intraportal infusions of microbeads. Transient macrophage inhibition, particularly in hepatic Kupffer cells, is associated with significant prolongation of graft survival after intraportal islet allotransplantation (ITx) in rats: 7.2 days in the control group versus 11.9 days in the GdCl3 group (P < 0.01) and 15.6 days in the Cl2MDP group (P < 0.0006), respectively. Although systemic release of inflammatory mediators was observed only when islet transplantations were performed and it could be inhibited by macrophage-targeting treatments, perturbation of the functional profile of endothelial cells was also observed when microembolization was induced by the use of microbeads and could not be prevented by macrophage inhibition. These experiments provide evidence to support the concept that macrophages play a key role in early inflammatory events known to adversely affect islet engraftment and suggest that manipulation of nonspecific immune activation by inhibition of macrophage function may facilitate hepatic engraftment of islet allografts. The mechanisms mediating this effect are likely to include