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Sample records for primary adult optical

  1. Primary Gliosarcoma of the Optic Nerve: A Unique Adult Optic Pathway Glioma.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J; Sychev, Yevgeniy V; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Mudumbai, Raghu C; Keene, C Dirk

    2016-10-11

    A 90-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of right-sided progressive proptosis, neovascular glaucoma, blindness, and worsening ocular pain. No funduscopic examination was possible because of a corneal opacity. Head CT scan without contrast demonstrated a heterogeneous 4.1 cm (anterior-posterior) by 1.7 cm (transverse) cylindrical mass arising in the right optic nerve and extending from the retrobulbar globe to the optic canal. She underwent palliative enucleation with subtotal resection of the orbital optic nerve and tumor. Pathological examination showed effacement of the optic nerve by an infiltrative high-grade glial neoplasm with biphasic sarcomeric differentiation. Invasion into the uvea and retina was present. The neoplasm was negative for melan-A, HMB45, tyrosinase, synaptophysin, smooth muscle actin, and epithelial membrane antigen. The glioma had strongly intense, but patchy immunopositivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Multiple foci of neoplastic cells had pericellular reticulin staining. The overall features were diagnostic of a gliosarcoma (World Health Organization grade IV) of the optic nerve. Postoperative MRI demonstrated postsurgical changes and residual gliosarcoma with extension into the optic chiasm. The patient died 2 and a half months after her enucleation surgery at her nursing home. Autopsy was unavailable due to the caregiver wishes, making a definitive cause of death unknown. Gliosarcoma is a rare variant of glioblastoma, and this is the first documented case presenting as a primary neoplasm of the optic nerve.

  2. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  3. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  4. Primary Varicella in an Immunocompetent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Lilly

    2009-01-01

    Primary varicella zoster infection in adults and immunocompromised persons may result in serious complications. For this reason, a speedy and accurate diagnosis is essential to prevent life-threatening sequelae. Primary varicella presents as a vesicular exanthem with fevers and other constitutional symptoms. The differential diagnosis of primary varicella zoster infection comprises several other important entities, including smallpox infection, which should be considered before definitive diagnosis of varicella is made. Here, the authors describe an immunocompetent adult with primary varicella infection and review the literature on its clinical presentation and treatment. PMID:20729954

  5. Optical design study for NASA's spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2004-10-01

    Several of NASA's future space telescopes project teams have chosen or are considering segmented primary mirrors as a part of their architecture. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) design employs a 6.5-meter conic primary mirror constructed of 18 hexagonal segments, where each hex is one of three off-axis surface profiles corresponding to its radial distance to the parent mirror axis. Other future mission concepts such as SAFIR (Single Aperture Far-Infra Red) and SUVO (Space Ultra Violet Optical telescope) are considering even larger segmented primary mirrors. The goal of the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) project discussed in this paper is to investigate the option of a spherical primary mirror for such future large aperture NASA missions. Ground-based telescopes such as the Hobby-Eberly have realized this design option, and the current baseline design for ESO's OWL project incorporates a 100-meter segmented spherical primary mirror. While the benefits of fabricating large numbers of identical spherical surface segments are obvious, the optical design for the telescope becomes more complex in order to correct the significant aberration resulting from a spherical primary surface. This paper briefly surveys design approaches of spherical primary telescopes. Image based performance comparisons are made, and examples are presented.

  6. Primary care of adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, William F.; Berg, Joseph M.; Bradley, Elspeth; Cheetham, Tom; Denton, Richard; Heng, John; Hennen, Brian; Joyce, David; Kelly, Maureen; Korossy, Marika; Lunsky, Yona; McMillan, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2006 Canadian guidelines for primary care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and to make practical recommendations based on current knowledge to address the particular health issues of adults with DD. Quality of evidence Knowledgeable health care providers participating in a colloquium and a subsequent working group discussed and agreed on revisions to the 2006 guidelines based on a comprehensive review of publications, feedback gained from users of the guidelines, and personal clinical experiences. Most of the available evidence in this area of care is from expert opinion or published consensus statements (level III). Main message Adults with DD have complex health issues, many of them differing from those of the general population. Good primary care identifies the particular health issues faced by adults with DD to improve their quality of life, to improve their access to health care, and to prevent suffering, morbidity, and premature death. These guidelines synthesize general, physical, behavioural, and mental health issues of adults with DD that primary care providers should be aware of, and they present recommendations for screening and management based on current knowledge that practitioners can apply. Because of interacting biologic, psychoaffective, and social factors that contribute to the health and well-being of adults with DD, these guidelines emphasize involving caregivers, adapting procedures when appropriate, and seeking input from a range of health professionals when available. Ethical care is also emphasized. The guidelines are formulated within an ethical framework that pays attention to issues such as informed consent and the assessment of health benefits in relation to risks of harm. Conclusion Implementation of the guidelines proposed here would improve the health of adults with DD and would minimize disparities in health and health care between adults with DD and those in the general population

  7. Screening for Suicide Risk in Adolescents, Adults, and Older Adults in Primary Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force Recommendations Screening for Suicide Risk in Adolescents, Adults, and Older Adults in Primary Care The ... recommendation statement on Screening for Suicide Risk in Adolescents, Adults, and Older Adults in Primary Care. This ...

  8. Solar optical telescope primary mirror controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Liu, D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a technique to control the articulated primary mirror (APM) of the solar optical telescope (SOT) is discussed. Program results indicate that a single, all digital controller has sufficient capability to totally handle the computational requirements for control of the SOT APM.

  9. Radiation therapy for primary optic nerve meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Vuksanovic, M M; Yates, B M; Bienfang, D C

    1981-06-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas, formerly thought to be rare, have been encountered with surprising frequency since the widespread use of computed tomography. Early diagnosis led to an enthusiastic surgical approach to these lesions, but this has been tempered by the realization that even in the best of hands, blindness followed such surgery with distressing frequency. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas may be divided into primary, secondary, and multiple meningioma groups. Five patients with primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas treated with irradiation therapy are presented in this report. Improvement in visual acuity, stabilization to increase in the visual field, and decrease in size to total regression of optociliary veins, have been documented following irradiation therapy of the posterior orbital and intracanalicular portions of the optic nerve in some of these cases. Although each patient must be carefully individualized, there is no question that visual palliation can be achieved in some cases of optic nerve sheath meningioma. Further investigation of this therapeutic modality in selected cases in advised.

  10. Screening Adults for Depression in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Smithson, Sarah; Pignone, Michael P

    2017-07-01

    The burden of depression in the United States is substantial. Evidence supports the benefits of screening for depression in all adults, including older patients and pregnant and postpartum women, when coupled with appropriate resources for management of disease. Developing, implementing, and sustaining a high-fidelity screening process is an important first step for improving the care of patients with depression in primary care. Initial treatment for depression should include psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. Collaborative care models are evidence-based approaches to depression treatment and follow-up that can be feasibly initiated in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spreading Optics in the primary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; Gónzalez-Nuñez, Héctor; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; García-Sánchez, Ángel; Pallarés, David; Aymerich, María; Aragón, Ángel L.; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2015-04-01

    The USC-OSA is a student chapter located at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) whose objective is to bring optics and photonics knowledge closer to general public. In order to arouse kids' interest in Optics we developed an activity called Funny Light. This activity consisted on a visit of some USC-OSA members to a several local primary schools where we organized several optics experiments. In this work we present the optics demonstrations and the reaction of the 6 years-old students. The activities with greater acceptance include an explanation of light properties as polarization, refraction or reflection, and the workshop where they learnt how to build their own kaleidoscope and made a chromatic disk. Besides, they also participated in a demonstration and explanation of color properties and some optical illusions. We think that this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and experiment science in real life, as well as helping teachers to explain some complex properties and Physics phenomena of light. Given the broad acceptance of this activity, we are intending to make it a routine event of our student chapter repeating it every year.

  12. Optical pacing of the adult rabbit heart

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Wang, Y. T.; Doughman, Y. Q.; Watanabe, M.; Cheng, Y.; Rollins, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Optical pacing has been demonstrated to be a viable alternative to electrical pacing in embryonic hearts. In this study, the feasibility of optically pacing an adult rabbit heart was explored. Hearts from adult New Zealand White rabbits (n = 9) were excised, cannulated and perfused on a modified Langendorff apparatus. Pulsed laser light (λ = 1851 nm) was directed to either the left or right atrium through a multimode optical fiber. An ECG signal from the left ventricle and a trigger pulse from the laser were recorded simultaneously to determine when capture was achieved. Successful optical pacing was demonstrated by obtaining pacing capture, stopping, then recapturing as well as by varying the pacing frequency. Stimulation thresholds measured at various pulse durations suggested that longer pulses (8 ms) had a lower energy capture threshold. To determine whether optical pacing caused damage, two hearts were perfused with 30 µM of propidium iodide and analyzed histologically. A small number of cells near the stimulation site had compromised cell membranes, which probably limited the time duration over which pacing was maintained. Here, short-term optical pacing (few minutes duration) is demonstrated in the adult rabbit heart for the first time. Future studies will be directed to optimize optical pacing parameters to decrease stimulation thresholds and may enable longer-term pacing. PMID:24049683

  13. Comparison of primary optics in amonix CPV arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Aditya; Kinsey, Geoffrey S.; Liu, Mingguo; Bagienski, William; Garboushian, Vahan

    2012-10-01

    The Amonix CPV system utilizes an acrylic Fresnel lens Primary Optical Element (POE) and a reflective Secondary Optical Element (SOE). Improvements in the optical design have contributed to more than 10% increase in rated power last year. In order to further optimize the optical power path, Amonix is looking at various trade-offs in optics, including, concentration, optical materials, reliability, and cost. A comparison of optical materials used for manufacturing the primary optical element and optical design trade off's used to maximize power output will be presented. Optimization of the power path has led to the demonstration of a module lens-area efficiency of 35% in outdoor testing at Amonix.

  14. Primary carnitine deficiency in a male adult.

    PubMed

    Karmaniolas, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Liatis, Stavros; Dalamanga, Maria; Papalambros, Theoharis; Migdalis, Ilias

    2002-01-01

    The case is described of a 36 year-old man who presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness and weight loss. His serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were markedly elevated. The muscle biopsy showed lipid storage myopathy. The muscle carnitine concentration was extremely low (5.6% of normal levels), establishing the diagnosis of myopathic carnitine deficiency. The disorder was considered as primary because there were no indications of any other identifiable condition which could result in a secondary carnitine deficiency. The patient was treated with oral L-carnitine (2 g per day) and showed rapid improvement. Primary myopathic carnitine deficiency is a curable disorder and therefore it should always be considered as a potential diagnosis in cases of myopathy in young adults.

  15. Spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher; Hagopian, John; DeMarco, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT) project is an internal research and development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goals of the program are to develop a robust and cost effective way to manufacture spherical mirror segments and demonstrate a new wavefront sensing approach for continuous phasing across the segmented primary. This paper focuses on the fabrication of the mirror segments. Significant cost savings were achieved through the design, since it allowed the mirror segments to be cast rather than machined from a glass blank. Casting was followed by conventional figuring at Goddard Space Flight Center. After polishing, the mirror segments were mounted to their composite assemblies. QED Technologies used magnetorheological finishing (MRF®) for the final figuring. The MRF process polished the mirrors while they were mounted to their composite assemblies. Each assembly included several magnetic invar plugs that extended to within an inch of the face of the mirror. As part of this project, the interaction between the MRF magnetic field and invar plugs was evaluated. By properly selecting the polishing conditions, MRF was able to significantly improve the figure of the mounted segments. The final MRF figuring demonstrates that mirrors, in the mounted configuration, can be polished and tested to specification. There are significant process capability advantes due to polishing and testing the optics in their final, end-use assembled state.

  16. Hybrid RF / Optical Communication Terminal with Spherical Primary Optics for Optical Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Jeffrey R.; Hoppe, Daniel H.; Sehic, Asim

    2011-01-01

    Future deep space communications are likely to employ not only the existing RF uplink and downlink, but also a high capacity optical downlink. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is currently investigating the benefits of a ground based hybrid RF and deep space optical terminal based on limited modification of existing 34 meter antenna designs. The ideal design would include as large an optical aperture as technically practical and cost effective, cause minimal impact to RF performance, and remain cost effective even when compared to a separate optical terminal of comparable size. Numerous trades and architectures have been considered, including shared RF and optical apertures having aspheric optics and means to separate RF and optical signals, plus, partitioned apertures in which various zones of the primary are dedicated to optical reception. A design based on the latter is emphasized in this paper, employing spherical primary optics and a new version of a "clamshell" corrector that is optimized to fit within the limited space between the antenna sub-reflector and the existing apex structure that supports the subreflector. The mechanical design of the hybrid accommodates multiple spherical primary mirror panels in the central 11 meters of the antenna, and integrates the clamshell corrector and optical receiver modules with antenna hardware using existing attach points to the maximum extent practical. When an optical collection area is implemented on a new antenna, it is possible to design the antenna structure to accommodate the additional weight of optical mirrors providing an equivalent aperture of several meters diameter. The focus of our near term effort is to use optics with the 34 meter DSS-13 antenna at Goldstone to demonstrate spatial optical acquisition and tracking capability using an optical system that is temporarily integrated into the antenna.

  17. Hybrid RF / Optical Communication Terminal with Spherical Primary Optics for Optical Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Jeffrey R.; Hoppe, Daniel H.; Sehic, Asim

    2011-01-01

    Future deep space communications are likely to employ not only the existing RF uplink and downlink, but also a high capacity optical downlink. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is currently investigating the benefits of a ground based hybrid RF and deep space optical terminal based on limited modification of existing 34 meter antenna designs. The ideal design would include as large an optical aperture as technically practical and cost effective, cause minimal impact to RF performance, and remain cost effective even when compared to a separate optical terminal of comparable size. Numerous trades and architectures have been considered, including shared RF and optical apertures having aspheric optics and means to separate RF and optical signals, plus, partitioned apertures in which various zones of the primary are dedicated to optical reception. A design based on the latter is emphasized in this paper, employing spherical primary optics and a new version of a "clamshell" corrector that is optimized to fit within the limited space between the antenna sub-reflector and the existing apex structure that supports the subreflector. The mechanical design of the hybrid accommodates multiple spherical primary mirror panels in the central 11 meters of the antenna, and integrates the clamshell corrector and optical receiver modules with antenna hardware using existing attach points to the maximum extent practical. When an optical collection area is implemented on a new antenna, it is possible to design the antenna structure to accommodate the additional weight of optical mirrors providing an equivalent aperture of several meters diameter. The focus of our near term effort is to use optics with the 34 meter DSS-13 antenna at Goldstone to demonstrate spatial optical acquisition and tracking capability using an optical system that is temporarily integrated into the antenna.

  18. [Addison's disease, primary adrenal insufficiency in adults].

    PubMed

    Krikke, Maaike; ten Wolde, Marije; Smit, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare but fatal disease if left unrecognized. Symptoms often mimic more prevalent diseases. We discuss three patients with primary adrenal insufficiency. These cases illustrate that presenting symptoms such as syncope, nausea, vomiting, weight loss and hypoglycemia are often non-specific and, therefore, often not immediately recognized. When an adrenal crisis is suspected, glucocorticoids should be given promptly. The symptoms are caused by insufficient production of adrenal hormones due to destruction of the adrenal glands by auto-immune adrenalitis. An ACTH stimulation test should confirm the diagnosis when primary adrenal insufficiency is suspected. Treatment consists of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement. Primary adrenal insufficiency is a 'master of disguise'. Unexplained syncope, vomiting, weight loss or hypoglycemia should prompt suspicion of this disease.

  19. Primary Care Providers' HIV Prevention Practices Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tracy; Teaster, Pamela B.; Thornton, Alice; Watkins, John F.; Alexander, Linda; Zanjani, Faika

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore primary care providers' HIV prevention practices for older adults. Primary care providers' perceptions and awareness were explored to understand factors that affect their provision of HIV prevention materials and HIV screening for older adults. Design and Method Data were collected through 24 semistructured interviews with primary care providers (i.e., physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) who see patients older than 50 years. Results Results reveal facilitators and barriers of HIV prevention for older adults among primary care providers and understanding of providers' HIV prevention practices and behaviors. Individual, patient, institutional, and societal factors influenced HIV prevention practices among participants, for example, provider training and work experience, lack of time, discomfort in discussing HIV/AIDS with older adults, stigma, and ageism were contributing factors. Furthermore, factors specific to primary and secondary HIV prevention were identified, for instance, the presence of sexually transmitted infections influenced providers' secondary prevention practices. Implications HIV disease, while preventable, is increasing among older adults. These findings inform future research and interventions aimed at increasing HIV prevention practices in primary care settings for patients older than 50. PMID:25736425

  20. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment.

  1. Fiber optic signal collection system for primary flight control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Sandy L.

    1994-10-01

    The FOPMN is a fiber-optic signal collection system for primary flight control applications. An avionics bay protected electro-optic interface unit transmits light down fiber optic cable to an optical sensor housed in the harsh environment of a hydraulic actuator. The interface unit also receives the sensor's reflected pattern and calculates independent positions from the multiplexed signals. This paper discusses the FOPMN method for fiber-optically sensing and multiplexing two channels of position of a TEF actuator's main ram cylinder. Currently installed in NASA Dryden's SRA F/A-18, the FOPMN has accumulated approximately 15 hours of flight time. A performance comparison is made between the FOPMN positions and the flight control computer's feedback mechanism (the actuator LVDTs). Included is a discussion of some of the lessons learned as a result of testing the FOPMN in the lab and in flight. The FOPMN is well on its way to proving itself as a robust fiber optic system with the ability to multiplex numerous optical sensors for primary flight control. The success of the FOPMN leads to the second phase of the project--optical loop closure. Our goal for this phase is to have four FOPMN sensor channels on the main ram and/or the main control valve of the actuator to serve as the quad redundant feedback mechanism for flight control.

  2. Refractory Adult Primary Autoimmune Neutropenia that Responded to Alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Neerukonda, Anu R; Lan, Fengshuo; Gabig, Theodore; Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary autoimmune neutropenia (P-AIN) is an extremely rare disease. The most effective treatment for primary P-AIN is a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; however, no curative treatment has been reported. We herein report a case of an adult P-AIN patient with a relatively mild medical history (irrespective of the severe neutropenia) who showed a sustained hematological response over seventeen months after the initiation of treatment with subcutaneous Alemtuzumab.

  3. Adult primary immune deficiency: what are we missing?

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Bharat T; Alizadehfar, Reza; Desrosiers, Martin; Shuster, Joseph; Pai, Nitika Pant; Tsoukas, Christos M

    2012-08-01

    More than 200 primary immune deficiencies have been described. In adults, their identification can be difficult. The lack of timely referrals, diagnostic facilities, and available expertise often delay appropriate treatment. Because an increasing number of adults are now diagnosed with immune deficiencies, there is a need to better understand the immune deficits in this age group. The study objective was to analyze the diagnostic spectrum of adults with primary immune deficiency and to determine the presumptive diagnostic accuracy of the referring physicians. We conducted a retrospective chart review over a 10-year period of all individuals referred to a dedicated center for adults with primary immune deficiency. Suspected cases were confirmed using standard clinical criteria and state of the art immune assays. Of the 381 individuals studied, 244 were diagnosed as immune deficient. Of these, 210 had primary immune deficiency classified as novel, defined, and undefined. Forty-three patients had a prior diagnosis and were referred for follow-up care, and 201 patients were newly diagnosed. Most patients had common variable immune deficiency. Despite an apparent high index of suspicion in initiating the referrals, only one third of these patients had a prior quantitative assessment of serum immunoglobulins. In this first known analysis of a large cohort of adults with suspected immune deficiency using established diagnostic criteria, we confirmed the diagnosis in two thirds of all patients. Our findings highlight the wide spectrum of primary immune deficiency states seen in adult medical practices and the need for increased awareness of their existence. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Undiagnosed hypertension among young adults with regular primary care use.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Heather M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Bartels, Christie M; Schumacher, Jessica R; Palta, Mari; Pandhi, Nancy; Sheehy, Ann M; Smith, Maureen A

    2014-01-01

    Young adults meeting hypertension diagnostic criteria have a lower prevalence of a hypertension diagnosis than middle-aged and older adults. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of a new hypertension diagnosis for different age groups and identify predictors of delays in the initial diagnosis among young adults who regularly use primary care. A 4-year retrospective analysis included 14 970 patients, at least 18 years old, who met clinical criteria for an initial hypertension diagnosis in a large, Midwestern, academic practice from 2008 to 2011. Patients with a previous hypertension diagnosis or prior antihypertensive medication prescription were excluded. The probability of diagnosis at specific time points was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazard models (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval) were fit to identify predictors of delays to an initial diagnosis, with a subsequent subset analysis for young adults (18-39 years old). After 4 years, 56% of 18-24-year-olds received a diagnosis compared with 62% (25-31-year-olds), 68% (32-39-year-olds), and more than 70% (≥40-year-olds). After adjustment, 18-31-year-olds had a 33% slower rate of receiving a diagnosis (18-24 years hazard ratio 0.66, 0.53-0.83; 25-31 years hazard ratio 0.68, 0.58-0.79) compared with adults at least 60 years. Other predictors of a slower diagnosis rate among young adults were current tobacco use, white ethnicity, and non-English primary language. Young adults with diabetes, higher blood pressures, or a female provider had a faster diagnosis rate. Provider and patient factors are critical determinants of poor hypertension diagnosis rates among young adults with regular primary care use.

  5. Undiagnosed hypertension among young adults with regular primary care use

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Heather M.; Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Bartels, Christie M.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Palta, Mari; Pandhi, Nancy; Sheehy, Ann M.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Young adults meeting hypertension diagnostic criteria have a lower prevalence of a hypertension diagnosis than middle-aged and older adults. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of a new hypertension diagnosis for different age groups and identify predictors of delays in the initial diagnosis among young adults who regularly use primary care. Methods: A 4-year retrospective analysis included 14 970 patients, at least 18 years old, who met clinical criteria for an initial hypertension diagnosis in a large, Midwestern, academic practice from 2008 to 2011. Patients with a previous hypertension diagnosis or prior antihypertensive medication prescription were excluded. The probability of diagnosis at specific time points was estimated by Kaplan–Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazard models (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval) were fit to identify predictors of delays to an initial diagnosis, with a subsequent subset analysis for young adults (18–39 years old). Results: After 4 years, 56% of 18–24-year-olds received a diagnosis compared with 62% (25–31-year-olds), 68% (32–39-year-olds), and more than 70% (≥40-year-olds). After adjustment, 18–31-year-olds had a 33% slower rate of receiving a diagnosis (18–24 years hazard ratio 0.66, 0.53–0.83; 25–31 years hazard ratio 0.68, 0.58–0.79) compared with adults at least 60 years. Other predictors of a slower diagnosis rate among young adults were current tobacco use, white ethnicity, and non-English primary language. Young adults with diabetes, higher blood pressures, or a female provider had a faster diagnosis rate. Conclusion: Provider and patient factors are critical determinants of poor hypertension diagnosis rates among young adults with regular primary care use. PMID:24126711

  6. Outpatient Treatment of Primary Anorexia Nervosa in Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziesat, Harold A., Jr.; Ferguson, James M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes three cases of adult-onset primary anorexia nervosa in males. For each case, the history and diagnostic patterns are considered, followed by a discussion of the course of outpatient treatment. The therapy was multimodal and included elements of behavioral contingency management, cognitive therapy, and dynamic psychotherapy. (JAC)

  7. Primary care for adults on the autism spectrum.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Kripke, Clarissa Calliope; Raymaker, Dora

    2014-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is defined by differences in social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities. Skills and challenges can change depending on environmental stimuli, supports, and stressors. Quality of life can be improved by the use of accommodations, assistive technologies, therapies to improve adaptive function or communication, caregiver training, acceptance, access, and inclusion. This article focuses on the identification of ASD in adults, referrals for services, the recognition of associated conditions, strategies and accommodations to facilitate effective primary care services, and ethical issues related to caring for autistic adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary stabbing headache in adults and pediatrics: a review.

    PubMed

    Hagler, Suzanne; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Robbins, Matthew S

    2014-10-01

    Primary stabbing headache (PSH) is an under-recognized primary headache disorder, which often goes undiagnosed. It is mainly characterized by its ultrashort stabbing quality and can be easily overlooked both by patients and providers as it is often not severe enough to interfere significantly with daily life. However, PSH may be severe and require therapy, and it is important for providers to recognize this headache type, both in adult and pediatric populations, as well as to be able to distinguish it from secondary headache disorders. PSH also may be more common than previously thought.

  9. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Whitt, Jessica L

    2015-12-01

    Sensory loss leads to widespread adaptation of brain circuits to allow an organism to navigate its environment with its remaining senses, which is broadly referred to as cross-modal plasticity. Such adaptation can be observed even in the primary sensory cortices, and falls into two distinct categories: recruitment of the deprived sensory cortex for processing the remaining senses, which we term 'cross-modal recruitment', and experience-dependent refinement of the spared sensory cortices referred to as 'compensatory plasticity.' Here we will review recent studies demonstrating that cortical adaptation to sensory loss involves LTP/LTD and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity is observed in adults, hence cross-modal sensory deprivation may be an effective way to promote plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

  10. Optical topographic studies of adults and neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissila, Ilkka T.; Kotilahti, Kalle; Noponen, Tommi E.; Huotilainen, Minna; Naatanen, Risto; Katila, Toivo E.

    2003-07-01

    We used a four-channel intensity-modulated near-infrared spectroscopy device to study the hemodynamic responses due to brain activation in adults and neonates. The stimuli included finger tapping, tickling of the heel, and auditory stimuli. The subjects included two adults and ten neonates of age between 0.5 and 4 days. A block paradigm was used in the studies, and responses were successfully obtained from both subject groups.

  11. Negotiating Depression Treatment with Older Adults: Primary Care Providers’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wittink, Marsha N.; Givens, Jane L.; Knott, Kathryn A.; Coyne, James C.; Barg, Frances K.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Whether and how primary care providers consider older patients’ perceptions of depression may have an impact on patients’ acceptance of treatment. AIM To explore how physicians view and experience the process of discussing depression diagnosis and care with older adults. METHOD Semi-structured interviews conducted with 15 providers involved with intervention studies of depression management for older adults. We used the constant comparative method to identify themes related to negotiating the diagnosis and treatment of depression with older adults. RESULTS Providers felt that older patients often attribute depression to non-medical causes. They talked about the challenges of treating older adults and described the need to “convince” them of the medical model of depression to enter them into standard treatment (medication). CONCLUSION How primary care physicians surmise patients’ views of depression may influence whether and how depression is discussed in practice. Given that they most often provide medication for depression treatment, some may feel compelled to convince their patients of biomedical explanations while others may avoid treating depression altogether. DECLARATION OF INTEREST Dr. Marsha Wittink was supported by an NIMH Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (MH073658). Provider interviews were funded by the Advanced Center for Interventions and Services Research of the University of Pennsylvania. PMID:21780938

  12. Conservative versus interventional management for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in adults.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Michael; Haug, Greg; Mulcahy, Pete; Ogden, Kathryn J; Jensen, Oliver; Walters, Julia A E

    2014-12-18

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is widely managed according to size with interventional techniques based on practice guidelines. Interventional management is not without complications and observational data suggest conservative management works. The current guidelines are based on expert consensus rather than evidence, and a systematic review may help in identifying evidence for this practice. The objective of the review is to compare conservative and interventional treatments of adult primary spontaneous pneumothorax for outcomes of clinical efficacy, tolerability and safety. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library, Issue 6, 2014); MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1920 to 26th June 2014); EMBASE via Ovid SP (1947 to 26th June 2014); CINAHL via EBSCO host (1980 to 26th June 2014); and ISI Web of Science (1945 to 26th June 2014). We searched ongoing trials via the relevant databases and contacted authors. We also searched the 'grey literature'. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and we accepted quasi-RCTs if a systematic method of allocation was used. Participants were limited to adults aged 18 to 50 years, with their first symptomatic primary spontaneous pneumothorax with radiological evidence and no underlying lung disease. Two of five authors independently reviewed all studies in the search criteria and made inclusions and exclusions according to the selection criteria. No statistical methods were necessary as there were no included trials. We identified 358 studies with duplicates removed. There were three potentially relevant studies that we excluded as they were not randomized controlled trials. There was one ongoing trial that was relevant and we contacted the authors and confirmed the study is ongoing at June 2014. We will update this review when this ongoing study is completed. There are no completed randomized controlled trials comparing conservative and interventional management for primary

  13. Primary Colonic Eosinophilia and Eosinophilic Colitis in Adults.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kevin O; Sinkre, Richa A; Neumann, William L; Genta, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The normal content of eosinophils in the adult colon and the criteria for the histopathologic diagnosis of eosinophilic colitis remain undefined. This study aimed at: (1) establishing the numbers of eosinophils in the normal adult colon; and (2) proposing a clinicopathologic framework for the diagnosis of primary colonic eosinophilia and eosinophilic colitis. To accomplish these goals, we counted the eosinophils in the right, transverse, and left colon of 159 adults with normal colonic histology. Using a database of 1.2 million patients with colonic biopsies, we extracted all adults with a diagnosis of colonic eosinophilia. We reviewed the slides from all cases and captured demographic, clinical, and pathologic data, including information about eosinophilia in other organs. We then compared the clinical manifestations of the study patients (those with no identifiable cause of eosinophilia) to those of patients with other types of colitis. The normal eosinophil counts (per mm) were 55.7±23.4 in the right, 41.0±18.6 in the transverse, and 28.6±17.2 in the left colon. Of the 194 study patients (eosinophil counts 166-5050/mm), 63 were asymptomatic and had a normal colonoscopy. Diarrhea and abdominal pain were the commonest indications for colonoscopy (38% and 27%, respectively) among the 131 patients who had symptoms, endoscopic abnormalities, or both. Neither clinical manifestations nor endoscopic appearance were sufficiently characteristic to elicit the suspicion of colonic eosinophilia. In conclusion, primary colonic eosinophilia was extremely rare in this series (<1 in 6000 patients); one third of these patients were asymptomatic. Their clinical manifestations were not distinctive and could not have led clinicians to suspect this condition; one third of the patients were asymptomatic. We suggest that regularly reporting high colonic eosinophilia may result in increased opportunities for clinicopathologic studies that might lead to a better definition of this

  14. Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Adult Patient with Primary Obstructive Megaureter

    PubMed Central

    Makiyama, Kazuhide; Ohtake, Shinji; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Sano, Futoshi; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old female with a complaint of abdominal distension was referred to our hospital. She had a history of being treated for pyelonephritis three times. By computed tomography and retrograde pyelography, she was diagnosed with adult left primary megaureter. Her left renal function was severely deteriorated. She hoped for surgical intervention before becoming pregnant. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureters seems to be difficult due to the large size. By sucking urine from an inserted ureteral catheter and setting trocar positions, we successfully performed laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureter. PMID:24455395

  15. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size.

  16. Postural adaptations to repeated optic flow stimulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Kathryn W; Loughlin, Patrick J; Redfern, Mark S; Sparto, Patrick J

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the processes of adaptation (changes in within-trial postural responses) and habituation (reductions in between-trial postural responses) to visual cues in older and young adults. Of particular interest were responses to sudden increases in optic flow magnitude. The postural sway of 25 healthy young adults and 24 healthy older adults was measured while subjects viewed anterior-posterior 0.4 Hz sinusoidal optic flow for 45 s. Three trials for each of three conditions were performed: (1) constant 12 cm optic flow amplitude (24 cm peak-to-peak), (2) constant 4 cm amplitude (8 cm p-t-p), and (3) a transition in amplitude from 4 to 12 cm. The average power of head sway velocity (P(vel)) was calculated for consecutive 5s intervals during the trial to examine the changes in sway within and between trials. A mixed factor repeated measures ANOVA was performed to examine the effects of subject Group, Trial, and Interval on the P(vel). P(vel) was greater in older adults in all conditions (p<0.001). During the 12 cm constant amplitude trials, within-trial adaptation occurred for all subjects, but there were differences in the between-trial habituation. P(vel) of the older adults decreased significantly between all 3 trials, but decreased only between Trials 1 and 2 in young adults. While the responses of the young adults to the transition in optic flow from 4 to 12 cm did not significantly change, older adults had an increase in P(vel) following the transition, ranging from 6.5 dB for the first trial to 3.4 dB for the third trial. These results show that older adults can habituate to repeated visual perturbation exposures; however, this habituation requires a greater number of exposures than young adults. This suggests aging impacts the ability to quickly modify the relative weighting of the sensory feedback for postural stabilization.

  17. Comparative study of two CPV optical concentrators, using a Fresnel lens as primary optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Himer, S.; El-Yahyaoui, S.; Mechaqrane, A.; Ahaitouf, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the performances of two optimized reflective secondary optics elements a CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) and a Cone for use in a CPV concentrator system are studied using ray-tracing simulation for the same primary optical element: a Fresnel lens. These optical elements are compared in terms of concentration, acceptance angle, exit angle and output light distribution. Our results show that the power distribution at the end of the concentrator is more uniform in the case of the cone. The optical efficiency is higher when the secondary element is placed at a distance f + \\frac{\\text{R}}{{\\tan \\text{θ }}} with f the focal length; R the input radius of the secondary optical element and θ the acceptance angle of the secondary optical element. Also, we found that the length and the input radius of each optical element decrease when the Fresnel lens diameter increases but the input radius of the CPC stills the larger. Finally, our calculation show that the CPC is longer than the cone while the Fresnel lens diameter is less than 200 mm and beyond this value both the cone and the CPC mostly present the same length.

  18. [Management of adult secondary insomnia in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Luís Filipe; Ribeiro, Lúcia

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder in adults, with secondary insomnia being the most prevalent. This sleep disorder is associated with important medical and social consequences. The General Practitioner (GP) plays a key role in the diagnosis of insomnia, which may affect about 69% of their patients in the PHC (Primary Health Care). Recognize the differential diagnosis of secondary insomnia in adults, evaluate and manage these patients in the PHC, appropriately use the treatments available and meet the criteria for referral. Bibliographic search in MEDLINE databases, and evidence based review databases, using the MeSH terms: Primary Health Care, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, for articles published since January 2000 until July 2009, in English, Portuguese, French and Spanish. Index de Revistas Médicas Portuguesas and scientific societies dedicated to sleep disorders were searched. Mood and anxiety disorders are the main co-morbidities associated with secondary insomnia, being present in 30% to 50% of patients with insomnia. The medical pathology and substance abuse are present respectively in 10% of patients. It is essential a proper clinical history, with a history of sleep, sleep diary and the partner information. There is evidence that the combination of specific pharmacological treatments (benzodiazepines and the benzodiazepine receptor agonists) with the nonpharmacological (cognitive-behavioral therapy) may be useful in secondary insomnia, as co-adjuvant treatment of the underlying disease. There are several treatment options with their indications and adverse effects. The criteria for referral should be defined according to the availability of human resources. Due to the high prevalence and the serious consequences of secondary insomnia in adults, it must be systematically managed by the GP. It is important to know and to use non-pharmacological therapy in GP consultation, because this therapy was shown to be important in treating this type of insomnia

  19. Fibromyalgia in 300 adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Barton, Jackson C; Acton, Ronald T

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and clinical and laboratory associations of fibromyalgia in adults with primary immunodeficiency (immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We performed a retrospective analysis of these observations in 300 non-Hispanic white adult index patients with recurrent/severe respiratory tract infections and IgGSD or CVID: age; sex; IgGSD; fibromyalgia; chronic fatigue; autoimmune conditions (ACs); interstitial cystitis (IC); diabetes; body mass index; serum Ig isotypes; blood lymphocytes and subsets; and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and -B types and haplotypes. We performed univariate comparisons, logistic multivariable regressions, and an analysis of covariance. Mean age was 49 ± 12 (standard deviation) y. There were 246 women (82.0%). IgGSD was diagnosed in 276 patients (92.0%). Fifty-six patients had fibromyalgia (18.7%; female:male 13:1). Other characteristics included: chronic fatigue, 63.0%; aggregate ACs, 35.3%; Sjögren's syndrome, 8.0%; IC, 3.0%; diabetes, 10.3%; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity, 9.7%. Prevalences of female sex; chronic fatigue; IC; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity were greater in patients with fibromyalgia. Logistic regression on fibromyalgia revealed three positive associations: chronic fatigue (p=0.0149; odds ratio 2.6 [95% confidence interval 1.2, 5.6]); Sjögren's syndrome (p=0.0004; 5.2 [2.1, 13.2]); and IC (p=0.0232; 5.7 [1.3, 25.7]). In an analysis of covariance, there were significant interactions of chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and interstitial cystitis on fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is common in non-Hispanic white adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency, especially women. Chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and IC are significantly associated with fibromyalgia after adjustment for other independent variables.

  20. Optic Neuritis Caused by Rathke's Cleft Cyst in Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Namie; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Onoda, Takatsugu; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Adachi-Usami, Emiko

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of right optic neuritis caused by Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC) in a young adult. A 15-year-old boy presented with reduced visual acuity in the right eye. He was diagnosed with optic neuritis in the right eye 4 years earlier at other clinics before he was referred to our department. During our one-year examinations, the cause of the reduced vision in his right eye could not be determined conclusively. At the age of 17 years, a RCC was detected by a neurosurgeon who specialized in hypophyseal diseases. He underwent microscopic transsphenoidal resection of the cyst, and his vision recovered to 1.2 and he has had no recurrence for at least 9 months. We suggest that repeated rupturing of the RCC was the cause of the optic neuritis, and a RCC can be successfully treated by surgery even after 3 years of optic neuritis. PMID:25045561

  1. Handheld optical coherence tomography scanner for primary care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Jeon, Mansik; Chaney, Eric J; Stewart, Charles N; Boppart, Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop an advanced point-of-care diagnostic instrument for use in a primary care office using handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system has the potential to enable earlier detection of diseases and accurate image-based diagnostics. Our system was designed to be compact, portable, user-friendly, and fast, making it well suited for the primary care office setting. The unique feature of our system is a versatile handheld OCT imaging scanner which consists of a pair of computer-controlled galvanometer-mounted mirrors, interchangeable lens mounts, and miniaturized video camera. This handheld scanner has the capability to guide the physician in real time for finding suspicious regions to be imaged by OCT. In order to evaluate the performance and use of the handheld OCT scanner, the anterior chamber of a rat eye and in vivo human retina, cornea, skin, and tympanic membrane were imaged. Based on this feasibility study, we believe that this new type of handheld OCT device and system has the potential to be an efficient point-of-care imaging tool in primary care medicine.

  2. The evaluation of saphenofemoral insufficiency in primary adult varicocele.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Hakan; Ergenoglu, Mehmet; Yencilek, Faruk; Gulcan, Nilay; Tasdelen, Neslihan; Yencilek, Esin; Sarica, Kemal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible relationship between varicocele and saphenofemoral insufficiency in patients diagnosed with primary varicocele. A total of 70 patients with the primary diagnosis of varicocele were included into the study. A total of 30 age-matched healthy adults were also included in the study as a control group. Varicocele was diagnosed by palpation and observation of each spermatic cord in standing position before and during a valsalva maneuver. Additionally, scrotal Doppler and lower extremity venous Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Patients who were with spermatic varicose vein larger than 3.0 mm were included in the study group as a varicocele patient. At the lower extremity venous Doppler ultrasonography, a retrograde flow lasting longer than 0.5 seconds during normal breathing or at the valsalva maneuver was considered to be meaningful for saphenofemoral junction insufficiency. Thirty-six (51.35%) patients had insufficiency in saphenofemoral junction in the study group (6 [8.5%] bilateral, 30 [42.85%] unilateral) whereas 8 (26.6%) had insufficiency in the control group (2 [6.6%] bilateral, 6 [20%] unilateral insufficiency). The patients with primary varicocele had a statistically significant (P = .02) higher rate of venous insufficiency in their saphenofemoral junctions when compared with the control group. In the present study, the rate of saphenofemoral insufficiency has been found to be statistically higher in patients with primary varicocele compared with healthy men. Depending on the common presence of valvular insufficiency, we believe that the presence of varicocele should be investigated in the young population suffering from saphenofemoral junction insufficiency.

  3. Characteristics of primary nocturnal enuresis in adults: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C K; Sihoe, J D Y; Sit, F K Y; Bower, W; Sreedhar, B; Lau, J

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) in adults in Hong Kong, as there are currently limited epidemiological data in adults. After a telephone survey, 8534 respondents (3996 males and 4538 females) aged 16-40 years were selected for the study and stratified in age groups. The questionnaire used comprised two parts; the first started with questions mainly about the general demographic background to decrease the sensitivity of the study and to establish rapport. The second part was conducted through an automated telephone interview service, with the questions being asked by recorded messages and the respondents then keying in their responses with no need to converse with an interviewer. This part included questions about enuretic symptoms and a subjective assessment of social and psychological effects of bedwetting, and measurements of the individual's self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale) and depression (The Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale). Of the 8534 subjects interviewed, 196 had PNE, giving an overall prevalence of 2.3% (2.7% males and 2.0% females); of these 196, 36 (18.4%) also had daytime urinary incontinence. Hence, 1.9% of adults (2.2% males and 1.7% females) had monosymptomatic PNE. Of these, 53% wet >3 nights/week and 26% wet every night. Prevalence rates remained relatively stable among different age groups, with no apparent trend of a reduction with age. Compared with nonenuretic normal controls, significantly fewer enuretics reached tertiary education (33.4% vs 17.8%, P < 0.01). Bedwetters had a significantly higher incidence of depression and lower self-esteem, and a higher incidence of sleep disturbances than the control group. Among bedwetters, 32-40% felt that there was some effect on their choice of job, work performance and social activities, whilst 23% felt the condition affected their family life and in making friends of either sex. However, there was no significant difference

  4. Primary glioblastoma of the cerebellopontine angle in adults.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Liu, Weidong; Zhu, Hong; Feng, Hailong; Liu, Jinping

    2011-05-01

    Gliomas are rare entities in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) in adults. The authors present clinical, neuroradiological, serological, and neuropathological findings in a 60-year-old man with an extraaxial CPA glioblastoma arising from the proximal portion of cranial nerve VIII. The patient presented with progressive left-sided deafness and left-sided facial palsy lasting less than 2 months and progressive dysarthria and dysphagia lasting 2 weeks. Preoperative neuroimaging suggested the diagnosis of CPA meningioma with "dural-tail" sign and involvement of the internal auditory canal. Serological examination showed an increase in the malignant markers of ferritin and neuron-specific enolase, which suggested underlying malignancy. The tumor was subtotally removed, and it was confirmed to be completely separated from the brainstem and cerebellum. Cranial nerves VII and VIII were destroyed and sacrificed. Transient severe bradycardia occurred during surgery due to entrapment of the caudal cranial nerve complex by the tumor in such an infiltrative way. The neuropathological examination revealed a glioblastoma. The patient underwent no further treatment and died of cachexia 2 months postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the first case of a primary glioblastoma in the CPA in an adult. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on clinical assessment, radiological findings, and serum detection of specific malignant markers is essential to diagnose such uncommon CPA lesions.

  5. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging of optic nerve and optic radiation in healthy adults at 3T.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Hong; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Qiu-Juan; Bai, Zhi-Lan; He, Ping

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the diffusion characteristics of water of optic nerve and optic radiation in healthy adults and its related factors by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3T. A total of 107 healthy volunteers performed head conventional MRI and bilateral optic nerve and optic radiation DTI. The primary data of DTI was processed by post-processing software of DTI studio 2.3, obtaining fractional anisotropy value, mean diffusivity value, principal engine value, orthogonal engine value by measuring, and analyzed by the SPSS13.0 statistical software. The bilateral optic nerve and optic radiation fibers presented green color in directional encoded color (DEC) maps and presented high signal in fractional anisotropy (FA) maps. The FA value of the left optic nerve was 0.598±0.069 and the right was 0.593±0.065; the mean diffusivity (MD) value of the left optic nerve was (1.324±0.349)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (1.312±0.350)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the principal engine value (λ‖) of the left optic nerve was (2.297±0.522)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (2.277±0.526)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the orthogonal engine value (λ⊥) of the left optic nerve was (0.838±0.285)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (0.830±0.280)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the FA value of the left optic radiation was 0.636±0.057 and the right was 0.628±0.056; the mean diffusivity (MD) value of the left optic radiation was (0.907±0.103)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (0.889±0.125)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the principal eigenvalue (λ‖) of the left optic radiation was (1.655±0.210)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (1.614±0.171)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the orthogonal enginvalue (λ⊥) of the left optic radiation was (0.531±0.103)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (0.524±0.152)×10(-3)mm(2)/s. There was no obvious difference between the FA, MD, λ‖, λ⊥ of the bilateral optic radiation and the bilateral optic nerve (P>0.05) and no obvious difference between male and female group. The FA, MD, λ‖, λ⊥ of the bilateral

  6. Hyperbola-parabola primary mirror in Cassegrain optical antenna to improve transmission efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Lu; Yang, HuaJun; Jiang, Ping; Mao, Shengqian; Caiyang, Weinan

    2015-08-20

    An optical model with a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror added in the Cassegrain optical antenna, which can effectively improve the transmission efficiency, is proposed in this paper. The optimum parameters of a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror and a secondary mirror for the optical antenna system have been designed and analyzed in detail. The parabola-hyperbola primary structure optical antenna is obtained to improve the transmission efficiency of 10.60% in theory, and the simulation efficiency changed 9.359%. For different deflection angles to the receiving antenna with the emit antenna, the coupling efficiency curve of the optical antenna has been obtained.

  7. Active Optics for a Segmented Primary Mirror on a Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article investigates the active optical control of segments in the primary mirror to correct for wavefront errors in the Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA). Although an exact assessment of improvement in signal blur radius cannot be made until a more detailed preliminary structural design is completed, analytical tools are identified for a time when such designs become available. A brief survey of appropriate sensing approaches is given. Since the choice of control algorithm and architecture depends on the particular sensing system used, typical control systems, estimated complexities, and the type of equipment required are discussed. Once specific sensor and actuator systems are chosen, the overall control system can be optimized using methods identified in the literature.

  8. Primary Care Physician Perceptions of Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Jody L.; Perkins, Susan M.; Haggstrom, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing cure rates for childhood cancers have resulted in a population of adult childhood cancer survivors (CCS) that are at risk for late effects of cancer-directed therapy. Our objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to primary care physicians (PCPs) providing late effects screening and evaluate information tools PCPs perceive as useful. We analyzed surveys from 351 practicing internal medicine and family practice physicians nationwide. A minority of PCPs perceived that their medical training was adequate to recognize late effects of chemotherapy (27.6%), cancer surgery (36.6%), and radiation therapy (38.1%). Most PCPs (93%) had never used Children’s Oncology Group guidelines, but 86% would follow their recommendations. Most (84–86%) PCPs stated that they had never received a cancer treatment summary or survivorship care plan but (>90%) thought these documents would be useful. PCPs have a low level of awareness and receive inadequate training to recognize late effects. Overall, PCPs infrequently utilize guidelines, cancer treatment summaries, and survivorship care plans, although they perceive such tools as useful. We have identified gaps to address when providing care for CCS in routine general medical practice. PMID:24309612

  9. Regeneration of optic nerve fibers of adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masami

    2010-09-01

    The pathway from the retina to the brain in mammals provides a well-defined model system for investigation of not only surviving axotomy but also axonal regeneration of injured neurons. Here I introduce our recent works on axonal regeneration in the optic nerve (OpN) of adult cats. Fibers of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) extend beyond the crush site of OpN with injections of a macrophage stimulator (oxidized galectin-1) or a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-39983 or Y-27632) while axonal extension is blocked with injection of saline. Elongation of crushed optic fibers, however, is slowed after 2 weeks. Transplantation of peripheral nerve makes RGCs regenerate their transected axons into a graft but regenerated fibers extend only a few mm in the brain. Effectiveness of combination of the drugs and treatments has to be verified in future.

  10. Prevalence and predictors of change in adult-child primary caregivers.

    PubMed

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E; Davey, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Family caregiving research is increasingly contextual and dynamic, but few studies have examined prevalence and predictors of change in primary caregivers, those with the most frequent contact with healthcare professionals. We identified prevalence and predictors of 2-year change in primary adult-child caregivers. Data pooled from the 1992-2000 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) represent 1,068 parent-level care occasions and 3,616 child-level occasions. There is considerable 2-year stability in primary adult-child caregivers. Parents are more prone to experience a change in adult-child primary caregivers if they live by themselves and if they have more sons and daughters. As far as the adult children are concerned, daughters and children living closer to parents are more likely to remain primary caregivers. Results suggest that change in primary caregivers is more strongly associated with available alternatives and gender norms than burden and competing obligations.

  11. Optic neuropathy in a child with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rodriguez, J; Garcia-Carrasco, M; Ramirez, E S; Romero-Rodriguez, F; Ramos-Casals, M; Rojas-Serrano, J; Terrazas-Ramirez, A

    1998-05-01

    An eight-year-old girl developed optic neuritis followed by primary Sjögren's syndrome confirmed by a lip biopsy. Glucocorticoid therapy combined during six months with monthly intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide ensured resolution of the sicca syndrome but failed to improve the visual impairment. This is the second pediatric case of optic neuritis associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome, and the first pediatric case in which optic neuritis was the only neurologic manifestation.

  12. Characteristics of Older Adults in Primary Care Who May Benefit from Primary Palliative Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Nancy; Ritchie, Christine S; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Covinsky, Kenneth E; Cooper, Bruce A; Patel, Kanan; Stijacic-Cenzer, Irena; Chapman, Susan A

    2017-09-12

    Older adults with advanced illness and associated symptoms may benefit from primary palliative care, but limited data exist to identify older adults in U.S. primary care to benefit from this care. To describe U.S. primary care visits among adults 65 years and older with advanced illness. Cross-sectional analysis of the National Ambulatory and Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys (2009-2011) was conducted using chi-square tests to compare visits without and with advanced illness to U.S. primary care defined by NCQA Palliative and End-of-Life Care Physician Performance Measurement Set ICD-9 codes for end-stage illness. Among visits by older adults to primary care, 7.9% of visits were related to advanced illness. A higher proportion of advanced illness visits was among males vs. females (8.9% vs. 7.2%; P=0.03) and adults aged 75 and older, non-Hispanic Whites (8.3%) and Blacks (8.2%) vs. Hispanic (6.7%) and non-Hispanic other (2.5%) (P=0.02), dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, and from patient Zip Codes with lower median household incomes (below $32,793). A higher percentage of visits with advanced illness conditions to primary care was COPD, CHF, dementia, and cancer, and symptoms reported with these visits were mostly pain, depression, anxiety, fatigue, and insomnia. In the United States, approximately 8% of primary care visits among older adults was related to advanced illness conditions. Advanced illness visits were most common among those most likely to be socio-economically vulnerable and highlight the need to focus efforts for high quality palliative care for these populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Priorities for young adults when accessing UK primary care: literature review.

    PubMed

    Davey, Antoinette; Carter, Mary; Campbell, John L

    2013-10-01

    This literature review focuses on what matters to young adults when they access primary care services in the United Kingdom. Patients' access to and experience of primary care services differs across age groups. Existing research has largely focused on the needs and experiences of children, adolescents, and adults. There is some evidence to suggest the views of young adults (aged 18-25 years) that may differ from the views of other age groups, and research has not previously reported specifically on the views of this group of the population. The literature was reviewed to identify the views and priorities of young UK adults regarding primary healthcare provision, and furthermore, to identify those related topics that would benefit from further research. Relevant academic publications and grey literature published from 2000 onwards was reviewed and synthesised. We identified and reported emerging themes that were of importance to young adults in respect of the UK primary care provision. A total of 19 papers met our inclusion criteria. Young adults access primary care services less frequently than other age groups; this may be because of their experience of primary care throughout childhood and adolescence. Five aspects of primary care provision emerged as being of importance to young adults--the accessibility and availability of services, the confidentiality of health-related information, issues relating to communication with healthcare professionals, continuity of care, and behaviours and attitudes expressed towards young adults by healthcare professionals. There is a lack of focus of current research on the expectations, needs, and primary healthcare experiences of young adults. Young adults may hold views that are distinct from other age groups. Further research is needed to better understand the needs of a young adult population as their needs may impact the future use of services.

  14. Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, M. Katherine; Stanley, Joan; Werner, Kathryn E.; Schmid, Emily

    This document presents the nurse practitioner primary care competencies that a national panel of representatives of nine national organizations of the five primary care nurse practitioner specialties--adult, family, gerontological, pediatric, and women's health--identified as necessary for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners. Section 1…

  15. Voluntary physical exercise promotes ocular dominance plasticity in adult mouse primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Haack, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2014-11-12

    Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) declines during aging and is absent beyond postnatal day (P) 110 when mice are raised in standard cages (SCs; Lehmann and Löwel, 2008). In contrast, raising mice in an enriched environment (EE) preserved a juvenile-like OD plasticity into late adulthood (Greifzu et al., 2014). EE raising provides the mice with more social interactions, voluntary physical exercise, and cognitive stimulation compared with SC, raising the question whether all components are needed or whether one of them is already sufficient to prolong plasticity. To test whether voluntary physical exercise alone already prolongs the sensitive phase for OD plasticity, we raised mice from 7 d before birth to adulthood in slightly larger than normal SCs with or without a running wheel (RW). When the mice were older than P135, we visualized V1 activity before and after monocular deprivation (MD) using intrinsic signal optical imaging. Adult RW-raised mice continued to show an OD shift toward the open eye after 7 d of MD, while age-matched SC mice without a RW did not show OD plasticity. Notably, running just during the 7 d MD period restored OD plasticity in adult SC-raised mice. In addition, the OD shift of the RW mice was mediated by a decrease of deprived-eye responses in V1, a signature of "juvenile-like" plasticity. We conclude that voluntary physical exercise alone is sufficient to promote plasticity in adult mouse V1.

  16. Enhancing Primary Health Care Services for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Finlayson, J.; Cooper, S.-A.; Allan, L.; Robinson, N.; Burns, E.; Martin, G.; Morrison, J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary health care teams have an important part to play in addressing the health inequalities and high levels of unmet health needs experienced by people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Practice nurses have an expanding role within primary health care teams. However, no previous studies have measured their attitudes, knowledge, training…

  17. Enhancing Primary Health Care Services for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Finlayson, J.; Cooper, S.-A.; Allan, L.; Robinson, N.; Burns, E.; Martin, G.; Morrison, J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary health care teams have an important part to play in addressing the health inequalities and high levels of unmet health needs experienced by people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Practice nurses have an expanding role within primary health care teams. However, no previous studies have measured their attitudes, knowledge, training…

  18. Optic Neuropathy Associated with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Bak, Eunoo; Yang, Hee Kyung; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2017-04-01

    To determine the diverse clinical features of optic neuropathy associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome in Korean patients. Five women with acute and/or chronic optic neuropathy who were diagnosed as primary Sjögren's syndrome were retrospectively evaluated. Primary Sjögren's syndrome was diagnosed by signs and symptoms of keratoconjunctivitis sicca, positive serum anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB antibodies, and/or minor salivary gland biopsy. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination. Among the five patients diagnosed as optic neuropathy related to primary Sjögren's syndrome, four patients had bilateral optic neuropathy and one patient was unilateral. The clinical course was chronic in three patients and one of them showed acute exacerbation and was finally diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. The other two patients presented as acute optic neuritis and one was diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Sicca symptoms were present in four patients, but only two patients reported these symptoms before the onset of optic neuropathy. Patients showed minimal response to systemic corticosteroids or steroid dependence, requiring plasmapheresis in the acute phase and immunosuppressive agents for maintenance therapy. Optic neuropathy associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome may show variable clinical courses, including acute optic neuritis, insidious progression of chronic optic atrophy, or in the context of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. Optic neuropathy may be the initial manifestation of primary Sjögren's syndrome without apparent sicca symptoms, which makes the diagnosis often difficult. The presence of specific antibodies including anti-Ro/SSA, anti-La/SSB, and anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies are supportive for the diagnosis and treatment in atypical cases of optic neuropathy.

  19. Genomics of primary chemoresistance and remission induction failure in paediatric and adult acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Fiona C; Cifani, Paolo; Drill, Esther; He, Jie; Still, Eric; Zhong, Shan; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Pavlick, Dean; Yilmazel, Bahar; Knapp, Kristina M; Alonzo, Todd A; Meshinchi, Soheil; Stone, Richard M; Kornblau, Steven M; Marcucci, Guido; Gamis, Alan S; Byrd, John C; Gonen, Mithat; Levine, Ross L; Kentsis, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Cure rates of children and adults with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory partly due to chemotherapy resistance. We investigated the genetic basis of AML in 107 primary cases by sequencing 670 genes mutated in haematological malignancies. SETBP1, ASXL1 and RELN mutations were significantly associated with primary chemoresistance. We identified genomic alterations not previously described in AML, together with distinct genes that were significantly overexpressed in therapy-resistant AML. Defined gene mutations were sufficient to explain primary induction failure in only a minority of cases. Thus, additional genetic or molecular mechanisms must cause primary chemoresistance in paediatric and adult AML. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Risk and prognosis of adult primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Nørgaard, Mette

    2012-04-01

    Adult immune thrombocytopenia was previously considered a benign disease affecting young people and with a low risk of severe bleeding. This view was challenged by studies published during the past decade, as the median age of adult immune thrombocytopenia patients has been found to be 55-60 years and the incidence increases with age. Recent studies reported that mortality and morbidity are increased compared with the general population. In this review, we describe patient-specific factors associated with the outcome of disease, the clinical course of immune thrombocytopenia including the potential adverse impact of some treatments and finally the overall prognosis.

  1. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  2. [Primary adrenal insufficiency in adults: 150 years after Addison].

    PubMed

    Silva, Regina do Carmo; Castro, Margaret de; Kater, Claudio E; Cunha, Andréa Aparecida; Moraes, Andréia M de; Alvarenga, Daniela B de; Moreira, Ayrton C; Elias, Lucila L K

    2004-10-01

    Thomas Addison first described, 150 years ago, a clinical syndrome characterized by salt-wasting and skin hyperpigmentation, associated with a destruction of the adrenal gland. Even today, over a century after Addison's report, primary adrenal insufficiency can present as a life-threatening condition, since it frequently goes unrecognized in its early stages. In the 1850s, tuberculous adrenalitis was present in the majority of patients, but nowadays, autoimmune Addison's disease is the most common cause of primary adrenal insufficiency. In the present report, we show the prevalence of different etiologies, clinical manifestations and laboratorial findings, including the adrenal cortex autoantibody, and 21-hydroxylase antibody in a Brazilian series of patients with primary adrenal insufficiency followed at Divisão de Endocrinologia da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP) and at Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto-USP (FMRP-USP).

  3. Prevalence and Predictors of Change in Adult-Child Primary Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E.; Davey, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Family caregiving research is increasingly contextual and dynamic, but few studies have examined prevalence and predictors of change in primary caregivers, those with the most frequent contact with healthcare professionals. We identified prevalence and predictors of 2-year change in primary adult-child caregivers. Data pooled from the 1992-2000…

  4. Primary Care for Adults with Down Syndrome: Adherence to Preventive Healthcare Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, K. M.; Taylor, L. C.; Davis, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and…

  5. Primary Care for Adults with Down Syndrome: Adherence to Preventive Healthcare Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, K. M.; Taylor, L. C.; Davis, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and…

  6. Primary Afferent Synapses on Developing and Adult Renshaw Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z.; Siembab, Valerie C.; Zerda, Ricardo; O’Donovan, Michael J.; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms that diversify adult interneurons from a few pools of embryonic neurons are unknown. Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs), and possibly other types of mammalian spinal interneurons have common embryonic origins within the V1 group. However, in contrast to IaINs and other V1-derived interneurons, adult Renshaw cells receive motor axon synapses and lack proprioceptive inputs. Here, we investigated how this specific pattern of connectivity emerges during the development of Renshaw cells. Tract tracing and immunocytochemical markers [parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1)] showed that most embryonic (embryonic day 18) Renshaw cells lack dorsal root inputs, but more than half received dorsal root synapses by postnatal day 0 (P0) and this input spread to all Renshaw cells by P10–P15. Electrophysiological recordings in neonates indicated that this input is functional and evokes Renshaw cell firing. VGLUT1-IR bouton density on Renshaw cells increased until P15 but thereafter decreased because of limited synapse proliferation coupled with the enlargement of Renshaw cell dendrites. In parallel, Renshaw cell postsynaptic densities apposed to VGLUT1-IR synapses became smaller in adult compared with P15. In contrast, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-IR motor axon synapses contact embryonic Renshaw cells and proliferate postnatally matching Renshaw cell growth. Like other V1 neurons, Renshaw cells are thus competent to receive sensory synapses. However, after P15, these sensory inputs appear deselected through arrested proliferation and synapse weakening. Thus, Renshaw cells shift from integrating sensory and motor inputs in neonates to predominantly motor inputs in adult. Similar synaptic weight shifts on interneurons may be involved in the maturation of motor reflexes and locomotor circuitry. PMID:17182780

  7. Primary afferent synapses on developing and adult Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Siembab, Valerie C; Zerda, Ricardo; O'Donovan, Michael J; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2006-12-20

    The mechanisms that diversify adult interneurons from a few pools of embryonic neurons are unknown. Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs), and possibly other types of mammalian spinal interneurons have common embryonic origins within the V1 group. However, in contrast to IaINs and other V1-derived interneurons, adult Renshaw cells receive motor axon synapses and lack proprioceptive inputs. Here, we investigated how this specific pattern of connectivity emerges during the development of Renshaw cells. Tract tracing and immunocytochemical markers [parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1)] showed that most embryonic (embryonic day 18) Renshaw cells lack dorsal root inputs, but more than half received dorsal root synapses by postnatal day 0 (P0) and this input spread to all Renshaw cells by P10-P15. Electrophysiological recordings in neonates indicated that this input is functional and evokes Renshaw cell firing. VGLUT1-IR bouton density on Renshaw cells increased until P15 but thereafter decreased because of limited synapse proliferation coupled with the enlargement of Renshaw cell dendrites. In parallel, Renshaw cell postsynaptic densities apposed to VGLUT1-IR synapses became smaller in adult compared with P15. In contrast, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-IR motor axon synapses contact embryonic Renshaw cells and proliferate postnatally matching Renshaw cell growth. Like other V1 neurons, Renshaw cells are thus competent to receive sensory synapses. However, after P15, these sensory inputs appear deselected through arrested proliferation and synapse weakening. Thus, Renshaw cells shift from integrating sensory and motor inputs in neonates to predominantly motor inputs in adult. Similar synaptic weight shifts on interneurons may be involved in the maturation of motor reflexes and locomotor circuitry.

  8. Improving nutritional support for adults in primary and secondary care.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Andrea

    There has been serious concern about the nutritional care provided in some secondary and primary care settings. As a result, best practice, benchmarking initiatives and nutritional guidance have been issued by government and non-government agencies. This article helps nurses to synthesise these initiatives and improve their knowledge of nutritional care.

  9. Comparative characteristics of primary hyperparathyroidism in pediatric and young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kristina J; McCoy, Kelly L; Witchel, Selma F; Stang, Michael T; Carty, Sally E; Yip, Linwah

    2016-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is rare in pediatric patients. Our study aim was to compare primary hyperparathyroidism in pediatric (<19 years) and young adult (19-29 years) patients. A prospectively collected database from a single, high-volume institution was queried for all patients age <30 years who had initial parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism yielding 126/4,546 (2.7%) primary hyperparathyroidism patients representing 39 pediatric and 87 young adult patients. Presenting symptoms, operative data, and postoperative course were compared for patients age 0-19 years and 20-29 years. Sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism was present in 81.7% and occurred less often in pediatric patients than young adult patients (74.4% vs 86.2%, P = .12). Among patients with hereditary primary hyperparathyroidism, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was the most common type. Multiglandular disease was common in both pediatric (30.7%) and young adult (21.8%) patients. Following parathyroidectomy, 3 (2.3%) patients had permanent hypoparathyroidism and none had permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Biochemical cure at 6 months was equally likely in pediatric and young adult patients (97.1% vs 93.6%, P = .44) with comparable follow-up (78.4 months vs 69.1 months, P = .66) and rates of recurrent disease (5.9% vs 10.3%, P = .46). Recurrence was due to multiple endocrine neoplasia 1-related primary hyperparathyroidism in all cases. Although primary hyperparathyroidism is sporadic in most patients <19 years, they are more likely to have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1-associated primary hyperparathyroidism (23%). Parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism can be performed safely in pediatric patients with a high rate of cure. Follow-up for patients with hereditary disease is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The first aluminum coating of the 3700mm primary mirror of the Devasthal Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bheemireddy, Krishna Reddy; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Pant, Jayshreekar; Omar, Amitesh; Kumar, Brijesh; Uddin, Wahab; Kumar, Nirmal

    2016-07-01

    Initially the primary mirror of the 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope is uncoated polished zerodur glass supplied by Lytkarino Optical Glass Factory, Russia/Advanced Mechanical and Optical Systems, Belgium. In order to do the aluminium coating on the primary mirror the coating plant including washing unit is installed near the telescope (extension building of telescope) by Hind High Vacuum (HHV) Bangalore, India. Magnetron sputtering technique is used for the coating. Several coating trials are done before the primary mirror coating; samples are tested for reflectivity, uniformity, adhesivity and finally commissioned. The primary mirror is cleaned, coated by ARIES. We present here a brief description of the coating plant installation, Mirror cleaning and coating procedures and the testing results of the samples.

  11. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney in adults.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Singhal, Mitali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2013-03-04

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a neural crest tumour derived from neuroectoderm. Renal PNET is a very rare tumour occurring during childhood or adolescence. We report two cases of PNET involving kidney in adults. Presenting signs and symptoms include abdominal/flank pain and/or haematuria. Microscopy reveals the tumour consisted of small round cells with round nuclei and scant cytoplasm. Diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with diffuse membranous positivity of tumour cells with CD99. As these tumours have an aggressive clinical course with rapid death in many reported cases, it is important to differentiate them from other small round-cell tumours.

  12. Optic Disc Perfusion in Primary Open Angle and Normal Tension Glaucoma Eyes Using Optical Coherence Tomography-Based Microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Joanne C.; Zhang, Qinqin; Xin, Chen; Gupta, Divakar; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate optic disc perfusion differences in normal, primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and normal tension glaucoma (NTG) eyes using optical microangiography (OMAG) based optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography technique. Design Cross-sectional, observational study. Subjects Twenty-eight normal, 30 POAG, and 31 NTG subjects. Methods One eye from each subject was scanned with a 68 kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5,000-based OMAG prototype system centered at the optic nerve head (ONH) (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA). Microvascular images were generated from the OMAG dataset by detecting the differences in OCT signal between consecutive B-scans. The pre-laminar layer (preLC) was isolated by a semi-automatic segmentation program. Main Outcome Measures Optic disc perfusion, quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux (flux normalized by the vessel area) within the ONH. Results Glaucomatous eyes had significantly lower optic disc perfusion in preLC in all three perfusion metrics (p<0.0001) compared to normal eyes. The visual field (VF) mean deviation (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD) were similar between the POAG and NTG groups, and no differences in optic disc perfusion were observed between POAG and NTG. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlation between optic disc perfusion and VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in both POAG and NTG groups (p≤0.0288). However, normalized optic disc perfusion was correlated with some structural measures (retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and ONH cup/disc ratio) only in POAG eyes. Conclusions Optic disc perfusion detected with OMAG was significantly reduced in POAG and NTG groups compared to normal controls, but no difference was seen between POAG and NTG groups with similar levels of VF damage. Disc perfusion was significantly correlated with VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in glaucomatous eyes. Vascular changes at the optic disc as measured using OMAG may provide useful information for

  13. [Prevalence in adults of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder using the medical records of primary care].

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Enric; Lluís Piñol, Josep; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; López-Cortacans, German; Caballero, Antònia; Bosch, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    ADHD in adults is not uncommon and, according to recent epidemiological data, has a population prevalence of 3-4%. However, there is major unawareness of this disorder among doctors, particularly in primary care. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of the diagnosis of ADHD recorded in adults and the proportion of patients with drug prescriptions for this disorder in primary care. This is a cross-sectional study on databases of computerised primary care medical records. The target population is adults (18-44 years) assigned to primary care centres of the Catalan Health Institute (n = 2,452,107). We obtained the proportion of patients with ADHD (F90/ICD- 10 code) registered as active problem, and the proportion of patients with a specific prescription for ADHD in adults: methylphenidate, methylphenidate extended release or atomoxetine. The prevalence of recorded ADHD is 0.04% (0.07% in men, 0.02% in women). The percentage of patients with a specific prescription for ADHD is 0.07% (0.08% in men, 0.05% in women). 32.05% of ADHD patients had specific prescription. The diagnosis of ADHD in adults and specific treatment are extremely low in primary care. These results contrast with population data: registered ADHD is 1/85 of the population prevalence.

  14. Environmental factors associated with primary care access among urban older adults.

    PubMed

    Ryvicker, Miriam; Gallo, William T; Fahs, Marianne C

    2012-09-01

    Disparities in primary care access and quality impede optimal chronic illness prevention and management for older adults. Although research has shown associations between neighborhood attributes and health, little is known about how these factors - in particular, the primary care infrastructure - inform older adults' primary care use. Using geographic data on primary care physician supply and surveys from 1260 senior center attendees in New York City, we examined factors that facilitate and hinder primary care use for individuals living in service areas with different supply levels. Supply quartiles varied in primary care use (visit within the past 12 months), racial and socio-economic composition, and perceived neighborhood safety and social cohesion. Primary care use did not differ significantly after controlling for compositional factors. Individuals who used a community clinic or hospital outpatient department for most of their care were less likely to have had a primary care visit than those who used a private doctor's office. Stratified multivariate models showed that within the lowest-supply quartile, public transit users had a higher odds of primary care use than non-transit users. Moreover, a higher score on the perceived neighborhood social cohesion scale was associated with a higher odds of primary care use. Within the second-lowest quartile, nonwhites had a lower odds of primary care use compared to whites. Different patterns of disadvantage in primary care access exist that may be associated with - but not fully explained by - local primary care supply. In lower-supply areas, racial disparities and inadequate primary care infrastructure hinder access to care. However, accessibility and elder-friendliness of public transit, as well as efforts to improve social cohesion and support, may facilitate primary care access for individuals living in low-supply areas.

  15. Trust, negotiation, and communication: young adults' experiences of primary care services.

    PubMed

    Davey, Antoinette; Asprey, Anthea; Carter, Mary; Campbell, John L

    2013-12-30

    Young adulthood is an important transitional period during which there is a higher risk of individuals engaging in behaviours which could have a lasting impact on their health. Research has shown that young adults are the lowest responders to surveys about healthcare experiences and are also the least satisfied with the care they receive. However, the factors contributing to this reduced satisfaction are not clear. The focus of our research was to explore the needs and experiences of young adults around healthcare services with an aim of finding out possible reasons for lower satisfaction. Twenty young adults were interviewed at GP surgeries and at a local young adult advice agency, exploring their experiences and use of primary care services. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The use of primary care services varied amongst the young adult interviewees. Many interviewees reported positive experiences; those who did not linked their negative experiences to difficulties in negotiating their care with the health care system, and reported issues with trust, and communication difficulties. Most of the interviewees were unaware of the use of patient surveys to inform healthcare planning and delivery and were not inclined to take part, mainly because of the length of surveys and lack of interest in the topic area. In order to effectively address the health needs of young adults, young adults need to be educated about their rights as patients, and how to most efficiently use primary care services. GPs should be alert to effective means of approaching and handling the healthcare needs of young adults. A flexible, varied approach is needed to gathering high quality data from this group in order to provide services with information on the changes necessary for making primary care services more accessible for young adults.

  16. The influence of the secondary mirror position and the lightweight primary mirror on optical performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. J.; Sim, S. H.; Chung, C. S.; Kang, E. C.; Kim, J. K.

    2006-01-01

    To design a laser beam director (LBD), we considered the ritchey chretien system with a hyperbolic mirror surface. The aperture sizes of the designed primary mirror and secondary mirror were 800 mm and 120 mm, respectively, and the obstruction ratio was 0.3. Energy distribution on the target surface was studied in terms of a spot diagram and encircled energy in order to investigate the optical performance of the LBD system. As the LBD system was designed to focus on the various positions of target by varying the position of the secondary mirror, we developed the computer program called LOSA (Large Optical System Assessment) to investigate the influence of the position of the secondary mirror on optical performance. To reduce weight of the primary mirror of the LBD, we also considered the primary mirror of a double arch shape with parabolic contours. Deformation of the primary mirror caused by gravity was not rotationally symmetrical about the mirror axis. We also used the LOSA program to analyze the influence of the light weight primary mirror on optical performance, and finally determined the optimum structure of the primary mirror.

  17. Motivational interviewing for older adults in primary care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Purath, Janet; Keck, Annmarie; Fitzgerald, Cynthia E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic disease is now the leading cause of death and disability in United States. Many chronic illnesses experienced by older adults can be prevented or managed through behavior change, making patient counseling an essential component of disease prevention and management. Motivational Interviewing (MI), a type of conversational method, has been effective in eliciting health behavior changes in people in a variety of settings and may also be a useful tool to help older adults change. This review of the literature analyzes current research and describes potential biases of MI interventions that have been conducted in primary care settings with older adults. MI shows promise as a technique to elicit health behavior change among older adults. However, further study with this population is needed to evaluate efficacy of MI interventions in primary care settings. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Personality Assessment Screener, Childhood Abuse, and Adult Partner Violence in African American Women Using Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Porcerelli, John H; Hurrell, Kristen; Cogan, Rosemary; Jeffries, Keturah; Markova, Tsveti

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between psychopathology with the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) and childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult physical and sexual partner violence in a primary care sample of 98 urban-dwelling African American women. Patients completed the PAS, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The PAS total score significantly correlated with all measures of childhood and adult abuse. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that PAS element scores of Suicidal Thinking and Hostile Control significantly predicted a history of childhood physical abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Hostile Control, and Acting Out significantly predicted a history of childhood sexual abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Negative Affect, and Alienation significantly predicted current adult partner physical violence; and Psychotic Features, Alcohol Problems, and Anger Control significantly predicted current adult sexual partner violence. The PAS appears to be a useful measure for fast-paced primary care settings for identifying patients who need a more thorough assessment for abuse. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Highly efficient transduction of primary adult CNS and PNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Evgeny; Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Delivery and expression of recombinant genes, a key methodology for many applications in biological research, remains a challenge especially for mature neurons. Here, we report easy, highly efficient and well tolerated transduction of adult peripheral and central neuronal populations of diverse species in culture using VSV-G pseudo-typed, recombinant baculovirus (BacMam). Transduction rates of up to 80% were reliably achieved at high multiplicity of infection without apparent neuro-cytopathic effects. Neurons could be transduced either shortly after plating or after several days in culture. Co-incubation with two different baculoviruses attained near complete co-localization of fluorescent protein expression, indicating multigene delivery. Finally, evidence for functional protein expression is provided by means of cre-mediated genetic recombination and neurite outgrowth assays. Recombinant protein was already detected within hours after transduction, thereby enabling functional readouts even in relatively short-lived neuronal cultures. Altogether, these results substantiate the usefulness of baculovirus-mediated transduction of mature neurons for future research in neuroscience. PMID:27958330

  20. CPV module with Fresnel lens primary optics and homogenizing secondary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenfarth, Maike; Dörsam, Tobias; Eltermann, Fabian; Hornung, Thorsten; Siefer, Gerald; Steiner, Marc; van Riesen, Sascha; Neubauer, Martin; Boos, Alexander; Wanka, Sven; Gombert, Andreas; Bett, Andreas W.

    2015-09-01

    In this work CPV modules based on Fresnel lenses and using refractive secondary optical elements (SOEs) are investigated. Pure silicone as well as glass SOEs glued on top of the solar cells are explored in prototype modules. They are differently manufactured in respect to how the secondary optics was assembled. For example, units with secondary silicone optics directly casted to solar cells are manufactured. For a design of glued glass optics and Fresnel lenses, the optical design is analyzed experimentally. Moreover, the long term stability has been intensively tested by accelerated aging tests and outdoor experiments. Here, the focus was on the used silicone material and the adhesion of the silicone to the glass interface.

  1. How Much Do We Know about Adult-onset Primary Tics? Prevalence, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Robakis, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Background Tic disorders are generally considered to be of pediatric onset; however, reports of adult-onset tics exist in the literature. Tics can be categorized as either primary or secondary, with the latter being the larger group in adults. Primary or idiopathic tics that arise in adulthood make up a subset of tic disorders whose epidemiologic and clinical features have not been well delineated. Methods Articles to be included in this review were identified by searching PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science using the terms adult- and late-onset tics, which resulted in 120 unique articles. Duplicates were removed. Citing references were identified using Google Scholar; all references were reviewed for relevance. Results The epidemiologic characteristics, clinical phenomenology, and optimal treatment of adult-onset tics have not been ascertained. Twenty-six patients with adult-onset, primary tics were identified from prior case reports. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities may be lower in adults than in children, and obsessive compulsive disorder was the most common comorbidity. Adult-onset primary tics tend to wax and wane, occur predominantly in males, are often both motor and phonic in the same individual, and are characterized by a poor response to treatment. Discussion We know little about adult-onset tic disorders, particularly ones without a secondary association or cause. They are not common, and from the limited data available, appear to share some but not all features with childhood tics. Further research will be important in gaining a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder. PMID:28546883

  2. How Much Do We Know about Adult-onset Primary Tics? Prevalence, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Tic disorders are generally considered to be of pediatric onset; however, reports of adult-onset tics exist in the literature. Tics can be categorized as either primary or secondary, with the latter being the larger group in adults. Primary or idiopathic tics that arise in adulthood make up a subset of tic disorders whose epidemiologic and clinical features have not been well delineated. Articles to be included in this review were identified by searching PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science using the terms adult- and late-onset tics, which resulted in 120 unique articles. Duplicates were removed. Citing references were identified using Google Scholar; all references were reviewed for relevance. The epidemiologic characteristics, clinical phenomenology, and optimal treatment of adult-onset tics have not been ascertained. Twenty-six patients with adult-onset, primary tics were identified from prior case reports. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities may be lower in adults than in children, and obsessive compulsive disorder was the most common comorbidity. Adult-onset primary tics tend to wax and wane, occur predominantly in males, are often both motor and phonic in the same individual, and are characterized by a poor response to treatment. We know little about adult-onset tic disorders, particularly ones without a secondary association or cause. They are not common, and from the limited data available, appear to share some but not all features with childhood tics. Further research will be important in gaining a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder.

  3. Transformation of adult rat cardiac myocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Tamas; Lozinskiy, Ilya; Payne, Charles E; Edelmann, Stephanie; Norton, Byron; Chen, Biyi; Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T; Balke, C William

    2008-03-01

    We characterized the morphological, electrical and mechanical alterations of cardiomyocytes in long-term cell culture. Morphometric parameters, sarcomere length, T-tubule density, cell capacitance, L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)), inward rectifier potassium current (I(K1)), cytosolic calcium transients, action potential and contractile parameters of adult rat ventricular myocytes were determined on each day of 5 days in culture. We also analysed the health of the myocytes using an apoptotic/necrotic viability assay. The data show that myocytes undergo profound morphological and functional changes during culture. We observed a progressive reduction in the cell area (from 2502 +/- 70 microm(2) on day 0 to 1432 +/- 50 microm(2) on day 5), T-tubule density, systolic shortening (from 0.11 +/- 0.02 to 0.05 +/- 0.01 microm) and amplitude of calcium transients (from 1.54 +/- 0.19 to 0.67 +/- 0.19) over 5 days of culture. The negative force-frequency relationship, characteristic of rat myocardium, was maintained during the first 2 days but diminished thereafter. Cell capacitance (from 156 +/- 8 to 105 +/- 11 pF) and membrane currents were also reduced (I(Ca,L), from 3.98 +/- 0.39 to 2.12 +/- 0.37 pA pF; and I(K1), from 34.34p +/- 2.31 to 18.00 +/- 5.97 pA pF(-1)). We observed progressive depolarization of the resting membrane potential during culture (from 77.3 +/- 2.5 to 34.2 +/- 5.9 mV) and, consequently, action potential morphology was profoundly altered as well. The results of the viability assays indicate that these alterations could not be attributed to either apoptosis or necrosis but are rather an adaptation to the culture conditions over time.

  4. Primary cutaneous smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gittler, Julia; Martires, Kathryn; Terushkin, Vitaly; Brinster, Nooshin; Ramsay, David

    2016-12-15

    HTLV-1 is a virus that is endemic in southwesternJapan and the Caribbean and has been implicatedin the development of ATLL. ATLL, which is anuncommon malignant condition of peripheralT-lymphocytes, is characterized by four clinicalsubtypes, which include acute, lymphomatous,chronic, and smoldering types, that are based onLDH levels, calcium levels, and extent of organinvolvement. We present a 52-year- old woman withpruritic patches with scale on the buttocks and withtender, hyperpigmented macules and papules oftwo-years duration. Histopathologic examinationwas suggestive of mycosis fungoides, laboratoryresults showed HTLV-I and II, and the patient wasdiagnosed with primary cutaneous ATLL. We reviewthe literature on HTLV-1 and ATLL and specifically theprognosis of cutaneous ATLL. The literature suggeststhat a diagnosis of ATLL should be considered amongpatients of Caribbean origin or other endemicareas with skin lesions that suggest a cutaneousT-cell lymphoma, with clinicopathologic features ofmycosis fungoides. Differentiation between ATLLand cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is imperative as theyhave different prognoses and treatment approaches.

  5. The Optical Biopsy: A Novel Technique for Rapid Intraoperative Diagnosis of Primary Pulmonary Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gregory T; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; Keating, Jane J; Heitjan, Daniel F; Deshpande, Charuhas; Litzky, Leslie A; Albelda, Steven M; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Nie, Shuming; Low, Philip S; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-10-01

    With increasing use of chest computed tomography scans, indeterminate pulmonary nodules are frequently detected as an incidental finding and present a diagnostic challenge. Tissue biopsy followed by histological review and immunohistochemistry is the gold standard to obtain a diagnosis and the most common malignant finding is a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Our objective was to determine whether an intraoperative optical biopsy (molecular imaging) may provide an alternative approach for determining if a pulmonary nodule is a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Before surgery, 30 patients with an indeterminate pulmonary nodule were intravenously administered a folate receptor-targeted fluorescent contrast agent specific for primary lung adenocarcinomas. During surgery, the nodule was removed and the presence of fluorescence (optical biopsy) was assessed in the operating room to determine if the nodule was a primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Standard-of-care frozen section and immunohistochemical staining on permanent sections were then performed as the gold standard to validate the results of the optical biopsy. Optical biopsies identified 19 of 19 (100%) primary pulmonary adenocarcinomas. There were no false positive or false negative diagnoses. An optical biopsy required 2.4 minutes compared to 26.5 minutes for frozen section (P < 0.001) and it proved more accurate than frozen section in diagnosing lung adenocarcinomas. An optical biopsy has excellent positive predictive value for intraoperative diagnosis of primary lung adenocarcinomas. With refinement, this technology may prove to be an important supplement to standard pathology for examining close surgical margins, identifying lymph node involvement, and determining whether suspicious nodules are malignant.

  6. Regenerating Fish Optic Nerves and a Regeneration-Like Response in Injured Optic Nerves of Adult Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M.; Belkin, M.; Harel, A.; Solomon, A.; Lavie, V.; Hadani, M.; Rachailovich, I.; Stein-Izsak, C.

    1985-05-01

    Regeneration of fish optic nerve (representing regenerative central nervous system) was accompanied by increased activity of regeneration-triggering factors produced by nonneuronal cells. A graft of regenerating fish optic nerve, or a ``wrap-around'' implant containing medium conditioned by it, induced a response associated with regeneration in injured optic nerves of adult rabbits (representing a nonregenerative central nervous system). This response was manifested by an increase of general protein synthesis and of selective polypeptides in the retinas and by the ability of the retina to sprout in culture.

  7. Comparing optical test methods for a lightweight primary mirror of a space-borne Cassegrain telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Yu, Zong-Ru; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Ho, Cheng-Fong; Huang, Ting-Ming; Chen, Cheng-Huan

    2014-09-01

    A Cassegrain telescope with a 450 mm clear aperture was developed for use in a spaceborne optical remote-sensing instrument. Self-weight deformation and thermal distortion were considered: to this end, Zerodur was used to manufacture the primary mirror. The lightweight scheme adopted a hexagonal cell structure yielding a lightweight ratio of 50%. In general, optical testing on a lightweight mirror is a critical technique during both the manufacturing and assembly processes. To prevent unexpected measurement errors that cause erroneous judgment, this paper proposes a novel and reliable analytical method for optical testing, called the bench test. The proposed algorithm was used to distinguish the manufacturing form error from surface deformation caused by the mounting, supporter and gravity effects for the optical testing. The performance of the proposed bench test was compared with a conventional vertical setup for optical testing during the manufacturing process of the lightweight mirror.

  8. Miniaturized LED primary optics design used for short-distance color mixing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Xian; Tsai, Meng-Che; Chang, Shuo-Chieh; Liu, Kuei-Chun

    2016-11-10

    Color-tunable LED light fixtures generally change colors by controlling LEDs of multiple colors. This type of light source requires additional secondary optics and light-mixing distances to deliver color-mixing functions and perform high color uniformity. However, the color-mixing elements increase the optics size, resulting in more difficulties in making tiny lighting fixtures. Therefore, in this study, we introduce a LED primary optics design method that retains standard LED package size while featuring a color-mixing chamber. This method combines a lens having a rotational symmetry with a freeform profile and a zigzag structure by using double total internal reflection to disperse light uniformly. In contrast to a typical hemispherical lens, our design effectively lowers the weighted average color difference from 0.03 to 0.0035, and maintains optical efficiency of at least 90% without using any optical diffuser.

  9. Histologically benign, clinically aggressive: Progressive non-optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas in adults with NF1.

    PubMed

    Strowd, Roy E; Rodriguez, Fausto J; McLendon, Roger E; Vredenburgh, James J; Chance, Aaron B; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S; Blakeley, Jaishri O

    2016-06-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8 ± 4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n = 3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4 ± 1 vs. 14 ± 8.3 months, P = 0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n = 2), chemotherapy (n = 2), and targeted, biologic agents (n = 2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6-30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Histologically Benign, Clinically Aggressive: Progressive Non-Optic Pathway Pilocytic Astrocytomas in Adults with NF1

    PubMed Central

    Strowd, Roy E.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; McLendon, Roger E.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Chance, Aaron B.; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S.; Blakeley, Jaishri O.

    2016-01-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8±4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n=3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4±1 vs. 14±8.3 months, P=0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n=2), chemotherapy (n=2), and targeted, biologic agents (n=2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6–30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. PMID:26992069

  11. Campylobacter fetus bacteremia with purulent pleurisy in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Keiko; Miyashita, Tomoko; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Shirano, Michinori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kameda, Kazuaki; Nishijima, Masayoshi; Imanishi, Masahiro; Yang, Xi; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with fever and pleural effusion predominantly containing lymphocytes. Cultures of the pleural effusion and blood revealed Campylobacter fetus, and laboratory studies showed a low serum level of immunoglobulin. The patient was diagnosed with C. fetus pleuritis, bacteremia and primary hypogammaglobulinemia, and subsequent treatment with meropenem and immunoglobulin improved his condition. Although the underlying cause of the primary hypogammaglobulinemia remains unclear, the patient's status improved under immunoglobulin replacement therapy. C. fetus pleuritis is a rare infectious disease usually observed in immunocompromised hosts. We herein describe the first report of C. fetus pleuritis in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

  12. A Comparison of Intralesional Triamcinolone Acetonide Injection for Primary Chalazion in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky W. Y.; Yau, Gordon S. K.; Wong, Michelle Y. Y.; Yuen, Can Y. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcome differences of intralesional triamcinolone acetonide (TA) injection for primary chalazia in children versus adults. Methods. A retrospective review of consecutive subjects with primary chalazion who received intralesional TA injection was conducted. A single investigator injected 0.05–0.15 mL of TA (40 mg/mL) intralesionally. Patients were stratified into the pediatric (<18 years old) and adult (≥18 years old) group. In both groups, the correlation of resolution time with chalazion size and TA dose was performed. Results. 17 children and 24 adults were enrolled, with a mean age of 7.4 ± 5.5 and 39.3 ± 16.7 years, respectively. Both groups had statistically similar baseline characteristics. There was no significant difference between the resolution time in the pediatric (18.2 ± 11.4 days) and adult (16.5 ± 11.0 days) group (P = 0.7). There were no significant complications from the TA injection. There was no significant correlation of resolution time to chalazion size (P = 0.7) nor TA dose (P = 0.3) in both groups. Conclusion. TA for the treatment of primary chalazion was equally effective in children and adults, without any significant complications, and the rate of clinical response did not appear to be dose-dependent. PMID:25386597

  13. Prevalence of Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Suzanne; Moran, Robert; Platt, Tan; Wood, Hope; Isaac, Terri; Dasari, Srikanth

    2005-01-01

    Two primary care practices were used to recruit adults with and without disability. Disability groups included autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and mental retardation. The patients without disability had an epilepsy prevalence rate of 1%. The prevalence of epilepsy within the disability groups was 13% for cerebral palsy, 13.6% for Down…

  14. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  15. Power Plays: Primary School Children's Constructions of Gender, Power, and Adult Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Becky

    The constructions of gender formed by elementary school children, aged 7 through 11 years, were studied in relation to their own lives and the issue of adult occupations as revealed in children's role plays. Data were collected from dialogue and role play with 145 children in primary schools in England, and these data were analyzed in a…

  16. A Meta-Analysis of Adult-Rated Child Personality and Academic Performance in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poropat, Arthur E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Personality is reliably associated with academic performance, but personality measurement in primary education can be problematic. Young children find it difficult to accurately self-rate personality, and dominant models of adult personality may be inappropriate for children. Aims: This meta-analysis was conducted to determine the…

  17. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  18. Prevalence of Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Suzanne; Moran, Robert; Platt, Tan; Wood, Hope; Isaac, Terri; Dasari, Srikanth

    2005-01-01

    Two primary care practices were used to recruit adults with and without disability. Disability groups included autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and mental retardation. The patients without disability had an epilepsy prevalence rate of 1%. The prevalence of epilepsy within the disability groups was 13% for cerebral palsy, 13.6% for Down…

  19. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  20. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  1. Primary Spinal OPC Culture System from Adult Zebrafish to Study Oligodendrocyte Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kroehne, Volker; Tsata, Vasiliki; Marrone, Lara; Froeb, Claudia; Reinhardt, Susanne; Gompf, Anne; Dahl, Andreas; Sterneckert, Jared; Reimer, Michell M.

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are a promising target to improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) by remyelinating denuded, and therefore vulnerable, axons. Demyelination is the result of a primary insult and secondary injury, leading to conduction blocks and long-term degeneration of the axons, which subsequently can lead to the loss of their neurons. In response to SCI, dormant OPCs can be activated and subsequently start to proliferate and differentiate into mature myelinating oligodendrocytes (OLs). Therefore, researchers strive to control OPC responses, and utilize small molecule screening approaches in order to identify mechanisms of OPC activation, proliferation, migration and differentiation. In zebrafish, OPCs remyelinate axons of the optic tract after lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-induced demyelination back to full thickness myelin sheaths. In contrast to zebrafish, mammalian OPCs are highly vulnerable to excitotoxic stress, a cause of secondary injury, and remyelination remains insufficient. Generally, injury induced remyelination leads to shorter internodes and thinner myelin sheaths in mammals. In this study, we show that myelin sheaths are lost early after a complete spinal transection injury, but are re-established within 14 days after lesion. We introduce a novel, easy-to-use, inexpensive and highly reproducible OPC culture system based on dormant spinal OPCs from adult zebrafish that enables in vitro analysis. Zebrafish OPCs are robust, can easily be purified with high viability and taken into cell culture. This method enables to examine why zebrafish OPCs remyelinate better than their mammalian counterparts, identify cell intrinsic responses, which could lead to pro-proliferating or pro-differentiating strategies, and to test small molecule approaches. In this methodology paper, we show efficient isolation of OPCs from adult zebrafish spinal cord and describe culture conditions that enable analysis up to 10

  2. Echellé Spectropolarimeter of the BTA Primary Focus: Purpose and Optical-Mechanical Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchuk, V. E.; Klochkova, V. G.; Yushkin, M. V.; Yakopov, G. V.; Verich, Yu. B.; Sachkov, M. E.

    2017-06-01

    Here we present an optical layout and construction of the new echellé spectropolarimeter ESPRI of the primary focus of the Russian 6-m telescope BTA. We discuss its science case and state of art. The spectropolarimeter control system is realised based on NI myRIO-1900 controller and Xilinx Zyng-7010 CPU.

  3. Security risk assessment of the primary layer of wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Petr; Siska, Petr; Latal, Jan; Poboril, Radek; Hajek, Lukas; Kepak, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation passive optical access networks come to the fore nowadays. These optical next-generation networks are the response to the increasing qualitative requirements from end users. Technologies using Time Division Multiplexing include NG-PON (XG-PON 1 and XG-PON 2) and 10GEPON. Their advantage is the applicability to older topologies, which are operated by the original technology of passive optical access networks. Wavelength Division Multiplexing Passive Optical Network (WDM-PON) is an alternative also belonging to next-generation networks. Time Division Multiplexing is in this case replaced by Wavelength Division Multiplexing. Certain variants of WDM-PON use a combination of broadband light source, optical circulator, optical phased array and tunable FP laser. Construction of the terminal units (ONU) is advantageous because it can always tune in to the appropriate wavelength in the given optical DWDM channel (100 GHz). The disadvantage is the increased security risk on the primary layer due to channel crosstalk in an optical phased array (AWG). The aim of this paper is to assess the degree of security risk in real conditions. The article includes both simulation and real measurements in C + L bands with 100 GHz DWDM spacing.

  4. "They're younger… it's harder." Primary providers' perspectives on hypertension management in young adults: a multicenter qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Heather M; Warner, Ryan C; Bartels, Christie M; LaMantia, Jamie N

    2017-01-03

    Young adults (18-39 year-olds) have the lowest hypertension control rates among adults with hypertension in the United States. Unique barriers to hypertension management in young adults with primary care access compared to older adults have not been evaluated. Understanding these differences will inform the development of hypertension interventions tailored to young adults. The goals of this multicenter study were to explore primary care providers' perspectives on barriers to diagnosing, treating, and controlling hypertension among young adults with regular primary care. Primary care providers (physicians and advanced practice providers) actively managing young adults with uncontrolled hypertension were recruited by the Wisconsin Research & Education Network (WREN), a statewide practice-based research network. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in three diverse Midwestern clinical practices (academic, rural, and urban clinics) using a semi-structured interview guide, and content analysis was performed. Primary care providers identified unique barriers across standard hypertension healthcare delivery practices for young adults. Altered self-identity, greater blood pressure variability, and unintended consequences of medication initiation were critical hypertension control barriers among young adults. Gender differences among young adults were also noted as barriers to hypertension follow-up and antihypertensive medication initiation. Tailored interventions addressing the unique barriers of young adults are needed to improve population hypertension control. Augmenting traditional clinic structure to support the "health identity" of young adults and self-management skills are promising next steps to improve hypertension healthcare delivery.

  5. Time-Gated Optical Projection Tomography Allows Visualization of Adult Zebrafish Internal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Foglia, Efrem Alessandro; Pistocchi, Anna; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; De Silvestri, Sandro; Cerullo, Giulio; Cotelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Optical imaging through biological samples is compromised by tissue scattering and currently various approaches aim to overcome this limitation. In this paper we demonstrate that an all optical technique, based on non-linear upconversion of infrared ultrashort laser pulses and on multiple view acquisition, allows the reduction of scattering effects in tomographic imaging. This technique, namely Time-Gated Optical Projection Tomography (TGOPT), is used to reconstruct three dimensionally the internal structure of adult zebrafish without staining or clearing agents. This method extends the use of Optical Projection Tomography to optically diffusive samples yielding reconstructions with reduced artifacts, increased contrast and improved resolution with respect to those obtained with non-gated techniques. The paper shows that TGOPT is particularly suited for imaging the skeletal system and nervous structures of adult zebrafish. PMID:23185643

  6. Natural Restoration of Critical Period Plasticity in the Juvenile and Adult Primary Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Panizzutti, Rogerio; de Villers-Sidani, Étienne; Madeira, Caroline; Merzenich, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    Since its first description >40 years ago, the neurological “critical period” has been predominantly described as an early, plastic postnatal brain development stage that rather abruptly advances to an aplastic or less plastic “adult” stage. Here, we show that chronic exposure of juvenile or adult rats to moderate-level acoustic noise results in a broad reversal of maturational changes that mark the infant-to-adult progression in the primary auditory cortex. In time, noise exposure reinstates critical period plasticity. Cortical changes resulting from noise exposure are again reversed to reestablish a physically and functionally normal adult cortex, by returning animals to natural acoustic environments. These studies show that at least some of neurological changes believed to mark the transition from the infantile to the mature (adult) stage are, by their nature, reversible. PMID:21490203

  7. Primary expert system applied in design of electron-optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wei; Tong, Linsu

    1995-09-01

    It is well known that the structure of electron optical system is complicated, so many factors, such as magnification, geometrical aberrations, and space charge effect must be taken into account in the design. At present, the main work of electron optical system CAD is solving equations and calculating numerical values. However, the designs perhaps need more inference and expertise than numerical calculations. In this paper, a primary expert system which is applied in design of electron optical system is established. This expert system is combined with the simulation software SEU-3D program to design some practical electron optical systems. Although the knowledge base is small and rules are not abundant, this paper has used this system to obtain some very useful results. The initial success with this system suggests that further work need to be done whether more rules and knowledge will be added to extend the ability of expert system.

  8. Design of primary optics for LED chip array in road lighting application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Wang, Kai; Chen, Fei; Liu, Sheng

    2011-07-04

    In this study, we proposed an effective optical design method to solve the problem of prescribed illuminance for LED chip array packaging (LCAP). With this method, light energy redistribution can be obtained by optimizing meshing parameters on the target. Not only can it deal with light controlling of extended source, but also improve the uniformity of both illuminance and luminance for road lighting as well. As an example, we designed a 16W LED packaging with a smooth primary freeform lens for general road lighting. The simulation results demonstrated that optical performance of this lens can meet the requirements of Commission Internationale del'Eclairage (CIE) quite well. Longitudinal and overall uniformities are 0.7 and 0.5 respectively, and relative optical efficiency of luminaire can be enhanced 19.6% in theory compared with traditional optics.

  9. Primary immune deficiencies presenting in adults: seven years of experience from Iran.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Davood; Adimi, Parisa; Mirsaedi, Mehdi; Mansouri, Nahal; Tabarsi, Payam; Amiri, Majid; Jamaati, Hamid R; Motavasseli, Masoud; Baghaii, Noushin; Cheraghvandi, Ali; Rouhi, Reza; Roozbahany, Navid A; Zahirifard, Soheila; Mohammadi, Forouzan; Masjedi, Mohammad R; Velayati, Ali A; Casanova, Jean L; Speert, David P; Elwood, R Kevin; Schellenberg, Robert; Turvey, Stuart E

    2005-07-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are not solely diseases of childhood. We describe the clinical presentation and outcome for 55 adult patients with previously unrecognized PIDs. This series provides unique data regarding PIDs presenting in adulthood, and serves as a timely reminder that physicians must consider the diagnosis of PIDs in their adult patients. Using the experience gained from these patients, we outline key "warning signs" suggestive of an underlying PID. Only through increased physician awareness will patients with PIDs receive timely diagnosis and optimal management.

  10. Urolithiasis in an Adult with Primary Obstructive Megaureter: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S.; Venkiteswaran, Khrishna P.; Shareef, Omar W.

    2013-01-01

    This is a rare case of adult primary obstructive megaureter complicated by combined uric acid-oxalate lithiasis of the ureter and renal stones. A 24-year-old male patient presented with frank hematuria on exercise of 4 years duration. The patient had an open surgery in the form of excision of stenotic segment of ureter and left ureteric re-implantation with removal of ureteric and renal stones. Congenital megaureter is a diagnosis that urologists and radiologists need to consider in the setting of isolated distal ureteral dilation, as the diagnosis of adult megaureter may require more involved surgical measures to prevent recurrence of adverse symptoms. PMID:24044065

  11. Foveal topography in the optic nerve and primary visual centers in Falconiforms.

    PubMed

    Inzunza, O; Bravo, H

    1993-04-01

    The topography of the retinal nasal and temporal foveal projections upon the optic nerve and primary visual centers was studied in diurnal bifoveate birds of prey by means of restricted tritiated proline intraocular injection. According to the degree of retinotopy, this study reveals that a single injection of tracer in the nasal or temporal fovea produces a well-defined and complementary pattern of projections in the following contralateral nuclei: lateral anterior thalamus, lateroventral geniculate nucleus (glv), superficial synencephalic (ss), tectal grey (gt), and optic tectum. In the thalamic nucleus dorsolateral anterior, the nasal foveal projections are seen mainly in the lateral and rostrolateral subdivision, while temporal projections are seen mainly in the magnocellular subdivision. In the external and ectomammillary nuclei there is some evidence of retinotopic innervation. Finally, a discrete field of projection from the nasal or temporal fovea is detected in lateral hypothalamus, ventrolateral thalamus, lateral geniculate intercalated nucleus, and pretectal optic area. The nasotemporal axis of the retina is ventrodorsally oriented in the optic nerve with ganglion cell axons of the temporal fovea more dorsally placed than the nasal ones. In the primary visual centers this retinal axis is mediolaterally represented in the nuclei glv, ss, and gt, and dorsoventrally oriented in the optic tectum.

  12. A Rare Case of Primary Anterior Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor in an Elderly Adult Male

    PubMed Central

    Nakhla, Sammy G.; Sundararajan, Srinath

    2016-01-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumors are extragonadal germ cell tumors (EGGCTs) commonly seen in children and young adults. They are more common in men. Clinically they are classified as teratomas, seminomas, and nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. Primary mediastinal yolk sac neoplasm is an extremely rare tumor. We present here a very rare case of primary yolk sac tumor of the anterior mediastinum in a 73-year-old male. Mediastinal germ cell tumors have a worse prognosis than gonadal germ cell tumors. Chemotherapy followed by adjuvant surgery improves overall response in EGGCTs. However, comorbidities can render treatment with chemotherapy and surgery challenging in elderly patients. PMID:27144043

  13. Initial manifestation of primary hyperoxaluria type I in adults-- recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, J J

    1996-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I may initially manifest as urolithiasis, renal insufficiency, or symptoms of systemic oxalosis. This hereditary disorder was fatal until effective therapies evolved during the past two decades. Difficulty in recognizing and diagnosing this disorder in adults is illustrated in a report of a patient eventually restored to good health by high-flux dialysis and combined renal and hepatic transplantation. I explore the molecular processes of the genetic defect and discuss clinical indicators of primary hyperoxaluria type I, manifestations of oxalosis, the pathogenesis of chronic oxalate nephropathy, and the diagnosis and management of this disease. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8779202

  14. [Autoimmune hepatitis/primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome in adults: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Santos, Oscar Mauricio; Muñoz Ortiz, Edison; Pérez, Camilo; Restrepo, Juan Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Overlap syndromes are cases of liver diseases that share clinical, serological, histological and radiological criteria of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). No definitions have been fully established and therefore there is no solid evidence on the diagnosis and treatment. This article presents the cases of three adult patients with overlapping features of AIH and PSC. Orthotopic liver transplantation was considered the best therapeutic alternative due to advanced disease progression in one patient, while medical treatment was provided in the remaining two patients.

  15. In vivo evaluation of optic nerve aging in adult rhesus monkey by diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yumei; Li, Longchuan; Preuss, Todd M.; Hu, Xiaoping; Herndon, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Aging of the optic nerve can result in reduced visual sensitivity or vision loss. Normal optic nerve aging has been investigated previously in tissue specimens but poorly explored in vivo. In the present study, the normal aging of optic nerve was evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in non-human primates. Adult female rhesus monkeys at the ages of 9 to 13 years old (young group, n=8) and 21 to 27 years old (old group, n=7) were studied using parallel-imaging-based DTI on a clinical 3T scanner. Compared to young adults, the old monkeys showed 26% lower fractional anisotropy (P<0.01), and 44% greater radial diffusivity, although the latter difference was of marginal statistical significance (P=0.058). These MRI findings are largely consistent with published results of light and electron microscopic studies of optic nerve aging in macaque monkeys, which indicate a loss of fibers and degenerative changes in myelin sheaths. PMID:24649434

  16. Minding the Gap: Factors Associated With Primary Care Coordination of Adults in 11 Countries.

    PubMed

    Penm, Jonathan; MacKinnon, Neil J; Strakowski, Stephen M; Ying, Jun; Doty, Michelle M

    2017-03-01

    Care coordination has been identified as a key strategy in improving the effectiveness, safety, and efficiency of the US health care system. Our objective was to determine whether population or health care system issues are associated with primary care coordination gaps in the United States and other high-income countries. We analyzed data from the 2013 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy (IHP) survey with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Respondents were adult primary care patients from 11 countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. Poor primary care coordination was defined as participants reporting at least 3 gaps in the coordination of care out of a maximum of 5. Analyses were based on 13,958 respondents. The rate of poor primary care coordination was 5.2% (724/13,958 respondents) overall and highest in the United States, at 9.8% (137/1,395 respondents). Multivariate regression analysis among all respondents found that they were less likely to experience poor primary care coordination if their primary care physician often or always knew their medical history, spent sufficient time, involved them, and explained things well (odds ratio = 0.6 for each). Poor primary care coordination was more likely to occur among patients with chronic conditions (odds ratios = 1.4-2.1 depending on number) and patients younger than 65 years (odds ratios = 1.6-2.3 depending on age-group). Among US respondents, insurance status, health status, household income, and sex were not associated with poor primary care coordination. The United States had the highest rate of poor primary care coordination among the 11 high-income countries evaluated. An established relationship with a primary care physician was significantly associated with better care coordination, whereas being chronically ill or younger was associated with poorer care coordination. © 2017 Annals of

  17. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, M K; Samples, J R; Kramer, P L; Rust, K; Topinka, J R; Yount, J; Koler, R D; Acott, T S

    1997-01-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. PMID:9012402

  19. Primary Care Providers' Perspectives on Screening Older Adult Patients for Food Insecurity.

    PubMed

    Pooler, Jennifer A; Hoffman, Vanessa A; Karva, Fata J

    2017-08-02

    Food insecurity has been associated with poor health and health outcomes among older adults, yet food assistance resources are available and underutilized. Routine screening and referral for food insecurity in primary care is one avenue to connect food-insecure older adults with available resources. This qualitative study aims to better understand the beliefs of primary care providers (PCPs) about food security screening and referrals in a primary care setting and perceived barriers to implementation. PCPs (n = 16) who have older adult patients but do not routinely screen for food insecurity were interviewed by phone. PCPs recognize the importance of food security for older patients and discuss nutrition and food access with patients under certain circumstances. Concerns emerged with regard to implementing a systematic screening and referral process: limited time to meet with patients, a lack of resources for addressing food insecurity, and prioritizing food insecurity at both the health system and the patient levels. Despite perceived challenges, PCPs are receptive to the idea of systematically screening and referring patients to external resources for food assistance and support. Barriers could be addressed by health systems prioritizing food insecurity as a health concern and public and private payers providing reimbursement for screening.

  20. Isolation, Culturing, and Differentiation of Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Lubna; McMillan, Joseph D; Afroze, Dil; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-05-05

    Myogenesis is a multi-step process that leads to the formation of skeletal muscle during embryonic development and repair of injured myofibers. In this process, myoblasts are the main effector cell type which fuse with each other or to injured myofibers leading to the formation of new myofibers or regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults. Many steps of myogenesis can be recapitulated through in vitro differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. Most laboratories use immortalized myogenic cells lines that also differentiate into myotubes. Although these cell lines have been found quite useful to delineating the regulatory mechanisms of myogenesis, they often show a great degree of variability depending on the origin of the cells and culture conditions. Primary myoblasts have been suggested as the most physiologically relevant model for studying myogenesis in vitro. However, due to their low abundance in adult skeletal muscle, isolation of primary myoblasts is technically challenging. In this article, we describe an improved protocol for the isolation of primary myoblasts from adult skeletal muscle of mice. We also describe methods for their culturing and differentiation into myotubes.

  1. Isolation, Culturing, and Differentiation of Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Lubna; McMillan, Joseph D.; Afroze, Dil; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Myogenesis is a multi-step process that leads to the formation of skeletal muscle during embryonic development and repair of injured myofibers. In this process, myoblasts are the main effector cell type which fuse with each other or to injured myofibers leading to the formation of new myofibers or regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults. Many steps of myogenesis can be recapitulated through in vitro differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. Most laboratories use immortalized myogenic cells lines that also differentiate into myotubes. Although these cell lines have been found quite useful to delineating the regulatory mechanisms of myogenesis, they often show a great degree of variability depending on the origin of the cells and culture conditions. Primary myoblasts have been suggested as the most physiologically relevant model for studying myogenesis in vitro. However, due to their low abundance in adult skeletal muscle, isolation of primary myoblasts is technically challenging. In this article, we describe an improved protocol for the isolation of primary myoblasts from adult skeletal muscle of mice. We also describe methods for their culturing and differentiation into myotubes. PMID:28730161

  2. Telemedicine and primary care obesity management in rural areas - innovative approach for older adults?

    PubMed

    Batsis, John A; Pletcher, Sarah N; Stahl, James E

    2017-01-05

    The growing prevalence of obesity is paralleling a rise in the older adult population creating an increased risk of functional impairment, nursing home placement and early mortality. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid recognized the importance of treating obesity and instituted a benefit in primary care settings to encourage intensive behavioral therapy in beneficiaries by primary care clinicians. This benefit covers frequent, brief, clinic visits designed to address older adult obesity. We describe the challenges in the implementation and delivery into real-world settings. The challenges in rural settings that have the fastest growing elderly population, high obesity rates, but also workforce shortages and lack of specialized services are emphasized. The use of Telemedicine has successfully been implemented in other specialties and could be a useful modality in delivering much needed intensive behavioral therapy, particularly in distant, under-resourced environments. This review outlines some of the challenges with the current benefit and proposed solutions in overcoming rural primary care barriers to implementation, including changes in staffing models. Recommendations to extend the benefit's coverage to be more inclusive of non-physician team members is needed but also for improvement in reimbursement for telemedicine services for older adults with obesity.

  3. Systematic review of outcomes from home-based primary care programs for homebound older adults.

    PubMed

    Stall, Nathan; Nowaczynski, Mark; Sinha, Samir K

    2014-12-01

    To describe the effect of home-based primary care for homebound older adults on individual, caregiver, and systems outcomes. A systematic review of home-based primary care interventions for community-dwelling older adults (aged ≥65) using the Cochrane, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases from the earliest available date through March 15, 2014. Studies were included if the house calls visitor was the ongoing primary care provider and if the intervention measured emergency department visits, hospitalizations, hospital beds days of care, long-term care admissions, or long-term care bed days of care. Home-based primary care programs. Homebound community-dwelling older adults (N = 46,154). Emergency department visits, hospitalizations, hospital bed days of care, long-term care admissions, long-term care bed days of care, costs, program design, and individual and caregiver quality of life and satisfaction with care. Of 357 abstracts identified, nine met criteria for review. The nine interventions were all based in North America, with five emerging from the Veterans Affairs system. Eight of nine programs demonstrated substantial effects on at least one inclusion outcome, with seven programs affecting two outcomes. Six interventions shared three core program components: interprofessional care teams, regular interprofessional care meetings, and after-hours support. Specifically designed home-based primary care programs may substantially affect individual, caregiver and systems outcomes. Adherence to the core program components identified in this review could guide the development and spread of these programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. [Screening for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adult patients in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Enric; Cañisá, Anna; Caballero, Antònia; Piñol-Moreso, Josep Lluís

    2013-05-01

    AIMS. To estimate the proportion of adult patients in primary care with a positive screening test for attention deficit hyper-activity disorder (ADHD) and to analyse their characteristics. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in nine primary care clinics in the province of Tarragona. The sample consisted of 432 consecutive patients in primary care who visited for any reason, with ages ranging from 18 to 55 years. Screening for ADHD was carried out by means of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Data about functional impact (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained and a review of the patient records provided data concerning psychiatric comorbidity and the consumption of psychopharmaceuticals. RESULTS. The percentage of positive results in the screening tests was 19.9% (95% CI = 16.4-23.9%). Taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ASRS, the 'real' prevalence was estimated to be 12.5% (95% CI = 8.2-16.8%). None of these patients were diagnosed or treated for ADHD. Positive screening tests are associated with occupational, social and familial dysfunction, and greater perceived stress. There is also a higher level of comorbidity with affective disorders and substance abuse, as well as greater use of psychopharmaceuticals. CONCLUSIONS. Screening for ADHD in adult patients in primary care gives rise to a notably high proportion of positive screening test results, which suggests that there could be a significant prevalence of patients with ADHD. These data contrast with the absence of this diagnosis in the patient records. Further research is needed to determine the usefulness of the diagnosis of ADHD and the possible role that must be played by primary care.

  5. Primary care for adults with Down syndrome: adherence to preventive healthcare recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K M; Taylor, L C; Davis, M M

    2013-05-01

    Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and condition-specific preventive care in a cohort of adults with Down syndrome. In this retrospective observational cohort study, preventive screening was evaluated in patients with Down syndrome aged 18-45 years who received primary care in an academic medical centre from 2000 to 2008. Comparisons were made based on the field of patients' primary care providers (Family or Internal Medicine). This cohort included 62 patients, median index age = 33 years. Forty per cent of patients received primary care by Family Physicians, with 60% seen by Internal Medicine practices. Patient demographics, comorbidities and overall screening patterns were similar between provider groups. Despite near universal screening for obesity and hypothyroidism, adherence to preventive care recommendations was otherwise inconsistent. Screening was 'moderate' (50-80%) for cardiac anomalies, reproductive health, dentition, and the combined measure of behaviour, psychological, or memory abnormalities. Less than 50% of patients were evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea, atlanto-axial instability, hearing loss or vision loss. We observed inconsistent preventive care in adults with Down syndrome over this 8.5-year study. This is concerning, given that the adverse effects of many of these conditions can be ameliorated if discovered in a timely fashion. Further studies must evaluate the implications of screening practices and more timely identification of comorbidities on clinical outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Crouzon syndrome with primary optic nerve atrophy and normal brain functions: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pal, Uma Shankar; Gupta, Chandan; Chellappa, Arul A L

    2012-01-01

    This report and review of literature aimed to assess an unusual case of Crouzon syndrome characterized by distinctive disfigurement of craniofacial skeletal and soft tissue structures with primary optic nerve atropy. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with Crouzon syndrome displaying classic facial abnormalities with reduced vision and hearing loss. Crouzon syndrome should be managed as early as possible as it results in airway obstruction, decreased vision, mental retardation and poor cosmetic appearance.

  7. Crouzon syndrome with primary optic nerve atrophy and normal brain functions: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Uma Shankar; Gupta, Chandan; Chellappa, Arul A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background This report and review of literature aimed to assess an unusual case of Crouzon syndrome characterized by distinctive disfigurement of craniofacial skeletal and soft tissue structures with primary optic nerve atropy. Methods We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with Crouzon syndrome displaying classic facial abnormalities with reduced vision and hearing loss. Conclusion Crouzon syndrome should be managed as early as possible as it results in airway obstruction, decreased vision, mental retardation and poor cosmetic appearance. PMID:25737846

  8. Macular Thickness Variability in Primary Open Angle Glaucoma Patients using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjali; Agarwal, Prakashchand; Sathyan, P; Saini, V K

    2014-01-01

    To compare the difference of retinal macular thickness and macular volume using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients with the normal subjects. This observational case control study included primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients (n = 124 eyes) and healthy subjects in the control group (n = 124 eyes). All subjects underwent detailed history, general and systemic exami -nation. Complete ocular examination included best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), slit lamp examination, intraocular pressure (IOP), central corneal thickness, gonioscopy, dilated fundus biomicroscopy. Field analysis was done by white on white Humphrey Field Analyzer (Carl Zeiss). Optical coherence tomography imaging of macular area was performed using Stratus OCT (OCT 3, Version 4, Carl Zeiss Inc, Dublin, California, USA). In both these groups, parameters analyzed were macular thickness, inner macular thicknesses (IMT), outer macular thicknesses (OMT), central macular thick ness (CMT) and total macular volume (TMV). The POAG group had significantly decreased values of TMV, OMT and IMT, compared to control group, while there was no difference in CMT, presumably due to absence of ganglion cells in the central part. Thus, macular thickness and volume parameters may be used for making the diagnosis of glaucoma especially in patients with abnormalities of disc. Macular thickness parameters correlated well with the diagnosis of glaucoma. How to cite this article: Sharma A, Agarwal P, Sathyan P, Saini VK. Macular Thickness Variability in Primary Open Angle Glaucoma Patients using Optical Coherence Tomography. J Current Glau Prac 2014;8(1):10-14.

  9. Clinical, histopathologic, and genetic features of pediatric primary myelofibrosis--an entity different from adults.

    PubMed

    DeLario, Melissa R; Sheehan, Andrea M; Ataya, Ramona; Bertuch, Alison A; Vega, Carlos; Webb, C Renee; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Venkateswaran, Lakshmi

    2012-05-01

    Primary myelofibrosis is a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by cytopenias, leukoerythroblastosis, extramedullary hematopoiesis, hepatosplenomegaly and bone marrow fibrosis. Primary myelofibrosis is a rare disorder in adults; children are even less commonly affected by this entity, with the largest pediatric case series reporting on three patients. Most literature suggests spontaneous resolution of myelofibrosis without long term complications in the majority of affected children. We describe the clinical, pathologic, and molecular characteristics and outcomes of nineteen children with primary myelofibrosis treated in our center from 1984 to 2011. Most patients had cytopenia significant enough to require supportive therapy. No child developed malignant transformation and only five of the 19 children (26%) had spontaneous resolution of disease. Sequence analyses for JAK2V617F and MPLW515L mutations were performed on bone marrow samples from 17 and six patients, respectively, and the results were negative. In conclusion, analysis of this large series of pediatric patients with primary myelofibrosis demonstrates distinct clinical, hematologic, bone marrow, and molecular features from adult patients.

  10. Genus Distichopora (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa): from primary cyclosystem to adult pore organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puce, S.; Pica, D.; Brun, F.; Mancini, L.; Bavestrello, G.

    2012-09-01

    This investigation provides the first detailed description of the growth stages of two Distichopora species showing the formation of a primary cyclosystem and explaining the growth process leading from primary cyclosystem to adult pore organisation. The earliest observed stage is an oval calcareous disc from which, at a later stage, a primary cyclosystem raises up. Then, the addition of new gastropores and dactylopores leads to the pore rows typical of the genus. Using X-ray computed microtomography, we are able to visualise the dense canal network that permeates the coenosteum and envelops the gastropores and the dactylopores in all the observed growth stages. In both species, the thin canals surrounding the gastropores are responsible for the formation of the new gastropores that originate between the old ones, while the thin canals placed on the external side of the dactylopore rows produce the new dactylopores.

  11. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  12. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A; Obukhov, Dmitry K

    2016-04-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1-4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration.

  13. Glucose metabolism by adult hepatocytes in primary culture and by cell lines from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Bissell, D M; Levine, G A; Bissell, M J

    1978-03-01

    The metabolic fate of [U-14C]glucose has been examined in detail in adult rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture, as well as in two permanent cell lines--Buffalo rat liver (BRL) and transplantable rat hepatoma (HTC) cells-derived from normal rat liver and from rat hepatoma, respectively. Under defined conditions of incubation, at a glucose concentration of 5.5 mM, the three types of cultured liver cells exhibited pronounced differences in glucose metabolism. Primary cultures, like the intact liver, differed from the cell lines in consuming relatively small amounts of glucose and converting approximately 50% of the total metabolized glucose to lactate. By contrast, the permantent cell lines consumed glucose at a 40-fold greater rate than did primary cultures, converting 80--90% of the carbohydrate to lactate. Oxidative metabolism of glucose carbon also differed among the three types of liver culture. Of the total [U-14C]glucose consumed, primary cultures converted approximately 30% to labeled CO2 per hour, whereas the liver cell lines converted 5--10%. Finally, glucose metabolism in primary culture exhibited adaptation as hepatocytes aged in culture, shifting progressively toward the pattern exhibited by the permanent cell lines. This change occurred over a time course similar to that for other kinds of functional change in hepatocytes in primary culture and thus may be relevant to the general problem of phenotypic alteration in liver cell culture.

  14. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  15. Onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability associated with primary caregiver depression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Kuo, Meng-Ting; Wu, Jia-Lin; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability experience depressive symptoms, but the aging factors of the care recipients associated with the depressive symptoms are unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability that associated with the depression scores of their primary caregivers. A cross-sectional survey was administered to gather information from 455 caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability about their symptoms of depression which assessed by a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The 12 aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability include physical and mental health. The results indicate that 78% of adults with an intellectual disability demonstrate aging conditions. Physical conditions associated with aging include hearing decline (66.3%), vision decline (63.6%), incontinence (44%), articulation and bone degeneration (57.9%), teeth loss (80.4), physical strength decline (81.2%), sense of taste and smell decline (52.8%), and accompanied chronic illnesses (74.6%). Mental conditions associated with aging include memory loss (77%), language ability deterioration (74.4%), poor sleep quality (74.2%), and easy onset of depression and sadness (50.3%). Aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability (p<0.001) was one factor that significantly affected the presence of depressive symptom among caregivers after controlling demographic characteristics. Particularly, poor sleep quality of adults with an intellectual disability (yes vs. no, OR=3.807, p=0.002) was statistically correlated to the occurrence of significant depressive symptoms among their caregivers. This study suggests that the authorities should reorient community services and future policies toward the needs of family caregivers to decrease the burdens associated with caregiving.

  16. Use of antihypertensive medications and diagnostic tests among privately-insured adolescents and young adults with primary vs. secondary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Esther Y.; Cohn, Lisa; Freed, Gary; Rocchini, Albert; Kershaw, David; Ascione, Frank; Clark, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the use of antihypertensive medications and diagnostic tests among adolescents and young adults with primary vs. secondary hypertension Methods We conducted retrospective cohort analysis of claims data for adolescents and young adults (12–21 years) with ≥ 3 years of insurance coverage (≥ 11 months/year) in a large private managed care plan during 2003–2009 with diagnosis of primary hypertension or secondary hypertension. We examined their use of antihypertensive medications and identified demographic characteristics and presence of obesity-related comorbidities. For the subset receiving antihypertensive medications, we examined their diagnostic test use (echocardiograms, renal ultrasounds, and electrocardiograms (EKG)). Results Study sample included 1232 adolescents and young adults; 84% had primary hypertension and 16% had secondary hypertension. Overall prevalence rate of hypertension was 2.6%. One-quarter (28%) with primary hypertension had ≥1 antihypertensive medication whereas 65% with secondary hypertension had ≥1 antihypertensive medication. Leading prescribers of antihypertensives for subjects with primary hypertension were primary care physicians (PCP) (80%) whereas antihypertensive medications were equally prescribed by PCPs (43%) and subspecialists (37%) for subjects with secondary hypertension. Conclusions The predominant hypertension diagnosis among adolescents and young adults is primary hypertension. Antihypertensive medication use was higher among those with secondary hypertension compared to those with primary hypertension. Further study is needed to determine treatment effectiveness and patient outcomes associated with differential treatment patterns used for adolescents and young adults with primary vs. secondary hypertension. PMID:24492018

  17. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44 ± 13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4 ± 2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4 ± 3.1 days (range 7–16 days). WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 19.4 months (range 13–66 months) no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94 ± 5.6 points (range 91–100) at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:27800188

  18. Jaundice in primary care: a cohort study of adults aged >45 years using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anna; Stapley, Sally; Hamilton, William

    2012-08-01

    Jaundice is a rare but important symptom of malignant and benign conditions. When patients present in primary care, understanding the relative likelihood of different disease processes can help GPs to investigate and refer patients appropriately. To identify and quantify the various causes of jaundice in adults presenting in primary care. Historical cohort study using electronic primary care records. UK General Practice Research Database. Participants (186 814 men and women) aged >45 years with clinical events recorded in primary care records between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007. Data were searched for episodes of jaundice and explanatory diagnoses identified within the subsequent 12 months. If no diagnosis was found, the patient's preceding medical record was searched for relevant chronic diseases. From the full cohort, 277 patients had at least one record of jaundice between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006. Ninety-two (33%) were found to have bile duct stones; 74 (27%) had an explanatory cancer [pancreatic cancer 34 (12%), cholangiocarcinoma 13 (5%) and other diagnosed primary malignancy 27 (10%)]. Liver disease attributed to excess alcohol explained 26 (9%) and other diagnoses were identified in 24 (9%). Sixty-one (22%) had no diagnosis related to jaundice recorded. Although the most common cause of jaundice is bile duct stones, cancers are present in over a quarter of patients with jaundice in this study, demonstrating the importance of urgent investigation into the underlying cause.

  19. Isolated primary central nervous system lymphoma arising from the optic chiasm.

    PubMed

    Vassal, F; Pommier, B; Boutet, C; Forest, F; Campolmi, N; Nuti, C

    2014-12-01

    A 58-year-old previously healthy woman rapidly developed progressive bilateral visual loss. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bulging appearance of the optic chiasm, with homogeneous enhancement after gadolinium administration, which suggested an optic glioma or inflammatory disease. In the absence of (para)clinical clues for a specific diagnosis despite extensive investigation, a biopsy of one optic nerve was performed, resulting in a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma. There was no evidence of any other ocular or systemic involvement, therefore the conclusion was that this immunocompetent patient had a primary central nervous system lymphoma isolated in the anterior visual pathway. Treatment included two cycles of polychemotherapy (rituximab, methotrexate, carmustine, etoposide, methylprednisolone), followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and rituximab plus cytarabine consolidation therapy. Subsequently, the patient exhibited significant improvement in vision, and was still disease-free at the 1-year follow-up examination. The aim of the present paper was to provide well-documented clinical, radiological, and intraoperative features of isolated primary malignant lymphoma arising from the anterior visual pathway. A better recognition of this rare pathological entity is necessary for clinicians who may encounter similar presentations, as prompt management is crucial for both a visual and vital prognosis.

  20. The optical metrology system for cryogenic testing of the JWST primary mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Chaney, David M.; Carey, Larkin B.

    2011-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal mirror segments each approximately 1.5 m point-to-point. Each primary mirror segment assembly (PMSA) is constructed from a lightweight beryllium substrate with both a radius-of-curvature actuation system and a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system. With the JWST being a near to mid-infrared observatory, the nominal operational temperature of a PMSA is 45 K. Each PMSA must be optically tested at 45 K twice, first to measure the change in the surface figure & radius-of-curvature between ambient & cryogenic temperatures and then to verify performance at cryo following final polishing. This testing is conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) X-Ray & Cryogenic Facility (XRCF). The chamber & metrology system can accommodate up to six PMSAs per cryo test. This paper will describe the optical metrology system used during PMSA cryogenic testing. This system evolved from systems used during the JWST mirror technology development program. The main components include a high-speed interferometer, a computer-generated holographic null, an absolute distance meter, a tiltable window, and an imaging system for alignment. The optical metrology system is used to measure surface figure error, radius-of-curvature, conic constant, prescription alignment, clear aperture, and the range & resolution of the PMSA actuation systems.

  1. Adult depression screening in Saudi primary care: prevalence, instrument and cost

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background By the year 2020 depression would be the second major cause of disability adjusted life years lost, as reported by the World Health Organization. Depression is a mental illness which causes persistent low mood, a sense of despair, and has multiple risk factors. Its prevalence in primary care varies between 15.3-22%, with global prevalence up to 13% and between 17-46% in Saudi Arabia. Despite several studies that have shown benefit of early diagnosis and cost-savings of up to 80%, physicians in primary care setting continue to miss out on 30-50% of depressed patients in their practices. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at three large primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia aiming at estimating point prevalence of depression and screening cost among primary care adult patients, and comparing Patient Health Questionnaires PHQ-2 with PHQ-9. Adult individuals were screened using Arabic version of PHQ-2 and PHQ-9. PHQ-2 scores were correlated with PHQ-9 scores using linear regression. A limited cost-analysis and cost saving estimates of depression screening was done using the Human Capital approach. Results Patients included in the survey analysis were 477, of whom 66.2% were females, 77.4% were married, and nearly 20% were illiterate. Patients exhibiting depressive symptoms on the basis of PHQ9 were 49.9%, of which 31% were mild, 13.4% moderate, 4.4% moderate-severe and 1.0% severe cases. Depression scores were significantly associated with female gender (p-value 0.049), and higher educational level (p-value 0.002). Regression analysis showed that PHQ-2 & PHQ-9 were strongly correlated R = 0.79, and R2 = 0.62. The cost-analysis showed savings of up to 500 SAR ($133) per adult patient screened once a year. Conclusion The point prevalence of screened depression is high in primary care visitors in Saudi Arabia. Gender and higher level of education were found to be significantly associated with screened depression. Majority of cases were mild to

  2. Pet Ownership may Attenuate Loneliness Among Older Adult Primary Care Patients Who Live Alone

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Ian H.; Conwell, Yeates; Bowen, Connie; Van Orden, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Older adults who report feelings of loneliness are at increased risk for a range of negative physical and mental health outcomes, including early mortality. Identifying potential sources of social connectedness, such as pet ownership, could add to the understanding of how to promote health and well-being in older adults. The aim of this study is to describe the association of pet ownership and loneliness. Methods The current study utilizes cross-sectional survey data from a sample (N = 830) of older adult primary care patients (age > 60 years). Results Pet owners were 36% less likely than non-pet owners to report loneliness, in a model controlling for age, living status (i.e., alone vs. not alone), happy mood, and seasonal residency (adjOR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.41-0.98, p <.05). An interaction was found between pet ownership and living status (b = −1.60, p < .001) in which living alone and not owning a pet was associated with the greatest odds of reporting feelings of loneliness. Conclusions Findings suggest that pet ownership may confer benefits for well-being, including attenuating feelings of loneliness and its related sequelae, among older adults who live alone. PMID:24047314

  3. Associations between adult attachment characteristics, medical burden, and life satisfaction among older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchmann, Helmut; Nolte, Tobias; Runkewitz, Kristin; Bayerle, Lisa; Becker, Simone; Blasczyk, Verena; Lindloh, Julia; Strauss, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether attachment security, measured by the Adult Attachment Prototype Rating (AAPR), was correlated with life satisfaction, independent of sociodemographic characteristics, medical burden, and age-related coping strategies in a sample of 81 patients (69-73 years) recruited from the register of a general primary care practice. Furthermore, we examined whether patients classified as AAPR-secure reported better adjustment to medical burden in terms of higher life satisfaction than did insecure patients. Attachment security was independently related to life satisfaction. Moreover, the association between medical burden and lower life satisfaction was significantly stronger for insecure than for secure participants. Our findings indicate that interventions to improve attachment security or coping processes related to attachment could help older adults retain life satisfaction.

  4. Stigmatizing Attitudes towards Mental Illness among Racial/Ethnic Older Adults in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Daniel E.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Cardenas, Veronica; Alegría, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    Objective The current study applies the perceived stigma framework to identify differences in attitudes toward mental health and mental health treatment among various racial/ethnic minority older adults with common mental health problems including depression, anxiety disorders, or at-risk alcohol use. Specifically, this study examines to what extent race/ethnicity is associated with differences in: (1) perceived stigma of mental illness; and (2) perceived stigma for different mental health treatment options. Methods Analyses were conducted using baseline data collected from participants who completed the SAMHSA Mental Health and Alcohol Abuse Stigma Assessment, developed for the PRISM-E (Primary Care Research in Substance Abuse and Mental Health for the Elderly) study, a multi-site randomized trial for older adults (65+) with depression, anxiety, or at-risk alcohol consumption. The final sample consisted of 1247 non-Latino Whites, 536 African-Americans, 112 Asian-Americans, and 303 Latinos. Results African-Americans and Latinos expressed greater comfort in speaking to primary care physicians or mental health professionals concerning mental illness compared to non-Latino Whites. Asian-Americans and Latinos expressed greater shame and embarrassment about having a mental illness than non-Latino Whites. Asian-Americans expressed greater difficulty in seeking or engaging in mental health treatment. Conclusions Racial/ethnic differences exist among older adults with mental illness with respect to stigmatizing attitudes towards mental illness and mental health treatment. Results of this study could help researchers and clinicians educate racial/ethnic minority older adults about mental illness and engage them in much needed mental health services. PMID:23361866

  5. Aspirin use for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rodondi, Nicolas; Vittinghoff, Eric; Cornuz, Jacques; Butler, Javed; Ding, Jingzhong; Satterfield, Suzanne; Newman, Anne B; Harris, Tamara B; Hulley, Stephen B; Bauer, Douglas C

    2005-11-01

    Aspirin for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (has a more favorable risk/benefit profile among adults with high coronary heart disease risk than among low-risk adults, but there is little information on the current patterns of aspirin use for primary prevention. We determined the prevalence of aspirin use in relation to coronary heart disease risk and changes over time. We measured regular aspirin use in 2163 black and white older adults without cardiovascular disease in a population-based cohort from 1997 to 1998 and 2002 to 2003. We determined the 10-year coronary heart disease risk by using the Framingham risk score. In 1997-1998, 17% of the cohort were regular aspirin users. Aspirin use increased with coronary heart disease risk from 13% in persons with a 10-year risk less than 6% (low risk) to 23% in those with a 10-year risk greater than 20% (highest risk) (P for trend < .001). Blacks were less likely to use aspirin (13%) than whites (20%). In multivariate analysis, black race was still associated with lower aspirin use (odds ratio 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.49-0.89). In 1997-1998 and 2002 to 2003, aspirin use increased from 17% to 32% among those still free of coronary heart disease (P < .001), and the association with coronary heart disease risk continued (P for trend < .001). Despite their high coronary heart disease risk, diabetic persons were not more likely to use aspirin than nondiabetic persons, even in 2002 and 2003 (odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.56-1.40). Regular use of aspirin by older adults with no history of cardiovascular disease has increased in recent years. Individuals at higher coronary heart disease risk are more likely to take aspirin, but there is room for considerable improvement in targeting those at high risk, particularly diabetic persons and blacks.

  6. Quantitative optical imaging of primary tumor organoid metabolism predicts drug response in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for technologies to predict the efficacy of cancer treatment in individual patients. Here we show that optical metabolic imaging of organoids derived from primary tumors can predict therapeutic response of xenografts and measure anti-tumor drug responses in human-tumor derived organoids. Optical metabolic imaging quantifies the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of NADH and FAD, co-enzymes of metabolism. As early as 24 hours after treatment with clinically relevant anti-cancer drugs, the optical metabolic imaging index of responsive organoids decreased (p<0.001) and was further reduced when effective therapies were combined (p<5×10–6), with no change in drug-resistant organoids. Drug response in xenograft-derived organoids was validated with tumor growth measurements in vivo and stains for proliferation and apoptosis. Heterogeneous cellular responses to drug treatment were also resolved in organoids. Optical metabolic imaging shows potential as a high-throughput screen to test the efficacy of a panel of drugs to select optimal drug combinations. PMID:25100563

  7. Quantitative optical imaging of primary tumor organoid metabolism predicts drug response in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Alex J; Cook, Rebecca S; Sanders, Melinda E; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Arteaga, Carlos L; Skala, Melissa C

    2014-09-15

    There is a need for technologies to predict the efficacy of cancer treatment in individual patients. Here, we show that optical metabolic imaging of organoids derived from primary tumors can predict the therapeutic response of xenografts and measure antitumor drug responses in human tumor-derived organoids. Optical metabolic imaging quantifies the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of NADH and FAD, coenzymes of metabolism. As early as 24 hours after treatment with clinically relevant anticancer drugs, the optical metabolic imaging index of responsive organoids decreased (P < 0.001) and was further reduced when effective therapies were combined (P < 5 × 10(-6)), with no change in drug-resistant organoids. Drug response in xenograft-derived organoids was validated with tumor growth measurements in vivo and staining for proliferation and apoptosis. Heterogeneous cellular responses to drug treatment were also resolved in organoids. Optical metabolic imaging shows potential as a high-throughput screen to test the efficacy of a panel of drugs to select optimal drug combinations. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5184-94. ©2014 AACR.

  8. Changes in the contralateral eye in uncomplicated persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous in adults.

    PubMed

    Awan, K J; Humayun, M

    1985-02-15

    In two adults (a 62-year-old man and a 71-year-old woman) uncomplicated full-blown unilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous was diagnosed on the basis of characteristic clinical features and ultrasonography. In the contralateral uninvolved eyes, we found open-angle glaucoma, anomalous blood vessels along the entire circumference of the anterior chamber angle, band keratopathy, and heterochromia iridis. The axial length of one involved eye was about 0.85 mm larger than that of the uninvolved eye.

  9. Positive Affect and Suicide Ideation in Older Adult Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Chapman, Benjamin; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a significant public health problem for older adults. Identification of protective factors associated with reduced risk is important. The authors examined the association of positive affect and suicide ideation in 462 primary care patients ages 65 and older. Positive affect distinguished suicide ideators from nonideators, after controlling for age, gender, depression, negative affect, illness burden, activity, sociability, cognitive functioning, and physical functioning. There was a trend toward age moderation of this relationship. Clinical and theoretical formulations of late-life suicide should consider the role of positive affect, including the possibility that its protective effects grow more pronounced with age. PMID:17563193

  10. Adult onset primary focal dystonia of the foot: an orthopaedic intervention.

    PubMed

    Logan, Loretta; Resseque, Barbara; Dontamsetti, Monica Sakshi

    2016-03-30

    A 54-year-old woman presented to a foot centre with a chief symptom of cramping in her toes, which, she believed, was of a secondary cause originating from a bunion. She was treated conservatively; however, she returned a month later as the symptoms had progressed to painful cramping of toes, toe-curling and instability while walking, due to involuntary movement of her toes. It was believed that the patient presented with a rare case of primary adult onset focal foot dystonia. This case report explains dystonia further in detail and delves into the different treatment and management options available today, including the unique orthopaedic intervention provided for this patient.

  11. Antibody response to revaccination among adult non-responders to primary Hepatitis B vaccination in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Jiaye; Lu, Jingjing; Yan, Bingyu; Song, Lizhi; Li, Li; Cui, Fuqiang; Zhang, Guomin; Wang, Fuzhen; Liang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Aiqiang

    2015-01-01

    About 10% adult failed to develop antibody response after primary hepatitis B vaccination, and revaccination may be an option to improve immune response, but the antibody responses to revaccination in adult non-responders have not been fully examined. Adult non-responders to primary 3-dose hepatitis B vaccination were randomly divided into 2 groups and revaccinated with 20 μg hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) derived from Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (HepB-SC) or 20 μg HepB derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells (HepB-CHO), respectively, at 0-, 1-, 6- month. Seroconversion rate and titer of antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) was measured one month after the 1st and 3rd revaccination dose. Anti-HBs seroconversion rates significantly increased from 54.98% [95% confidence interval (CI) 48.60%-61.24%] after the 1st revaccination dose to 89.24% (95% CI: 84.74%-92.79%) after the 3rd revaccination dose (P < 0.001), and the geometric mean titer (GMT) of anti-HBs increased from 12.18 mIU/ml (95%CI: 7.81-18.98 mIU/ml) to 208.31 mIU/ml (95% CI: 148.87-291.47 mIU/ml) (P = 0.008).Compared with those with anti-HBs titer <2 mIU/ml after primary vaccination, those with antibody titer ≥ 2 mIU/ml after primary vaccination had higher seroconversion rate after the 1st dose revaccination (38.36% vs. 78.10%, P < 0.001) and after the 3rd dose of revaccination (84.25% vs. 96.19%, P = 0.003), and had higher antibody titer after the 1st dose of revaccination (3.32 mIU/ml vs. 74.21 mIU/ml, P < 0.0001) and after the 3rd dose of revaccination (145.73 mIU/ml vs. 342.34 mIU/ml, P = 0.01). Anti-HBs titer was significantly higher in those revaccinated with HepB-CHO than those revaccinated with HepB-SC after the 3rd dose (131.46 mIU/ml vs. 313.38 mIU/ml, P = 0.01). Revaccination on adult HepB non-responders increased the immune response to HepB and may confer further protection against hepatitis B virus infection. If possible, revaccination might be an option to HepB non

  12. Splenomegaly as a Primary Manifestation of Gaucher Disease in a Young Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Merra, Giuseppe; Lago, Antonio Dal; Ricci, Roberta; Antuzzi, Daniela; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysosomal storage disease. It is caused by the defective activity of acid β-glucosidase, which results in the accumulation of lipid glucocerebroside in macrophages throughout the body. In this case report we describe the case of a young adult woman with splenomegaly as the primary manifestation of this pathology. This is a case of type 1 Gaucher disease because there is a lack of primary neurological involvement but we have, instead, an age-independent involvement of the visceral organs. It is very important to classify or characterize these patients in a precise manner and to make a complete diagnosis with the help of the many diagnostic resources now at our disposal, especially with genetics, radiology and new techniques of advanced microscopy, also because Gaucher disease requires a long and complex management from early life to adulthood. PMID:21897802

  13. Fertility in adult women with classic galactosemia and primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    van Erven, Britt; Berry, Gerard T; Cassiman, David; Connolly, Geraldine; Forga, Maria; Gautschi, Matthias; Gubbels, Cynthia S; Hollak, Carla E M; Janssen, Mirian C; Knerr, Ina; Labrune, Philippe; Langendonk, Janneke G; Õunap, Katrin; Thijs, Abel; Vos, Rein; Wortmann, Saskia B; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2017-07-01

    To study pregnancy chance in adult women with classic galactosemia and primary ovarian insufficiency. Despite dietary treatment, >90% of women with classic galactosemia develop primary ovarian insufficiency, resulting in impaired fertility. For many years, chance of spontaneous conception has not been considered, leading to counseling for infertility. But an increasing number of reports on pregnancies in this group questions whether current counseling approaches are correct. Multicenter retrospective observational study. Metabolic centers. Adult women (aged >18 y) with confirmed classic galactosemia and primary ovarian insufficiency were included. Participants and medical records were consulted to obtain study data in a standardized manner with the use of a questionnaire. Conception opportunities, time to pregnancy, pregnancy outcome, hormone replacement therapy use, fertility counseling, and the participants' vision of fertility were evaluated. Potential predictive factors for increased pregnancy chance were explored. Eighty-five women with classic galactosemia and primary ovarian insufficiency participated. Twenty-one women actively attempted to conceive or did not take adequate contraceptive precautions. Of these 21 women, nine became pregnant spontaneously (42.9%). This was higher than reported in primary ovarian insufficiency due to other causes (5%-10%). After a period of 12 months, a cumulative proportion of 27.8% of couples had conceived, which increased to 48.4% after 24 months and 61.3% after 27 months. Predictive factors could not be identified. A considerable miscarriage rate of 30% was observed (6 of 20 pregnancies). Although a substantial proportion of women expressed a child-wish (n = 28/53; 52.8%), the vast majority of participants (n = 43/57; 75.4%) considered conceiving to be highly unlikely, owing to negative counseling in the past. The pregnancy rate in women with classic galactosemia and primary ovarian insufficiency was higher than for

  14. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves.

  15. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005–0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  16. Origin of germ cells and formation of new primary follicles in adult human ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Svetlikova, Marta; Upadhyaya, Nirmala B

    2004-01-01

    sophisticated adaptive mechanism created during the evolution of female reproduction. Our data indicate that the pool of primary follicles in adult human ovaries does not represent a static but a dynamic population of differentiating and regressing structures. An essential mission of such follicular turnover might be elimination of spontaneous or environmentally induced genetic alterations of oocytes in resting primary follicles. PMID:15115550

  17. Aiming for remission in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: The primary care goal.

    PubMed

    Mattingly, Greg; Culpepper, Larry; Babcock, Thomas; Arnold, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often undiagnosed and undertreated in adults, resulting in wide-ranging problems and functional deficits in patients' lives. In addition, psychiatric comorbidities unrelated to symptom severity may be present. However, effective treatment that can alleviate symptoms and bring about meaningful improvements in functionality is available. Primary care providers can play a crucial role in recognizing and diagnosing ADHD, initiating and monitoring treatment, and obtaining consultations or arranging referrals when necessary, all with the goal of achieving and maintaining remission. Fulfillment of this role requires a practical understanding of the diverse clinical manifestations of ADHD in patients stratified by age and sex, and familiarity with current treatment guidelines. Although there is no absolute consensus on the criteria by which remission is defined, treatment response may be guided by objective ratings of global symptom severity and patients' self-reports of changes in their ability to cope with routine daily tasks, academic and vocational responsibilities, and social relationships. Although there has been much research into the genetic and neurophysiologic basis of ADHD, it is more important for primary care providers to appreciate that ADHD is a chronic condition requiring lifelong follow-up and that clinical presentation and response to treatment can vary widely among patients and over time in the same patients. Such variability makes the management of ADHD challenging, but the opportunity to bring about dramatic improvement in patients' lives makes it imperative for primary care providers to be competent in this area. This review provides primary care clinicians with a practical definition of remission in adults with ADHD, to emphasize that symptom reduction does not necessarily mean intact functionality, and to suggest a multidisciplinary approach aimed at achieving the greatest possible reduction of

  18. Now what should I do? Primary care physicians' responses to older adults expressing thoughts of suicide.

    PubMed

    Vannoy, Steven D; Tai-Seale, Ming; Duberstein, Paul; Eaton, Laura J; Cook, Mary Ann

    2011-09-01

    Many older adults who die by suicide have had recent contact with a primary care physician. As the risk-assessment and referral process for suicide is not readily comparable to procedures for other high-risk behaviors, it is important to identify areas in need of quality improvement (QI). Identify patterns in physician-patient communication regarding suicide to inform QI interventions. Qualitative thematic analysis of video-taped clinical encounters in which suicide was discussed. Adult primary care patients (n = 385) 65 years and older and their primary care physicians. Mental health was discussed in 22% of encounters (n = 85), with suicide content found in less than 2% (n = 6). Three patterns of conversation were characterized: (1) Arguing that "Life's Not That Bad." In this scenario, the physician strives to convince the patient that suicide is unwarranted, which results in mutual fatigue and discouragement. (2) "Engaging in Chitchat." Here the physician addresses psychosocial matters in a seemingly aimless manner with no clear therapeutic goal. This results in a superficial and misleading connection that buries meaningful risk assessment amidst small talk. (3) "Identify, assess, and…?" This pattern is characterized by acknowledging distress, communicating concern, eliciting information, and making treatment suggestions, but lacks clearly articulated treatment planning or structured follow-up. The physicians in this sample recognized and implicitly acknowledged suicide risk in their older patients, but all seemed unable to go beyond mere assessment. The absence of clearly articulated treatment plans may reflect a lack of a coherent framework for managing suicide risk, insufficient clinical skills, and availability of mental health specialty support required to address suicide risk effectively. To respond to suicide's numerous challenges to the primary care delivery system, QI strategies will require changes to physician education and may require

  19. The effect of increased primary schooling on adult women's HIV status in Malawi and Uganda: Universal Primary Education as a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Behrman, Julia Andrea

    2015-02-01

    This paper explores the causal relationship between primary schooling and adult HIV status in Malawi and Uganda, two East African countries with some of the highest HIV infection rates in the world. Using data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic Health Survey and the 2011 Uganda AIDS Indicator Survey, the paper takes advantage of a natural experiment, the implementation of Universal Primary Education policies in the mid 1990s. An instrumented regression discontinuity approach is used to model the relationship between increased primary schooling and adult women's HIV status. Results indicate that a one-year increase in schooling decreases the probability of an adult woman testing positive for HIV by 0.06 (p < 0.01) in Malawi and by 0.03 (p < 0.05) in Uganda. These results are robust to a variety of model specifications. In a series of supplementary analyses a number of potential pathways through which such effects may occur are explored. Findings indicate increased primary schooling positively affects women's literacy and spousal schooling attainment in Malawi and age of marriage and current household wealth in Uganda. However primary schooling has no effect on recent (adult) sexual behavior.

  20. Wavefront sensing and control architecture for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Smith, Jeff S.; Budinoff, Jason G.; Feinberg, Lee

    2006-06-01

    Testbed results are presented demonstrating high-speed image-based wavefront sensing and control for a spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT). The testbed incorporates a phase retrieval camera coupled to a 3-Mirror Vertex testbed (3MV) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Actuator calibration based on the Hough transform is discussed as well as several supercomputing architectures for image-based wavefront sensing. Timing results are also presented based on various algorithm implementations using a cluster of 64 TigerSharc TS101 DSP's (digital-signal processors).

  1. Raising awareness of bronchiectasis in primary care: overview of diagnosis and management strategies in adults.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D; Sethi, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic lung disease characterised by recurrent infection, inflammation, persistent cough and sputum production. The disease is increasing in prevalence, requiring a greater awareness of the disease across primary and secondary care. Mild and moderate cases of bronchiectasis in adults can often be managed by primary care clinicians. Initial assessments and long-term treatment plans that include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, however, should be undertaken in collaboration with a secondary care team that includes physiotherapists and specialists in respiratory medicine. Bronchiectasis is often identified in patients with other lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and in a lesser but not insignificant number of patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Overall goals of therapy are to prevent exacerbations, improve symptoms, improve quality of life and preserve lung function. Prompt treatment of exacerbations with antibiotic therapy is important to limit the impact of exacerbations on quality of life and lung function decline. Patient education and cooperation with health-care providers to implement treatment plans are key to successful disease management. It is important for the primary care provider to work with secondary care providers to develop an individualised treatment plan to optimise care with the goal to delay disease progression. Here, we review the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis with a focus on practical considerations that will be useful to primary care.

  2. Role for limited neck exploration in young adults with apparently sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Adam, Laura A; Smith, Brian J; Calva-Cerqueira, Daniel; Howe, James R; Lal, Geeta

    2008-07-01

    The risk of multiglandular disease (MGD) dictates the extent of exploration in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Historically, young patients with PHPT were more likely to have MGD, but the existing literature is sparse and conflicting. We hypothesized that young adults (ages 16-40 years) without familial PHPT have a disease process similar to that in older patients. A 22-year retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent neck exploration for PHPT at our tertiary care center. Altogether, 708 charts were reviewed for demographics, family history, laboratory values, operative findings, pathology, and outcomes. As a group, young adults comprised 14.0% of the total population and were more likely to have preexisting familial disorders of PHPT (p < 0.01), therapeutic failure (p < 0.01), failure to identify an abnormal parathyroid at operation (p < 0.01), and higher reoperative rates (p = 0.02); they were less likely to have single-gland disease (p = 0.04). Young adults without a family history of the disease demonstrated no disease differences except for a higher rate of symptoms (p < 0.01). Additional analysis found that patients with a family history of hypercalcemia, a sole family member with PHPT, or nephrolithiasis ("possible" family history) were more likely to have MGD (relative risk 2.0). In this largest single-institution study of young adults with sporadic PHPT, we conclude that sporadic PHPT in young adults represents a disease entity similar to that in older patients, with no increased risk for MGD, and hence they can be managed with a similar surgical approach. Further studies are needed to assess the role of a "possible" family history as a risk factor for MGD.

  3. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  4. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  5. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  6. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  7. Retinal intrinsic optical signals in a cat model of primary congenital glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Schallek, Jesse B; McLellan, Gillian J; Viswanathan, Suresh; Ts'o, Daniel Y

    2012-04-18

    To examine the impact of reduced inner retinal function and breed on intrinsic optical signals in cats. Retinal intrinsic optical signals were recorded from anesthetized cats with a modified fundus camera. Near infrared light (NIR, 700-900 nm) was used to illuminate the retina while a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera captured the NIR reflectance of the retina. Visible stimuli (540 nm) evoked patterned changes in NIR retinal reflectance. NIR intrinsic signals were compared across three subject groups: two Siamese cats with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), a control Siamese cat without glaucoma, and a control group of seven normally pigmented cats. Intraocular pressure (IOP), pattern electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography measurements were evaluated to confirm the inner retinal deficit in PCG cats. Stimulus-evoked, NIR retinal reflectance signals were observed in PCG cats despite severe degeneration of the nerve fiber layer and inner retinal function. The time course, spectral dependence, and spatial profile of signals imaged in PCG cats were similar to signals measured from normal and Siamese control cats. Despite increased IOP, reduced nerve fiber layer thickness and ganglion cell function, intrinsic optical signals persist in cats affected with PCG. The mechanisms giving rise to intrinsic signals remain despite inner retinal damage. Signal strength was reduced in all Siamese cats compared to controls, suggesting that reduced intrinsic signals in PCG cats represent a difference between breeds rather than loss of ganglion cells. These results corroborated previous findings that retinal ganglion cells are not the dominant source of intrinsic optical signals of the retina.

  8. First international comparison of fountain primary frequency standards via a long distance optical fiber link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéna, J.; Weyers, S.; Abgrall, M.; Grebing, C.; Gerginov, V.; Rosenbusch, P.; Bize, S.; Lipphardt, B.; Denker, H.; Quintin, N.; Raupach, S. M. F.; Nicolodi, D.; Stefani, F.; Chiodo, N.; Koke, S.; Kuhl, A.; Wiotte, F.; Meynadier, F.; Camisard, E.; Chardonnet, C.; Le Coq, Y.; Lours, M.; Santarelli, G.; Amy-Klein, A.; Le Targat, R.; Lopez, O.; Pottie, P. E.; Grosche, G.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the first comparison of distant caesium fountain primary frequency standards (PFSs) via an optical fiber link. The 1415 km long optical link connects two PFSs at LNE-SYRTE (Laboratoire National de métrologie et d’Essais—SYstème de Références Temps-Espace) in Paris (France) with two at PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt) in Braunschweig (Germany). For a long time, these PFSs have been major contributors to accuracy of the International Atomic Time (TAI), with stated accuracies of around 3× {{10}-16} . They have also been the references for a number of absolute measurements of clock transition frequencies in various optical frequency standards in view of a future redefinition of the second. The phase coherent optical frequency transfer via a stabilized telecom fiber link enables far better resolution than any other means of frequency transfer based on satellite links. The agreement for each pair of distant fountains compared is well within the combined uncertainty of a few 10-16 for all the comparisons, which fully supports the stated PFSs’ uncertainties. The comparison also includes a rubidium fountain frequency standard participating in the steering of TAI and enables a new absolute determination of the 87Rb ground state hyperfine transition frequency with an uncertainty of 3.1× {{10}-16} . This paper is dedicated to the memory of André Clairon, who passed away on 24 December 2015, for his pioneering and long-lasting efforts in atomic fountains. He also pioneered optical links from as early as 1997.

  9. Retinal Intrinsic Optical Signals in a Cat Model of Primary Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Schallek, Jesse B.; McLellan, Gillian J.; Viswanathan, Suresh; Ts'o, Daniel Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the impact of reduced inner retinal function and breed on intrinsic optical signals in cats. Methods. Retinal intrinsic optical signals were recorded from anesthetized cats with a modified fundus camera. Near infrared light (NIR, 700–900 nm) was used to illuminate the retina while a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera captured the NIR reflectance of the retina. Visible stimuli (540 nm) evoked patterned changes in NIR retinal reflectance. NIR intrinsic signals were compared across three subject groups: two Siamese cats with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), a control Siamese cat without glaucoma, and a control group of seven normally pigmented cats. Intraocular pressure (IOP), pattern electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography measurements were evaluated to confirm the inner retinal deficit in PCG cats. Results. Stimulus-evoked, NIR retinal reflectance signals were observed in PCG cats despite severe degeneration of the nerve fiber layer and inner retinal function. The time course, spectral dependence, and spatial profile of signals imaged in PCG cats were similar to signals measured from normal and Siamese control cats. Conclusions. Despite increased IOP, reduced nerve fiber layer thickness and ganglion cell function, intrinsic optical signals persist in cats affected with PCG. The mechanisms giving rise to intrinsic signals remain despite inner retinal damage. Signal strength was reduced in all Siamese cats compared to controls, suggesting that reduced intrinsic signals in PCG cats represent a difference between breeds rather than loss of ganglion cells. These results corroborated previous findings that retinal ganglion cells are not the dominant source of intrinsic optical signals of the retina. PMID:22395886

  10. Evaluation of bio-optical algorithms to remotely sense marine primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Beatrice; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    1994-01-01

    In situ bio-optical measurements from several oceanographic campaigns were analyzed to derive a direct relationship between water column primary production P (sub t) ocean color as expressed by the ratio of reflectances R (sub 1) at 440 nm and R (sub 3) at 550 nm and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR). The study is restricted to the Morel case I waters for which the following algorithm is proposed: log (P(sub f)) = -4.286 - 1.390 log (R(sub 1)/R(sub3)) + 0.621 log (PAR), with P(sub t) in g C m(exp -2)/d and PAR in J m(exp -2)/d. Using this algorithm the rms accuracy of primary production estimate is 0.17 on a logarithmic scale, i.e., a factor of 1.5. Using spectral reflectance measurements in the entire visible spectral range, the central wavelength, spectral bandwidth, and radiometric noise level requirements are investigated for the channels to be used by an ocean color space mission dedicated to estimating global marine primary production and the associated carbon fluxes. Nearly all the useful information is provided by two channels centered at 440 nm and 550 nm, but the accuracy of primary production estimate appears weakly sensitive to spectral bandwidth, which, consequently, may be enlarged by several tens of nanometers. The sensitivity to radiometric noise, on the contrary, is strong, and a noise equivalent reflectance of 0.005 degraded the accuracy on the primary production estimate by a factor 2 (0.14-0.25 on a logarithmic scale). The results should be applicable to evaluating the primary production of oligotrophic and mesotrophic waters, which constitute most of the open ocean.

  11. Evaluation of bio-optical algorithms to remotely sense marine primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Beatrice; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    1994-01-01

    In situ bio-optical measurements from several oceanographic campaigns were analyzed to derive a direct relationship between water column primary production P (sub t) ocean color as expressed by the ratio of reflectances R (sub 1) at 440 nm and R (sub 3) at 550 nm and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR). The study is restricted to the Morel case I waters for which the following algorithm is proposed: log (P(sub f)) = -4.286 - 1.390 log (R(sub 1)/R(sub3)) + 0.621 log (PAR), with P(sub t) in g C m(exp -2)/d and PAR in J m(exp -2)/d. Using this algorithm the rms accuracy of primary production estimate is 0.17 on a logarithmic scale, i.e., a factor of 1.5. Using spectral reflectance measurements in the entire visible spectral range, the central wavelength, spectral bandwidth, and radiometric noise level requirements are investigated for the channels to be used by an ocean color space mission dedicated to estimating global marine primary production and the associated carbon fluxes. Nearly all the useful information is provided by two channels centered at 440 nm and 550 nm, but the accuracy of primary production estimate appears weakly sensitive to spectral bandwidth, which, consequently, may be enlarged by several tens of nanometers. The sensitivity to radiometric noise, on the contrary, is strong, and a noise equivalent reflectance of 0.005 degraded the accuracy on the primary production estimate by a factor 2 (0.14-0.25 on a logarithmic scale). The results should be applicable to evaluating the primary production of oligotrophic and mesotrophic waters, which constitute most of the open ocean.

  12. Effect of the Keck telescope`s segmented primary on the performance on the Keck adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.

    1997-06-01

    The 349 degree of freedom Keck adaptive optics system will be mapped on to the 36 segment Keck primary mirror. Each telescope segment is independently controlled in piston and tilt by an active control system and each segment also has its own set of aberrations. This presents a unique set of problems for the Keck adaptive optics system, not encountered with continuous primaries. To a certain extent the low order segment aberrations, beginning with focus, can be corrected statically by the adaptive optic system. However, the discontinuous surface at the segment edges present special problems in sensing and correcting wavefront with laser guide stars or natural guide stars.

  13. Primary afferent plasticity following deafferentation of the trigeminal brainstem nuclei in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    De Riu, Pier Luigi; Russo, Antonella; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Stanzani, Stefania; Tringali, Giovanni; Roccazzello, Anna Maria; De Riu, Giacomo; Marongiu, Patrizia; Mameli, Ombretta

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-tyrosinated tubulin is a cytoskeletal protein that is involved in axonal growth and is considered a marker of neuronal plasticity in adult mammals. In adult rats, unilateral ablation of the left facial sensorimotor cortical areas induces degeneration of corticotrigeminal projections and marked denervation of the contralateral sensory trigeminal nuclei. Western blotting and real-time-PCR of homogenates of the contralateral trigeminal ganglion (TG) revealed consistent overexpression of growth proteins 15 days after left decortication in comparison with the ipsilateral side. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated marked overexpression of alpha-tyrosinated tubulin in the cells of the ganglion on the right side. Cytoskeletal changes were primarily observed in the small ganglionic neurons. Application of HRP-CT, WGA-HRP, and HRP to infraorbital nerves on both sides 15 days after left decortication showed a significant degree of terminal sprouting and neosynaptogenesis from right primary afferents at the level of the right caudalis and interpolaris trigeminal subnuclei. These observations suggest that the adaptive response of TG neurons to central deafferentation, leading to overcrowding and rearrangement of the trigeminal primary afferent terminals on V spinal subnuclei neurons, could represent the anatomical basis for distortion of facial modalities, perceived as allodynia and hyperalgesia, despite nerve integrity.

  14. Isolation and cultivation of adult primary bovine hepatocytes from abattoir derived liver

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Sonja; Schmicke, Marion

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to establish a cell culture of adult primary bovine hepatocytes obtained from liver following slaughter and to cultivate the cells in a sandwich culture. Cells and medium samples were taken after separation of cells (day 0), during monolayer (days 1, 2 and 3) and during sandwich culture (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 14). The mRNA expression of BAX, BCL2L, FAS, IGF-1 and GHR1A was measured as well as urea and LDH. Hepatocytes were obtained by using a two-step collagenase perfusion and were purified thereafter by density gradient centrifugation. The viability was 68.2 ± 9.5 %. In sandwich culture, cells have a typical polygonal hepatocyte-like shape, build cell-cell contacts, and show irregularity of cell borders suggesting bile canaliculi generation. The BAX mRNA expression increased on day 1 as well but decreased steadily until day 3 and remained constant for 14 days. Urea- and LDH-concentrations increased from day 4 to day 7. In conclusion, we found that it is possible to gather viable primary hepatocytes from adult bovine liver after slaughter, and that cells gathered this way show typical morphologies, urea-production and low LDH-leakage especially at day 4 in a sandwich system. PMID:28275320

  15. Measuring health-related quality of life in adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe health-related quality of life (HRQOL) conceptual frameworks, critically review 3 commonly used HRQOL scales relevant to adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings, and make recommendations for using HRQOL scales in primary care practice. Data sources Information was accessed regarding HRQOL conceptual and theoretical approaches. A comprehensive search strategy identified 3 commonly used scales that met the review criteria and evidence regarding use of the scales in adults with chronic conditions in community settings. Scale selection Scales were selected if they were designed for clinical use; were easy to administer; were generic and broad in content areas; and contained some individualized items. Scales were critiqued according to content development, theoretical basis, psychometric properties, scoring, feasibility, the concepts being measured, and the number of items that measured an individualized concept. Synthesis Early HRQOL approaches focused on health and functional status while recent approaches incorporate individualized concepts such as the person’s own values and the environment. The abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Duke Health Profile were critiqued. All address physical, mental, and social domains, while the WHOQOL-BREF also addresses environment. Psychometric evidence supports use of the SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF with this population. The SF-36 has the most evidence of responsiveness but has some floor and ceiling effects, while the WHOQOL-BREF does not appear to have floor or ceiling effects but has limited evidence of responsiveness. The WHOQOL-BREF has the highest proportion of individualized items. Conclusion Measurement of HRQOL in adults with chronic conditions can support patient management and contribute to primary care service evaluation. Scales that are based on a broad definition of health and that

  16. Primary structure of subfragment-2 from adult chicken cardiac ventricular muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, B

    1993-07-01

    The complete primary structure of the subfragment-2 (S-2) from adult chicken cardiac ventricular muscle myosin has been determined by analysis of peptides derived from digests of S-2 with cyanogen bromide, lysyl endopeptidase, arginyl endopeptidase, and from hydrolysates of CNBr fragments with formic acid. This region composed of 520 amino-acid residues which span the connecting segment between subfragment-1 (S-1) and S-2 to the NH2-terminal portion of light meromyosin (LMM). Comparing this sequence with the partial sequence of the rod from the same chicken ventricular muscle myosin deduced from its nucleotides of cDNA which lacks 64 NH2-terminal amino-acid residues, 14 amino-acid differences and 3 deletion/insertions were recognized. Furthermore, the sequence of S-2 from adult chicken ventricular myosin was compared with corresponding sequences of rat alpha and beta cardiac myosin heavy chains (MHC) and human alpha and beta cardiac MHCs. The results show 83.7%, 82.1%, 83.1% and 82.1% sequence identities, respectively with almost similar degrees of similarities to both alpha- and beta-MHCs. However, sequences of isoform-specific regions in this S-2 from adult chicken ventricular myosin showed clearly a higher homology to those of alpha-MHCs than to beta-MHCs of mammalian cardiac myosins.

  17. Relationship status impacts primary reasons for interest in the HPV vaccine among young adult women.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Erika L; Vamos, Cheryl A; Sappenfield, William M; Straub, Diane M; Daley, Ellen M

    2016-06-08

    The HPV vaccine prevents HPV-related cancers and genital warts, which cause significant morbidity and mortality in the US. The vaccine is targeted toward 11-12 year old males and females, but is recommended for "catch-up" vaccination until age 26 for females. Young adult females (18-26 years) represent a unique group that may face distinct barriers to HPV vaccination, one of which is relationship status. The purpose of this study was to assess how relationship status impacts interest in HPV vaccination and primary reasons for non-vaccination among 18-26 year old young adult women. The National Health Interview Survey 2010 was examined among unvaccinated females, 18-26 years (N=1457). A survey-weighted logistic regression analysis with conversion to prevalence ratios assessed how interest in the HPV vaccine (yes/no) was influenced by relationship status (married, living with a partner, other, single) among young adult women. A Rao-Scott chi-square test examined differences between primary reasons for non-vaccination and relationship status among HPV vaccine uninterested women. Among unvaccinated women, 31.4% were interested in the HPV vaccine. Women who were living with a partner (PR=1.45, 95%CI 1.06-1.90) and single (PR=1.42, 95%CI 1.11-1.76) were significantly more likely than married women to be interested in the HPV vaccine, while controlling for socio-demographic and other known risk factors. Additionally, primary reasons for non-vaccination differed based on relationship status among uninterested women (p<0.01). Women who were married were more likely to cite not needing the vaccine compared to never married women (p<0.05). Relationship status in young adulthood impacts HPV vaccine interest and decision-making among a national sample of women. Primary reasons for non-interest in the vaccine may be shaped by attitudes and knowledge about the HPV vaccine that differ by relationship status. Future research is needed to elucidate ways to overcome relationship

  18. Use of antihypertensive medications and diagnostic tests among privately insured adolescents and young adults with primary versus secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Esther Y; Cohn, Lisa; Freed, Gary; Rocchini, Albert; Kershaw, David; Ascione, Frank; Clark, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    To compare the use of antihypertensive medications and diagnostic tests among adolescents and young adults with primary versus secondary hypertension. We conducted retrospective cohort analysis of claims data for adolescents and young adults (12-21 years of age) with ≥3 years of insurance coverage (≥11 months/year) in a large private managed care plan during 2003-2009 with diagnosis of primary hypertension or secondary hypertension. We examined their use of antihypertensive medications and identified demographic characteristics and the presence of obesity-related comorbidities. For the subset receiving antihypertensive medications, we examined their diagnostic test use (echocardiograms, renal ultrasounds, and electrocardiograms). The study sample included 1,232 adolescents and young adults; 84% had primary hypertension and 16% had secondary hypertension. The overall prevalence rate of hypertension was 2.6%. One quarter (28%) with primary hypertension had one or more antihypertensive medications, whereas 65% with secondary hypertension had one or more antihypertensive medications. Leading prescribers of antihypertensives for subjects with primary hypertension were primary care physicians (80%), whereas antihypertensive medications were equally prescribed by primary care physicians (43%) and sub-specialists (37%) for subjects with secondary hypertension. The predominant hypertension diagnosis among adolescents and young adults is primary hypertension. Antihypertensive medication use was higher among those with secondary hypertension compared with those with primary hypertension. Further study is needed to determine treatment effectiveness and patient outcomes associated with differential treatment patterns used for adolescents and young adults with primary versus secondary hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Primary Care for the Oral Health of Rural and Urban Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Julia T; Lee, Haena; Cagney, Kathleen A

    2017-09-01

    Rural populations often have restricted access to dental care and poor oral health. These problems may disproportionately affect older blacks in rural areas. Little is known about how access to primary health care may improve the oral health of rural seniors. This study examines whether the relationship between having a usual source of health care and oral health varies for white and black older adults in rural and urban areas in the United States. We draw on cross-sectional data of adults (50 years+) from the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study (n = 15,473). Multivariate logistic regression examined the role of a usual source of health care in conditioning racial differences in complete tooth loss and a dental visit in the past 2 years. A usual source of health care is a place, not including an emergency room, where a person goes when he or she is sick or needs health advice. In rural areas, blacks had high rates of tooth loss (28%) and low rates of dental visits (34%). Having a usual source of health care was associated with higher odds of a dental visit for all adults. In rural areas, the association between a usual source of health care and tooth loss varied by race (P < .001); blacks had more tooth loss than whites even with a usual source of health care. Access to primary health care was associated with improved oral health outcomes, but it did not close the gap between whites and blacks in rural areas. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  20. Primary blast injury-induced lesions in the retina of adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of primary blast exposure on the brain is widely reported but its effects on the eye remains unclear. Here, we aim to examine the effects of primary blast exposure on the retina. Methods Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to primary blast high and low injury and sacrificed at 24 h, 72 h, and 2 weeks post injury. The retina was subjected to western analysis for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), aquaporin-4 (AQP4), glutamine synthethase (GS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS), endothelial NOS, neuronal NOS and nestin expression; ELISA analysis for cytokines and chemokines; and immunofluorescence for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)/VEGF, GFAP/AQP4, GFAP/nestin, GS/AQP4, lectin/iNOS, and TUNEL. Results The retina showed a blast severity-dependent increase in VEGF, iNOS, eNOS, nNOS, and nestin expression with corresponding increases in inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. There was also increased AQP4 expression and retinal thickness after primary blast exposure that was severity-dependent. Finally, a significant increase in TUNEL+ and Caspase-3+ cells was observed. These changes were observed at 24 h post-injury and sustained up to 2 weeks post injury. Conclusions Primary blast resulted in severity-dependent pathological changes in the retina, manifested by the increased expression of a variety of proteins involved in inflammation, edema, and apoptosis. These changes were observed immediately after blast exposure and sustained up to 2 weeks suggesting acute and chronic injury mechanisms. These changes were most obvious in the astrocytes and Müller cells and suggest important roles for these cells in retina pathophysiology after blast. PMID:23819902

  1. Implementing Routine Cognitive Screening of Older Adults in Primary Care: Process and Impact on Physician Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Scanlan, James; Hummel, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Kathy; Lessig, Mary; Zuhr, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Background Early detection of cognitive impairment is a goal of high-quality geriatric medical care, but new approaches are needed to reduce rates of missed cases. Objective To evaluate whether adding routine cognitive screening to primary care visits for older adults increases rates of dementia diagnosis, specialist referral, or prescribing of antidementia medications. Setting Four primary care clinics in a university-affiliated primary care network. Design A quality improvement screening project and quasiexperimental comparison of 2 intervention clinics and 2 control clinics. The Mini-Cog was administered by medical assistants to intervention clinic patients aged 65+ years. Rates of dementia diagnoses, referrals, and medication prescribing were tracked over time using computerized administrative data. Results Twenty-six medical assistants successfully screened 70% (n = 524) of all eligible patients who made at least 1 clinic visit during the intervention period; 18% screened positive. There were no complaints about workflow interruption. Relative to baseline rates and control clinics, Mini-Cog screening was associated with increased dementia diagnoses, specialist referrals, and prescribing of cognitive enhancing medications. Patients without previous dementia indicators who had a positive Mini-Cog were more likely than all other patients to receive a new dementia diagnosis, specialty referral, or cognitive enhancing medication. However, relevant physician action occurred in only 17% of screen-positive patients. Responses were most related to the lowest Mini-Cog score level (0/5) and advanced age. Conclusion Mini-Cog screening by office staff is feasible in primary care practice and has measurable effects on physician behavior. However, new physician action relevant to dementia was likely to occur only when impairment was severe, and additional efforts are needed to help primary care physicians follow up appropriately on information suggesting cognitive

  2. DSM-5 substance use disorders among adult primary care patients: Results from a multisite study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Tzy; McNeely, Jennifer; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Brady, Kathleen T; Sharma, Gaurav; VanVeldhuisen, Paul; Zhu, He; Schwartz, Robert P

    2017-10-01

    There are limited data about the extent of DSM-5 substance use disorders (SUDs) among primary care patients. This study analyzed data from a multisite validation study of a substance use screening instrument conducted in a diverse sample of 2000 adults aged ≥18 years recruited from five primary care practices in four states. Prevalence and correlates of 12-month DSM-5 SUDs were examined. Overall, 75.5% of the sample used any substance, including alcohol (62.0%), tobacco (44.1%), or illicit drugs/nonmedical medications (27.9%) in the past 12 months (marijuana 20.8%, cocaine 7.3%, opioids 4.8%, sedatives 4.1%, heroin 3.9%). The prevalence of any 12-month SUD was 36.0% (mild disorder 14.2%, moderate/severe disorder 21.8%): tobacco 25.3% (mild 11.5%, moderate/severe 13.8%); alcohol 13.9% (mild 6.9%, moderate/severe 7.0%); and any illicit/nonmedical drug 14.0% (mild 4.0%, moderate/severe 10.0%). Among past 12-month users, a high proportion of tobacco or drug users met criteria for a disorder: tobacco use disorder 57.4% (26.1% mild, 31.3% moderate/severe) and any drug use disorder 50.2% (14.3% mild, 35.8% moderate/severe); a lower proportion of alcohol users (22.4%) met criteria for alcohol use disorder (11.1% mild, 11.3% moderate/severe). Over 80% of adults with opioid/heroin use disorder met criteria for a moderate/severe disorder. Younger ages, male sex, and low education were associated with increased odds of having SUD. These findings reveal the high prevalence of SUDs in primary care and underscore the need to identify and address them. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system presenting as unilateral optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Neal M; Prasad, Pradeep S; Flippen, Charles C; Wagner, Aaron S; Yim, Catherine M; Salamon, Noriko; Vinters, Harry V

    2014-12-01

    A middle-aged woman who experienced recurrent episodes of unilateral vision loss and eye pain. On presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated left optic nerve enhancement with patchy hyperintensities in the white matter of both frontal lobes and ill-defined enhancement in a lenticulostriate distribution. Ophthalmologic examination revealed left optic disc edema with a macular scar consistent with neuroretinitis. Her subsequent clinical course was notable for 2 episodes of painful vision loss, without associated neurologic symptoms, which resolved with intravenous and oral steroids. More than 1 year after her initial presentation, the patient developed right facial weakness and slurred speech, and shortly thereafter suffered a fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Histopathology on autopsy confirmed a diagnosis of primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS). This is an unusual case of PACNS presenting with recurrent unilateral optic neuritis. The vascular enhancement pattern on MRI suggesting inflamed cerebral blood vessels is a rarely described pattern, which likely reflects intracerebral extension of the ocular pathology. The combination of neuroretinitis and perivascular MRI enhancement pattern may represent a subtype of PACNS.

  4. Structural, electronic and optical properties of well-known primary explosive: Mercury fulminate.

    PubMed

    Yedukondalu, N; Vaitheeswaran, G

    2015-11-28

    Mercury Fulminate (MF) is one of the well-known primary explosives since 17th century and it has rendered invaluable service over many years. However, the correct molecular and crystal structures are determined recently after 300 years of its discovery. In the present study, we report pressure dependent structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of MF. Non-local correction methods have been employed to capture the weak van der Waals interactions in layered and molecular energetic MF. Among the non-local correction methods tested, optB88-vdW method works well for the investigated compound. The obtained equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that MF is softer than the well known primary explosives Silver Fulminate (SF), silver azide and lead azide. MF exhibits anisotropic compressibility (b > a > c) under pressure, consequently the corresponding elastic moduli decrease in the following order: C22 > C11 > C33. The structural and mechanical properties suggest that MF is more sensitive to detonate along c-axis (similar to RDX) due to high compressibility of Hg⋯O non-bonded interactions along that axis. Electronic structure and optical properties were calculated including spin-orbit (SO) interactions using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The calculated TB-mBJ electronic structures of SF and MF show that these compounds are indirect bandgap insulators. Also, SO coupling is found to be more pronounced for 4d and 5d-states of Ag and Hg atoms of SF and MF, respectively. Partial density of states and electron charge density maps were used to describe the nature of chemical bonding. Ag-C bond is more directional than Hg-C bond which makes SF to be more unstable than MF. The effect of SO coupling on optical properties has also been studied and found to be significant for both (SF and MF) of the compounds.

  5. Structural, electronic and optical properties of well-known primary explosive: Mercury fulminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury Fulminate (MF) is one of the well-known primary explosives since 17th century and it has rendered invaluable service over many years. However, the correct molecular and crystal structures are determined recently after 300 years of its discovery. In the present study, we report pressure dependent structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of MF. Non-local correction methods have been employed to capture the weak van der Waals interactions in layered and molecular energetic MF. Among the non-local correction methods tested, optB88-vdW method works well for the investigated compound. The obtained equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that MF is softer than the well known primary explosives Silver Fulminate (SF), silver azide and lead azide. MF exhibits anisotropic compressibility (b > a > c) under pressure, consequently the corresponding elastic moduli decrease in the following order: C22 > C11 > C33. The structural and mechanical properties suggest that MF is more sensitive to detonate along c-axis (similar to RDX) due to high compressibility of Hg⋯O non-bonded interactions along that axis. Electronic structure and optical properties were calculated including spin-orbit (SO) interactions using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The calculated TB-mBJ electronic structures of SF and MF show that these compounds are indirect bandgap insulators. Also, SO coupling is found to be more pronounced for 4d and 5d-states of Ag and Hg atoms of SF and MF, respectively. Partial density of states and electron charge density maps were used to describe the nature of chemical bonding. Ag—C bond is more directional than Hg—C bond which makes SF to be more unstable than MF. The effect of SO coupling on optical properties has also been studied and found to be significant for both (SF and MF) of the compounds.

  6. Coping, quality of life, and hope in adults with primary antibody deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Sigstad, Hanne Marie Høybråten; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Frøland, Stig S

    2005-01-01

    Background Living with a chronic disease, such as primary antibody deficiency, will often have consequences for quality of life. Previous quality-of-life studies in primary antibody deficiency patients have been limited to different treatment methods. We wanted to study how adults with primary antibody deficiencies manage their conditions and to identify factors that are conducive to coping, good quality of life and hope. Methods Questionnaires were sent to all patients ≥20 years of age with primary antibody deficiencies who were served by Rikshospitalet University Hospital. The questionnaires consisted of several standardized scales: Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QLI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS), Nowotny Hope Scale (NHS), and one scale we devised with questions about resources and pressures in the past. Of a total of 91, 55 patients (aged 23–76 years) answered the questionnaires. The questionnaire study were supplemented with selected interviews of ten extreme cases, five with low and five with high quality of life scores. Results Among the 55 patients, low quality of life scores were related to unemployment, infections in more than four organs, more than two additional diseases, or more than two specific occurrences of stress in the last 2–3 months. Persons with selective IgA deficiency had significantly higher QLI scores than those with other antibody deficiencies. An optimistic coping style was most frequent used, and hope values were moderately high. Based on the interviews, the patients could be divided into three groups: 1) low QLI scores, low hope values, and reduced coping, 2) low QLI scores, moderate hope values, and good coping, and 3) high QLI scores, moderate to strong hope values, and good coping. Coping was related to the patients' sense of closeness and competence. Conclusion Low quality of life scores in adults with primary antibody deficiencies were linked to unemployment and disease-related strains

  7. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Kearns, Lisa S; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W; Mackey, David A; Trounce, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function.

  8. Protein-engineered scaffolds for in vitro 3D culture of primary adult intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Dewi, Ruby E; Bernal, Gabriela; Kuo, Calvin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-10-15

    Though in vitro culture of primary intestinal organoids has gained significant momentum in recent years, little has been done to investigate the impact of microenvironmental cues provided by the encapsulating matrix on the growth and development of these fragile cultures. In this work, the impact of various in vitro culture parameters on primary adult murine organoid formation and growth are analyzed with a focus on matrix properties and geometric culture configuration. The air-liquid interface culture configuration was found to result in enhanced organoid formation relative to a traditional submerged configuration. Additionally, through use of a recombinantly engineered extracellular matrix (eECM), the effects of biochemical and biomechanical cues were independently studied. Decreasing mechanical stiffness and increasing cell adhesivity were found to increase organoid yield. Tuning of eECM properties was used to obtain organoid formation efficiency values identical to those observed in naturally harvested collagen I matrices but within a stiffer construct with improved ease of physical manipulation. Increased ability to remodel the surrounding matrix through mechanical or enzymatic means was also shown to enhance organoid formation. As the engineering and tunability of recombinant matrices is essentially limitless, continued property optimization may result in further improved matrix performance and may help to identify additional microenvironmental cues that directly impact organoid formation, development, differentiation, and functional behavior. Continued culture of primary organoids in recombinant matrices could therefore prove to be largely advantageous in the field of intestinal tissue engineering for applications in regenerative medicine and in vitro tissue mimics.

  9. Isolation of intact astrocytes from the optic nerve head of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2015-08-01

    The astrocytes of the optic nerve head are a specialized subtype of white matter astrocytes that form the direct cellular environment of the unmyelinated ganglion cell axons. Due to their potential involvement in glaucoma, these astrocytes have become a target of research. Due to the heterogeneity of the optic nerve tissue, which also contains other cell types, in some cases it may be desirable to conduct gene expression studies on small numbers of well-characterized astrocytes or even individual cells. Here, we describe a simple method to isolate individual astrocytes. This method permits obtaining astrocytes with intact morphology from the adult mouse optic nerve and reduces contamination of the isolated astrocytes by other cell types. Individual astrocytes can be recognized by their morphology and collected under microscopic control. The whole procedure can be completed in 2-3 h. We also discuss downstream applications like multiplex single-cell PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR).

  10. Creating an optical spectroscopy system for use in a primary care clinical setting (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Gould, Bradley; Wu, Wenli; Konda, Vani; Yang, Leslie W.; Koons, Ann; Feder, Seth; Valuckaite, Vesta; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    While there are a plethora of in-vivo spectroscopic techniques that have demonstrated the ability to detect a number of diseases in research trials, very few techniques have successfully become a fully realized clinical technology. This is primarily due to the stringent demands on a clinical device for widespread implementation. Some of these demands include: simple operation requiring minimal or no training, safe for in-vivo patient use, no disruption to normal clinic workflow, tracking of system performance, warning for measurement abnormality, and meeting all FDA guidelines for medical use. Previously, our group developed a fiber optic probe-based optical sensing technique known as low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS) to quantify tissue ultrastructure in-vivo. Now we have developed this technique for the application of prescreening patients for colonoscopy in a primary care (PC) clinical setting. To meet the stringent requirements for a viable medical device used in a PC clinical setting, we developed several novel components including an automated calibration tool, optical contact sensor for signal acquisition, and a contamination sensor to identify measurements which have been affected by debris. The end result is a state-of-the-art medical device that can be realistically used by a PC physician to assess a person's risk for harboring colorectal precancerous lesions. The pilot study of this system shows great promise with excellent stability and accuracy in identifying high-risk patients. While this system has been designed and optimized for our specific application, the system and design concepts are universal to most in-vivo fiber optic based spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Prevalence of pre-diabetes in young Mexican adults in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique L; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Torres-Sánchez, José R; Hernández-Herrera, Aurora; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2015-04-01

    Pre-diabetes in young people is frequently unrecognized or not treated on time, with the consequent loss of opportunity for diabetes prevention. In Mexico, there is scarce information about the prevalence of pre-diabetes in young adults. To determine the prevalence and risk factors for pre-diabetes in young Mexican adults in primary health care. In a cross-sectional study, 288 subjects, aged 18-30 years, from a primary care unit were included. Pre-diabetes was diagnosed (according to the criteria of the American Diabetes Association) as impaired fasting glucose (8-12 hours fasting plasma glucose level: 100-125 mg/dl) or impaired glucose tolerance (140-199 mg/dl after a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test). Prevalence of pre-diabetes was 14.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 10.7-19.2], whereas that of diabetes was 2.4% (95% CI: 1.0-4.9). A high proportion of patients had history of obesity, diabetes, hypertension and consumption of tobacco and alcohol. Pre-diabetic patients were older than normoglycaemics (pre-diabetic patients: 26±4 years versus normoglycaemic subjects: 24±3 years, P = 0.003) and had higher body mass index (BMI; pre-diabetic patients: 29.4±6.8 kg/m(2) versus normoglycaemic subjects: 26.8±5.8 kg/m(2); P = 0.009), particularly in the case of men (pre-diabetic men: 29.3±7.0 kg/m(2) versus normoglycaemic men: 26.4±5.1 kg/m(2); P = 0.03). Although waist circumference showed a trend to be higher among pre-diabetics, no significant differences were found according to gender (among males: pre-diabetics: 99.5±18.8 cm versus normoglycaemics: 93.3±14.4 cm, P = 0.09; among females: pre-diabetics: 91.5±13.8 cm versus normoglycaemics: 85.8±15.9 cm, P = 0.16). Only age and BMI were significantly associated with the presence of pre-diabetes. Almost 15% of these young adults had pre-diabetes. Many modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors were present in these patients, but only age and a higher BMI were independent variables significantly associated with

  12. Development of a Primary Care-Based Clinic to Support Adults With a History of Childhood Cancer: The Tactic Clinic.

    PubMed

    Overholser, Linda S; Moss, Kerry M; Kilbourn, Kristin; Risendal, Betsy; Jones, Alison F; Greffe, Brian S; Garrington, Timothy; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; Yamashita, Traci E; Kutner, Jean S

    2015-01-01

    Describe the development and evolution of a primary-care-based, multidisciplinary clinic to support the ongoing care of adult survivors of childhood cancer. A consultative clinic for adult survivors of childhood cancer has been developed that is located in an adult, academic internal medicine setting and is based on a long-term follow-up clinic model available at Children's Hospital Colorado. The clinic opened in July 2008. One hundred thirty-five patients have been seen as of April 2014. Referrals and clinic capacity have gradually increased over time, and a template has been developed in the electronic medical record to help facilitate completion of individualized care plan letters. A primary care-based, multidisciplinary consultative clinic for adults with a history of childhood cancer survivor is feasible and actively engages adult primary care resources to provide risk-based care for long-term pediatric cancer survivors. This model of care planning can help support adult survivors of pediatric cancer and their primary care providers in non-academic, community settings as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of occlusal caries in primary teeth using swept source optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yukie; Shimada, Yasushi; Sadr, Alireza; Wada, Ikumi; Miyashin, Michiyo; Takagi, Yuzo; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) as a detecting tool for occlusal caries in primary teeth. At the in vitro part of the study, 38 investigation sites of occlusal fissures (noncavitated and cavitated) were selected from 26 extracted primary teeth and inspected visually using conventional dental equipment by six examiners without any magnification. SS-OCT cross-sectional images at 1330-nm center wavelength were acquired on the same locations. The teeth were then sectioned at the investigation site and directly viewed under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) by two experienced examiners. The presence and extent of caries were scored in each observation. The results obtained from SS-OCT and conventional visual inspections were compared with those of CLSM. Consequently, SS-OCT could successfully detect both cavitated and noncavitated lesions. The magnitude of sensitivity for SS-OCT was higher than those for visual inspection (sensitivity of visual inspection and SS-OCT, 0.70 versus 0.93 for enamel demineralization, 0.49 versus 0.89 for enamel cavitated caries, and 0.36 versus 0.75 for dentin caries). Additionally, occlusal caries of a few clinical cases were observed using SS-OCT in vivo. The results indicate that SS-OCT has a great detecting potential for occlusal caries in primary teeth.

  14. Detection of occlusal caries in primary teeth using swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yukie; Shimada, Yasushi; Sadr, Alireza; Wada, Ikumi; Miyashin, Michiyo; Takagi, Yuzo; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) as a detecting tool for occlusal caries in primary teeth. At the in vitro part of the study, 38 investigation sites of occlusal fissures (noncavitated and cavitated) were selected from 26 extracted primary teeth and inspected visually using conventional dental equipment by six examiners without any magnification. SS-OCT cross-sectional images at 1330-nm center wavelength were acquired on the same locations. The teeth were then sectioned at the investigation site and directly viewed under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) by two experienced examiners. The presence and extent of caries were scored in each observation. The results obtained from SS-OCT and conventional visual inspections were compared with those of CLSM. Consequently, SS-OCT could successfully detect both cavitated and noncavitated lesions. The magnitude of sensitivity for SS-OCT was higher than those for visual inspection (sensitivity of visual inspection and SS-OCT, 0.70 versus 0.93 for enamel demineralization, 0.49 versus 0.89 for enamel cavitated caries, and 0.36 versus 0.75 for dentin caries). Additionally, occlusal caries of a few clinical cases were observed using SS-OCT in vivo. The results indicate that SS-OCT has a great detecting potential for occlusal caries in primary teeth.

  15. Precision Linear Actuators for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope Demonstration Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Pfenning, David

    2006-01-01

    The Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) is an ongoing research effort at Goddard Space Flight Center developing wavefront sensing and control architectures for future space telescopes. The 03.5-m SPOT telescope primary mirror is comprise9 of six 0.86-m hexagonal mirror segments arranged in a single ring, with the central segment missing. The mirror segments are designed for laboratory use and are not lightweighted to reduce cost. Each primary mirror segment is actuated and has tip, tilt, and piston rigid-body motions. Additionally, the radius of curvature of each mirror segment may be varied mechanically. To provide these degrees of freedom, the SPOT mirror segment assembly requires linear actuators capable of

  16. A prototype, glassless densitometer traceable to primary optical standards for quantitative radiochromic film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B. S. Hammer, C. G.; Kunugi, K. A.; DeWerd, L. A.; Soares, C. G.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a prototype densitometer traceable to primary optical standards and compare its performance to an EPSON Expression{sup ®} 10000XL flatbed scanner (the Epson) for quantitative radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry. Methods: A prototype traceable laser densitometry system (LDS) was developed to mitigate common film scanning artifacts, such as positional scan dependence and high noise in low-dose regions, by performing point-based measurements of RCF suspended in free-space using coherent light. The LDS and the Epson optical absorbance scales were calibrated up to 3 AU, using reference materials calibrated at a primary standards laboratory and a scanner calibration factor (SCF). Calibrated optical density (OD) was determined for 96 Gafchromic{sup ®} EBT3 film segments before and after irradiation to one of 16 dose levels between 0 and 10 Gy, exposed to {sup 60}Co in a polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) phantom. The sensitivity was determined at each dose level and at two rotationally orthogonal readout orientations to obtain the sensitometric response of each RCF dosimetry system. LDS rotational scanning dependence was measured at nine angles between 0°and 180°, due to the expected interference between coherent light and polarizing EBT3 material. The response curves were fit to the analytic functions predicted by two physical response models: the two-parameter single-hit model and the four-parameter percolation model. Results: The LDS and the Epson absorbance measurements were linear to primary optical standards to within 0.2% and 0.3% up to 2 and 1 AU, respectively. At higher densities, the LDS had an over-response (2.5% at 3 AU) and the Epson an under-response (3.1% and 9.8% at 2 and 3 AU, respectively). The LDS and the Epson SCF over the applicable range were 0.968% ± 0.2% and 1.561% ± 0.3%, respectively. The positional scan dependence was evaluated on each digitizer and shown to be mitigated on the LDS, as compared to the Epson. Maximum EBT3

  17. Impact of Patient Portal Secure Messages and Electronic Visits on Adult Primary Care Office Visits

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Sarah J.; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Ebbert, Jon O.; Ytterberg, Karen; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M.; Stroebel, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Secure messages and electronic visits (“e-visits”) through patient portals provide patients with alternatives to face-to-face appointments, telephone contact, letters, and e-mails. Limited information exists on how portal messaging impacts face-to-face visits in primary care. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 2,357 primary care patients who used electronic messaging (both secure messages and e-visits) on a patient portal. Face-to-face appointment frequencies (visits/year) of each patient were calculated before and after the first message in a matched-pairs analysis. We analyzed visit frequencies with and without adjustments for a first message surge in visits, and we examined subgroups of high message utilizers and long-term users. Results: Primary care patients who sent at least one message (secure message or e-visit) had a mean of 2.43 (standard deviation [SD] 2.3) annual face-to-face visits before the first message and 2.47 (SD 2.8) after, a nonsignificant difference (p=0.45). After adjustment for a first message surge in visits, no significant visit frequency differences were observed (mean, 2.35 annual visits per patient both before and after first message; p=0.93). Subgroup analysis also showed no significant change in visit frequency for patients with higher message utilization or for those who had used the messaging feature longer. Conclusions: No significant change in face-to-face visit frequency was observed following implementation of portal messaging. Secure messaging and e-visits through a patient portal may not result in a change of adult primary care face-to-face visits. PMID:24350803

  18. In-hospital Mobility Variations across Primary Diagnoses among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Valiani, Vincenzo; Gao, Shiyao; Chen, Zhiguo; Swami, Sunil; Harle, Christopher A.; Lipori, Gigi; Sourdet, Sandrine; Wu, Samuel; Nayfield, Susan G.; Sabbá, Carlo; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between primary diagnoses and mobility impairment and recovery among hospitalized older adults. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting UF Health Shands Hospital, an 852-bed level I trauma center located in Gainesville, Florida. Participants 18,551 older adults (≥65 years) with 29,148 hospitalizations between 1/2009 and 4/2014. Measurements Incident and discharge mobility impairment and recovery were assessed using the Braden activity subscale score that was recorded by the nursing staff at every shift change–approximately three times per day. Primary diagnosis ICD-9 codes were used as predictors and re-categorized by using the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality Clinical Classification Software. Results Out of the 15,498 hospital records where the patient was initially observed to “walk frequently”, 3,186 (20.6%) developed incident mobility impairment (chair-fast or bedfast). Primary diagnoses with a surgical or invasive procedure were the most prevalent (77.2 %) among the hospital observations with incident mobility impairment; otherwise primary diagnoses without surgery were much more associated with discharge mobility impairment (59%). The highest incidence of mobility impairment occurred in patients with heart valve disorders and aortic and peripheral/visceral artery aneurysms (6.24 and 6.05 events per 30 person-days, respectively); septicemia showed the highest incidence rate for mobility limitation at discharge (0.94 events per 30 person-days). Mobility impairment was observed in 13,650 (46.8% of total) records at admission and 5,930 (43.44%) were observed to recover to a state of walking occasionally or frequently. Osteoarthritis and cancer of gastrointestinal organs/peritoneum had the highest incidence rate for mobility recovery (7.68 and 5.63 events per 30 person-days respectively). Conclusions Approximately 1 out of 5 patients who were mobile at admission became significantly impaired during

  19. Activity, Inhibition, and Induction of Cytochrome P450 2J2 in Adult Human Primary Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Eric A.; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Mokadam, Nahush A.; Jones, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2J2 plays a significant role in the epoxidation of arachidonic acid to signaling molecules important in cardiovascular events. CYP2J2 also contributes to drug metabolism and is responsible for the intestinal clearance of ebastine. However, the interaction between arachidonic acid metabolism and drug metabolism in cardiac tissue, the main expression site of CYP2J2, has not been examined. Here we investigate an adult-derived human primary cardiac cell line as a suitable model to study metabolic drug interactions (inhibition and induction) of CYP2J2 in cardiac tissue. The primary human cardiomyocyte cell line demonstrated similar mRNA-expression profiles of P450 enzymes to adult human ventricular tissue. CYP2J2 was the dominant isozyme with minor contributions from CYP2D6 and CYP2E1. Both terfenadine and astemizole oxidation were observed in this cell line, whereas midazolam was not metabolized suggesting lack of CYP3A activity. Compared with recombinant CYP2J2, terfenadine was hydroxylated in cardiomyocytes at a similar Km value of 1.5 μM. The Vmax of terfenadine hydroxylation in recombinant enzyme was found to be 29.4 pmol/pmol P450 per minute and in the cells 6.0 pmol/pmol P450 per minute. CYP2J2 activity in the cell line was inhibited by danazol, astemizole, and ketoconazole in submicromolar range, but also by xenobiotics known to cause cardiac adverse effects. Of the 14 compounds tested for CYP2J2 induction, only rosiglitazone increased mRNA expression, by 1.8-fold. This cell model can be a useful in vitro model to investigate the role of CYP2J2-mediated drug metabolism, arachidonic acid metabolism, and their association to drug induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24021950

  20. Prevalence of Mental and Social Disorders in Adults Attending Primary Care Centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Broers, Teresa; Hodgetts, Geoffrey; Batić-Mujanović, Olivera; Petrović, Verica; Hasanagić, Melida; Godwin, Marshall

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence of mental and social disorders in adults who attend primary care health centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods Sixty-nine family physicians from the Primary Care Research Network in Bosnia and Herzegovina each invited 20 randomly selected patients from their practices to complete the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), which consists of 26-58 questions about symptoms and signs of depression, anxiety, somatization disorder, eating disorders, and alcoholism. A total of 1574 patients were invited to participate in the study. Physicians reviewed the PHQ and calculated the final score, which determined a provisional diagnosis. Definitive diagnosis was determined by further questioning and clinical knowledge of the patient. Data collection was performed between November 2003 and January 2004. Lists of non-participants were maintained by the physicians. Results The response rate was 82%. Of 1285 respondents, 61% were women. At least one type of mental or social disorder was found in 26% of the respondents, and 12% had more than one disorder. Somatization disorder, major depression syndrome, and panic syndrome were experienced by 16%, 10%, and 14% of respondents, respectively, while 5% or less were suffering from eating disorders or alcohol abuse. More women than men had somatization disorder, panic syndrome, and binge eating disorder, while more men than women reported alcohol abuse. Conclusion More than one-quarter of all adults who attended family medicine centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina presented with at least one type of mental or social disturbance. New health policies, strengthened professional training, and accessible support networks need to be developed throughout the country. PMID:16758527

  1. Occupational and environmental risk factors of adult primary brain cancers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J; Al Zayadi, A; Guzman, A

    2011-04-01

    The incidence of brain neoplasm has been progressively increasing in recent years in the industrialized countries. One of the reasons for this increased incidence could be better access to health care and improved diagnosis in the industrialized countries. It also appears that Caucasians have a higher incidence than blacks or Hispanics or Asians. A number of risk factors have been identified and described including the genetic, ethnic and age-based factors. Certain occupational and environmental factors are also believed to influence the risk of primary adult brain tumors. Potential occupational and environmental factors include exposure to diagnostic and therapeutic radiations, electromagnetic radiation from cellular phones and other wireless devices, infectious agents, air pollution and residence near landfills and high-voltage power lines and jobs as firefighters, farmers, physician, chemists and jobs in industries such as petrochemical, power generation, synthetic rubber manufacturing, agricultural chemicals manufacturing. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine occupational and environmental risk factors of brain neoplasm. A range of occupational and environmental exposures are evaluated for significance of their relationship with adult primary brain tumors. On the basis of this review we suggest a concurrent evaluation of multiple risk factors both within and beyond occupational and environmental domains. The concurrent approach needs to consider better exposure assessment techniques, lifetime occupational exposures, genotypic and phenotypic characteristics and lifestyle and dietary habits. This approach needs to be interdisciplinary with contributions from neurologists, oncologists, epidemiologists and molecular biologists. Conclusive evidence that has eluded multitude of studies with single focus and single exposure needs to multifaceted and multidisciplinary.

  2. Assessing the Quality of a Nonrandomized Pragmatic Trial for Primary Prevention of Falls among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Steven M.; Edelstein, Offer; King, Jennifer; Flatt, Jason; Lin, Chyongchiou J.; Boudreau, Robert; Newman, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current approaches to falls prevention mostly rely on secondary and tertiary prevention and target individuals at high risk of falls. An alternative is primary prevention, in which all seniors are screened, referred as appropriate, and educated regarding falls risk. Little information is available on research designs that allow investigation of this approach in the setting of aging services delivery, where randomization may not be possible. Methods Healthy Steps for Older Adults, a statewide program of the Pennsylvania (PA) Department of Aging, involves a combination of education about falls and screening for balance problems, with referral to personal physicians and home safety assessments. We developed a nonrandomized statewide trial, Falls Free PA, to assess its effectiveness in reducing falls incidence over 12 months. We recruited 814 seniors who completed the program (503 first time participants, 311 people repeating the program) and 1020 who did not participate in the program, from the same sites. We assessed the quality of this nonrandomized design by examining recruitment, follow-up across study groups, and comparability at baseline. Results Of older adults approached in senior centers, 90.5% (n=2219) signed informed consent, and 1834 (82.4%) completed baseline assessments and were eligible for follow-up. Attrition in the three groups over 12 months was low and non-differential (<10% for withdrawal and <2% for other loss to follow-up). Median follow-up, which involved standardized monthly assessment of falls, was 10 months in all study groups. At baseline the groups did not differ in measures of health or falls risk factors. Conclusions Comparable status at baseline, recruitment from common sites, and similar experience with retention suggest that the nonrandomized design will be effective for assessment of this approach to primary prevention of falls. PMID:24488533

  3. Do Avoidable Hospitalization Rates among Older Adults Differ by Geographic Access to Primary Care Physicians?

    PubMed

    Daly, Michael R; Mellor, Jennifer M; Millones, Marco

    2017-06-28

    To investigate the association between older adults' potentially avoidable hospitalization rates and both a geographic measure of primary care physician (PCP) access and a standard bounded-area measure of PCP access. State physician licensure data from the Virginia Board of Medicine. Patient-level hospital discharge data from Virginia Health Information. Area-level data from the American Community Survey and the Area Health Resources Files. Virginia Information Technologies Agency road network data. US Census Bureau TIGER/Line boundary files. We use enhanced two-step floating catchment area methods to calculate geographic PCP accessibility for each ZIP Code Tabulation Area in Virginia. We use spatial regression techniques to model potentially avoidable hospitalization rates. Geographic accessibility was calculated using ArcGIS. Physician locations were geocoded using TAMU GeoServices and ArcGIS. Increased geographic access to PCPs is associated with lower rates of potentially avoidable hospitalization among older adults. This association is robust, allowing for spatial spillovers in spatial lag models. Compared to bounded-area density measures, unbounded geographic accessibility measures provide more robust evidence that avoidable hospitalization rates are lower in areas with more PCPs per person. Results from our spatial lag models reveal the presence of positive spatial spillovers. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. A quality-of-life measure for adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia: QOL–PCD

    PubMed Central

    Behan, Laura; Dunn Galvin, Audrey; Alpern, Adrianne; Morris, Anjana M.; Carroll, Mary P.; Knowles, Michael R.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is characterised by chronic suppurative lung disease, rhino-sinusitis, hearing impairment and sub-fertility. We have developed the first multidimensional measure to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with PCD (QOL–PCD). Following a literature review and expert panel meeting, open-ended interviews with patients investigated the impact of PCD on HRQoL in the UK and North America (n=21). Transcripts were content analysed to derive saturation matrices. Items were rated for relevance by patients (n=49). Saturation matrices, relevance scores, literature review, evaluation of existing measures, and expert opinion contributed to development of a preliminary questionnaire. The questionnaire was refined following cognitive interviews (n=18). Open-ended interviews identified a spectrum of issues unique to adults with PCD. Saturation matrices confirmed comprehensive coverage of content. QOL–PCD includes 48 items covering the following seven domains: Physical Functioning, Emotional Functioning, Treatment Burden, Respiratory and Sinus Symptoms, Ears and Hearing, Social Functioning, and Vitality and Health Perceptions. Cognitive testing confirmed that content was comprehensive and the items were well-understood by respondents. Content validity and cognitive testing supported the items and structure. QOL–PCD has been translated into other languages and is awaiting psychometric testing. PMID:25976687

  5. Changes in Young Adult Primary Care Under the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Carol A.; French, Benjamin; Rubin, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to describe changes in young adults’ routine care and usual sources of care (USCs), according to provider specialty, after implementation of extended dependent coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010. Methods. We used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2006 to 2012 to examine young adults’ receipt of routine care in the preceding year, identification of a USC, and USC provider specialties (pediatrics, family medicine, internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology). Results. The percentage of young adults who sought routine care increased from 42.4% in 2006 to 49.5% in 2012 (P < .001). The percentage identifying a USC remained stable at approximately 60%. Among young adults with a USC, there was a trend between 2006 and 2012 toward increasing percentages with pediatric (7.6% vs 9.1%) and family medicine (75.9% vs 80.9%) providers and declining percentages with internal medicine (11.5% vs 7.6%) and obstetrics and gynecology (5.0% vs 2.5%) providers. Conclusions. Efforts under the ACA to increase health insurance coverage had favorable effects on young adults’ use of routine care. Monitoring routine care use and USC choices in this group can inform primary care workforce needs and graduate medical education priorities across specialties. PMID:26447914

  6. Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 in a family with adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Lynch, David R.; Lukas, Thomas; Ahmeti, Kreshnik; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Ryan, Eanna; Schadt, Kimberly A.; Newman, Jordan H.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic defect for adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) in a family with 5 patients. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the shared genetic variants in 3 affected members in a PLS family with 5 affected individuals. Sanger sequencing was used for validation of the variants and for cosegregation analysis. Mitochondrial activity for both patients and unaffected siblings was measured using a SeaHorse metabolic analyzer. Results: Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent cosegregation analysis demonstrated that compound heterozygous missense variants L695P and I743T in SPG7 were the only mutations cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal recessive fashion in this family. The parents and siblings are genetically heterozygous and clinically unaffected. Functional studies suggested that the PLS-associated SPG7 mutants affect mitochondrial function when glucose is reduced. Conclusions: Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 are associated with adult-onset PLS, extending the spectrum of SPG7-linked neurologic diseases. Patients with the PLS phenotype should have genetic testing for paraplegin, especially when the condition is familial. PMID:27123479

  7. First-time primary caregivers' experience of caring for young adults with first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terence V; Lubman, Dan I; Clark, Eileen

    2011-03-01

    Becoming a career is associated with physical, emotional, and financial hardship, with caregivers often experiencing a maelstrom of emotions as they struggle to understand what has happened to their loved one. While the burden of caring for young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) has been well documented, much less is known about how carers develop the strength and resilience to continue caring. This qualitative study aimed to understand the experience of 20 first-time primary caregivers of young adults with FEP. Most caregivers were female (85%, n = 17) and parents (85%, n = 17). The average length of involvement as a caregiver at an FEP service was 14.5 months. Six main themes were identified in the data, highlighting the carers' experience in supporting young adults with FEP. Caregiving is a burdensome responsibility and is characterized as a roller coaster and unpredictable experience. Caregivers often feel responsible for the young person's illness; however, eventually most come to terms with the changes that have occurred in the young person with FEP. As a consequence of the illness, the relationship between caregiver and care recipient frequently becomes closer and deeper, although it is important that they both maintain hope for the future. These findings provide important insights into the experiences of first-time caregivers of young people with FEP, with direct implications for improving the information and support given to caregivers by FEP services, as well as the development of interventions that effectively address the unique challenges caregivers face following the onset of FEP.

  8. Linkage to Primary Care and Survival After Hospital Discharge for HIV-Infected Adults in Tanzania: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Peck, Robert N; Wang, Richard J; Mtui, Graham; Smart, Luke; Yango, Missana; Elchaki, Rim; Wajanga, Bahati; Downs, Jennifer A; Mteta, Kien; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2016-12-15

    Little is known about outcomes after hospitalization for HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. We determined 12-month, posthospital mortality rates in HIV-infected vs. uninfected adults and predictors of mortality. In this prospective cohort study, we enrolled adults admitted to the medical wards of a public hospital in northwestern Tanzania. We conducted standardized questionnaires, physical examinations, and basic laboratory analyses including HIV testing. Participants or proxies were called at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months to determine outcomes. Predictors of in-hospital and posthospital mortality were determined using logistic regression. Cox regression models were used to analyze mortality incidence and associated factors. To confirm our findings, we studied adults admitted to another government hospital. We enrolled 637 consecutive adult medical inpatients: 38/143 (26.6%) of the HIV-infected adults died in hospital vs. 104/494 (21.1%) of the HIV-uninfected adults. Twelve-month outcomes were determined for 98/105 (93.3%) vs. 352/390 (90.3%) discharged adults, respectively. Posthospital mortality was 53/105 (50.5%) for HIV-infected adults vs. 126/390 (32.3%) for HIV-uninfected adults (adjusted P = 0.006). The 66/105 (62.9%) HIV-infected adults who attended clinic within 1 month after discharge had significantly lower mortality than the other HIV-infected adults [adjusted hazards ratio = 0.17 (0.07-0.39), P < 0.001]. Adults admitted to a nearby government hospital had similar high rates of posthospital mortality. Posthospital mortality is disturbingly high among HIV-infected adult inpatients in Tanzania. The posthospital period may offer a window of opportunity to improve survival in this population. Interventions are urgently needed and should focus on increasing posthospital linkage to primary HIV care.

  9. A primary culture system of adult rat heart cells for the evaluation of cocaine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Welder, A A

    1992-01-01

    The complex dose-response relationship by which cocaine (Coc) directly precipitates unfavorable cardiac consequences are not known. There appears to be two diametrically opposed cardiovascular actions of Coc. At low doses, the sympathetic nervous system responses dominate, whereas, at high doses, the local anesthetic actions exert the most powerful effects. The purpose of this study was to describe a dose- and time-dependent Coc cardiotoxicity profile in a model of spontaneously contracting adult primary myocardial cell cultures obtained from 60-90-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Indices of toxicity determined included contractility, morphology, lactate dehydrogenase release (LDH), mitochondrial tetrazolium formazan (MTT) production and neutral red (NR) formation. After the cells had been grown in culture for 11 days, they were exposed to 1 x 10(-3), 1 x 10(-5), 1 x 10(-7) and 1 x 10(-9) M Coc for 1-24 h. The two lowest doses of Coc (1 x 10(-7) and 1 x 10(-9) M) had little or no effect on the adult heart cell cultures. However, morphological alterations included vacuolization, granulation and pseudopodia formation as early as 1 h after exposure to the highest doses of Coc (1 x 10(-3) and 1 x 10(-5) M). For all time points observed, the two highest doses of Coc (1 x 10(-3) and 1 x 10(-5) M) significantly depressed contractility and induced significant LDH release. MTT formazan production and NR retention were not significantly different from untreated controls for all treatments. By employing an acute Coc exposure paradigm, these data demonstrate that Coc doses greater than or equal to 1 x 10(-5) M induce direct injurious local anesthetic effects on contractility and morphology of spontaneously contracting adult rat myocardial cells in culture.

  10. [Chromaticity and optical spectrum colorimetry of the tongue color in different syndromes of primary hepatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Zeng, Chang-chun; Cai, Xiu-yu; Guo, Rong-ping; Nie, Guang; Jin, Ying

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the optical data of tongue color of different syndromes in primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) were detected by optical spectrum colorimetry, and the chromaticity of tongue color was compared and analyzed. The tongue color characteristics of different syndromes in PHC and the relationship between different syndromes and tongue color were also investigated. Tongue color data from 133 eligible PHC patients were collected by optical spectrum colorimetry and the patients were divided into 4 syndrome groups according to their clinical features. The syndrome groups were liver depression and spleen deficiency (LDSD), accumulation of damp-heat (ADH), deficiency of liver and kidney yin (DLKY), and qi stagnation and blood stasis (QSBS). The variation characteristics of chromaticity coordinates, dominant wavelength, excitation purity and the distribution in the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) LAB uniform color space were measured. At the same time, the differences of overall chromatism, clarity, chroma, saturation and hue were also calculated and analyzed. PHC patients in different syndrome groups exhibited differences in chromaticity coordinates. The dominant wavelength of QSBS was distinctly different from that of the other 3 syndromes. Excitation purity in the syndromes of LDSD, ADH and DLKY showed gradual increases (P<0.01). Different syndromes in the CIE LAB color three-dimensional space showed differences in tongue color distribution areas. The CIE hue-angle value of QSBS was negative, and different from that of the other 3 syndromes (P<0.01). CIE chroma in the syndromes of LDSD, ADH and DLKY showed gradual increases (P<0.01), the same as excitation purity. In the comparison of chromatism, tongue color variations in different syndromes were quantified by human observation. This study shows that tongue color diagnosis according to the syndrome classifications of traditional Chinese medicine can be quantified with optical spectrum colorimetry

  11. Most Uninsured Adults Could Schedule Primary Care Appointments Before The ACA, But Average Price Was $160.

    PubMed

    Saloner, Brendan; Polsky, Daniel; Kenney, Genevieve M; Hempstead, Katherine; Rhodes, Karin V

    2015-05-01

    Provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allow millions more Americans to obtain health insurance. However, a sizable number of people remain uninsured because they live in states that have not expanded Medicaid coverage or because they feel that Marketplace coverage is not affordable. Using data from a ten-state telephone survey in which callers posed as patients, we examined prices for primary care visits offered by physician offices to new uninsured patients in 2012-13, prior to ACA insurance expansions. Patients were quoted a mean price of $160. Significantly lower prices for the uninsured were offered by family practice offices compared to general internists, in offices participating in Medicaid managed care plans, and in federally qualified health centers. Prices were also lower for offices in ZIP codes with higher poverty rates. Only 18 percent of uninsured callers were told that they could bring less than the full amount to the visit and arrange to pay the rest later. ACA insurance expansions could greatly decrease out-of-pocket spending for low-income adults seeking primary care. However, benefits of health reform are likely to be greater in states expanding Medicaid eligibility. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of a primary care adult mental health service: Year 2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a primary care adult mental health service operating within a stepped care model of service delivery. Methods Supervised by a principal psychologist manager, psychology graduate practitioners provided one-to-one brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to service users. The Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) was used to assess service user treatment outcomes. Satisfaction questionnaires were administered to service users and referring general practitioners (GPs). Results A total of 43 individuals attended for an initial appointment, of whom 19 (44.2%) completed brief CBT treatment. Of the 13 service users who were in the clinical range pre-treatment, 11 (84.6%) achieved clinical and reliably significant improvement. Of the six service users who were in the non-clinical range pre-treatment, three (50%) achieved reliably significant improvement. Both service users and GPs indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service, although service accessibility was highlighted as needing improvement. Conclusion The service was effective in treating mild to moderate mental health problems in primary care. Stricter adherence to a stepped care model through the provision of low-intensity, high-throughput interventions would be desirable for future service provision. PMID:24381655

  13. Evaluation of a primary care adult mental health service: Year 2.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Patrick; Brennan, John; Galligan, Niall; McGonagle, Claire; Byrne, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a primary care adult mental health service operating within a stepped care model of service delivery. Methods Supervised by a principal psychologist manager, psychology graduate practitioners provided one-to-one brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to service users. The Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) was used to assess service user treatment outcomes. Satisfaction questionnaires were administered to service users and referring general practitioners (GPs). Results A total of 43 individuals attended for an initial appointment, of whom 19 (44.2%) completed brief CBT treatment. Of the 13 service users who were in the clinical range pre-treatment, 11 (84.6%) achieved clinical and reliably significant improvement. Of the six service users who were in the non-clinical range pre-treatment, three (50%) achieved reliably significant improvement. Both service users and GPs indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service, although service accessibility was highlighted as needing improvement. Conclusion The service was effective in treating mild to moderate mental health problems in primary care. Stricter adherence to a stepped care model through the provision of low-intensity, high-throughput interventions would be desirable for future service provision.

  14. Personality and Medical Illness Burden Among Older Adults in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.; Duberstein, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between Five Factor Model personality traits (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to experience, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness) and physician-quantified aggregate morbidity in a sample of older adults in primary care. Methods A total of 449 primary care patients, ranging in age from 65 to 97 years (75 ± 6.9 (mean ± standard deviation)), completed the Neo-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and extensive interviews. A physician-investigator completed the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS), a well-validated measure of aggregate morbidity based on a review of medical records. Results Bivariate analyses demonstrated that all five domains of the NEO-FFI were associated with CIRS scores. Multivariate regression controlling for age, gender, education, depression, smoking, hypertension, total cholesterol, alcohol or substance misuse, and other personality traits showed that greater Conscientiousness was independently associated with lower CIRS scores (β = −0.10, t(435) = −1.96, p = .05). Other independent predictors of less morbidity were younger age, absence of hypertension, and lower levels of depression. Conclusion Our results point toward the necessity of considering Conscientiousness and other personality traits in studies of risk factors for aggregate morbidity. More detailed characterization of at-risk populations will increase the likelihood of constructing informed and effective prevention, intervention, and policy initiatives. PMID:17401059

  15. OUTCOME OF NEW BENZODIAZEPINE PRESCRIPTIONS TO OLDER ADULTS IN PRIMARY CARE

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gregory E; Ludman, Evette J

    2008-01-01

    Objective Examine the indications, baseline characteristics, duration of use, and clinical outcomes for older primary care patients prescribed benzodiazepines. Methods Computerized records were used to identify outpatients (n=129) aged 60 or over receiving new benzodiazepine prescriptions from primary care physicians of a group-model managed care organization. A baseline telephone survey assessed indication for prescription, sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), depression (Symptom Checklist depression scale and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV), alcohol use (CAGE), and functional status (SF-36). A two-month follow-up survey assessed benzodiazepine use, sleep quality, and depression. Results The most common indications for prescription were insomnia (42%) and anxiety (36%). At baseline, participants reported moderate sleep disturbance (mean Pittsburgh Sleep Index = 9.3, st. dev. 4.0), only 15% met criteria for current depressive episode, and only 3% reported at-risk alcohol use. After two months, 30% were using benzodiazepines at least daily. Both those continuing daily use and those not continuing reported significant improvements in sleep quality and depression, with no difference between groups in rate of improvement. Conclusions Initial benzodiazepine prescriptions to older adults are typically intended for treatment of anxiety or insomnia, with little evidence for occult depression or alcohol abuse. A significant minority develop a pattern of long term use, raising concerns about tolerance and dependence. PMID:16950371

  16. Personality and medical illness burden among older adults in primary care.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Benjamin P; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Duberstein, Paul

    2007-04-01

    To examine the association between Five Factor Model personality traits (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to experience, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness) and physician-quantified aggregate morbidity in a sample of older adults in primary care. A total of 449 primary care patients, ranging in age from 65 to 97 years (75 +/- 6.9 (mean +/- standard deviation)), completed the Neo-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and extensive interviews. A physician-investigator completed the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS), a well-validated measure of aggregate morbidity based on a review of medical records. Bivariate analyses demonstrated that all five domains of the NEO-FFI were associated with CIRS scores. Multivariate regression controlling for age, gender, education, depression, smoking, hypertension, total cholesterol, alcohol or substance misuse, and other personality traits showed that greater Conscientiousness was independently associated with lower CIRS scores (beta = -0.10, t(435) = -1.96, p = .05). Other independent predictors of less morbidity were younger age, absence of hypertension, and lower levels of depression. Our results point toward the necessity of considering Conscientiousness and other personality traits in studies of risk factors for aggregate morbidity. More detailed characterization of at-risk populations will increase the likelihood of constructing informed and effective prevention, intervention, and policy initiatives.

  17. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a mestizo group of adult patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT).

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Zubieta, Victoria; Gonzalez-Villaseñor, Gloria A; Vargas-Ortega, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Baldomero; Ramirez-Renteria, Claudia; Mercado, Moises; Molina-Ayala, Mario A; Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo

    2015-04-03

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and metabolic syndrome (MS) have been independently related to cardiovascular morbidities, however this association is still controversial. Mexican population has a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, however its frequency seems to be even higher than expected in patients with PHPT. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients that underwent parathyroidectomy for PHPT in a referral center and used the criteria from the National Cholesterol Educational Program (NCEP)/Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) to define MS before surgery. We compared the characteristics between the patients with and without MS. 60 patients were analyzed, 77% were female and 72% had a single parathyroid adenoma. MS was present in 59% of the patients, this group was significantly older (57 vs. 48 years, p = 0.01) and they had lower iPTH (115 vs. 161 ng/ml, p = 0.017). Other parameters did not show differences. MS is frequent in our population diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism, adverse cardiovascular parameters are common and significant differences in calcium metabolism compared to the non-MS group are present.

  18. Efficacy and Safety of 6-Month Nightly Ramelteon Administration in Adults with Chronic Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Geert; Wang-Weigand, Sherry; Roth-Schechter, Barbara; Lehmann, Reiner; Staner, Corinne; Partinen, Markku

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Long-duration ( ≥ 6 months) polysomnographic studies of insomnia medications are lacking. This study evaluated the long-term efficacy of ramelteon, a selective MT1/MT2 melatonin-receptor agonist used for insomnia treatment. Design: Six-month, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Setting: Forty-six investigative sites in the United States, Europe, Russia, and Australia. Participants: Four hundred fifty-one adults (age ≥ 18 years) with chronic primary insomnia. Interventions: Ramelteon, 8 mg, or placebo 30 minutes before bedtime nightly for 6 months. Measurements: Sleep was evaluated by polysomnography and morning questionnaires on the first 2 nights of Week 1; the last 2 nights of Months 1, 3, 5, and 6; and Nights 1 and 2 of the placebo run-out. Next-morning residual effects as well as adverse effects and vital signs were recorded at each visit. Rebound insomnia and withdrawal effects were evaluated during placebo run-out. Results: Over the 6 months of treatment, ramelteon consistently reduced latency to persistent sleep compared with baseline and with placebo; significant decreases were observed at Week 1 and Months 1, 3, 5, and 6 (P < 0.05). Ramelteon significantly reduced subjective sleep latency relative to placebo at Week 1, Month 1, and Month 5 (P < 0.05), with reductions nearing statistical significance at Months 3 and 6 (P ≤ 0.08). No significant next-morning residual effects were detected during ramelteon treatment. No withdrawal symptoms or rebound insomnia were detected after ramelteon discontinuation. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Conclusions: In adults with chronic insomnia, long-term ramelteon treatment consistently reduced sleep onset, with no next-morning residual effects or rebound insomnia or withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation. Citation: Mayer G; Wang-Weigand S; Roth-Schechter B; Lehmann R; Staner C; Partinen M. Efficacy and safety of 6-month nightly ramelteon administration in

  19. Bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy in adults: clinical, imaging, serological, and genetic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, S P; Borruat, F X; Miller, D H; Moseley, I F; Sweeney, M G; Govan, G G; Kelly, M A; Francis, D A; Harding, A E; McDonald, W I

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the cause(s) of acute or subacute bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy (BSON) in adult life, a follow up study of 23 patients was performed with clinical assessment, brain MRI, HLA typing, and mitochondrial DNA analysis. The results of CSF electrophoresis were available from previous investigations in 11 patients. At follow up, five (22%) had developed clinically definite multiple sclerosis, four (17%) had mitochondrial DNA point mutations indicating a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The remaining 14 patients (61%) still had clinically isolated BSON a mean of 50 months after the onset of visual symptoms: three of 14 (21%) had multiple MRI white matter lesions compatible with multiple sclerosis, three of 14 (21%) had the multiple sclerosis associated HLA-DR15/DQw6 haplotype, and one of seven tested had CSF oligoclonal IgG bands; in total only five (36%) had one or more of these risk factors. The low frequency of risk factors for the development of multiple sclerosis in these 14 patients suggests that few will develop multiple sclerosis with more prolonged follow up. It is concluded that: (a) about 20% of cases of BSON without affected relatives are due to LHON; (b) multiple sclerosis develops after BSON in at least 20% of cases, but the long term conversion rate is likely to be considerably less than the rate of over 70% seen after an episode of acute unilateral optic neuritis in adult life. PMID:7823072

  20. Structural, electronic and optical properties of well-known primary explosive: Mercury fulminate

    SciTech Connect

    Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2015-11-28

    Mercury Fulminate (MF) is one of the well-known primary explosives since 17th century and it has rendered invaluable service over many years. However, the correct molecular and crystal structures are determined recently after 300 years of its discovery. In the present study, we report pressure dependent structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of MF. Non-local correction methods have been employed to capture the weak van der Waals interactions in layered and molecular energetic MF. Among the non-local correction methods tested, optB88-vdW method works well for the investigated compound. The obtained equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that MF is softer than the well known primary explosives Silver Fulminate (SF), silver azide and lead azide. MF exhibits anisotropic compressibility (b > a > c) under pressure, consequently the corresponding elastic moduli decrease in the following order: C{sub 22} > C{sub 11} > C{sub 33}. The structural and mechanical properties suggest that MF is more sensitive to detonate along c-axis (similar to RDX) due to high compressibility of Hg⋯O non-bonded interactions along that axis. Electronic structure and optical properties were calculated including spin-orbit (SO) interactions using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The calculated TB-mBJ electronic structures of SF and MF show that these compounds are indirect bandgap insulators. Also, SO coupling is found to be more pronounced for 4d and 5d-states of Ag and Hg atoms of SF and MF, respectively. Partial density of states and electron charge density maps were used to describe the nature of chemical bonding. Ag—C bond is more directional than Hg—C bond which makes SF to be more unstable than MF. The effect of SO coupling on optical properties has also been studied and found to be significant for both (SF and MF) of the compounds.

  1. Long term measurements of aerosol optical properties at a primary forest site in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Paixão, M.; Cirino, G. G.; Arana, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Roldin, P.; Fors, E. O.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Leal, L. S. M.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-03-01

    A long term experiment was conducted in a primary forest area in Amazonia, with continuous in-situ measurements of aerosol optical properties between February 2008 and April 2011, comprising, to our knowledge, the longest database ever in the Amazon Basin. Two major classes of aerosol particles, with significantly different optical properties were identified: coarse mode predominant biogenic aerosols in the wet season (January-June), naturally released by the forest metabolism, and fine mode dominated biomass burning aerosols in the dry season (July-December), transported from regional fires. Dry particle median scattering coefficients at the wavelength of 550 nm increased from 6.3 Mm-1 to 22 Mm-1, whereas absorption at 637 nm increased from 0.5 Mm-1 to 2.8 Mm-1 from wet to dry season. Most of the scattering in the dry season was attributed to the predominance of fine mode (PM2) particles (40-80% of PM10 mass), while the enhanced absorption coefficients are attributed to the presence of light absorbing aerosols from biomass burning. As both scattering and absorption increased in the dry season, the single scattering albedo (SSA) did not show a significant seasonal variability, in average 0.86 ± 0.08 at 637 nm for dry aerosols. Measured particle optical properties were used to estimate the aerosol forcing efficiency at the top of the atmosphere. Results indicate that in this primary forest site the radiative balance was dominated by the cloud cover, particularly in the wet season. Due to the high cloud fractions, the aerosol forcing efficiency absolute values were below -3.5 W m-2 in 70% of the wet season days and in 46% of the dry season days. Besides the seasonal variation, the influence of out-of-Basin aerosol sources was observed occasionally. Periods of influence of the Manaus urban plume were detected, characterized by a consistent increase on particle scattering (factor 2.5) and absorption coefficients (factor 5). Episodes of biomass burning and mineral dust

  2. A new type of Schwann cell graft transplantation to promote optic nerve regeneration in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Mo, Xiaofen; Guo, Wenyi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Peihua; Wang, Yan; Rong, Xianfang; Tian, Jie; Sun, Xinghuai

    2010-12-01

    Like other parts of the central nervous system, the adult mammalian optic nerve is difficult to regenerate after injury. Transplantation of the peripheral nerve or a Schwann cell (SC) graft can promote injured axonal regrowth. We tried to develop a new type of tissue-engineered SC graft that consisted of SCs seeded onto a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduit. Meanwhile, SCs were transfected along the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene in vitro by electroporation to increase their neurotrophic effect. Four weeks after transplantation, GAP-43 labelled regenerating axons were found in the SC grafts, and axons in the CNTF-SC graft were longer than those in the SC graft. Tissue-engineered SC grafts can provide a feasible environment for optic nerve regeneration and may become an alternative for bridging damaged nerves and repairing nerve defects in the future.

  3. Longitudinal Analysis of Serum Autoantibody-Reactivities in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma and Optic Disc Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Keilani, Munir M.; Wasielica-Poslednik, Joanna; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of our current investigation was to analyze the autoantibody-reactivities of primary open angle glaucoma patients with optic disc hemorrhage as possibly correlated to disease progression by means of a protein microarray approach. Methods Sera of patients with primary open angle glaucoma and optic disc hemorrhage (n = 16) were collected directly after study inclusion (0 weeks) and after 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 12 weeks. As a control group patients with primary open angle glaucoma (n = 18) were used (0 weeks and 12 weeks). Microarrays were incubated and occurring antibody-antigen-reactions were visualized with fluorescence labeled anti-human-IgG secondary antibodies. To detect changes in autoantibodies spot intensities were digitized and compared. Results With respect to the immunoreactivity at 0 weeks level increment of anti-adaptor protein 1 complex subunit mu-1 antibodies and anti-SPRY domain-containing SOCS box protein 3 antibodies in sera of primary open angle patients with optic disc hemorrhage was detected. Linear trend analysis revealed a positive correlation with r ≥ 0.8 between antibody-level and time course. Control group show no relevant changes in the same period. Significant changes were found in time point 4 comparison between patient groups in anti-adaptor protein 1 complex subunit mu-1-level (p = 0.01). No significant changes in visual acuity were found. Conclusion With this approach we were able to detect autoimmune reactivities in sera of patients with primary open angle glaucoma and optic disc hemorrhage compared to patients without optic disc hemorrhage. These antibodies could give further insights into the pathogenesis and the autoimmune component of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. PMID:28030545

  4. Assessment of optic disc parameters among healthy adult Malays by Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph II.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Shawarinin; Shaharuddin, Bakiah; Wan Hitam, Wan H

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to assess the optic disc characteristics in healthy adult Malays and to correlate them with age, gender and refractive errors. Cross-sectional study. A total of 200 voluntary participants (106 women and 94 men) among Malay students aged 20 to 37 years at Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia. The relationship between Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph parameters with age, gender and refractive error were analysed with correlation tests and multiple linear regression analyses.   Twelve parameters, that is, disc area, rim area, cup area, cup to disc area, cup volume, rim volume, height variation contour, cup shape measure, mean cup depth, maximum cup depth, mean retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and retinal nerve fibre layer cross-sectional area.   Disc area, rim area and cup : disc area ratio averaged 2.24 ± 0.52 (mean ± standard deviation), 1.64 ± 0.32 and 0.25 ± 0.12 mm(2) , respectively. Five parameters (disc area, cup area, cup volume, cup : disc area ratio and mean retinal nerve fibre layer thickness) showed statistically significant difference between men and women. Age was negatively and significantly correlated with rim area with coefficient r = -0.21, P = 0.003. All optic disc parameters were significantly correlated (P < 0.05) with disc area, except cup shape measure.   One or more of optic disc parameters were affected significantly by age, gender and disc area in healthy adult Malays' eyes. These factors need to be considered during the evaluation of optic disc. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2010 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  5. First-Time Primary Caregivers’ Experience of Caring for Young Adults With First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Terence V.; Lubman, Dan I.; Clark, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a carer is associated with physical, emotional, and financial hardship, with caregivers often experiencing a maelstrom of emotions as they struggle to understand what has happened to their loved one. While the burden of caring for young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) has been well documented, much less is known about how carers develop the strength and resilience to continue caring. This qualitative study aimed to understand the experience of 20 first-time primary caregivers of young adults with FEP. Most caregivers were female (85%, n = 17) and parents (85%, n = 17). The average length of involvement as a caregiver at an FEP service was 14.5 months. Six main themes were identified in the data, highlighting the carers’ experience in supporting young adults with FEP. Caregiving is a burdensome responsibility and is characterized as a roller coaster and unpredictable experience. Caregivers often feel responsible for the young person's illness; however, eventually most come to terms with the changes that have occurred in the young person with FEP. As a consequence of the illness, the relationship between caregiver and care recipient frequently becomes closer and deeper, although it is important that they both maintain hope for the future. These findings provide important insights into the experiences of first-time caregivers of young people with FEP, with direct implications for improving the information and support given to caregivers by FEP services, as well as the development of interventions that effectively address the unique challenges caregivers face following the onset of FEP. PMID:19679716

  6. National Trends in Antidepressant, Benzodiazepine, and Other Sedative-Hypnotic Treatment of Older Adults in Psychiatric and Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Maust, Donovan T; Blow, Frederic C; Wiechers, Ilse R; Kales, Helen C; Marcus, Steven C

    2017-04-01

    To describe how use of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and other anxiolytic/sedative-hypnotics among older adults (age ≥ 65 years) has changed over time among visits to primary care providers and psychiatrists. Data were from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (years 2003-2005 and 2010-2012), a nationally representative cross-section of outpatient physician visits. Analysis focused on visits to primary care providers (n = 14,282) and psychiatrists (n = 1,095) at which an antidepressant, benzodiazepine, or other anxiolytic/sedative-hypnotic was prescribed, which were stratified by demographic and clinical characteristic (including ICD-9-CM diagnosis) and compared across study intervals. Odds of medication use were calculated for each stratum, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. The visit rate by older adults to primary care providers where any of the medications were prescribed rose from 16.4% to 21.8% (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.43, P < .001) while remaining steady among psychiatrists (75.4% vs 68.5%; AOR = 0.69, P = .11). Primary care visits rose for antidepressants (9.9% to 12.3%; AOR = 1.28, P = .01) and other anxiolytic/sedative-hypnotics (3.4% to 4.7%; AOR = 1.39, P = .01), but the largest growth was among benzodiazepines (5.6% to 8.7%; AOR = 1.62, P < .001). Among patients in primary care, increases primarily occurred among men, non-Hispanic white patients, and those with pain diagnoses as well as those with no mental health or pain diagnoses. From 2003 to 2012, use of the most common psychotropic medications among older adults seen in primary care increased, with concentration among patients with no mental health or pain diagnosis. As the population of older adults grows and receives mental health treatment in primary care, it is critical to examine the appropriateness of psychotropic use.

  7. The problems and limitations of applying evidence-based medicine to primary surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bridwell, Keith H; Berven, Sigurd; Edwards, Charles; Glassman, Steven; Hamill, Christopher; Schwab, Frank

    2007-09-01

    : Assessment of peer-reviewed literature and personal experience with publications and grant organization. : This is an analysis of the current status of evidence-based medicine for primary adult spinal deformity to answer the question of whether surgical treatment benefits patients. : A limited number of evidence-based studies have been performed for primary adult scoliosis and spinal deformity surgery. None of these studies is ideal. : This is an assessment of current literature and study group methodology in an attempt to provide an evidence-based medicine approach for the study of primary presentation adult scoliosis and related spinal deformity. : Many reasonable studies exist; however, there are no current definitive studies that answer the question posed above. There are many obstacles, both financial and organizational, to producing an "ideal" study. Most smaller studies suggest that surgical treatment of primary adult scoliosis benefits the patient. However, there is no multicenter prospective randomized study to answer this question. : A multicenter funded study is needed to answer appropriate questions.

  8. Blood transcriptomic biomarkers in adult primary care patients with major depressive disorder undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Redei, E E; Andrus, B M; Kwasny, M J; Seok, J; Cai, X; Ho, J; Mohr, D C

    2014-01-01

    An objective, laboratory-based diagnostic tool could increase the diagnostic accuracy of major depressive disorders (MDDs), identify factors that characterize patients and promote individualized therapy. The goal of this study was to assess a blood-based biomarker panel, which showed promise in adolescents with MDD, in adult primary care patients with MDD and age-, gender- and race-matched nondepressed (ND) controls. Patients with MDD received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and clinical assessment using self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire–9 (PHQ-9). The measures, including blood RNA collection, were obtained before and after 18 weeks of CBT. Blood transcript levels of nine markers of ADCY3, DGKA, FAM46A, IGSF4A/CADM1, KIAA1539, MARCKS, PSME1, RAPH1 and TLR7, differed significantly between participants with MDD (N=32) and ND controls (N=32) at baseline (q< 0.05). Abundance of the DGKA, KIAA1539 and RAPH1 transcripts remained significantly different between subjects with MDD and ND controls even after post-CBT remission (defined as PHQ-9 <5). The ROC area under the curve for these transcripts demonstrated high discriminative ability between MDD and ND participants, regardless of their current clinical status. Before CBT, significant co-expression network of specific transcripts existed in MDD subjects who subsequently remitted in response to CBT, but not in those who remained depressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals. PMID:25226551

  9. Insulin resistance in adult primary care patients with a surrogate index, Guadalajara, Mexico, 2012.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Bermúdez, María Claudia; Robles-Cervantes, José Antonio; del Sagrario Villarreal-Hernández, Liliana; Villaseñor-Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-González, Sandra Ofelia; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Pérez-Rubio, Karina Griselda

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a key molecular disorder related with diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine IR in adult primary care patients using the triglyceride/glucose (TyG) index [(Ln TG (mg/dL) × FG (mg/dL))/2]. We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis and identified IR subjects according to the TyG index. There were 1500 patients included. Significant differences were found between the IR group versus the insulin-sensitive group, respectively: age (in years), 46.4 ± 9.34 versus 40.24 ± 11.27 (P < 0.001); fasting glucose (mg/dL), 99.87 ± 11.95 versus 84.62 ± 6.59 (P < 0.001); total cholesterol (mg/dL), 203.21 ± 37.38 versus 173.91 ± 33.99 (P < 0.001); triglycerides (mg/dL), 226.40 ± 96.66 versus 111.27 ± 23.44 (P < 0.001); uric acid (mg/dL), 6.09 ± 1.59 versus 4.77 ± 1.40 (P < 0.001); and TyG index, 4.96 ± 0.21 versus 4.48 ± 0.13 (P < 0.001). The cutoff of the TyG index for IR was 4.68 or greater. The TyG index allows for early diagnosis of IR in primary health care.

  10. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: a case report of primary cutaneous tumoral type

    PubMed Central

    Lyra-da-Silva, Julia Ocampo; de Mello Gonzaga, Yung Bruno; de Melo Espíndola, Otávio; de Andrada-Serpa, Maria José; Dib, Cassio; Jeunon, Thiago

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinctive peripheral T- lymphocytic malignancy associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It may closely resemble other skin lymphomas, particularly mycosis fungoides (MF). Case report: A 38-year-old woman presented some ellipsoid scaling patches lasting 18 months and developed a large tumoral lesion in the abdomen, which were previously diagnosed as MF. Although histopathologic and immunohistochemistry findings were in consonance with this diagnosis, the fast progression of the disease raised the suspicion that it could represent another type of T-cell lymphoma. The work-up revealed a positive anti-HTLV-1 serology and molecular studies confirmed the monoclonal integration of HTLV-1 provirus into neoplastic cells of the skin, but not into circulating lymphocytes. Extensive investigations were unable to demonstrate any systemic involvement. The final diagnosis was of primary cutaneous type of ATLL. The patient was submitted to a chemotherapy regimen with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone, later to conjugated dexamethasone and surgical cytoreduction and then to a second line treatment with gemcitabine, resulting in partial response. A bone marrow heterologous transplantation was performed, but failed to achieve a sustained remission. Discussion: ATLL is a rare lymphoid malignancy in non-endemic HTLV-1 areas, the diagnosis of which could be missed if not highly suspected. In addition to the four subtypes of Shimoyama classification (acute, lymphomatous, chronic and smoldering), a fifth one denominated primary cutaneous and characterized by presence of lesions only in the skin had been proposed and is herein exemplified. PMID:23785591

  11. Insulin Resistance in Adult Primary Care Patients With a Surrogate Index, Guadalajara, Mexico, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Bermúdez, María Claudia; Robles-Cervantes, José Antonio; del Sagrario Villarreal-Hernández, Liliana; Villaseñor-Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-González, Sandra Ofelia; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Pérez-Rubio, Karina Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Insulin resistance (IR) is a key molecular disorder related with diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine IR in adult primary care patients using the triglyceride/glucose (TyG) index [(Ln TG (mg/dL) × FG (mg/dL))/2]. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis and identified IR subjects according to the TyG index. Results There were 1500 patients included. Significant differences were found between the IR group versus the insulin-sensitive group, respectively: age (in years), 46.4 ± 9.34 versus 40.24 ± 11.27 (P < 0.001); fasting glucose (mg/dL), 99.87 ± 11.95 versus 84.62 ± 6.59 (P < 0.001); total cholesterol (mg/dL), 203.21 ± 37.38 versus 173.91 ± 33.99 (P < 0.001); triglycerides (mg/dL), 226.40 ± 96.66 versus 111.27 ± 23.44 (P < 0.001); uric acid (mg/dL), 6.09 ± 1.59 versus 4.77 ± 1.40 (P < 0.001); and TyG index, 4.96 ± 0.21 versus 4.48 ± 0.13 (P < 0.001). The cutoff of the TyG index for IR was 4.68 or greater. Conclusions The TyG index allows for early diagnosis of IR in primary health care. PMID:25503090

  12. Blood transcriptomic biomarkers in adult primary care patients with major depressive disorder undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Redei, E E; Andrus, B M; Kwasny, M J; Seok, J; Cai, X; Ho, J; Mohr, D C

    2014-09-16

    An objective, laboratory-based diagnostic tool could increase the diagnostic accuracy of major depressive disorders (MDDs), identify factors that characterize patients and promote individualized therapy. The goal of this study was to assess a blood-based biomarker panel, which showed promise in adolescents with MDD, in adult primary care patients with MDD and age-, gender- and race-matched nondepressed (ND) controls. Patients with MDD received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and clinical assessment using self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The measures, including blood RNA collection, were obtained before and after 18 weeks of CBT. Blood transcript levels of nine markers of ADCY3, DGKA, FAM46A, IGSF4A/CADM1, KIAA1539, MARCKS, PSME1, RAPH1 and TLR7, differed significantly between participants with MDD (N=32) and ND controls (N=32) at baseline (q< 0.05). Abundance of the DGKA, KIAA1539 and RAPH1 transcripts remained significantly different between subjects with MDD and ND controls even after post-CBT remission (defined as PHQ-9 <5). The ROC area under the curve for these transcripts demonstrated high discriminative ability between MDD and ND participants, regardless of their current clinical status. Before CBT, significant co-expression network of specific transcripts existed in MDD subjects who subsequently remitted in response to CBT, but not in those who remained depressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals.

  13. Constructivist Learning and Teaching of Optics Concepts Using ICT Tools in Greek Primary School: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekos, George; Solomonidou, Christina

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study documents the design and evaluation results of an innovative teaching approach with the use of ICT regarding the optics concepts of light reflection and diffusion, and vision in Greek primary school. First there was a survey of 140 students to ascertain their initial ideas regarding these concepts. On the basis of the results of…

  14. Development of lightweight mirror elements for a very large astronomical adaptive optic primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Shaffer, Joseph; Romeo, Robert C.; Chen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    New very large telescopes with apertures as large as 100 meters are being proposed. They will be made up of mirror segments only a meter or two in diameter and phased together. The diffraction-limited resolution of a mirror is directly proportional to its diameter, and the light-gathering-power is proportional to the square of the diameter. Near-diffraction-limited performance using adaptive optics would make such large mirrors very exciting. We have built two small prototype composite adaptive optic mirrors of graphite fiber impregnated cyanate ester resin driven by actuators spaced 4 cm apart and with a faceplate influence function of 5 cm. The second mirror assembly also makes possible a 2 cm actuator spacing. The overall figure is not yet as good as desired, but we believe that much of this problem can be corrected by mechanical adjustment of the actuator rest positions and use of low expansion mandrels. This mirror concept, when realized in primary mirror segments a meter or more in diameter, should make correction possible for atmospheric turbulence under almost any observatory seeing conditions. The composite optical faceplate in the most recent prototype had a roughness of 0.6 to 0.8 nm. Two centrifugal elutriation super-polishers, each over 1.2 meters in diameter, are in place to produce superpolished mandrels on which to form superpolished faceplates over a meter in diameter. Scattered light from such a mirror surface will be reduced by as much as a factor of ten, as compared to conventional fresh feed polishing. The name "transfer mirrors" rather than the widely recognized but poorer quality "replica mirrors" is given to such faceplates. They have an expansion coefficient comparable to ULE quartz or Zerodur, and are lightweight with 10-20, an aerial density of 17 kg/m2 for the mirror with a 4 cm actuator spacing or 34 kg/m2 for the mirror with 2 cm actuator spacing. In both cases the effect of gravitational sag is minimized. A 60 volt potential results

  15. Sleep time and pattern of adult individuals in primary care in an Asian urbanized community

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Tan, Mui Suan; Hwang, Siew Wai; Teo, Chia Chia; Lee, Zhi Kang Niccol; Soh, Jing Yao Jonathan; Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; How, Choon How

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sleep norms vary between individuals, being affected by personal, communal, and socioeconomic factors. Individuals with sleep time which deviate from the population norm are at risks of adverse mental, cardiovascular, and metabolic health. Sleep-related issues are common agenda for consultation in primary care. This study aimed to determine the sleep time, pattern, and behavior of multiethnic Asian individuals who attended public primary care clinics in an urban metropolitan city-state. Standardized questionnaires were assistant-administered to adult Asian individuals who visited 2 local public primary care clinics in north-eastern and southern regions of Singapore. The questionnaire included questions on demographic characteristics, self-reported sleep time, patterns, and behavior and those originated from the American National Sleep Foundation Sleep Diary. The data were collated, audited, rectified, and anonymized before being analyzed by the biostatistician. Individuals with 7 h sleep time or longer were deemed getting adequate sleep. Chi-squared or Fisher exact test was used to test the association between the demographic and behavioral variables and sleep time. Next, regression analysis was performed to identify key factors associated with their sleep time. A total of 350 individuals were recruited, with higher proportion of those of Chinese ethnicity reporting adequate sleep. Almost half (48.1%) of those who slept <7 h on weekdays tended to sleep ≥7 h on weekends. More individuals who reported no difficulty falling asleep, had regular sleep hours and awakening time, tended to sleep adequately. Those who slept with children, studied, read leisurely, used computer or laptops in their bedrooms, drank caffeinated beverages or smoked had inadequate sleep. Those who perceived sufficient sleep and considered 8 h as adequate sleep time had weekday and weekend sleep adequacy. Sleep time varied according to ethnicity, employment status, personal

  16. [Primary immune thrombocytopenia in adults in Mexico: national characteristics and the relation to international literature].

    PubMed

    Meillón-García, Luis Antonio; García-Chávez, Jaime; Gómez-Almaguer, David; Gutiérrez-Espíndola, Guillermo R; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify the clinical approach of a sample of Mexican hematologists for primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adults in Mexico, we applied an electronic survey via the internet to identify common practices for the diagnosis and treatment of ITP and draw a comparison between the information from these hematologists with international guidelines or the international literature. The results were analyzed using measures of central tendency. The sample was 21 medical hematologists, predominantly from Mexico City (average age: 51.4 years). A total of 66.7% of the surveyed physicians use international guidelines to make therapeutic decisions, and 43% defined ITP including the numerical concept (< 100 x 10(9)/l). We found some differences between requested clinical exams and tests indicated by the guidelines. In first-line treatment (except emergency), 91% of the participants start with prednisone and 24% use dexamethasone. Danazol is used in persistent ITP by most (41%) of the specialists. In second-line treatment, 67% would indicate splenectomy. Some differences were found between clinical practice of the hematologists in Mexico versus guidelines recommendations.

  17. Misdiagnosis of primary pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma of the right thigh in a young adult: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaolong; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hucheng; Guo, Runsheng; Dai, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma (PRMS) is a rare type of soft tissue tumor accounting for <2% of all adult sarcomas. The present study describes a case of a 28-year-old male patient with primary PRMS of the right thigh. The patient was initially diagnosed with a schwannoma and underwent conservative therapy at a local hospital. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient reported a marked increase in the size of the mass. Finally, the patient underwent fine-needle aspiration and total tumor resection. The tumor measured 11×9×5 cm3 in size and was located in the vastus intermedius muscle. According to histological and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of PRMS was confirmed by an expert pathology consultant. Postoperative follow-up at 3 months revealed no evidence of recurrent disease or residual side effects from therapy. However, it is imperative that such cases are closely monitored following surgery, in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the procedure, since misdiagnosis may increase the risk of recurrence and metastasis. The present case is noteworthy due to the misdiagnosis of PRMS, the large size of the mass and the young age of the patient. PMID:27588141

  18. Mental ability performance among adults with type 2 diabetes in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Aim and method The present university-based outpatient clinic, cross-sectional study assessed cognitive performance in a sample of 137 adults, with the primary objective of determining differences in cognitive performance as a function of gender and hypertension status in a type 2 diabetes cohort. Results Approximately 64% of the sample was 65 years old and younger, and 50 subjects had > 13 years of education. Global mental ability scores were relatively similar by age grouping, and higher-ordered cognitive functioning and reading literacy were strongly correlated, r (98) = 0.62, P < 0.01. Approximately 30% of the sample posted global mental ability scores in the slow learner range on tasks measuring attention, immediate memory and verbal reasoning. Males achieved higher cognitive functioning scores compared to females on multiple mental ability tasks. The presence of hypertension was associated with significantly worse cognitive performance compared to those subjects without hypertension, t = 2.11, P = 0.03. Approximately 57% of the hypertension group was classified as mild cognitive impaired. Conclusion While approximately half of the general population can be expected to demonstrate an average range of performance on cognitive ability measures, such an expectation could be inappropriately generalised to persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, even among those who were high school educated. PMID:22477898

  19. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Cultural Beliefs and Mental Health Treatment Preferences of Ethnically Diverse Older Adult Consumers in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Daniel E.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Cardenas, Veronica; Daliwal, Sanam S.; Alegría, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Beliefs concerning the causes of mental illness may help explain why there are significant disparities in the rates of formal mental health service use among racial/ethnic minority elderly as compared with their Caucasian counterparts. This study applies the Cultural Influences on Mental Health framework to identify the relationship between race/ethnicity and differences in: (1) beliefs on the cause of mental illness; (2) preferences for type of treatment; and (3) provider characteristics. Method Analyses were conducted using baseline data collected from participants who completed the Cultural Attitudes toward Healthcare and Mental Illness Questionnaire, developed for the PRISM-E (Primary Care Research in Substance Abuse and Mental Health for the Elderly) study, a multi-site randomized trial for older adults (65+) with depression, anxiety, or at-risk alcohol consumption. The final sample consisted of 1257 non-Latino Whites, 536 African-Americans, 112 Asian-Americans, and 303 Latinos. Results African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Latinos had differing beliefs regarding the causes of mental illness when compared to Non-Latino Whites. Race/ethnicity was also associated with determining who makes healthcare decisions, treatment preferences, and preferred characteristics of healthcare providers. Conclusions This study highlights the association between race/ethnicity and health beliefs, treatment preferences, healthcare decisions, and consumers' preferred characteristics of healthcare providers. Accommodating the values and preferences of individuals can be helpful in engaging racial/ethnic minority patients in mental health services. PMID:21992942

  1. Beliefs about generic drugs among elderly adults in hospital-based primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Iosifescu, Alice; Halm, Ethan A.; McGinn, Thomas; Siu, Albert L.; Federman, Alex D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to characterize seniors’ beliefs about generic drugs, and examine potential correlates of these beliefs, including socioeconomic and health status variables, health literacy, and physician communication skills. Methods Older adults (≥65 years) were interviewed in two primary care practices of an inner-city, tertiary care hospital (n = 311). Beliefs about generics were measured using a scale that compared generic and brand name drugs across four domains. Beliefs were modeled with multivariable linear regression. Results Negative beliefs about generics were associated with non-white race (p < 0.0001), lower education (p = 0.008) and income (p = 0.001), and having Medicaid coverage (p = 0.001). Individuals with low health literacy and who reported that their physicians had poor communication skills were more likely to hold negative views (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.003, respectively). In multivariable analysis, black race (β = -2.30, p = 0.006) and inadequate health literacy (β = -2.17, p = 0.0004) remained strongly associated with negative views about generic drugs. Poor physician communication skills also predicted negative beliefs about generics but the association was not significant for all levels of communication skill. Conclusion Many low-income seniors mistrust generic medications, especially African-Americans and seniors with low health literacy. Practice implications Educational efforts to promote generic medications should account for patients’ health literacy and cultural backgrounds. PMID:18706784

  2. Nurse practitioner screening for childhood adversity among adult primary care patients: A mixed-method study.

    PubMed

    Kalmakis, Karen A; Chandler, Genevieve E; Roberts, Susan Jo; Leung, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated an association between experiencing childhood abuse and multiple chronic health conditions in adulthood, yet this evidence has not been routinely translated to practice. The purpose of this research study was to examine nurse practitioner (NP) practices, skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers associated with screening adult patients for childhood abuse to determine the extent to which evidence of the association between childhood abuse and negative health outcomes has been translated to NP practice. A mixed-method approach with web-based questionnaires and online focus groups was used to examine NP screening for histories of childhood abuse. A total of 188 complete NP surveys were analyzed along with data from focus groups with 12 NPs. One third of the NPs regularly screened for childhood abuse and believed screening was their responsibility. Six barriers, including insufficient time and lack of confidence when inquiring about abuse, were significantly associated with NP screening practices. The focus group participants discussed how and when one should ask about childhood abuse, and the need for education about screening. Time constraints and NPs' lack of confidence in their ability to screen for histories of childhood abuse must be addressed to encourage routine screening in primary care practice. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Triceps brachii reinnervation in primary reconstruction of the adult brachial plexus: experience in 25 cases.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2011-10-01

    Elbow flexion and shoulder abduction are the primary goals in brachial plexus surgery; however, reinnervation of the triceps is also an objective to be considered, as restoration of elbow extension improves the stabilization of the elbow and can provide a more powerful grasp. This study aims to demonstrate the author's experience with restoration of elbow extension function in cases of brachial plexus surgery in adults. Records of 25 patients sustaining traumatic brachial plexus injuries who were treated surgically with reinnervation of the triceps were reviewed. Nine techniques were employed, including posterior cord reconstruction and nerve transfers using donors such as the ipsilateral C7 root, phrenic nerve, medial pectoral nerve, intercostal nerves, the spinal accessory nerve, and a motor fascicle of the ulnar nerve. The targeted structure was the radial nerve or the branch to the long head of the triceps. Twenty-one subjects (83%) obtained triceps reinnervation, and good results (M3 or better) were observed in 19 cases (76%). M4 grade was noted in 36% of the cases, M3 grade in 40%, M2 grade in 8%, M1 grade in 8%, and M0 grade in 8% of the patients. The best outcomes were observed in the cases presenting a C5 to C7 palsy and those in which the nerve to the triceps was chosen as the transfer target. Reinnervation of the triceps can be achieved in most patients if adequate donor and recipient nerves are carefully selected based on an individual case-specific decision.

  4. Secondary malignant neoplasms following radiotherapy for primary cancer in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Harbron, Richard W; Feltbower, Richard G; Glaser, Adam; Lilley, John; Pearce, Mark S

    2014-04-01

    A study was conducted to investigate secondary malignant neoplasm (SMN) occurrence following radiotherapy (RT) for cancer in children and young adults, to examine the spatial distribution of SMNs in relation to the irradiated field, and to evaluate a possible role of bystander effects in SMN distribution. Forty-two SMNs were identified among 7257 subjects diagnosed with cancer while living in Yorkshire, UK. Thirty-two of these occurred in patients receiving RT. Distances between SMN locations and RT field edge were estimated along with dose at SMN site. Expected radiation-induced SMN frequency in remote tissues receiving less than 0.1 Gy was predicted using risk estimates based on atomic bombing data. After a median follow-up period of 7.58 years, patients treated with RT were at a nearly five-fold increased risk of developing a subsequent primary neoplasm than the general population in the 0-29 years age range. The most common type of secondary malignancy associated with RT was of the central nervous system (28%), followed by sarcoma (25%) and leukemia (19%). Considering only solid SMNs developing 5 years or more from treatment, the spatial distribution showed a strong pattern of proximity to the irradiated field, with 68% occurring in-field or within 8 cm of the field edge. The SMN frequency in distant tissues receiving doses of less than 0.1 Gy was low but compatible with local absorbed dose.

  5. Mental ability performance among adults with type 2 diabetes in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mount, David L; Lambert, Michael C

    2009-06-01

    Aim and method The present university-based outpatient clinic, cross-sectional study assessed cognitive performance in a sample of 137 adults, with the primary objective of determining differences in cognitive performance as a function of gender and hypertension status in a type 2 diabetes cohort.Results Approximately 64% of the sample was 65 years old and younger, and 50 subjects had > 13 years of education. Global mental ability scores were relatively similar by age grouping, and higher-ordered cognitive functioning and reading literacy were strongly correlated, r (98) = 0.62, P < 0.01. Approximately 30% of the sample posted global mental ability scores in the slow learner range on tasks measuring attention, immediate memory and verbal reasoning. Males achieved higher cognitive functioning scores compared to females on multiple mental ability tasks. The presence of hypertension was associated with significantly worse cognitive performance compared to those subjects without hypertension, t = 2.11, P = 0.03. Approximately 57% of the hypertension group was classified as mild cognitive impaired.Conclusion While approximately half of the general population can be expected to demonstrate an average range of performance on cognitive ability measures, such an expectation could be inappropriately generalised to persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, even among those who were high school educated.

  6. A Nation-Wide Epidemiological Study of Newly Diagnosed Primary Spine Tumor in the Adult Korean Population, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Seil; Kim, Jinhee; Chung, Chun Kee; Lee, Na Rae; Sohn, Moon Jun; Kim, Sung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Objective This 2009–2011 nation-wide study of adult Koreans was aimed to provide characteristics, medical utilization states, and survival rates for newly diagnosed patients with primary nonmalignant and malignant spine tumors. Methods Data for patients with primary spine tumors were selected from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. The data included their age, sex, health insurance type, co-morbidities, medical cost, and hospital stay duration. Hospital stay duration and medical costs per person occurring in one calendar year were used. In addition, survival rates of patients with primary malignant spine tumors were evaluated. Results The incidence rate of a primary spine tumor increased with age, and the year of diagnosis (p≤0.0001). Average annual medical costs ranged from 1627 USD (pelvis & sacrum & coccyx tumors) to 6601 USD (spinal cord tumor) for primary nonmalignant spine tumor and from 12137 USD (spinal meningomas) to 20825 USD (pelvis & sacrum & coccyx tumors) for a primary malignant spine tumor. Overall survival rates for those with a primary malignant spine tumor were 87.0%, 75.3%, and 70.6% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively. The Cox regression model results showed that male sex, medicare insurance were significantly positive factors affecting survival after a diagnosis of primary malignant spine tumor. Conclusion Our study provides a detailed view of the characteristics, medical utilization states, and survival rates of patients newly diagnosed with primary spine tumors in Korea. PMID:28264240

  7. Simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in adults.

    PubMed

    Carson-Chahhoud, Kristin V; Wakai, Abel; van Agteren, Joseph Em; Smith, Brian J; McCabe, Grainne; Brinn, Malcolm P; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2017-09-07

    For management of pneumothorax that occurs without underlying lung disease, also referred to as primary spontaneous pneumothorax, simple aspiration is technically easier to perform than intercostal tube drainage. In this systematic review, we seek to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage for management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. This review was first published in 2007 and was updated in 2017. To compare the clinical efficacy and safety of simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage for management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 1) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (1966 to January 2017); and Embase (1980 to January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry for ongoing trials (August 2017). We checked the reference lists of included trials and contacted trial authors. We imposed no language restrictions. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adults 18 years of age and older with primary spontaneous pneumothorax that compared simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage. Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We combined studies using the random-effects model. Of 2332 publications obtained through the search strategy, seven studies met the inclusion criteria; one study was ongoing and six studies of 435 participants were eligible for inclusion in the updated review. Data show a significant difference in immediate success rates of procedures favouring tube drainage over simple aspiration for management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (risk ratio (RR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69 to 0.89; 435 participants, 6 studies; moderate-quality evidence). Duration of hospitalization however was significantly less for patients treated by simple aspiration (mean

  8. Applications of hybrid diffuse optics for clinical management of adults after brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Meeri Nam

    Information about cerebral blood flow (CBF) is valuable for clinical management of patients after severe brain injury. Unfortunately, current modalities for monitoring brain are often limited by hurdles that include high cost, low throughput, exposure to ionizing radiation, probe invasiveness, and increased risk to critically ill patients when transportation out of their room or unit is required. A further limitation of current technologies is an inability to provide continuous bedside measurements that are often desirable for unstable patients. Here we explore the clinical utility of diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) as an alternative approach for bedside CBF monitoring. DCS uses the rapid intensity fluctuations of near-infrared light to derive a continuous measure of changes in blood flow without ionizing radiation or invasive probing. Concurrently, we employ another optical technique, called diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS), to derive changes in cerebral oxyhemoglobin ( HbO2) and deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. Our clinical studies integrate DCS with DOS into a single hybrid instrument that simultaneously monitors CBF and HbO2/Hb in the injured adult brain. The first parts of this dissertation present the motivations for monitoring blood flow in injured brain, as well as the theory underlying diffuse optics technology. The next section elaborates on details of the hybrid instrumentation. The final chapters describe four human subject studies carried out with these methods. Each of these studies investigates an aspect of the potential of the hybrid monitor in clinical applications involving adult brain. The studies include: (1) validation of DCS-measured CBF against xenon-enhanced computed tomography in brain-injured adults; (2) a study of the effects of age and gender on posture-change-induced CBF variation in healthy subjects; (3) a study of the efficacy of DCS/DOS for monitoring neurocritical care patients during various medical interventions such

  9. Point-of-care and point-of-procedure optical imaging technologies for primary care and global health

    PubMed Central

    Boppart, Stephen A.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Leveraging advances in consumer electronics and wireless telecommunications, low-cost, portable optical imaging devices have the potential to improve screening and detection of disease at the point of care in primary health care settings in both low- and high-resource countries. Similarly, real-time optical imaging technologies can improve diagnosis and treatment at the point of procedure by circumventing the need for biopsy and analysis by expert pathologists, who are scarce in developing countries. Although many optical imaging technologies have been translated from bench to bedside, industry support is needed to commercialize and broadly disseminate these from the patient level to the population level to transform the standard of care. This review provides an overview of promising optical imaging technologies, the infrastructure needed to integrate them into widespread clinical use, and the challenges that must be addressed to harness the potential of these technologies to improve health care systems around the world. PMID:25210062

  10. Assessment of ciliary phenotype in primary ciliary dyskinesia by micro-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, George M.; Francis, Richard; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Birket, Susan E.; Gabriel, George; Trombley, John E.; Lemke, Kristi L.; Klena, Nikolai; Turner, Brett; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2017-01-01

    Ciliary motion defects cause defective mucociliary transport (MCT) in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Current diagnostic tests do not assess how MCT is affected by perturbation of ciliary motion. In this study, we sought to use micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT) to delineate the mechanistic basis of cilia motion defects of PCD genes by functional categorization of cilia motion. Tracheae from three PCD mouse models were analyzed using μOCT to characterize ciliary motion and measure MCT. We developed multiple measures of ciliary activity, integrated these measures, and quantified dyskinesia by the angular range of the cilia effective stroke (ARC). Ccdc39–/– mice, with a known severe PCD mutation of ciliary axonemal organization, had absent motile ciliary regions, resulting in abrogated MCT. In contrast, Dnah5–/– mice, with a missense mutation of the outer dynein arms, had reduced ciliary beat frequency (CBF) but preserved motile area and ciliary stroke, maintaining some MCT. Wdr69–/– PCD mice exhibited normal motile area and CBF and partially delayed MCT due to abnormalities of ciliary ARC. Visualization of ciliary motion using μOCT provides quantitative assessment of ciliary motion and MCT. Comprehensive ciliary motion investigation in situ classifies ciliary motion defects and quantifies their contribution to delayed mucociliary clearance. PMID:28289722

  11. Primary vacuometer based on an ultracold gas in a shallow optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhalov, V. B.; Martiyanov, K. A.; Turlapov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    A calibration-free primary vacuometer based on an ultracold atomic gas in a shallow far-off-resonance optical dipole trap is proposed and demonstrated. The pressure is obtained by measuring the loss of trapped atoms which is caused by collisions with the ambient gas of the vacuum chamber. The loss is related to the ambient-gas pressure via a theoretical model based on first principles. The model is applicable owing to elimination of a number of systematic effects which otherwise preclude or complicate construction of a first-principle model. These systematics include loss unrelated to collisions with the ambient gas as well as loss dependance on the number and energy of trapped atoms. In the demonstrated vacuometer, the atom-number decay is exponential with the rate proportional to the pressure, where the proportionality coefficient is expressed via the gas composition and van der Waals coefficients C 6. Whenever the gas composition is unknown, the systematic error is typically well below that of the hot-cathode ionization gauge. The vacuometer is implemented using a gas of ultracold lithium-6, which is the optimal working body for such a vacuometer. The lowest measured pressure, 2.8× {{10}-9} Pa, is limited by the vacuum in the apparatus, while the dominant error source of 4% is due to uncertainty in the C 6 value and may be improved. Comparison with reading of a hot-cathode ionization gauge is also shown.

  12. Prescribing exercise for older adults: A needs assessment comparing primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Dauenhauer, Jason A; Podgorski, Carol A; Karuza, Jurgis

    2006-01-01

    To inform the development of educational programming designed to teach providers appropriate methods of exercise prescription for older adults, the authors conducted a survey of 177 physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners (39% response rate). The survey was designed to better understand the prevalence of exercise prescriptions, attitudes, barriers, and educational needs of primary care practitioners toward older adults. Forty-seven percent of primary care providers report not prescribing exercise for older adults; 85% of the sample report having no formal training in exercise prescription. Practitioner attitudes were positive toward exercise, but were not predictive of their exercise prescribing behavior, which indicates that education efforts aimed at changing attitudes as a way of increasing exercise-prescribing behaviors would not be sufficient. In order to facilitate and reinforce practice changes to increase exercise-prescribing behaviors of primary care providers, results suggest the need for specific skill training on how to write an exercise prescription and motivate older adults to follow these prescriptions.

  13. Adults with ADHD: use and misuse of stimulant medication as reported by patients and their primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Michael B; Zeiner, Pål; Sandvik, Leiv; Opjordsmoen, Stein

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the agreement on treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between adults with ADHD and the primary care physicians responsible for their treatment. Adults with ADHD and the primary care physicians responsible for their ADHD treatment completed a survey. The κ-statistic assessed physician-patient agreement on ADHD treatment variables. The eligible sample consisted of 274 patients with confirmed current or previous psychopharmacological treatment for ADHD and the physicians responsible for their treatment. We received 159 questionnaires (58.0 %) with sufficient information from both sources. There were no significant differences between participants and nonparticipants (N = 115) on ADHD sample characteristics. Participants' mean age was 37.6 years, and 75 (47.2 %) were females. There was high agreement for current pharmacological treatment for ADHD, current and last ADHD drug prescription, treatment for substance use, and misuse of stimulant medication. Agreement for nonpharmacological treatment for ADHD and treatment termination because of the side effects was low. A minority of participants from both sources reported misuse of stimulant medication. There was a moderate correlation between the physicians' clinical judgment and patients' self-report on current functioning. The study showed that primary care physicians and their patients agreed on the pharmacological but not the nonpharmacological, treatments given. They also agreed on patients' current functioning. Physicians and patients reported low levels of misuse of stimulant medication. The results show that pharmacological treatment for adults with ADHD can be safely undertaken by primary care physicians.

  14. Economic burden to primary informal caregivers of hospitalized older adults in Mexico: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The burden of out of pocket spending for the Mexican population is high compared to other countries. Even patients insured by social security institutions have to face the cost of health goods, services or nonmedical expenses related to their illness. Primary caregivers, in addition, experience losses in productivity by taking up responsibilities in care giving activities. This situation represents a mayor economic burden in an acute care setting for elderly population. There is evidence that specialized geriatric services could represent lower overall costs in these circumstances and could help reduce these burdens. The aim of this study was to investigate economic burden differences in caregivers of elderly patients comparing two acute care services (Geriatric and Internal Medicine). Specifically, economic costs associated with hospitalization of older adults in these two settings by evaluating health care related out of pocket expenditures (OOPE), non-medical OOPE and indirect costs. Methods A comparative analysis of direct and indirect costs in hospitalised elderly patients (60-year or older) and their primary informal caregivers in two health care settings, using a prospective cohort was performed. Economic burden was measured by out of pocket expenses and indirect costs (productivity lost) due to care giving activities. The analysis included a two-part model, the first one allowing the estimation of the probability of observing any health care related and non-medical OOPE; and the second one, the positive observations or expenditures. Results A total of 210 subjects were followed during their hospital stay. Of the total number of subjects 95% reported at least one non-medical OOPE, being daily transportation the most common expense. Regarding medical OOPE, medicines were the most common expense, and the mean numbers of days without income were 4.12 days. Both OOPE and indirect costs were significantly different between type of services, with less

  15. Identifying adults at risk of COPD who need confirmatory spirometry in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kylie; Hodder, Richard; Blouin, Maria; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Guyatt, Gordon; Goldstein, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the usefulness of a symptom-based case-finding questionnaire (CFQ) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea scale in identifying which individuals with known risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) require targeted spirometry in primary care. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Three community primary care practices in Ontario. Participants Men and women 40 years of age and older with a smoking history of 20 pack-years or more. Main outcome measures We administered a CFQ for the presence of cough, sputum, wheeze, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infections (possible range of scores from 0 to 5) and applied the MRC dyspnea scale to assess the severity of COPD (possible range of scores from 1 to 5). Spirometric measures of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were collected, with COPD defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC of less than 0.7 and FEV1 of less than 80% of the predicted value. Using spirometric data to confirm the diagnosis of COPD, likelihood ratios, pretest and posttest probabilities, and area under a receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated for the total CFQ and MRC scores. Results Scores for the CFQ and MRC dyspnea scale were available for 996 and 829 participants, respectively. The likelihood ratios for a total CFQ score of 3 or higher and an MRC dyspnea score of 4 or 5 were 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48 to 2.22) and 4.22 (95% CI 2.08 to 8.56), respectively. The likelihood ratios for a total CFQ score of 2 or less and an MRC dyspnea score of 1 were 0.75 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.85) and 0.50 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.65), respectively. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.62 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.67; P < .001) for the total CFQ scores and 0.64 (95% CI 0.60 to 068; P < .001) for the MRC dyspnea scores. Conclusion In adults with known risk factors, the likelihood of having moderate to severe COPD is increased in those who

  16. Economic burden to primary informal caregivers of hospitalized older adults in Mexico: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    López-Ortega, Mariana; García-Peña, Carmen; Granados-García, Víctor; García-González, José Juan; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2013-02-08

    The burden of out of pocket spending for the Mexican population is high compared to other countries. Even patients insured by social security institutions have to face the cost of health goods, services or nonmedical expenses related to their illness. Primary caregivers, in addition, experience losses in productivity by taking up responsibilities in care giving activities. This situation represents a mayor economic burden in an acute care setting for elderly population. There is evidence that specialized geriatric services could represent lower overall costs in these circumstances and could help reduce these burdens.The aim of this study was to investigate economic burden differences in caregivers of elderly patients comparing two acute care services (Geriatric and Internal Medicine). Specifically, economic costs associated with hospitalization of older adults in these two settings by evaluating health care related out of pocket expenditures (OOPE), non-medical OOPE and indirect costs. A comparative analysis of direct and indirect costs in hospitalised elderly patients (60-year or older) and their primary informal caregivers in two health care settings, using a prospective cohort was performed. Economic burden was measured by out of pocket expenses and indirect costs (productivity lost) due to care giving activities. The analysis included a two-part model, the first one allowing the estimation of the probability of observing any health care related and non-medical OOPE; and the second one, the positive observations or expenditures. A total of 210 subjects were followed during their hospital stay. Of the total number of subjects 95% reported at least one non-medical OOPE, being daily transportation the most common expense. Regarding medical OOPE, medicines were the most common expense, and the mean numbers of days without income were 4.12 days. Both OOPE and indirect costs were significantly different between type of services, with less overall economic burden to

  17. Morphometric analysis of infant and adult medullary nuclei through optical disector method.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Parenti, Anna; De Caro, Raffaele

    2009-10-01

    In the literature, comprehensive and comparative morphometric studies of infant and adult medullary nuclei performed with unbiased methods are still lacking. In this study, the unbiased quantitative method of the optical disector was applied to analyze neuronal densities, nuclear volumes, and total neuron numbers of the hypoglossal nucleus (XII), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV), nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), medial vestibular nucleus (MedVe), cuneate nucleus (Cu), nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract, principal inferior olivary nucleus (PION), medial inferior olivary nucleus (MION), and dorsal inferior olivary nucleus (DION) in adults (16 male, six female; mean age: 37 years) and infants (five male, five female; mean age: 5 months). In both infants and adults, higher neuronal densities were found in the more ventrally located nuclei of the spinal trigeminal tract (mean values (coefficient of variation): 20,947 (0.29) and 8,990 (0.18) neurons/mm(3), respectively) and inferior olivary complex (PION: 20,010 (0.15) and 9,076 (0.10); MION: 18,667 (0.20) and 9,989 (0.13); DION: 22,424 (0.17) and 10,986 (0.20), respectively) than in the nuclei of the medullary tegmentum, that is, XII (2,747 (0.39) and 1,026 (0.31)), DMNV (2,876 (0.19) and 1,553 (0.26)), NTS (7,993 (0.17) and 2,877 (0.13)), MedVe (7,010 (0.17) and 2,918 (0.12)), and Cu (2,563 (0.23) and 1,038 (0.16)). All the medullary nuclei showed higher volumes and lower neuronal densities in adults than in infants, without statistically significant differences in total neuron numbers, probably because of postnatal development of the neuropil and microvascularization.

  18. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the primary motor cortex improves word-retrieval in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Meinzer, Marcus; Lindenberg, Robert; Sieg, Mira M.; Nachtigall, Laura; Ulm, Lena; Flöel, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Language facilitation by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in healthy individuals has generated hope that tDCS may also allow improving language impairment after stroke (aphasia). However, current stimulation protocols have yielded variable results and may require identification of residual language cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which complicates incorporation into clinical practice. Based on previous behavioral studies that demonstrated improved language processing by motor system pre-activation, the present study assessed whether tDCS administered to the primary motor cortex (M1) can enhance language functions. This proof-of-concept study employed a sham-tDCS controlled, cross-over, within-subject design and assessed the impact of unilateral excitatory (anodal) and bihemispheric (dual) tDCS in 18 healthy older adults during semantic word-retrieval and motor speech tasks. Simultaneous fMRI scrutinized the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS effects. Both active tDCS conditions significantly improved word-retrieval compared to sham-tDCS. The direct comparison of activity elicited by word-retrieval vs. motor-speech trials revealed bilateral frontal activity increases during both anodal- and dual-tDCS compared to sham-tDCS. This effect was driven by more pronounced deactivation of frontal regions during the motor-speech task, while activity during word-retrieval trials was unaffected by the stimulation. No effects were found in M1 and secondary motor regions. Our results show that tDCS administered to M1 can improve word-retrieval in healthy individuals, thereby providing a rationale to explore whether M1-tDCS may offer a novel approach to improve language functions in aphasia. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed neural facilitation specifically during motor speech trials, which may have reduced switching costs between the overlapping neural systems for lexical retrieval and speech processing, thereby resulting in

  19. Exploring knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward older adults with hypertension in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Chotisiri, Luckwirun; Yamarat, Khemika; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High blood pressure increases the risk of cardiovascular and kidney diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore a baseline of hypertension knowledge, attitudes, and practices among older adults with hypertension at a sub-district Health Promoting Hospital in the Pathum Thani province of Thailand. Patients and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the outpatient clinic of the sub-district Health Promoting Hospital, one of the primary care sectors, between January and March 2015, and a total of 144 cases were recruited. All clinical parameters were collected and a structured questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results Most of the participants (74.3%) were females, and their mean age was 66.1 years. Two-thirds (66.7%) were married, unemployed/retired (67.4%), and had completed elementary education (79.2%). The screenings showed that their mean blood pressure was 136.4 (±14.4)/79.2 (±10.1) mmHg, the group’s mean body mass index was 24.9 kg/m2 (± 3.6 kg/m2), and their mean waist circumference was 88.6 cm (±7.1 cm) for males and 85.7 cm (±6.8 cm) for females. In addition, their mean score of hypertension knowledge was high, and most of the participants had a neutral attitude toward hypertension; their practices in terms of dietary and exercise habits for controlling blood pressure were low in nature. Conclusion This study indicated that increasing patients’ practices would be useful for promoting their healthy behaviors to achieve blood pressure control. PMID:27822057

  20. Analysis of symptomatic and asymptomatic primary root canal infections in adult Norwegian patients.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F; Debelian, Gilberto J

    2011-09-01

    This molecular study analyzed the microbiota of primary root canal infections from adult Norwegian patients. Samples were taken from the necrotic root canals of teeth with symptomatic (n = 13) or asymptomatic (n = 21) apical periodontitis and chronic apical abscesses (n = 9). DNA was extracted from samples, and bacterial identifications were performed by a closed-ended reverse-capture checkerboard approach targeting 50 candidate endodontic pathogens. Bacterial DNA was detected in all cases. In teeth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis, the most frequent taxa were Dialister invisus (71%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (62%), and Porphyromonas endodontalis (62%). In chronic apical abscesses, the most prevalent taxa were P. endodontalis (100%), D. invisus (89%), Parvimonas micra (78%), and Solobacterium moorei (78%). In teeth with symptomatic apical periodontitis, the most prevalent taxa were D. invisus, P. endodontalis, S. moorei, Propionibacterium acnes, and Streptococcus species (all in 69%). None of the targeted taxa were significantly associated with either sinus tract or pain (P > .05), except for Selenomonas sputigena, which was more frequently found in painful cases (P = .04). No taxa were found in significantly higher levels in any conditions (P > .05). Cluster analyses revealed bacterial groupings that differed between cases with and without pain. Although basically the same species were highly prevalent in the different conditions examined and none of the most prevalent taxa were positively associated with symptoms, results revealed that species formed different partnerships and associations in samples from teeth with or without pain. Therefore, it is possible that more virulent multispecies communities can form as a result of overall bacterial combinations and give rise to acute inflammation. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence of neuroepithelial primary brain tumors among adult population of Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy.

    PubMed

    Baldin, Elisa; Testoni, Stefania; de Pasqua, Silvia; Ferro, Salvatore; Albani, Fiorenzo; Baruzzi, Agostino; D'Alessandro, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Incidence of neuroepithelial Primary Brain Tumors (nPBT) varies, ranging from 7.3 to 11.6 cases/100,000/year across Europe. We present incidence and survival of nPBT in the Emilia-Romagna region (ER), Italy. This study is the largest in Southern Europe. Specialists in neurosurgery, neurology, neuroradiology, oncology, radiotherapy, genetics, and pathology of ER notified all suspected nPBT adult cases residing in ER (4,337,966 inhabitants) observed during 2009. Furthermore, through ICD-9 discharge codes, we identified and reviewed all possible cases. Neuroepithelial PBT diagnosis was based on histological or radiological findings. We included 400 incident nPBT cases, of which 102 (25%) were retrospectively identified. These latter were significantly older. The standardized incidence was 10.5/100,000/year (95% CI 9.4-11.5), higher for men. It was 9.2/100,000/year (95% CI 8.3-10.2) for astrocytic tumors, 0.6/100,000/year (95% CI 0.4-0.9) for oligodendroglial tumors, and 7.1 (95% CI 6.3-8.0) for glioblastoma (GBM). Among GBM patients, median survival was 249 days if prospectively identified vs. 132 days when identified through ICD-9 codes (p < 0.0001). The incidence of nPBT in the ER region is among the highest in the literature. Older patients were more likely to escape an active surveillance system. This should be considered when comparing incidence rates across studies, giving the increasing number of elderly people in the general population.

  2. Hospitalization in older adults: association with multimorbidity, primary health care and private health plan.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Soares, Mariangela Uhlmann; Wachs, Louriele Soares; Volz, Pâmela Moraes; Saes, Mirelle de Oliveira; Duro, Suele Manjourany Silva; Thumé, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-05-04

    Evaluate the association of multimorbidity, primary health care model and possession of a private health plan with hospitalization. A population-based cross-sectional study with 1,593 elderly individuals (60 years old or older) living in the urban area of the city of Bagé, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The outcome was hospitalization in the year preceding the interview. The multimorbidity was evaluated through two cut-off points (≥ 2 and ≥ 3). The primary health care model was defined by residence in areas covered by traditional care or by Family Health Strategy. The older adults mentioned the possession of a private health plan. We performed a gross and adjusted analysis by Poisson regression using a hierarchical model. The adjustment included demographic, socioeconomic, functional capacity disability and health services variables. The occurrence of overall and non-surgical hospitalization was 17.7% (95%CI 15.8-19.6) and 10.6% (95%CI 9.1-12.1), respectively. Older adults with multimorbidity were admitted to hospitals more often when to older adults without multimorbidity, regardless of the exhibition' form of operation. Having a private health plan increased the hospitalization by 1.71 (95%CI 1.09-2.69) times among residents in the areas of the Family Health Strategy when compared to elderly residents in traditional areas without a private health plan. The multimorbidity increased the occurrence of hospitalizations, especially non-surgical ones. Hospitalization was more frequent in older adults with private health plan and those living in Family Health Strategy areas, regardless of the presence of multiple diseases. Avaliar a associação da multimorbidade, modelo de atenção básica e posse de plano de saúde com hospitalização. Estudo transversal de base populacional com 1.593 idosos (60 anos ou mais) residentes na zona urbana do município de Bagé, Rio Grande do Sul. O desfecho foi a hospitalização no ano anterior à entrevista. A

  3. Primary mature cystıc teratoma mimickıng an adrenal mass in an adult male patient.

    PubMed

    Okulu, Emrah; Ener, Kemal; Aldemir, Mustafa; Isik, Evren; Irkkan, Cigdem; Kayigil, Onder

    2014-02-01

    Teratomas are bizarre neoplasms derived from embryonic tissues that are typically found only in the gonadal and sacrococcygeal regions of adults. Primary retroperitoneal teratomas are rare and present challenging management options. We report a case of a unilateral primary retroperitoneal mature cystic teratoma mimicking an adrenal mass in a 54-year-old male patient. Complete resection of the adrenal mass was performed by the flank approach by using the 11th rib resection. Because of the risk of malignancy, follow-up radiographic studies were performed to ensure the oncologic efficacy of resection. The patient has been free of recurrence for longer than 12 months.

  4. FOXL2 molecular status in adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary: A study of primary and metastatic cases.

    PubMed

    Zannoni, Gian Franco; Improta, Giuseppina; Petrillo, Marco; Pettinato, Angela; Scambia, Giovanni; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2016-08-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary are uncommon neoplasms, accounting for ~5% of all malignant ovarian tumors. GCTs are a relatively homogeneous group of tumors, categorized into two distinct subtypes, juvenile GCT and adult GCT (AGCT), likely arising from a limited set of molecular events usually involving the disruption of pathways that regulate granulosa cell proliferation. In the present study, the presence of forkheadbox L2 (FOXL2) c.402C>G mutation was investigated in a series of 42 samples of primary and metastatic AGCT of the ovary. The samples consisted of 37 primary and 5 metastatic ovarian AGCTs from 37 patients. FOXL2 mutational status was evaluated using a pyrosequencing approach on 2.5-µm sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. FOXL2 c.402C>G mutation was found in 33/37 (89.2%) primary AGCTs and in 4/5 (80.0%) metastases, with the molecular status of the metastases recapitulating that of the primary tumors (4 mutated cases and 1 wild-type case). Overall, FOXL2 mutation is present in the majority of primary and metastatic AGCTs, and could be used as a valid tool in the diagnosis of the disease and in cases of metastatic lesions from an unknown primary origin. Moreover the concordance of FOXL2 molecular status in primary and associated metastases suggests its early appearance and genomic stability in AGCT tumorigenesis.

  5. New Insights in Vanishing White Matter Disease-Isolated Bilateral Optic Neuropathy in Adult Onset Disease.

    PubMed

    Barros, Sandra R; Parreira, Sónia C R; Miranda, Ana F B; Pereira, Ana M B; Campos, Nuno M P

    2017-09-07

    Vanishing white matter disease (VWMD) is a rare disease affecting cerebral white matter. The adult form is even rarer and manifests with motor symptoms, behavioral problems, and dementia. There is no treatment and progression is inevitable. We describe a case with atypical manifestations and an unusual course. Description of a 42-year-old man with VWMD complaining of progressive visual loss in the right eye. The patient's visual acuity was 20/60, right eye, and 20/25, left eye, with pale optic nerves bilaterally. MRI showed atrophy of the corpus callosum, diffuse rarefaction of cerebral white matter including the anterior and posterior visual pathways. Our patient had no further symptoms besides loss of visual acuity, which is rare in patients with VWMD of the same age and genetic mutation.

  6. Mapping cerebral pulse pressure and arterial compliance over the adult lifespan with optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Kong, Tania; Fletcher, Mark A; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular health is important for maintaining a high level of cognitive performance, not only in old age, but also throughout the lifespan. Recently, it was first demonstrated that diffuse optical imaging measures of pulse amplitude and arterial compliance can provide estimates of cerebral arterial health throughout the cortex, and were associated with age, estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF), neuroanatomy and cognitive function in older adults (aged 55-87). The current study replicates and extends the original findings using a broader age range (a new adult sample aged 18-75), longer recording periods (360 s), and a more extensive optical montage (1536 channels). These methodological improvements represent a 5-fold increase in recording time and a 4-fold increase in coverage compared to the initial study. Results show that reliability for both pulse amplitude and compliance measures across recording blocks was very high (r(45) = .99 and .75, respectively). Pulse amplitude and pulse pressure were shown to correlate with age across the broader age range. We also found correlations between arterial health and both cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes. Additionally, we replicated the correlations between arterial compliance and age, eCRF, global brain atrophy, and cognitive flexibility. New regional analyses revealed that higher performance on the operation span (OSPAN) working memory task was associated with greater localized arterial compliance in frontoparietal cortex, but not with global arterial compliance. Further, greater arterial compliance in frontoparietal regions was associated with younger age and higher eCRF. These associations were not present in the visual cortex. The current study not only replicates the initial one in a sample including a much wider age range, but also provides new evidence showing that frontoparietal regions may be especially vulnerable to vascular degeneration during brain aging, with potential functional

  7. Mapping cerebral pulse pressure and arterial compliance over the adult lifespan with optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A.; Kong, Tania; Fletcher, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Maclin, Edward L.; Chiarelli, Antonio M.; Gratton, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular health is important for maintaining a high level of cognitive performance, not only in old age, but also throughout the lifespan. Recently, it was first demonstrated that diffuse optical imaging measures of pulse amplitude and arterial compliance can provide estimates of cerebral arterial health throughout the cortex, and were associated with age, estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF), neuroanatomy and cognitive function in older adults (aged 55–87). The current study replicates and extends the original findings using a broader age range (a new adult sample aged 18–75), longer recording periods (360 s), and a more extensive optical montage (1536 channels). These methodological improvements represent a 5-fold increase in recording time and a 4-fold increase in coverage compared to the initial study. Results show that reliability for both pulse amplitude and compliance measures across recording blocks was very high (r(45) = .99 and .75, respectively). Pulse amplitude and pulse pressure were shown to correlate with age across the broader age range. We also found correlations between arterial health and both cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes. Additionally, we replicated the correlations between arterial compliance and age, eCRF, global brain atrophy, and cognitive flexibility. New regional analyses revealed that higher performance on the operation span (OSPAN) working memory task was associated with greater localized arterial compliance in frontoparietal cortex, but not with global arterial compliance. Further, greater arterial compliance in frontoparietal regions was associated with younger age and higher eCRF. These associations were not present in the visual cortex. The current study not only replicates the initial one in a sample including a much wider age range, but also provides new evidence showing that frontoparietal regions may be especially vulnerable to vascular degeneration during brain aging, with potential functional

  8. Research in the Integration of Behavioral Health for Adolescents and Young Adults in Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Laura P; McCarty, Carolyn A; Radovic, Ana; Suleiman, Ahna Ballonoff

    2017-03-01

    Despite the recognition that behavioral and medical health conditions are frequently intertwined, the existing health care system divides management for these issues into separate settings. This separation results in increased barriers to receipt of care and contributes to problems of underdetection, inappropriate diagnosis, and lack of treatment engagement. Adolescents and young adults with mental health conditions have some of the lowest rates of treatment for their conditions of all age groups. Integration of behavioral health into primary care settings has the potential to address these barriers and improve outcomes for adolescents and young adults. In this paper, we review the current research literature for behavioral health integration in the adolescent and young adult population and make recommendations for needed research to move the field forward.

  9. Optical intrinsic signals in rat primary somatosensory cortex during non-noxious and noxious elecrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weihua; Li, Pengcheng; Chen, Shangbin; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    Optical imaging method was applied into observing the temporal-spatial characteristic of rat primary somatosensory cortex during graded electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve (5hz,duration of 2s,0.5ms puls,1x,10x and 20x muscle twitch threshold). We found that the temporal and spatial properties of hindlimb somatosensory cortex were modulated by graded intensity electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. The magnitude and time course were larger and longer with the intensity raising. And the spatial extent was wider at 20x stimulus than the other two kinds of stimulus. Therefore, our optical imaging was based on 570nm, which only reflect the changes of blood volume. Then our future study will reveal more information of pain modulation in primary somatosensory cortex.

  10. Time course of hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency in adults receiving cranial radiotherapy for primary extrasellar brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Madaschi, Sara; Sara, Madaschi; Fiorino, Claudio; Claudio, Fiorino; Losa, Marco; Marco, Losa; Lanzi, Roberto; Roberto, Lanzi; Mazza, Elena; Elena, Mazza; Motta, Micaela; Micaela, Motta; Perna, Lucia; Lucia, Perna; Brioschi, Elena; Elena, Brioschi; Scavini, Marina; Marina, Scavini; Reni, Michele; Michele, Reni

    2011-04-01

    No longitudinal data on hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) function are available in patients who had received cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for primary extrasellar brain tumors (PBT). To investigate the effects of CRT on HP function in adults with PBT. Twenty-six adults irradiated for PBT and six CRT naive controls were studied. CRT was delivered with 6 MV X-ray by a linear accelerator (2 Gy fraction schedule). Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) excluded the HP region that was contoured on the planning CT. Median dose to the HP region was 41.8 Gy (IQR: 30.7-49.8). All controls maintained normal HP function. Hypopituitarism developed in 38% of CRT patients (GH deficiency 29%, ACTH 22%, TSH 14%, gonadotropin 4%, no abnormal prolactin level or diabetes insipidus). All HP failures occurred within 32 months after CRT. Adults undergoing CRT for PBT are at increased risk for HP dysfunction within 3 years from CRT. Endocrine surveillance is recommended also in adults patients exposed to CRT for primary brain tumors distant from HP region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring the response to primary medical therapy for breast cancer using three- dimensional time-resolved optical mammography.

    PubMed

    Enfield, L C; Cantanhede, G; Westbroek, D; Douek, M; Purushotham, A D; Hebden, J C; Gibson, A P

    2011-12-01

    Primary medical therapy is used to reduce tumour size prior to surgery in women with locally advanced breast cancer. Optical tomography is a functional imaging technique using near- infrared light to produce three-dimensional breast images of tissue oxygen saturation and haemoglobin concentration. Its advantages include the ability to display quantitative physiological information, and to allow repeated scans without the hazards associated with exposure to ionising radiation. There is a need for a non-invasive functional imaging tool to evaluate response to treatment, so that non-responders can be given the opportunity to change their treatment regimen. Here, we evaluate the use of optical tomography for this purpose. Four women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were about to undergo primary medical therapy gave informed and voluntary consent to take part in the study. Changes in physiological and optical properties within the tumour were evaluated during the course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Optical imaging was performed prior to treatment, after the first cycle of chemotherapy, halfway through, and on completion of chemotherapy. Images of light absorption and scatter at two wavelengths were produced, from which images of total haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation were derived. All patients that showed a good or complete response to treatment on MRI showed a corresponding recovery in the haemoglobin concentration images. Changes in mean tumour total haemoglobin concentration could be seen four weeks into treatment. The tumour oxygen saturation was low compared to background in three out of four patients, and also showed a return to baseline over treatment. Optical imaging of the breast is feasible during primary medical therapy and can be used to assess response to treatment over six months.

  12. Prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of pertussis in adults with acute cough: a prospective, observational study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Teepe, Jolien; Broekhuizen, Berna DL; Ieven, Margareta; Loens, Katherine; Huygen, Kris; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; de Melker, Hester; Butler, Chris C; Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Coenen, Samuel; Goossens, Herman; Verheij, Theo JM

    2015-01-01

    Background Most cases of adult pertussis probably remain undiagnosed. Aim To explore the prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of acute pertussis infection in adult patients presenting with acute cough. Design and setting Prospective observational study between 2007 and 2010 in primary care in 12 European countries. Method Adults presenting with acute cough (duration of ≤28 days) were included. Bordetella pertussis infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (from nasopharyngeal flocked swabs and sputa) and by measurement of immunoglobulin G antibodies to pertussis toxin (PT) in venous blood at day 28. An antibody titre to PT of ≥125 IU/ml or PCR positive result in a respiratory sample defined recent infection. Patients completed a symptom diary for 28 days. Results Serum and/or respiratory samples were obtained in 3074 patients. Three per cent (93/3074) had recent B. pertussis infection. Prior cough duration >2 weeks discriminated to some extent between those with and without pertussis (adjusted odds ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 3.07; P = 0.010). Median cough duration after presentation was 17 and 12 days in patients with and without pertussis, respectively (P = 0.008). Patients with pertussis had longer duration of phlegm production (P = 0.010), shortness of breath (P = 0.037), disturbed sleep (P = 0.013) and interference with normal activities or work (P = 0.033) after presentation. Conclusion Pertussis infection plays a limited role among adults presenting with acute cough in primary care, but GPs should acknowledge the possibility of pertussis in uncomplicated lower respiratory tract infection. As in children, pertussis also causes prolonged symptoms in adults. However, pertussis is difficult to discern from other acute cough syndromes in adults at first presentation. PMID:26412843

  13. Prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of pertussis in adults with acute cough: a prospective, observational study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Teepe, Jolien; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Ieven, Margareta; Loens, Katherine; Huygen, Kris; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; de Melker, Hester; Butler, Chris C; Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Coenen, Samuel; Goossens, Herman; Verheij, Theo J M

    2015-10-01

    Most cases of adult pertussis probably remain undiagnosed. To explore the prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of acute pertussis infection in adult patients presenting with acute cough. Prospective observational study between 2007 and 2010 in primary care in 12 European countries. Adults presenting with acute cough (duration of ≤28 days) were included. Bordetella pertussis infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (from nasopharyngeal flocked swabs and sputa) and by measurement of immunoglobulin G antibodies to pertussis toxin (PT) in venous blood at day 28. An antibody titre to PT of ≥125 IU/ml or PCR positive result in a respiratory sample defined recent infection. Patients completed a symptom diary for 28 days. Serum and/or respiratory samples were obtained in 3074 patients. Three per cent (93/3074) had recent B. pertussis infection. Prior cough duration >2 weeks discriminated to some extent between those with and without pertussis (adjusted odds ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 3.07; P = 0.010). Median cough duration after presentation was 17 and 12 days in patients with and without pertussis, respectively (P = 0.008). Patients with pertussis had longer duration of phlegm production (P = 0.010), shortness of breath (P = 0.037), disturbed sleep (P = 0.013) and interference with normal activities or work (P = 0.033) after presentation. Pertussis infection plays a limited role among adults presenting with acute cough in primary care, but GPs should acknowledge the possibility of pertussis in uncomplicated lower respiratory tract infection. As in children, pertussis also causes prolonged symptoms in adults. However, pertussis is difficult to discern from other acute cough syndromes in adults at first presentation. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  14. Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Redalje, Donald G.; Lohrenz, Stevern E.

    2001-02-12

    In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.

  15. Prevalence of coeliac disease in primary biliary cirrhosis and of antimitochondrial antibodies in adult coeliac disease patients in Italy.

    PubMed

    Floreani, A; Betterle, C; Baragiotta, A; Martini, S; Venturi, C; Basso, D; Pittoni, M; Chiarelli, S; Sategna Guidetti, C

    2002-04-01

    Although an association between primary biliary cirrhosis and coeliac disease has recently been reported in Northern Europe, there are still conflicting data concerning this issue. To evaluate both the prevalence of coeliac disease in a series of primary biliary cirrhosis patients and that of antimitochondrial antibodies in a series of adult biopsy proven coeliac disease patients from Northern Italy. A total of 87 primary biliary cirrhosis patients (79 female, 8 male) were screened for both IgA-transglutaminase antibodies and antiendomysium antibodies and, in those with either IgA-transglutaminase antibodies or antiendomysium antibodies positivity, upper endoscopy with distal duodenum biopsy was offered. In those who refused upper endoscopy, the intestinal permeability test with lactulose/mannitol excretion was performed. Antiendomysium antibodies positivity was detected in 3 subjects (3.4%), all of whom had serum IgA-transglutaminase antibodies above the normal range, and fulfilled the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Of 21 other patients with serum IgA-transglutaminase antibodies above the normal range, 17 underwent upper endoscopy which revealed normal duodenum architecture. The remaining 4 patients underwent the lactulose/mannitol excretion test which was within the normal range. Sera from 108 adult coeliac disease patients were tested for antimitochondrial antibodies and positivity was found in 4 patients (3.7%): all had normal liver biochemistry tests, whereas 2 of them also presented thyroid disease. Antibodies directed to the 74-kDa polypeptide of antimitochondrial antibodies were found in 3 out of 4 antimitochondrial antibodies+ve patients. These results suggest an association between primary biliary cirrhosis and coeliac disease similar to that observed in the Northern European series. In conclusion, screening for coeliac disease with antiendomysium antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis is justified, and screening for antimitochondrial antibodies is

  16. A program of nurse algorithm-guided care for adult patients with acute minor illnesses in primary care.

    PubMed

    Fabrellas, Núria; Sánchez, Carmen; Juvé, Eulàlia; Aurin, Eva; Monserrat, Dolors; Casanovas, Esther; Urrea, Magali

    2013-05-16

    Attention to patients with acute minor-illnesses requesting same-day consultation represents a major burden in primary care. The workload is assumed by general practitioners in many countries. A number of reports suggest that care to these patients may be provided, at in least in part, by nurses. However, there is scarce information with respect to the applicability of a program of nurse management for adult patients with acute minor-illnesses in large areas. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a program of nurse algorithm-guided care for adult patients with acute minor illnesses requesting same-day consultation in primary care in a largely populated area. A cross-sectional study of all adult patients seeking same day consultation for 16 common acute minor illnesses in a large geographical area with 284 primary care practices. Patients were included in a program of nurse case management using management algorithms. The main outcome measure was case resolution, defined as completion of the algorithm by the nurse without need of referral of the patient to the general practitioner. The secondary outcome measure was return to consultation, defined as requirement of new consultation for the same reason as the first one, in primary care within a 7-day period. During a two year period (April 2009-April 2011), a total of 1,209,669 consultations were performed in the program. Case resolution was achieved by nurses in 62.5% of consultations. The remaining cases were referred to a general practitioner. Resolution rates ranged from 94.2% in patients with burns to 42% in patients with upper respiratory symptoms. None of the 16 minor illnesses had a resolution rate below 40%. Return to consultation during a 7-day period was low, only 4.6%. A program of algorithms-guided care is effective for nurse case management of patients requesting same day consultation for minor illnesses in primary care.

  17. Upregulation of Gem relates to retinal ganglion cells apoptosis after optic nerve crush in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Huang, Hui; Wu, Yu; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Li; Chen, Lifei; Zeng, Siming; Li, Li; Li, Min

    2014-10-01

    GTP-binding protein Gem, a member protein of the Ras superfamily, can regulate actin cytoskeleton reorganization mediated by Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK). One attractive activity of the ROCK is playing a potential role in physiological and pathological process in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) apoptosis. However, the function of Gem in retina is still with limited understanding. To investigate whether Gem is involved in optic nerve injury, we performed an optic nerve crush (ONC) model in adult rats. Western blot analysis indicated that Gem was significantly increased in the retina at the 3rd day after ONC. Meanwhile, double-immunofluorescent staining showed that Gem expression was mainly up-regulated in ganglion cell layer and co-localized with NeuN (a marker of RGCs). Additionally, the co-localizations of Gem/active-caspase-3 and Gem/TUNEL-positive cells were detected in RGCs. Furthermore, the expression of active-caspase-3 and TUNEL-positive cells was parallel with that of Gem. Finally, expression pattern of ROCK family (only ROCK2 but not ROCK1) was increased in the differentiated process, which was collected with the expression of GEM and active-caspase-3. Based on the present results, it is suggested that Gem might play a crucial role in RGCs apoptosis after ONC, which might be involved in ROCK pathway.

  18. Quantitative in vivo optical tomography of cancer progression & vasculature development in adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Lockwood, Nicola; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Correia, Teresa; Ellis, Matthew; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Andrews, Natalie; Patel, Rachel; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.; Brandner, Sebastian; Arridge, Simon; Katan, Matilda; McGinty, James; Frankel, Paul; French, Paul M.W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to study tumour progression and vasculature development in vivo via global 3-D fluorescence imaging of live non-pigmented adult zebrafish utilising angularly multiplexed optical projection tomography with compressive sensing (CS-OPT). This “mesoscopic” imaging method bridges a gap between established ~μm resolution 3-D fluorescence microscopy techniques and ~mm-resolved whole body planar imaging and diffuse tomography. Implementing angular multiplexing with CS-OPT, we demonstrate the in vivo global imaging of an inducible fluorescently labelled genetic model of liver cancer in adult non-pigmented zebrafish that also present fluorescently labelled vasculature. In this disease model, addition of a chemical inducer (doxycycline) drives expression of eGFP tagged oncogenic K-RASV12 in the liver of immune competent animals. We show that our novel in vivo global imaging methodology enables non-invasive quantitative imaging of the development of tumour and vasculature throughout the progression of the disease, which we have validated against established methods of pathology including immunohistochemistry. We have also demonstrated its potential for longitudinal imaging through a study of vascular development in the same zebrafish from early embryo to adulthood. We believe that this instrument, together with its associated analysis and data management tools, constitute a new platform for in vivo cancer studies and drug discovery in zebrafish disease models. PMID:27259259

  19. Quantitative in vivo optical tomography of cancer progression & vasculature development in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Lockwood, Nicola; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Correia, Teresa; Ellis, Matthew; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Andrews, Natalie; Patel, Rachel; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J; Brandner, Sebastian; Arridge, Simon; Katan, Matilda; McGinty, James; Frankel, Paul; French, Paul M W

    2016-07-12

    We describe a novel approach to study tumour progression and vasculature development in vivo via global 3-D fluorescence imaging of live non-pigmented adult zebrafish utilising angularly multiplexed optical projection tomography with compressive sensing (CS-OPT). This "mesoscopic" imaging method bridges a gap between established ~μm resolution 3-D fluorescence microscopy techniques and ~mm-resolved whole body planar imaging and diffuse tomography. Implementing angular multiplexing with CS-OPT, we demonstrate the in vivo global imaging of an inducible fluorescently labelled genetic model of liver cancer in adult non-pigmented zebrafish that also present fluorescently labelled vasculature. In this disease model, addition of a chemical inducer (doxycycline) drives expression of eGFP tagged oncogenic K-RASV12 in the liver of immune competent animals. We show that our novel in vivo global imaging methodology enables non-invasive quantitative imaging of the development of tumour and vasculature throughout the progression of the disease, which we have validated against established methods of pathology including immunohistochemistry. We have also demonstrated its potential for longitudinal imaging through a study of vascular development in the same zebrafish from early embryo to adulthood. We believe that this instrument, together with its associated analysis and data management tools, constitute a new platform for in vivo cancer studies and drug discovery in zebrafish disease models.

  20. Adult Visual Experience Promotes Recovery of Primary Visual Cortex from Long-Term Monocular Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Quentin S.; Aleem, Salman; Zhou, Hongyi; Pham, Tony A.

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged visual deprivation from early childhood to maturity is believed to cause permanent visual impairment. However, there have been case reports of substantial improvement of binocular vision in human adults following lifelong visual impairment or deprivation. These observations, together with recent findings of adult ocular dominance…

  1. Adult Visual Experience Promotes Recovery of Primary Visual Cortex from Long-Term Monocular Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Quentin S.; Aleem, Salman; Zhou, Hongyi; Pham, Tony A.

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged visual deprivation from early childhood to maturity is believed to cause permanent visual impairment. However, there have been case reports of substantial improvement of binocular vision in human adults following lifelong visual impairment or deprivation. These observations, together with recent findings of adult ocular dominance…

  2. Comparison of relation between visual function index and retinal nerve fiber layer structure by optical coherence tomography among primary open angle glaucoma and primary angle closure glaucoma eyes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    To compare the visual field index (VFI) in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) eyes, and to study the correlation with disc variables on optical coherence tomography (OCT) in all stages of severity. Thirty POAG and PACG underwent Humphrey visual field 24-2 along with detailed examination. They also underwent stratus OCT imaging of the optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). The correlation of VFI with RNFL thickness was compared in POAG and PACG. The VFI significantly differed between POAG and PACG, with POAG eyes apparently having a better VFI at all severities of glaucoma. There were statistically significant differences in the superior max (Smax) and inferior max (Imax) in early and moderate POAG and PACG eyes. In early and moderate glaucoma, multivariate regression showed that maximum correlation of the VFI was seen with the mean deviation (b = 1.7, P < 0.001), average and superior RNFL thickness (b = 2.1, P < 0.001 and b = 1.8, P = 0.03, respectively), and age (b = 0.7, P = 0.04); while no correlation was seen with intraocular pressure (IOP), axial length, sex, or other clinical variables. VFI did not correlate well with RNFL thickness or other disc variables on OCT in severe glaucoma. VFI may not serve as a useful indicator of visual function in severe glaucoma. More useful indicators are required to monitor glaucoma patients with severe damage.

  3. Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Female Adults With Primary Sjögren Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Wu, Biing-Ru; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No large-scale population-based cohort study has ever investigated the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in patients with Sjögren syndrome (SS). This study evaluated the risk of COPD in women with primary SS (pSS) in a nationwide population. We used the data of the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to establish a pSS group consisting of 3013 female adults diagnosed between 2000 and 2005, and a non-SS group consisting of 12,052 women without SS matched by a propensity score. Incident COPD cases were identified to the end of 2011. The pSS group to non-SS group adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) of COPD were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. After a mean follow-up period of 7.99 years, the incidence of COPD was 1.4-fold greater in the pSS group than in the non-SS group (3.87 vs 2.77 per 1000 person-years) with an aHR of 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10–1.75, P = 0.007). The COPD incidence was 7-fold greater for women aged 50 years and above than women aged 20 to 49, with the aHR of 4.24 (95% CI = 3.06–5.88, P < 0.001). Comorbidity increased the COPD risk further for women with pSS. Women with both pSS and comorbidity had an aHR of 3.11 (95% CI = 2.23–4.33, P < 0.001) for COPD, compared to those free of both pSS and comorbidity. Women with pSS are at a greater risk of developing COPD than those without SS. Patients with SS require close monitoring to prevent COPD development, particularly for those with comorbidity. PMID:26962839

  4. Anti-Neurotrophic Effects from Autoantibodies in Adult Diabetes Having Primary Open Angle Glaucoma or Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zimering, Mark B.; Moritz, Thomas E.; Donnelly, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To test for anti-endothelial and anti-neurotrophic effects from autoantibodies in subsets of diabetes having open-angle glaucoma, dementia, or control subjects. Methods: Protein-A eluates from plasma of 20 diabetic subjects having glaucoma or suspects and 34 age-matched controls were tested for effects on neurite outgrowth in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells or endothelial cell survival. The mechanism of the diabetic glaucoma autoantibodies’ neurite-inhibitory effect was investigated in co-incubations with the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 or the sulfated proteoglycan synthesis inhibitor sodium chlorate. Stored protein-A eluates from certain diabetic glaucoma or dementia subjects which contained long-lasting, highly stable cell inhibitory substances were characterized using mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing. Results: Diabetic primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or suspects (n = 20) or diabetic dementia (n = 3) autoantibodies caused significantly greater mean inhibition of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells (p < 0.0001) compared to autoantibodies in control diabetic (n = 24) or non-diabetic (n = 10) subjects without glaucoma (p < 0.01). Neurite inhibition by the diabetic glaucoma autoantibodies was completely abolished by 10 μM concentrations of Y27632 (n = 4). It was substantially reduced by 30 mM concentrations of sodium chlorate (n = 4). Peak, long-lasting activity survived storage ×5 years at 0–4°C and was associated with a restricted subtype of Ig kappa light chain. Diabetic glaucoma or dementia autoantibodies (n = 5) caused contraction and process retraction in quiescent cerebral cortical astrocytes effects which were blocked by 5 μM concentrations of Y27632. Conclusion: These data suggest that autoantibodies in subsets of adult diabetes having POAG (glaucoma suspects) and/or dementia inhibit neurite outgrowth and promote a reactive astrocyte morphology by a mechanism which may involve

  5. An Update of the Mayo Clinic Cohort of Patients With Adult Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D.; Christianson, Teresa; Miller, Dylan V.; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition in which lesions are limited to vessels of the brain and spinal cord. Because the clinical manifestations are not specific, the diagnosis is often difficult, and permanent disability and death are frequent outcomes. This study is based on a cohort of 163 consecutive patients with PCNSV who were examined at the Mayo Clinic over a 29-year period from 1983 to 2011. The aim of the study was to define the characteristics of these patients, which represents the largest series in adults reported to date. A total of 105 patients were diagnosed by angiographic findings and 58 by biopsy results. The patients diagnosed by biopsy more frequently had at presentation cognitive dysfunction, greater cerebrospinal fluid total protein concentrations, less frequent cerebral infarcts, and more frequent leptomeningeal gadolinium-enhanced lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with less mortality and disability at last follow-up. The patients diagnosed by angiograms more frequently had at presentation hemiparesis or a persistent neurologic deficit or stroke, more frequent infarcts on MRI and an increased mortality. These differences were mainly related to the different size of the vessels involved in the 2 groups. Although most patients responded to therapy with glucocorticoids alone or in conjunction with cyclophosphamide and tended to improve during the follow-up period, an overall increased mortality rate was observed. Relapses occurred in one-quarter of the patients and were less frequent in patients treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide compared with those treated with prednisone alone. The mortality rate and degree of disability at last follow-up were greater in those with increasing age, cerebral infarctions on MRI, angiographic large vessel involvement, and diagnosis made by angiography alone, but were lower in those with gadolinium-enhanced lesions on MRI and in those with

  6. Spatial and temporal hemodynamic study of human primary visual cortex using simultaneous functional MRI and diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Toronov, Vladislav Y.; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI and near infrared optical tomography have been widely used to investigate the hemodynamic response to functional stimulation in the human brain. In this paper, we present a complete methodology of integrating the two imaging modalities to study the underlying physiological mechanism of hemodynamic response in the human primary visual cortex. The integration was made feasible thanks to the development of an MRI-compatible optical probe. The optical imaging was conducted using a frequency-domain near infrared spectrometer. The 3-dimentional optical image reconstruction was based on diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the perturbative approach. The sensitivity function of the forward problem was obtained using Monte Carlo method. From our preliminary observation, the spatial activation pattern of deoxyhemoglobin is consistent with the BOLD signal map. The patterns of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin are very similar. The temporal hemodynamic response shows an increased total hemoglobin concentration, which indicates an increment of cerebral blood volume (CBV) during physiological activation. PMID:17282286

  7. Diagnosing epilepsy in older adults: what does it mean for the primary care physician?

    PubMed

    Sirven, Joseph I; Ozuna, Judy

    2005-10-01

    Acute and chronic seizures (epilepsy) occur frequently in older adults. However, despite their high prevalence, the condition is often overlooked or misdiagnosed because seizures mimic other common spells in the aged. The causes of seizures in older adults are often the sequelae of highly prevalent conditions that occur in this age group, eg, stroke, dementia, and head trauma. Recognizing and correctly diagnosing seizures can lead to a number of effective treatments. This article reviews the causes and presentation of seizures in older adults and offers an approach for diagnosis.

  8. Primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus as predictors of health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kevin C J; Kołtowska-Häggström, Maria; Cook, David M; Fox, Janet L; Jönsson, Peter J; Geffner, Mitchell E; Abs, Roger

    2014-04-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are often associated with significant morbidity due to their location and treatment effects. Little is known of the effects of primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus (DI), a clinical surrogate of hypothalamic obesity, on health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma (COCP). The objective of the study was to examine health outcomes of adults with COCP based on primary treatment regimens and the presence of DI. This study included a retrospective KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) data analysis of 180 adults with COCP according to the primary treatment regimen [one surgery (1Surg) vs complex treatment regimen (CTrR) of more than 1Surg and/or radiotherapy] and the presence of DI. The majority of COCP patients underwent transcranial surgery (77%) without receiving radiotherapy (84%). Compared with the 1Surg group, more CTrR patients developed visual field defects and ophthalmoplegia (all P < .01). Compared with patients without DI, those with DI had higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits, body mass index, and fat mass (all P < .01). By contrast, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, lipid panel, and quality of life were comparable among 1Surg vs CTrR patients, and patients with vs without DI. Regardless of primary treatment received, the presence of DI in either group was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits and obesity. CTrR and DI predicted health outcomes differently. CTrR predisposed to the development of visual dysfunction, whereas DI was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary dysfunction and weight gain. Higher body mass index and fat mass in patients with DI further implicate the role of hypothalamic damage as an important causal factor of obesity in these patients.

  9. Molecular and immunocytochemical characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain: Differential expression of neuronal and glial protein markers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Sarkar, Sumit; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-11-15

    Neurobiological studies using primary neuronal cultures commonly employ fetal-derived neurons, but much less often adult brain-derived neurons. Our goal is to perform morphological and molecular characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain, including the relative expression of neuronal and glial cell markers at different time points. We tested the hypothesis that long-term neuronal viability is compatible with glial proliferation in adult neuron culture. We examined neuron culture from adult rat brain, which was maintained at steady state up to 24 days, and characterized them on the basis of cellular, molecular and biochemical properties at different time points of the culture. We identified neuronal and glial cells by both immunocytochemical and western immunoblotting techniques using NSE and Tau as neuronal markers and GFAP as glial protein marker, which revealed the presence of predominantly neuronal cells in the initial phase of the culture and a rise in glial cells from day 12 onwards. Notably, neuronal cells were preserved in the culture along with the glial cells even at day 24. Transfection of the cultured cells with a GFP expression vector and plasmids containing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of two different gene promoters demonstrated DNA transfectability. Taken together, these results suggest a differential expression of neuronal and glial cells at different time points and long-term neuronal viability in the presence of glial proliferation. Such adult neurons serve as a suitable system for the application of neurodegeneration models and for drug target discovery in various brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Design, Recruitment and Start Up of a Primary Care Weight Loss Trial Targeting African American and Hispanic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kumanyika, Shiriki; Fassbender, Jennifer; Phipps, Etienne; Tan-Torres, Susan; Localio, Russell; Morales, Knashawn H.; Sarwer, David B.; Harralson, Tina; Allison, Kelly; Wesby, Lisa; Kessler, Ronni; Tsai, Adam Gilden; Wadden, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Primary care offices are critical access points for obesity treatment, but evidence for approaches that can be implemented within these settings is limited. The Think Health! (¡Vive Saludable!) Study was designed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a behavioral weight loss program, adapted from the Diabetes Prevention Program, for implementation in routine primary care. Recruitment of clinical sites targeted primary care practices serving African American and Hispanic adults. The randomized design compares (a) a moderate-intensity treatment consisting of primary care provider counseling plus additional counseling by an auxiliary staff member (i.e., lifestyle coach), with (b) a low-intensity, control treatment involving primary care provider counseling only. Treatment and follow up duration are 1 to 2 years. The primary outcome is weight change from baseline at 1 and 2 years post-randomization. Between November 2006 and January 2008, 14 primary care providers (13 physicians; 1 physician assistant) were recruited at five clinical sites. Patients were recruited between October 2007 and November 2008. A total of 412 patients were pre-screened, of whom 284 (68.9%) had baseline assessments and 261 were randomized, with the following characteristics: 65% African American; 16% Hispanic American; 84% female; mean (SD) age of 47.2 (11.7) years; mean (SD) BMI of 37.2(6.4) kg/m2; 43.7% with high blood pressure; and 18.4% with diabetes. This study will provide insights into the potential utility of moderate-intensity lifestyle counseling delivered by motivated primary care clinicians and their staff. The study will have particular relevance to African Americans and women. PMID:21062645

  11. Addressing Adult Innumeracy via an Interventionist Approach to Mathematics Aversion in Pre-Service Primary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Student primary teachers tend to have pervasive and frequently severe negative attitudes, low mathematics self-efficacy beliefs, and anxiety of mathematics that are more extreme than those of any other undergraduate student group. If unaddressed, such mathematics aversion will be carried into primary school classrooms, presenting a tangible and…

  12. Sleep paralysis and trauma, psychiatric symptoms and disorders in an adult African American population attending primary medical care.

    PubMed

    Mellman, Thomas A; Aigbogun, Notalelomwan; Graves, Ruth Elaine; Lawson, William B; Alim, Tanya N

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of sleep paralysis (SP) absent narcolepsy appears to not be uncommon in African Americans and probably other non-European groups. Prior research has linked SP to trauma and psychiatric disorders and suggested a specific relationship to panic disorder in African Americans. The objective of our study was to evaluate relationships of SP with trauma, concurrent psychiatric symptoms and lifetime psychiatric diagnoses in an adult African American population recruited from primary care. Cross sectional study with surveys and diagnostic interviews; Patients attending primary care clinics filled out a survey that determined the 6 month prevalence and associated features of SP, a panic disorder screen, the self-rated Hamilton Depression Scale, and an inventory of trauma exposure. A subset of trauma-exposed participants (N = 142) received comprehensive diagnostic interviews that incorporated the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the Clinician Assessed PTSD Scale. Four hundred and forty-one adults participated (mean age-40.0 SD = 13.3, 68% female, 95% African American). Fourteen percent endorsed recent SP. In approximately 1/3 of those with SP, episodes also featured panic symptoms. SP was strongly associated with trauma history, and concurrent anxiety and mood symptoms. SP was not associated with specific psychiatric disorders other than lifetime (but not current) alcohol or substance use disorders. Our findings suggest that SP is not uncommon in adult African Americans and is associated with trauma and concurrent distress but not with a specific psychiatric diagnosis.

  13. Comorbidity and its impact in adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Thomas; Ornstein, Craig S

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature relevant to the primary care practitioner concerning comorbidity and its impact on diagnosis and treatment efficacy in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A MEDLINE literature review was performed using the keywords: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; psychiatric comorbidity; bipolar disorder; major depressive disorder; oppositional defiant disorder; conduct disorder; and substance use disorder. The authors assessed and summarized literature identified as relevant to primary care practitioners. Results demonstrated high rates of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with ADHD. These comorbid disorders, coupled with the differing characteristics of ADHD symptoms in adults versus children, may complicate accurate diagnosis and treatment of ADHD. Controlled clinical trials indicate that the presence of comorbidity does not substantially alter the safety and efficacy of ADHD pharmacotherapy and that treatment of ADHD can sometimes improve symptoms of the comorbid disorder. Although rates of psychiatric comorbidity are high in adults with ADHD, available data suggest that the benefits of pharmacotherapy for ADHD are not compromised by the presence of psychiatric comorbidity.

  14. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGES

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  15. Does a Depression Management Program Decrease Mortality in Older Adults with Specific Medical Conditions in Primary Care? An Exploratory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Hillary R; Joo, Jin H; Hwang, Seungyoung; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce, Martha L; Reynolds, Charles F; Gallo, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether treating depression decreases mortality from various chronic medical conditions. Long-term follow-up of multisite-practice randomized controlled trial (Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial). Twenty primary care practices randomized to intervention or usual care. Individuals aged 60 and older identified through depression screening of random patients (N=1,226). For 2 years, a depression care manager worked with primary care physicians in intervention practices to provide algorithm-based care for depression. Mortality risk based on a median follow-up of 98 months (range 0.8-116.4 months) through 2008; chronic medical conditions ascertained through self-report. For heart disease, persons with major depression were at greater risk of death, whether in usual-care or intervention practices. Older adults with major depression and diabetes mellitus in practices randomized to the intervention condition (hazard ratio=0.47, 95% confidence interval=0.24-0.91) were less likely to die. For other medical conditions, the point estimates for risk of death in persons with major depression were all in the direction of indicating lower risk in intervention practices but did not reach statistical significance. Older adults with depression and medical comorbidity pose a significant clinical and public health challenge. Evidence was found of a statistically significant intervention effect on mortality for diabetes mellitus in persons with major depression. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Study origin of germ cells and formation of new primary follicles in adult human and rat ovaries.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Gupta, Satish K; Virant-Klun, Irma; Upadhyaya, Nirmala B; Copas, Pleas; Van Meter, Stuart E; Svetlikova, Marta; Ayala, Maria E; Dominguez, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The central thesis regarding the human ovaries is that, although primordial germ cells in embryonal ovaries are of extraovarian origin, those generated during the fetal period and in postnatal life are derived from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) bipotent cells. With the assistance of immune system-related cells, secondary germ cells and primitive granulosa cells originate from OSE stem cells in the fetal and adult human gonads. Fetal primary follicles are formed during the second trimester of intrauterine life, prior to the end of immune adaptation, possibly to be recognized as self-structures and renewed later. With the onset of menarche, a periodical oocyte and follicular renewal emerges to replace aging primary follicles and ensure that fresh eggs for healthy babies are always available during the prime reproductive period. The periodical follicular renewal ceases between 35 and 40 yr of age, and the remaining primary follicles are utilized during the premenopausal period until exhausted. However, the persisting oocytes accumulate genetic alterations and may become unsuitable for ovulation and fertilization. The human OSE stem cells preserve the character of embryonic stem cells, and they may produce distinct cell types, including new eggs in vitro, particularly when derived from patients with premature ovarian failure or aging and postmenopausal ovaries. Our observations also indicate that there are substantial differences in follicular renewal between adult human and rat ovaries. As part of this chapter, we present in detail protocols utilized to analyze oogenesis in humans and to study interspecies differences when compared to the ovaries of rat females.

  17. Sex-specific associations between birth weight and adult primary liver cancer in a large cohort of Danish children.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Esther; Berentzen, Tina L; Gamborg, Michael; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Baker, Jennifer L

    2016-03-15

    Whether the prenatal period is critical for the development of adult primary liver cancer (PLC) is sparsely investigated. Recently, attention has been drawn to potential sex-differences in the early origins of adult disease. The association between birth weight and adult PLC, separately in men and women was investigated, using a large cohort of 217,227 children (51% boys), born from 1936 to 1980, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, and followed them until 2010 in national registers. Hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of PLC (30 years or older) were estimated by Cox regression models stratified by birth cohort. During 5.1 million person-years of follow-up, 185 men and 65 women developed PLC. Sex modified the association between birth weight and adult PLC (p values for interaction = 0.0005). Compared with a sex-specific reference group of birth weights between 3.25 and 3.75 kg, men with birth weights between 2.00 and 3.25 kg and 3.75-5.50 kg, had HRs of 1.48 (1.06-2.05) and 0.85 (0.56-1.28), respectively. Among women the corresponding HRs were 1.71 (0.90-3.29) and 3.43 (1.73-6.82). Associations were similar for hepatocellular carcinoma only, across year of birth, and after accounting for diagnoses of alcohol-related disorders, viral hepatitis and biliary cirrhosis. Prenatal exposures influenced the risk of adult PLC, and the effects at the high birth weight levels appeared to be sex-specific. These findings underscore the importance of considering sex-specific mechanisms in the early origins of adult PLC. © 2015 UICC.

  18. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements of normal Northern Nigerian adults using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Sani, Rabi Yahaya; Abdu, Lawal; Pam, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    To assess retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements of normal Northern Nigerian adults using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The OCT procedure was carried out with the Carl Zeiss Stratus OCT Model 3000 software version 4.0 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany). The fast RNFL scan protocol was used to obtain RNFL thickness measurements. Student's t-test was used to compare mean RNFL thickness values. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Average RNFL thickness was correlated with age. Two hundred and twenty eyes of 110 subjects aged 18-51 years were examined. The average RNFL thickness was 104.17 ± 10.71 μm. The mean values for the RNFL thickness were 129.15 ± 16.87 μm, 135.34 ± 20.40 μm, 85.10 ± 23.60 μm, and 67.19 ± 13.27 μm for the inferior, superior, nasal, and temporal quadrants, respectively. A statistically significant difference was found between males and females for the mean RNFL thickness (t = 3.30, P = 0.001) and for the mean superior and inferior RNFL thickness. There was a statistically significant difference between right and left eyes (t = 3.73, P = 0.001) for the mean RNFL thickness. A negative correlation was found between RNFL thickness and age (r = -0.313, P = 0.002). Normal RNFL thickness measurements in healthy Nigerian adults are presented. The RNFL was found to be thicker in females and in right eyes. The values were comparable to those of the Indian population but higher than some Caucasian values.

  19. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements of normal Northern Nigerian adults using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Rabi Yahaya; Abdu, Lawal; Pam, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements of normal Northern Nigerian adults using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Subjects and Methods: The OCT procedure was carried out with the Carl Zeiss Stratus OCT Model 3000 software version 4.0 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany). The fast RNFL scan protocol was used to obtain RNFL thickness measurements. Student's t-test was used to compare mean RNFL thickness values. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Average RNFL thickness was correlated with age. Results: Two hundred and twenty eyes of 110 subjects aged 18–51 years were examined. The average RNFL thickness was 104.17 ± 10.71 μm. The mean values for the RNFL thickness were 129.15 ± 16.87 μm, 135.34 ± 20.40 μm, 85.10 ± 23.60 μm, and 67.19 ± 13.27 μm for the inferior, superior, nasal, and temporal quadrants, respectively. A statistically significant difference was found between males and females for the mean RNFL thickness (t = 3.30, P = 0.001) and for the mean superior and inferior RNFL thickness. There was a statistically significant difference between right and left eyes (t = 3.73, P = 0.001) for the mean RNFL thickness. A negative correlation was found between RNFL thickness and age (r = −0.313, P = 0.002). Conclusion: Normal RNFL thickness measurements in healthy Nigerian adults are presented. The RNFL was found to be thicker in females and in right eyes. The values were comparable to those of the Indian population but higher than some Caucasian values. PMID:27044727

  20. A review of primary care interventions to improve health outcomes in adult survivors of adverse childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Korotana, Laurel M; Dobson, Keith S; Pusch, Dennis; Josephson, Trevor

    2016-06-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated a link between the experience of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and adult health conditions, including mental and physical health problems. While a focus on the prevention or mitigation of adversity in childhood is an important direction of many programs, many individuals do not access support services until adulthood, when health problems may be fairly engrained. It is not clear which interventions have the strongest evidence base to support the many adults who present to services with a history of ACEs. The current review examines the evidence base for psychosocial interventions for adults with a history of ACEs. The review focuses on interventions that may be provided in primary care, as that is the setting where most patients will first present and are most likely to receive treatment. A systematic review of the literature was completed using PsycInfo and PubMed databases, with 99 studies identified that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. These studies evaluated a range of interventions with varying levels of supportive evidence. Overall, cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBT) have the most evidence for improving health problems - in particular, improving mental health and reducing health-risk behaviors - in adults with a history of ACEs. Expressive writing and mindfulness-based therapies also show promise, whereas other treatments have less supportive evidence. Limitations of the current literature base are discussed and research directions for the field are provided.

  1. Research on the reflection coating at three wavelengths for primary reflector of the optical antenna in the laser communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huasong; Liu, Muxiao; Wang, Zhanshan; Ji, Yiqin; Lu, Jiangtao

    2011-02-01

    Primary reflector of the optical antenna is a key component in the space laser communication systems, and multi-wavelengths laser need to be worked in the common aperture. Reflection coating is designed for the primary reflector of a laser communication system, which can work at three wavelengths (633nm, 808nm, 1550nm), the designed target reflectance are R633nm>=50%, R808nm>=99% and R1550nm>=99% at angle of incidence from 0 to 20 deg. We selected Ta2O5 and SiO2 as the high refractive index and low refractive index coating materials, analyzed the impact on the reflection coating of the systemic errors and random errors, and determined the manufacture error of the coater system which can't greater than 1%. The Ion beam sputtering deposition technique was used to manufacture reflection coating for three-wavelengths and a LAMBDA900 spectrophotometer was used to analysis the reflectance at three wavelengths which achieved the design requirements. Finally we give the origin of manufacture error source for this high reflection coating. The reflection coating component was successfully used in the primary reflector of the optical antenna of the laser communication systems.

  2. Research on the reflection coating at three wavelengths for primary reflector of the optical antenna in the laser communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huasong; Liu, Muxiao; Wang, Zhanshan; Ji, Yiqin; Lu, Jiangtao

    2010-10-01

    Primary reflector of the optical antenna is a key component in the space laser communication systems, and multi-wavelengths laser need to be worked in the common aperture. Reflection coating is designed for the primary reflector of a laser communication system, which can work at three wavelengths (633nm, 808nm, 1550nm), the designed target reflectance are R633nm>=50%, R808nm>=99% and R1550nm>=99% at angle of incidence from 0 to 20 deg. We selected Ta2O5 and SiO2 as the high refractive index and low refractive index coating materials, analyzed the impact on the reflection coating of the systemic errors and random errors, and determined the manufacture error of the coater system which can't greater than 1%. The Ion beam sputtering deposition technique was used to manufacture reflection coating for three-wavelengths and a LAMBDA900 spectrophotometer was used to analysis the reflectance at three wavelengths which achieved the design requirements. Finally we give the origin of manufacture error source for this high reflection coating. The reflection coating component was successfully used in the primary reflector of the optical antenna of the laser communication systems.

  3. [Role of the general practitioner or primary care physician in the management of adult congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Thambo, Jean-Benoît

    2013-03-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common inborn defect, occurring approximately 0.8% according to the last European Union count. This rate is stable for decades. Nowadays, up to 90% of children born with congenital heart diseases underwent surgical correction and reach adulthood, gratefully to the surgery and interventional cardiology advances, in conjunction to the post-surgery and following cares improvement. Both of this facts results to a growing population of adults with congenital heart diseases, actually exceeding the infant population. This arising population will lead general practitioners and primary care physicians to face more often this kind of patient. The needed cares are specifics, regarding the typical evolutions of this pathologies, as well as because congenital heart diseases wil impact other pathologies or usual cares. The need of an extended knowledge of the adult patients with congenital heart diseases is clearly emerging, and should lead the whole medical corps to work in close network.

  4. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, David O; Walsh, Kieran A; Galvin, Rose; Sinnott, Carol; Kearney, Patricia M; Byrne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid), Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America). Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of patients. PMID

  5. The clinical course of pain and function in older adults with a new primary care visit for back pain.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Sean D; Sherman, Karen J; Heagerty, Patrick J; Mock, Charles N; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2015-03-01

    To report the clinical course of older adults presenting for a new primary care visit for back pain, no healthcare visit for back pain within the prior 6 months, by describing pain intensity, disability, pain interference, and resolution of back pain over 12 months. Prospective inception cohort study. Primary care settings of three integrated healthcare systems in the United States that participated in the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data (BOLD) registry. Five thousand two hundred eleven (99.5%) of the 5,239 adults aged 65 and older who had reached their 12-month follow-up date. Baseline demographic characteristics, EQ-5D score, duration of back pain, expectation for recovery, depression, and anxiety. Participant-reported outcomes of back-related disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire), numerical pain rating scale, pain interference, and resolution of back pain were collected at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months. Most improvement occurred within the first 3 months. The number and proportion with 30% improvement in back pain increased from 1,950 (42.3%) at 3 months to 1,994 (44.8%) by 12 months, and 1,331 (28.8%) and 1,576 (35.4%) had 30% improvement in disability at 3 and 12 months. Only 23.0% reported that their back pain had resolved at 12 months. Improvements in disability and interference with activity over 12 months differed according to age, duration of back pain, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and expectation for recovery. The majority of older adults in primary care practice settings presenting with a new visit for back pain have persistent symptoms, disability, and interference over 12 months of follow-up. Future research is needed to identify risk factors for persistent symptoms and effective interventions. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Numerical analysis of primary rainbows from a homogeneous cylinder and an optical fiber for incident low-coherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świrniak, Grzegorz; Mroczka, Janusz

    2017-07-01

    This work provides a numerical study of the scattering of low-coherent light by an infinite right circular cylinder and various types of optical fiber (with step- and graded-index profiles) in the vicinity of primary rainbows, caused by light that has been subjected to one internal reflection. The scattered intensity is analyzed in terms of the Fourier transform as well as in the time domain (by examining the impulse response of a fiber) with the aim to obtain a detailed information about the scattering process. The analysis reveals a wealth of information about the scattering process that is not obvious when a fiber is illuminated by a temporally coherent light source. The results also provide an idea for the characterization of the core size of step-index optical fibers.

  7. Ultraviolet and optical studies of binaries with luminous cool primaries and hot companions. IV - Further IUE detections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Sidney B.; Ake, Thomas B.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained IUE spectra for 31 middle and late-type giant and supergiant stars whose TD-1 fluxes or ground-based spectra indicate the presence of a hot component, or whose radial velocities indicate an unseen component. Stellar components earlier than type F1 were detected in 22 cases. While 20 of the hot secondaries are seen weakly in optical spectra, two are UV discoveries: HD 58134 and HD 183864. The hot companions are classified accurately by temperature class from their far-UV spectra. The interstellar extinction of each system and the relative luminosities of the components are derived from the UV and optical fluxes, using a new grid of UV intrinsic colors for hot dwarfs. We find that many giant stars apparently have companions which are too hot and hence too luminous for consistency with the primary's spectral classification.

  8. Microscopy, culture, and sensitive management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in adults in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Sivathasan, Niroshan; Rakowski, Krzysztof R

    2011-06-01

    The high prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) places a significant burden on healthcare systems. Clinicians may over-manage the issue, and there is great variability in practice, with economic- and resource- implications. Up to 40% of patients with a suspected UTI do not have an infection. Using PubMed (Medline) to shortlist relevant papers in English from the last 30 years, and further sub-selection to include only uncomplicated UTIs in adults in primary care, we reviewed the literature pertaining to uncomplicated UTIs, and how it should be managed efficiently in the primary care setting. In general practice, there is no advantage to routinely request microscopy and culture of urine samples in the presence of an appropriate history and urinalysis reagent-strip testing. If antibiotics are required, then a 3-day course shall suffice. Larger epidemiological studies focusing on more susceptible sub-populations may provide better guidance for discriminatory factors to produce an algorithm for treatment.

  9. Intra-cluster correlation coefficients in adults with diabetes in primary care practices: the Vermont Diabetes Information System field survey

    PubMed Central

    Littenberg, Benjamin; MacLean, Charles D

    2006-01-01

    Background Proper estimation of sample size requirements for cluster-based studies requires estimates of the intra-cluster correlation coefficient (ICC) for the variables of interest. Methods We calculated the ICC for 112 variables measured as part of the Vermont Diabetes Information System, a cluster-randomized study of adults with diabetes from 73 primary care practices (the clusters) in Vermont and surrounding areas. Results ICCs varied widely around a median value of 0.0185 (Inter-quartile range: 0.006, 0.037). Some characteristics (such as the proportion having a recent creatinine measurement) were highly associated with the practice (ICC = 0.288), while others (prevalence of some comorbidities and complications and certain aspects of quality of life) varied much more across patients with only small correlation within practices (ICC<0.001). Conclusion The ICC values reported here may be useful in designing future studies that use clustered sampling from primary care practices. PMID:16672056

  10. Trends and predictors of primary dental care health services for adults in Israel.

    PubMed

    Zlotnick, C; Baron-Epel, O; Zusman, S Paul; Keinan-Boker, L

    2014-12-01

    Guided by the Andersen-Aday Behavioral Model of Health Care Utilization, this study compared primary dental care use trends between 2000 and 2010, and differences in primary dental care use between Israel's two largest ethnic groups, Jews and Arabs. Two waves (years 2000 and 2010) of existing cross-sectional data collected from a nationwide sample on the population's health knowledge, attitudes and practice were used. This study uses the sample of Israeli-Jews (n = 2806) from 2000; and the nationally representative sample of Israeli-Jews (n = 2539) and Israeli-Arabs (n = 1723) from 2010. Primary dental care use increased between 2000 and 2010 in Israel. Israelis who had at least a high school diploma, average or higher income, no dental pain and reported flossing their teeth were more likely to use primary dental care, but this was true of fewer Israeli-Arabs than Israeli-Jews. Other variables, associated with use of primary dental care but differing by ethnic group, were: being older than 65 years, being a native-born Israeli, employment, and health risk factors such as smoking and obesity. As with other western societies and as indicated by the model's three factors (i.e., predisposing, enabling and reinforcing/need), disparities in primary dental care use were found based on income (i.e., enabling); immigrants and ethnic minority status (i.e., predisposing), and health risk such as smoking (i.e., reinforcing/need). It is evident that health promotion activities are needed to target specific population subgroups to reduce disparities in primary dental care utilisation.

  11. Sources of unsafe primary care for older adults: a mixed-methods analysis of patient safety incident reports.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Alison; Edwards, Adrian; Williams, Huw; Evans, Huw P; Avery, Anthony; Hibbert, Peter; Makeham, Meredith; Sheikh, Aziz; J Donaldson, Liam; Carson-Stevens, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    older adults are frequent users of primary healthcare services, but are at increased risk of healthcare-related harm in this setting. to describe the factors associated with actual or potential harm to patients aged 65 years and older, treated in primary care, to identify action to produce safer care. a cross-sectional mixed-methods analysis of a national (England and Wales) database of patient safety incident reports from 2005 to 2013. 1,591 primary care patient safety incident reports regarding patients aged 65 years and older. we developed a classification system for the analysis of patient safety incident reports to describe: the incident and preceding chain of incidents; other contributory factors; and patient harm outcome. We combined findings from exploratory descriptive and thematic analyses to identify key sources of unsafe care. the main sources of unsafe care in our weighted sample were due to: medication-related incidents e.g. prescribing, dispensing and administering (n = 486, 31%; 15% serious patient harm); communication-related incidents e.g. incomplete or non-transfer of information across care boundaries (n = 390, 25%; 12% serious patient harm); and clinical decision-making incidents which led to the most serious patient harm outcomes (n = 203, 13%; 41% serious patient harm). priority areas for further research to determine the burden and preventability of unsafe primary care for older adults, include: the timely electronic tools for prescribing, dispensing and administering medication in the community; electronic transfer of information between healthcare settings; and, better clinical decision-making support and guidance.

  12. Preparation and Culture of Myogenic Precursor Cells/Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult and Aged Humans.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Arroquia, Ana; Clegg, Peter D; Molloy, Andrew P; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna

    2017-02-16

    Skeletal muscle homeostasis depends on muscle growth (hypertrophy), atrophy and regeneration. During ageing and in several diseases, muscle wasting occurs. Loss of muscle mass and function is associated with muscle fiber type atrophy, fiber type switching, defective muscle regeneration associated with dysfunction of satellite cells, muscle stem cells, and other pathophysiological processes. These changes are associated with changes in intracellular as well as local and systemic niches. In addition to most commonly used rodent models of muscle ageing, there is a need to study muscle homeostasis and wasting using human models, which due to ethical implications, consist predominantly of in vitro cultures. Despite the wide use of human Myogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) and primary myoblasts in myogenesis, there is limited data on using human primary myoblast and myotube cultures to study molecular mechanisms regulating different aspects of age-associated muscle wasting, aiding in the validation of mechanisms of ageing proposed in rodent muscle. The use of human MPCs, primary myoblasts and myotubes isolated from adult and aged people, provides a physiologically relevant model of molecular mechanisms of processes associated with muscle growth, atrophy and regeneration. Here we describe in detail a robust, inexpensive, reproducible and efficient protocol for the isolation and maintenance of human MPCs and their progeny - myoblasts and myotubes from human muscle samples using enzymatic digestion. Furthermore, we have determined the passage number at which primary myoblasts from adult and aged people undergo senescence in an in vitro culture. Finally, we show the ability to transfect these myoblasts and the ability to characterize their proliferative and differentiation capacity and propose their suitability for performing functional studies of molecular mechanisms of myogenesis and muscle wasting in vitro.

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Doxepin 1 mg, 3 mg, and 6 mg in Adults with Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Thomas; Rogowski, Roberta; Hull, Steven; Schwartz, Howard; Koshorek, Gail; Corser, Bruce; Seiden, David; Lankford, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of doxepin 1, 3, and 6 mg in insomnia patients. Design: Adults (18-64 y) with chronic primary insomnia (DSM-IV) were randomly assigned to one of four sequences of 1 mg, 3 mg, and 6 mg of doxepin, and placebo in a crossover study. Treatment periods consisted of 2 polysomnographic assessment nights with a 5-day or 12-day drug-free interval between periods. Efficacy was assessed using polysomnography (PSG) and patient-reported measures. Safety analyses included measures of residual sedation and adverse events. Measurements and Results: Sixty-seven patients were randomized. Wake time during sleep, the a priori defined primary endpoint, was statistically significantly improved at the doxepin 3 mg and 6 mg doses versus placebo. All three doses had statistically significant improvements versus placebo for PSG-defined wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and overall sleep efficiency (SE). SE in the final third-of-the-night also demonstrated statistically significant improvement at all doses. The doxepin 6 mg dose significantly reduced subjective latency to sleep onset. All three doxepin doses had a safety profile comparable to placebo. There were no statistically significant differences in next-day residual sedation, and sleep architecture was generally clinically preserved. Conclusions: In adults with primary insomnia, doxepin 1 mg, 3 mg, and 6 mg was well-tolerated and produced improvement in objective and subjective sleep maintenance and duration endpoints that persisted into the final hour of the night. The side-effect profile was comparable to placebo, with no reported anticholinergic effects, no memory impairment, and no significant hangover/next-day residual effects. These data demonstrate that doxepin 1 mg, 3 mg, and 6 mg is efficacious in improving the sleep of patients with chronic primary insomnia. Citation: Roth T; Rogowski R; Hull S; Schwartz H; Koshorek G; Corser B; Seiden D. Efficacy and safety of

  14. Prevalence of multimorbidity in the adult population attending primary care in Portugal: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Prazeres, Filipe; Santiago, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of multimorbidity in the adult population attending primary care in Portugal, to identify associated sociodemographic factors, and to reveal combinations of chronic health problems. Design Cross-sectional, analytical study. Setting Primary Care Centres in mainland Portugal across the five Portuguese Healthcare Administrative Regions. Participants 1279 women and 714 men agreed to participate. The mean age was 56.3 years (59.0 years for men; 54.8 years for women). The most frequent marital status was married/cohabiting (69.5%). The most predominant living arrangement was living as a couple (57.2%). A considerable proportion consisted of pensioners/retirees (41.5%) and adults with a low educational level (48.7%). Sufficient monthly income was reported in 54.4% of the cases. Primary outcome measures For each patient, multimorbidity was measured either by the presence of ≥2 or ≥3 chronic health problems, from a list of 147 chronic health problems. Clinical data were collected using the general practitioner's knowledge of the patient's history, patient's self-report and medical records. Cluster analyses were performed to reveal distinct patterns of multimorbidity. Secondary outcome measures Patient social and demographic data (sex, age, residence area, current marital status, number of years of formal education, living arrangements, professional status and self-perceived economic status). Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the association between sociodemographic factors and multimorbidity. Results Multimorbidity (2 or more chronic health problems) was present in 72.7%. When a cut-off of three or more was used, an expressive percentage of multimorbidity (57.2%) remained present. The likelihood of having multimorbidity increased significantly with age. Pensioners/retirees and adults with low levels of education were significantly more likely to suffer from multimorbidity. Cardiometabolic and mental

  15. The Role of National Adult Education Centre in Curriculum Development in Somalia in Selected Government Primary Adult Schools of Mogadisho. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation, No. 109.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahar, Ismail F. S.

    A study of curriculum development in Somalia focused on the role of the National Adult Education Centre (NAEC) and involvement of teachers and inspectors. The sample consisted of 80 Mogadisho primary adult school teachers. Information sources were related literature, teacher questionnaires, and unstructured interviews with school inspectors,…

  16. The Role of National Adult Education Centre in Curriculum Development in Somalia in Selected Government Primary Adult Schools of Mogadisho. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation, No. 109.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahar, Ismail F. S.

    A study of curriculum development in Somalia focused on the role of the National Adult Education Centre (NAEC) and involvement of teachers and inspectors. The sample consisted of 80 Mogadisho primary adult school teachers. Information sources were related literature, teacher questionnaires, and unstructured interviews with school inspectors,…

  17. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  18. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slike, Bonnie M.; Creegan, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5–10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10–20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35–49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112–3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program. PMID:28046039

  19. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations.

    PubMed

    Slike, Bonnie M; Creegan, Matthew; Marovich, Mary; Ngauy, Viseth

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5-10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10-20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35-49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112-3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program.

  20. Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma-Associated Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia Masquerading as Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Young Adult.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mahsa; Azmoodeh Ardalan, Farid; Najafi, Masoumeh; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Ghanadan, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell malignancy with atypical CD30 positive lymphocytes. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is an uncommon finding in primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and may mimic squamous cell carcinoma as pseudomalignancy. Careful attention of a pathologist to correct diagnosis of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and its underlying causes will help physicians to avoid inappropriate management. Here, we present a 22-year-old man referred to our hospital with a solitary nodule persistent on his forearm which was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma in the first biopsy. The lesion recurred after two months and histopathologic and immunohistochemistry examination revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma with florid pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia which masquerading as well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Diagnosis of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia must guide the pathologist to search for underlying causes, such as primary cutaneous lymphoma. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia may mimic squamous cell carcinoma and this can result in inappropriate diagnosis and management.

  1. Effect of primary posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis with posterior optic buttonholing on pilocarpine-induced IOL shift.

    PubMed

    Leydolt, Christina; Menapace, Rupert; Stifter, Eva-Maria; Prinz, Ana; Neumayer, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    To assess intraocular lens (IOL) shift along the visual axis induced by ciliary muscle contraction with pilocarpine after cataract surgery and to compare primary posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis (CCC) and posterior optic buttonholing with IOLs implanted in the bag. Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Clinical trial. Eyes with age-related cataract had cataract surgery with implantation of a nonaccommodating IOL (AF-1 YA-60BB). Surgery was performed with primary posterior CCC and posterior buttonholing in 1 eye (study eyes) and with conventional in-the-bag implantation in the contralateral eye (control eyes). After a minimum of 6 months postoperatively, the anterior chamber depth was assessed with partial coherence interferometry before and after application of pilocarpine 2.0% and, after a washout interval of 1 week, before and after the application of cyclopentolate 1.0%. Forty eyes of 20 patients were enrolled. A slight backward shift of the IOL (+78 μm) in study eyes and in control eyes (+118 μm) was detected after pilocarpine application (both P<.05). No significant difference in IOL shift was found between study eyes and control eyes (P=.19). Combined primary posterior CCC and posterior optic buttonholing did not affect IOL shift during pharmacologically stimulated ciliary muscle contraction compared with in-the-bag implanted IOLs. Capsule fibrosis diminished with primary posterior CCC but did not seem to be the only limiting factor in the accommodative IOL shift. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Impact of Checking the Health of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities on Primary Care Consultation Rates, Health Promotion and Contact with Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felce, David; Baxter, Helen; Lowe, Kathy; Dunstan, Frank; Houston, Helen; Jones, Glyn; Grey, Jill; Felce, Janet; Kerr, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: Studies have found that health checking in primary care led to the identification of previously unrecognized morbidity among adults with intellectual disabilities. The aim here was to evaluate whether health checking stimulated increased consultation with the general practitioner or another member of the primary care team, increased…

  3. The Impact of Checking the Health of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities on Primary Care Consultation Rates, Health Promotion and Contact with Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felce, David; Baxter, Helen; Lowe, Kathy; Dunstan, Frank; Houston, Helen; Jones, Glyn; Grey, Jill; Felce, Janet; Kerr, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: Studies have found that health checking in primary care led to the identification of previously unrecognized morbidity among adults with intellectual disabilities. The aim here was to evaluate whether health checking stimulated increased consultation with the general practitioner or another member of the primary care team, increased…

  4. Optic disc topography in Malay patients with normal-tension glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Adlina, Abdul Rahim; Alisa-Victoria, Koh; Shatriah, Ismail; Liza-Sharmini, Ahmad Tajudin; Ahmad, Mt Saad

    2014-01-01

    There are limited data concerning the optic disc topography in normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients living in Southeast Asian countries. This study aims to compare optic disc parameters in patients with NTG and POAG in Malaysia and to discuss the results in comparison with studies of NTG and POAG in other Asian countries. This prospective cross-sectional study was performed in two hospitals with glaucoma service in Malaysia from 2010 to 2012. Seventy-seven patients of Malay ethnicity were enrolled in this study, including 32 NTG patients and 45 POAG patients. Using the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph III, we measured optic disc area, cup area, rim area, cup volume, rim volume, cup-to-disc area ratio, mean cup depth, maximum cup depth, cup shape measure, height variation contour, mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and retinal nerve fiber layer cross-sectional area. The eyes for NTG patients had significantly larger optic disc areas (2.65 [standard deviation, 0.41] vs 2.40 [standard deviation, 0.36] mm(2), respectively; P=0.006) and cup areas (1.54 [standard deviation, 0.43] vs 1.32 [standard deviation, 0.40] mm(2), respectively; P=0.027) compared with the eyes of POAG patients. Comparison of the other parameters between the two groups revealed no significant difference (P>0.050). The moderate and severe NTG patients showed significantly deeper cups and larger disc and cup areas when compared with the moderate and severe POAG patients (P<0.050). The NTG patients in this study have notably larger optic disc and cup areas than the POAG patients. Our observations are consistent with those reported in studies of NTG and POAG patients in Korea. The deeper cups and larger disc and cup areas may serve as indicators of severity when comparing NTG with POAG. However, these findings require verification with IOP and visual field results.

  5. "Let him speak:" a descriptive qualitative study of the roles and behaviors of family companions in primary care visits among older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Vick, Judith B; Amjad, Halima; Smith, Katherine C; Boyd, Cynthia M; Gitlin, Laura N; Roth, David L; Roter, Debra L; Wolff, Jennifer L

    2017-06-06

    Cognitive impairment poses communication challenges in primary care. Although family "companions" commonly attend primary care visits of older adults with cognitive impairment, little is known about how their involvement affects communication. Therefore, we sought to understand how companion involvement affects the quality of primary care visit communication for older adults with cognitive impairment. Cross-sectional, descriptive qualitative study participants were as follows: (1) English-speaking adults age 65 or older with mild, moderate, or severe cognitive impairment; (2) family members or other unpaid companions who accompany older adults to primary care visits; and (3) primary care clinicians. Twenty semi-structured and in-depth qualitative interviews of older adults and their companions (N = 20 dyads) and two focus groups (N = 10 primary care clinicians) were conducted. Interviews and focus groups were transcribed and analyzed thematically. Family companions commonly facilitate communication by advocating for patients, ensuring the accuracy of information exchange and understanding, and preserving rapport. Significant communication challenges were also identified, including patient and companion role ambiguity, competing visit agendas, and primary care clinician confusion regarding the most accurate source of information. Patients, companions, and clinicians each identified strategies to improve communication, chief among them being to identify, differentiate, and respect both patient and companion priorities and perspectives. Family companions actively participate in primary care visits of older adults with cognitive impairment in ways that promote and inhibit effective communication. Findings suggest the need for strategies that more effectively and purposefully involve family in the care of primary care patients with cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Comorbidities in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a practical guide to diagnosis in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mao, Alice R; Findling, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults is complex and challenging because of the frequent comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders that have symptoms overlapping with those of ADHD. The presence of comorbidities can create challenges to making an accurate diagnosis and also impact treatment options and outcomes. This review discusses disorders that may be comorbid with ADHD in adults, including anxiety, mood, substance use disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder. Suggestions for recognizing these comorbidities and distinguishing them from ADHD and perspectives on their possible impact on ADHD treatment are included. Adjunctive nonpharmacologic modalities may be especially helpful in the case of comorbid mood, anxiety, substance abuse, or personality disorders.

  7. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  8. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes.

  9. Comparison of primary repair and patch plasty procedure on the P wave in adult atrial septal defect closure

    PubMed Central

    Ucak, Alper; Temizkan, Veysel; Ugur, Murat; Selcuk, Arif; Yilmaz, Ahmet Turan; Yedekci, Ahmet Erturk; Uz, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In this study we compared the effects of two different surgical procedures for closure of adult atrial septal defect (ASD) on postoperative P-wave changes. Methods: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery for secundum type ASD closure were evaluated retrospectively. Seventy-two patients with primary repair of ASD and 29 patients with pericardial patch plasty repair were compared according to Pmax, Pmin and P-wave dispersions (Pd). Results: In each group, the increases in postoperative maximum P-wave duration (Pmax) and minimum P-wave duration (Pmin) were statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between post- and pre-operative Pd values. In the comparison between group 1 and group 2 in terms of postoperative P-wave changes (Pmax, Pmin, Pd) there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Comparing patch plasty and primary repair for the surgical closure of ASD in the early to mid-postoperative period, no difference was found and both surgical procedures can be performed in adult ASDs. PMID:27149297

  10. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  11. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  12. Maintenance of Glia in the Optic Lamina Is Mediated by EGFR Signaling by Photoreceptors in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Ming; Sun, Y. Henry

    2015-01-01

    The late onset of neurodegeneration in humans indicates that the survival and function of cells in the nervous system must be maintained throughout adulthood. In the optic lamina of the adult Drosophila, the photoreceptor axons are surrounded by multiple types of glia. We demonstrated that the adult photoreceptors actively contribute to glia maintenance in their target field within the optic lamina. This effect is dependent on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands produced by the R1-6 photoreceptors and transported to the optic lamina to act on EGFR in the lamina glia. EGFR signaling is necessary and sufficient to act in a cell-autonomous manner in the lamina glia. Our results suggest that EGFR signaling is required for the trafficking of the autophagosome/endosome to the lysosome. The loss of EGFR signaling results in cell degeneration most likely because of the accumulation of autophagosomes. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for the role of adult neurons in the maintenance of glia and a novel role for EGFR signaling in the autophagic flux. PMID:25909451

  13. Adult community health-promoting interventions in primary health care: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    March, Sebastià; Torres, Elena; Ramos, María; Ripoll, Joana; García, Atanasio; Bulilete, Oana; Medina, David; Vidal, Clara; Cabeza, Elena; Llull, Micaela; Zabaleta-del-Olmo, Edurne; Aranda, José Manuel; Sastre, Silvia; Llobera, Joan

    2015-07-01

    To examine evidence on the effectiveness of health-promoting community interventions carried out in primary health care. Systematic review of originals and systematic reviews of health-promoting community interventions with the participation of primary health care. A working definition of community activities was used in the inclusion criteria. Databases searched up to 2013: PUBMED, EMBASE, CINHAL, Web of SCIENCE, IBECS, IME, and PSICODOC. No restrictions on year of publication or design. Articles were reviewed by separate researchers to identify risks of bias. Fifty-one articles published between 1966 and 2013 were included: 11 systematic reviews and 40 originals that described 39 community interventions. There is evidence on the effectiveness of community interventions in reducing cardiovascular risk factors, encouraging physical exercise, preventing falls and improving self-care among chronic patients compared with usual individual care. The effectiveness of some interventions increases when the community is involved in their development. Most assessments show positive results despite design limitations. The community approach may be more effective than the individual in usual preventive interventions in primary care. There is a lack of evidence on many community interventions in primary care and further research is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Systematic Review of Depression Treatments in Primary Care for Latino Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing depression treatments in primary care for Latinos is conducted. The authors rate the methodological quality of studies, examine cultural and linguistic adaptations, summarize clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness findings, and draw conclusions for improving…

  15. Care of Older Adults: Role of Primary Care Physicians in the Treatment of Cataracts and Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marra, Kyle V; Wagley, Sushant; Kuperwaser, Mark C; Campo, Rafael; Arroyo, Jorge G

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to facilitate optimal management of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing information on indications, risk factors, referral guidelines, and treatments and to describe techniques to maximize quality of life (QOL) for people with irreversible vision loss. A review of PubMed and other online databases was performed for peer-reviewed English-language articles from 1980 through August 2012 on visual impairment in elderly adults. Search terms included vision loss, visual impairment, blind, low vision, QOL combined with age-related, elderly, and aging. Articles were selected that discussed vision loss in elderly adults, effects of vision impairment on QOL, and care strategies to manage vision loss in older adults. The ability of primary care physicians (PCPs) to identify early signs of cataracts and AMD in individuals at risk of vision loss is critical to early diagnosis and management of these common age-related eye diseases. PCPs can help preserve vision by issuing aptly timed referrals and encouraging behavioral modifications that reduce risk factors. With knowledge of referral guidelines for soliciting low-vision rehabilitation services, visual aids, and community support resources, PCPs can considerably increase the QOL of individuals with uncorrectable vision loss. By offering appropriately timed referrals, promoting behavioral modifications, and allocating low-vision care resources, PCPs may play a critical role in preserving visual health and enhancing the QOL for the elderly population.

  16. Cognitive behavioral therapy vs zopiclone for treatment of chronic primary insomnia in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, Børge; Omvik, Siri; Pallesen, Ståle; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Havik, Odd E; Kvale, Gerd; Nielsen, Geir Høstmark; Nordhus, Inger Hilde

    2006-06-28

    Insomnia is a common condition in older adults and is associated with a number of adverse medical, social, and psychological consequences. Previous research has suggested beneficial outcomes of both psychological and pharmacological treatments, but blinded placebo-controlled trials comparing the effects of these treatments are lacking. To examine short- and long-term clinical efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacological treatment in older adults experiencing chronic primary insomnia. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 46 adults (mean age, 60.8 y; 22 women) with chronic primary insomnia conducted between January 2004 and December 2005 in a single Norwegian university-based outpatient clinic for adults and elderly patients. CBT (sleep hygiene, sleep restriction, stimulus control, cognitive therapy, and relaxation; n = 18), sleep medication (7.5-mg zopiclone each night; n = 16), or placebo medication (n = 12). All treatment duration was 6 weeks, and the 2 active treatments were followed up at 6 months. Ambulant clinical polysomnographic data and sleep diaries were used to determine total wake time, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and slow-wave sleep (only assessed using polysomnography) on all 3 assessment points. CBT resulted in improved short- and long-term outcomes compared with zopiclone on 3 out of 4 outcome measures. For most outcomes, zopiclone did not differ from placebo. Participants receiving CBT improved their sleep efficiency from 81.4% at pretreatment to 90.1% at 6-month follow-up compared with a decrease from 82.3% to 81.9% in the zopiclone group. Participants in the CBT group spent much more time in slow-wave sleep (stages 3 and 4) compared with those in other groups, and spent less time awake during the night. Total sleep time was similar in all 3 groups; at 6 months, patients receiving CBT had better sleep efficiency using polysomnography than those taking zopiclone. These results suggest that

  17. Optic nerve head changes after short-term intraocular pressure elevation in acute primary angle-closure suspects.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ran; Xu, Liang; Liu, Xue; Chen, Jian Dong; Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ya Xing

    2015-04-01

    To investigate changes in the optic nerve head morphology after acute intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation during a dark room prone provocative test (DRPPT). Prospective cohort study. Acute primary angle-closure (APAC) suspects underwent DRPPT. Study participants stayed in a dark room for 2 hours with the forehead placed on a desk. At baseline and within 5 minutes after DRPPT, tonometry and enhanced depth imaging by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) were performed. Changes in 3-dimensional optic nerve head topography. The study included 114 eyes of 65 participants with a mean age of 58.3±8.7 years and a mean IOP elevation of 10.1±10.9 mmHg during DRPPT. When all eyes were included, the mean value of most optic disc parameters did not change significantly, except for a decrease in the temporal minimal rim width (P = 0.005). By including only eyes with an IOP increase greater than 15 mmHg, the mean value of cup width (P = 0.001) and cup depth (P = 0.002) increased, whereas the lamina cribrosa (LC) thickness (P = 0.035), temporal minimal rim width (P = 0.001), and nasal minimal rim width (P < 0.001) decreased. The LC depth and Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) did not differ between the baseline and the end of DRPPT. An IOP increase was significantly associated with widening (P < 0.001; r = 0.46) and deepening (P < 0.001; r = 0.52) of the optic cup, thinning of the LC (P = 0.003; r = -0.35), temporal minimal rim width (P < 0.001; r = -0.34), and nasal minimal rim width (P < 0.001; r = -0.35). Angle-closure suspect eyes showed a widening and deepening of the optic cup, decrease in neuroretinal rim width, and thinning of the LC after a darkness-induced IOP increase of >15 mmHg. The diameter of the BMO and position of the anterior LC surface remained unchanged. This suggests that a short-term IOP increase leads to a condensation of neuroretinal rim, prelaminar tissue, and LC, without major changes in the optic disc size and position of the anterior LC

  18. Parents' level of support for adults' purchase and consumption of alcohol at primary school events when children are present.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bernadette; Kippen, Rebecca; Buykx, Penny; Gilligan, Conor; Chapman, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Environmental and societal factors are significant determinants of children's initiation to and use of alcohol. Schools are important settings for promoting well-being and substantial resources have been devoted to curriculum-based alcohol programs, but the effects of these in reducing the misuse of alcohol have been modest. Adults can and do consume alcohol at school events when students are present, but there is a dearth of evidence about parents' level of support for the practice. The aim of this study was to examine parents' level of support for the purchase and consumption of alcohol at primary school fundraising events when children are present. Four hundred seventy-nine Australian parents of children aged 0-12 years participated in an online survey. Logistic regression was used to assess the impact of parent characteristics on the level of agreement with parental purchase and consumption of alcohol at school fundraising events when children are present. The majority of parents (60%) disagreed/strongly disagreed with the practice of adults being able to purchase and consume alcohol at school fundraising events when children were present. The 21% of parents who supported the practice were more likely to be daily smokers and/or have higher (>6) Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-alcohol consumption scores. Despite the fact that the majority of parents disagree with this practice, published reports suggest that adults' use of alcohol at primary school events is an emerging issue. It is important that school decision-makers are mindful of the financial and educational value of fundraising activities. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  19. Comparison of quadriceps strength and handgrip strength in their association with health outcomes in older adults in primary care.

    PubMed

    Chan, On Ying A; van Houwelingen, Anne H; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Blom, Jeanet W; den Elzen, Wendy P J

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is thought to play a major role in the functional impairment that occurs with old age. In clinical practice, sarcopenia is often determined by measuring handgrip strength. Here, we compared the lower limb quadriceps strength to the handgrip strength in their association with health outcomes in older adults in primary care. Our study population consisted of older adults (n = 764, 68.2% women, median age 83) that participated in the Integrated Systemic Care for Older People (ISCOPE) study. Participants were visited at baseline to measure quadriceps strength and handgrip strength. Data on health outcomes were obtained at baseline and after 12 months (including life satisfaction, disability in daily living, GP contact-time and hospitalization). Quadriceps strength and handgrip strength showed a weak association (β = 0.42 [95% CI 0.33-0.50]; R (2) = 0.17). Quadriceps strength and handgrip strength were independently associated with health outcomes at baseline, including quality of life, disability in daily living, GP contact-time, hospitalization, and gait speed. Combined weakness of the quadriceps and handgrip distinguished a most vulnerable subpopulation that presented with the poorest health outcomes. At follow-up, handgrip strength showed an association with quality of life (β = 0.05; P = 0.002) and disability in daily living (β = -0.5; P = 0.004). Quadriceps weakness did not further contribute to the prediction of the measured health outcomes. We conclude that quadriceps strength is only moderately associated with handgrip strength in an older population and that the combination of quadriceps strength and handgrip strength measurements may aid in the identification of older adults in primary care with the poorest health outcomes. In the prediction of poor health outcomes, quadriceps strength measurements do not show an added value to the handgrip strength.

  20. Real-life management of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adult patients and adherence to practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lozano, María Luisa; Revilla, N; Gonzalez-Lopez, T J; Novelli, S; González-Porras, J R; Sánchez-Gonzalez, B; Bermejo, N; Pérez, S; Lucas, F J; Álvarez, M T; Arilla, M J; Perera, M; do Nascimento, J; Campos, R M; Casado, L F; Vicente, V

    2016-06-01

    Very few data exist on the management of adult patients diagnosed with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The objectives of this study were to describe the diagnostic and treatment patterns for ITP and to compare the findings to recent ITP guidelines. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of adult ITP patients diagnosed with primary ITP between January 2011 and June 2012 and examined whether management strategies were consistent or not with eight recent guideline-recommended practices. Overall, median age at the diagnosis of the disease (n = 101) was 58 years and median platelet count 12 × 10(9)/L with 75.2 % of patients having symptoms of ITP. The study perceived two major shortcomings in the diagnostic approach: (1) failure to perform peripheral blood film examination in 22.8 % of patients, a test that is mandatory by all guidelines, and (2) ordinary bone marrow assessment in more than half of the patients at diagnosis (50.5 %), a test not routinely recommended by guidelines. Low appropriateness in therapeutic management of patients included (1) unjustified use of intravenous immunoglobulin in the absence of bleeding in 54.8 % of patients and (2) splenectomy not being deferred until 6-12 months from diagnosis (median 161 days). Data also reflect a trend towards the early use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in the treatment of patients who are refractory to any first-line therapy. We have recognized important areas of inapropriateness in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult ITP patients. Compliance with established guidelines should be encouraged in order to improve patient outcomes.

  1. Effect of culture conditions on microRNA expression in primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Jun; Smith, Lynette M; Nelson, Amy J; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Gunji, Yoko; Farid, Maha; Wang, Xingqi; Basma, Hesham; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Liu, Xiangde; DeMeo, Dawn L; Rennard, Stephen I

    2015-04-01

    In vitro cell cultures, including lung fibroblasts, have been used to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) pathogenesis. However, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression. We examined whether miRNA expression in primary adult lung fibroblasts varies with cell density or passage in vitro and whether culture conditions confound the identification of altered miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts. Primary adult control and COPD lung fibroblasts were cultured until passage 3 or 8, after which cells were further cultured for 3 or 7 d (low vs. high density). Then, cells at low density were cultured with serum-free media, and those at high density were cultured with serum-free media in the absence or presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) for 24 h. RNA was extracted to perform miRNA microarray from which 1.25-fold differential expression and 10% false discovery rate were applied to identify "invariant" and "variant" miRNA for the various culture conditions. Of the 2226 miRNAs evaluated, 39.0% for cell density, 40.7% for cell passage, and 29.4% for both conditions were identified as "invariant" miRNAs. Furthermore, 38.1% of the evaluated miRNAs were "invariant" for cell passage with IL-1β and TNF-α. Differentially expressed miRNAs between control and COPD lung fibroblasts were identified with and without IL-1β and TNF-α, and of these, 32 out of the 34 top-ranked miRNAs exceeded the differences due to culture conditions. Thus, culture conditions may affect miRNA expression of adult human lung fibroblasts. Nevertheless, in vitro cultures can be used to assess differential miRNA expression in COPD lung fibroblasts.

  2. Nasal Nitric Oxide Measurement and a Modified PICADAR Score for the Screening of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia in Adults with Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, J; Buck, A; Schwerk, N; Price, M; Fuge, J; Welte, T; Ringshausen, F C

    2017-08-01

    Background Determining the underlying diagnosis is essential for the targeted and specific treatment of bronchiectasis. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disease, which is characterized by abnormalities in ciliary structure and/or function and which may result in bronchiectasis. The disease is probably underestimated among adults with bronchiectasis due to the fact that extensive diagnostic testing is required and that the recognition of PCD is low. Objective To evaluate a feasible screening algorithm for PCD among adults with bronchiectasis. Methods Data from all patients who presented to our bronchiectasis outpatient clinic from June 2010 until July 2016 were retrospectively analysed from our database. Nasal NO (nNO) and a modified PICADAR score (PrImary CiliAry DyskinesiA Rule) were measured and compared in the two groups of PCD-bronchiectasis and non-PCD-bronchiectasis. Results 185 of 365 patients (75 males, 110 females) had a sufficient measurement of nNO concentration and complete clinical data and were eligible for analysis. The mean (SD) nNO concentration in nL/ml was significant lower in the PCD group compared to the non-PCD group (25 [31] and 227 [112] nL/min, respectively; p < 0.001). A nNO level of 77 nL/min had the best discriminative value to differentiate between the two groups. Patients with PCD had a significant higher modified PIDACAR score than patients without PCD (5 2 and 1 1, respectively [p < 0.001]). Using ROC curve analysis, the modified PICADAR score of 2 had the best discriminative value with a sensitivity of 1.00 and a specificity of 0.89. Conclusions Low nNO concentration and the modified PICADAR score are suitable and cheap screening tests for PCD in adults with bronchiectasis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Frequency analysis of the visual steady-state response measured with the fast optical signal in younger and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Chun-Yu; Gordon, Brian A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Relatively high frequency activity (>4 Hz) carries important information about the state of the brain or its response to high frequency events. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is commonly used to study these changes because it possesses high temporal resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio. However, it provides limited spatial information. Non-invasive fast optical signals (FOS) have been proposed as a neuroimaging tool combining spatial and temporal resolution. Yet, this technique has not been applied to study high frequency brain oscillations because of its relatively low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we investigate the sensitivity of FOS to relatively high-frequency brain oscillations. We measured the steady-state optical response elicited in medial and lateral occipital cortex by checkerboard reversals occurring at 4, 6, and 8 Hz in younger and older adults. Stimulus-dependent oscillations were observed at the predicted stimulation frequency. In addition, in the younger adults the FOS steady-state response was smaller in lateral than medial areas, whereas in the older adults it was reversed in these two cortical regions. This may reflect diminished top-down inhibitory control in the older adults. The results indicate that FOS can be used to study the modulation of relatively high-frequency brain oscillations in adjacent cortical regions. PMID:20566389

  4. Primary Care Based Intervention to Reduce At-Risk Drinking in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alison A.; Blow, Fred C.; Hoffing, Marc; Welgreen, Sandra; Davis, James W.; Lin, James C.; Ramirez, Karina D.; Liao, Diana H.; Tang, Lingqi; Gould, Robert; Gill, Monica; Chen, Oriana; Barry, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine whether a multifaceted intervention among older at-risk drinking primary care patients reduced at-risk drinking and alcohol consumption at 3 and 12 months. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Three primary care sites in southern California. Participants Six hundred thirty-one adults aged ≥ 55 years who were at-risk drinkers identified by the Comorbidity Alcohol Risk Evaluation Tool (CARET) were randomly assigned between October 2004 and April 2007 during an office visit to receive a booklet on healthy behaviors or an intervention including a personalized report, booklet on alcohol and aging, drinking diary, advice from the primary care provider and telephone counseling from a health educator at 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Measurements The primary outcome was the proportion of participants meeting at-risk criteria, and secondary outcomes were number of drinks in past 7 days, heavy drinking (4 or more drinks in a day) in the past 7 days and risk score.. Findings At 3 months, relative to controls, fewer intervention group participants were at-risk drinkers (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.22–0.75); they reported drinking fewer drinks in the past 7 days (rate ratio [RR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–0.90), less heavy drinking (odds ratio [OR] 0.46; 95% CI 0.22–0.99), and had lower risk scores (RR 0.77 95% CI 0.63–0.94).. At 12 months, only the difference in number of drinks remained statistically significant (RR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76–0.99). Conclusions A multifaceted intervention among older at-risk drinkers in primary care does not reduce the proportions of at-risk or heavy drinkers, but does reduce amount of drinking at 12 months. PMID:21143686

  5. PRIMARY PEPTIDE SEQUENCES FROM SQUID MUSCLE AND OPTIC LOBE MYOSIN IIs: A STRATEGY TO IDENTIFY AN ORGANELLE MYOSIN

    PubMed Central

    MEDEIROS, NELSON A.; REESE, THOMAS S.; JAFFE, HOWARD; DEGIORGIS, JOSEPH A.; BEARER, ELAINE L.

    2013-01-01

    The squid giant axon provides an excellent model system for the study of actin-based organelle transport likely to be mediated by myosins, but the identification of these motors has proven to be difficult. Here the authors purified and obtained primary peptide sequence of squid muscle myosin as a first step in a strategy designed to identify myosins in the squid nervous system. Limited digestion yielded fourteen peptides derived from the muscle myosin which possess high amino acid sequence identities to myosin II from scallop (60–95%) and chick pectoralis muscle (31–83%). Antibodies generated to this purified muscle myosin were used to isolate a potential myosin from squid optic lobe which yielded 11 peptide fragments. Sequences from six of these fragments identified this protein as a myosin II. The other five sequences matched myosin II (50–60%, identities), and some also matched unconventional myosins (33–50%). A single band that has a molecular weight similar to the myosin purified from optic lobe copurifies with axoplasmic organelles, and, like the optic lobe myosin, this band is also recognized by the antibodies raised against squid muscle myosin II. Hence, this strategy provides an approach to the identification of a myosin associated with motile axoplasmic organelles. PMID:9878103

  6. Depression and Anxiety Screens as Simultaneous Predictors of 10-Year Incidence of Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Khambaty, Tasneem; Callahan, Christopher M; Perkins, Anthony J; Stewart, Jesse C

    2017-02-01

    To examine depression and anxiety screens and their individual items as simultaneous predictors of incident diabetes mellitus. Ten-year follow-up study of individuals screened for the Improving Mood-Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment (IMPACT) trial. Two large urban primary care clinics in Indianapolis, Indiana. Diverse sample (53% African American, 80% of lower socioeconomic status) of 2,156 older adults initially free of diabetes mellitus. Depression and anxiety screens were completed during routine primary care visits between 1999 and 2001. Incident diabetes mellitus data were obtained from an electronic medical record system and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services analytical files though 2009. Over the 10-year period, 558 (25.9%) participants had diabetes mellitus onset. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographic and diabetes mellitus risk factors revealed that a positive screen for anxiety, but not for depression, predicted incident diabetes mellitus when entered into separate models (anxiety: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.61, P < .001; depression: HR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.95-1.46, P = .13) and when entered simultaneously into one model (anxiety: HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.12-1.61, P < .001; depression: HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.83-1.31, P = .73). The feeling anxious (P = .03) and the worry (P = .02) items predicted incident diabetes mellitus independent of the depression screen. These findings suggest that screening positive for anxiety is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus in older adults independent of depression and traditional diabetes mellitus risk factors. Anxiety requires greater consideration and awareness in the context of diabetes mellitus risk assessment and primary prevention. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Adherence to Asthma Guidelines in Children, Tweens, and Adults in Primary Care Settings: A Practice-Based Network Assessment.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Rank, Matthew A; Cabana, Michael D; Wollan, Peter C; Juhn, Young J

    2016-04-01

    To assess primary care adherence to 2007 US asthma guidelines. Patients with persistent asthma aged 5 to 65 years from 22 primary care participating practices provided the data for this analysis of baseline information from the pragmatic randomized clinical trial the Asthma Tools Study. Using a combination of abstracted medical record data and patient-reported demographic information, we assessed the medical record documentation for elements of the 2007 US asthma guidelines. Elements assessed included documentation of (1) assessment of control, (2) factors that affect control (medication adherence evaluation, inhaler technique education, and evaluation for triggers), (3) self-management support (action plan), and (4) asthma medications prescribed (short-acting β-agonists and daily maintenance therapy). The baseline data was collected from March 16, 2009, to May 1, 2014. In 1176 patients (285 children, 211 tweens, and 680 adults) from 16 family medicine and 6 pediatric practices across the United States, documented guideline adherence was highest for prescription of medications (88.0% for short-acting β-agonists and 70.4% for maintenance medications) and lowest for an asthma action plan (3.1%). Documentation of control (15.0%) and factors that affect control (inhaler technique education, 7.6%; medication adherence assessment, 32.5%; and allergy evaluation, 32.5%) was not common and even less common for adults compared with children. A total of 22.2% of the enrolled patients had no asthma-related visit in the year before enrollment. Adherence to the nonmedication elements were higher in practices located in cities of more than 250,000 people and cities that used electronic medical records. Older patient age was negatively associated with guideline adherence. Adherence to asthma guidelines is poor in primary care practices, leaving many opportunities for improvement. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Corticosteroid Risk Function of Severe Infection in Primary Immune Thrombocytopenia Adults. A Nationwide Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Moulis, Guillaume; Palmaro, Aurore; Sailler, Laurent; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid (CS)-related infection risk in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the adjusted CS risk function of severe infection in persistent or chronic primary ITP adults. We designed a nested case-control study in the FAITH cohort. This cohort is built through the French national health insurance database named SNIIRAM and includes all treated incident persistent or chronic primary ITP adults in France (ENCePP n°4574). Patients who entered the FAITH cohort between 2009 and 2012 were eligible (n = 1805). Cases were patients with infection as primary diagnosis code during hospitalization. Index date was the date of first hospitalization for infection. A 2:1 matching was performed on age and entry date in the cohort. Various CS exposure time-windows were defined: current user, exposure during the 1/3/6 months preceding index date and from the entry date. CS doses were converted in prednisone equivalent (PEQ). The cumulative CS doses were averaged in each time-window to obtain daily PEQ dosages. Each CS exposure definition was assessed using multivariate conditional regression models. During the study period, 161 cases (9 opportunistic) occurred. The model with the best goodness of fit was CS exposure during the month before the index date (OR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.61-3.83). The dose-effect relation showed that the risk existed from averaged daily doses ≥5 mg PEQ (vs. <5 mg: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.17-3.71). The risk of infection was mainly supported by current or recent exposure to CS, even with low doses.

  9. Optimal Systolic Blood Pressure Levels for Primary Prevention of Stroke in General Hypertensive Adults: Findings From the CSPPT (China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial).

    PubMed

    Fan, Fangfang; Yuan, Ziwen; Qin, Xianhui; Li, Jianping; Zhang, Yan; Li, Youbao; Yu, Tao; Ji, Meng; Ge, Junbo; Zheng, Meili; Yang, Xinchun; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Gu, Dongfeng; Zhao, Dong; Wang, Jiguang; Sun, Ningling; Chen, Yundai; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xiaobin; Parati, Gianfranco; Hou, Fanfan; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xian; Zhao, Gang; Huo, Yong

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship of time-averaged on-treatment systolic blood pressure (SBP) with the risk of first stroke in the CSPPT (China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial). A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from 17 720 hypertensive adults without cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and renal function decline from the CSPPT, a randomized double-blind controlled trial. The primary outcome was first stroke. Over a median follow-up duration of 4.5 years, the association between averaged on-treatment SBP and risk for first stoke followed a U-shape curve, with increased risk above and below the reference range of 120 to 130 mm Hg. Compared with participants with time-averaged on-treatment SBP at 120 to 130 mm Hg (mean, 126.2 mm Hg), the risk of first stroke was not only increased in participants with SBP at 130 to 135 mm Hg (mean, 132.6 mm Hg; 1.5% versus 0.8%; hazard ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.63) or 135 to 140 mm Hg (mean, 137.5 mm Hg; 1.9% versus 0.8%; hazard ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.93), but also increased in participants with SBP <120 mm Hg (mean, 116.7 mm Hg; 3.1% versus 0.8%; hazard ratio, 4.37; 95% confidence interval, 2.10-9.07). Similar results were found in various subgroups stratified by age, sex, and treatment group. Furthermore, lower diastolic blood pressure was associated with lower risk of stroke, with a plateau at a time-average on-treatment diastolic blood pressure <80 mm Hg. In conclusion, among adults with hypertension and without a history of stroke or myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, or renal function decline, a lower SBP goal of 120 to 130 mm Hg, as compared with a target SBP of 130 to 140 mm Hg or <120 mm Hg, resulted in the lowest risk of first stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Challenges in Identifying and Managing Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adults in the Primary Care Setting: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine how to screen for and establish a correct diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and to identify the outcomes associated with untreated ADHD. Data Sources: PubMed was searched using the key words ADHD, adult, diagnosis, and primary care from the years 1999 to 2009. Study Selection: This search produced 50 publications. Data Extraction: Publications were screened for data specific to the diagnosis or management of adult patients with ADHD in the primary care setting. Data Synthesis: The estimated prevalence of ADHD in adults throughout the United States is 4.4% or approximately 10 million adults. Adults with ADHD by definition must experience impairment from the symptoms of ADHD in at least 2 areas of their life. Despite significant impairment, only 1 in 10 adults with ADHD have received ADHD treatment within the past year. Given the high rates of undertreatment, primary care physicians, who provide much of the general adult mental health care in the United States, are increasingly charged with making the diagnosis of ADHD in adults. ADHD symptoms are often masked by comorbid psychiatric conditions or patient adaptations such as choice of occupation. One of the ADHD assessment tools, a short 6-item screener, can simplify identification and management of ADHD in adults and help identify which patients may require further evaluation. Conclusions: Primary care physicians should consult with other members of the health care community such as psychiatrists and psychologists when necessary, but should also develop a level of comfort with diagnosing and treating ADHD. PMID:21494335

  11. Predictors of treatment satisfaction among older adults with anxiety in a primary care psychology program.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Natalie E; Armento, Maria E A; Porter, Bennett; Cully, Jeffrey A; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda

    2013-04-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are treated in integrated primary care mental health programs. The current study examined predictors of satisfaction with treatment in patients from a randomized clinical trial of late-life generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in primary care. Higher treatment satisfaction was associated with receiving CBT rather than enhanced usual care. Treatment credibility, treatment expectancies, social support, and improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms predicted higher treatment satisfaction in the total sample. In the CBT group, only credibility and adherence with treatment predicted satisfaction. This suggests that older patients receiving CBT who believe more strongly in the treatment rationale and follow the therapist's recommendations more closely are likely to report satisfaction at the end of treatment. In addition, this study found that adherence mediated the relationship between treatment credibility and treatment satisfaction. In other words, patients' perceptions that the treatment made sense for them led to greater treatment adherence which then increased their satisfaction with treatment.

  12. 'SIMPLES': a structured primary care approach to adults with difficult asthma.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Dermot; Murphy, Anna; Ställberg, Björn; Baxter, Noel; Heaney, Liam G

    2013-09-01

    The substantial majority of patients with asthma can expect minimal breakthrough symptoms on standard doses of inhaled corticosteroids with or without additional add-on therapies. SIMPLES is a structured primary care approach to the review of a person with uncontrolled asthma which encompasses patient education monitoring, lifestyle and pharmacological management and addressing support needs which will achieve control in most patients. The small group of patients presenting with persistent asthma symptoms despite being prescribed high levels of treatment are often referred to as having 'difficult asthma'. Some will have difficult, 'therapy resistant' asthma, some will have psychosocial problems which make it difficult for them to achieve asthma control and some may prove to have an alternative diagnosis driving their symptoms. A few patients will benefit from referral to a 'difficult asthma' clinic. The SIMPLES approach, aligned with close co-operation between primary and specialist care, can identify this patient group, avoid inappropriate escalation of treatment, and streamline clinical assessment and management.

  13. [Cost per responder associated with romiplostim and rituximab treatment for adult primary immune thrombocytopenia in France].

    PubMed

    Chiche, L; Perrin, A; Stern, L; Kutikova, L; Cohen-Nizard, S; Lefrère, F

    2014-05-01

    This analysis compared the response rates and cost per responder associated with romiplostim and rituximab in adult immune thrombocytopenia from the French National Health System payer perspective. A decision analytic model was developed to estimate the cost per patient and per responder of treating adult immune thrombocytopenia patients with romiplostim versus rituximab over 6 months. A systematic literature review identified phase 3 randomized controlled trials. Published response rates were extracted (response definition: ≥50×10(9) platelets/liter). Resource utilization was based on French and international treatment guidelines, and clinical expert opinion. Unit costs were derived from literature and French reimbursement lists, and included the costs of routine physician visits, treatment administration, and emergency care. Non-responders incurred bleeding-related event costs. The literature review identified a phase 3 randomized controlled trial for romiplostim with a response rate of 83%. Due to a lack of phase 3 randomized controlled trials for rituximab, a systematic review of studies was selected as the best source, reporting a response rate of 62.5%. Romiplostim and rituximab were associated with similar treatment costs, with an estimated cost per patient for romiplostim of €17,456 and €17,068 for rituximab. Rituximab resulted in a 30% higher cost per responder (€27,308 for rituximab versus €21,031 for romiplostim). Romiplostim use reduced drug administration, intravenous immunoglobulin, and bleeding-related hospitalization costs compared to rituximab. Due to its high efficacy leading to lower bleeding-related costs, romiplostim represents an efficient use of resources for adult immune thrombocytopenia patients in the French healthcare system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Health education with older adults: action research with primary care professionals.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Francielle Toniolo Nicodemos Furtado de; Santos, Álvaro da Silva; Buso, Ana Luisa Zanardo; Malaquias, Bruna Stephanie Sousa

    2017-01-01

    To assess the development and implementation of permanent education action. Quantitative-qualitative research based on action research in three phases (diagnosis of reality, implementation of activity and evaluation), performed with health professionals and managers of basic health units. The evaluation was on the perception of changes immediately following the activity and after 120 days. In the first phase, 110 professionals took part, 36.4% of whom indicated the existence of groups for older adults at work. In the second phase, 98 professionals participated, pointing out interferences of the group in the life of older adults, items of importance and facilitation in forming groups and developing reality-based activities. The third phase showed, in the quantitative analysis, positive impact of the training, and in the qualitative analysis, reassessment of groups, greater knowledge and confidence in managing groups and increased respect for older adults. Permanent education opens pathways for the construction of differentiated care for older adults based on respect and health promotion. Avaliar o desenvolvimento e implementação de uma ação de educação permanente. Pesquisa quantitativo-qualitativa baseada na pesquisa-ação em 3 fases (diagnóstico da realidade, implementação de atividade e avaliação), realizada com profissionais de saúde e gerentes de unidades básicas. A avaliação se deu pela percepção de mudanças imediatamente à atividade e após 120 dias. Na 1ª fase, participaram 110 profissionais, dos quais 36,4% apontaram a existência de grupos para idosos no trabalho. Na 2ª fase, participaram 98 profissionais, que apontaram interferências do grupo na vida do idoso, itens de importância e facilitação para construção de grupos e atividade baseada na realidade. A 3ª fase mostrou, na análise quantitativa, impacto positivo do treinamento; e, na qualitativa, releitura dos grupos e manejo com mais conhecimento, segurança e respeito ao

  15. Primary Care Opportunities to Prevent Unintentional Home Injuries: A Focus on Children and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Eileen M.; Mack, Karin; Shields, Wendy C.; Lee, Robin P.; Gielen, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries are a persistent public health problem in the United States. A new health care landscape has the potential to create a clinical environment that fosters greater involvement by health care providers in injury prevention. The aim of this article is to provide evidence supporting the need for engagement by primary care providers in unintentional home injury prevention along with examples of how this could be accomplished. We know a great deal about what population groups are at risk for certain types of injuries. We also know that many injuries can be prevented through policies, programs, and resources that ensure safe environments and promote safe behaviors. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) initiative comprises clinical decision support tools and educational materials for health care providers. Two effective interventions that have demonstrated a reduction in falls among children are the redesign of baby walkers (engineering) and the mandated use of window guards (enforcement). Primary care clinicians can play a key role in promoting their patient’s safety. Taken collectively, a focused attention on preventing unintentional home injuries by primary care providers can contribute to the reduction of injuries and result in optimal health for all. PMID:27141210

  16. Office-Based Case Finding for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Older Adults in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is underdiagnosed in primary care. Aim. To explore the utility of proactive identification of COPD in patients 75 years of age and older in a Canadian primary care setting. Methods. Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) screening questions were administered to patients with a smoking history of 20 pack-years or more; those with a positive screen were referred for postbronchodilator spirometry. Results. A total of 107 patients (21%), of 499 screened, had a 20-pack-year smoking history; 105 patients completed the CTS screening. Forty-four (42%) patients were positive on one or more questions on the screening; significantly more patients with a previous diagnosis of COPD (64%) were positive on the CTS compared to those without a previous diagnosis of COPD (30%). Of those who were not previously diagnosed with COPD (N = 11), four (36%) were newly diagnosed with COPD. Conclusion. A systematic two-stage method of screening for COPD, using CTS screening questions followed by spirometric confirmation, is feasible in the context of a busy primary care setting. More research is needed to assess the value of restricting screening to patients with a smoking history of 20 pack-years and on the sensitivity and specificity of these measures. PMID:27445513

  17. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Implementation of a diabetes self-management education program in primary care for adults using shared medical appointments.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Iris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement diabetes self-management education in primary care using the Chronic Care Model and shared medical appointments (SMA) to provide evidence-based interventions to improve process and measure outcomes. A quality improvement project using the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle was implemented in a primary care setting in South Texas to provide diabetes self-management education for adults. Biological measures were evaluated in 70 patients at initiation of the project and thereafter based on current practice guidelines. The results of the project were consistent with the literature regarding the benefits, sustainability, and viability of SMA. As compared with that in studies presented in the literature, the patient population who participated in SMA had similar outcomes regarding improvement in A1C, self-management skills, and satisfaction. SMA are an innovative system redesign concept with the potential to provide comprehensive and coordinated care for patients with multiple and chronic health conditions while still being an efficient, effective, financially viable, and sustainable program. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes increase, innovative models of care can meet the growing demand for access and utilization of diabetes self-management education programs. Programs focusing on chronic conditions to improve outcomes can be replicated by health care providers in primary care settings. SMA can increase revenue and productivity, improve disease management, and increase provider and patient satisfaction.

  19. An assessment of optical properties and primary production derived from remote sensing in the Southern Ocean (SO GasEx)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zhongping; Lance, Veronica P.; Shang, Shaoling; Vaillancourt, Robert; Freeman, Scott; Lubac, Bertrand; Hargreaves, Bruce R.; Del Castillo, Carlos; Miller, Richard; Twardowski, Michael; Wei, Guomei

    2011-04-01

    Optical properties and primary production were measured during the Southern Ocean (SO) Gas Exchange Experiment (GasEx) (March-April 2008). To assess and evaluate these properties derived from remote sensing, absorption coefficients derived from remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) with the quasi-analytical algorithm were compared with those from in situ measurements from both an ac-9 optical instrument deployed on a profiling package and from discrete water samples analyzed using filter pad spectrophotometry. Total absorption coefficients from Rrs retrievals were found, on average, to be ˜12% less than ac-9 measurements and ˜15% less than filter pad measurements. Absorption coefficients of gelbstoff-detritus and phytoplankton pigments (at 443 nm) derived from Rrs were ˜15% and ˜25% less than ac-9 measurements, respectively. The difference can be well explained based on the determination methods and these results indicate general consistency between remote sensing retrievals and in situ measurements for these waters. Further, incorporating measured surface radiation data, water column primary production (PPeu) was estimated using chlorophyll concentration based models (Chl-PP) and a phytoplankton absorption based model (Aph-PP), where remote-sensing Chl was retrieved with an operational empirical algorithm. These estimated PPeu values were then compared with primary productivity measured using 14C incubation techniques, and coefficient of determination (R2, N = 13) of 0.74 were found for the Aph-PP results, while the R2 of the Chl-PP results were less than 0.5. Such a contrast further highlights the importance of analytically retrieving phytoplankton absorption from measurement of ocean color and the advantage of using phytoplankton absorption to represent the role of phytoplankton in photosynthesis. Spatial distribution and contrast of PPeu in the greater SO GasEx region estimated from satellite data are also presented.

  20. Violence victimization after HIV infection in a US probability sample of adult patients in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Zierler, S; Cunningham, W E; Andersen, R; Shapiro, M F; Nakazono, T; Morton, S; Crystal, S; Stein, M; Turner, B; St Clair, P; Bozzette, S A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of HIV-infected adults who have been assaulted by a partner or someone important to them since their HIV diagnosis and the extent to which they reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of the violence. METHODS: Study participants were from a nationally representative probability sample of 2864 HIV-infected adults who were receiving medical care and were enrolled in the HIV Costs and Service Utilization Study. All interviews (91% in person, 9% by telephone) were conducted with computer-assisted personal interviewing instruments. Interviews began in January 1996 and ended 15 months later. RESULTS: Overall, 20.5% of the women, 11.5% of the men who reported having sex with men, and 7.5% of the heterosexual men reported physical harm since diagnosis, of whom nearly half reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of violent episodes. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-related care is an appropriate setting for routine assessment of violence. Programs to cross-train staff in antiviolence agencies and HIV care facilities need to be developed for men and women with HIV infection. PMID:10667181

  1. The Effect of a Primary Care Practice–Based Depression Intervention on Mortality in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Joseph J.; Bogner, Hillary R.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Post, Edward P.; Lin, Julia Y.; Bruce, Martha L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have tested the effects of a depression intervention on the risk for death associated with depression. Objective To test whether an intervention to improve depression care can modify the risk for death. Design Practice-based, randomized, controlled trial. Setting 20 primary care practices in New York, New York, and Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Patients 1226 randomly sampled patients identified through a 2-stage, age-stratified (60 to 74 years and ≥75 years) depression screening. Intervention Depression care manager working with primary care physicians to provide algorithm-based care. Measurements Depression status based on clinical interview and vital status at 5 years by using the National Death Index. Results At baseline, 396 patients met criteria for major depression and 203 patients met criteria for clinically significant minor depression. After a median follow-up of 52.8 months, 223 patients died. Patients with depression in intervention practices were less likely to have died than those in usual care practices (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.67 [95% CI, 0.44 to 1.00]). Risk for death was reduced in patients with major depression (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.55 [CI, 0.36 to 0.84]) but not in patients with clinically significant minor depression (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.97 [CI, 0.49 to 1.92]). The benefit seemed to be almost entirely attributable to a reduction in deaths due to cancer. Limitations The mechanism for an effect on deaths due to cancer is unclear. Depression status, cause of death, and vital status might have been misclassified. Conclusions Older primary care patients with major depression in practices that implemented depression care management were less likely to die over a 5-year period than were patients with major depression in usual care practices. The effect seemed to be limited to deaths due to cancer. The mechanism for such an effect is unclear and warrants further investigation. PMID:17502629

  2. [Impact of a national treatment program in overweight adults women in primary care centers].

    PubMed

    Echenique Sarah, J; Rodríguez Osiac, L; Pizarro Quevedo, T; Martín, Ma A; Atalah Samur, E

    2011-01-01

    Chile has a high prevalence of overweight and obesity and is important to implement and evaluate treatment and control strategies that are effective. To evaluate changes in nutritional status and fasting glucose in overweight women, pre-diabetic and/or pre-hypertension in primary care centers of public health sector. A retrospective cohort of the universe of women admitted to the program in the participating primary care centers for 18 months was studied. Intervention includes consultations and workshops with doctors, nutritionists, psychologists and physical therapists for 4 months, in primary heath center, promoting healthy eating and increased physical activity, not using drugs. Analysis of causes of admission, dropout, participation in scheduled activities and changes in baseline nutritional status and fasting glucose after 4 months of intervention. 1,528 women 18 to 65 years old, with initial BMI between 25 and 40 were studied and 1,222 completed treatment (71.6%). The median weight change was -3.9% (CI -4.1 to 3.7) of initial weight and -2.0 mg/dl (CI -2.0 to 1.0) of blood glucose. 36.8% of patient decreased ≥ 5% of initial weight, 12.5% of overweight and about one third of obese partly improved or normalized their nutritional status. There was significant reduction in the prevalence of pre-diabetes (16.6 to 8.8%, p < 0.001). The intervention was effective for good adhesion and impact in reducing cardiovascular risk factors as BMI, waist circumference and high fasting glucose. One challenge is to keep track of this population to ascertain the impact in the medium and long term.

  3. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (e.g., Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate its feasibility.

  4. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid, segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (eg, Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate it s feasibility.

  5. The Association between Primary Tooth Emergence and Anthropometric Measures in Young Adults: Findings from a Large Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Evans, David M.; Tobias, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Cross sectional studies suggest a link may exist between tooth emergence and obesity. To explore this relationship, we aimed to evaluate the prospective associations between primary tooth emergence and anthropometric measures in young adults. Multivariable linear regression was used to analyse relationships between primary tooth emergence, and anthropometric measures measured at 17.8 years, in 2977 participants (1362 males and 1615 females) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). In minimally adjusted models, ‘quintiles of number of paired teeth’ (assessed by questionnaire at 15 months) was positively associated with height [change in height (cm) per quintile increase in ‘number of paired teeth’ (β) = 0.35 (95%CI: 0.18, 0.52) P = 0.0001] and weight [ratio of geometric mean weight per quintile increase in ‘number of paired teeth’ (RGM) = 1.015 (95%CI: 1.010, 1.019) P<0.0001]. The relationship with weight was largely driven by fat mass, which showed an equivalent relationship with ‘quintiles of number of paired teeth’ to that seen for weight [RGM = 1.036 (95%CI: 1.022, 1.051) P<0.0001] (adjusted for height)]. Conversely, no association was seen between ‘quintiles of number of paired teeth’ and lean mass. An increase in ‘quintiles of number of paired teeth’ at age 15 months was associated with a higher Tanner stage at age 13 in girls but not boys, but further adjustment of associations between ‘quintiles of number of paired teeth’ and anthropometric traits for Tanner stage was without effect. Primary tooth emergence is associated with subsequent fat mass, suggesting these could share common constitutive factors, and that early primary tooth emergence may represent a hitherto unrecognised risk factor for the development of obesity in later life. PMID:24823714

  6. Adult-onset nemaline myopathy in a dog presenting with persistent atrial standstill and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R K; Russell, N J; Shelton, G D

    2012-06-01

    A nine-year-old neutered female mixed breed dog presented for evaluation following a five-day history of lethargy, inappetence, weakness, abdominal distension and generalised muscle atrophy. Persistent vatrial standstill with a junctional rhythm was identified on electrocardiogram. Echocardiogram identified moderate dilation of all cardiac chambers and mild thickening of the mitral and tricuspid valves. Serology was negative for Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii. Permanent pacemaker implantation was performed in addition to endomyocardial and skeletal muscle biopsies. Cryosections from the biceps femoris muscle showed numerous nemaline rod bodies while endomyocardial biopsies were possibly consistent with end-stage myocarditis. Rod bodies have rarely been reported in the veterinary literature. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of adult-onset nemaline rod myopathy and hypothyroidism with concurrent cardiac disease in a dog. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Lipid-mediated transfection of normal adult human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ourlin, J C; Vilarem, M J; Daujat, M; Harricane, M C; Domergue, J; Joyeux, H; Baulieux, J; Maurel, P

    1997-04-05

    The aim of this work was to develop a procedure for the lipid-mediated transfection of DNA into normal adult human hepatocytes in culture. Cells were plated in a serum-free culture medium at various cell densities, on plastic or collagen-coated dishes, both in the absence and in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF). The cells were incubated for various periods of time with mixtures of DNA-lipofectin or DNA-3 beta[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-chol) liposomes, and the efficiency of transfection was assessed by measuring the activity of reporter genes, beta-galactosidase or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). For comparison, similar experiments were carried out with human cell lines including HepG2, Caco-2, and WRL68. The efficiency of transfection (in percentage of cells) was not significantly different after transfection with lipofectin or DC-chol and comprised between 0.04 and 1.7% (extreme values) for different cultures. The efficiency of transfection decreased as the age or density of the culture increased and increased in cultures treated with EGF. Direct measurement of the rate of DNA synthesis suggested that the efficiency of transfection was related to the number of cells entering the S phase. Under the same conditions, the efficiency of transfection was one to two orders of magnitude greater in the three cell lines. A plasmid harboring 660 bp of the 5'-flanking region of CYP1A1 (containing two xenobiotic enhancer elements) fused upstream of the promoter of thymidine kinase and the CAT reporter gene was constructed. When this plasmid was transfected in human hepatocytes, CAT activity was induced as expected. We conclude that normal adult human hepatocytes can be transfected with exogenous DNA and that the transfected construct is regulated in the manner expected from in vivo studies.

  8. Prognostic factors in primary nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma of the rib in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sajid S; Kembhavi, Seema; Vora, Tushar; Ramadwar, Mukta; Laskar, Siddharth; Talole, Sanjay; Kurkure, Purna

    2013-04-01

    The rarity of Ewing sarcoma of rib has resulted in paucity of data, particularly on the prognostic factors and pattern of relapses. We analyzed the recurrences in patients with primary nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma of the rib and examined prognostic factors of poor outcome. From January 2004 to January 2011, 37 patients were treated. After induction chemotherapy, complete (from costal cartilage to vertebra) or partial excision of involved rib with or without adjacent ribs was performed. Postoperative radiotherapy was administered for positive margins, poor response to chemotherapy, and large primary tumors with significant soft tissue component at presentation. Disease relapsed in 16 patients: at the local site (n = 5), both local and distant (n = 2), and distant site only (n = 9). The projected 5-year cause-specific, relapse-free survival and local control were 50%, 44%, and 72%. Poor response to chemotherapy (>5% residual tumor) and resection of adjacent lung parenchyma (a surrogate for tumor extension) were adverse prognostic factors for relapse-free survival in multivariate analysis. Relapses occurred more often at distant sites and had a poor outcome. In this study, poor histologic response to chemotherapy (P = .04) and the infiltration of adjacent lung parenchyma (P = .01) are adverse prognostic factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. General Practitioners’ Decision Making about Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jesse; Bonner, Carissa; Irwig, Les; Doust, Jenny; Glasziou, Paul; Bell, Katy; Naganathan, Vasi; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in older people is challenging as they are a diverse group with varying needs, frequent presence of comorbidities, and are more susceptible to treatment harms. Moreover the potential benefits and harms of preventive medication for older people are uncertain. We explored GPs’ decision making about primary CVD prevention in patients aged 75 years and older. Method 25 GPs participated in semi-structured interviews in New South Wales, Australia. Transcribed audio-recordings were thematically coded and Framework Analysis was used. Results Analysis identified factors that are likely to contribute to variation in the management of CVD risk in older people. Some GPs based CVD prevention on guidelines regardless of patient age. Others tailored management based on factors such as perceptions of prevention in older age, knowledge of limited evidence, comorbidities, polypharmacy, frailty, and life expectancy. GPs were more confident about: 1) medication and lifestyle change for fit/healthy older patients, and 2) stopping or avoiding medication for frail/nursing home patients. Decision making for older patients outside of these categories was less clear. Conclusion Older patients receive different care depending on their GP’s perceptions of ageing and CVD prevention, and their knowledge of available evidence. GPs consider CVD prevention for older patients challenging and would welcome more guidance in this area. PMID:28085944

  10. Physician discussion about social activities in primary care encounters with older adults.

    PubMed

    Ory, Marcia; Yuma, Paula J; Wade, Angie; Kaunas, Christine; Bramson, Rachel

    2008-07-01

    Involvement in social activities is linked to positive health outcomes. This study focused on the prevalence of social activity discussions during the primary care medical encounter, and examined how patient, physician, and contextual factors were associated with discussions between physicians and older patients. The research was a secondary analysis of 434 videotapes recorded during primary care medical visits between 1998 and 2000 in outpatient clinics. Recordings were coded to identify a number of variables related to patient, physician, and companion characteristics, physician discussion on various topics, and quality of the physician's interaction with the patient. Physicians discussed social activity in only 31% of medical encounters. Variables significantly associated with social activity discussions included patient and physician race/ethnicity, physician age group, physician supportiveness, and the geographical site of the visit. Results support the inclusion of discussion and counseling about social activities in medical encounters with older patients. Family physicians will likely experience improved patient satisfaction, and geriatric patients can potentially reap health benefits that improve both quality of life and medical outcomes. Additional research is needed to understand more fully the correlates and benefits of social activity discussion during the medical encounter.

  11. Primary and rescue immune tolerance induction in children and adults: a multicentre international study with a VWF-containing plasma-derived FVIII concentrate.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, J; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Peiró-Jordán, R; Aledort, L M; Santagostino, E

    2014-01-01

    Most studies on immune tolerance induction (ITI) therapy in haemophilia A patients are focused on primary ITI in children. Here we report on the ITI outcome in a large retrospective cohort, including adults and patients with rescue ITI, treated with a pdFVIII/VWF concentrate. Retrospective data from haemophilic patients (FVIII< 2%) with inhibitors from 22 centres in Spain, Italy and Germany, who underwent primary or rescue ITI with pdFVIII/VWF concentrate, were collected. Complete success (CS), partial success (PS) and failure were defined based on the criteria of the consensus recommendations of the 2006 International ITI Workshop. A total of 41 cases of primary ITI (32 children and 9 adults) and 19 cases of rescue ITI (17 children and 2 adults) were evaluated. Success (CS+PS) rate of 87% was achieved in primary ITI and 74% in the higher risk profile of rescue ITI. Eight of nine (85%) patients with poorest prognosis (three or more of the known risk factors of poor response to ITI) achieved success (CS+PS). CS of 100% was observed in eight primary ITI patients with titre at start of ITI ≤2.5 BU and inhibitor peak ≤25 BU. The favourable response rates in primary and rescue ITI in children and in adult patients, even in the presence of poor prognostic factors, should be encouraged for broadening the indication of immune tolerance therapy in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

  12. Global cardiovascular risk assessment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults: systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Alice C; Onakpoya, Igho J; Roberts, Nia; Ward, Alison M; Heneghan, Carl J

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify, critically appraise and summarise existing systematic reviews on the impact of global cardiovascular risk assessment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. Design Systematic review of systematic reviews published between January 2005 and October 2016 in The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE or CINAHL databases, and post hoc analysis of primary trials. Participants, interventions, outcomes Systematic reviews of interventions involving global cardiovascular risk assessment relative to no formal risk assessment in adults with no history of CVD. The primary outcomes of interest were CVD-related morbidity and mortality and all-cause mortality; secondary outcomes were systolic blood pressure (SBP), cholesterol and smoking. Results We identified six systematic reviews of variable but generally of low quality (mean Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews 4.2/11, range 0/11 to 7/11). No studies identified by the systematic reviews reported CVD-related morbidity or mortality or all-cause mortality. Meta-analysis of reported randomised controlled trials (RCTs) showed small reductions in SBP (mean difference (MD) −2.22 mm Hg (95% CI −3.49 to −0.95); I2=66%; n=9; GRADE: very low), total cholesterol (MD −0.11 mmol/L (95% CI −0.20 to −0.02); I2=72%; n=5; GRADE: very low), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.15 mmol/L (95% CI −0.26 to −0.05), I2=47%; n=4; GRADE: very low) and smoking cessation (RR 1.62 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.43); I2=17%; n=7; GRADE: low). The median follow-up time of reported RCTs was 12 months (range 2–36 months). Conclusions The quality of existing systematic reviews was generally poor and there is currently no evidence reported in these reviews that the prospective use of global cardiovascular risk assessment translates to reductions in CVD morbidity or mortality. There are reductions in SBP, cholesterol and smoking but they may not be clinically

  13. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice. PMID:27660753

  14. Cognitive behavioral treatment for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. A therapist manual for primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Melinda A; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Hopko, Derek R

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project suggested the potential benefits of a new version of CBT for GAD among older patients in primary care. The manual developed and tested in this pilot project is presented here. Treatment components include motivation and education, relaxation skills, cognitive therapy, problem-solving-skills training, exposure exercises, and sleep-management-skills training. Procedures are designed to be administered flexibly to maximize attention to individual patient needs. Examples of session summaries, patient handouts, and homework forms are provided.

  15. Primary hyperoxaluria in an adult male: A rare cause of end-stage kidney disease yet potentially fatal if misdiagnosed.

    PubMed

    El-Reshaid, Kamel; Al-Bader, Dalal; Madda, John P

    2016-05-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is an autosomal recessive disorder due to a deficiency in the activity of the peroxisomal hepatic enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase. It is a common cause of urolithiasis and end-stage kidney disease in children contrary to the adult phenotypic presentation which is considered a mild disorder with occasional urolithiasis. In this case report, we describe a 25-year-old man who presented with advanced and irreversible kidney failure within three months following strenuous physical training in the police academy. He had nephrocalcinosis and stones in one kidney. Diagnosis was confirmed by establishing the existence of extensive tubular and interstitial crystal deposition in his kidneys and molecular genetic testing. The case illustrates the need to establish an early diagnosis of this disorder to prevent the need for combined liver and kidney transplantation.

  16. Prospective long-term study on primary CMV infections in adult liver transplant (D+/R-) patients after valganciclovir prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Loginov, Raisa; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Höckerstedt, Krister

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) can cause severe infections in transplanted patients. To prevent CMV infection, most liver centers use prophylaxis for CMV-seronegative recipients receiving an organ from a seropositive donor (D+/R-). Valganciclovir is mostly given for 3-6 months after transplantation. However, the patients may develop primary CMV infection after the cessation of prophylaxis and late-onset CMV disease may occur. A prospective long-term follow-up of CMV (D+/R-) adult liver transplant recipients after 3 months valganciclovir prophylaxis was investigated. Of 154 consecutive adult liver recipients transplanted from 2006 to 2009, 20 (13%) were CMV D+/R- and received antiviral prophylaxis up to 3 months after transplantation. After excluding the recipients with incomplete prophylaxis or monitoring, 13 (D+/R-) patients with follow-up of >4 years after the 3-month period of valganciclovir prophylaxis were included in the study.The patients were monitored for CMV by real-time quantitative plasma PCR. No break-through CMV infections were recorded during the prophylaxis period. After cessation of valganciclovir prophylaxis 12/13 (90%) patients demonstrated CMV-DNAemia following a post transplantation mean interval of 165 days (range 95-320). Ten patients with high viral loads (peak viral load mean 81,510, range 1900-648950cps/ml) were successfully treated, 6 with valganciclovir, and 4 with ganciclovir. Two patients with low level CMV-DNAemia (<1000cps/ml) were asymptomatic and not treated. No intragraft infection was seen, but one patient developed gastrointestinal CMV infection verified from ileum biopsy. During long-term follow-up, 3 patients demonstrated low-level viral replication, but no symptomatic recurrences occurred. One patient died of bacterial sepsis, but no patient or graft was lost due to CMV. Primary CMV infections after cessation of prophylaxis were common, but were successfully treated with valganciclovir or ganciclovir. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  17. Influence of CRP testing and clinical findings on antibiotic prescribing in adults presenting with acute cough in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Kristin Alise; Melbye, Hasse; Kelly, Mark J.; Ceynowa, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Respiratory tract infections are the most common indication for antibiotic prescribing in primary care. The value of clinical findings in lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is known to be overrated. This study aimed to determine the independent influence of a point of care test (POCT) for C-reactive protein (CRP) on the prescription of antibiotics in patients with acute cough or symptoms suggestive of LRTI, and how symptoms and chest findings influence the decision to prescribe when the test is and is not used. Design Prospective observational study of presentation and management of acute cough/LRTI in adults. Setting Primary care research networks in Norway, Sweden, and Wales. Subjects Adult patients contacting their GP with symptoms of acute cough/LRTI. Main outcome measures Predictors of antibiotic prescribing were evaluated in those tested and those not tested with a POCT for CRP using logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results A total of 803 patients were recruited in the three networks. Among the 372 patients tested with a POCT for CRP, the CRP value was the strongest independent predictor of antibiotic prescribing, with an odds ratio (OR) of CRP ≥ 50 mg/L of 98.1. Crackles on auscultation and a patient preference for antibiotics perceived by the GP were the strongest predictors of antibiotic prescribing when the CRP test was not used. Conclusions The CRP result is a major influence in the decision whether or not to prescribe antibiotics for acute cough. Clinicians attach less weight to discoloured sputum and abnormal lung sounds when a CRP value is available. CRP testing could prevent undue reliance on clinical features that poorly predict benefit from antibiotic treatment. PMID:20704523

  18. Influence of CRP testing and clinical findings on antibiotic prescribing in adults presenting with acute cough in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Kristin Alise; Melbye, Hasse; Kelly, Mark J; Ceynowa, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C

    2010-12-01

    Respiratory tract infections are the most common indication for antibiotic prescribing in primary care. The value of clinical findings in lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is known to be overrated. This study aimed to determine the independent influence of a point of care test (POCT) for C-reactive protein (CRP) on the prescription of antibiotics in patients with acute cough or symptoms suggestive of LRTI, and how symptoms and chest findings influence the decision to prescribe when the test is and is not used. Prospective observational study of presentation and management of acute cough/LRTI in adults. Primary care research networks in Norway, Sweden, and Wales. Adult patients contacting their GP with symptoms of acute cough/LRTI. Predictors of antibiotic prescribing were evaluated in those tested and those not tested with a POCT for CRP using logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 803 patients were recruited in the three networks. Among the 372 patients tested with a POCT for CRP, the CRP value was the strongest independent predictor of antibiotic prescribing, with an odds ratio (OR) of CRP ≥ 50 mg/L of 98.1. Crackles on auscultation and a patient preference for antibiotics perceived by the GP were the strongest predictors of antibiotic prescribing when the CRP test was not used. The CRP result is a major influence in the decision whether or not to prescribe antibiotics for acute cough. Clinicians attach less weight to discoloured sputum and abnormal lung sounds when a CRP value is available. CRP testing could prevent undue reliance on clinical features that poorly predict benefit from antibiotic treatment.

  19. [Etiological agents more common in primary hip and knee joint replacement infections in older adults].

    PubMed

    Argüelles-Martínez, O; Rivera-Villa, A H; Miguel-Pérez, A; Torres-González, R; Pérez-Atanasio, J M; Mata-Hernández, A; De la Fuente-Zuno, J C

    2016-01-01

    The most common etiological agents in periprosthetic infections are Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The frequency of these infections are found in knee replacement with 0.68 to 1.60% compared to the hip with 0.67 to 2.4%. To identify what are the most common etiologic agents in periprosthetic infections in elderly patients with primary hip and knee surgery. An observational study, transverse and retrospective case series was performed in a period from June 2011 to December 2014, patients over 60 years with a diagnosis of periprosthetic infection by two positive cultures with antibiograma. 62 patients were evaluated 59.7% were infections of knee and hip 40.3%, 59% were infections by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus 22%. The best sensitivity reported antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 40.3%. The largest penicillin G resistance 32.2%. The most common causative agents were Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  20. [Primary cardiac lymphoma in an immunocompetent young adult: outcome with chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Perna, Gian Piero; Gini, Guido; Brambatti, Michela; Battistoni, Ilaria; Marini, Marco; Angelini, Luca; Francioni, Matteo; Goteri, Gaia; Dottori, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Primitive cardiac lymphoma (PCL) is a rare disease accounting for only 1-2% of primary cardiac tumors. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is the most common type and shows a rapid progression with poor prognosis. The clinical presentation of PCL is nonspecific, and echocardiographic study is essential to the initial work-up. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scan are the methods of choice for the assessment of tumor extension. The definitive diagnosis is histopathology examination. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the best treatment and should be started promptly after PCL diagnosis. We here report a case of PCL in a 59-year-old man complicated by pulmonary microembolism, atrial fibrillation and signs of right outflow tract obstruction.

  1. Adult primary pulmonary primitive neuroectodermal tumor: molecular features and translational opportunities.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Mirela; Cramer, Stewart F; Kramer, Zachary B; Zeidan, Amer; Faltas, Bishoy

    2013-02-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) arising directly from the lung are very rare but particularly aggressive neoplasms. We report a case of a 31-y-old man with primary pulmonary neuroectodermal tumor. We review the clinical as well as pathological features. As typical for these tumors, the diagnosis was initially delayed in our patient and prognosis was poor despite aggressive surgical resection, postoperative chemotherapy and local irradiation. Recent biological insights have revealed unique chromosomal translocations crucial to the pathogenesis of these tumors, most notably the EWS-FLI-1 translocation. We provide an overview of the molecular features of the Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFT) including PNET and their potential implications for therapeutic targeting.

  2. Primary lymphoma of bone in the pediatric and young adult population.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Karen M; Ohgami, Robert S; Tan, Brent; Hasserjian, Robert P; Weinberg, Olga K

    2017-02-01

    Primary lymphoma of bone (PLB) accounts for 3% to 7% of primary neoplasms of bone and must be distinguished from more common bone tumors in the pediatric population such as osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and other small round blue cell tumors. In this study, pathology databases from 4 institutions were queried for PLB in individuals 1 to 21 years old. A total of 54 cases of PLB were identified, including 41 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL, 76%), 8 B-lymphoblastic lymphomas (BLL, 15%), 3 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL, 6%), and 2 low-grade follicular lymphomas (4%). The male/female ratio was 1.8:1 and median age was 16 years (range, 2-21). Patients with DLBCL were significantly older (P<.001), and patients with ALCL and BLL were significantly younger (P=.050 and P=.008, respectively) when compared with the other patients. Due to necrosis, crush artifact, and/or insufficient material, 30% of cases required multiple biopsies for diagnosis. The femur, tibia, pelvic bones, humerus, and vertebrae were most commonly involved. DLBCL patients had significantly more solitary bone involvement (P=.001), whereas BLL had significantly more polyostotic involvement (P<.001). Of the 37 patients with outcome data, all had no evidence of disease on last follow-up. This largest pediatric series of PLB identifies DLBCL as the most frequent subtype and documents rarer occurrences of BLL, ALCL, and follicular lymphomas. The differential diagnosis of bone neoplasms in pediatric patients, including those with necrosis, should include PLB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary-to-secondary care referral experience of suspected colorectal malignancy in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K; Doulias, T; Hoad, T; Lee, C; Alberts, JC

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer in patients younger than 50 years of age is increasing steadily in the UK with limited guidelines available indicating need for secondary care referral. The aims of this study were to report the cancer incidence in those aged under 50 years referred to secondary care with suspected colorectal malignancy and also to analyse the quality of those referrals. Methods A total of 197 primary care referrals made between 2008 and 2014 to a UK district general hospital for suspected colorectal malignancy were analysed. All confirmed cancers were further evaluated regarding presenting symptoms, tumour characteristics and clinical outcomes. Each referral was given a referral performance score (out of 9) dependant on relevant information documented. Results The overall malignancy rate was 9.1% (11 male and 7 female patients). The median age in this cohort was 41.5 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 37–49 years). Abdominal pain was the only presenting symptom to differ significantly when comparing malignant with non-malignant patients (44.4% vs 21.8% respectively, p=0.042). The median time period between referral date and colorectal specialist consultation was 11 days (IQR: 7–13 days) and the median referral performance score was 5 (range: 3–9). Conclusions Malignancy is prevalent in patients under 50 years of age who are referred to secondary care for suspected colorectal cancer. Those referred with abdominal pain in the presence of other high risk lower gastrointestinal symptoms are at significant risk of having a malignancy. Major deficiencies are apparent in urgent primary care referrals, highlighting the need for further national guidance to aid early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in the young. PMID:27023637

  4. Primary-to-secondary care referral experience of suspected colorectal malignancy in young adults.

    PubMed

    Patel, K; Doulias, T; Hoad, T; Lee, C; Alberts, J C

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer in patients younger than 50 years of age is increasing steadily in the UK with limited guidelines available indicating need for secondary care referral. The aims of this study were to report the cancer incidence in those aged under 50 years referred to secondary care with suspected colorectal malignancy and also to analyse the quality of those referrals. A total of 197 primary care referrals made between 2008 and 2014 to a UK district general hospital for suspected colorectal malignancy were analysed. All confirmed cancers were further evaluated regarding presenting symptoms, tumour characteristics and clinical outcomes. Each referral was given a referral performance score (out of 9) dependant on relevant information documented. The overall malignancy rate was 9.1% (11 male and 7 female patients). The median age in this cohort was 41.5 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 37-49 years). Abdominal pain was the only presenting symptom to differ significantly when comparing malignant with non-malignant patients (44.4% vs 21.8% respectively, p=0.042). The median time period between referral date and colorectal specialist consultation was 11 days (IQR: 7-13 days) and the median referral performance score was 5 (range: 3-9). Malignancy is prevalent in patients under 50 years of age who are referred to secondary care for suspected colorectal cancer. Those referred with abdominal pain in the presence of other high risk lower gastrointestinal symptoms are at significant risk of having a malignancy. Major deficiencies are apparent in urgent primary care referrals, highlighting the need for further national guidance to aid early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in the young.

  5. Pain measurement as part of primary healthcare of adult patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Andreza Aparecida Felix; Ribeiro, Sonia Beatriz Felix; Moraes-Souza, Helio; de Oliveira, Lucas Felix; Ribeiro, João Batista; da Silva, Sheron Hellen; de Oliveira, Daniel Fachinelli Felix; Ribeiro, Matheus Fernando Felix

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this exploratory, cross-sectional study was to evaluate pain in sickle cell disease patients and aspects related to primary healthcare. Methods Data were obtained through home interviews. The assessment instruments (body diagram, Numerical Pain Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire) collected information on the underlying disease and on pain. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program for Windows. Associations between the subgroups of sickle cell disease patients (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, sickle β-thalassemia and others) and pain were analyzed using contingency tables and non-parametric tests of association (classic chi-square, Fisher's and Kruskal-Wallis) with a level of 5% (p-value < 0.05) being set for the rejection of the null hypothesis. Results Forty-seven over 18-year-old patients with sickle cell disease were evaluated. Most were black (78.7%) and female (59.6%) and the mean age was 30.1 years. The average number of bouts of pain annually was 7.02; pain was predominantly reported by individuals with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS). The intensity of pain (Numeric Pain Scale) was 5.5 and the quantitative index (McGill) was 35.9. This study also shows that patients presented a high frequency of moderately painful crises in their own homes. Conclusion According to these facts, it is essential that pain related to sickle cell disease is properly identified, quantified, characterized and treated at the three levels of healthcare. In primary healthcare, accurate measurement of pain combined with better care may decrease acute painful episodes and consequently minimize tissue damage, thus improving the patient's overall health. PMID:24106446

  6. Systematic review of medical home models to promote transitions to primary adult health care for adolescents living with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kathleen; Zeni, Mary Beth

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing number of children diagnosed and living with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the United States. This increasing incidence and prevalence of ASDs require care coordination within a medical home model, which needs to continue into adulthood. This paper is an evidence review of medical home models for transitioning adolescents living with ASDs from pediatric primary healthcare practices to adult primary care practices. Databases were reviewed and articles selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Nine articles were reviewed and four met criteria. None of the articles addressed medical home models to transition adolescents living with ASDs into adult primary healthcare services. There is a need for nursing to work within an interdisciplinary framework to educate adult healthcare providers on the needs of adolescents living with ASDs and to evaluate medical home transition models for this vulnerable population. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Primary sleep disorders and paroxysmal nocturnal nonepileptic events in adults with epilepsy from the perspective of sleep specialists.

    PubMed

    Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine; Ralls, Frank

    2011-04-01

    Sleep specialists are frequently referred adults with epilepsy to evaluate their sleep/wake complaints, sometimes to determine whether their paroxysmal nocturnal behaviors are epileptic or not. Many patients with epilepsy have at least one parasomnia (some more than one), and the sleep specialists are often asked to differentiate and treat these. Sleep specialists review which primary sleep disorders are more common in adults with epilepsy and how to evaluate and best treat these. The authors summarize (1) how to evaluate and differentiate parasomnias using video-polysomnography; (2) the value of sleep deprivation and loud auditory stimuli to increase the likelihood of provoking a non-rapid eye movement arousal parasomnia with a single night of video-polysomnography; and (3) how to score excessive muscle activity during rapid eye movement sleep to confirm a diagnosis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. The clinical semiology and video-polysomnography features of simple and complex sleep-related movement disorders and parasomnias are reviewed.

  8. Consumer health information technology in an adult public health primary care clinic: a heart health education feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gleason-Comstock, Julie A; Streater, Alicia; Jen, Kai-Lin Catherine; Artinian, Nancy T; Timmins, Jessica; Baker, Suzanne; Joshua, Bosede; Paranjpe, Aniruddha

    2013-12-01

    To explore the feasibility and short term outcomes of using an interactive kiosk integrated into office flow to deliver health information in a primary care clinic. Fifty-one adults with BMI ≥25 were randomly assigned to use a kiosk with attached devices to receive a six-week healthy eating/weight monitoring (intervention) or general health/BP monitoring (attention-control) program. Outcomes were measured at baseline, 8 weeks (post) and three month follow-up. Participants completed an average of 2.73 weekly sessions, with transportation and time given as limiting factors. They found the kiosk easy to use (97%), liked the touchscreen (94%), and would use the kiosk again (81%). Although there were no differences between groups, the 27 completing all assessments showed reduced weight (p=.02), and decreased systolic (p=.01) and diastolic BP (p<.001) at follow-up. Although healthy eating behaviors increased, the change was not statistically significant. Using a kiosk within a clinic setting is a feasible method of providing health information and self-monitoring. Multi-session educational content can provide beneficial short-term outcomes in overweight adults. A kiosk with attached peripherals in a clinic setting is a viable adjunct to provider education, particularly in medically underserved areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acceptance and commitment therapy program for distressed adults with a primary brain tumor: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Maria; McDonald, Skye; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2015-10-01

    Research has indicated that adults diagnosed with a primary brain tumor (BT) are susceptible to experiencing anxiety and depressive problems post-diagnosis. However, there is a notable paucity of psychological interventions which have been tested with adult BT patients. An acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)-based manualized program was developed for anxious and/or depressed BT patients. The preliminary efficacy of this program was initially tested using a proof-of-concept study design based on a case series of four clinically distressed BT patients. Three of the four participants no longer met criteria for anxiety and/or depressive disorders at post-therapy, and these effects were maintained at 3 months of follow-up. The fourth participant, who had a premorbid psychiatric history, experienced a stabilization of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Given the current dearth of studies which have tested psychological interventions for distressed BT survivors, these preliminary findings have promising clinical utility. However, the efficacy of psychological interventions tailored for clinically distressed BT patients needs to be further tested using larger-scale controlled trial designs.

  10. HEALTH LITERACY, MEDICATION ADHERENCE, AND BLOOD PRESSURE LEVEL AMONG HYPERTENSIVE OLDER ADULTS TREATED AT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CENTERS.

    PubMed

    Wannasirikul, Phitchayaphat; Termsirikulchai, Lakkhana; Sujirarat, Dusit; Benjakul, Sarunya; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to explore the causal relationships between health literacy, individual characteristics, literacy, culture and society, cognitive ability, medication adherence, and the blood pressure levels of hypertensive older adults receiving health care services at Primary Health Care Centers in Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand. Six hundred hypertensive older adults had their blood pressure level recorded and were interviewed using questionnaires. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to determine the effect size, both direct and indirect, among factors. Almost half (48.7%) of studied subjects had inadequate health literacy, 98.3% had good medication adherence, and 80% had good blood pressure levels. The highest effect size on health literacy was literacy, followed by cognitive ability, and culture and society. Medication adherence was affected directly and indirectly by cognitive ability, literacy, and culture and society. Health literacy had not only a direct effect on medication adherence but was also the mediator. Finally, the highest effect size on blood pressure level was critical and communicative health literacy. These findings suggest that health literacy should be considered in the Health Literacy Program of the National Public Health Policy and Plan, Ministry of Public Health.

  11. Evaluation of optical remote sensing parameters to improve modeling of gross primary productivity in a heterogeneous agricultural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schickling, A.; Damm, A.; Schween, J.; Rascher, U.; Crewell, S.; Wahner, A.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial photosynthesis greatly determines plant mediated exchange processes in the vegetation atmosphere system and substantially influences patterns in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and water vapor. Therefore, an accurate quantification of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, commonly referred to as gross primary productivity (GPP), is a key parameter to distinguish those atmospheric patterns on various spatio-temporal scales. Remote sensing (RS) offers the unique possibility to determine GPP at different spatial scales ranging from the local to the global scale. Attempts to estimate GPP from RS data focus on the light use efficiency (LUE) concept of Monteith which relates GPP to the absorbed photosynthetically active radiation and the efficiency of plant canopies to utilize the absorbed radiation for photosynthesis. To reliably predict GPP on different spatio-temporal scales LUE has to be linked to optical RS parameters which detect changes in photosynthetic efficiency due to environmental conditions. In this study we evaluated two optical RS parameters, namely the sun-induced fluorescence (Fs) and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), for their potential to serve as a proxy for LUE. The parameters were derived from two ASD FieldSpec spectrometers which were operated in parallel. During several days one instrument was installed on the ground above the vegetation canopy of either a winter wheat or a sugar beet field. The second instrument was operated from a small research aircraft continuously crossing the observation sites at low altitude (< 300 m). GPP was calculated on a diurnal basis including optical parameters in Monteith's LUE concept. The calculated GPP was compared to simultaneously acquired GPP data from eddy covariance measurements. The diurnal behavior of calculated and measured GPP corresponded well indicating that optical RS parameters are able to track the diurnal response of physiological regulation of photosynthesis to changing

  12. Optical mapping of the electrical activity of isolated adult zebrafish hearts: acute effects of temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric; Ribeiro, Amanda; Ding, Weiguang; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Beg, Mirza Faisal

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as an important model for developmental cardiovascular (CV) biology; however, little is known about the cardiac function of the adult zebrafish enabling it to be used as a model of teleost CV biology. Here, we describe electrophysiological parameters, such as heart rate (HR), action potential duration (APD), and atrioventricular (AV) delay, in the zebrafish heart over a range of physiological temperatures (18–28°C). Hearts were isolated and incubated in a potentiometric dye, RH-237, enabling electrical activity assessment in several distinct regions of the heart simultaneously. Integration of a rapid thermoelectric cooling system facilitated the investigation of acute changes in temperature on critical electrophysiological parameters in the zebrafish heart. While intrinsic HR varied considerably between fish, the ex vivo preparation exhibited impressively stable HRs and sinus rhythm for more than 5 h, with a mean HR of 158 ± 9 bpm (means ± SE; n = 20) at 28°C. Atrial and ventricular APDs at 50% repolarization (APD50) were 33 ± 1 ms and 98 ± 2 ms, respectively. Excitation originated in the atrium, and there was an AV delay of 61 ± 3 ms prior to activation of the ventricle at 28°C. APD and AV delay varied between hearts beating at unique HRs; however, APD and AV delay did not appear to be statistically dependent on intrinsic basal HR, likely due to the innate beat-to-beat variability within each heart. As hearts were cooled to 18°C (by 1°C increments), HR decreased by ∼40%, and atrial and ventricular APD50 increased by a factor of ∼3 and 2, respectively. The increase in APD with cooling was disproportionate at different levels of repolarization, indicating unique temperature sensitivities for ion currents at different phases of the action potential. The effect of temperature was more apparent at lower levels of repolarization and, as a whole, the atrial APD was the cardiac parameter most affected by acute

  13. From the optic tectum to the primary visual cortex: migration through evolution of the saliency map for exogenous attentional guidance.

    PubMed

    Zhaoping, Li

    2016-10-01

    Recent data have supported the hypothesis that, in primates, the primary visual cortex (V1) creates a saliency map from visual input. The exogenous guidance of attention is then realized by means of monosynaptic projections to the superior colliculus, which can select the most salient location as the target of a gaze shift. V1 is less prominent, or is even absent in lower vertebrates such as fish; whereas the superior colliculus, called optic tectum in lower vertebrates, also receives retinal input. I review the literature and propose that the saliency map has migrated from the tectum to V1 over evolution. In addition, attentional benefits manifested as cueing effects in humans should also be present in lower vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A new bio-optical model to estimate phytoplankton primary production: An application in the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanì, Chiara; Bonamano, Simone; Melchiorri, Cristiano; Piermattei, Viviana; Fani, Fabiola; Lazzara, Luigi; Marcelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The estimation of phytoplankton primary production provides basic input for the quantification of carbon flux in the ocean because of the strong relationship between available photosynthetic energy at the ocean surface and energy storage by algal photosynthesis. We used a new version of PhytoVFP (Variable Fluorescence Phytoplankton Production) bio-optical model to calculate phytoplankton primary production (PP) in the euphotic zone. PhytoVFP is classified as a Wavelength- and Depth-resolved (WRDR) model and is based on the implementation of photosynthetic efficiency (Fv / Fmax), measured in-situ by the PrimProd probe. An innovation of the model is the reproduction of the daily photoacclimation process by varying photosynthetic parameters (Ek, alfa and Pbmax ) along the water column as a function of stratification. The PhytoVFP model is structured into three main modules: (1) "PAR estimation ";- (2) "Photo-acclimation of marine phytoplankton"; - (3) "Phytoplankton primary production estimation". The performance of the PhytoVFP model was evaluated using PAR and 14C primary production measures collected during the SAMCA3 and SAMCA4 oceanographic cruises. The comparison between the measured and calculated radiation showed a good correlation, both in the surface and along the water column (R2 = 0.8992 in the presence, and R2 = 0.8747 in the absence, of clouds) Sensitivity tests, carried out on phie (photosynthetic quantum yield) and beta (photoinhibition parameter), allowed us to identify the best model parametrization which minimized the MAE (Mean Absolute Error). The values assigned to these parameters allowed to have a good correlation between the measured and estimated primary production values (R² = 0.808923). The results of PhytoVFP model have been also compared with its older version and the Morel (1991) model showing that the MAE of the new version is lower than the other models. The PhytoVFP model was applied on Primprod data collected during MedGOOS12 cruise

  15. Primary structure of the hinge region in adult chicken cardiac myosin subfragment-2.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, B; Tanigawa, M

    1993-01-01

    The complete amino-acid sequence of the hinge region in the subfragment-2 (S-2) derived from adult chicken cardiac ventricular muscle myosin has been determined by direct protein sequencing. The entire amino-acid sequence of this hinge composed of 143 residues was established by structural analysis of CNBr peptides, lysyl and arginyl endopeptidase peptides of carboxymethylated S-2. By sequence comparison with the corresponding region of the same chicken cardiac myosin which was recently deduced from its cDNA eight amino-acid differences were recognized. Comparing the sequence of this hinge with those of other cardiac myosins such as rat alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chains (MHC), rabbit alpha-MHC and human alpha- and beta-MHCs relatively lower degrees of sequence identities, namely 74.8%, 77.6%, 76.1% 75.5% and 75.5%, are observed. On the other hand, more than 89.5% sequence identities are shown among these mammalian cardiac myosins. These results indicate that avian cardiac MHC has diverged earlier than mammalian cardiac myosin has diverged to alpha- and beta-MHC. Amino-acid substitutions in this hinge region form a cluster on the C-terminal sequence region. On the contrary, in the N-terminal portion, completely conserved segments are observed, suggesting that these regions may contribute to the myosin ATPase activity and muscle contraction.

  16. Yolk sac primary tumor of mediastino: a rare case in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena Luryann Cartaxo da; Vergilio, Fernanda Sasaki; Yamaguti, Diva Carvalho Collarile; Cruz, Isabela Azevedo Nicodemos da; Queen, Joana Angrisani Granato

    2017-09-21

    Germ cell tumors are rare neoplasms that mostly occur in the gonads, although they can also affect other body sites, especially the anterior mediastinum (50 to 70% of all extragonadal germ cell tumors). We report a case of a primary mediastinal yolk sac tumor, a rare and aggressive germ cell tumors subtype. This was a 38-year-old man who was admitted to Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual "Francisco Morato de Oliveira", complaining about dyspnea and dry cough for 1 year. The computed tomography scan of his chest revealed a large mass in the anterior mediastinum with heterogeneous enhancement to the contrast associated with pleural effusion. There were also high serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the mass, followed by pathological examination, which confirmed a primary mediastinal yolk sac tumor, a nonseminomatous subtype of germ cell tumors. Primary mediastinal yolk sac tumors have poor prognosis, despite advances in therapy with surgical resection and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This poor prognosis is due to the degree of invasion and unresectability in most patients by the time of the diagnosis. RESUMO Os tumores de células germinativas são neoplasias raras que acometem mais frequentemente as gônadas, embora possam também ocorrer em outras localizações do corpo, destacando-se o mediastino anterior (50 a 70% de todos os tumores de células germinativas extragonadais). No presente artigo, relatamos um caso de tumor de saco vitelínico mediastinal primário, de subtipo raro e agressivo de tumor de células germinativas. Tratava-se de um homem, 38 anos, admitido no Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual "Francisco Morato de Oliveira", com quadro de dispneia e tosse seca há 1 ano. Na investigação clínica, foi solicitada tomografia computadorizada de tórax, que mostrou volumosa massa no mediastino anterior com realce heterogêneo ao meio de contraste associada a derrame pleural

  17. Co-phasing primary mirror segments of an optical space telescope using a long stroke Zernike WFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Kate; Wallace, J. K.; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Static Zernike phase-contrast plates have been used extensively in microscopy for half a century and, more recently, in optical telescopes for wavefront sensing. A dynamic Zernike wavefront sensor (WFS) with four phase shifts, for reducing error due to spurious light and eliminating other asynchronous noise, has been proposed for use in adaptive optics. Here, we propose adapting this method for co-phasing the primary mirror of a segmented space telescope. In order to extend the dynamic range of the WFS, which has a maximum range of +/ - λ/2, a phase- contrast plate with multiple steps, both positive and negative, has been developed such that errors as large as +/ - 10λ can be sensed. The manufacturing tolerances have been incorporated into simulations, which demonstrate that performance impacts are minimal. We show that the addition of this small optical plate along with a high precision linear translation stage at the prime focus of a telescope and pupil viewing capability can provide extremely accurate segment phasing with a simple white-light fringe fitting algorithm and a closed-loop controller. The original focal-plane geometry of a centro-symmetric phase shifting element is replaced with a much less constrained shape, such as a slot. Also, a dedicated pupil imager is not strictly required; an existing pupil sampler such as a Shack-Hartmann (SH) WFS can be used just as effectively, allowing simultaneous detection of wavefront errors using both intensity and spot positions on the SH-WFS. This could lead to an efficient synergy between Zernike and SH-WFS, enabling segment phasing in conjunction with high-dynamic range sensing.

  18. Medication regimen complexity in adults and the elderly in a primary healthcare setting: determination of high and low complexities

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Juliana M.; Galato, Dayani; Melo, Angelita C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The complexity of a medication regimen is related to the multiple characteristics of the prescribed regimen and can negatively influence the health outcomes of patients. Objective: To propose cut-off points in the complexity of pharmacotherapy to distinguish between patients with low and high complexities seen in a primary health care (PHC) setting to enable prioritization of patient management. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, which included 517 adult and elderly patients, analyzing different cut-off points to define the strata of low and high pharmacotherapy complexities based on percentiles of the population evaluated. Data collection began with the solicitation of prescriptions, followed by a questionnaire that was administered by an interviewer. The complexity of a medication regimen was estimated from the Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI). High complexity pharmacotherapy scores were analyzed from patient profiles, the use of health services, and pharmacotherapy. The criteria for subject inclusion in the sample population were as follows: inhabitant of the area covered by the municipality, 18 years or older, and being prescribed at least one drug during the collection period. Exclusion criteria at the time of collection were the use of any medication whose prescription was not available. All medications were accessed through the Primary Healthcare Service (PHS). Results: The median total pharmacotherapy complexity score was 8.5. High MRCI scores were correlated with age, medications taken with in the Brazilian PHS, having at least one potential drug-related problem, receiving up to eight years of schooling, number of medications and polypharmacy (five or more medicines), number of medical conditions, number of medical appointments, and number of cardiovascular diseases and endocrine metabolic diseases. We suggest different complexity tracks according to age (e.g., adult or elderly) that consider the pharmacotherapy and population

  19. Sexual violence against adult women primary care attenders in east London.

    PubMed Central

    Coid, Jeremy; Petruckevitch, Ann; Chung, Wai-Shan; Richardson, Jo; Moorey, Stirling; Cotter, Sarah; Feder, Gene S

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual violence against women is common. The prevalence appears to be higher in north America than Europe. However, not all surveys have differentiated the experience of forced sex by a current or former partner. Few women are thought to report these experiences to their general practitioner (GP). AIM: To measure the prevalence of rape, sexual assault, and forced sexual intercourse by a partner among women attending general practices, to test the association between these experiences of sexual violence and demographic factors, and to assess the acceptability to women of screening for sexual violence by GPs. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional survey. METHOD: A self-administered questionnaire survey of 1207 women aged over 15 years was carried out in 13 general practices in Hackney, east London. RESULTS: Eight per cent (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.2 to 9.6) of women have experienced rape, 9% (95% CI = 7.0 to 10.6) another type of sexual assault, and 16% (95% CI = 13.6 to 18.1) forced sex by a partner in adulthood: 24% (95% CI = 21.2 to 26.5) have experienced one or more of these types of sexual violence. Experiences of sexual violence demonstrated high levels of lifetime co-occurrence. Women forced to have sex by partners experienced the most severe forms of domestic violence. One in five women would object to routine questioning about being raped and/or sexually assaulted, and one in nine about being forced to have sex by a partner. CONCLUSION: Experiences of sexual violence are common in the lives of adult women in east London, and they represent a significant public health problem. Those women who have one experience appear to be at risk of being victims again. A substantial minority object to routine questions about sexual violence. PMID:14702905

  20. Echocardiographic dimensions and function in adults with primary growth hormone resistance (Laron syndrome).

    PubMed

    Feinberg, M S; Scheinowitz, M; Laron, Z

    2000-01-15

    Patients with primary growth hormone (GH) resistance-Laron Syndrome (LS)-have no GH signal transmission, and thus, no generation of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and should serve as a unique model to explore the controversies concerning the longterm effect of GH/IGF-I deficiency on cardiac dimension and function. We assessed 8 patients with LS (4 men, 4 women) with a mean (+/- SD) age of 38+/-7 years (range 22 to 45), and 8 aged-matched controls (4 men, 4 women) with a mean age of 38+/-9 years (range 18 to 47) by echocardiography at rest, following exercise, and during dobutamine administration. Left ventricular (LV) septum, posterior wall, and end-diastolic diameter were significantly reduced in untreated patients with LS compared with the control group (p<0.05 for all). Systolic Doppler-derived parameters, including LV stroke volume, stroke index, cardiac output, and cardiac index, were significantly lower (p<0.05 for all) than in the control subjects, whereas LV diastolic Doppler parameters, including mitral valve waves E, A, E/A ratio, and E deceleration time, were similar in both groups. LV ejection fraction at rest as well as the stress-induced increment of the LV ejection fraction were similar in both groups. Our results show that untreated patients with long-term IGF-I deficiency have reduced cardiac dimensions and output but normal LV ejection fraction at rest and LV contractile reserve following stress.

  1. Primary central nervous system ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqin; Li, Jun; Huo, Na; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhao; Lin, Xiaohong; Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It mostly invades lymph nodes with extranodal involvement observed in the soft tissue, bone, and skin. Patient concerns: We report a 34-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with headache, diplopia, and vomit. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis via lumbar puncture showed elevated CSF pressure, elevated CSF protein concentrations, decreased CSF glucose and chloride concentration significantly, and pleocytosis of 68 to 350 × 106/L, in which lymphocytes and monocytes were predominant. These changes could be suggestive of tuberculous (TB) meningitis. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord delineated multiple enhancing nodules in spinal cord, cauda equina, and cristae membrane, and multiple abnormal enhancing lesions in bilateral lumbar intervertebral foramen. Diagnoses: Spinal dura mater biopsy and paraffin pathology examination revealed anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive ALCL. Interventions: High-dose methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside craniospinal, and radiotherapy. Outcomes: Last follow-up on September 22, 2015 showed no evidence of tumor recurrence and the lower extremity muscle strength recovered to 4/5. Lessons: ALCL of primary central nervous system is an exceedingly rare tumor, which is usually misdiagnosed as meningitis (especially TB meningitis) according to clinical manifestation and laboratory examination. Thus closely monitoring patient's conditions and timely adjusting therapeutic regimen during treatment are necessary. PMID:27930548

  2. Acute primary canine herpesvirus-1 dendritic ulcerative keratitis in an adult dog.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Kristen J; Pirie, Christopher G; Ledbetter, Eric C; Pizzirani, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    We present a report of dendritic ulcerative keratitis in a 4-year old locally immunosuppressed dog suspected to result from acute primary canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) infection. The dog was presented for evaluation of mild blepharospasm and conjunctival hyperemia in the right eye (OD) shortly after attending a public boarding facility. For approximately 3 months, the dog had been receiving topical prednisolone acetate 1.0% and tacrolimus 0.02% in both eyes (OU) q12h for treatment of follicular conjunctivitis. Ophthalmic examination revealed three regions of corneal fluorescein retention OD. The lesions had a dendritic pattern, were approximately 2-3 mm in length, and were located at the dorsomedial, lateral, and ventromedial aspects of the cornea. No additional abnormalities were noted on complete ophthalmic and physical examinations. CHV-1 was identified in conjunctival samples OD by polymerase chain reaction, and paired CHV-1 serum virus neutralization antibody titers were positive and consistent with acute infection. Topical prednisolone acetate and tacrolimus were discontinued. The dog was treated with cidofovir 0.5% OU q12h for a period of 4 weeks, with resolution of corneal disease noted within 1 week of treatment. In conjunction with previous studies, this case report supports a central role for alterations in host immune status in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of CHV-1 ocular disease in dogs.

  3. A case report: primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in a young Zambian adult.

    PubMed

    Chomba, Mashina; Mucheleng'anga, Luchenga A; Fwoloshi, Sombo; Ngulube, Joseph; Mutengo, Mable M

    2017-08-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fulminant disease of the brain caused by Naegleria fowleri. Although the disease is rare, the case fatality rate is very high. In this report, we describe the first case of PAM in Zambia. The patient presented with sudden onset of seizures and fever on admission. On physical examination he was febrile, comatose and with a stiff neck. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collected on admission did not reveal any organism on microscopy or culture but showed elevated white cell count. A working diagnosis of severe septicemia with acute meningoencephalitis was then made and the patient was started on IV Cephtriaxone (2 g) twice daily. Despite receiving treatment, his condition deteriorated. A second CSF sample collected on day 3 was also negative for bacteria and other organisms. However, a repeat CSF sample collected on day 8 revealed numerous motile organisms that were identified as Naegleria on microscopy and confirmed to be N. fowleri on polymerase chain reaction. The patient died on day 8 of hospital admission after having received one dose of Amphotericin B (50 mg). Features consistent with PAM were detected on autopsy. The isolation of N. fowleri in this patient calls for increased awareness among clinical and laboratory staff on suspected PAM cases to promptly diagnose and effectively manage the disease.

  4. Prevalence of undifferentiated fever in adults of Rawalpindi having primary dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Humaira; Hayyat, Abbas; Akhtar, Naeem; Rizwan, Syeda Fatima

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the study were to highlight early subclinical presentation of dengue viral infection (DVI) as an undifferentiated febrile illness. The descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out at Microbiology Department, Rawalpindi Medical College from March to September 2009. Stratified random sampling was used to select subjects from various urban and rural areas of Rawalpindi, and Serum IgG anti-dengue antibodies were detected by using 3rd generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Out of the total 240 subjects, 69 (28.75%) were found to be positive for anti-dengue IgG antibodies. Of the positive cases, 41 (59.4%) - comprising 31 (44.9%) urban residents - and 10 (14.4%) rural residents presented with a previous history of undifferentiated fever (p<0.05). It was concluded that primary DVI can present as subclinical form in healthy population residing in rural and urban areas of Rawalpindi, which is an alarming situation indicating the spread of disease in the study area.

  5. Knowledge, attitude and practice in primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention among young adult Italian women.

    PubMed

    Donati, Serena; Giambi, Cristina; Declich, Silvia; Salmaso, Stefania; Filia, Antonietta; Ciofi degli Atti, Marta Luisa; Alibrandi, Maria Pia; Brezzi, Silvia; Carozzi, Francesca; Collina, Natalina; Franchi, Daniela; Lattanzi, Amedeo; Meda, Margherita; Minna, Maria Carmela; Nannini, Roberto; Gallicchio, Giuseppina; Bella, Antonino

    2012-03-09

    In Italy since 2007 vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is offered to 11-year-old females, whereas vaccination for older age groups is still a matter of debate. To assess Italian young women's knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention a cross-sectional study among young women aged 18-26 years was conducted in 2008. The survey collected information on in-depth awareness and knowledge regarding Pap testing, HPV infection, HPV vaccine and cervical cancer. The response rate was 57.7% with a wide range of variability (34-84%) amongst local health units. Among 667 women who participated in the survey poor awareness and various misconceptions regarding HPV and cervical cancer prevention were detected. Overall women were found to be more knowledgeable about Pap smears and cervical cancer than about HPV infection and the HPV vaccine. Respondents pointed to their healthcare providers as their most trusted source for medical information. Understanding women's knowledge on cervical cancer prevention, as well as related factors is important in helping to achieve and maintain adherence to cervical cancer preventive strategies. Moreover in order to minimize cervical cancer risk by improving women's adherence to preventive strategies, appropriate and adequate information dissemination, and guidance from health professionals appear to be crucial elements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Finite elements numerical codes as primary tool to improve beam optics in NIO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltador, C.; Cavenago, M.; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.

    2017-08-01

    The RF negative ion source NIO1, built at Consorzio RFX in Padua (Italy), is aimed to investigate general issues on ion source physics in view of the full-size ITER injector MITICA as well as DEMO relevant solutions, like energy recovery and alternative neutralization systems, crucial for neutral beam injectors in future fusion experiments. NIO1 has been designed to produce 9 H-beamlets (in a 3x3 pattern) of 15mA each and 60keV, using a three electrodes system downstream the plasma source. At the moment the source is at its early operational stage and only operation at low power and low beam energy is possible. In particular, NIO1 presents a too strong set of SmCo co-extraction electron suppression magnets (CESM) in the extraction grid (EG) that will be replaced by a weaker set of Ferrite magnets. A completely new set of magnets will be also designed and mounted on the new EG that will be installed next year, replacing the present one. In this paper, the finite element code OPERA 3D is used to investigate the effects of the three sets of magnets on beamlet optics. A comparison of numerical results with measurements will be provided where possible.

  7. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  8. Regenerative and other responses to injury in the retinal stump of the optic nerve in adult albino rats: transection of the intracranial optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, B Y; Anderson, P N; Campbell, G; Lieberman, A R

    1995-01-01

    The response to injury of the proximal (retinal) stump of the intracranially transected optic nerve in adult rats has been studied by electron microscopy. The central part of the retinal stump of the optic nerve underwent severe ischaemic damage resulting in the formation by 3 days postoperation (dpo) of a cone-shaped region of necrotic tissue which extended from a base occupying most of the cross-sectional area of the nerve at the cut end to an apex within the intraorbital part of the nerve and only 2-3 mm from the eyeball. A mixture of apparently viable and dead or dying cells and axons was present in an intermediate zone surrounding the ischaemic core. Apparently intact nerve fibres occupied most of the periphery of the optic nerve. Small bundles of sprout-like axons were seen in the intermediate zone at 3 dpo, and by 5 dpo such sprouts were present at the periphery of the degenerative core. By 7 dpo, the sprouts were also found in the centre of the degenerative core, accompanied by astrocyte processes. The number of axonal sprouts present in the degenerative core and intermediate zone was much higher at 2 and 4 wk postoperation (wpo) than at 7 dpo, then declined gradually by 6 and 8 wpo. These results show that intracranial transection of the rat optic nerve produces extensive degeneration in the proximal stump and effectively produces an intraorbital axotomy of many retinal ganglion cells. Nevertheless, surviving axons display the ability to produce regenerative sprouts which persist for considerably longer than those produced after intraorbital injury. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 PMID:7559123

  9. Effects of low-energy He-Ne laser irradiation on posttraumatic degeneration of adult rabbit optic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.; Doron, A.; Erlich, M.; Lavie, V.; Benbasat, S.; Belkin, M.; Rochkind, S.

    1987-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian peripheral and central nervous systems degenerate after nerve injury. We have recently found that He-Ne laser irradiation may prevent some of the consequences of the injury in peripheral nerves of mammals. In the present study, the efficacy of the laser in treating injured neurons of the mammalian CNS was tested. Optic nerves of adult rabbits were exposed daily for 8-14 days to He-Ne laser irradiation (14 min, 15 mW) through the overlying muscles and skin. As a result of this treatment, the injured nerves maintained their histological integrity, which is invariably lost in injured mammalian CNS neurons.

  10. Constructivist Learning and Teaching of Optics Concepts Using ICT Tools in Greek Primary School: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekos, George; Solomonidou, Christina

    2009-10-01

    This pilot study documents the design and evaluation results of an innovative teaching approach with the use of ICT regarding the optics concepts of light reflection and diffusion, and vision in Greek primary school. First there was a survey of 140 students to ascertain their initial ideas regarding these concepts. On the basis of the results of that survey, a range of ICT tools were developed, including a multimedia software application and a piece of Greek physics educational software. They were then used in the classroom together with an applet on the Web and printed students' worksheets, and their effectiveness was evaluated. Teaching was implemented in four Greek primary school classes with 81 students. Another 59 students were taught the subject traditionally. Before and after instruction all students answered a written questionnaire. Data analysis revealed that students of the experimental group achieved statistically better performance and manifested conceptual change whereas students in the control group students presented only a minimal evolution in their initial ideas.

  11. Early decompression of the injured optic nerve reduces axonal degeneration and improves functional outcome in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Marcus; Svensson, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    The putative beneficial role of an early decompression of injured CNS tissue following trauma remains controversial. In this study, we approach this scientific query using a standardized injury of the optic nerve in adult rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a standardized optic nerve constriction injury by applying a loose ligature around the nerve for 5 min, 1, 6 or 24 h. All animals were sacrificed at 28 dpi. Viable axons distal to the injury were quantified using semithin sections, and regenerative fibers were studied using antisera to neurofilament and GAP43. Axonal degeneration and glial scar development were analyzed using Fluoro-Jade staining and anti-GFAP, respectively. Visual function was studied with visual evoked potentials (VEP). No significant differences were observed between 1 and 6 h of optic nerve compression. However, the number of viable axons analyzed with neurofilament and on semithin sections, decreased significantly between 6 and 24 h, paralleled by an increase in Fluoro-Jade labeled axonal debris (P < 0.001). GFAP-IR density was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the 24 h compression group in comparison to 6 h. VEP showed preserved, but impaired visual function in animals subjected to compression up to 6 h, compared to an abolished cortical response at 24 h. Regenerative GAP43-positive sprouts were occasionally found distal to the lesion in animals subjected to compression up to 6 h, but not at 24 h. These findings suggest that early optic nerve decompression within hours after the initial trauma is beneficial for functional outcome.

  12. Risk of Shingles in Adults with Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome and Treatments: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Wang, Li-Kai; Feng, Ping-Hsun; Chu, Chin-Chen; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Weng, Shih-Feng; Wu, Su-Zhen; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Chang, Chia-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is associated with immunological dysfunctions—a well-known risk factor of shingles. This study aimed to examine the incidence and risk of shingles in adults with pSS and pharmacological treatments. Methods This retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted using National Health Insurance claims data. Using propensity scores, 4,287 pSS adult patients and 25,722-matched cohorts by age, gender, selected comorbidities and Charlson comorbidity index scores were identified. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression were conducted to compare the differences in developing shingles. In pSS, oral and eye dryness are treated with substitute agents. Extraglandular features are often treated with pharmacological drugs including steroids and immunosuppressants. pSS patients were grouped as follows: no pharmacological drugs, steroids alone; immunosuppressants alone; combined therapies. Results During the follow-up, 463 adults with pSS (10.80%) and 1,345 control cohorts (5.23%) developed shingles. The cumulative incidence of shingles in pSS patients (18.74/1,000 patient-years) was significantly higher than controls (8.55/1,000 patient-years). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of shingles was 1.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50–1.90). In age-subgroup analyses, incidences of shingles in pSS increased with age and peaked in pSS patients aged ≧60; however, adjusted HRs decreased with age. Compared to control cohorts with no drugs, adjusted HRs for shingles in pSS patients were ranked from high to low as: combined therapies (4.14; 95% CI 3.14–5.45) > immunosuppressants alone (3.24; 95% CI 2.36–4.45) > steroids alone (2.54; 95% CI 2.16–2.97) > no pharmacological drugs (2.06; 95% CI 1.76–2.41). Rates of shingles-associated hospitalization and postherpetic neuralgia were 5.62% and 24.41%, both of which were significantly higher than those (2.60%; 13.01%) in the control cohorts. Conclusions Adults with pSS were at

  13. A retrospective clinical study of 98 adult idiopathic primary intraventricular hemorrhage cases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Ma, Lu; Shrestha, Bal Krishna; Yu, Zhiyuan; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to define the clinical features, risk factors, treatment and prognosis of idiopathic primary intraventricular hemorrhage (IPIVH). We retrospectively collected the data of consecutively admitted patients who were diagnosed and treated for IPIVH in our hospital from January 2010 to December 2014. The clinical information, treatment, and prognosis at the 6-month follow-up were analyzed. Among the 3798 cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), 98 IPIVH (2.58%) patients were recruited for the study. The study population consisted of 60 males and 38 females, with an average age (± standard deviation, SD) of 51.20 ± 15.48 years. The initial symptoms were headache (75 cases) and impaired consciousness (23 cases). The surgical treatments included hematoma evacuation under a microscope or an endoscope in 8 cases (8.16%), external ventricular drainage (EVD) in 11 cases (11.22%), lumbar drainage (LD) in 10 cases (10.20%), and a combination of EVD and LD in 11 cases (11.22%). In total, 4 patients died in the hospital (4.08%). At the 6-month follow-up, 73 patients (74.49%) had an improved outcome (modified Rankin scale [mRS] < 3), and 21 patients (21.43%) had a poor outcome (mRS ≥ 3 points) at the end of the 6-month follow-up. IPIVH is rare in clinical practice, and hypertension is the most common risk factor. Furthermore, the treatment of IPIVH is still controversial. Hematoma evacuation under a microscope or an endoscope, EVD, LD and a combination of EVD and LD could be surgical options for the treatment of IPIVH patients. The outcomes for IPIVH patients could be relatively favorable with individualized treatment. PMID:27759637

  14. The association of affective temperaments with smoking initiation and maintenance in adult primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Eory, Ajandek; Rozsa, Sandor; Gonda, Xenia; Dome, Peter; Torzsa, Peter; Simavorian, Tatevik; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Akiskal, Knarig K; Akiskal, Hagop S; Rihmer, Zoltan; Kalabay, Laszlo

    2015-02-01

    Smoking behaviour and its course is influenced by personality factors. Affective temperaments could allow a more specific framework of the role trait affectivity plays in this seriously harmful health-behaviour. The aim of our study was to investigate if such an association exists in an ageing population with a special emphasis on gender differences. 459 primary care patients completed the TEMPS-A, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). Subjects were characterized according to their smoking behaviour as current, former or never smokers. Univariate analysis ANOVA and logistic regression were performed to analyse differences in the three smoking subgroups to predict smoking initiation and maintenance. Current smokers were younger and less educated than former or never smokers. Males were more likely to try tobacco during their lifetime and were more successful in cessation. Depressive, cyclothymic and irritable temperament scores showed significant differences between the three smoking subgroups. Irritable temperament was a predictor of smoking initiation in females whereas depressive temperament predicted smoking maintenance in males with a small, opposite effect of HAM-A scores independent of age, education, lifetime depression and BDI scores. Whereas smoking initiation was exclusively predicted by a higher BDI score in males, smoking maintenance was predicted by younger age and lower education in females. The cross-sectional nature of the study design may lead to selective survival bias and hinder drawing causal relationships. Affective temperaments contribute to smoking initiation and maintenance independently of age, education, and depression. The significant contribution of depressive temperament in males and irritable temperament in females may highlight the role of gender-discordant temperaments in vulnerable subgroups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Managed care and inpatient mortality in adults: effect of primary payer.

    PubMed

    Hines, Anika L; Raetzman, Susan O; Barrett, Marguerite L; Moy, Ernest; Andrews, Roxanne M

    2017-02-08

    Because managed care is increasingly prevalent in health care finance and delivery, it is important to ascertain its effects on health care quality relative to that of fee-for-service plans. Some stakeholders are concerned that basing gatekeeping, provider selection, and utilization management on cost may lower quality of care. To date, research on this topic has been inconclusive, largely because of variation in research methods and covariates. Patient age has been the only consistently evaluated outcome predictor. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the association between managed care and inpatient mortality for Medicare and privately insured patients. A cross-sectional design was used to examine the association between managed care and inpatient mortality for four common inpatient conditions. Data from the 2009 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases for 11 states were linked to data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. Hospital discharges were categorized as managed care or fee for service. A phased approach to multivariate logistic modeling examined the likelihood of inpatient mortality when adjusting for individual patient and hospital characteristics and for county fixed effects. Results showed different effects of managed care for Medicare and privately insured patients. Privately insured patients in managed care had an advantage over their fee-for-service counterparts in inpatient mortality for acute myocardial infarction, stroke, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure; no such advantage was found for the Medicare managed care population. To the extent that the study showed a protective effect of privately insured managed care, it was driven by individuals aged 65 years and older, who had consistently better outcomes than their non-managed care counterparts. Privately insured patients in managed care plans, especially older adults, had better outcomes than those in fee-for-service plans

  16. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yanez, Andy A; Harrell, Telvin; Sriranganathan, Heather J; Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-02-07

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG) after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN) and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons.

  17. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, Andy A.; Harrell, Telvin; Sriranganathan, Heather J.; Ives, Angela M.; Bertke, Andrea S.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG) after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN) and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons. PMID:28178213

  18. Lead decreases cell survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation of primary cultured adult neural precursor cells through activation of the JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Engstrom, Anna; Wang, Hao; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is the process whereby adult neural precursor cells (aNPCs) in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) generate adult-born, functional neurons in the hippocampus. This process is modulated by various extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and the adult-born neurons have been implicated in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. However, studies on how neurotoxic agents affect this process and the underlying mechanisms are limited. The goal of this study was to determine whether lead, a heavy metal, directly impairs critical processes in adult neurogenesis and to characterize the underlying signaling pathways using primary cultured SGZ-aNPCs isolated from adult mice. We report here that lead significantly increases apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in SGZ-aNPCs. In addition, lead significantly impairs spontaneous neuronal differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, we found that activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathways are important for lead cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that lead can directly act on adult neural stem cells and impair critical processes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which may contribute to its neurotoxicity and adverse effects on cognition in adults. PMID:25967738

  19. Fabrication and Thermo-Optical Properties of the MLS Composite Primary Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Dyer, Jack; Dummer, Sam

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a limb-sounding radiometer sensing emissions in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range. MLS will contribute to an understanding of atmospheric chemistry by assessing stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion, climate forcings and volcanic effects. The heart of the antenna is the primary reflector, constructed from graphite/cyanate composites in a facesheet/core construction. The reflector has an aperture of one square meter, a mass of 8.7 kilos and final figure accuracy of 4.37 microns rms. The surface is also modified to ensure RF reflectivity, prevent solar concentration and provide thermal balance to the spacecraft The surface is prepared by precision beadblasting, then coated with vapor deposited aluminum (VDA) and finally a layer of silicon suboxide (SiO(x)) to control the infrared emissivity. The resulting surface has a solar absorptance of 0.43 and an absorptance/emittance ratio of 1.3. BRDF analysis shows that 93% of the incident thermal energy is reflected outside a 10 degree angle of cone. For its mass and aperture, we believe this reflector to have the highest figure accuracy yet achieved in a composite antenna construction.

  20. Development and implementation of an online clinical pathway for adult chronic kidney disease in primary care: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Donald, Maoliosa; McBrien, Kerry; Jackson, Wes; Manns, Braden J; Tonelli, Marcello; King-Shier, Kathryn; Jindal, Kailash; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Braun, Ted; Straus, Sharon E; Naugler, Christopher; Elliott, Meghan J; Jun, Min; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2016-08-17

    Primary care physicians and other primary health care professionals from Alberta, Canada identified a clinical pathway as a potential tool to facilitate uptake of clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, management and referral of adults with chronic kidney disease. We describe the development and implementation of a chronic kidney disease clinical pathway (CKD-CP; www.ckdpathway.ca ). The CKD-CP was developed and implemented based on the principles of the Knowledge-To-Action Cycle framework. We used a mixed methods approach to identify the usability and feasibility of the CKD-CP. This included individual interviews, an online survey and website analytics, to gather data on barriers and facilitators to use, perceived usefulness and characteristics of users. Results are reported using conventional qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics. Eighteen individual interviews were conducted with primary care physicians, nephrologists, pharmacists and nurse practitioners to identify themes reflecting both barriers and facilitators to integrating the CKD-CP into clinical practice. Themes identified included: communication, work efficiency and confidence. Of the 159 participants that completed the online survey, the majority (52 %) were first time CKD-CP users. Among those who had previously used the CKD-CP, 94 % agreed or strongly agreed that the pathway was user friendly, provided useful information and increased their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with CKD. Between November 2014 and July 2015, the CKD-CP website had 10,710 visits, 67 % of which were new visitors. The 3 most frequently visited web pages were home, diagnose and medical management. Canada, Indonesia and the United States were the top 3 countries accessing the website during the 9 month period. An interactive, online, point-of-care tool for primary care providers can be developed and implemented to assist in the care of patients with CKD. Our findings are important

  1. The epidemiology of pharmacologically treated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, adolescents and adults in UK primary care.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Suzanne; Wilton, Lynda; Murray, Macey L; Hodgkins, Paul; Asherson, Philip; Wong, Ian C K

    2012-06-19

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by the symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. ADHD was once perceived as a condition of childhood only; however increasing evidence has highlighted the existence of ADHD in older adolescents and adults. Estimates for the prevalence of ADHD in adults range from 2.5-4%. Few data exist on the prescribing trends of the stimulants methylphenidate and dexamfetamine, and the non-stimulant atomoxetine in the UK. The aim of this study was to investigate the annual prevalence and incidence of pharmacologically treated ADHD in children, adolescents and adults in UK primary care. The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database was used to identify all patients aged over 6 years with a diagnosis of ADHD/hyperkinetic disorder and a prescription for methylphenidate, dexamfetamine or atomoxetine from 2003-2008. Annual prevalence and incidence of pharmacologically treated ADHD were calculated by age category and sex. The source population comprised 3,529,615 patients (48.9% male). A total of 118,929 prescriptions were recorded for the 4,530 patients in the pharmacologically treated ADHD cohort during the 6-year study. Prevalence (per 1000 persons in the mid-year THIN population) increased within each age category from 2003 to 2008 [6-12 years: from 4.8 (95% CI: 4.5-5.1) to 9.2 (95% CI: 8.8-9.6); 13-17 years: from 3.6 (95% CI: 3.3-3.9) to 7.4 (95% CI: 7.0-7.8); 18-24 years: from 0.3 (95% CI: 0.2-0.3) to 1.1 (95% CI: 1.0-1.3); 25-45 years: from 0.02 (95% CI: 0.01-0.03) to 0.08 (95% CI: 0.06-0.10); >45 years: from 0.01 (95% CI: 0.00-0.01) to 0.02 (95% CI: 0.01-0.03). Whilst male patients aged 6-12 years had the highest prevalence; the relative increase in prescribing was higher amongst female patients of the same age - the increase in prevalence in females aged 6-12 years was 2.1 fold compared to an increase of 1.9 fold for their male counterparts. Prevalence of

  2. Effectiveness of multicomponent interventions in primary healthcare settings to promote continuous smoking cessation in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Martín Cantera, Carlos; Puigdomènech, Elisa; Ballvé, Jose Luis; Arias, Olga Lucía; Clemente, Lourdes; Casas, Ramon; Roig, Lydia; Pérez-Tortosa, Santiago; Díaz-Gete, Laura; Granollers, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present review is to evaluate multicomponent/complex primary care (PC) interventions for their effectiveness in continuous smoking abstinence by adult smokers. Design A systematic review of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials was undertaken. Eligibility criteria for included studies Selected studies met the following criteria: evaluated effects of a multicomponent/complex intervention (with 2 or more intervention components) in achieving at least 6-month abstinence in adult smokers who visited a PC, biochemical confirmation of abstinence, intention-to-treat analysis and results published in English/Spanish. Methods We followed PRISMA statement to report the review. We searched the following data sources: MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus (from inception to February 2014), 3 key journals and a tobacco research bulletin. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network checklists were used to evaluate methodological quality. Data selection, evaluation and extraction were done independently, using a paired review approach. Owing to the heterogeneity of interventions in the studies included, a meta-analysis was not conducted. Results Of 1147 references identified, 9 studies were selected (10 204 participants, up to 48 months of follow-up, acceptable methodological quality). Methodologies used were mainly individual or group sessions, telephone conversations, brochures or quit-smoking kits, medications and economic incentives for doctors and no-cost medications for smokers. Complex interventions achieved long-term continuous abstinence ranging from 7% to 40%. Behavioural interventions were effective and had a dose–response effect. Both nicotine replacement and bupropion therapy were safe and effective, with no observed differences. Conclusions Multicomponent/complex interventions in PC are effective and safe, appearing to achieve greater long-term continuous smoking cessation than usual care and counselling alone. Selected

  3. Adiposity across the adult life course and incidence of primary liver cancer: The NIH-AARP cohort.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baiyu; Petrick, Jessica L; Kelly, Scott P; Graubard, Barry I; Freedman, Neal D; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2017-07-15

    Obesity relatively late in adulthood has been consistently associated with increased risk of primary liver cancer. However, little is known about the role of early adult adiposity and evolution of adiposity across adulthood in hepatocarcinogenesis. We examined adult body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2) ) in relation to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) in a large prospective cohort. Weight at ages 18, 35, 50 and at study baseline was retrospectively reported by 303,620 participants. BMI trajectories were identified using latent class trajectory modeling. Incidence of HCC and ICC was determined through 2011. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 372 HCC cases and 104 ICC cases occurred during follow-up. Being obese (BMI ≥ 30) at ages 18, 35, 50 and at baseline (mean age 62.3 years, range 50.3-71.5 years) was associated with an 86-119% elevated risk of HCC. BMI trajectories that resulted in obesity were associated with ∼80% higher HCC incidence. BMI at age 18, per 5 kg/m(2) , was associated with a 34% higher risk of ICC, but the association attenuated for BMI at older ages. In conclusion, our findings suggest that maintaining a healthy BMI throughout the lifetime may reduce liver cancer risk. Future studies with longitudinally collected weight information are warranted to further elucidate the role of life-course adiposity in liver cancer development. Published 2017. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain of the United States of America.

  4. Public Stigma towards Older Adults with Depression: Findings from the São Paulo-Manaus Elderly in Primary Care Study.

    PubMed

    Scazufca, Marcia; P de Paula Couto, Maria Clara; Huang, Hsiang; Kester, Rachel; Braga, Patrícia Emília; Peluso, Érica T P; Blay, Sérgio L; R Menezes, Paulo; E Ribeiro, Euler

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates three domains of public stigma (perceived negative reactions, perceived discrimination, and dangerousness) against older adults with depression. The sample comprised of older adults registered with primary care clinics (n = 1,291) and primary health care professionals (n = 469) from São Paulo and Manaus, Brazil. Participants read a vignette describing a 70-year-old individual (Mary or John) with a depressive disorder and answered questions measuring stigma. The prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 30.2 and 37.6% among older participants from São Paulo and between 27.6 and 35.4% among older participants from Manaus. Older adults from both cities reported similar prevalence of perceived stigma. Key factors associated with stigmatizing beliefs among older participants were reporting depressive symptoms, having physical limitations, and identifying the case of the vignette as a case of mental disorder. Among health professionals, the prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 19.8 and 34.8% in São Paulo and 30.2 and 44.6% in Manaus. The key factor associated with stigma among primary health care professionals was city, with consistently higher risk in Manaus than in São Paulo. Findings confirm that public stigma against older adults in Brazil is common. It is important to educate the public and primary health care providers in Brazil on stigma related to mental illness in order to reduce barriers to adequate mental health treatment.

  5. Public Stigma towards Older Adults with Depression: Findings from the São Paulo-Manaus Elderly in Primary Care Study

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Rachel; Braga, Patrícia Emília; Peluso, Érica T. P.; Blay, Sérgio L.; R. Menezes, Paulo; E. Ribeiro, Euler

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates three domains of public stigma (perceived negative reactions, perceived discrimination, and dangerousness) against older adults with depression. The sample comprised of older adults registered with primary care clinics (n = 1,291) and primary health care professionals (n = 469) from São Paulo and Manaus, Brazil. Participants read a vignette describing a 70-year-old individual (Mary or John) with a depressive disorder and answered questions measuring stigma. The prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 30.2 and 37.6% among older participants from São Paulo and between 27.6 and 35.4% among older participants from Manaus. Older adults from both cities reported similar prevalence of perceived stigma. Key factors associated with stigmatizing beliefs among older participants were reporting depressive symptoms, having physical limitations, and identifying the case of the vignette as a case of mental disorder. Among health professionals, the prevalence of the three stigma domains was between 19.8 and 34.8% in São Paulo and 30.2 and 44.6% in Manaus. The key factor associated with stigma among primary health care professionals was city, with consistently higher risk in Manaus than in São Paulo. Findings confirm that public stigma against older adults in Brazil is common. It is important to educate the public and primary health care providers in Brazil on stigma related to mental illness in order to reduce barriers to adequate mental health treatment. PMID:27352293

  6. Poor glycemic control in younger women attending Malaysian public primary care clinics: findings from adults diabetes control and management registry.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ai Theng; Lee, Ping Yein; Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Mohamad Adam, Bujang; Chew, Boon How; Mastura, Ismail; Jamaiyah, Haniff; Syed Alwi, Syed-Abdul-Rahman; Sri Wahyu, Taher; Nafiza, Mat-Nasir

    2013-12-10

    Women of reproductive age are a group of particular concern as diabetes may affect their pregnancy outcome as well as long-term morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to compare the clinical profiles and glycemic control of reproductive and non-reproductive age women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in primary care settings, and to determine the associated factors of poor glycemic control in the reproductive age group women. This was a cross-sectional study using cases reported by public primary care clinics to the Adult Diabetes Control and Management registry from 1st January to 31st December 2009. All Malaysian women aged 18 years old and above and diagnosed with T2D for at least 1 year were included in the analysis. The target for glycemic control (HbA1c < 6.5%) is in accordance to the recommended national guidelines. Both univariate and multivariate approaches of logistic regression were applied to determine whether reproductive age women have an association with poor glycemic control. Data from a total of 30,427 women were analyzed and 21.8% (6,622) were of reproductive age. There were 12.5% of reproductive age women and 18.0% of non-reproductive age women that achieved glycemic control. Reproductive age group women were associated with poorer glycemic control (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-1.8). The risk factors associated with poor glycemic control in the reproductive age women were being of Malay and Indian race, longer duration of diabetes, patients on anti-diabetic agents, and those who had not achieved the target total cholesterol and triglycerides. Women with T2D have poor glycemic control, but being of reproductive age was associated with even poorer control. Health care providers need to pay more attention to this group of patients especially for those with risk factors. More aggressive therapeutic strategies to improve their cardiometabolic control and pregnancy outcome are warranted.

  7. Cardiovascular Exercise Intervention Improves the Primary Antibody Response to Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (KLH) in Previously Sedentary Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grant, R.W.; Mariani, R.A.; Vieira, V. J.; Fleshner, M.; Smith, T. P.; Keylock, K.T.; Lowder, T.W.; McAuley, E.; Hu, L.; Chapman-Novakofski, K.; Woods, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Based upon a prior cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that an aerobic exercise intervention in sedentary older adults would improve a primary T cell-dependent immune response. Participants were a subset of older subjects from a large, ongoing exercise intervention study who were randomly assigned to either an aerobic exercise (Cardio, n=30, 68.9 ± 0.8 yrs) or flexibility/balance (Flex, n=20, 69.9 ± 1.2 yrs) intervention. The intervention consisted of either 3 aerobic sessions for 30–60 min at 55–70% VO2 max or two 60 min flexibility/balance sessions weekly for 10 months. Eight months into the intervention, samples were collected before intramuscular administration of KLH (125 µg), followed by sampling at 2, 3, and 6 wks post-KLH. Serum anti-KLH IgM, IgG1, and IgG2 was measured by ELISA. Physiological and psychosocial measures were also assessed pre-and post-intervention. While there was no difference in the anti-KLH IgG2 response between groups, Cardio displayed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher anti-KLH IgG1 (at wks 2, 3, and 6 post) and IgM responses when compared to Flex. Despite cardiovascular intervention-induced improvement in physical fitness (~11% vs. 1% change in VO2peak in Cardio vs. Flex, respectively), we found no relationship between improved fitness and enhanced anti-KLH antibody responses. Optimism, perceived stress, and affect were all associated with enhanced immune response. We have shown for the first time that cardiovascular training in previously sedentary elderly results in significantly higher primary IgG1 and IgM antibody responses, while having no effect on IgG2 production. PMID:18295445

  8. Cardiovascular exercise intervention improves the primary antibody response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in previously sedentary older adults.

    PubMed

    Grant, R W; Mariani, R A; Vieira, V J; Fleshner, M; Smith, T P; Keylock, K T; Lowder, T W; McAuley, E; Hu, L; Chapman-Novakofski, K; Woods, J A

    2008-08-01

    Based upon a prior cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that an aerobic exercise intervention in sedentary older adults would improve a primary T cell-dependent immune response. Participants were a subset of older subjects from a large, ongoing exercise intervention study who were randomly assigned to either an aerobic exercise (Cardio, n=30, 68.9+0.8 years) or flexibility/balance (Flex, n=20, 69.9+1.2 years) intervention. The intervention consisted of either three aerobic sessions for 30-60 min at 55-70% VO(2 max) or two 60 min flexibility/balance sessions weekly for 10 months. Eight months into the intervention, samples were collected before intramuscular administration of KLH (125 microg), followed by sampling at 2, 3, and 6 weeks post-KLH. Serum anti-KLH IgM, IgG1, and IgG2 was measured by ELISA. Physiological and psychosocial measures were also assessed pre- and post-intervention. While there was no difference in the anti-KLH IgG2 response between groups, Cardio displayed significantly (p<0.05) higher anti-KLH IgG1 (at weeks 2, 3, and 6 post) and IgM responses when compared to Flex. Despite cardiovascular intervention-induced improvement in physical fitness (approximately 11% vs. 1% change in VO(2 peak) in Cardio vs. Flex, respectively), we found no relationship between improved fitness and enhanced anti-KLH antibody responses. Optimism, perceived stress, and affect were all associated with enhanced immune response. We have shown for the first time that cardiovascular training in previously sedentary elderly results in significantly higher primary IgG1 and IgM antibody responses, while having no effect on IgG2 production.

  9. Prevalence and incidence of adults consulting for shoulder conditions in UK primary care; patterns of diagnosis and referral.

    PubMed

    Linsell, L; Dawson, J; Zondervan, K; Rose, P; Randall, T; Fitzpatrick, R; Carr, A

    2006-02-01

    To estimate the national prevalence and incidence of adults consulting for a shoulder condition and to investigate patterns of diagnosis, treatment, consultation and referral 3 yr after initial presentation. Prevalence and incidence rates were estimated for 658469 patients aged 18 and over in the year 2000 using a primary care database, the IMS Disease Analyzer-Mediplus UK. A cohort of 9215 incident cases was followed-up prospectively for 3 yr beyond the initial consultation. The annual prevalence and incidence of people consulting for a shoulder condition was 2.36% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.32-2.40%] and 1.47% (95% CI 1.44-1.50%), respectively. Prevalence increased linearly with age whilst incidence peaked at around 50 yr then remained static at around 2%. Around half of the incident cases consulted once only, while 13.6% were still consulting with a shoulder problem during the third year of follow-up. During the 3 yr following initial presentation, 22.4% of patients were referred to secondary care, 30.8% were prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and 10.6% were given an injection by their general practitioner (GP). GPs tended to use a limited number of generalized codes when recording a diagnosis; just five of 426 possible Read codes relating to shoulder conditions accounted for 74.6% of the diagnoses of new cases recorded by GPs. The prevalence of people consulting for shoulder problems in primary care is substantially lower than community-based estimates of shoulder pain. Most referrals occur within 3 months of initial presentation, but only a minority of patients are referred to orthopaedic specialists or rheumatologists. GPs may lack confidence in applying precise diagnoses to shoulder conditions.

  10. Performance of the primary mirror center-of-curvature optical metrology system during cryogenic testing of the JWST Pathfinder telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse and fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment and phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development and spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software and procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate and efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  11. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-curvature Optical Metrology System During Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius-of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse & fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment & phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development & spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software & procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate & efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  12. Correlations between corneal and optic nerve head variables in healthy subjects and patients with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Frances, Federico; Jañez, Luis; Borrego-Sanz, Lara; Berrozpe-Villabona, Clara; Martinez-de-la-Casa, Jose Maria; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Garcia-Sanchez, Julian; Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To correlate corneal variables (determined using the Pentacam) with optic nerve head (ONH) variables determined using the Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) in healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Measurements were made in 75 healthy eyes and 73 eyes with POAG and correlations examined through Pearson correlation coefficients between the two sets of variables in the two subject groups. The corneal variables determined were corneal volume (CVol), central corneal thickness (CCT), overall corneal thickness (OvCT), the mean thickness of a circular zone centered at the corneal apex of 1 mm radius (zone I) and the mean thickness of several concentric rings, also centered at the apex until the limbus, each of 1 mm width (zones II to VI respectively). The ONH variables were determined using the HRT. RESULTS The following pairs of variables were correlated in the control group: CCT-disc area (DAr) (-0.48; P<0.0001), Zone I-DAr (-0.503; P<0.0001) and Zone II-DAr (-0.443; P<0.0001); and in the POAG group: CCT-cup-to-disc area ratio (CDRa) (-0.402; P<0.0001), Zone I-CDRa (-0.418; P<0.0001), Zone II-CDRa (-0.405; P=0.006), Zone I-cup shape measure (CSM) (-0.415; P=0.002), Zone II-CSM (-0.405; P=0.001), Zone IV-height variation contour (HVC) (0.378; P=0.002); Zone V-HVC (0.388, P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In the healthy subjects, significant negative correlation was detected between central and paracentral corneal thickness and optic disc area. In contrast, the POAG patients showed significant negative correlation between central and paracentral corneal thickness and the cup-disc ratio and CSM, and positive correlation between peripheral corneal thickness and HVC. PMID:26682165

  13. Characterization of Light Lesion Paradigms and Optical Coherence Tomography as Tools to Study Adult Retina Regeneration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Anke; Hochmann, Sarah; Cimalla, Peter; Gärtner, Maria; Kuscha, Veronika; Hans, Stefan; Geffarth, Michaela; Kaslin, Jan; Koch, Edmund; Brand, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Light-induced lesions are a powerful tool to study the amazing ability of photoreceptors to regenerate in the adult zebrafish retina. However, the specificity of the lesion towards photoreceptors or regional differences within the retina are still incompletely understood. We therefore characterized the process of degeneration and regeneration in an established paradigm, using intense white light from a fluorescence lamp on swimming fish (diffuse light lesion). We also designed a new light lesion paradigm where light is focused through a microscope onto the retina of an immobilized fish (focused light lesion). Focused light lesion has the advantage of creating a locally restricted area of damage, with the additional benefit of an untreated control eye in the same animal. In both paradigms, cell death is observed as an immediate early response, and proliferation is initiated around 2 days post lesion (dpl), peaking at 3 dpl. We furthermore find that two photoreceptor subtypes (UV and blue sensitive cones) are more susceptible towards intense white light than red/green double cones and rods. We also observed specific differences within light lesioned areas with respect to the process of photoreceptor degeneration: UV cone debris is removed later than any other type of photoreceptor in light lesions. Unspecific damage to retinal neurons occurs at the center of a focused light lesion territory, but not in the diffuse light lesion areas. We simulated the fish eye optical properties using software simulation, and show that the optical properties may explain the light lesion patterns that we observe. Furthermore, as a new tool to study retinal degeneration and regeneration in individual fish in vivo, we use spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Collectively, the light lesion and imaging assays described here represent powerful tools for studying degeneration and regeneration processes in the adult zebrafish retina. PMID:24303018

  14. Adenosine 5' triphosphate evoked mobilization of intracellular calcium in central nervous system white matter of adult mouse optic nerve.

    PubMed

    James, G; Butt, A M

    1999-06-11

    Although it has been established that immature glial cells express functional purinergic receptors, the responsiveness of mature glial cells in vivo had not been elucidated. This question was addressed using fura-2 ratiometric measurements of [Ca2+]i in the adult mouse optic nerve, a central nervous system (CNS) white matter tract, taking advantage of the facts that (i), the optic nerve contains glial cells but not neurons and (ii), that fura-2 loads primarily astrocytes in isolated intact optic nerves. We show that adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP) evoked an increase in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximal effect at 3 microm ATP, and with a rank order of agonist potency of ATP > ADP > alpha,beta-methyline-ATP > UDP > adenosine. The results indicate mainly P2Y and P2X components, consistent with the in vitro astroglial purinergic receptor profile. The in vivo response of mature glia to ATP may be important in their response to CNS damage.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Optic Nerve Traction During Adduction in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma With Normal Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.; Clark, Robert A.; Suh, Soh Youn; Giaconi, JoAnn A.; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros; Law, Simon K.; Bonelli, Laura; Coleman, Anne L.; Caprioli, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain effects of optic nerve (ON) traction in adduction, a phenomenon proposed as neuropathic in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods Seventeen patients with POAG and maximal IOP ≤ 20 mm Hg, and 31 controls underwent MRI in central gaze and 20° to 30° abduction and adduction. Optic nerve and sheath area centroids permitted computation of midorbital lengths versus minimum paths. Results Average mean deviation (±SEM) was −8.2 ± 1.2 dB in the 15 patients with POAG having interpretable perimetry. In central gaze, ON path length in POAG was significantly more redundant (104.5 ± 0.4% of geometric minimum) than in controls (102.9 ± 0.4%, P = 2.96 × 10−4). In both groups the ON became significantly straighter in adduction (28.6 ± 0.8° in POAG, 26.8 ± 1.1° in controls) than central gaze and abduction. In adduction, the ON in POAG straightened to 102.0% ± 0.2% of minimum path length versus 104.5% ± 0.4% in central gaze (P = 5.7 × 10−7), compared with controls who straightened to 101.6% ± 0.1% from 102.9% ± 0.3% in central gaze (P = 8.7 × 10−6); and globes retracted 0.73 ± 0.09 mm in POAG, but only 0.07 ± 0.08 mm in controls (P = 8.8 × 10−7). Both effects were confirmed in age-matched controls, and remained significant after correction for significant effects of age and axial globe length (P = 0.005). Conclusions Although tethering and elongation of ON and sheath are normal in adduction, adduction is associated with abnormally great globe retraction in POAG without elevated IOP. Traction in adduction may cause mechanical overloading of the ON head and peripapillary sclera, thus contributing to or resulting from the optic neuropathy of glaucoma independent of IOP. PMID:28829843

  16. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners.

  17. Sleep time and pattern of adult individuals in primary care in an Asian urbanized community: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Tan, Mui Suan; Hwang, Siew Wai; Teo, Chia Chia; Lee, Zhi Kang Niccol; Soh, Jing Yao Jonathan; Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; How, Choon How

    2016-08-01

    Sleep norms vary between individuals, being affected by personal, communal, and socioeconomic factors. Individuals with sleep time which deviate from the population norm are at risks of adverse mental, cardiovascular, and metabolic health. Sleep-related issues are common agenda for consultation in primary care. This study aimed to determine the sleep time, pattern, and behavior of multiethnic Asian individuals who attended public primary care clinics in an urban metropolitan city-state.Standardized questionnaires were assistant-administered to adult Asian individuals who visited 2 local public primary care clinics in north-eastern and southern regions of Singapore. The questionnaire included questions on demographic characteristics, self-reported sleep time, patterns, and behavior and those originated from the American National Sleep Foundation Sleep Diary. The data were collated, audited, rectified, and anonymized before being analyzed by the biostatistician. Individuals with 7 h sleep time or longer were deemed getting adequate sleep. Chi-squared or Fisher exact test was used to test the association between the demographic and behavioral variables and sleep time. Next, regression analysis was performed to identify key factors associated with their sleep time.A total of 350 individuals were recruited, with higher proportion of those of Chinese ethnicity reporting adequate sleep. Almost half (48.1%) of those who slept <7 h on weekdays tended to sleep ≥7 h on weekends. More individuals who reported no difficulty falling asleep, had regular sleep hours and awakening time, tended to sleep adequately. Those who slept with children, studied, read leisurely, used computer or laptops in their bedrooms, drank caffeinated beverages or smoked had inadequate sleep. Those who perceived sufficient sleep and considered 8 h as adequate sleep time had weekday and weekend sleep adequacy.Sleep time varied according to ethnicity, employment status, personal behavior, and

  18. Anxiety Sensitivity and Age: Roles in Understanding Subjective Social Status among Low Income Adult Latinos in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Paulus, Daniel J; Bakhshaie, Jafar; Garza, Monica; Manning, Kara; Lemaire, Chad; Reitzel, Lorraine R; Smith, Lia J; Ochoa-Perez, Melissa

    2017-07-05

    One social determinant of health construct that is reliably related to health disparities among the Latino population is subjective social status, reflecting subjective ratings of social standing. Yet, little research has explored factors that may undergird variability in subjective social status among this population or in general. Accordingly, the present investigation examined one possible etiological model wherein age moderates the relation between individual differences in anxiety sensitivity (fear of the negative consequences of stress sensations) and subjective social status among a Latino primary care sample. Participants included Spanish-speaking Latino adults (n = 394; 86.5% female; average age = 39.0 years). Results demonstrated an interaction between the anxiety sensitivity and age for subjective social status among the Latino sample. Inspection of the form of the significant interaction indicated that the association between anxiety sensitivity and subjective social status was evident among older, but not younger, persons. The current findings suggest that decreasing anxiety sensitivity, especially among older Latinos, may be one possible viable therapeutic approach to change subjective social status in order to help offset health disparities among this group.

  19. Preventive services recommendations for adults in primary care settings: agreement between Canada, France and the USA--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gelly, Julien; Mentre, France; Nougairede, Michel; Duval, Xavier

    2013-07-01

    To analyze the level of agreement between recommendations on preventive services developed by Canada, France and the USA. We gathered recommendations on primary and secondary preventive services to adults up to November 3rd, 2011 from Canadian and US Task Forces, and equivalent French agencies. We excluded recommendations on immunization, long-term diseases or pregnancy. Among 250 recommendations, 84 (34%) issued by a single country could not be compared; 43 (26%) of the remaining 166 were in strong agreement (strictly identical grades between advising countries); 25 of 43 resulted in a proposal to be implemented in clinical practice, two others not to be implemented in clinical practice and 16 were indeterminate about implementation. Strong agreement was more frequent for recommendations concerning history-taking and physical examination than for those concerning interventions (odds ratio (OR)=11.3, 95%CI: 1.6-241.2; p=0.04), and for recommendations concerning a high-risk population than for those concerning the general population (OR=3.1, 95%CI: 1.4-7.0; p=0.006). Agreement did not differ either according to maximum time range between recommendations' publication or according to the advising country. Agreement between recommendations is low particularly on those concerning non-clinical preventive services or non-high-risk individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary new-onset hydroceles presenting in late childhood and pre-adolescent patients resemble the adult type hydrocele pathology.

    PubMed

    Koutsoumis, Georgios; Patoulias, Ioannis; Kaselas, Christos

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of a patent processus vaginalis (PPV) in children of late childhood and pre-adolescence presenting with new onset hydrocele. All males with hydrocele presenting at our department from January 2011 to January 2013 were followed. Patients with secondary hydroceles were excluded. Demographic data, medical history, clinical symptoms and signs relative to their pathology and U/S findings were recorded. According to their indications, patients were either operated or followed up. Patients surgically treated, consisted our study group. Sixty patients were identified. Thirteen were followed until resolution of their hydrocele. Forty-seven patients were surgically treated. Twenty-seven had right sided hydrocele (57.44%), 13 had left sided hydrocele (27.66%) whereas in 7 patients the hydroceles were bilateral (14.9%). All patients were operated by an inguinal approach. In all 9 patients (19.14%) presenting with new-onset hydrocele at the age >10 years (range: 10-15 years), intraoperative exploration did not reveal a PPV. All patients were followed at least for 6 months post-operatively. Early evidence shows that primary new onset hydroceles presenting in late childhood and pre-adolescence seem to be non-communicating and resemble the adult type hydrocele pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Optical measurement with direct traceability to the primary standards of length and time - Toward a system of metrology based entirely on the properties of the photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roy

    1993-03-01

    It is proposed that the primary standards of length and time have now reached a sufficient level of maturity that they may be removed from the standards laboratories and used directly for measurement calibration with minimal recourse to the use of intermediate secondary standards. In particular, if a measurement can be configured to give a time-related output such as decay time, time of flight (TOF), frequency, or phase shift, then direct traceability to the primary atomic clock standard can be realized through use of the LORAN C or global position satellite systems. Twelve illustrative examples are considered covering a wide range of optical and spectroscopic measurements. This approach is then extended to mass, the remaining primary standard that is not currently photon-based. An optical definition of mass is realizable in terms of length and time through the angular momentum properties of the photon measured using the torsion balance.

  2. Monitoring of Single-Cell Responses in the Optic Tectum of Adult Zebrafish with Dextran-Coupled Calcium Dyes Delivered via Local Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Kassing, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become one of the major animal models for in vivo examination of sensory and neuronal computation. Similar to Xenopus tadpoles neural activity in the optic tectum, the major region controlling visually guided behavior, can be examined in zebrafish larvae by optical imaging. Prerequisites of these approaches are usually the transparency of larvae up to a certain age and the use of two-photon microscopy. This principle of fluorescence excitation was necessary to suppress crosstalk between signals from individual neurons, which is a critical issue when using membrane-permeant dyes. This makes the equipment to study neuronal processing costly and limits the approach to the study of larvae. Thus there is lack of knowledge about the properties of neurons in the optic tectum of adult animals. We established a procedure to circumvent these problems, enabling in vivo calcium imaging in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish. Following local application of dextran-coupled dyes single-neuron activity of adult zebrafish can be monitored with conventional widefield microscopy, because dye labeling remains restricted to tens of neurons or less. Among the neurons characterized with our technique we found neurons that were selective for a certain pattern orientation as well as neurons that responded in a direction-selective way to visual motion. These findings are consistent with previous studies and indicate that the functional integrity of neuronal circuits in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish is preserved with our staining technique. Overall, our protocol for in vivo calcium imaging provides a useful approach to monitor visual responses of individual neurons in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish even when only widefield microscopy is available. This approach will help to obtain valuable insight into the principles of visual computation in adult vertebrates and thus complement previous work on developing visual circuits. PMID:23667529

  3. Inscribing Optical Excitability to Non-Excitable Cardiac Cells: Viral Delivery of Optogenetic Tools in Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    We describe in detail a method to introduce optogenetic actuation tools, a mutant version of channelrhodopsin-2, ChR2(H134R), and archaerhodopsin (ArchT), into primary cardiac fibroblasts (cFB) in vitro by adenoviral infection to yield quick, robust, and consistent expression. Instructions on adjusting infection parameters such as the multiplicity of infection and virus incubation duration are provided to generalize the method for different lab settings or cell types. Specific conditions are discussed to create hybrid co-cultures of the optogenetically modified cFB and non-transformed cardiomyocytes to obtain light-sensitive excitable cardiac syncytium, including stencil-patterned cell growth. We also describe an all-optical framework for the functional testing of responsiveness of these opsins in cFB. The presented methodology provides cell-specific tools for the mechanistic investigation of the functional bioelectric contribution of different non-excitable cells in the heart and their electrical coupling to cardiomyocytes under different conditions.

  4. Inscribing Optical Excitability to Non-Excitable Cardiac Cells: Viral Delivery of Optogenetic Tools in Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    We describe in detail a method to introduce optogenetic actuation tools, a mutant version of channelrhodopsin- 2, ChR2(H134R), and archaerhodopsin (ArchT), into primary cardiac fibroblasts (cFB) in vitro by adenoviral infection to yield quick, robust, and consistent expression. Instructions on adjusting infection parameters such as the multiplicity of infection and virus incubation duration are provided to generalize the method for different lab settings or cell types. Specific conditions are discussed to create hybrid co-cultures of the optogenetically modified cFB and non-transformed cardiomyocytes to obtain light- sensitive excitable cardiac syncytium, including stencil-patterned cell growth. We also describe an all-optical framework for the functional testing of responsiveness of these opsins in cFB. The presented methodology provides cell-specific tools for the mechanistic investigation of the functional bioelectric contribution of different non-excitable cells in the heart and their electrical coupling to cardiomyocytes under different conditions. PMID:26965132

  5. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  6. Long-Term Optical Device Use by Young Adults with Low Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachofer, Cynthia Susan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term use of optical devices by individuals who participated in a school-based comprehensive low vision program focusing on use of devices, both near and distance. Thirty-seven participants (five non-users), ages 18-28, completed phone interviews giving information on their personal…

  7. Systematic evaluation of a time-domain Monte Carlo fitting routine to estimate the adult brain optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selb, Juliette; Ogden, Tyler M.; Dubb, Jay; Fang, Qianqian; Boas, Da