Science.gov

Sample records for primary aluminum production

  1. Final Technical Report Microwave Assisted Electrolyte Cell for Primary Aluminum Production

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; J.Y. Hwang

    2007-04-18

    This research addresses the high priority research need for developing inert anode and wetted cathode technology, as defined in the Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap and Inert Anode Roadmap, with the performance targets: a) significantly reducing the energy intensity of aluminum production, b) ultimately eliminating anode-related CO2 emissions, and c) reducing aluminum production costs. This research intended to develop a new electrometallurgical extraction technology by introducing microwave irradiation into the current electrolytic cells for primary aluminum production. This technology aimed at accelerating the alumina electrolysis reduction rate and lowering the aluminum production temperature, coupled with the uses of nickel based superalloy inert anode, nickel based superalloy wetted cathode, and modified salt electrolyte. Michigan Technological University, collaborating with Cober Electronic and Century Aluminum, conducted bench-scale research for evaluation of this technology. This research included three sub-topics: a) fluoride microwave absorption; b) microwave assisted electrolytic cell design and fabrication; and c) aluminum electrowinning tests using the microwave assisted electrolytic cell. This research concludes that the typically used fluoride compound for aluminum electrowinning is not a good microwave absorbing material at room temperature. However, it becomes an excellent microwave absorbing material above 550°C. The electrowinning tests did not show benefit to introduce microwave irradiation into the electrolytic cell. The experiments revealed that the nickel-based superalloy is not suitable for use as a cathode material; although it wets with molten aluminum, it causes severe reaction with molten aluminum. In the anode experiments, the chosen superalloy did not meet corrosion resistance requirements. A nicked based alloy without iron content could be further investigated.

  2. Development of perfluorocarbon (PFC) primary standards for monitoring of emissions from aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, G; Chu, P; Dolin, E; Marks, J; Howard, T; Lytle, M; McKenzie, L; Altman, D

    2001-08-01

    An EPA Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAIP) program has been formed to help US primary producers focus on reducing the emissions of two perfluorocarbons (PFCs), tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and hexafluoroethane (C2F6), during the production of aluminum. To ensure comparability of measurements over space and time, traceability to national sources was desirable. Hence, the EPA approached the NIST to develop a suite of primary standards to cover a mole fraction (concentration) range of 0.1 to 1400 micromol mol(-1) for CF4 and 0.01 to 150 micromol mol(-1) of C2F6. A total of eight gravimetric PFC gas standards were prepared with relative expanded uncertainties of < or = 0.52% (approximately 95% confidence level). These primary standards were ultimately used to assign values to a series of secondary gas standards at three mole-fraction levels with relative expanded uncertainties ranging from +/- 0.7% to 5.3% (approximately 95% confidence level). This series of secondary standards was used within the aluminum industry to calibrate instruments used to make emission measurements. Assignment of values to the secondary standards was performed by use of gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Real time pot-line and stack samples from a local aluminum plant were also obtained and sub-samples sent to each participating facility for analysis. The data generated from each facility were sent to NIST for analysis. The maximum difference between the NIST and individual facilities' values for the same sub-sample was +/- 26%.

  3. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  4. 75 FR 66798 - Ormet Primary Aluminum Corporation Including On-Site Temporary Workers, Hannibal, OH; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Ormet Primary Aluminum Corporation Including On-Site Temporary Workers... regarding eligibility for workers and former workers of Ormet Primary Aluminum Corporation, including on... United States production, consumption, and importation of primary and secondary aluminum to...

  5. 40 CFR 421.20 - Applicability: description of the primary aluminum smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary aluminum smelting subcategory. 421.20 Section 421.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Aluminum Smelting Subcategory § 421.20 Applicability: description of the primary aluminum... production of aluminum from alumina in the Hall-Heroult process....

  6. 40 CFR 421.20 - Applicability: description of the primary aluminum smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary aluminum smelting subcategory. 421.20 Section 421.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Aluminum Smelting Subcategory § 421.20 Applicability: description of the primary aluminum... production of aluminum from alumina in the Hall-Heroult process....

  7. 40 CFR 421.20 - Applicability: description of the primary aluminum smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary aluminum smelting subcategory. 421.20 Section 421.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Aluminum Smelting Subcategory § 421.20 Applicability: description of the primary aluminum... production of aluminum from alumina in the Hall-Heroult process....

  8. 40 CFR 421.20 - Applicability: description of the primary aluminum smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary aluminum smelting subcategory. 421.20 Section 421.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Aluminum Smelting Subcategory § 421.20 Applicability: description of the primary aluminum... production of aluminum from alumina in the Hall-Heroult process....

  9. 40 CFR 421.20 - Applicability: description of the primary aluminum smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary aluminum smelting subcategory. 421.20 Section 421.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Aluminum Smelting Subcategory § 421.20 Applicability: description of the primary aluminum... production of aluminum from alumina in the Hall-Heroult process....

  10. Cast Aluminum Primary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ABSTRAC R A A A357 cast aluminum alloy forward fuselage pressure bulkhead has been developed and manufactured for the AMST-YC-14 aircraft. This work...urring in castings. Test coupons were! removed from castings containing defU-ts and subjected to repeated loads. The shift of the S-N curve for A357 ...selected for the casting is A357 . The cast bulkhead (Fig 2) measures approximately 2.29 m (7.5 ft) by 1.37 m (4.5 ft). It is designed to replace the

  11. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  12. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  13. The use of primary dross from the aluminum industry for manufacturing aluminum sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    The use of primary dross as a source for aluminum ion in the manufacture of aluminum sulfate offers opportunities for an inexpensive raw material. The aluminum sulfate industry in the US is a mature market with numerous small plants operating close to major users. The majority of manufacturers use either bauxite or aluminum oxide trihydrate as a source for the aluminum ion. However, using process technology developed and patented by IWC, the oxides are removed from primary dross for use in manufacturing aluminum sulfate prior to metal recovery. This process offers the benefit of reducing costs for metal recovery. This paper discusses some of the methodology used in this process.

  14. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site leased... are engaged in the production of aluminum alloy forgings. Information shows that on July 28,...

  15. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  16. 77 FR 2677 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Primary Aluminum Reduction Plants...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Aluminum Reduction Plants; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Primary Aluminum Reduction Plants'' is being extended for 12...

  17. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  18. Updated Life-Cycle Assessment of Aluminum Production and Semi-fabrication for the GREET Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Qiang; Kelly, Jarod C.; Burnham, Andrew; Elgowainy, Amgad

    2015-09-01

    This report serves as an update for the life-cycle analysis (LCA) of aluminum production based on the most recent data representing the state-of-the-art of the industry in North America. The 2013 Aluminum Association (AA) LCA report on the environmental footprint of semifinished aluminum products in North America provides the basis for the update (The Aluminum Association, 2013). The scope of this study covers primary aluminum production, secondary aluminum production, as well as aluminum semi-fabrication processes including hot rolling, cold rolling, extrusion and shape casting. This report focuses on energy consumptions, material inputs and criteria air pollutant emissions for each process from the cradle-to-gate of aluminum, which starts from bauxite extraction, and ends with manufacturing of semi-fabricated aluminum products. The life-cycle inventory (LCI) tables compiled are to be incorporated into the vehicle cycle model of Argonne National Laboratory’s Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model for the release of its 2015 version.

  19. Conceptual Design for Lower-Energy Primary Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, N. A.

    2008-04-01

    Operating parameters have been identified such that slag melts typical of other carbothermic aluminum processes are thermodynamically unstable. This facilitates the direct reaction of carbon in carbon-saturated aluminum with alumina under dispersed-contact high-intensity conditions. A conceptual design for one million tonnes per annum (1 Mtpa) aluminum production from Bayer alumina is developed. Freestanding graphite reactors and an ancillary plant encapsulated by inert gas are totally unconstrained within refractory-lined shells. Electrical conductive heating and melt circulation in closed loops, employing a 10 vol pct dispersion of fine carbon particles in aluminum (slurry), transports sensible heat to a single pressurized metal-producing reactor (MPR) to satisfy the endothermicity. In the proposed plant, an MPR at 0.28 MPa (2.8 bar) and 2433 K (2160 °C) with a hearth 2-m-wide × 190-m-long leads the melt via a barometric leg back to essentially atmospheric pressure, for further in-line processing. The impeller-stirred assimilation of fine carbon particles is followed by multistage gas-lift pumping to provide a 5.4-m total head, as required by two parallel straight-line melt-conductive heaters 1 m in diameter × 226 m in length. Overall energy-consumption figures 28.7 pct lower than today’s more recently installed Hall Heroult electrolytic plants are predicted, with 51.3 pct less purchased electricity, supplemented with 1.10 times the stoichiometric elemental carbon.

  20. Aluminum in Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition Products: Measured Versus Labeled Content

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Robert L.; Pieroni, Kevin P.; Gaskari, Shabnam; Dixon, Tessa K.; Park, KT; Kerner, John A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Aluminum is a contaminant in all parenteral nutrition solutions. Manufacturers currently label these products with the maximum aluminum content at the time of expiry, but there are no published data to establish the actual measured concentration of aluminum in parenteral nutrition solution products prior to being compounded in the clinical setting. This investigation assessed quantitative aluminum content of products commonly used in the formulation of parenteral nutrition solutions. The objective of this study is to determine the best products to be used when compounding parenteral nutrition solutions (i.e., those with the least amount of aluminum contamination). METHODS All products available in the United States from all manufacturers used in the production of parenteral nutrition solutions were identified and collected. Three lots were collected for each identified product. Samples were quantitatively analyzed by Mayo Laboratories. These measured concentrations were then compared to the manufacturers' labeled concentration. RESULTS Large lot-to-lot and manufacturer-to-manufacturer differences were noted for all products. Measured aluminum concentrations were less than manufacturer-labeled values for all products. CONCLUSIONS The actual aluminum concentrations of all the parenteral nutrition solutions were significantly less than the aluminum content based on manufacturers' labels. These findings indicate that 1) the manufacturers should label their products with actual aluminum content at the time of product release rather than at the time of expiry, 2) that there are manufacturers whose products provide significantly less aluminum contamination than others, and 3) pharmacists can select products with the lowest amounts of aluminum contamination and reduce the aluminum exposure in their patients. PMID:22477831

  1. Aluminum recovery as a product with high added value using aluminum hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2013-10-15

    The samples of hazardous aluminum solid waste such as dross were physically and chemically characterized. A relationship between density, porosity and metal content of dross was established. The paper also examines the chemical reactions involving aluminum dross in landfill and the negative consequences. To avoid environmental problems and to recovery the aluminum, a processing method was developed and aluminum was recovered as an added value product such as alumina. This method refers to a process at low temperature, in more stages: acid leaching, purification, precipitation and calcination. At the end of this process aluminum was extracted, first as Al(3+) soluble ions and final as alumina product. The composition of the aluminum dross and alumina powder obtained were measured by applying the leaching tests, using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and chemical analysis. The mineralogical composition of aluminum dross samples and alumina product were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The method presented in this work allows the use of hazardous aluminum solid waste as raw material to recover an important fraction from soluble aluminum content as an added value product, alumina, with high grade purity (99.28%).

  2. Secondary Aluminum Production: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) for new and existing sources at secondary aluminum production facilities. Includes rule history, summary, federal register citations and implementation information.

  3. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  4. Energy conservation in the primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries together use nearly 13% of the electrical energy consumed by US industry. As part of its mission to promote energy conservation in basic US industries, the DOE surveys the present technological status of the major electrochemical industries and evaluates promising technological innovations that may lead to reduced energy requirements. This study provides technical and economic analyses in support of a government program of research and development in advanced electrolytic technology. This program is intended to supplement the development efforts directed toward energy savings by private industry. Sections II and III of this report cover aluminum and chlorine production processes only, since these two industries represent over 90% of the electrical energy requirements of all electrolytic industries in the United States. Section IV examines barriers to accelerated research and development by the electrolytic industries, and makes suggestions for government actions to overcome these barriers.

  5. Ultrahigh-Efficiency Aluminum Production Cells

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research project to develop a commercially viable inert anode aluminum electrolysis cell technology. Accompanying enabling technologies will also be developed, including a wetted cathode design and a novel low-temperature electrolyte.

  6. Gross Primary Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's new Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) allows scientists to gauge our planet's metabolism on an almost daily basis. GPP, gross primary production, is the technical term for plant photosynthesis. This composite image over the continental United States, acquired during the period March 26-April 10, 2000, shows regions where plants were more or less productive-i.e., where they 'inhaled' carbon dioxide and then used the carbon from photosynthesis to build new plant structures. This false-color image provides a map of how much carbon was absorbed out of the atmosphere and fixed within land vegetation. Areas colored blue show where plants used as much as 60 grams of carbon per square meter. Areas colored green and yellow indicate a range of anywhere from 40 to 20 grams of carbon absorbed per square meter. Red pixels show an absorption of less than 10 grams of carbon per square meter and white pixels (often areas covered by snow or masked as urban) show little or no absorption. This is one of a number of new measurements that MODIS provides to help scientists understand how the Earth's landscapes are changing over time. Scientists' goal is use of these GPP measurements to refine computer models to simulate how the land biosphere influences the natural cycles of water, carbon, and energy throughout the Earth system. The GPP will be an integral part of global carbon cycle source and sink analysis, an important aspect of Kyoto Protocol assessments. This image is the first of its kind from the MODIS instrument, which launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra spacecraft. MODIS began acquiring scientific data on February 24, 2000, when it first opened its aperture door. The MODIS instrument and Terra spacecraft are both managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Image courtesy Steven Running, MODIS Land Group Member, University of Montana

  7. 78 FR 20298 - Restoration and Compensation Determination Plan and Environmental Assessment: Aluminum Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Environmental Assessment: Aluminum Production Plants and Engine Manufacturer, St. Lawrence River, Massena, NY... resource injuries and service losses associated with the release of hazardous substances from two aluminum... included polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aluminum, fluoride,...

  8. Reusing steel and aluminum components at end of product life.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel R; Allwood, Julian M

    2012-09-18

    Reusing steel and aluminum components would reduce the need for new production, possibly creating significant savings in carbon emissions. Currently, there is no clearly defined set of strategies or barriers to enable assessment of appropriate component reuse; neither is it possible to predict future levels of reuse. This work presents a global assessment of the potential for reusing steel and aluminum components. A combination of top-down and bottom-up analyses is used to allocate the final destinations of current global steel and aluminum production to product types. A substantial catalogue has been compiled for these products characterizing key features of steel and aluminum components including design specifications, requirements in use, and current reuse patterns. To estimate the fraction of end-of-life metal components that could be reused for each product, the catalogue formed the basis of a set of semistructured interviews with industrial experts. The results suggest that approximately 30% of steel and aluminum used in current products could be reused. Barriers against reuse are examined, prompting recommendations for redesign that would facilitate future reuse.

  9. Effects of anti-odor automobile air-conditioning system products on adherence of Serratia marcescens to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Drago, G K; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    2002-12-01

    Sixteen commercial products for use in automobile air-conditioning systems (ACS), most designated for abatement of malodors presumably of microbial origin, were examined for their potential to inhibit attachment and to detach cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens on aluminum sections. Numbers of attached cells were appreciably reduced (>60%) following immersion in three alcohol-type and two acrylic-coating-type products. Several products had essentially no effect on the attached cells. Most of the products indicated for alleviation of associated microbial odors from ACS provided only short-term effects. When products were coated onto aluminum prior to exposure to the cells, water-insoluble coatings appeared to provide more consistent inhibition of primary adherence of S. marcescens. The differences in degrees of primary adherence of a selected strain of S. marcescens to variously treated aluminum provided a rapid and reproducible assessment of potential antimicrobial efficacy of ACS products.

  10. [The unbearable lightness of aluminum: the social and environmental impacts of Brazil's insertion in the primary aluminum global market].

    PubMed

    Henriques, Alen Batista; Porto, Marcelo Firpo Souza

    2013-11-01

    This article assesses aluminum production in Brazil and its social, environmental and public health impacts. The effects of the aluminum production chain challenge the idea of sustainable growth affirmed by business groups that operate in the sector. This article upholds the theory that the insertion of Brazil in the global aluminum market is part of a new configuration of the International Division of Labor (IDL), the polluting economic and highly energy dependent activities of which - as is the case of aluminum - have been moving to peripheral nations or emerging countries. The laws in such countries are less stringent, and similarly the environmental movements and the claims of the affected populations in the territories prejudiced in their rights to health, a healthy environment and culture are less influential. The competitiveness of this commodity is guaranteed in the international market, from the production of external factors such as environmental damage, deforestation, emissions of greenhouse gases and scenarios of environmental injustice. This includes undertakings in the construction of hydroelectric dams that expose traditional communities to situations involving the loss of their territories.

  11. Magnesium for automotive applications: Primary production cost assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sujit

    2003-11-01

    Production technologies must be cost effective for primary magnesium to become an economically viable alternative material for wide spread automotive applications. In this article, the prices at which magnesium becomes competitive with aluminum and steel are examined, including magnesium production cost estimates for current and future scenarios using electrolytic and thermal processes. The economic viability of the industry for automotive applications is also examined in the context of magnesium market price, taking into consideration the dynamics of its supply and demand as well.

  12. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  13. Aluminum dross oxide products for the portland cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Zuck, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recovery of aluminum metal from drosses is a major factor in the recyclability success story enjoyed by the United States aluminum industry. Today`s modern dross processor uses the latest technology to maximize metal recovery at the lowest cost while complying with all environmental laws and regulations. Most dross processors, however, pay little attention to the resulting saltcake, the end residual of dross recycling, and rely on landfills for disposition of this material. The alternative is to recycle the saltcake, but the success of this technology is dependent on the development of reliable outlets for each of the saltcake constituents. This paper discusses the evolution of an aluminum dross oxide processing technology that produces an economically attractive source of alumina for the production of portland cement.

  14. Aluminum potentiates glutamate-induced calcium accumulation and iron-induced oxygen free radical formation in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Mundy, W R; Freudenrich, T M; Kodavanti, P R

    1997-01-01

    Aluminum is a neurotoxic metal that may be involved in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although the mechanism of action is not known, aluminum has been shown to alter Ca2+ flux and homeostasis, and facilitate peroxidation of membrane lipids. Since abnormal increases of intracellular Ca2+ and oxygen free radicals have both been implicated in pathways leading to neurodegeneration, we examined the effect of aluminum on these parameters in vitro using primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells. Exposure to glutamate (1-300 microM) caused a concentration-dependent uptake of 45Ca in granule cells to a maximum of 280% of basal. Pretreatment with AlCl3 (1-1000 microM) had no effect on 45Ca accumulation, but increased the uptake induced by glutamate. Similarly, AlCl3 had no effect on intracellular free Ca2+ levels measured using fluorescent probe fura-2, but potentiated the increase induced by glutamate. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescin. By itself, AlCl3 had little effect on ROS production. However, AlCl3 pretreatment potentiated the ROS production induced by 50 microM Fe2+. These results suggest that aluminum may facilitate increases in intracellular Ca2+ and ROS, and potentially contribute to neurotoxicity induced by other neurotoxicants.

  15. 40 CFR 415.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... aluminum sulfate production subcategory. 415.20 Section 415.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Sulfate Production Subcategory § 415.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and...

  16. 40 CFR 415.230 - Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... aluminum fluoride production subcategory. 415.230 Section 415.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Fluoride Production Subcategory § 415.230 Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  17. 40 CFR 415.230 - Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... aluminum fluoride production subcategory. 415.230 Section 415.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Fluoride Production Subcategory § 415.230 Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  18. 40 CFR 415.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... aluminum sulfate production subcategory. 415.20 Section 415.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Sulfate Production Subcategory § 415.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and...

  19. 40 CFR 415.10 - Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... aluminum chloride production subcategory. 415.10 Section 415.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.10 Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  20. 40 CFR 415.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... aluminum sulfate production subcategory. 415.20 Section 415.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Sulfate Production Subcategory § 415.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and...

  1. 40 CFR 415.10 - Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... aluminum chloride production subcategory. 415.10 Section 415.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.10 Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  2. 40 CFR 415.230 - Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... aluminum fluoride production subcategory. 415.230 Section 415.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Fluoride Production Subcategory § 415.230 Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  3. 40 CFR 415.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... aluminum sulfate production subcategory. 415.20 Section 415.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Sulfate Production Subcategory § 415.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and...

  4. 40 CFR 415.10 - Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... aluminum chloride production subcategory. 415.10 Section 415.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.10 Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  5. 40 CFR 415.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... aluminum sulfate production subcategory. 415.20 Section 415.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Sulfate Production Subcategory § 415.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum sulfate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and...

  6. 40 CFR 415.230 - Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... aluminum fluoride production subcategory. 415.230 Section 415.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Fluoride Production Subcategory § 415.230 Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  7. 40 CFR 415.10 - Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... aluminum chloride production subcategory. 415.10 Section 415.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.10 Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  8. 40 CFR 415.10 - Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... aluminum chloride production subcategory. 415.10 Section 415.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.10 Applicability; description of the aluminum chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  9. 40 CFR 415.230 - Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... aluminum fluoride production subcategory. 415.230 Section 415.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Fluoride Production Subcategory § 415.230 Applicability; description of the aluminum fluoride production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  10. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  11. High-energy electron-induced damage production at room temperature in aluminum-doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, J. W.; Cheng, L. J.; Jaworowski, A.; Karins, J. P.; Lee, Y. H.; Lindstroem, L.; Mooney, P. M.; Oehrlen, G.; Wang, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    DLTS and EPR measurements are reported on aluminum-doped silicon that was irradiated at room temperature with high-energy electrons. Comparisons are made to comparable experiments on boron-doped silicon. Many of the same defects observed in boron-doped silicon are also observed in aluminum-doped silicon, but several others were not observed, including the aluminum interstitial and aluminum-associated defects. Damage production modeling, including the dependence on aluminum concentration, is presented.

  12. Primary productivity in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in primary productivity is discussed in the book based on 27 symposia texts and 19 poster abstracts. Most papers deal with particular cellular processes in pelagic phytoplankton and their relationship to whole plant photosynthesis and growth. In addition, presentations on the productivity of the seaweed, Laminaria, zooxanthellae and whole corals are included. Other articles discuss predictive modeling, new developments in remote sensing, nutrient regeneration within the sea, grazing effects, and carbon cycling. (JMT)

  13. Possible greenhouse effects of tetrafluoromethane and carbon dioxide emitted from aluminum production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Ralph E.

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) is an extremely stable gas which strongly absorbs infrared radiation at ˜ 8 μm, and therefore is capable of influencing the greenhouse effect. No natural sources have been identified, and the major anthropogenic source appears to be the electrolytic smelting of alumina to produce aluminum. Measurements of CF 4 concentrations in the atmosphere are reviewed, and these are combined with aluminum production rates to provide an estimate of 1.3-3.6 kg of CF 4 emitted per ton of aluminum produced for the period up to ˜ 1985. Aluminum production also requires large amounts of electrical energy, leading to the emission of as much as 22 tons of carbon dioxide per ton of aluminum due to fossil fuel combustion in power plants. The present day contribution of hydroelectric power reduces this figure to about 14 tons of carbon dioxide per ton of aluminum. An estimate of the relative radiative trapping of CF 4 and CO 2 emitted in aluminum production during this same period (1900-1985) indicates that the effect of CF 4 is about one-third that of the CO 2 formed by aluminum production. However, the emission of fluorocarbons from modem aluminum electrolysis cells is much lower than previous estimates indicate, and this factor is considered in estimating potential long-term global warming effects of CF 4 and CO 2 from aluminum production. Possible processes leading to removal of CF 4 from the atmosphere are described.

  14. Aluminum base alloy powder metallurgy process and product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical method including cooling molten aluminum particles and consolidating resulting solidified particles into a multiparticle body, wherein the improvement comprises the provision of greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn. Aluminum containing greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn.

  15. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  16. Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

    1981-02-01

    At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

  17. Production of Magnesium and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys from Recycled Secondary Aluminum Scrap Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesing, Adam J.; Das, Subodh K.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental proof of concept was demonstrated for a patent-pending and trademark-pending RE12™ process for extracting a desired amount of Mg from recycled scrap secondary Al melts. Mg was extracted by electrorefining, producing a Mg product suitable as a Mg alloying hardener additive to primary-grade Al alloys. This efficient electrorefining process operates at high current efficiency, high Mg recovery and low energy consumption. The Mg electrorefining product can meet all the impurity specifications with subsequent melt treatment for removing alkali contaminants. All technical results obtained in the RE12™ project indicate that the electrorefining process for extraction of Mg from Al melt is technically feasible. A techno-economic analysis indicates high potential profitability for applications in Al foundry alloys as well as beverage—can and automotive—sheet alloys. The combination of technical feasibility and potential market profitability completes a successful proof of concept. This economical, environmentally-friendly and chlorine-free RE12™ process could be disruptive and transformational for the Mg production industry by enabling the recycling of 30,000 tonnes of primary-quality Mg annually.

  18. Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    The Kaiser Aluminum plant in Sherman, Texas, adjusted controls and made repairs to a furnace for a simple payback of 1 month. Kaiser adopted DOE's Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST) software as the corporate diagnostic tool and has used it to evaluate process heating systems at five other aluminum plants.

  19. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using ceramic inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Douglas A.; DiMilia, Robert A.; Dynys, Joseph M.; Phelps, Frankie E.; LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising ceramic inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The ceramic inert anodes used in the process may comprise oxides containing Fe and Ni, as well as other oxides, metals and/or dopants.

  20. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.

    2001-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The inert anodes used in the process preferably comprise a cermet material comprising ceramic oxide phase portions and metal phase portions.

  1. Characterization of salt cake from secondary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Badawy, Amro El; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Ford, Robert; Barlaz, Morton; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2014-05-30

    Salt cake is a major waste component generated from the recycling of secondary aluminum processing (SAP) waste. Worldwide, the aluminum industry produces nearly 5 million tons of waste annually and the end-of-life management of these wastes is becoming a challenge in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 39 SAP waste salt cake samples collected from 10 different facilities across the U.S. were determined. The results showed that aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride and its oxides, spinel and elpasolite are the dominant aluminum mineral phases in salt cake. The average total Al content was 14% (w/w). The overall percentage of the total leachable Al in salt cake was 0.6% with approximately 80% of the samples leaching at a level less than 1% of the total aluminum content. The extracted trace metal concentrations in deionized water were relatively low (μgL(-1) level). The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was employed to further evaluate leachability and the results indicated that the leached concentrations of toxic metals from salt cake were much lower than the EPA toxicity limit set by USEPA.

  2. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  3. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a)(1), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  4. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  5. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  6. 48 CFR 252.216-7007 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products-representation. 252.216-7007 Section 252....216-7007 Economic price adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products... Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or Copper Mill Products—Representation (MAR 2012) (a) Definitions....

  7. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a)(1), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  8. 48 CFR 252.216-7007 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products-representation. 252.216-7007 Section 252....216-7007 Economic price adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products... Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or Copper Mill Products—Representation (MAR 2012) (a) Definitions....

  9. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a)(1), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  10. 48 CFR 252.216-7007 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products-representation. 252.216-7007 Section 252....216-7007 Economic price adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products... Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or Copper Mill Products—Representation (MAR 2012) (a) Definitions....

  11. Carbonaceous cathode with enhanced wettability for aluminum production

    DOEpatents

    Keller, Rudolf; Gatty, David G.; Barca, Brian J.

    2003-09-09

    A method of preparing carbonaceous blocks or bodies for use in a cathode in an electrolytic cell for producing aluminum wherein the cell contains an electrolyte and has molten aluminum contacting the cathode, the cathode having improved wettability with molten aluminum. The method comprises the steps of providing a carbonaceous block and a boron oxide containing melt. The carbonaceous block is immersed in the melt and pressure is applied to the melt to impregnate the melt into pores in the block. Thereafter, the carbonaceous block is withdrawn from the melt, the block having boron oxide containing melt intruded into pores therein, the boron oxide capable of reacting with a source of titanium or zirconium or like metal to form titanium or zirconium diboride during heatup or operation of said cell.

  12. Electrolytic Cell For Production Of Aluminum Employing Planar Anodes.

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Robert J.; Mezner, Michael B.; Bradford, Donald R

    2004-10-05

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte, the method comprising providing a molten salt electrolyte having alumina dissolved therein in an electrolytic cell. A plurality of anodes and cathodes having planar surfaces are disposed in a generally vertical orientation in the electrolyte, the anodes and cathodes arranged in alternating or interleaving relationship to provide anode planar surfaces disposed opposite cathode planar surfaces, the anode comprised of carbon. Electric current is passed through anodes and through the electrolyte to the cathodes depositing aluminum at the cathodes and forming carbon containing gas at the anodes.

  13. Variability in primary productivity determines metapopulation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Temporal variability in primary productivity can change habitat quality for consumer species by affecting the energy levels available as food resources. However, it remains unclear how habitat-quality fluctuations may determine the dynamics of spatially structured populations, where the effects of habitat size, quality and isolation have been customarily assessed assuming static habitats. We present the first empirical evaluation on the effects of stochastic fluctuations in primary productivity—a major outcome of ecosystem functions—on the metapopulation dynamics of a primary consumer. A unique 13-year dataset from an herbivore rodent was used to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variations in primary productivity determine spatiotemporal habitat occupancy patterns and colonization and extinction processes. Inter-annual variability in productivity and in the growing season phenology significantly influenced habitat colonization patterns and occupancy dynamics. These effects lead to changes in connectivity to other potentially occupied habitat patches, which then feed back into occupancy dynamics. According to the results, the dynamics of primary productivity accounted for more than 50% of the variation in occupancy probability, depending on patch size and landscape configuration. Evidence connecting primary productivity dynamics and spatiotemporal population processes has broad implications for metapopulation persistence in fluctuating and changing environments. PMID:27053739

  14. Chemicals: UV-curable coating for aluminum can production

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-29

    Fact sheet on curing aluminum can coatings written for the NICE3 Program. Coors Brewing Company has been using ultraviolet (UV) light curing technology on its aluminum beverage cans for 25 years. The company is now looking to share its cost-saving technology with other aluminum can producers. Traditional curing methods for creating external decorations on cans rely on convective-heat ovens to cure ink and over-varnish coatings. These thermal-curing methods require large amounts of energy and money, and can have unintended environmental impacts. Coors' technique uses coating materials that cure when exposed to UV light, thereby eliminating the expensive heat treatments used by conventional coating methods. Additionally, the UV-coating process creates much lower emissions and a smaller pollution waste stream than rival thermal processes because it requires much less solvent than thermal processes. This technology can be used not only in the aluminum can industry, but in the automotive, airline, wood, paper, and plastics industries, as well.

  15. Primary Production in Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Worthen, Denise L.; Lizotte, Michael P.; Dixon, Paul; Dieckmann, Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    A numerical model shows that in Antarctic sea ice, increased flooding in regions with thick snow cover enhances primary production in the infiltration (surface) layer. Productivity in the freeboard (sea level) layer is also determined by sea ice porosity, which varies with temperature. Spatial and temporal variation in snow thickness and the proportion of first-year ice thus determine regional differences in sea ice primary production. Model results show that of the 40 tera-grams of carbon produced annually in the Antarctic ice pack, 75 percent was associated with first-year ice and nearly 50 percent was produced in the Weddell Sea.

  16. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  17. The association between aluminum-containing products and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Graves, A B; White, E; Koepsell, T D; Reifler, B V; van Belle, G; Larson, E B

    1990-01-01

    The association between exposure to aluminum through the lifetime use of antiperspirants and antacids and Alzheimer's disease (AD) was explored in a case-control study of 130 matched pairs. Cases were clinically diagnosed between January 1980 and June 1985 at two geriatric psychiatric clinics in Seattle, Wash. Controls were friends or non-blood relatives of the case. Subjects were matched by age, sex, and the relationship between the case and his or her surrogate. For all antiperspirant/deodorant use, regardless of aluminum content, there was no association with AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.6-2.4). For aluminum-containing antiperspirants, the overall adjusted OR was 1.6 (95% CI = 1.04-2.4) with a trend toward a higher risk with increasing frequency of use (p for trend = 0.03), the adjusted OR in the highest tertile being 3.2. For antacids regardless of aluminum content, the overall adjusted OR was 3.1 (95% CI = 1.2-7.9). Here, a steep dose-response gradient was found (p for trend = 0.009), with an adjusted OR for the highest tertile of 11.7. However, when only aluminum-containing antacids were analyzed, the overall adjusted OR was only 0.7 (95% CI = 0.3-2.0) and there was no significant dose-response trend. These results are provocative but inconclusive due to methodologic problems relating to the necessary use of surrogate respondents and the long time period of potential exposure for this dementing disease.

  18. Recycling production designs: the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Tracey H.

    The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an intermediate recycling facility that can reprocess the secondary materials into a liquid product Two downstream aluminum remelters will incorporate the liquid products into their aluminum alloy production schedules. Energy and environmental benefits result from delivering the products as liquid but coordination challenges persist because of the energy cost to maintain the liquid. Further coordination challenges result from the necessity to establish a long term recycling production plan in the presence of long term downstream aluminum remelter production uncertainty and inherent variation in the daily order schedule of the downstream aluminum remelters. In this context a fundamental question arises, considering the metallurgical complexities of dross reprocessing, what is the value of operating a coordinated set of by-product reprocessing plants and remelting cast houses? A methodology is presented to calculate the optimal recycling center production parameters including 1) the number of recycled products, 2) the volume of recycled products, 3) allocation of recycled materials across recycled products, 4) allocation of recycled products across finished alloys, 4) the level of flexibility for the recycling center to operate. The methods implemented include, 1) an optimization model to describe the long term operations of the recycling center, 2) an uncertainty simulation tool, 3) a simulation optimization method, 4) a dynamic simulation tool with four embedded daily production optimization models of varying degrees of flexibility. This methodology is used to quantify the performance of several recycling center production designs of varying levels of coordination and flexibility. This analysis allowed the identification of the optimal recycling

  19. Numerical Simulation of Aluminum Dust Detonations with Different Product Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, H. H.; Jiang, Z. L.

    Detonation waves are waves of supersonic combustion induced by strong coupling shock and heat release. Detonation research has attracted much attention in recent years owing to its potential applications in hypersonic propulsion. Aluminum (Al) particle detonation is a type of dust detonation, and its research is important in the prevention of industrial explosions. Al dust detonations for flake and spherical particles have been studied , which is found to be very sensitive to the specific area[1].

  20. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTY IN NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net primary production (NPP, e.g., g m-2 yr-1), a key ecosystem attribute, is estimated from a combination of other variables, e.g. standing crop biomass at several points in time, each of which is subject to errors in their measurement. These errors propagate as the variables a...

  1. Primary Productivity in Meduxnekeag River, Maine, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Robert M.; Schalk, Charles W.; Kempf, Joshua P.

    2009-01-01

    During August and September 2005, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, specific conductance, streamflow, and light intensity (LI) were determined continuously at six sites defining five reaches on Meduxnekeag River above and below Houlton, Maine. These data were collected as input for a dual-station whole-stream metabolism model to evaluate primary productivity in the river above and below Houlton. The river receives nutrients and organic matter from tributaries and the Houlton wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Model output estimated gross and net primary productivity for each reach. Gross primary productivity (GPP) varied in each reach but was similar and positive among the reaches. GPP was correlated to LI in the four reaches above the WWTP but not in the reach below. Net primary productivity (NPP) decreased in each successive downstream reach and was negative in the lowest two reaches. NPP was weakly related to LI in the upper two reaches and either not correlated or negatively correlated in the lower three reaches. Relations among GPP, NPP, and LI indicate that the system is heterotrophic in the downstream reaches. The almost linear decrease in NPP (the increase in metabolism and respiration) indicates a cumulative effect of inputs of nutrients and organic matter from tributaries that drain agricultural land, the town of Houlton, and the discharges from the WWTP.

  2. ASR prevention — Effect of aluminum and lithium ions on the reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Alahrache, Salaheddine; Winnefeld, Frank

    2015-10-15

    In spite of the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms enabling aluminum-containing SCM like metakaolin and added LiNO{sub 3} to limit the extent of ASR in mortar and concrete, some gaps still remain. They concern mainly the effect of aluminum-containing SCM on the formed ASR products and the influence of aggregate characteristics on the effectiveness of LiNO{sub 3}. In this study, a model system, concrete and mortar were investigated by pore solution analysis, TGA, XRD, NMR, SEM combined with EDX and ToF-SIMS to address these questions. The amount of aluminum present in the pore solution of concrete and mortar is only able to slow down SiO{sub 2} dissolution but not to alter morphology, structure and composition of the reaction products. LiNO{sub 3} can suppress ASR by forming dense products protecting reactive minerals from further reaction. But its effectiveness is decreasing with increasing specific surface area of the reactive minerals in aggregates. - Highlights: • Aluminum of SCM slows down SiO{sub 2} dissolution. • Aluminum of SCM does not alter morphology and structure of ASR product. • ASR suppressing effect of LiNO{sub 3} depends on specific surface area of the aggregates.

  3. Effect of uniform magnetic and electric fields on microstructure and substructure characteristics of combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, A. P.; Mostovshchikov, A. V.; Pak, A. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    We have analyzed the effect of constant electric and magnetic fields on the micro- and substructure characteristics of the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air. It has been found that the combustion of aluminum nanopowder in a magnetic field leads to the formation of single crystals of the hexagonal habitus, while the combustion in an electric field results in the formation of faceted crystallites with layered morphology. The fields noticeably affect the crystal lattice parameters of aluminum oxide and nitride (reduce the coherent scattering regions in aluminum nitride and increase such regions in aluminum γ-oxide). At the same time, the displacement of atoms relative to the equilibrium position becomes noticeably smaller for all crystal phases under the action of the fields (except for aluminum nitride in a magnetic field). These results have been explained by the orienting and stabilizing actions of the fields on the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air.

  4. Identification of the primary lesion of toxic aluminum in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Kopittke, Peter M; Moore, Katie L; Lombi, Enzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Ferguson, Brett J; Blamey, F Pax C; Menzies, Neal W; Nicholson, Timothy M; McKenna, Brigid A; Wang, Peng; Gresshoff, Peter M; Kourousias, George; Webb, Richard I; Green, Kathryn; Tollenaere, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Despite the rhizotoxicity of aluminum (Al) being identified over 100 years ago, there is still no consensus regarding the mechanisms whereby root elongation rate is initially reduced in the approximately 40% of arable soils worldwide that are acidic. We used high-resolution kinematic analyses, molecular biology, rheology, and advanced imaging techniques to examine soybean (Glycine max) roots exposed to Al. Using this multidisciplinary approach, we have conclusively shown that the primary lesion of Al is apoplastic. In particular, it was found that 75 µm Al reduced root growth after only 5 min (or 30 min at 30 µm Al), with Al being toxic by binding to the walls of outer cells, which directly inhibited their loosening in the elongation zone. An alteration in the biosynthesis and distribution of ethylene and auxin was a second, slower effect, causing both a transient decrease in the rate of cell elongation after 1.5 h but also a longer term gradual reduction in the length of the elongation zone. These findings show the importance of focusing on traits related to cell wall composition as well as mechanisms involved in wall loosening to overcome the deleterious effects of soluble Al.

  5. 76 FR 76259 - National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Primary Aluminum Reduction Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... aluminum POM ton) of green anode. plant). 0.09 kg/Mg (0.18 lb/ ton) of green anode. \\1\\ CWPB1 = Center... aluminum POM ton) of green anode plant). 0.025 kg/Mg (0.05 lb/ ton) of green anode. Pitch storage tanks...

  6. Chemolithotrophic primary production in a subglacial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Havig, Jeff R; Skidmore, Mark L; Shock, Everett L

    2014-10-01

    Glacial comminution of bedrock generates fresh mineral surfaces capable of sustaining chemotrophic microbial communities under the dark conditions that pervade subglacial habitats. Geochemical and isotopic evidence suggests that pyrite oxidation is a dominant weathering process generating protons that drive mineral dissolution in many subglacial systems. Here, we provide evidence correlating pyrite oxidation with chemosynthetic primary productivity and carbonate dissolution in subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada. Quantification and sequencing of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) transcripts suggest that populations closely affiliated with Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, an iron sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium, are abundant constituents of microbial communities at RG. Microcosm experiments indicate sulfate production during biological assimilation of radiolabeled bicarbonate. Geochemical analyses of subglacial meltwater indicate that increases in sulfate levels are associated with increased calcite and dolomite dissolution. Collectively, these data suggest a role for biological pyrite oxidation in driving primary productivity and mineral dissolution in a subglacial environment and provide the first rate estimate for bicarbonate assimilation in these ecosystems. Evidence for lithotrophic primary production in this contemporary subglacial environment provides a plausible mechanism to explain how subglacial communities could be sustained in near-isolation from the atmosphere during glacial-interglacial cycles.

  7. Chemolithotrophic Primary Production in a Subglacial Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Havig, Jeff R.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Shock, Everett L.

    2014-01-01

    Glacial comminution of bedrock generates fresh mineral surfaces capable of sustaining chemotrophic microbial communities under the dark conditions that pervade subglacial habitats. Geochemical and isotopic evidence suggests that pyrite oxidation is a dominant weathering process generating protons that drive mineral dissolution in many subglacial systems. Here, we provide evidence correlating pyrite oxidation with chemosynthetic primary productivity and carbonate dissolution in subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada. Quantification and sequencing of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) transcripts suggest that populations closely affiliated with Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, an iron sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium, are abundant constituents of microbial communities at RG. Microcosm experiments indicate sulfate production during biological assimilation of radiolabeled bicarbonate. Geochemical analyses of subglacial meltwater indicate that increases in sulfate levels are associated with increased calcite and dolomite dissolution. Collectively, these data suggest a role for biological pyrite oxidation in driving primary productivity and mineral dissolution in a subglacial environment and provide the first rate estimate for bicarbonate assimilation in these ecosystems. Evidence for lithotrophic primary production in this contemporary subglacial environment provides a plausible mechanism to explain how subglacial communities could be sustained in near-isolation from the atmosphere during glacial-interglacial cycles. PMID:25085483

  8. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-04

    a solid with six crystalline phases. In principle, alane is a promising propellant . The specific impulse of an AP/HTPB propellant mixed with alane...Distribution approved for public release. 2     Introduction Boranes (boron hydrides) were once thought to be promising propellants .1-14 The reasons...diborane, hydrogen, and a white solid . Whatley et al.8 studied the products of diborane oxidation. Roth and co-workers9 found HOBO to be the main

  9. PRIMARY PRODUCTION ESTIMATES IN CHESAPEAKE BAY USING SEAWIFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal and spatial variability in primary production along the main stem of Chesapeake Bay was examined from 1997 through 2000. Primary production estimates were determined from the Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM) (Behrenfeld and Falkowski, 1997) using chloro...

  10. Production of aluminum-lithium near net shape extruded cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Paula J.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1980's, under funding from the Advanced Launch System Program, numerous near net shape technologies were investigated as a means for producing high quality, low cost Aluminum-Lithium (Al-Li) hardware. Once such option was to extrude near net shape barrel panels instead of producing panels by machining thick plate into a final tee-stiffened configuration (which produced up to 90% scrap). This method offers a reduction in the volume of scrap and consequently reduces the buy-to-fly cost. Investigation into this technology continued under Shuttle-C funding where four Al alloys 2219, 2195, 2096, and RX 818 were extruded. Presented herein are the results of that program. Each alloy was successfully extruded at Wyman Gordon, opened and flattened at Ticorm, and solution heat treated and stretched at Reynolds Metals Company. The first two processes were quite successful while the stretching process did offer some challenges. Due to the configuration of the panels and the stretch press set-up, it was difficult to induce a consistent percentage of cold work throughout the length and width of each panel. The effects of this variation will be assessed in the test program to be conducted at a future date.

  11. Observations of Ocean Primary Productivity Using MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark R.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Measuring the magnitude and variability of oceanic net primary productivity (NPP) represents a key advancement toward our understanding of the dynamics of marine ecosystems and the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. MODIS observations make two new contributions in addition to continuing the bio-optical time series begun with Orbview-2's SeaWiFS sensor. First, MODIS provides weekly estimates of global ocean net primary productivity on weekly and annual time periods, and annual empirical estimates of carbon export production. Second, MODIS provides additional insight into the spatial and temporal variations in photosynthetic efficiency through the direct measurements of solar-stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The two different weekly productivity indexes (first developed by Behrenfeld & Falkowski and by Yoder, Ryan and Howard) are used to derive daily productivity as a function of chlorophyll biomass, incident daily surface irradiance, temperature, euphotic depth, and mixed layer depth. Comparisons between these two estimates using both SeaWiFS and MODIS data show significant model differences in spatial distribution after allowance for the different integration depths. Both estimates are strongly dependence on the accuracy of the chlorophyll determination. In addition, an empirical approach is taken on annual scales to estimate global NPP and export production. Estimates of solar stimulated fluorescence efficiency from chlorophyll have been shown to be inversely related to photosynthetic efficiency by Abbott and co-workers. MODIS provides the first global estimates of oceanic chlorophyll fluorescence, providing an important proof of concept. MODIS observations are revealing spatial patterns of fluorescence efficiency which show expected variations with phytoplankton photo-physiological parameters as measured during in-situ surveys. This has opened the way for research into utilizing this information to improve our understanding of oceanic NPP

  12. "A L C L A D" A New Corrosion Resistant Aluminum Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, E H , Jr

    1927-01-01

    Described here is a new corrosion resistant aluminum product which is markedly superior to the present strong alloys. Its use should result in greatly increased life of a structural part. Alclad is a heat-treated aluminum, copper, manganese, magnesium alloy that has the corrosion resistance of pure metal at the surface and the strength of the strong alloy underneath. Of particular importance is the thorough character of the union between the alloy and the pure aluminum. Preliminary results of salt spray tests (24 weeks of exposure) show changes in tensile strength and elongation of Alclad 17ST, when any occurred, to be so small as to be well within the limits of experimental error. Some surface corrosion of the pure metal had taken place, but not enough to cause the specimens to break through those areas.

  13. The productivity of primary care research networks.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, F; Wild, A; Harvey, J; Fenton, E

    2000-01-01

    Primary care research networks are being publicly funded in the United Kingdom to promote a culture of research and development in primary care. This paper discusses the organisational form of these networks and how their productivity can be evaluated, drawing on evidence from management science. An evaluation of a research network has to take account of the complexity of the organisation, the influence of its local context, and its stage of development. Output measures, such as number of research papers, and process measures, such as number of research meetings, may contribute to an evaluation. However, as networking relies on the development of informal, trust-based relationships, the quality of interactions within a network is of paramount importance for its success. Networks can audit and reflect on their success in promoting such relationships and a more formal qualitative evaluation by an independent observer can document their success to those responsible for funding. PMID:11141879

  14. Evaluation of borated aluminum products for criticality control in 235-F

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, W.

    2003-04-01

    Plutonium-containing materials are destined for storage in the 235-F vault. The projected amount of stored materials will require the presence of neutron absorber materials. The leading design concept is for the neutron absorber materials to be in non-load-bearing borated aluminum plates lining the walls of the vault. A comprehensive evaluation of the borated aluminum plate materials was performed to identify a suitable material, and verify that these materials would remain effective as neutron absorbers under normal service conditions and for design-basis events, including the fire accident scenario, throughout a 20-year service life. Aluminum 1100 with boron additions is the recommended neutron absorber material for plutonium material storage in the 235-F vault based on boron loading capacity and durability in the storage environment. Borated aluminum 1100 is commercially available up to 4.5 wt. % boron. A detailed comparison was made of the physical, mechanical, and corrosion properties of borated aluminum alloy 1100 to standard alloy 1100-O1 to demonstrate near-equivalency in properties and to justify application of alloy 1100-O properties to the borated product as needed for the degradation analysis. The expected degradation of the borated aluminum is extremely low for storage conditions, including the bounding scenario of an aggressive atmospheric condition. A maximum loss of 0.00029 inches/year would be expected under potentially aggressive atmospheric conditions and would result in a fractional loss of only 0.42 wt. % of the boron present in a 7mm plate for a 20-year storage period. The fraction of Boron-10 consumption by spontaneous neutrons is expected to be less than 10-8 for the 20-year storage in 235-F fully loaded with Pu materials. The borated aluminum alloy 1100 will be thermally stable and unaltered up to near-melt temperature (643°C). Mechanical testing data at elevated temperatures show that the strengths (yield and ultimate) of the borated

  15. Evaluation of borated aluminum products for criticality control in 235-F

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Sindelar, R.

    2003-05-06

    Plutonium-containing materials are destined for storage in the 235-F vault. The projected amount of stored materials will require the presence of neutron absorber materials. The leading design concept is for the neutron absorber materials to be in non-load-bearing borated aluminum plates lining the walls of the vault. A comprehensive evaluation of the borated aluminum plate materials was performed to identify a suitable material, and verify that these materials would remain effective as neutron absorbers under normal service conditions and for design-basis events, including the fire accident scenario, throughout a 20-year service life. Aluminum 1100 with boron additions is the recommended neutron absorber material for plutonium material storage in the 235-F vault based on boron loading capacity and durability in the storage environment. Borated aluminum 1100 is commercially available up to 4.5 wt. % boron. A detailed comparison was made of the physical, mechanical, and corrosion properties of borated aluminum alloy 1100 to standard alloy 1100-O (-O designating the fully annealed condition) to demonstrate near-equivalency in properties and to justify application of alloy 1100-O properties to the borated product as needed for the degradation analysis. The expected degradation of the borated aluminum is extremely low for storage conditions, including the bounding scenario of an aggressive atmospheric condition. A maximum loss of 0.00029 inches/year would be expected under potentially aggressive atmospheric conditions and would result in a fractional loss of only 0.42 wt.% of the boron present in a 7mm plate for a 20-year storage period. The fraction of Boron-10 consumption by spontaneous neutrons is expected to be less than 10{sup -8} for the 20-year storage in 235-F fully loaded with Pu materials. The borated aluminum alloy 1100 will be thermally stable and unaltered up to near-melt temperature (643°C). Mechanical testing data at elevated temperatures show that the

  16. MODIS-Derived Terrestrial Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven; Heinsch, Faith Ann; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    Temporal and spatial changes in terrestrial biological productivity have a large impact on humankind because terrestrial ecosystems not only create environments suitable for human habitation, but also provide materials essential for survival, such as food, fiber and fuel. A recent study estimated that consumption of terrestrial net primary production (NPP; a list of all the acronyms is available in the appendix at the end of the chapter) by the human population accounts for about 14-26% of global NPP (Imhoff et al. 2004). Rapid global climate change is induced by increased atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration, especially CO2, which results from human activities such as fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. This directly impacts terrestrial NPP, which continues to change in both space and time (Melillo et al. 1993; Prentice et al. 2001; Nemani et al. 2003), and ultimately impacts the well-being of human society (Milesi et al. 2005). Additionally, substantial evidence show that the oceans and the biosphere, especially terrestrial ecosystems, currently play a major role in reducing the rate of the atmospheric CO2 increase (Prentice et al. 2001; Schimel et al. 2001). NPP is the first step needed to quantify the amount of atmospheric carbon fixed by plants and accumulated as biomass. Continuous and accurate measurements of terrestrial NPP at the global scale are possible using satellite data. Since early 2000, for the first time, the MODIS sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, have operationally provided scientists with near real-time global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and net photosynthesis (PsnNet) data. These data are provided at 1 km spatial resolution and an 8-day interval, and annual NPP covers 109,782,756 km2 of vegetated land. These GPP, PsnNet and NPP products are collectively known as MOD17 and are part of a larger suite of MODIS land products (Justice et al. 2002), one of the core Earth System or Climate Data Records (ESDR or

  17. Method And Reactor For Production Of Aluminum By Carbothermic Reduction Of Alumina

    DOEpatents

    Aune, Jan Arthur; Johansen, Kai

    2004-10-19

    A hollow partition wall is employed to feed carbon material to an underflow of a carbothermic reduction furnace used to make aluminum. The partition wall divides a low temperature reaction zone where aluminum oxide is reacted with carbon to form aluminum carbide and a high temperature reaction zone where the aluminum carbide and remaining aluminum oxide are reacted to form aluminum and carbon monoxide.

  18. [Practical Use Evaluation of Aluminum Packaging for Medicinal Products Based on Universal Design].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kazuya; Hidaka, Takashi; Marubashi, Koichi; Takagi, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Many pharmacists have requested optimization of aluminum packaging of medicinal products in terms of usability. To improve operational efficiency of aluminum packaging, we used Universal Design (UD)-based approach, which enables products to be used properly and consistently regardless of users. The UD-pack used in this research is composed of a film that can be easily opened and torn linear. Here, we compared the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging by evaluating the practical use of each under the cooperation of 24 pharmacists. Following opening and removal of contents of one sample for both types of packaging, monitors were asked which type was easier to use in each case. Also, monitors were to repeat the opening and removal of contents of five samples in a row, and were asked the same question. Monitors were recorded by digital camera to measure the time required to finish the procedure for five samples in a row. After opening one sample, approximately 83% of monitors preferred the UD-pack, and after opening five samples, all (100%) preferred the UD-pack. Regarding the time required for opening five samples and removing the contents measured by analyzing the recorded video, the UD-pack significantly reduced the time required for all monitors. The average time ratio of the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging was approximately 59%, and no significant difference was observed between male and female pharmacists. Our results indicate the UD-pack improves ease of opening and removal of contents and increases efficiency of dispensing in a clinical setting compared with conventional aluminum packaging.

  19. Continued increases in Arctic Ocean primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; van Dijken, Gert L.

    2015-08-01

    Dramatic declines in sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean in recent decades have the potential to fundamentally alter marine ecosystems. Here we investigate changes in sea ice between the years 1998 and 2012 at regional and basin scales and how these have impacted rates of phytoplankton net primary production (NPP). Annual NPP increased 30% over the Arctic Ocean during our study period, with the largest increases on the interior shelves and smaller increases on inflow shelves. Increased annual NPP was often, but not always, associated with reduced sea-ice extent and a longer phytoplankton growing season (fewer days of ice cover). Spatial patterns of increased annual NPP suggest that increased nutrient fluxes may also play an important role. Outflow shelves either exhibited no change in annual NPP during our study period or a significant decline, perhaps indicating that nutrients had been consumed by increased NPP farther upstream.

  20. Primary and Bacterial Production in Two Dimictic Indiana Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Charles R.; Konopka, Allan

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between primary and bacterial production in two dimictic Indiana lakes with different primary productivities was examined during the summer stratification period in 1982. Primary production rates were calculated from rates of H14CO3− incorporation by natural samples, and bacterial production was calculated from rates of [3H-methyl]thymidine incorporation by natural samples. Both vertical and seasonal distributions of bacterial production in the more productive lake (Little Crooked Lake) were strongly influenced by primary production. A lag of about 2 weeks between a burst in primary production and the subsequent response in bacterial production was observed. The vertical distribution of bacterial production in the water column of the less productive lake (Crooked Lake) was determined by the vertical distribution of primary production, but no clear relationship between seasonal maxima of primary and bacterial production in this lake was observed. High rates of bacterial production in Crooked Lake during May indicate the importance of allochthonous carbon washed in by spring rains. Bacterial production accounted for 30.6 and 31.8% of total (primary plus bacterial) production in Crooked Lake and Little Crooked Lake, respectively, from April through October. High rates of bacterial production during late September and October were observed in both lakes. Calculation of the fraction of bacterial production supported by phytoplankton excretion implies an important role for other mechanisms of supplying carbon, such as phytoplankton autolysis. Several factors affecting the calculation of bacterial production from the thymidine incorporation rates in these lakes were examined. PMID:16346742

  1. Phosphorous and aluminum gettering in Silicon-Film{trademark} Product II material

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, J.E.; Barnett, A.M.; Hall, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    Gettering processes are being developed for the Silicon-Film{trademark} Product II solar cell structure. These processes have been developed specifically for films of silicon grown on dissimilar substrates with barrier layers. Gettering with both phosphorous- and aluminum-based processing sequences has resulted in enhancement of minority carrier diffusion length. Long diffusion lengths have allowed the characterization of light trapping in thin films of silicon grown on barrier-coated substrates.

  2. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  3. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  4. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98—Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum...

  5. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production.

  6. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca2+ level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca2+ fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload. PMID:27089935

  7. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca(2+) level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca(2+) fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload.

  8. Primary production in the northern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qurban, Mohammed Ali; Balala, Arvin C.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bhavya, P. S.; Wafar, Mohideen

    2014-04-01

    Rates of uptake of carbon and nitrogen (ammonium, nitrate and urea) by phytoplankton, along with concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll a, in the Saudi Arabian waters of the northern Red Sea (23 °N-28 °N) were measured in autumn, 2012. Concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and phosphate within the euphotic zone were in trace amounts while those of silicon were in excess of 0.5 μmol L- 1. Concentrations of chlorophyll (Chl a) were very low within the euphotic zone (0.01-0.6 μg L- 1 at discrete depths and 1.53-21.5 mg m- 2 as column-integrated values). A deep chlorophyll maximum and a nitrite maximum were present between 60 and 80 m at almost all of the stations occupied. Rates of carbon uptake at discrete depths ranged from 0.02 to 3 μg C L- 1 h- 1. Chl-normalized carbon uptake rates related with ambient light in a Michaelis-Menten kinetic pattern. About 80% of the carbon uptake was attributable to the < 20 μm fraction. Ammonium and urea were the nitrogen compounds taken up in preference by phytoplankton and accounted for close to 90% of the total N uptake. Considered together, these results indicate that the waters of the northern Red Sea are oligotrophic and that the primary production is strongly N-controlled. Analyses of the data and interpretation of the results led to the following speculations: (1) the perceived north-south gradient in Chl a (and possibly in primary production) in the Red Sea is maintained by circulation of Chl- and nutrient-rich waters through a series of gyres, (2) there is a greater role for heterotrophy and microbial loop in the trophic dynamics, and (3) in situ nitrification in the euphotic zone is an important source of N for phytoplankton and consequently export of carbon to deep sea could be lesser than that indicated by f-ratios.

  9. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  10. Studies for aluminum photoionization in hot cavity for the selective production of exotic species projecta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, D.; Vasquez, J.; Tomaselli, A.; Grassi, D.; Biasetto, L.; Cavazza, A.; Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Montano, J.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.

    2012-02-01

    Selective production of exotic species (SPES) is an ISOL-based accelerator facility that will be built in the Legnaro INFN Laboratory (Italy), intended to provide an intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams obtained by proton induced fission of an uranium carbide target. Beside this main target, a silicon carbide (SiC) target will the first to be used to deliver some p-rich beams. This target will validate also the functionality of the SPES facility with aluminum beam as result of hitting SiC target with protons. In the past off-line studies on laser photoionization of aluminum have performed in Pavia Spectroscopy Laboratory and in Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro where, recently, a XeCl excimer laser was installed in order to test the laser ionization in the SPES hot cavity. Results are promising to justify further studies with this technique, aiming a better characterization of the SPES ion extraction capability under laser photoionization.

  11. Electrocoagulation of palm oil mill effluent as wastewater treatment and hydrogen production using electrode aluminum.

    PubMed

    Nasution, M Ansori; Yaakob, Z; Ali, Ehsan; Tasirin, S M; Abdullah, S R S

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is highly polluting wastewater generated from the palm oil milling process. Palm oil mill effluent was used as an electrolyte without any additive or pretreatment to perform electrocoagulation (EC) using electricity (direct current) ranging from 2 to 4 volts in the presence of aluminum electrodes with a reactor volume of 20 L. The production of hydrogen gas, removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), and turbidity as a result of electrocoagulation of POME were determined. The results show that EC can reduce the COD and turbidity of POME by 57 and 62%, respectively, in addition to the 42% hydrogen production. Hydrogen production was also helpful to remove the lighter suspended solids toward the surface. The production of Al(OH)XHO at the aluminum electrode (anode) was responsible for the flocculation-coagulation process of suspended solids followed by sedimentation under gravity. The production of hydrogen gas from POME during EC was also compared with hydrogen gas production by electrolysis of tap water at pH 4 and tap water without pH adjustment under the same conditions. The main advantage of this study is to produce hydrogen gas while treating POME with EC to reduce COD and turbidity effectively.

  12. Primary productivity in the Golden Horn.

    PubMed

    Gönüllü, M Talha; Avşar, Yaşar; Bayhan, Hürrem; Sakar, Süeyman; Arslankaya, Ertan; Apaydin, Omer; Kurt, Uĝur

    2005-10-01

    The shores of the Golden Horn--once most important seaport of the region--represented throughout history a romantic and recreational venue. This tributary to the Bosphorus, however, became seriously polluted with the extensive industrialization and rapid population growth in Istanbul over the past century. Two main tributaries, the Alibeykoy and the Kagithane, dumped both liquid and solid waste from residential areas and industry (small and large-scale) into the Golden Horn. As a result of this pollution, the landward three to four kilometers of the estuary became swamped with sediment. The dominance of anaerobic activity resulted in a highly unpleasant smell, and the shallow depth as one progressed up the bay restricted navigation. In early 1997 The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality began a dredging operation and gradually diverted all domestic and industrial wastewater discharge from the Golden Horn. Since then there have been remarkable improvements in water quality. This paper presents the state of eutrophication through the water body of the Golden Horn; parameters such as DO, TKN, NH(3)-N, NO(3)-N, the total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved phosphorus (PO(4)-P), phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a have been were analyzed in samples of water taken from various points in the Golden Horn. The presence of DO and the phytoplankton, both indicators of primary productivity in an aquatic body, has been evaluated in relation to former conditions.

  13. Parameterization of Oceanic Convection In Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehde, Henning

    The influence of Oceanic Convection in Primary Production was investigated in a numerical model study. Lagrangian tracers were introduced to a 2.5 dimensional non- hydrostatic convection model. Model domain is a vertical ocean slice with an isotropic grid size of 5 meters, vanishing gradients normal to the plane and cyclic lateral bound- ary conditions. The horizontal dimension is chosen according to the expected convec- tive aspect ratios that vary between 1 and 3. For each tracer a simple phytoplankton model predicts growth dependent on light conditions. The mean amount of light avail- able for growth for a plankton cell depends on the thickness of the mixed layer and the convective activity. The model was applied to several shelf and open ocean strat- ifications and forced with varying atmospheric conditions to study the sensitivity and to quantify the contact duration and return frequency of plankton into the euphotic zone. The phytoplankton concentration is closely related to the depth of the convec- tively mixed layer. The oceanic convection forms the actual mixed layer depth and was found to heavily influence the contact duration and return frequency of a plank- ton cell into the euphotic zone. Phytoplankton is dispersed by convection in vertical orbit cells. The vertical motion allow for the frequent return of plankton cells to the euphotic zone.

  14. Global patterns in human consumption of net primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence, William T.

    2004-06-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our own use. Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, energy flows within food webs and the provision of important ecosystem services. Here we present a global map showing the amount of net primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial balance sheet of net primary production `supply' and `demand' for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production `imports' and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  15. Global Patterns in Human Consumption of Net Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence William T.

    2004-01-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, flows within food webs and the provision of important primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial ba!mce sheet of net primary production supply and demand for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production "imports" and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  16. Global patterns in human consumption of net primary production.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Marc L; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence, William T

    2004-06-24

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our own use. Net primary production--the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis--can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, energy flows within food webs and the provision of important ecosystem services. Here we present a global map showing the amount of net primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial balance sheet of net primary production 'supply' and 'demand' for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production 'imports' and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  17. Metal Anode Performance in Low-Temperature Electrolytes for Aluminum Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, T. R.; Macrae, C. M.; Wilson, N. C.

    2011-08-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into the performance of metal alloy anodes used to produce aluminum via an electrochemical method. Alumina was electrolyzed in NaF/AlF3 and KF/AlF3 electrolytes and mixtures thereof with copper-nickel-iron (Cu:Ni:Fe) alloy anodes and titanium diboride (TiB2) cathodes. The operating temperatures of the electrochemical cells ranged from 973 K to 1123 K (700 °C to 850 °C), with an anode current density of 5000 A/m2. Cells ranged in current capacity from 10 to 300 amperes, with oxygen gas formed at the anode and molten aluminum collected from the cathode. Posttest anodes were sectioned, and elemental maps were performed to characterize the distribution of the chemical phases, including the metal electrodes, bath phases, and aluminum metal production, which were used to determine the reaction mechanisms of the cell. The metal alloy slowly corroded and formed an adherent, electronically conducting nickel ferrite plus copper scale during the operation of the cell. The proposed mechanisms of the anode performance are described herein.

  18. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Mills, Gerald D.; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Stracener, Daniel W.

    2015-10-01

    We present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3-AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility and the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600 °C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. The potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.

  19. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; ...

    2015-06-29

    In this paper, we present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3–AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility andmore » the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600°C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. In conclusion, the potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.« less

  20. Importance of coastal primary production in the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Ask, Jenny; Rowe, Owen; Brugel, Sonia; Strömgren, Mårten; Byström, Pär; Andersson, Agneta

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we measured depth-dependent benthic microalgal primary production in a Bothnian Bay estuary to estimate the benthic contribution to total primary production. In addition, we compiled data on benthic microalgal primary production in the entire Baltic Sea. In the estuary, the benthic habitat contributed 17 % to the total annual primary production, and when upscaling our data to the entire Bothnian Bay, the corresponding value was 31 %. This estimated benthic share (31 %) is three times higher compared to past estimates of 10 %. The main reason for this discrepancy is the lack of data regarding benthic primary production in the northern Baltic Sea, but also that past studies overestimated the importance of pelagic primary production by not correcting for system-specific bathymetric variation. Our study thus highlights the importance of benthic communities for the northern Baltic Sea ecosystem in general and for future management strategies and ecosystem studies in particular.

  1. Formation of calcium in the products of iron oxide-aluminum thermite combustion in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. A.; Gromov, A. M.; Popenko, E. M.; Sergienko, A. V.; Sabinskaya, O. G.; Raab, B.; Teipel, U.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of condensed products resulting from the combustion of thermite mixtures (Al + Fe2O3) in air is studied by precise methods. It is shown that during combustion, calcium is formed and stabilized in amounts of maximal 0.55 wt %, while is missing from reactants of 99.7 wt % purity. To explain this, it is hypothesized that a low-energy nuclear reaction takes place alongside the reactions of aluminum oxidation and nitridation, resulting in the formation of calcium (Kervran-Bolotov reaction).

  2. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  3. The first aluminum coating of the 3700mm primary mirror of the Devasthal Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bheemireddy, Krishna Reddy; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Pant, Jayshreekar; Omar, Amitesh; Kumar, Brijesh; Uddin, Wahab; Kumar, Nirmal

    2016-07-01

    Initially the primary mirror of the 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope is uncoated polished zerodur glass supplied by Lytkarino Optical Glass Factory, Russia/Advanced Mechanical and Optical Systems, Belgium. In order to do the aluminium coating on the primary mirror the coating plant including washing unit is installed near the telescope (extension building of telescope) by Hind High Vacuum (HHV) Bangalore, India. Magnetron sputtering technique is used for the coating. Several coating trials are done before the primary mirror coating; samples are tested for reflectivity, uniformity, adhesivity and finally commissioned. The primary mirror is cleaned, coated by ARIES. We present here a brief description of the coating plant installation, Mirror cleaning and coating procedures and the testing results of the samples.

  4. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Mills, Gerald D.; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Stracener, Daniel W.

    2015-06-29

    In this paper, we present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3–AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility and the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600°C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. In conclusion, the potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.

  5. Friction Stir Welding of Thick Section Aluminum for Military Vehicle Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    production-level, single-pass friction stir welding ( FSW ) parameters for thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 1.6 inches in aluminum alloys 5083, 5059, and 2139...developing thick section aluminum Friction Stir Welding ( FSW ) for use in aluminum military vehicle applications. The primary objective of this...this demonstration article represents a significant step forward in the acceptance of FSW technology as a viable joining method for aluminum hulled

  6. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Krumpelt, Michael; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  7. Net primary production of forests: a constant fraction of gross primary production?

    PubMed

    Waring, R. H.; Landsberg, J. J.; Williams, M.

    1998-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made in our ability to model and measure annual gross primary production (GPP) by terrestrial vegetation. But challenges remain in estimating maintenance respiration (R(m)) and net primary production (NPP). To search for possible common relationships, we assembled annual carbon budgets from six evergreen and one deciduous forest in Oregon, USA, three pine plantations in New South Wales, Australia, a deciduous forest in Massachusetts, USA, and a Nothofagus forest on the South Island of New Zealand. At all 12 sites, a standard procedure was followed to estimate annual NPP of foliage, branches, stems, and roots, the carbon expended in synthesis of these organs (R(g)), their R(m), and that of previously produced foliage and sapwood in boles, branches, and large roots. In the survey, total NPP ranged from 120 to 1660 g C m(-2) year(-1), whereas the calculated fraction allocated to roots varied from 0.22 to 0.63. Comparative analysis indicated that the total NPP/GPP ratio was conservative (0.47 +/- 0.04 SD). This finding supports the possibility of greatly simplifying forest growth models. The constancy of the NPP/GPP ratio also provides an incentive to renew efforts to understand the environmental factors affecting partitioning of NPP above and belowground.

  8. Cerium-Based, Intermetallic-Strengthened Aluminum Casting Alloy: High-Volume Co-product Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Zachary C.; Weiss, D.; McCall, S. K.; McGuire, M. A.; Ott, R. T.; Geer, Tom; Rios, Orlando; Turchi, P. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Several rare earth elements are considered by-products to rare earth mining efforts. By using one of these by-product elements in a high-volume application such as aluminum casting alloys, the supply of more valuable rare earths can be globally stabilized. Stabilizing the global rare earth market will decrease the long-term criticality of other rare earth elements. The low demand for Ce, the most abundant rare earth, contributes to the instability of rare earth extraction. In this article, we discuss a series of intermetallic-strengthened Al alloys that exhibit the potential for new high-volume use of Ce. The castability, structure, and mechanical properties of binary, ternary, and quaternary Al-Ce based alloys are discussed. We have determined Al-Ce based alloys to be highly castable across a broad range of compositions. Nanoscale intermetallics dominate the microstructure and are the theorized source of the high ductility. In addition, room-temperature physical properties appear to be competitive with existing aluminum alloys with extended high-temperature stability of the nanostructured intermetallic.

  9. Cerium-based, intermetallic-strengthened aluminum casting alloy: High-volume co-product development

    DOE PAGES

    Sims, Zachary C.; Weiss, David; McCall, S. K.; ...

    2016-05-23

    Here, several rare earth elements are considered by-products to rare earth mining efforts. By using one of these by-product elements in a high-volume application such as aluminum casting alloys, the supply of more valuable rare earths can be globally stabilized. Stabilizing the global rare earth market will decrease the long-term criticality of other rare earth elements. The low demand for Ce, the most abundant rare earth, contributes to the instability of rare earth extraction. In this article, we discuss a series of intermetallic-strengthened Al alloys that exhibit the potential for new high-volume use of Ce. The castability, structure, and mechanicalmore » properties of binary, ternary, and quaternary Al-Ce based alloys are discussed. We have determined Al-Ce based alloys to be highly castable across a broad range of compositions. Nanoscale intermetallics dominate the microstructure and are the theorized source of the high ductility. In addition, room-temperature physical properties appear to be competitive with existing aluminum alloys with extended high-temperature stability of the nanostructured intermetallic.« less

  10. Cerium-based, intermetallic-strengthened aluminum casting alloy: High-volume co-product development

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, Zachary C.; Weiss, David; McCall, S. K.; McGuire, Michael A.; Ott, Ryan T.; Geer, Tom; Rios, Orlando; Turchi, P. A. E.

    2016-05-23

    Here, several rare earth elements are considered by-products to rare earth mining efforts. By using one of these by-product elements in a high-volume application such as aluminum casting alloys, the supply of more valuable rare earths can be globally stabilized. Stabilizing the global rare earth market will decrease the long-term criticality of other rare earth elements. The low demand for Ce, the most abundant rare earth, contributes to the instability of rare earth extraction. In this article, we discuss a series of intermetallic-strengthened Al alloys that exhibit the potential for new high-volume use of Ce. The castability, structure, and mechanical properties of binary, ternary, and quaternary Al-Ce based alloys are discussed. We have determined Al-Ce based alloys to be highly castable across a broad range of compositions. Nanoscale intermetallics dominate the microstructure and are the theorized source of the high ductility. In addition, room-temperature physical properties appear to be competitive with existing aluminum alloys with extended high-temperature stability of the nanostructured intermetallic.

  11. Effects of fluorine emission on agricultural products surrounding an aluminum factory

    SciTech Connect

    Muramoto, S.; Nishizaki, H.; Aoyama, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The F concentrations of precipitate dust, agricultural products, and fingernail and hair at the surrounding Al factory were investigated. The F content of dust ranged from 15400 to 42500 micrograms/g dry weight, 190,000 to 380,000 micrograms/g Al. Rice grain contained about 3.4 times more F than that in the control area, but some kinds of agricultural products, egg plants (S. melongena L.), mulberry plants (M. japonica Bailey non Sieb.), and soy beans (G. max (L.) Merrill) were almost equal to that of controls. Also, the high F concentration in the hair and nails of some workers was affected by available F contents in the emission from the factory as well as food and water surrounding the aluminum factory compared with those of control area.

  12. Modelling Lake Primary Production Based on Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soomets, Tuuli; Kutser, Tiit; Danckaert, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The productivity of the lakes has a marked importance in the estimation of their ecological state and for predicting their development in the future. Combining modelling with Earth Observation data facilitates a new perspective for lake primary production studies. In this study the primary production was modelled for a 3 different large lakes (Geneva, Peipsi and Võrtsjärv) using MERIS images. We used a semi-empirical model that estimates primary production as a function of photosynthetically absorbed radiation and quantum yield of carbon fixation. The necessary input parameters of the model (concentration of chlorophyll a, downwelling irradiance, and the diffuse attenuation coefficient) were obtained from MERIS products. The primary production maps allow us to study temporal and spatial changes in those lakes.

  13. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2013-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of four phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First, we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production ((is)approximately 50%, the equivalent of 20 PgC·y1). Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed approximately 20% ((is) approximately 7 PgC·y1) of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10% ((is) approximately 4 PgC·y1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in the high latitudes ((is) greater than 40 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4% (1-2 PgC·y1). We assessed the effects of climate variability on group-specific primary production using global (i.e., Multivariate El Niño Index, MEI) and "regional" climate indices (e.g., Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p (is) less than 0.05) between the MEI and the group-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatoms/cyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect

  14. Aluminum Exposure in Neonatal Patients Using the Least Contaminated Parenteral Nutrition Solution Products

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Robert L.; Pieroni, Kevin P.; Gaskari, Shabnam; Dixon, Tessa; Kerner, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a contaminant in all parenteral nutrition (PN) solution component products. Manufacturers currently label these products with the maximum Al content at the time of expiry. We recently published data to establish the actual measured concentration of Al in PN solution products prior to being compounded in the clinical setting [1]. The investigation assessed quantitative Al content of all available products used in the formulation of PN solutions. The objective of this study was to assess the Al exposure in neonatal patients using the least contaminated PN solutions and determine if it is possible to meet the FDA “safe limit” of less than 5 μg/kg/day of Al. The measured concentrations from our previous study were analyzed and the least contaminated products were identified. These concentrations were entered into our PN software and the least possible Al exposure was determined. A significant decrease (41%–44%) in the Al exposure in neonatal patients can be achieved using the least contaminated products, but the FDA “safe limit” of less than 5 μg/kg/day of Al was not met. However, minimizing the Al exposure may decrease the likelihood of developing Al toxicity from PN. PMID:23201834

  15. Intertidal invertebrates locally enhance primary production.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Catherine A

    2007-07-01

    The contribution of autochthonous vs. allochthonous inputs to productivity is an important determinant of ecosystem function across multiple habitats. In coastal marine systems, nutrients are thought to come primarily from the upwelling of deep, nutrient-rich water. Using experimental manipulations of a dominant tide pool animal, the mussel Mytilus californianus, I show that the presence of mussels greatly increases the supply of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus. Mussels further had a direct effect on productivity: benthic microalgal abundance increased by a factor of 4-8, while the growth of a red alga was four times greater in the presence of mussels. The increase in nitrite and nitrate associated with mussels further suggests nitrifying activity by microbes. These findings have broad implications for coastal marine systems, including that regenerated nutrients may contribute more to productivity than previously recognized and that the presence of animal-generated nutrients sets the stage for numerous positive interactions.

  16. Manure phosphorus extractability as affected by aluminum- and iron by-products and aerobic composting.

    PubMed

    Dao, T H; Sikora, L J; Hamasaki, A; Chaney, R L

    2001-01-01

    Shifts in manure phosphorus (P) chemical forms and pool sizes induced by water treatment residuals and industrial mineral by-products are largely undefined. We conducted a manure P fractionation study to determine mechanisms of reduction of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in poultry manure upon mineral by-product additions. The effects of composting on the P immobilization efficacy of the by-products were determined using laboratory self-heating composting simulators. The mineral by-products included an aluminum-water treatment residual (Al-WTR) and an iron-rich titanium-processing by-product. The noncomposted manure averaged 0.11 g g(-1) of total P as DRP forms. The by-products significantly reduced manure DRP, by an average of 39 and 48% in the Al- and the Fe-treated manure, respectively. The by-products also reduced the 0.5 M NH4F-extractable phosphorus (FEP) fraction. Shifts in P forms between FEP and 0.1 M NaOH-extractable phosphorus (SHEP) depended upon the Al and Fe contents of the by-products while the combined FEP + SHEP pool remained constant. Phosphate sorption measurements supported the observations that the Fe-rich by-product was more effective at reducing manure DRP and enhancing the formation of SHEP forms at the expense of FEP than the Al-WTR. Composting had no effect on the efficacy of either by-product to reduce DRP. Potential mechanisms of enhanced P stabilization in treated manure upon composting included chemical shifts from the DRP and FEP fractions to the citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite extractable P fraction. Thus, the choice of P immobilization agents affected the stability of immobilized P forms and should be taken into consideration in developing manure processing and nutrient stabilization methods.

  17. Nanomolar aluminum induces pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic gene expression in human brain cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J; Percy, Maire E; Kruck, Theo P

    2005-09-01

    Aluminum, the most abundant neurotoxic metal in our biosphere, has been implicated in the etiology of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To further understand aluminum's influence on gene expression, we examined total messenger RNA levels in untransformed human neural cells exposed to 100 nanomolar aluminum sulfate using high density DNA microarrays that interrogate the expression of every human gene. Preliminary data indicate that of the most altered gene expression levels, 17/24 (70.8%) of aluminum-affected genes, and 7/8 (87.5%) of aluminum-induced genes exhibit expression patterns similar to those observed in AD. The seven genes found to be significantly up-regulated by aluminum encode pro-inflammatory or pro-apoptotic signaling elements, including NF-kappaB subunits, interleukin-1beta precursor, cytosolic phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase-2, beta-amyloid precursor protein and DAXX, a regulatory protein known to induce apoptosis and repress transcription. The promoters of genes up-regulated by aluminum are enriched in binding sites for the stress-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and NF-kappaB, suggesting a role for aluminum, HIF-1 and NF-kappaB in driving atypical, pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic gene expression. The effect of aluminum on specific stress-related gene expression patterns in human brain cells clearly warrant further investigation.

  18. Technological, Economic, and Environmental Optimization of Aluminum Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana, Adrian; Semenescu, Augustin

    2013-08-01

    The four strategic directions (referring to the entire life cycle of aluminum) are as follows: production, primary use, recycling, and reuse. Thus, in this work, the following are analyzed and optimized: reducing greenhouse gas emissions from aluminum production, increasing energy efficiency in aluminum production, maximizing used-product collection, recycling, and reusing. According to the energetic balance at the gaseous environment level, the conductive transfer model is also analyzed through the finished elements method. Several principles of modeling and optimization are presented and analyzed: the principle of analogy, the principle of concepts, and the principle of hierarchization. Based on these principles, an original diagram model is designed together with the corresponding logic diagram. This article also presents and analyzes the main benefits of aluminum recycling and reuse. Recycling and reuse of aluminum have the main advantage that it requires only about 5% of energy consumed to produce it from bauxite. The aluminum recycling and production process causes the emission of pollutants such as dioxides and furans, hydrogen chloride, and particulate matter. To control these emissions, aluminum recyclers are required to comply with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Secondary Aluminum Production. The results of technological, economic, and ecological optimization of aluminum recycling are based on the criteria function's evaluation in the modeling system.

  19. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Slope and Overvoltage Coefficients for the Calculation of PFC Emissions From Aluminum Production F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 98... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production Pt. 98, Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part...

  20. Pechiney Rolled Products: Plant-Wide Energy Assessment Identifies Opportunities to Optimize Aluminum Casting and Rolling Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    A Pechiney Rolled Products plant focused on various aluminum casting processes during a PWA. The assessment revealed potential annual savings of 460,000 MMBtu in natural gas, 9.6 million kWh in electricity, 69 million pounds in CO2, and $2.5 million.

  1. Reduction of Carbon Footprint and Energy Efficiency Improvement in Aluminum Production by Use of Novel Wireless Instrumentation Integrated with Mathematical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Evans

    2012-04-11

    The work addressed the greenhouse gas emission and electrical energy consumption of the aluminum industry. The objective was to provide a means for reducing both through the application of wireless instrumentation, coupled to mathematical modeling. Worldwide the aluminum industry consumes more electrical energy than all activities in many major countries (e.g. the UK) and emits more greenhouse gasses (e.g. than France). Most of these excesses are in the 'primary production' of aluminum; that is the conversion of aluminum oxide to metal in large electrolytic cells operating at hundreds of thousands of amps. An industry-specific GHG emission has been the focus of the work. The electrolytic cells periodically, but at irregular intervals, experience an upset condition known as an 'anode effect'. During such anode effects the cells emit fluorinated hydrocarbons (PFCs, which have a high global warming potential) at a rate far greater than in normal operation. Therefore curbing anode effects will reduce GHG emissions. Prior work had indicated that the distribution of electrical current within the cell experiences significant shifts in the minutes before an anode effect. The thrust of the present work was to develop technology that could detect and report this early warning of an anode effect so that the control computer could minimize GHG emissions. A system was developed to achieve this goal and, in collaboration with Alcoa, was tested on two cells at an Alcoa plant in Malaga, Washington. The project has also pointed to the possibility of additional improvements that could result from the work. Notable among these is an improvement in efficiency that could result in an increase in cell output at little extra operating cost. Prospects for commercialization have emerged in the form of purchase orders for further installations. The work has demonstrated that a system for monitoring the current of individual anodes in an aluminum cell is practical. Furthermore the system has

  2. Rapid Aluminum Nanoparticle Production by Milling in NH₃ and CH₃NH₂ Atmospheres: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brandon W; Yu, Jiang; Boatz, Jerry A; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-07-29

    Ball milling of aluminum in gaseous atmospheres of ammonia and monomethylamine (MMA) was found to produce particles in the 100 nm size range with high efficiency. A combination of mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometric product analysis (TGA-MS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to study the particles and the chemical interactions responsible for particle production. To help understand the nature of the surface chemistry, high level quantum chemical calculations were performed to predict the structures and energetics for binding and reactions of NH3 and MMA on aluminum surfaces. Both NH3 and MMA react with aluminum under milling conditions, producing H2 and other gaseous products, and leaving the surfaces functionalized. The surface functionalization enhances size reduction by reducing the surface free energy and the tendency toward mechanochemical welding. For both NH3 and MMA, the particle cores are metallic aluminum, but the surface chemical properties are quite different. The ammonia-milled particles are capped by an AlNxOyHz layer ∼10 nm thick, which passivates the particles. The MMA-milled particles are capped with a thinner passivating layer, such that they are pyrophoric in air and react with N2 at elevated temperatures.

  3. Primary production of the cryptoendolithic microbiota from the Antarctic Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Primary production in the Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbiota can be determined from biomass and photosynthetic 14CO2 incorporation measurements. Even though good nanoclimate data are available, it is difficult to determine the amount of time when abiotic conditions permit metabolism. Making appropriate assumptions concerning the metabolism of the cryptoendolithic microbiota during periods of warmth, light and moisture, the primary production of the biota was calculated to be on the order of 0.108 to 4.41 mgC/m2/yr, with a carbon turnover time from 576 to 23,520 years. These production values are the lowest found on planet Earth.

  4. Global climate change and terrestrial net primary production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Mcguire, A. D.; Kicklighter, David W.; Moore, Berrien, III; Vorosmarty, Charles J.; Schloss, Annette L.

    1993-01-01

    A process-based model was used to estimate global patterns of net primary production and soil nitrogen cycling for contemporary climate conditions and current atmospheric CO2 concentration. Over half of the global annual net primary production was estimated to occur in the tropics, with most of the production attributable to tropical evergreen forest. The effects of CO2 doubling and associated climate changes were also explored. The responses in tropical and dry temperate ecosystems were dominated by CO2, but those in northern and moist temperate ecosystems reflected the effects of temperature on nitrogen availability.

  5. Primary production of the cryptoendolithic microbiota from the Antarctic Desert.

    PubMed

    Vestal, J R

    1988-01-01

    Primary production in the Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbiota can be determined from biomass and photosynthetic 14CO2 incorporation measurements. Even though good nanoclimate data are available, it is difficult to determine the amount of time when abiotic conditions permit metabolism. Making appropriate assumptions concerning the metabolism of the cryptoendolithic microbiota during periods of warmth, light and moisture, the primary production of the biota was calculated to be on the order of 0.108 to 4.41 mgC/m2/yr, with a carbon turnover time from 576 to 23,520 years. These production values are the lowest found on planet Earth.

  6. Overcoming residual stresses and machining distortion in the production of aluminum alloy satellite boxes.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    Distortion frequently occurs during machining of age hardening aluminum alloys due to residual stresses introduced during the quenching step in the heat treatment process. This report quantifies, compares, and discusses the effectiveness of several methods for minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion in aluminum alloys 7075 and 6061.

  7. Solar Aluminum Production by Vacuum Carbothermal Reduction of Alumina—Thermodynamic and Experimental Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruesi, M.; Galvez, M. E.; Halmann, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2011-02-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations indicate the possibility of significantly lowering the onset temperature of aluminum vapor formation via carbothermal reduction of Al2O3 by decreasing the total pressure, enabling its vacuum distillation while bypassing the formation of undesired by-products Al2O, Al4C3, and Al-oxycarbides. Furthermore, the use of concentrated solar energy as the source of high-temperature process heat offers considerable energy savings and reduced concomitant CO2 emissions. When the reducing agent is derived from a biomass source, the solar-driven carbothermal reduction is CO2 neutral. Exploratory experimental runs using a solar reactor were carried out at temperatures in the range 1300 K to 2000 K (1027 °C to 1727 °C) and with total pressures in the range 3.5 to 12 millibar, with reactants Al2O3 and biocharcoal directly exposed to simulated high-flux solar irradiation, yielding up to 19 pct Al by the condensation of product gases, accompanied by the formation of Al4C3 and Al4O4C within the crucible. Based on the measured CO generation, integrated over the duration of the experimental run, the reaction extent reached 55 pct at 2000 K (1727 °C).

  8. Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production - Can Earth Keep Up?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Earth's vegetation or net primary production required to support human activities is powerful measure of aggregate human impacts on the biosphere. Biophysical models applied to consumption statistics were used to estimate the annual amount of net primary production in the form of elemental carbon required for food, fibre, and fuel-wood by the global population. The calculations were then compared to satellite-based estimates of Earth's average net primary production to produce a geographically explicit balance sheet of net primary production "supply" and "demand". Humans consume 20% of Earth's net primary production (11.5 petagrams carbon) annually and this percentage varies regionally from 6% (South America) to over 70% (Europe and Asia), and locally from near 0% (central Australia) to over 30,000% (New York City, USA). The uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations are vulnerable to climate change and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of NPP demand.

  9. Nuclide production by primary cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in the solar system and in interstellar space were calculated for the primary protons in the galactic and solar cosmic rays. At 1 AU, the long-term average fluxes of solar protons usually produce many more atoms of a cosmogenic nuclide than the primary protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the exceptions being nuclides made only by high-energy reactions (like /sup 10/Be). Because the particle fluxes inside meteorites and other large objects in space include many secondary neutrons, the production rates are much higher and ratios inside large objects are often very different from those by just the primary GCR protons in small objects. The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are calculated to vary by about factors of 2.5 during at typical 11-year solar cycle, in agreement with measurements of short-lived radionuclides in recently fallen meteorites. The production of cosmogenic nuclides by the GCR particles outside the heliosphere is higher than that by the modulated GCR primaries normally in the solar system. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the fluxes of interstellar protons and, therefore, in the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in interstellar space. Production rates and ratios for cosmogenic nuclides would be able to identify particles that were small in space or that were exposed to an unmodulated spectrum of GCR particles. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The 2010 spring drought reduced primary productivity in southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Xiao, Jingfeng; Li, Jing; Wang, Kun; Lei, Liping; Guo, Huadong

    2012-12-01

    Many parts of the world experience frequent and severe droughts. Summer drought can significantly reduce primary productivity and carbon sequestration capacity. The impacts of spring droughts, however, have received much less attention. A severe and sustained spring drought occurred in southwestern China in 2010. Here we examine the influence of this spring drought on the primary productivity of terrestrial ecosystems using data on climate, vegetation greenness and productivity. We first assess the spatial extent, duration and severity of the drought using precipitation data and the Palmer drought severity index. We then examine the impacts of the drought on terrestrial ecosystems using satellite data for the period 2000-2010. Our results show that the spring drought substantially reduced the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and gross primary productivity (GPP) during spring 2010 (March-May). Both EVI and GPP also substantially declined in the summer and did not fully recover from the drought stress until August. The drought reduced regional annual GPP and net primary productivity (NPP) in 2010 by 65 and 46 Tg C yr-1, respectively. Both annual GPP and NPP in 2010 were the lowest over the period 2000-2010. The negative effects of the drought on annual primary productivity were partly offset by the remarkably high productivity in August and September caused by the exceptionally wet conditions in late summer and early fall and the farming practices adopted to mitigate drought effects. Our results show that, like summer droughts, spring droughts can also have significant impacts on vegetation productivity and terrestrial carbon cycling.

  11. Carbon Use Efficiency, and Net Primary Productivity of Terrestrial Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    The carbon use efficiency (CUE), defined as the ratio of net carbon gain to gross carbon assimilation during a period, is a highly significant determinant of primary production of terrestrial plant communities. Available data for CUE is summarized. Then, a model for gross assimilation has been run using satellite and ancillary data to calculate annual net carbon gain or net primary productivity for the global land surface during four year period (1987-1990). The results are compared with other estimates. Interannual variability of 30-50% is found in some of the latitude bands

  12. Physical properties of a soil substitute derived from an aluminum recycling by-product.

    PubMed

    Hermsmeyer, Dirk; Diekmann, Ralf; van der Ploeg, Rienk R; Horton, Robert

    2002-11-11

    Disposal of highly saline industrial by-products in landfills is not permitted in member states of the European Union, such as Germany. Large amounts of such by-products thus have to be disposed of in alternative ways. In many countries bare potash mining residue mounds, consisting almost entirely of rock salt (NaCl), pose environmental problems. Covering such mounds with soil or soil-like material could help to reduce the yearly amount of briny runoff. A fine-granular saline aluminum recycling by-product (ALRP) has been proposed as a soil substitute to cover rock salt residue mounds. Use of this by-product as a combined soil substitute and surface barrier is not considered to be a landfill disposal, but as a beneficial by-product reuse. To judge the feasibility of ALRP for this purpose, its properties must be known. In this study physical characteristics of an industrially produced ALRP, mixed with the flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGDP) of a coal combustion power plant, were determined. It was found that the texture of both ALRP and ALRP-FGDP mix was silt loam. Bulk densities of ALRP and ALRP-FGDP were 0.93 and 0.88 Mg x m(-3) and the corresponding salt contents were 50.0 and 35.5%, respectively. The erodibility factor K of pure ALRP was estimated as 0.65 Mg h x ha (-1)N(-1). Because of the stabilizing effect of FGDP, this factor was reduced considerably in ALRP-FGDP. The water-holding capacity of unwashed ALRP was 44.5% and of washed ALRP-FGDP 61.8%. In view of its physical properties, ALRP-FGDP seems to be suitable as an evaporation enhancing, runoff reducing cover material for potash mine residue mounds, even on steep slopes. Use of ALRP, mixed with FGDP, as a soil substitute in a surface barrier, thus seems to be environmentally meaningful. However, the high salt content initially prevents plant growth. With time, after the salt has been leached, the material seems able to support plant growth, which would further reduce runoff. The physical and

  13. Primary production control of methane emission from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, G. J.; Chanton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands extending from subarctic peatlands to subtropical marshes, a positive correlation between CH4 emission and net ecosystem production is reported. It is suggested that net ecosystem production is a master variable integrating many factors which control CH4 emission in vegetated wetlands. It is found that about 3 percent of the daily net ecosystem production is emitted back to the atmosphere as CH4. With projected stimulation of primary production and soil microbial activity in wetlands associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the potential for increasing CH4 emission from inundated wetlands, further enhancing the greenhouse effect, is examined.

  14. Evaluation of primary production in Lake Erie by multiple proxies.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Carrick, Hunter J; Twiss, Michael R; Piwinski, Leah

    2005-06-01

    Direct measurements of rates of primary production in Lake Erie are few and uncertainties surround rate measurements based on radiocarbon and the light-dark bottle incubation methods. For these reasons, we conducted a series of simultaneous primary productivity measurements in Lake Erie in July and August of 2003, based on incubation with [14C]-NaHCO3, the light-dark bottle method, and incubation with (18)O enriched water. Significant differences in the rates of primary production obtained by incubations with [(18)O]-H2O (0.19-34.60 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1)), [14C]-NaHCO3 (0.03-90.50 mmol-C m(-3) h(-1)), and light-dark bottles (0.06-60.78 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1)) were evident in six out of nine comparisons. Within the epilimnion, [(18)O]-H2O rates of primary production were significantly different from rates based on [14C]-NaHCO3 and light-dark bottles in all four comparisons and lower rates were obtained in three out of four comparisons. Eutrophic conditions in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie were evident from the high primary production rates of 20.50-34.60 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1) ([(18)O]-H2O), 34.39-90.50 mmol-C m(-3) h(-1) ([14C]-NaHCO3), and 46.66-60.78 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1) (light-dark bottle). The photosynthetic quotient (PQ), or ratio of O2 production to CO2 consumption during photosynthesis, averaged 0.64+/-0.33 and 1.93+/-1.93, respectively, based on a comparison of [(18)O]-H2O to [14C]-NaHCO3 rates or light-dark bottle to [14C]-NaHCO3 production rates, respectively, demonstrating that photosynthesis in Lake Erie communities primarily follows expected stochiometric trends. The average of the ratio of production rates based on incubation with [(18)O]-H2O relative to those obtained by the light-dark incubation method was 0.66+/-0.33, indicating a tendency for the [(18)O]-H2O method to provide slightly lower estimates of production in Lake Erie. Lower estimates of primary production based on [(18)O]-H2O incubation relative to the other two approaches is most likely a consequence

  15. Decadal Changes in Global Ocean Annual Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson; Conkright, Margarita E.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Ginoux, Paul; Casey, Nancy W.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) has produced the first multi-year time series of global ocean chlorophyll observations since the demise of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) in 1986. Global observations from 1997-present from SeaWiFS combined with observations from 1979-1986 from the CZCS should in principle provide an opportunity to observe decadal changes in global ocean annual primary production, since chlorophyll is the primary driver for estimates of primary production. However, incompatibilities between algorithms have so far precluded quantitative analysis. We have developed and applied compatible processing methods for the CZCS, using modern advances in atmospheric correction and consistent bio-optical algorithms to advance the CZCS archive to comparable quality with SeaWiFS. We applied blending methodologies, where in situ data observations are incorporated into the CZCS and SeaWiFS data records, to provide improvement of the residuals. These re-analyzed, blended data records provide maximum compatibility and permit, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of the changes in global ocean primary production in the early-to-mid 1980's and the present, using synoptic satellite observations. An intercomparison of the global and regional primary production from these blended satellite observations is important to understand global climate change and the effects on ocean biota. Photosynthesis by chlorophyll-containing phytoplankton is responsible for biotic uptake of carbon in the oceans and potentially ultimately from the atmosphere. Global ocean annual primary decreased from the CZCS record to SeaWiFS, by nearly 6% from the early 1980s to the present. Annual primary production in the high latitudes was responsible for most of the decadal change. Conversely, primary production in the low latitudes generally increased, with the exception of the tropical Pacific. The differences and similarities of the two data records provide evidence

  16. Seasonality of primary and secondary production in an Arctic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M.; Huryn, A.; Deegan, L.

    2011-12-01

    Rivers and streams that freeze solid for 8-9 months each year provide excellent examples of the extreme seasonality of arctic habitats. The communities of organisms inhabiting these rivers must complete growth and development during summer, resulting in a rapid ramp-up and down of production over the short ice-free period. The effects of recent shifts in the timing of the spring thaw and autumn freeze-up on the duration and pattern of the period of active production are poorly understood. We are currently investigating: 1) the response of the biotic community of the Kuparuk River (Arctic Alaska) to shifts in the seasonality of the ice-free period, and 2) the community response to increases in phosphorous (P) supply anticipated as the volume of the permafrost active-layer increases in response to climate warming. Here algal production supports a 2-tier web of consumers. We tracked primary and secondary production from the spring thaw through mid-August in a reference reach and one receiving low-level P fertilization. Gross primary production/community respiration (GPP/R) ratios for both reaches were increasing through mid-July, with higher GPP/R in response to the P addition. Understanding the degree of synchrony between primary and secondary production in this Arctic river system will enhance further understanding of how shifts in seasonality affect trophic dynamics.

  17. Deep-sea primary production at the Galapagos hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, D.M.; Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1980-03-21

    Dense animal populations surrounding recently discovered hydrothermal vents at the Galapagos Rift sea-floor spreading center, 2550 meters deep, are probably sustained by microbial primary production. Energy in the form of geothermically reduced sulfur compounds emitted from the vents is liberated during oxidation and used for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic matter by chemosynthetic bacteria.

  18. Forecasting annual aboveground net primary production in the intermountain west

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many land manager’s annual aboveground net primary production, or plant growth, is a key factor affecting business success, profitability and each land manager's ability to successfully meet land management objectives. The strategy often utilized for forecasting plant growth is to assume every y...

  19. Magnetic properties of the ammonolysis product of α-Fe powder containing a small amount of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Tsugawa, Yuta; Maubuchi, Yuji; Motohashi, Teruki; Kikkawa, Shinichi

    2015-02-15

    Magnetite was prepared containing a small amount of aluminum and its nitride was generated through low temperature ammonolysis following reduction under hydrogen. The nitrided product was determined by XRD to be a mixture of “α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}” having a slightly deformed crystal structure from α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} and the residual α-Fe. Magnetic coercivity of the mixture was decreased from the value of 150 mT obtained for the nitride product made without aluminum, due to the precipitation of nonmagnetic amorphous alumina in the low temperature nitrided bcc (Fe{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}) with x≤0.03. The aluminum-doped nitride product in which the “α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}” fraction was 30 at% exhibited magnetization at 1.5 T of approximately 200 Am{sup 2}kg{sup −1} at room temperature and its magnetic coercivity was 20 mT. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic iron nitride particles were separated by nonmagnetic amorphous γ-alumina. Magnetic coercivity was decreased by reducing the magnetic interaction between the particles. - Highlights: • Magnetic coercivity decreased in α”-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} like compound as a soft magnet. • Small amount of Al addition was effective in its preparation. • Magnetic interaction decreased between the “α”-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}” particles.

  20. The DART dispersion analysis research tool: A mechanistic model for predicting fission-product-induced swelling of aluminum dispersion fuels. User`s guide for mainframe, workstation, and personal computer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes the primary physical models that form the basis of the DART mechanistic computer model for calculating fission-product-induced swelling of aluminum dispersion fuels; the calculated results are compared with test data. In addition, DART calculates irradiation-induced changes in the thermal conductivity of the dispersion fuel, as well as fuel restructuring due to aluminum fuel reaction, amorphization, and recrystallization. Input instructions for execution on mainframe, workstation, and personal computers are provided, as is a description of DART output. The theory of fission gas behavior and its effect on fuel swelling is discussed. The behavior of these fission products in both crystalline and amorphous fuel and in the presence of irradiation-induced recrystallization and crystalline-to-amorphous-phase change phenomena is presented, as are models for these irradiation-induced processes.

  1. Carbon dioxide supersaturation promotes primary production in lakes.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Mats; Karlsson, Jan; Jonsson, Anders

    2012-06-01

    A majority of the world's lakes are supersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide (CO(2) ). By experimental manipulation of the CO(2) concentration in supersaturated boreal lakes, we demonstrate that phytoplankton primary production was up to 10 times higher in supersaturated lake water in comparison with water with CO(2) at equilibrium concentrations and that CO(2) , together with nutrients, explained most of the variation in pelagic primary production and phytoplankton biomass over a wide variety of unproductive lakes. These results suggest that phytoplankton can be co-limited by CO(2) and nutrients in unproductive lakes. As import of terrestrial organic carbon and its subsequent microbial mineralisation in lakes is a driving force of CO(2) -supersaturation our results suggest that lake productivity and carbon cycling may respond to variations in terrestrial organic carbon export, (e.g. caused by land use or climate change) in ways not described before.

  2. Mercury emission to atmosphere from primary Zn production in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Xinbin; Li, Zhonggen; Qiu, Guangle; Shang, Lihai; Liang, Peng; Wang, Dingyong; Yang, Yongkui

    2010-09-15

    Emissions of mercury (Hg) to air have regional and global impacts through long range transport in the atmosphere. Primary Zn production is regarded as an important anthropogenic Hg source in China, but research on its Hg emission is limited. To gain a better understanding of Hg emissions from Zn production activities in China, field investigations at four industrial-scale Zn production plants using electrostatic process with Hg removal (HP-WR), electrostatic process without Hg removal (HP-WOR), retort Zn production (RZ), imperial smelting process (ISP), and one artisanal Zn smelting process (AZ) were carried out. In the investigation, Hg emission factors are defined as how much Hg was emitted to the atmosphere per ton Zn produced during various Zn production methods and were estimated by using mass balance method. The results showed that the estimated Hg emission factors of Zn production were 5.7+/-4.0 g Hg t(-1) Zn for HP-WR, 31+/-22 g Hg t(-1) Zn for HP-WOR, 34+/-71 g Hg t(-1) Zn for RZ, 122+/-122 g Hg t(-1) Zn g t(-1) for ISP, and 75+/-115 g Hg t(-1) Zn for AZ. Approximately 80.7-104.2 t year(-1) of Hg was emitted to atmosphere from primary Zn production during the period of 2002-2006 in China.

  3. Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ preparation and use in electrolysis process for aluminum production

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.C.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    A continuous process for producing aluminum sulfide and for electrolyzing the aluminum sulfide to form metallic aluminum in which the aluminum sulfide is produced from aluminum oxide and COS or CS/sub 2/ in the presence of a chloride melt which also serves as the electrolysis bath. Circulation between the reactor and electrolysis cell is carried out to maintain the desired concentration of aluminum sulfide in the bath.

  4. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  5. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2002-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  6. Factors affecting the estimate of primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, W. M.; Byrne, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    Remote sensing of primary production in the euphotic zone has been based mostly on visible-band and water-leaving radiance measured with the coastal zone color scanner. There are some robust, simple relationships for calculating integral production based on surface measurements, but they also require knowledge for photoadaptive parameters such as maximum photosynthesis which currently cannot be obtained from spave. A 17,000-station data set is used to show that space-based estimates of maximum photosynthesis could improve predictions of psi, the water column light utiliztion index, which is an important term in many primary productivity models. Temperature is also examined as a factor for predicting hydrographic structure and primary production. A simple model is used to relate temperature and maximum photosynthesis; the model incorporates (1) the positive relationship between maximum photosynthesis and temperature and (2) the strongly negative relationship between temperature and nitrate in the ocean (which directly affects maximum growth rates via nitrogen limitation). Since these two factors relate to carbon and nitrogen, 'balanced carbon/nitrogen assimilation' was calculated using the Redfield ratio, It is expected that the relationship between maximum balanced carbon assimilation versus temperature is concave-down, with the peak dependent on nitrate uptake kinetics, temperature-nitrate relationships,a nd the carbon chlorophyll ration. These predictions were compared with the sea truth data. The minimum turnover time for nitrate was also calculated using this approach. Lastly, sea surface temperature gradients were used to predict the slope of isotherms (a proxy for the slope of isopycnals in many waters). Sea truth data show that at size scales of several hundred kilometers, surface temperature gradients can provide information on the slope of isotherms in the top 200 m of the water column. This is directly relevant to the supply of nutrients into the surface

  7. Primary production in the Delta: Then and now

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Robinson, April; Richey, Amy; Grenier, Letitia; Grossinger, Robin; Boyer, Katharyn E.; Burau, Jon; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; DeGeorge, John F.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Enright, Chris; Howe, Emily R.; Kneib, Ronald; Mueller-Solger, Anke; Naiman, Robert J.; Pinckney, James L.; Safran, Samuel M.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Simenstad, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the role of restoration in the recovery of the Delta ecosystem, we need to have clear targets and performance measures that directly assess ecosystem function. Primary production is a crucial ecosystem process, which directly limits the quality and quantity of food available for secondary consumers such as invertebrates and fish. The Delta has a low rate of primary production, but it is unclear whether this was always the case. Recent analyses from the Historical Ecology Team and Delta Landscapes Project provide quantitative comparisons of the areal extent of 14 habitat types in the modern Delta versus the historical Delta (pre-1850). Here we describe an approach for using these metrics of land use change to: (1) produce the first quantitative estimates of how Delta primary production and the relative contributions from five different producer groups have been altered by large-scale drainage and conversion to agriculture; (2) convert these production estimates into a common currency so the contributions of each producer group reflect their food quality and efficiency of transfer to consumers; and (3) use simple models to discover how tidal exchange between marshes and open water influences primary production and its consumption. Application of this approach could inform Delta management in two ways. First, it would provide a quantitative estimate of how large-scale conversion to agriculture has altered the Delta's capacity to produce food for native biota. Second, it would provide restoration practitioners with a new approach—based on ecosystem function—to evaluate the success of restoration projects and gauge the trajectory of ecological recovery in the Delta region.

  8. Towards 250 m mapping of terrestrial primary productivity over Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsamo, A.; Chen, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are an important part of the climate and global change systems. Their role in climate change and in the global carbon cycle is yet to be well understood. Dataset from satellite earth observation, coupled with numerical models provide the unique tools for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of territorial carbon cycle. The Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) is a remote sensing based approach to quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle by that gross and net primary productivity (GPP and NPP) and terrestrial carbon sinks and sources expressed as net ecosystem productivity (NEP). We have currently implemented a scheme to map the GPP, NPP and NEP at 250 m for first time over Canada using BEPS model. This is supplemented by improved mapping of land cover and leaf area index (LAI) at 250 m over Canada from MODIS satellite dataset. The results from BEPS are compared with MODIS GPP product and further evaluated with estimated LAI from various sources to evaluate if the results capture the trend in amount of photosynthetic biomass distributions. Final evaluation will be to validate both BEPS and MODIS primary productivity estimates over the Fluxnet sites over Canada. The primary evaluation indicate that BEPS GPP estimates capture the over storey LAI variations over Canada very well compared to MODIS GPP estimates. There is a large offset of MODIS GPP, over-estimating the lower GPP value compared to BEPS GPP estimates. These variations will further be validated based on the measured values from the Fluxnet tower measurements over Canadian. The high resolution GPP (NPP) products at 250 m will further be used to scale the outputs between different ecosystem productivity models, in our case the Canadian carbon budget model of Canadian forest sector CBM-CFS) and the Integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon model (InTEC).

  9. Stabilization of tannery sludge by co-treatment with aluminum anodizing sludge and phytotoxicity of end-products.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulou, E; Zebiliadou, O; Mitrakas, M; Zouboulis, A

    2017-03-01

    A global demand for efficient re-utilization of produced solid wastes, which is based on the principles of re-use and recycling, results to a circular economy, where one industry's waste becomes another's raw material and it can be used in a more efficient and sustainable way. In this study, the influence of a by-product addition, such as aluminum anodizing sludge, on tannery waste (air-dried sludge) stabilization was examined. The chemical characterization of tannery waste leachate, using the EN 12457-2 standard leaching test, reveals that tannery waste cannot be accepted even in landfills for hazardous wastes, according to the EU Decision 2003/33/EC. The stabilization of tannery waste was studied applying different ratios of tannery waste and aluminum anodizing sludge, i.e. 50:50, 60:40, 70:30 and 80:20 ratios respectively. Subsequently, the stabilization rate of the qualified as optimum homogenized mixture of 50:50 ratio was also tested during time (7, 15 and 30days). Moreover, this stabilized product was subjected to phytotoxicity tests using the Lepidium sativum, Sinapis alba and Sorghum saccharatum seeds. The experimental results showed that aluminum anodizing sludge managed to stabilize effectively chromium and organic content of tannery waste, which are the most problematic parameters influencing its subsequent disposal. As a result, tannery waste stabilized with the addition of aluminum anodizing sludge at 50:50 ratio can be accepted in non-hazardous waste landfills, as chromium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations in the respective leachate are below the relevant regulation limits, while the stabilized waste shows decreased phytotoxicity.

  10. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major

  11. Satellites for the study of ocean primary productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.; Baker, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques for obtaining estimates of global marine primary productivity is examined. It is shown that remote sensing and multiplatform (ship, aircraft, and satellite) sampling strategies can be used to significantly lower the variance in estimates of phytoplankton abundance and of population growth rates from the values obtained using the C-14 method. It is noted that multiplatform sampling strategies are essential to assess the mean and variance of phytoplankton biomass on a regional or on a global basis. The relative errors associated with shipboard and satellite estimates of phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity, as well as the increased statistical accuracy possible from the utilization of contemporaneous data from both sampling platforms, are examined. It is shown to be possible to follow changes in biomass and the distribution patterns of biomass as a function of time with the use of satellite imagery.

  12. Cost-Effective Consolidation of Fine Aluminum Scrap for Increased Remelting Effieciency

    SciTech Connect

    William Van Geertruyden

    2005-09-22

    The main objective of this research was to develop a new re-melting process for fine or light gauge aluminum scrap products that exhibits dramatic improvements in energy efficiency. Light gauge aluminum scrap in the form of chips, turnings, and borings has historically been underutilized in the aluminum recycling process due to its high surface area to volume ratio resulting in low melt recovery. Laboratory scale consolidation experiments were performed using loose aluminum powder as a modeling material as well as shredded aluminum wire scrap. The processing parameters necessary to create consolidated aluminum material were determined. Additionally, re-melting experiments using consolidated and unconsolidated aluminum powder confirmed the hypothesis that metal recovery using consolidated material will significantly improve by as much as 20%. Based on this research, it is estimated that approximately 495 billion Btu/year can be saved by implementation of this technology in one domestic aluminum rolling plant alone. The energy savings are realized by substituting aluminum scrap for primary aluminum, which requires large amounts of energy to produce. While there will be an initial capital investment, companies will benefit from the reduction of dependence on primary aluminum thus saving considerable costs. Additionally, the technology will allow companies to maintain in-house alloy scrap, rather than purchasing from other vendors and eliminate the need to discard the light gauge scrap to landfills.

  13. Regulation of primary productivity rate in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, R.T. ); Chavez, F.P. )

    1991-12-01

    Analysis of the Chl-specific rate of primary productivity (P{sup B}) as a function of subsurface nutrient concentration at >300 equatorial stations provides an answer to the question: What processes regulate primary productivity rate in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the equatorial Pacific In the western Pacific where there is a gradient in 60-m (NO{sub 3}) from 0 to {approximately}12 {mu}M, the productivity rate is a linear function of nutrient concentration; in the eastern Pacific where the gradient is from 12 to 28 {mu}M, the productivity rate is independent of nutrient concentration and limited to {approximately}36 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1}, or a mean euphotic zone C-specific growth rate ({mu}) of 0.47 d{sup {minus}1}. However, rates downstream of the Galapagos Islands are not limited; they are 46.4 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1} and {mu} = 0.57 d{sup {minus}1}, very close to the predicted nutrient-regulated rates in the absence of other limitation. This pattern of rate regulation can be accounted for by a combination of eolian Fe, subsurface nutrients, and sedimentary Fe derived from the Galapagos platform. In the low-nutrient western Pacific the eolian supply of Fe is adequate to allow productivity rate to be set by subsurface nutrient concentration. In the nutrient-rich easter equatorial region eolian Fe is inadequate to support productivity rates proportional to the higher nutrient concentrations, so in this region eolian Fe is rate limiting. Around the Galapagos Islands productivity rates reach levels consistent with nutrient concentrations; sedimentary Fe from the Galapagos platform seems adequate to support increased nutrient-regulated productivity rates in this region.

  14. Revised calibration of the Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} pressure sensor using the Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rashchenko, Sergey V. Litasov, Konstantin D.; Kurnosov, Alexander; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2015-04-14

    The pressure-induced shift of Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} fluorescence was calibrated in a quasi-hydrostatic helium medium up to 60 GPa using the recent Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale as a reference. The resulting calibration can be written as P = −2836/14.3 [(1 + Δλ/685.51){sup −14.3 }− 1]. Previous calibrations based on the internally inconsistent primary scales are revised, and, after appropriate correction, found to agree with the proposed one. The calibration extended to 120 GPa was also performed using corrected previous data and can be written as P = 4.20 Δλ (1 + 0.020 Δλ)/(1 + 0.036 Δλ)

  15. Reduced temperature aluminum production in an electrolytic cell having an inert anode

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.; Kozarek, Robert L.; LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum is produced by electrolytic reduction of alumina in a cell having a cathode, an inert anode and a molten salt bath containing metal fluorides and alumina. The inert anode preferably contains copper, silver and oxides of iron and nickel. Reducing the molten salt bath temperature to about 900-950.degree. C. lowers corrosion on the inert anode constituents.

  16. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-05

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption.

  17. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  18. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Zinc Production Facilities § 63.11164 What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities? (a) If you own...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Zinc Production Facilities § 63.11164 What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities? (a) If you own...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Zinc Production Facilities § 63.11164 What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities? (a) If you own...

  1. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Zinc Production Facilities § 63.11164 What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities? (a) If you own...

  2. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Zinc Production Facilities § 63.11164 What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities? (a) If you own...

  3. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium Production Facilities § 63.11166 What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities? (a) You...

  4. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium Production Facilities § 63.11166 What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities? (a) You...

  5. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium Production Facilities § 63.11166 What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities? (a) You...

  6. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium Production Facilities § 63.11166 What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities? (a) You...

  7. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium Production Facilities § 63.11166 What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities? (a) You...

  8. Differential effects of nutrient-limited primary production on primary, secondary or tertiary consumers.

    PubMed

    Malzahn, Arne M; Hantzsche, Florian; Schoo, Katherina L; Boersma, Maarten; Aberle, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional imbalances between predator and prey are the rule rather than the exception at the lower end of food webs. We investigated the role of different grazers in the propagation of nutritionally imbalanced primary production by using the same primary producers in a three-trophic-level food chain and a four-trophic-level food chain experimental setup. The three-trophic-level food chain consisted of a classic single-cell primary producer (Rhodomonas salina), a metazoan grazer (the copepod Acartia tonsa) and a top predator (the jellyfish Gonionemus vertens), while we added a protozoan grazer (Oxyrrhis marina) as primary consumer to the food chain to establish the four-trophic-level food chain. This setup allowed us to investigate how nutrient-limitation effects change from one trophic level to another, and to investigate the performance of two components of our experimental food chains in different trophic positions. Stoichiometry and fatty acid profiles of the algae showed significant differences between the nutrient-depleted [no N and no P addition (-P), respectively] and the nutrient-replete (f/2) treatments. The differences in stoichiometry could be traced when O. marina was the first consumer. Copepods feeding on these flagellates were not affected by the nutritional imbalance of their prey in their stoichiometry, their respiration rates nor in their developmental rates. In contrast, when copepods were the primary consumer, those reared on the -P algae showed significantly higher respiration rates along with significantly lower developmental rates. In neither of our two experimental food chains did the signals from the base of the food chains travel up to jelly fish, our top predator.

  9. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G.; Geider, R.

    1992-07-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  10. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. ); Geider, R. . Coll. of Marine Studies)

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  11. Connected speech production in three variants of primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen M; Henry, Maya L; Besbris, Max; Ogar, Jennifer M; Dronkers, Nina F; Jarrold, William; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2010-07-01

    Primary progressive aphasia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive deficits isolated to speech and/or language, and can be classified into non-fluent, semantic and logopenic variants based on motor speech, linguistic and cognitive features. The connected speech of patients with primary progressive aphasia has often been dichotomized simply as 'fluent' or 'non-fluent', however fluency is a multidimensional construct that encompasses features such as speech rate, phrase length, articulatory agility and syntactic structure, which are not always impacted in parallel. In this study, our first objective was to improve the characterization of connected speech production in each variant of primary progressive aphasia, by quantifying speech output along a number of motor speech and linguistic dimensions simultaneously. Secondly, we aimed to determine the neuroanatomical correlates of changes along these different dimensions. We recorded, transcribed and analysed speech samples for 50 patients with primary progressive aphasia, along with neurodegenerative and normal control groups. Patients were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging, and voxel-based morphometry was used to identify regions where atrophy correlated significantly with motor speech and linguistic features. Speech samples in patients with the non-fluent variant were characterized by slow rate, distortions, syntactic errors and reduced complexity. In contrast, patients with the semantic variant exhibited normal rate and very few speech or syntactic errors, but showed increased proportions of closed class words, pronouns and verbs, and higher frequency nouns, reflecting lexical retrieval deficits. In patients with the logopenic variant, speech rate (a common proxy for fluency) was intermediate between the other two variants, but distortions and syntactic errors were less common than in the non-fluent variant, while lexical access was less impaired than in the semantic variant. Reduced speech rate was

  12. Production of Gas-Solid Structures in Aluminum and Nickel Alloys by Gasar Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Apprill, J.M.; Baldwin, M.D.; Maguire, M.C.; Miszkiel, M.E.; Shapovalov, V.I.

    1999-01-06

    Experimental data on directional and bulk solidification of hydrogen-charged samples of aluminum alloy A356 and nickel alloy Inconel 718 are discussed. The solidification structure of the porous zone is shown to be dependent on many process variables. Of these variables, hydrogen content in the melt prior to solidification, and furnace atmospheric pressure during solidification play the decisive role. Also important are the furnace atmosphere composition, the solidification velocity, and the temperature distribution of the liquid metal inside the mold.

  13. Global impact of tropical cyclones on primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menkes, Christophe E.; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Lévy, Marina; Ethé, Christian; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier; Vincent, Emmanuel; Vialard, Jérôme; Jullien, Swen

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we explore the global responses of surface temperature, chlorophyll, and primary production to tropical cyclones (TCs). Those ocean responses are first characterized from the statistical analysis of satellite data under ~1000 TCs over the 1998-2007 period. Besides the cold wake, the vast majority of TCs induce a weak chlorophyll response, with only ~10% of induced blooms exceeding 0.1 mg m-3. The largest chlorophyll responses mostly occur within coastal regions, in contrast to the strongest cold wakes that generally occur farther offshore. To understand this decoupling, we analyze a coupled dynamical-biogeochemical oceanic simulation forced by realistic wind vortices applied along observed TC tracks. The simulation displays a realistic spatial structure of TC-induced blooms and its observed decoupling with TC cold wakes. In regions of strong TC energy input, the strongest cold wakes occur in regions of shallow thermocline (<60 m) and the strongest blooms in regions of shallow nitracline and/or subsurface chlorophyll maximum (<60 m). Shallow thermoclines are found over many open ocean regions, while regions of shallow nitracline and/or subsurface chlorophyll maximum are most prominent in near-coastal areas, explaining the spatial decoupling between the cold and bloom wakes. The overall TC contribution to annual primary production is weak and amounts to ~1%, except in a few limited areas (east Eurasian coast, South tropical Indian Ocean, Northern Australian coast, and Eastern Pacific Ocean in the TC-prone region) where it can locally reach up to 20-30%. Nearly 80% of this TC-induced annual primary production is the result of the biogeochemical response to the 30% strongest TCs.

  14. Evaluating North American net primary productivity with satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Dye, Dennis G.

    1987-01-01

    An ecological model is developed to estimate annual net primary productivity (NPP) in 12 North American biomes. The model combines existing models which address canopy photosynthesis in response to light, temperature, and moisture availability, and account for respiration. Climate data, solar radiation data, and spectral vegetation index data are utilized. Estimates of NPP from the model compare well with data in the literature, but a systematic error is suspected. Difficulties encountered in specifying certain model parameters are discussed as possible sources of this error. The results of this study suggest the promise of remotely sensed measurements for macroscale evaluation and modeling of NPP.

  15. Process Conditions of Forming the Surface Layer of Aluminum Powder Product by Layer-by-layer Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saprykina, N. A.; Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents data on state of the art in selective laser sintering of products. Layer-by-layer sintering is shown to be a future-oriented technology, making it possible to synthesize products of metal powder materials. Factors, influencing the quality of a sintered product, are revealed in the paper. It presents outcomes of experiments, focused on the dependence of surface layer thickness of sintered aluminum powder PA-4 on laser processing conditions. Basic factors, influencing the quality of a sintered surface layer include laser power, speeds of scanning and moving the laser beam on the layer of powder. Thickness of the sintered layer varies from 0.74 to 1.55 mm, as the result of changing the laser processing conditions.

  16. Nutrient cycling by fish supports relatively more primary production as lake productivity increases.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Michael J; Bowling, Anna M; Dickman, Elizabeth M; Hale, R Scott; Higgins, Karen A; Horgan, Martin J; Knoll, Lesley B; Renwick, William H; Stein, Roy A

    2006-07-01

    Animals can be important in nutrient cycling in particular ecosystems, but few studies have examined how this importance varies along environmental gradients. In this study we quantified the nutrient cycling role of an abundant detritivorous fish species, the gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), in reservoir ecosystems along a gradient of ecosystem productivity. Gizzard shad feed mostly on sediment detritus and excrete sediment-derived nutrients into the water column, thereby mediating a cross-habitat translocation of nutrients to phytoplankton. We quantified nitrogen and phosphorus cycling (excretion) rates of gizzard shad, as well as nutrient demand by phytoplankton, in seven lakes over a four-year period (16 lake-years). The lakes span a gradient of watershed land use (the relative amounts of land used for agriculture vs. forest) and productivity. As the watersheds of these lakes became increasingly dominated by agricultural land, primary production rates, lake trophic state indicators (total phosphorus and chlorophyll concentrations), and nutrient flux through gizzard shad populations all increased. Nutrient cycling by gizzard shad supported a substantial proportion of primary production in these ecosystems, and this proportion increased as watershed agriculture (and ecosystem productivity) increased. In the four productive lakes with agricultural watersheds (>78% agricultural land), gizzard shad supported on average 51% of phytoplankton primary production (range 27-67%). In contrast, in the three relatively unproductive lakes in forested or mixed-land-use watersheds (>47% forest, <52% agricultural land), gizzard shad supported 18% of primary production (range 14-23%). Thus, along a gradient of forested to agricultural landscapes, both watershed nutrient inputs and nutrient translocation by gizzard shad increase, but our data indicate that the importance of nutrient translocation by gizzard shad increases more rapidly. Our results therefore support the

  17. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  18. Physical control of primary production on the Faroe Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Solva; Margretha Larsen, Karin; Hansen, Bogi

    2014-05-01

    The Faroe Islands are surrounded by a shelf with tidally mixed water, partly isolated from the open ocean by a tidal front. The on-shelf areas support a relatively uniform shelf ecosystem, distinct from the off-shelf waters. Earlier studies have shown high inter-annual variability in biological production on-shelf, with high correlation between fluctuations in the various trophic levels. It seems as if phytoplankton production is the prime driver in the ecosystem since grazing pressure by the zooplankton community during the spring bloom is not large enough to postpone and/or suppress the phytoplankton spring bloom. This indicates that physical effects are the dominant control of the primary production on the Faroe Shelf. For a well-mixed shelf water mass, solar radiation is an obvious candidate as a controlling factor, but inter-annual variations in light intensity show no correlation with primary production. Instead, it appears that variations in the horizontal exchange rate on-shelf and between on-shelf and off-shelf waters can explain the main features in both the inter-annual and shorter term variations of the spring bloom on-shelf. Two competing forcing factors seem to control the exchange rate: the homogenizing tidal currents and the air-sea heat exchange, which tends to induce both vertical and horizontal density gradients. In the presentation, a simple model is proposed to explain how the variations in these two factors affect the horizontal exchange rate and through that the spring bloom on the Faroe shelf.

  19. Excretion of caffeine and its primary degradation products into bile.

    PubMed

    Holstege, A; Kurz, M; Weinbeck, M; Gerok, W

    1993-01-01

    Caffeine, widely consumed in beverages, is known to alter several biliary parameters that can affect gallstone pathogenesis. To address the question whether methylxanthines can act on the luminal side of biliary epithelial cells, we measured caffeine and its primary demethylation products in human bile. Eight patients had an external biliary drainage due to bile duct or gallbladder disease. Two of the patients suffered from histologically confirmed liver cirrhosis. The levels of caffeine, paraxanthine, theobromine, and theophylline were monitored over 10 h in plasma and bile before and after a prior oral dose of caffeine (5 mg/kg b. wt.). Methylxanthines were enriched by an organic extraction procedure and separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Time-concentration curves in bile paralleled the time-course of methylxanthine levels in blood plasma. Accordingly, values in bile and blood plasma were highly correlated for each methylxanthine measured. Within 1 h after the oral test dose, peak levels of caffeine were obtained in both fluids. Biliary concentrations were either almost equal (caffeine) or lower (dimethylxanthines) than their respective values in blood plasma. The results of our study indicate that minor amounts of caffeine and its primary degradation products are excreted via the bile allowing local interference with epithelial cell metabolism of bile ducts and gallbladder.

  20. Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Christini

    1999-12-30

    A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

  1. Indicators of Early Research Productivity Among Primary Care Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, John F; Lanphear, Bruce P; Curtis, Peter; Vu, Kieu O

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Little is known about the impact of fellowship training in primary care on subsequent research productivity. Our goal was to identify characteristics of research fellows and their training associated with subsequent publications and research funding. DESIGN Mail survey in 1998. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS 1988–1997 graduates of 25 National Research Service Award primary care research fellowships in the United States. OUTCOME MEASURES 1) Publishing 1 or more papers per year since the beginning of fellowship, or 2) serving as principal investigator (PI) on a federal or non-federal grant. RESULTS One hundred forty-six of two hundred fifteen program graduates (68%) completed the survey. The median age was 38 years, and 51% were male. Thirty-two percent had published 1 or more papers per year, and 44% were PIs. Male gender (odds ratio [OR], 3.6; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.2), self-reported allocation of 40% or more of fellowship time to research (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.8 to 11.2), and having an influential mentor during fellowship (OR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.5 to 17.2) were independently associated with publishing 1 or more papers per year. Fellows with funding as a PI were also more likely to have an influential mentor (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.3 to 7.2). CONCLUSION Primary care fellows who had influential mentors were more productive in research early after fellowship. Awareness of the indicators of early research success can inform the policies of agencies that fund research training and the curricula of training programs themselves.

  2. Achieving Carbon Neutrality in the Global Aluminum Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subodh

    2012-02-01

    In the 21st century, sustainability is widely regarded as the new corporate culture, and leading manufacturing companies (Toyota, GE, and Alcoa) and service companies (Google and Federal Express) are striving towards carbon neutrality. The current carbon footprint of the global aluminum industry is estimated at 500 million metric tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2eq), representing about 1.7% of global emissions from all sources. For the global aluminum industry, carbon neutrality is defined as a state where the total "in-use" CO2eq saved from all products in current use, including incremental process efficiency improvements, recycling, and urban mining activities, equals the CO2eq expended to produce the global output of aluminum. This paper outlines an integrated and quantifiable plan for achieving "carbon neutrality" in the global aluminum industry by advocating five actionable steps: (1) increase use of "green" electrical energy grid by 8%, (2) reduce process energy needs by 16%, (3) deploy 35% of products in "in-use" energy saving applications, (4) divert 6.1 million metric tonnes/year from landfills, and (5) mine 4.5 million metric tonnes/year from aluminum-rich "urban mines." Since it takes 20 times more energy to make aluminum from bauxite ore than to recycle it from scrap, the global aluminum industry could set a reasonable, self-imposed energy/carbon neutrality goal to incrementally increase the supply of recycled aluminum by at least 1.05 metric tonnes for every tonne of incremental production via primary aluminum smelter capacity. Furthermore, the aluminum industry can and should take a global leadership position by actively developing internationally accepted and approved carbon footprint credit protocols.

  3. Evaluation of Primary Dendrite Arm Spacings from Aluminum-7wt% Silicon alloys Directionally Solidified aboard the International Space Station - Comparison with Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angart, Samuel; Lauer, Mark; Poirier, David; Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, Ravi; Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum – 7wt% silicon alloys were directionally solidified in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station as part of the “MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions” (MICAST) European led program. Cross-sections of the sample during periods of steady-state growth were metallographically prepared from which the primary dendrite arm spacing (lambda 1) was measured. These spacings were found to be in reasonable agreement with the Hunt-Lu model which assumes a diffusion-controlled, convectionless, environment during controlled solidification. Deviation from the model was found and is attributed to gravity-independent thermocapillary convection where, over short distances, the liquid appears to have separated from the crucible wall.

  4. Method of producing complex aluminum alloy parts of high temper, and products thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, I. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Fully annealed aluminum sheet is first stretch formed to the complex, doubly compound shape of a previously prepared forming die, e.g., an ejection seat blowout panel of a shuttlecraft. The part is then marked with a series of grid lines for monitoring later elongation. Thereafter it is solution heat treated and refrigerated to retard hardening. While still soft, it is stretched a second time on the same die to induce a modicum of work hardening, after which it is aged to the desired stress corrosion resistant temper, preferably the T8 level, to provide the desired hardness and stress corrosion resistance.

  5. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of

  6. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Foster, S.Q.; Kleckner, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land – estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m−2 yr−1, but the range is large: from −105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m−2 yr−1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148

  7. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  8. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  9. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  10. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  11. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  12. Preparation of a nanodispersed aluminum hydroxide-based binder used for the production of refractory corundum ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetchinkina, T. N.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Averin, V. V.; Olyunina, T. V.

    2015-03-01

    The preparation of the rehydrated metastable ρ phase of alumina with a large specific surface based on domestic aluminum hydroxide is studied in order to develop a method for producing a calcium-free binder (analog of the α-Bond binder produced abroad by the Almatis company for the preparation of corundum refractories with a high thermal stability). Three types of aluminum hydroxide specimens from three enterprises, i.e., obtained from different raw materials and by different methods, are studied. The specimens with a specific surface smaller than ~240 m2/g represented by the η-, χ-, ν-, θ-, ρ,and δ-Al2O3 structural modifications are isolated due to "impact" dehydration. The dehydration of Al(OH)3 under reduced pressures is studied. The product with a phase composition closest to that of the α-Bond binder is obtained under an impact thermal load at 600°C and a rarefaction of 0.01 MPa.

  13. Photo-ionization of aluminum in a hot cavity for the selective production of exotic species project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, D.; Makhathini, L.; Tomaselli, A.; Grassi, D.; Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Vasquez, J.; Calderolla, M.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) based accelerator facility that will be built in the Legnaro-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Laboratory (Italy), intended to provide intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams obtained by proton-induced fission of a uranium carbide (UCx) target. Besides this main target material, silicon carbide (SiC) will be the first to be used to deliver p-rich beams. This target will also validate the functionality of the SPES facility with aluminum beam as result of impinging SiC target with proton beam. In the past, off line studies on laser photoionization of aluminum have been performed in Pavia Spectroscopy Laboratory and in Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro; a XeCl excimer laser was installed in order to test the laser ionization in the SPES hot cavity. With the new Wien filter installed a better characterization of the ionization process in terms of efficiency was performed and results are discussed.

  14. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  15. Primary productivity and its correlation with rainfall on Aldabra Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekeine, J.; Turnbull, L. A.; Cherubini, P.; de Jong, R.; Baxter, R.; Hansen, D.; Bunbury, N.; Fleischer-Dogley, F.; Schaepman-Strub, G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldabra Atoll, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1982, hosts the world's largest population of giant tortoises. In view of recent rainfall declines in the East African region, it is important to assess the implications of local rainfall trends on the atoll's ecosystem and evaluate potential threats to the food resources of the giant tortoises. However, building an accurate picture of the effects of climate change requires detailed context-specific case-studies, an approach often hindered by data deficiencies in remote areas. Here, we present and analyse a new historical rainfall record of Aldabra atoll together with two potential measures of primary productivity: (1) tree-ring measurements of the deciduous tree species Ochna ciliata and, (2) satellite-derived NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) data for the period 2001-2012. Rainfall declined by about 6 mm yr-1 in the last four decades, in agreement with general regional declines, and this decline could mostly be attributed to changes in wet-season rainfall. We were unable to cross-date samples of O. ciliata with sufficient precision to deduce long-term patterns of productivity. However, satellite data were used to derive Aldabra's land surface phenology (LSP) for the period 2001-2012 which was then linked to rainfall seasonality. This relationship was strongest in the eastern parts of the atoll (with a time-lag of about six weeks between rainfall changes and LSP responses), an area dominated by deciduous grasses that supports high densities of tortoises. While the seasonality in productivity, as reflected in the satellite record, is correlated with rainfall, we did not find any change in mean rainfall or productivity for the shorter period 2001-2012. The sensitivity of Aldabra's vegetation to rainfall highlights the potential impact of increasing water stress in East Africa on the region's endemic ecosystems.

  16. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-05-22

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers.

  17. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    2002-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or the annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and respiration (R) per unit ground area. Available field observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), although it is generally recognized that there are considerable difficulties in determining these fluxes, and thus pose challenge in assessing the accuracy. Further uncertainties arise in extrapolating field measurements (which are acquired over a hectare or so area) to regional scale. Here, an approach is presented for determining these fluxes using satellite and ancillary data to be representative of regional scale and allow assessment of interannual variation. A, has been expressed as the product of radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis by an unstressed canopy and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, which is then adjusted for stresses due to soil water shortage and temperature away from optimum. R has been calculated as the sum of growth and maintenance components (respectively, R(sub g) and R(sub m)).The R(sub m) has been determined from nitrogen content of plant tissue per unit ground area, while R(sub g) has been obtained as a fraction of the difference of A(sub g) and R(sub m). Results for five consecutive years (1986-1990) are presented for the Amazon-Tocontins, Mississippi, and Ob River basins.

  18. Climate change enhances primary production in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Sébastien; Mostajir, Behzad; Bélanger, Simon; Schloss, Irene R; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Demers, Serge; Ferreyra, Gustavo A

    2015-06-01

    Intense regional warming was observed in the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) over the last 50 years. Here, we investigate the impact of climate change on primary production (PP) in this highly productive region. This study is based on temporal data series of ozone thickness (1972-2010), sea ice concentration (1978-2010), sea-surface temperature (1990-2010), incident irradiance (1988-2010) and satellite-derived chlorophyll a concentration (Chl-a, 1997-2010) for the coastal WAP. In addition, we apply a photosynthesis/photoinhibition spectral model to satellite-derived data (1997-2010) to compute PP and examine the separate impacts of environmental forcings. Since 1978, sea ice retreat has been occurring earlier in the season (in March in 1978 and in late October during the 2000s) while the ozone hole is present in early spring (i.e. August to November) since the early 1990s, increasing the intensity of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR, 280-320 nm). The WAP waters have also warmed over 1990-2010. The modelled PP rates are in the lower range of previously reported PP rates in the WAP. The annual open water PP in the study area increased from 1997 to 2010 (from 0.73 to 1.03 Tg C yr(-1) ) concomitantly with the increase in the production season length. The coincidence between the earlier sea ice retreat and the presence of the ozone hole increased the exposure to incoming radiation (UVBR, UVAR and PAR) and, thus, increased photoinhibition during austral spring (September to November) in the study area (from 0.014 to 0.025 Tg C yr(-1) ). This increase in photoinhibition was minor compared to the overall increase in PP, however. Climate change hence had an overall positive impact on PP in the WAP waters.

  19. Degradation of net primary production in a semiarid rangeland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hasan; Prince, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic land degradation affects many biogeophysical processes, including reductions of net primary production (NPP). Degradation occurs at scales from small fields to continental and global. While measurement and monitoring of NPP in small areas is routine in some studies, for scales larger than 1 km2, and certainly global, there is no regular monitoring and certainly no attempt to measure degradation. Quantitative and repeatable techniques to assess the extent of deleterious effects and monitor changes are needed to evaluate its effects on, for example, economic yields of primary products such as crops, lumber, and forage, and as a measure of land surface properties which are currently missing from dynamic global vegetation models, assessments of carbon sequestration, and land surface models of heat, water, and carbon exchanges. This study employed the local NPP scaling (LNS) approach to identify patterns of anthropogenic degradation of NPP in the Burdekin Dry Tropics (BDT) region of Queensland, Australia, from 2000 to 2013. The method starts with land classification based on the environmental factors presumed to control (NPP) to group pixels having similar potential NPP. Then, satellite remotely sensing data were used to compare actual NPP with its potential. The difference in units of mass of carbon and percentage loss were the measure of degradation. The entire BDT (7.45 × 106 km2) was investigated at a spatial resolution of 250 × 250 m. The average annual reduction in NPP due to anthropogenic land degradation in the entire BDT was -2.14 MgC m-2 yr-1, or 17 % of the non-degraded potential, and the total reduction was -214 MgC yr-1. Extreme average annual losses of 524.8 gC m-2 yr-1 were detected. Approximately 20 % of the BDT was classified as "degraded". Varying severities and rates of degradation were found among the river basins, of which the Belyando and Suttor were highest. Interannual, negative trends in reductions of NPP occurred in 7 % of the

  20. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Christini; R.K. Dawless; S.P. Ray; D.A. Weirauch, Jr.

    2001-11-05

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be

  1. North American Gross Primary Productivity: Regional Characterization and Interannual Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, I. T.; Denning, A.; Stockli, R.

    2009-12-01

    Seasonality and variability in North American photosynthetic activity are investigated. Using the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) we simulate 24 years (1983-2006) and evaluate regional and seasonal contribution to annual mean Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) as well as its interannual variability. The largest productivity occurs in tropical Mexico, the southeast U.S. and small areas in the Pacific Northwest. Annual variability is largest in tropical Mexico, the desert Southwest, and the Midwestern corridor that separates the eastern forests from the intermountain west. We find that several areas (Midwest, Northeast, SouthWest, Boreal Canada) have an elevated contribution to interannual variability when compared to other regions, but no single region or season consistently determines continental annual GPP anomaly on an annual basis. GPP variability in NA is highly heterogeneous in space and time. We find that GPP variability is generally dependent upon soil moisture in low- and mid-latitudes, and on temperature in the north. Soil moisture is a better metric than raw precipitation as it integrates precipitation events temporally. EOF analysis shows no significance on an annual basis, but a band from the central plains through New England shows a coherent signal for springtime GPP anomalies. As the springtime anomaly is the largest contributor to the annual GPP variability in almost half of the years simulated (11 of 24), we can posit that this region has significant influence over annual North American GPP variability. However, when regressed against climate modes such as El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Arctic Oscillation (AO) or Pacific-North America (PNA) patterns, we find that no climate mode can be associated with variability over the entire region highlighted by the EOF analysis. Furthermore, we find that while a general response to temperature is seen (warmer spring implies longer growing season implies anomalous GPP uptake of carbon), in some regions the

  2. Gross primary production of global forest ecosystems has been overestimated

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianyong; Yan, Xiaodong; Dong, Wenjie; Chou, Jieming

    2015-01-01

    Coverage rate, a critical variable for gridded forest area, has been neglected by previous studies in estimating the annual gross primary production (GPP) of global forest ecosystems. In this study, we investigated to what extent the coverage rate could impact forest GPP estimates from 1982 to 2011. Here we show that the traditional calculation without considering the coverage rate globally overestimated the forest gross carbon dioxide uptake by approximately 8.7%, with a value of 5.12 ± 0.23 Pg C yr−1, which is equivalent to 48% of the annual emissions from anthropogenic activities in 2012. Actually, the global annual GPP of forest ecosystems is approximately 53.71 ± 4.83 Pg C yr−1 for the past 30 years by taking the coverage rate into account. Accordingly, we argue that forest annual GPP calculated by previous studies has been overestimated due to the exaggerated forest area, and therefore, coverage rate may be a required factor to further quantify the global carbon cycle. PMID:26027557

  3. Estimation of gross primary production capacity from global satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Thanyapraneedkul, Juthasinee; Furumi, Shinobu; Soyama, Noriko; Daigo, Motomasa

    2012-10-01

    To estimate gross primary production (GPP), the process of photosynthesis was considered as two separate phases: capacity and reduction. The reduction phase is influenced by environmental conditions such as soil moisture and weather conditions such as vapor pressure differences. For a particular leaf, photosynthetic capacity mainly depends on the amount of chlorophyll and the RuBisCO enzyme. The chlorophyll content can be estimated by the color of the leaf, and leaf color can be detected by optical sensors. We used the chlorophyll content of leaves to estimate the level of GPP. A previously developed framework for GPP capacity estimation employs a chlorophyll index. The index is based on the linear relationship between the chlorophyll content of a leaf and the maximum photosynthesis at PAR =2000 (μmolm -2s-1) on a light-response curve under low stress conditions. As a first step, this study examined the global distribution of the index and found that regions with high chlorophyll index values in winter corresponded to tropical rainforest areas. The seasonal changes in the chlorophyll index differed from those shown by the normalized difference vegetation index. Next, the capacity of GPP was estimated from the light-response curve using the index. Most regions exhibited a higher GPP capacity than that estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations, except in areas of tropical rainforest, where the GPP capacity and the MODIS GPP estimates were almost identical.

  4. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering enhances terrestrial gross primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Neely, R. R., III

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering could impact the terrestrial carbon cycle by enhancing the carbon sink. With an 8 Tg yr-1 injection of SO2 to balance a Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6.0) scenario, we conducted climate model simulations with the Community Earth System Model, with the Community Atmospheric Model 4 fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (CAM4-chem). During the geoengineering period, as compared to RCP6.0, land-averaged downward visible diffuse radiation increased 3.2 W m-2 (11 %). The enhanced diffuse radiation combined with the cooling increased plant photosynthesis by 2.4 %, which could contribute to an additional 3.8 ± 1.1 Gt C yr-1 global gross primary productivity without nutrient limitation. This increase could potentially increase the land carbon sink. Suppressed plant and soil respiration due to the cooling would reduce natural land carbon emission and therefore further enhance the terrestrial carbon sink during the geoengineering period. This beneficial impact of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering would need to be balanced by a large number of potential risks in any future decisions about implementation of geoengineering.

  5. Spatial scaling of net primary productivity using subpixel landcover information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. F.; Chen, Jing M.; Ju, Wei M.; Ren, L. L.

    2008-10-01

    Gridding the land surface into coarse homogeneous pixels may cause important biases on ecosystem model estimations of carbon budget components at local, regional and global scales. These biases result from overlooking subpixel variability of land surface characteristics. Vegetation heterogeneity is an important factor introducing biases in regional ecological modeling, especially when the modeling is made on large grids. This study suggests a simple algorithm that uses subpixel information on the spatial variability of land cover type to correct net primary productivity (NPP) estimates, made at coarse spatial resolutions where the land surface is considered as homogeneous within each pixel. The algorithm operates in such a way that NPP obtained from calculations made at coarse spatial resolutions are multiplied by simple functions that attempt to reproduce the effects of subpixel variability of land cover type on NPP. Its application to a carbon-hydrology coupled model(BEPS-TerrainLab model) estimates made at a 1-km resolution over a watershed (named Baohe River Basin) located in the southwestern part of Qinling Mountains, Shaanxi Province, China, improved estimates of average NPP as well as its spatial variability.

  6. Large historical growth in global terrestrial gross primary production.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J E; Berry, J A; Seibt, U; Smith, S J; Montzka, S A; Launois, T; Belviso, S; Bopp, L; Laine, M

    2017-04-05

    Growth in terrestrial gross primary production (GPP)-the amount of carbon dioxide that is 'fixed' into organic material through the photosynthesis of land plants-may provide a negative feedback for climate change. It remains uncertain, however, to what extent biogeochemical processes can suppress global GPP growth. As a consequence, modelling estimates of terrestrial carbon storage, and of feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate, remain poorly constrained. Here we present a global, measurement-based estimate of GPP growth during the twentieth century that is based on long-term atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) records, derived from ice-core, firn and ambient air samples. We interpret these records using a model that simulates changes in COS concentration according to changes in its sources and sinks-including a large sink that is related to GPP. We find that the observation-based COS record is most consistent with simulations of climate and the carbon cycle that assume large GPP growth during the twentieth century (31% ± 5% growth; mean ± 95% confidence interval). Although this COS analysis does not directly constrain models of future GPP growth, it does provide a global-scale benchmark for historical carbon-cycle simulations.

  7. Natural organic matter as global antennae for primary production.

    PubMed

    Van Trump, J Ian; Rivera Vega, Fransheska J; Coates, John D

    2013-05-01

    Humic substances (HS) are high-molecular-weight complex refractory organics that are ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic environments. While resistant to microbial degradation, these compounds nevertheless support microbial metabolism via oxidation or reduction of their (hydro)quinone moieties. As such, they are known to be important electron sinks for respiratory and fermentative bacteria and electron sources for denitrifying and perchlorate-reducing bacteria. HS also strongly promote abiotic reduction of Fe(III) when irradiated with light. Here, we show that HS-enhanced Fe(III) photoreduction can also drive chemolithotrophic microbial respiration by producing Fe(II), which functions as a respiratory electron donor. Due to their molecular complexity, HS absorb most of the electromagnetic spectrum and can act as broad-spectrum antennae converting radiant energy into bioavailable chemical energy. The finding that chemolithotrophic organisms can utilize this energy has important implications for terrestrial, and possibly extraterrestrial, microbial processes and offers an alternative mechanism of radiation-driven primary productivity to that of phototrophy.

  8. Net Primary Production of boreal forests in the Krasnoyarsk Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larko, Alexander; Chernetskiy, Maxim; Shevyrnogov, Anatoly

    One of the most important characteristics used in the biosphere change control is net primary production dynamics. (NPP) NPP shows the amount of pure carbon fixed in plants for a definite time period, essentially, this indicator reflects the intensity of a carbon biochemical cycle. Being the main indicator of the ecosystem condition, NPP has great significance, since it is also an indicator of biosphere carbon flux intensity. Its use is important for ecological investigations, carbon cycle calculation and the distribution of natural recourses. Ground true ecosystems determine most of seasonal and annual changes in the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Satellite methods of investigation are known to be effectively used for the calculation of the global NPP distribution. In its turn, the study of boreal forest NPP dynamics is required to introduce clarity into global models and to understand their role in the carbon cycle. At present, there is a number of calculation models for obtaining NPP. In the given work, an estimate of NPP for boreal forests of the Krasnoyarsk Territory is made. For the calculation, the GloPEM model employing TERRA/MODIS and TOMS data has been used. The obtained data have been compared with satellite temperature and ground true climatic data and, also, with the forest vegetation maps. The maps contained data about the biomass amount and the forest species composition, which allowed one to obtain the results showing the nonuniformity of NPP distribution depending on the climatic conditions, species composition and the latitude of the objects under study.

  9. Hydrogen-rich water alleviates aluminum-induced inhibition of root elongation in alfalfa via decreasing nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Cui, Weiti; Zhu, Kaikai; Xie, Yanjie; Zhang, Chunhua; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-02-28

    One of the earliest and distinct symptoms of aluminum (Al) toxicity is the inhibition of root elongation. Although hydrogen gas (H2) is recently described as an important bio-regulator in plants, whether and how H2 regulates Al-induced inhibition of root elongation is largely unknown. To address these gaps, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to investigate a physiological role of H2 and its possible molecular mechanism. Individual or simultaneous (in particular) exposure of alfalfa seedlings to Al, or a fresh but not old nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP), not only increased NO production, but also led to a significant inhibition of root elongation. Above responses were differentially alleviated by pretreatment with 50% saturation of HRW. The addition of HRW also alleviated the appearance of Al toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of seedling growth and less accumulation of Al. Subsequent results revealed that the removal of NO by the NO scavenger, similar to HRW, could decrease NO production and alleviate Al- or SNP-induced inhibition of root growth. Thus, we proposed that HRW alleviated Al-induced inhibition of alfalfa root elongation by decreasing NO production. Such findings may be applicable to enhance crop yield and improve stress tolerance.

  10. Aluminum salen complexes and tetrabutylammonium salts: a binary catalytic system for production of polycarbonates from CO2 and cyclohexene oxide.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Billodeaux, Damon R

    2005-03-07

    A series of complexes of the form (salen)AlZ, where H2salen = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediimine and various other salen derivatives and Z = Et or Cl, have been synthesized. Several of these complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography. An investigation of the utilization of these aluminum derivatives along with both ionic and neutral bases as cocatalysts for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and cyclohexene oxide has been conducted. By studying the reactivity of these complexes for this process as substituents on the diimine backbone and phenolate rings are altered, we have observed that aluminum prefers electron-withdrawing groups on the salen ligands, thereby producing an electrophilic metal center to be most active toward production of polycarbonates from CO2 and cyclohexene oxide. For example, the complex derived from H2salen = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediimine is essentially inactive when compared to the analogous derivative containing nitro substituents in the 3-positions of the phenolate groups. This is to be contrasted with the catalytic activity observed for the (salen)CrX systems, where electron-donating salen ligands greatly enhanced the reactivity of these complexes for the coupling of CO2 and epoxides. While (salen)AlZ complexes are capable of producing poly(cyclohexene oxide) carbonate with low amounts of polyether linkage along with small quantities of cyclic carbonate byproducts, their reactivities, covering a turnover frequency range of 5.2-35.4 mol of epoxide consumed/(mol of Al x h), are greatly reduced when compared to their (salen)CrX analogues under identical reaction conditions.

  11. Attributing Changes in Gross Primary Productivity from 1901 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, C. R.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Michalak, A. M.; Cook, R. B.; El Masri, B.; Hayes, D. J.; Huang, M.; Jacobson, A. R.; Jain, A. K.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Tian, H.; Schaefer, K. M.; Wei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Model-based studies are foundational to perform diagnosis (has there been a change?) and attribution (what caused this change?) in the context of global environmental change. Here we employ a dual method approach using machine learning and simulation differencing across an ensemble of terrestrial biosphere models (TBM) to attribute changes in gross primary productivity (GPP) from 1901 to 2010. The simulations are taken from the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). For each TBM MsTMIP prescribes a semi-factorial set of five runs (globally at 0.5º spatial resolution) where time-varying controls on carbon metabolism are sequentially enabled. MsTMIP has a constrained simulation protocol -driving data, vegetation cover, boundary conditions, and steady-state spin up protocol are all standardized- such that only model structure varies and ensemble spread addresses process uncertainty. Applying this dual method to MsTMIP simulation output we attribute changes in GPP to changes in climate, land cover/land use change, atmospheric CO2, nitrogen deposition, near-surface air temperature, precipitation, and downwelling shortwave radiation as well as climate sigma (irreducible climate noise) and nonlinearity (interactions). Globally, the key factor associated with the Anthropocene, namely the sustained increase in atmospheric CO2, dominates changes in GPP across the full time period. Climate factors are of secondary importance and, along with land cover/land use change, may act to decrease GPP depending on decade and reference period. Despite differences in model structure attribution results across the full ensemble are generally consistent. Spatial morphologies, replicating the same dual approach by grid cell, exhibit high variability but with an atmospheric CO2 fertilization effect dominating the tropical zone. Our results suggest that the modern era of global warming, when viewed through the prism of GPP attribution, reaches back at

  12. [Migration of monomers and primary aromatic amines from nylon products].

    PubMed

    Mutsuga, Motoh; Yamaguchi, Miku; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Migration of 2 kinds of monomer and 21 kinds of primary aromatic amines (PAAs) from 21 kinds of nylon products such as turners, ladles and wrap film were determined. Samples were classified as regards materials by mean of pyrolysis-GC/MS. One sample was classified as nylon 6, 15 samples as nylon 66 and three samples as nylon 6/66 copolymers, while two samples were laminate of nylon 6 with polyethylene or polypropylene. All of the nylon 66 samples contained a small amount of ε-caprolactam (CPL), which is the nylon 6 monomer. Migration levels of monomers and PAAs at 60°C for 30 min into 20% ethanol were measured by LC/MS/MS. CPL was detected at the level of 0.015-38 µg/mL from all samples, excluding one wrap film sample, and 1,6-hexamethylenediamine was detected at the level of 0.002-0.013 µg/mL from all nylon 66 samples and one nylon 6/66 sample. In addition, 0.006-4.3 µg/mL of 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane from three samples, 0.032-0.23 µg/mL of aniline from four samples, 0.001 µg/mL of 4-chloroaniline from two samples, and 0.002 µg/mL of 2-toluidine and 0.066 mg/mL of 1-naphthylamine from one sample each were detected. The migration levels at 95 or 121°C were about 3 and 10 times the 60°C levels, respectively.

  13. Recent Changes in Primary Production in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade and a half, the continued loss of sea is in the Arctic ocean has led to a dramatic increase in marine net primary production (NPP). Increased annual NPP is often, but not always, associated with reduced sea-ice extent and a longer phytoplankton growing season (fewer days of ice cover). However, spatial patterns of enhanced annual NPP suggest that increased nutrient fluxes may also play a role. For instance, the greatest increases in Arctic NPP have been observed on the interior shelves in waters near the shelfbreak. These are areas where additional nutrients may become increasingly available as the sea ice retreats toward the pole, facilitated by increased shelfbreak upwelling. The eastern Arctic, which receives a large fraction of the high-nutrient Pacific water, exhibits an unusual pattern whereby increased annual NPP in more upstream waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas is offset by lower annual NPP in downstream regions of the Greenland Sea. The reason for the decline in NPP in downstream waters is unclear, especially if upstream nutrient supplies and NPP are increasing. Perhaps higher NPP on the Chukchi shelf has caused an increase in the rate of sediment denitrification, resulting in larger losses of fixed nitrogen. This would require that the large increase in annual NPP in the Beaufort Sea be driven by some other nutrient source, perhaps local shelfbreak upwelling. More efficient utilization of these nutrients, due perhaps to longer growing seasons, could eventually reduce inventories downstream, resulting in no change in annual NPP in the Baffin sector and a decline over the outflow shelves near Greenland. This is consistent with the observation that large increases in Chukchi Sea NPP preceded significant declines in Greenland Sea waters by more than a year. More work needs to be done to understand the factors responsible for both the large-scale and the small-scale patterns in annual NPP.

  14. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and autotrophic respiration (R) per unit ground area. Although available observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), viz., 0.3 to 0.7, it is generally recognized that much uncertainties exist in this fraction due to difficulties associated with the needed measurements. Additional uncertainties arise when these measurements are extrapolated to regional or global land surface using empirical equations, for example, using regression equations relating C to mean annual precipitation and air temperature. Here, a process-based approach has been taken to calculate A(sub g) and R using satellite and ancillary data. A(sub g) has been expressed as a product of radiation use efficiency, magnitude of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and normalized by stresses due to soil water shortage and air temperature away from the optimum range. A biophysical model has been used to determine the radiation use efficiency from the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf, foliage temperature, and the fraction of diffuse PAR incident on a canopy. All meteorological data (PAR, air temperature, precipitation, etc.) needed for the calculation are derived from satellite observations, while a land use, land cover data (based on satellite and ground measurements) have been used to assess the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf of varied cover type based on field measurements. R has been calculated as the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and live fine roots at a standard temperature of different land cover has been determined from their nitrogen content using field and satellite measurements, while that of living fraction of woody stem (viz., sapwood) from the seasonal maximum leaf area index as

  15. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2

  16. Alkali-Soluble Pectin Is the Primary Target of Aluminum Immobilization in Root Border Cells of Pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Qu, Mei; Fang, Jing; Shen, Ren Fang; Feng, Ying Ming; Liu, Jia You; Bian, Jian Feng; Wu, Li Shu; He, Yong Ming; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that a discrepancy of Al binding in cell wall constituents determines Al mobility in root border cells (RBCs) of pea (Pisum sativum), which provides protection for RBCs and root apices under Al toxicity. Plants of pea (P. sativum L. 'Zhongwan no. 6') were subjected to Al treatments under mist culture. The concentration of Al in RBCs was much higher than that in the root apex. The Al content in RBCs surrounding one root apex (10(4) RBCs) was approximately 24.5% of the total Al in the root apex (0-2.5 mm), indicating a shielding role of RBCs for the root apex under Al toxicity. Cell wall analysis showed that Al accumulated predominantly in alkali-soluble pectin (pectin 2) of RBCs. This could be attributed to a significant increase of uronic acids under Al toxicity, higher capacity of Al adsorption in pectin 2 [5.3-fold higher than that of chelate-soluble pectin (pectin 1)], and lower ratio of Al desorption from pectin 2 (8.5%) compared with pectin 1 (68.5%). These results indicate that pectin 2 is the primary target of Al immobilization in RBCs of pea, which impairs Al access to the intracellular space of RBCs and mobility to root apices, and therefore protects root apices and RBCs from Al toxicity.

  17. Alkali-Soluble Pectin Is the Primary Target of Aluminum Immobilization in Root Border Cells of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Qu, Mei; Fang, Jing; Shen, Ren Fang; Feng, Ying Ming; Liu, Jia You; Bian, Jian Feng; Wu, Li Shu; He, Yong Ming; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that a discrepancy of Al binding in cell wall constituents determines Al mobility in root border cells (RBCs) of pea (Pisum sativum), which provides protection for RBCs and root apices under Al toxicity. Plants of pea (P. sativum L. ‘Zhongwan no. 6’) were subjected to Al treatments under mist culture. The concentration of Al in RBCs was much higher than that in the root apex. The Al content in RBCs surrounding one root apex (104 RBCs) was approximately 24.5% of the total Al in the root apex (0–2.5 mm), indicating a shielding role of RBCs for the root apex under Al toxicity. Cell wall analysis showed that Al accumulated predominantly in alkali-soluble pectin (pectin 2) of RBCs. This could be attributed to a significant increase of uronic acids under Al toxicity, higher capacity of Al adsorption in pectin 2 [5.3-fold higher than that of chelate-soluble pectin (pectin 1)], and lower ratio of Al desorption from pectin 2 (8.5%) compared with pectin 1 (68.5%). These results indicate that pectin 2 is the primary target of Al immobilization in RBCs of pea, which impairs Al access to the intracellular space of RBCs and mobility to root apices, and therefore protects root apices and RBCs from Al toxicity. PMID:27679639

  18. Method of production of pure hydrogen near room temperature from aluminum-based hydride materials

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Balema, Viktor P.

    2004-08-10

    The present invention provides a cost-effective method of producing pure hydrogen gas from hydride-based solid materials. The hydride-based solid material is mechanically processed in the presence of a catalyst to obtain pure gaseous hydrogen. Unlike previous methods, hydrogen may be obtained from the solid material without heating, and without the addition of a solvent during processing. The described method of hydrogen production is useful for energy conversion and production technologies that consume pure gaseous hydrogen as a fuel.

  19. Examination of silicate limitation of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, China. I. Silicate being a limiting factor of phytoplankton primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Ji-Bin; Gao, Zhen-Hui; Chen, Yu

    2002-09-01

    Jiaozhou Bay data collected from May 1991 to February 1994, in 12 seasonal investigations, and provided the authors by the Ecological Station of Jiaozhou Bay, were analyzed to determine the spatiotemporal variations in temperature, light, nutrients (NO{3/-}-N, NO{2/-}-N, NH{4/+}-N, SiO{3/2-}-Si, PO{4/3-}-P), phytoplankton, and primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The results indicated that only silicate correlated well in time and space with, and had important effects on, the characteristics, dynamic cycles and trends of, primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The authors developed a corresponding dynamic model of primary production and silicate and water temperature. Eq. (1) of the model shows that the primary production variation is controlled by the nutrient Si and affected by water temperature; that the main factor controlling the primary production is Si; that water temperature affects the composition of the structure of phytoplankton assemblage; that the different populations of the phytoplankton assemblage occupy different ecological niches for C, the apparent ratio of conversion of silicate in seawater into phytoplankton biomas and D, the coefficient of water temperature's effect on phytoplankton biomass. The authors researched the silicon source of Jiaozhou Bay, the biogeochemical sediment process of the silicon, the phytoplankton predominant species and the phytoplankton structure. The authors considered silicate a limiting factor of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, whose decreasing concentration of silicate from terrestrial source is supposedly due to dilution by current and uptake by phytoplankton; quantified the silicate assimilated by phytoplankton, the intrinsic ratio of conversion of silicon into phytoplankton biomass, the proportion of silicate uptaken by phytoplankton and diluted by current; and found that the primary production of the phytoplankton is determined by the quantity of the silicate assimilated by them. The phenomenon of apparently high

  20. Photoneutron production in the primary barriers of medical accelerator rooms.

    PubMed

    McGinley, P H

    1992-04-01

    Several radiation surveys, at medical linear accelerator facilities where lead or steel had been used with concrete to fabricate the primary barriers, revealed the existence of a sizable neutron field outside the shielding. This neutron field is produced by photoneutrons generated in the metal portion of the shield when the primary x-ray beam is aimed at the barrier. A method was developed to calculate the neutron dose-equivalent rate expected outside a primary shield when it is irradiated by a high-energy x-ray beam. It was found that the minimum photoneutron dose was produced when the metal part of the shield was positioned inside the treatment room in front of the concrete and also by using steel in place of lead. A thickness of less than or equal to 17 cm of metal on the inner surface of the shield produced only a slight increase in the neutron dose equivalent outside the barrier.

  1. Short-term to seasonal variability in factors driving primary productivity in a shallow estuary: Implications for modeling production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canion, Andy; MacIntyre, Hugh L.; Phipps, Scott

    2013-10-01

    The inputs of primary productivity models may be highly variable on short timescales (hourly to daily) in turbid estuaries, but modeling of productivity in these environments is often implemented with data collected over longer timescales. Daily, seasonal, and spatial variability in primary productivity model parameters: chlorophyll a concentration (Chla), the downwelling light attenuation coefficient (kd), and photosynthesis-irradiance response parameters (Pmchl, αChl) were characterized in Weeks Bay, a nitrogen-impacted shallow estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Variability in primary productivity model parameters in response to environmental forcing, nutrients, and microalgal taxonomic marker pigments were analysed in monthly and short-term datasets. Microalgal biomass (as Chla) was strongly related to total phosphorus concentration on seasonal scales. Hourly data support wind-driven resuspension as a major source of short-term variability in Chla and light attenuation (kd). The empirical relationship between areal primary productivity and a combined variable of biomass and light attenuation showed that variability in the photosynthesis-irradiance response contributed little to the overall variability in primary productivity, and Chla alone could account for 53-86% of the variability in primary productivity. Efforts to model productivity in similar shallow systems with highly variable microalgal biomass may benefit the most by investing resources in improving spatial and temporal resolution of chlorophyll a measurements before increasing the complexity of models used in productivity modeling.

  2. The Aluminum Smelting Process and Innovative Alternative Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Drabløs, Per Arne

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The industrial aluminum production process is addressed. The purpose is to give a short but comprehensive description of the electrolysis cell technology, the raw materials used, and the health and safety relevance of the process. Methods: This article is based on a study of the extensive chemical and medical literature on primary aluminum production. Results: At present, there are two main technological challenges for the process—to reduce energy consumption and to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. A future step may be carbon dioxide gas capture and sequestration related to the electric power generation from fossil sources. Conclusions: Workers' health and safety have now become an integrated part of the aluminum business. Work-related injuries and illnesses are preventable, and the ultimate goal to eliminate accidents with lost-time injuries may hopefully be approached in the future. PMID:24806723

  3. Primary productivity in the southeast Pacific Ocean: Effect of enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Behrenfeld, M. ); Hardy, J.T. ); Gucinski, H.; Wones, A.G. )

    1990-01-09

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of predicted increases in solar UV-B radiation, resulting from stratospheric ozone depletion, on the primary production of natural marine phytoplankton assemblages over a wide latitudinal gradient. Primary production was measured every 2 to 4[degrees] latitude in the southeast Pacific using the carbon-14 technique. Fluorescent sunlamps were used to enhance the dose of UV-B radiation above ambient during shipboard incubations. Enhanced UV-B radiation caused a significant mean decrease of 34% in surface water primary production. Decreases in primary production increased with increasing assimilation efficiencies. Results indicate that predicted increases in ambient solar UV-B radiation could result in mean annual decreases of near-surface oceanic primary production of less than 1% near the equator to more than 34% at high southern latitudes.

  4. Elevation of arginine decarboxylase-dependent putrescine production enhances aluminum tolerance by decreasing aluminum retention in root cell walls of wheat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Sun, Chengliang; Wang, Jinghong; Ye, Yiquan; Lu, Lingli; Lin, Xianyong

    2015-12-15

    Aluminum (Al) stress induces putrescine (Put) accumulation in several plants and this response is proposed to alleviate Al toxicity. However, the mechanisms underlying this alleviation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that exposure to Al clearly increases Put accumulation in the roots of wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. 'Xi Aimai-1') and that this was accompanied by significant increase in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), a Put producing enzyme. Application of an ADC inhibitor (d-arginine) terminated the Al-induced Put accumulation, indicating that increased ADC activity may be responsible for the increase in Put accumulation in response to Al. The d-arginine treatment also increased the Al-induced accumulation of cell wall polysaccharides and the degree of pectin demethylation in wheat roots. Thus, it elevated Al retention in cell walls and exacerbated Al accumulation in roots, both of which aggravate Al toxicity in wheat plants. The opposite effects were true for exogenous Put application. These results suggest that ADC-dependent Put accumulation plays important roles in providing protection against Al toxicity in wheat plants through decreasing cell wall polysaccharides and increasing the degree of pectin methylation, thus decreasing Al retention in the cell walls.

  5. Extraction processes for the production of aluminum, titanium, iron, magnesium, and oxygen and nonterrestrial sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Choudary, U. V.; Erstfeld, T. E.; Williams, R. J.; Chang, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    The suitability of existing terrestrial extractive metallurgical processes for the production of Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, and O2 from nonterrestrial resources is examined from both thermodynamic and kinetic points of view. Carbochlorination of lunar anorthite concentrate in conjunction with Alcoa electrolysis process for Al; carbochlorination of lunar ilmenite concentrate followed by Ca reduction of TiO2; and subsequent reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 for Ti and Fe, respectively, are suggested. Silicothermic reduction of olivine concentrate was found to be attractive for the extraction of Mg becaue of the technological knowhow of the process. Aluminothermic reduction of olivine is the other possible alternative for the production of magnesium. The large quantities of carbon monoxide generated in the metal extraction processes can be used to recover carbon and oxygen by a combination of the following methods: (1) simple disproportionation of CO,(2) methanation of CO and electrolysis of H2O, and (3) solid-state electrolysis of gas mixtures containing CO, CO2, and H2O. The research needed for the adoption of earth-based extraction processes for lunar and asteroidal minerals is outlined.

  6. Production of a novel bioflocculant and its flocculation performance in aluminum removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixin; Ma, Fang; Zuo, Huimin

    2016-04-02

    A novel bioflocculant CBF with high flocculating activity, produced by mixed culture of Rhizobium radiobacter F2 and Bacillus sphaericus F6 from soil, was investigated with regard to its production and flocculation performance in Al(III) removal. The most preferred carbon source, nitrogen source and C/N ratio (w/w) for strains F2 and F6 to produce CBF were glucose, urea and 20, respectively. The optimal inoculum size for CBF production was 10 % (v/v). The optimal initial pH, culture temperature and shaking speed were 7-8, 30°C and 140 r/min for 24 h, respectively, under which the flocculating activity of the bioflocculant reached 98.52 %. According to literature review, flocculant dosage, coagulant aid dosage, pH, hydraulic condition of coagulation and sedimentation time are considered as influencing parameters for CBF flocculation performance in Al(III) removal by L16(4(5)) orthogonal design. The optimal conditions for Al(III) removal obtained through analysis and verification experiments were as follows: CBF, 28 mg/L; coagulant aid, 1.5 mL/L; initial pH, 8.0; and hydraulic conditions of coagulation: stir speed, 160 r/min; stir time, 40 s; and sedimentation time, 30 min. Under the optimal conditions, the removal efficiency of Al(III) was 92.95 %. Overall, these findings indicate that bioflocculant CBF offers an effective alternative method of decreasing Al(III) during drinking water treatment.

  7. Production of a novel bioflocculant and its flocculation performance in aluminum removal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixin; Ma, Fang; Zuo, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel bioflocculant CBF with high flocculating activity, produced by mixed culture of Rhizobium radiobacter F2 and Bacillus sphaericus F6 from soil, was investigated with regard to its production and flocculation performance in Al(III) removal. The most preferred carbon source, nitrogen source and C/N ratio (w/w) for strains F2 and F6 to produce CBF were glucose, urea and 20, respectively. The optimal inoculum size for CBF production was 10 % (v/v). The optimal initial pH, culture temperature and shaking speed were 7–8, 30°C and 140 r/min for 24 h, respectively, under which the flocculating activity of the bioflocculant reached 98.52 %. According to literature review, flocculant dosage, coagulant aid dosage, pH, hydraulic condition of coagulation and sedimentation time are considered as influencing parameters for CBF flocculation performance in Al(III) removal by L16(45) orthogonal design. The optimal conditions for Al(III) removal obtained through analysis and verification experiments were as follows: CBF, 28 mg/L; coagulant aid, 1.5 mL/L; initial pH, 8.0; and hydraulic conditions of coagulation: stir speed, 160 r/min; stir time, 40 s; and sedimentation time, 30 min. Under the optimal conditions, the removal efficiency of Al(III) was 92.95 %. Overall, these findings indicate that bioflocculant CBF offers an effective alternative method of decreasing Al(III) during drinking water treatment. PMID:27002778

  8. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  9. An Exploration of Behavioral Health Productivity and Billing Practices Within Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Cederna-Meko, Crystal L; Ellens, Rebecca E H; Burrell, Katherine M; Perry, Danika S; Rafiq, Fatima

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVES : To provide descriptive information on behavioral health (BH) productivity and billing practices within a pediatric primary care setting. METHODS : This retrospective investigation reviewed 30 months of electronic medical records and financial data. RESULTS : The percent of BH provider time spent in direct patient care (productivity) was 35.28% overall, with a slightly higher quarterly average (M  =  36.42%; SD  =  6.46%). In the 646.75 hr BH providers spent in the primary care setting, $52,050.00 was charged for BH services delivered ($80.48 hourly average). CONCLUSIONS : BH productivity and billing within pediatric primary care were suboptimal and likely multifactorially derived. To promote integrated primary care sustainability, the authors recommend three future aims: improve BH productivity, demonstrate the value-added contributions of BH services within primary care, and advocate for BH-supporting health care reform.

  10. An Exploration of Behavioral Health Productivity and Billing Practices Within Pediatric Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Ellens, Rebecca E. H.; Burrell, Katherine M.; Perry, Danika S.; Rafiq, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide descriptive information on behavioral health (BH) productivity and billing practices within a pediatric primary care setting. Methods This retrospective investigation reviewed 30 months of electronic medical records and financial data. Results The percent of BH provider time spent in direct patient care (productivity) was 35.28% overall, with a slightly higher quarterly average (M  =  36.42%; SD  =  6.46%). In the 646.75 hr BH providers spent in the primary care setting, $52,050.00 was charged for BH services delivered ($80.48 hourly average). Conclusions BH productivity and billing within pediatric primary care were suboptimal and likely multifactorially derived. To promote integrated primary care sustainability, the authors recommend three future aims: improve BH productivity, demonstrate the value-added contributions of BH services within primary care, and advocate for BH-supporting health care reform. PMID:27498983

  11. Transformation products of submicron-sized aluminum-substituted magnetite: Color and reductant solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetite, when present as fine particles, is soluble in acid ammonium oxalate (pH equals 3). However, the commonly used extractant for free iron oxides (i.e., citrate dithionite-bicarbonate (CDB) is not very effective in dissolving magnetite in soils and geologic materials. Upon oxidation, magnetite transforms to maghemite; at elevated temperatures, maghemite inverts to hematite. This transformation causes a change in color from black to red and may affect the reductant solubility as well. The objectives here were to examine the color and reflectance spectral characteristics of products during the transformation of magnetite to maghemite to hematite and to study the effect of Al-substitution in magnetite on the above process. Reductant solubility of Al-substituted magnetite, maghemite, and hematite was also studied. In summary, the transformation of magnetite to maghemite was accompanied by a change in color from black to red because of the oxidation of Fe2(+) to Fe3(+). The phase change maghemite to hematite had a relatively minor effect on the color and the reflectance spectra.

  12. Fast Reactions of Aluminum and Explosive Decomposition Products in a Post-Detonation Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappan, Bryce; Manner, Virginia; Lloyd, Joseph; Pemberton, Steven; Explosives Applications; Special Projects Team

    2011-06-01

    In order to determine the reaction behavior of Al in HMX/cast-cured binder formulations shortly after the passage of the detonation, a series of cylinder tests was performed on formulations with varying amounts of 2 μm spherical Al as well as LiF (an inert surrogate for Al). In these studies, both detonation velocity and cylinder expansion velocity are measured in order to determine exactly how and when Al contributes to the explosive event, particularly in the presence of oxidizing/energetic binders. The U.S. Army ARDEC at Picatinny has recently coined the term ``combined effects explosives'' for these materials as they demonstrate both high metal pushing capability and high blast ability. This study is aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the reaction of Al with explosives decomposition products, where both the detonation and post-detonation environment are analyzed. Reaction rates of Al metal are determined via comparison of predicted performance based on thermoequilibrium calculations. The JWL equation of state, detonation velocities, wall velocities, and parameters at the C-J plane are some of the parameters that will be discussed.

  13. Fast reactions of aluminum and explosive decomposition products in a post-detonation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappan, Bryce C.; Manner, Virginia W.; Lloyd, Joseph M.; Pemberton, Steven J.

    2012-03-01

    In order to determine the reaction behavior of Al in RDX or HMX/cast-cured binder formulations shortly after the passage of the detonation, a series of cylinder tests was performed on formulations comprising of varying binder systems and either 3.5 μm spherical Al or LiF (an inert salt with a similar molecular weight and density to Al). In these studies, both detonation velocity and cylinder expansion velocity are measured in order to determine exactly how and when Al contributes to the explosive event, particularly in the presence of oxidizing/energetic binders. The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Laboratory at Picatinny have recently coined the term "combined effects" explosives for materials such as these; as they demonstrate both high metal pushing capability and high blast ability. This study is aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the reaction of Al with explosives decomposition products, where both the detonation and early post-detonation environment are analyzed. Reaction rates of Al metal are investigated via comparison of predicted performance based on thermoequilibrium calculations. The detonation velocities, wall velocities, and parameters at the CJ plane are some of the parameters that will be discussed.

  14. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  18. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. The Impact of Submesoscale Physics on Primary Productivity of Plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-01-01

    Life in the ocean relies on the photosynthetic production of phytoplankton, which is influenced by the availability of light and nutrients that are modulated by a host of physical processes. Submesoscale processes are particularly relevant to phytoplankton productivity because the timescales on which they act are similar to those of phytoplankton growth. Their dynamics are associated with strong vorticity and strain rates that occur on lateral scales of 0.1-10 km. They can support vertical velocities as large as 100 m d-1 and play a crucial role in transporting nutrients into the sunlit ocean for phytoplankton production. In regimes with deep surface mixed layers, submesoscale instabilities can cause stratification within days, thereby increasing light exposure for phytoplankton trapped close to the surface. These instabilities help to create and maintain localized environments that favor the growth of phytoplankton, contribute to productivity, and cause enormous heterogeneity in the abundance of phytoplankton, which has implications for interactions within the ecosystem.

  5. The Impact of Submesoscale Physics on Primary Productivity of Plankton.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-01-01

    Life in the ocean relies on the photosynthetic production of phytoplankton, which is influenced by the availability of light and nutrients that are modulated by a host of physical processes. Submesoscale processes are particularly relevant to phytoplankton productivity because the timescales on which they act are similar to those of phytoplankton growth. Their dynamics are associated with strong vorticity and strain rates that occur on lateral scales of 0.1-10 km. They can support vertical velocities as large as 100 m d(-1) and play a crucial role in transporting nutrients into the sunlit ocean for phytoplankton production. In regimes with deep surface mixed layers, submesoscale instabilities can cause stratification within days, thereby increasing light exposure for phytoplankton trapped close to the surface. These instabilities help to create and maintain localized environments that favor the growth of phytoplankton, contribute to productivity, and cause enormous heterogeneity in the abundance of phytoplankton, which has implications for interactions within the ecosystem.

  6. Influence of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Primary Productivity in the Semi-Enclosed Bay in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, R.; Nishi, S.; Taniguchi, M.; Tominaga, O.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have shown that submarine groundwater discharge is an alternative nutrient pathway and can drive primary production in coastal seas. However, very little is known about an exact relationship between input of groundwater and response of primary production. To clarify the relationship, we conducted the field survey in the semi-enclosed coastal bay in Japan (Obama Bay). There are abundant amounts of groundwater resources in the basin. Firstly, we conducted 222Rn continuous measurement along the coast in March 2013 to obtain the spatial difference of groundwater impact. As a result, 222Rn activity clearly showed that groundwater discharge concentrates in the western part of the bay head. We thus conducted in-situ measurements of primary productivity using stable 13C tracer method and environmental parameters (ex. 222Rn activity, light intensity, temperature and nutrient concentrations) at 6 stations within the western bay head in July and August 2013. Primary productivity within the western bay head changed from 11.0 to 49.5 μg C L-1 hr-1 in July and from 9.3 to 32.4 μg C L-1 hr-1 in August. Moreover, there was significant relationship between primary productivity and 222Rn concentration in both months. Although light intensity and water temperature were different in each station and month, concentrations of nutrients limited primary productivity. These results showed that nutrient supply from SGD would affect crucial impact on primary productivity in Obama Bay.

  7. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-Specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2014-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (50, the equivalent of 20 PgC y-1. Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed to 20 (7 PgC y-1 of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10 (4 PgC y(sub-1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (45) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4 (1-2 PgC y-1. We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nio Index, MEI) and regional climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p 0.05) between the MEI and the class-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatomscyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect on the class-specific primary production in the Southern Ocean. These results provide a modeling and

  8. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  9. Ecological risks of Aluminum production and contaminated area by red mud in Western Hungary (Ajka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasulov, Oqil; Horváth, Adrienn; Bidló, András; Winkler, Dániel

    2016-04-01

    In October 2010, Hungary experienced one of the most severe environmental disasters: the dam wall of a red mud depository of an alumina plant in collapsed and more than 1 million m3 of toxic sludge flooded the surrounding area. Red mud is a strongly alkaline (pH of 9-12.5) by-product due to the high NaOH content. Apart from residual minerals and oxides, its components also include heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, Pb, Ni, Co. As it has already been assessed, red mud had considerable effect on soil properties and thus on soil biodiversity. The aim of our study was to determine the aftereffects of red mud pollution on the soil mesofauna (Collembola). Study plots were selected in the area affected by the toxic flood, in agricultural and grassland habitats, at different distances (0.3 to 12.5 km) from the contamination source. Control plots of each habitat types were selected for comparative analyses. Soil samples were taken during the summer of 2015, five years after the red mud disaster. From each of the selected plots, 5 soil cores of 100 cm3 volume (3.6 cm in diameter and 10 cm in depth) were sampled from which springtails were extracted within 14 days using a modified Tullgren apparatus. Simultaneously with the Collembola sampling, we collected soil samples on each plots in order to determine soil properties (pH, CaCO3, particle size distribution) and the degree of heavy metal pollution. 25 heavy metals were measured (including total Hg) following the method of total (cc. HNO3 + H2O2-soluble) and bioavailable (NH4-acetate + EDTA-soluble) element content using ICP-OES and AMA 254. The studied habitats presented neutral to moderately alkaline soils (pH 7.2-8.1). Total metal content was higher in the plots formerly affected by red mud flood. The Hg concentration ranged from 0.023 to 1.167 mg.kg-1, exceeding the threshold concentration (0.5 mg.kg-1) defined by Hungarian legislation for toxic trace metals in soil. The collected 1442 Collembola specimens belong to 32

  10. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile; Gregg, Watson

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton is responsible for over half of the net primary production on earth. The knowledge on the contribution of various phytoplankton groups to the total primary production is still poorly understood. Data from satellite observations suggest that for upwelling regions, photosynthetic rates by microplankton is higher than that of nanoplankton but that when the spatial extent is considered, the production by nanoplankton is comparable or even larger than microplankton. Here, we used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (approx. 50%) followed by coccolithophores and chlorophytes. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (>45 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nino Index, MEI) and 'regional' climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability. These results provide a modeling and data assimilation perspective to phytoplankton partitioning of primary production and contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of the carbon cycle in the oceans at a global scale.

  11. Primary production and canopy cover in bitterbrush-cheatgrass communities

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, W.H.; Sauer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Aboveground grass and forb production averaged 126 g m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ and ranged between 10 and 195 grams over a four year period 1975-1978. The low production year was 1977, a year of extreme drought. Production was not significantly different between unburned sites and burned sites five years post burning (1970). Canopy cover and species composition were similar on burned and unburned sites except for the shrubs, bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), which were killed by burning. There was no indication that shrubs were invading the burned areas as seedlings or vegetatively through sprouting. The implications of burning and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) management are briefly discussed.

  12. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Supplement: An evaluation of benthic habitat primary productivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Balcom, B.J.; Foster, M.A.; Fourqurean, J.J.; Heine, J.N.; Leonard, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Literature on current primary productivity was reviewed and evaluated for each of nine benthic communities or habitats, estimates of daily and annual benthic primary productivity were derived within each community, the benthic primary estimates were related to an estimate of areal extent of each community within or adjacent to each OCS planning area. Direct comparisons between habitats was difficult because of the varying measures and methodologies used. Coastal marshes were the most prevalent habitat type evaluated. Mangrove and coral reef habitats were highly productive but occur within few planning areas. Benthic diatoms and blue-green algae are less productive in terms of estimated annual productivity on a per square meter basis; these habitats have the potential to occur across wide areas of the OCS and should not be overlooked.

  13. Inflectional morphology in primary progressive aphasia: an elicited production study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen M; Brandt, Temre H; Henry, Maya L; Babiak, Miranda; Ogar, Jennifer M; Salli, Chelsey; Wilson, Lisa; Peralta, Karen; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2014-09-01

    Inflectional morphology lies at the intersection of phonology, syntax and the lexicon, three language domains that are differentially impacted in the three main variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). To characterize spared and impaired aspects of inflectional morphology in PPA, we elicited inflectional morphemes in 48 individuals with PPA and 13 healthy age-matched controls. We varied the factors of regularity, frequency, word class, and lexicality, and used voxel-based morphometry to identify brain regions where atrophy was predictive of deficits on particular conditions. All three PPA variants showed deficits in inflectional morphology, with the specific nature of the deficits dependent on the anatomical and linguistic features of each variant. Deficits in inflecting low-frequency irregular words were associated with semantic PPA, with lexical/semantic deficits, and with left temporal atrophy. Deficits in inflecting pseudowords were associated with non-fluent/agrammatic and logopenic variants, with phonological deficits, and with left frontal and parietal atrophy.

  14. Inflectional morphology in primary progressive aphasia: An elicited production study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen M.; Brandt, Temre H.; Henry, Maya L.; Babiak, Miranda; Ogar, Jennifer M.; Salli, Chelsey; Wilson, Lisa; Peralta, Karen; Miller, Bruce L.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Inflectional morphology lies at the intersection of phonology, syntax and the lexicon, three language domains that are differentially impacted in the three main variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). To characterize spared and impaired aspects of inflectional morphology in PPA, we elicited inflectional morphemes in 48 individuals with PPA and 13 healthy age-matched controls. We varied the factors of regularity, frequency, word class, and lexicality, and used voxel-based morphometry to identify brain regions where atrophy was predictive of deficits on particular conditions. All three PPA variants showed deficits in inflectional morphology, with the specific nature of the deficits dependent on the anatomical and linguistic features of each variant. Deficits in inflecting low-frequency irregular words were associated with semantic PPA, with lexical/semantic deficits, and with left temporal atrophy. Deficits in inflecting pseudowords were associated with non-fluent/agrammatic and logopenic variants, with phonological deficits, and with left frontal and parietal atrophy. PMID:25129631

  15. Fission Product Migration in Primary System and Containment

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-01

    Version 00 ART MOD2 aims at a comprehensive analysis for the FP behaviour in primary system and in containment during severe accidents and therefore the code considers the removal of radio-nuclides of up to 60 materials including chemical compounds by natural deposition and by the engineered safety features (ESF) such as spray systems. As for the natural deposition of radio-nuclides, the code can consider the phenomena such as gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, Brownian diffusion, diffusion under laminar or turbulent flows, resuspension, condensation, chemisorption and revaporization. The code also models the aerosol growth by agglomeration of aerosols and condensation/evaporation of volatile material at the aerosol surface. Recently, the models for iodine chemistry in containment sump water was incorporated into ART MOD2 ART MOD2 was modified in January 2015 to correct coding errors and improve the vibration of the calculation result of water (H2O) vapor.

  16. Will Global Change Effect Primary Productivity in Coastal Ecosystems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Algae are the base of coastal food webs because they provide the source of organic carbon for the remaining members of the community. Thus, the rate that they produce organic carbon to a large extent controls the productivity of the entire ecosystem. Factors that control algal productivity range from the physical (e.g., temperature, light), chemical (e.g., nutrient levels) to the biological (e.g., grazing). Currently, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide surficial fluxes of ultraviolet radiation are rising. Both of these environmental variables can have a profound effect on algal productivity. Atmospheric carbon dioxide may increase surficial levels of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our laboratory and field studies of algal mats and phytoplankton cultures under ambient and elevated levels of pCO2 show that elevated levels of inorganic carbon can cause an increase in photosynthetic rates. In some cases, this increase will cause an increase in phytoplankton numbers. There may be an increase in the excretion of fixed carbon, which in turn may enhance bacterial productivity. Alternatively, in analogy with studies on the effect of elevated pCO2 on plants, the phytoplankton could change their carbon to nitrogen ratios, which will effect the feeding of the planktonic grazers. The seasonal depletion of stratospheric ozone has resulted in elevated fluxes of UVB radiation superimposed on the normal seasonal variation. Present surface UV fluxes have a significant impact on phytoplankton physiology, including the inhibition of the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis, inhibition of nitrogenase activity, inhibition of heterocyst formation, reduction in motility, increased synthesis of the UV-screening pigment scytonemin, and mutation. After reviewing these issues, recent work in our lab on measuring the effect of UV radiation on phytoplankton in the San Francisco Bay Estuary will be presented.

  17. Primary production and biovolume of various phototrophic plankton size fractions in three southeastern United States reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, D.; Wilde, E.W.

    1981-04-01

    Plankton size classes of < 3 ..mu..m consisting largely of unicellular cyanobacteria accounted for 15 to 40% of the total primary production and generally represented < 5% of the total phototrophic plankton biovolume in three South Carolina reservoirs.

  18. High Productivity Aluminum Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    initiating the weld process Repeatability Laser accurate to microns . Can be programmed to compensate for look-ahead distance Probe is accurate to...24 Figure 8 Torch and Seam Tracking Probe Engaged...Figure 3 – Mechanized Gullco System Used for HDGMAW Process Development Commercial seam tracking systems are either laser or tactile probe

  19. Production of aluminum-26

    DOEpatents

    Steinkruger, Fred J.; Phillips, Dennis R.

    1991-01-01

    A method of producing Al-26 from potassium chloride by exposing it to a proton beam in order to break potassium and chlorine atoms into smaller pieces, which include Al-26. The Al-26 is isolated from the potassium chloride and other substances produced by the beam by means of extraction and ion exchange.

  20. Alcoa/Alumax Reduces Energy Costs While Improving Its Dust Collection Systems (Mt. Holly Aluminum Production Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    In 1995, Alumax (subsequently acquired by Alcoa), an aluminum refiner, decided to improve the energy efficiency of its four-pot line dust collection systems at its smelter in Mount Holly, S.C. One consultant recommended installing variable frequency drive (VFD) controls on the fourfan system.

  1. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Stream Food Webs Declines with Increasing Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Walters, David M; Raikow, David F; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Mehling, Molly G; Kovach, Amanda; Oris, James T

    2015-07-07

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048-0.71 mg O2 L(-1) d(-1)) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems.

  2. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in stream food webs declines with increasing primary production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David; D.F. Raikow,; C.R. Hammerschmidt,; M.G. Mehling,; A. Kovach,; J.T. Oris,

    2015-01-01

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048–0.71 mg O2 L–1 d–1) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems.

  3. Effect of cobalt on the primary productivity of Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.M.; Panigrahi, S.; Azeez, P.A.

    1987-10-01

    Cobalt, a micronutrient for biological organisms, is a metal of wide use. Main sources of Co to the environment are combustion of fossil fuels, smelters, cobalt processing facilities, sewage and industrial wastes. Atomic power plants and nuclear weapon detonations form an important source of radioisotopes of this metal to the environment. Cobalt has been included in the 14 toxic trace elements of critical importance from the point of view of environmental pollution and health hazards. Cobalt deficiency leads to diseases like stunted growth. At toxic level, Co inhibits heme biosynthesis and enzyme activities. The present study reports the effect of cobalt on biomass productivity of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

  4. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  5. Patchiness of phytoplankton and primary production in Liaodong Bay, China

    PubMed Central

    Laws, Edward A.; Zhang, Haibo; Ye, Siyuan; Yuan, Hongming; Liu, Haiyue

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive study of water quality, phytoplankton biomass, and photosynthetic rates in Liaodong Bay, China, during June and July of 2013 revealed two large patches of high biomass and production with dimensions on the order of 10 km. Nutrient concentrations were above growth-rate-saturating concentrations throughout the bay, with the possible exception of phosphate at some stations. The presence of the patches therefore appeared to reflect the distribution of water temperature and variation of light penetration restricted by water turbidity. There was no patch of high phytoplankton biomass or production in a third, linear patch of water with characteristics suitable for rapid phytoplankton growth; the absence of a bloom in that patch likely reflected the fact that the width of the patch was less than the critical size required to overcome losses of phytoplankton to turbulent diffusion. The bottom waters of virtually all of the eastern half of the bay were below the depth of the mixed layer, and the lowest bottom water oxygen concentrations, 3–5 mg L–1, were found in that part of the bay. The water column in much of the remainder of the bay was within the mixed layer, and oxygen concentrations in both surface and bottom waters exceeded 5 mg L–1. PMID:28235070

  6. 40 CFR 52.2500 - Best available retrofit technology requirements for the Intalco Aluminum Corporation (Intalco...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for the Intalco Aluminum Corporation (Intalco Works) primary aluminum plant-Better than BART... Best available retrofit technology requirements for the Intalco Aluminum Corporation (Intalco Works) primary aluminum plant—Better than BART Alternative. (a) Applicability. This section applies to...

  7. Tight coupling of primary production and marine mammal reproduction in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Paterson, J Terrill; Rotella, Jay J; Arrigo, Kevin R; Garrott, Robert A

    2015-05-07

    Polynyas are areas of open water surrounded by sea ice and are important sources of primary production in high-latitude marine ecosystems. The magnitude of annual primary production in polynyas is controlled by the amount of exposure to solar radiation and sensitivity to changes in sea-ice extent. The degree of coupling between primary production and production by upper trophic-level consumers in these environments is not well understood, which prevents reliable predictions about population trajectories for species at higher trophic levels under potential future climate scenarios. In this study, we find a strong, positive relationship between annual primary production in an Antarctic polynya and pup production by ice-dependent Weddell seals. The timing of the relationship suggests reproductive effort increases to take advantage of high primary production occurring in the months after the birth pulse. Though the proximate causal mechanism is unknown, our results indicate tight coupling between organisms at disparate trophic levels on a short timescale, deepen our understanding of marine ecosystem processes, and raise interesting questions about why such coupling exists and what implications it has for understanding high-latitude ecosystems.

  8. Tight coupling of primary production and marine mammal reproduction in the Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, J. Terrill; Rotella, Jay J.; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Garrott, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Polynyas are areas of open water surrounded by sea ice and are important sources of primary production in high-latitude marine ecosystems. The magnitude of annual primary production in polynyas is controlled by the amount of exposure to solar radiation and sensitivity to changes in sea-ice extent. The degree of coupling between primary production and production by upper trophic-level consumers in these environments is not well understood, which prevents reliable predictions about population trajectories for species at higher trophic levels under potential future climate scenarios. In this study, we find a strong, positive relationship between annual primary production in an Antarctic polynya and pup production by ice-dependent Weddell seals. The timing of the relationship suggests reproductive effort increases to take advantage of high primary production occurring in the months after the birth pulse. Though the proximate causal mechanism is unknown, our results indicate tight coupling between organisms at disparate trophic levels on a short timescale, deepen our understanding of marine ecosystem processes, and raise interesting questions about why such coupling exists and what implications it has for understanding high-latitude ecosystems. PMID:25854885

  9. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial purity aluminum by the direct reduction process. First interim technical report, Phase D, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.J.

    1981-04-01

    Operation of the bench AF-reactor on burden with all reducing carbon exterior to the ore pellet resulted in low metal alloy product yields and prematurely terminated runs, indicating the need for intimate contact between alumina and carbon to produce oxycarbide liquid prior to reaction with solid silicon carbide. Carbon solubility tests made on 60Al-40Si alloys at 2200/sup 0/C in graphite crucibles indicated continued reaction to form SiC for one hour. Efficiency of reduction to SiC ranged from 68 to 100%. The A-C two-electrode submerged arc reactor pilot, SAR-II, was successfully operated on both alumina-clay-coke and alumina-silicon carbide-coke (from the VSR prereduction) burdens. Metal alloy was produced and tapped in each of four runs. The pilot crystallizer was operated to evalute the two-stage (stop and go) crystallization technique on obtaining high yields of Al in Al-Si eutectic, with a limit of 1.0% Fe and 0.1% Ti in the alloy product. 18 figures, 19 tables. (DLC)

  10. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  11. Role of eddy pumping in enhancing primary production in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Kolber, Zbigniew; Ziemann, David; Bienfang, Paul K.

    1991-01-01

    Eddy pumping is considered to explain the disparity between geochemical estimates and biological measurements of exported production. Episodic nutrient injections from the ocean into the photic zone can be generated by eddy pumping, which biological measurements cannot sample accurately. The enhancement of production is studied with respect to a cyclonic eddy in the subtropical Pacific. A pump-and-probe fluorimeter generates continuous vertical profiles of primary productivity from which the contributions of photochemical and nonphotochemical processes to fluorescence are derived. A significant correlation is observed between the fluorescence measurements and radiocarbon measurements. The results indicate that eddy pumping has an important effect on phytoplankton production and that this production is near the maximum relative specific growth rates. Based on the production enhancement observed in this case, eddy pumping increases total primary production by only 20 percent and does not account for all enhancement.

  12. Automobile bodies: Can aluminum be an economical alternative to steel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Richard; Clark, Joel; Kelkar, Ashish

    2001-08-01

    Although the use of aluminum in cars has been increasing for the past two decades, progress has been limited in developing aluminum auto bodies. In fact, most aluminum substitution has come in the form of castings and forgings in the transmission, wheels, etc. Car manufacturers have developed all-aluminum cars with two competing designs: conventional unibody and the spaceframe. However, aluminum is far from being a material of choice for auto bodies. The substitution of aluminum for steel is partly influenced by regulatory pressures to meet fuel efficiency standards by reducing vehicle weight, and to meet recycling standards. The key obstacles are the high cost of primary aluminum as compared to steel and added fabrication costs of aluminum panels. Both the aluminum and the automotive industries have attempted to make aluminum a cost-effective alternative to steel. This paper analyzes the cost of fabrication and assembly of four different aluminum car body designs, making comparisons with conventional steel designs at current aluminum prices and using current aluminum fabrication technology. It then attempts to determine if aluminum can be an alternative to steel at lower primary aluminum prices, and improved fabrication processes.

  13. Production of primary mirror segments for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, H. M.; Allen, R. G.; Burge, J. H.; Davis, J. M.; Davison, W. B.; Johns, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kingsley, J. S.; Law, K.; Lutz, R. D.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Su, P.; Tuell, M. T.; West, S. C.; Zhou, P.

    2014-07-01

    Segment production for the Giant Magellan Telescope is well underway, with the off-axis Segment 1 completed, off-axis Segments 2 and 3 already cast, and mold construction in progress for the casting of Segment 4, the center segment. All equipment and techniques required for segment fabrication and testing have been demonstrated in the manufacture of Segment 1. The equipment includes a 28 m test tower that incorporates four independent measurements of the segment's figure and geometry. The interferometric test uses a large asymmetric null corrector with three elements including a 3.75 m spherical mirror and a computer-generated hologram. For independent verification of the large-scale segment shape, we use a scanning pentaprism test that exploits the natural geometry of the telescope to focus collimated light to a point. The Software Configurable Optical Test System, loosely based on the Hartmann test, measures slope errors to submicroradian accuracy at high resolution over the full aperture. An enhanced laser tracker system guides the figuring through grinding and initial polishing. All measurements agree within the expected uncertainties, including three independent measurements of radius of curvature that agree within 0.3 mm. Segment 1 was polished using a 1.2 m stressed lap for smoothing and large-scale figuring, and a set of smaller passive rigid-conformal laps on an orbital polisher for deterministic small-scale figuring. For the remaining segments, the Mirror Lab is building a smaller, orbital stressed lap to combine the smoothing capability with deterministic figuring.

  14. MODIS EVI as a proxy for net primary production across precipitation regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Above ground net primary production (ANPP) is a measure of the rate of photosynthesis in an ecosystem, and is indicative of its biomass productivity. Prior studies have reported a relationship between ANPP and annual precipitation which converged across biomes in dry years. This deserves further s...

  15. ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND SIZE AS DETERMINED REMOTELY FROM AIRCRAFT AND COASTAL OBSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used remotely sensed estimates of chlorophyll a and sea surface temperature, incorporated into the Chesapeake Bay Productivity Model (Harding et al., 2002), to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of phytoplankton net primary production and species size in the Narragans...

  16. Patterns of new versus recycled primary production in the terrestrial biosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability regulate plant productivity throughout the terrestrial biosphere, influencing the patterns and magnitude of net primary production (NPP) by land plants both now and into the future. These nutrients enter ecosystems via geologic and atmospheric pathways, a...

  17. Modeled diversity effects on microbial ecosystem functions of primary production, nutrient uptake, and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Nicole L; Edwards, Christopher A; Follows, Michael J; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem-wide primary productivity generally increases with primary producer diversity, emphasizing the importance of diversity for ecosystem function. However, most studies that demonstrate this positive relationship have focused on terrestrial and aquatic benthic systems, with little attention to the diverse marine pelagic primary producers that play an important role in regulating global climate. Here we show how phytoplankton biodiversity enhances overall marine ecosystem primary productivity and other ecosystem functions using a self-organizing ecosystem model. Diversity manipulation numerical experiments reveal positive, asymptotically saturating relationships between ecosystem-wide phytoplankton diversity and functions of productivity, nutrient uptake, remineralization, and diversity metrics used to identify mechanisms shaping these relationships. Increase in productivity with increasing diversity improves modeled ecosystem stability and model robustness and leads to productivity rates that exceed expected yields primarily through niche complementarity and facilitative interactions between coexisting phytoplankton types; the composition of traits in assemblages determines the magnitude of complementarity and selection effects. While findings based on these aggregate measures of diversity effects parallel those from the majority of experimental outcomes of terrestrial and benthic biodiversity-ecosystem function studies, we combine analyses of community diversity effects and investigations of the underlying interactions among phytoplankton types to demonstrate how an increase in recycled production of non-diatoms through an increase in new production of diatoms drives this diversity-cosystem function response. We demonstrate the important role that facilitation plays in the modeled marine plankton and how this facilitative interaction could amplify future climate-driven changes in ocean ecosystem productivity.

  18. Primary production and sinking export during fall in the Hudson Bay system, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapoussière, Amandine; Michel, Christine; Gosselin, Michel; Poulin, Michel; Martin, Johannie; Tremblay, Jean-Éric

    2013-01-01

    Primary production and organic material sinking export were investigated in the Hudson Bay system (i.e., Hudson Bay, Hudson Strait and Foxe Basin) under ice-free conditions during early fall 2005, using the 14C-uptake method and short-term free-drifting particle interceptor traps deployed below the euphotic zone at 50 m. Principal component analysis revealed spatial patterns of primary production and chlorophyll a (chl a) biomass in the euphotic zone that were shaped by hydrographic conditions and nutrient concentrations linked to freshwater/seawater influence. Primary production rates varied widely, from 70 to 435 mg C m-2 d-1, while the range of particulate organic carbon (POC) sinking fluxes was narrow, from 50 to 77 mg C m-2 d-1. Consequently, high ratios of POC sinking export to primary production (i.e., export ratios; range of 0.38-0.69) were observed at stations where primary production was low and dominated by small cells, and where heterotrophic protist dominated in biomass. These results show that at short temporal scales neither protist community structure nor biomass or production rates could be used to predict the magnitude of POC sinking export from the euphotic zone.

  19. Simplified, rapid, and inexpensive estimation of water primary productivity based on chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Weixian; Xie, Wei; Jiang, Liping; Liang, Qinlang; Huang, Mingjun; Wu, Zongwen; Wang, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Primary productivity in water environment relies on the photosynthetic production of microalgae. Chlorophyll fluorescence is widely used to detect the growth status and photosynthetic efficiency of microalgae. In this study, a method was established to determine the Chl a content, cell density of microalgae, and water primary productivity by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fo. A significant linear relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fo and Chl a content of microalgae, as well as between Fo and cell density, was observed under pure-culture conditions. Furthermore, water samples collected from natural aquaculture ponds were used to validate the correlation between Fo and water primary productivity, which is closely related to Chl a content in water. Thus, for a given pure culture of microalgae or phytoplankton (mainly microalgae) in aquaculture ponds or other natural ponds for which the relationship between the Fo value and Chl a content or cell density could be established, Chl a content or cell density could be determined by measuring the Fo value, thereby making it possible to calculate the water primary productivity. It is believed that this method can provide a convenient way of efficiently estimating the primary productivity in natural aquaculture ponds and bringing economic value in limnetic ecology assessment, as well as in algal bloom monitoring.

  20. A reassessment of primary production and environmental change in the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Zachary W.; van Dijken, Gert L.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2011-08-01

    Regarded as one of the world's most productive marine environments, the Bering Sea is widely thought to be rapidly warming and losing sea ice. Such changes would be expected to have dramatic impacts on primary producers, with cascading effects on upper trophic levels, including this region's vast commercial fisheries resources. Here, we use satellite-derived sea ice concentration, sea surface temperature, and ocean color data as input to a primary productivity algorithm to take stock of environmental change and primary production in the Bering Sea. Results show that, rather than declining, mean annual sea ice extent in the Bering Sea has exhibited no significant change over the satellite sea ice record (1979-2009). Furthermore, significant warming during the satellite sea surface temperature record (1982-2009) is mainly limited to the summer months, when all regions of the Bering Sea warmed. This warming suggests increasing stratification during the phytoplankton growth season. Despite certain hot spots of primary production and a strong pulse in the spring, the rate of annual area-normalized primary production in the Bering Sea (124 g C m-2 yr-1) is below the global mean (140 g C m-2 yr-1). Between 1998 and 2007, basin-wide annual primary production ranged from 233 to 331 Tg C yr-1 under the influence of highly variable sea ice and temperature conditions. By comparing warm, low-ice years (2001-2005) with cold, high-ice years (1998-2000 and 2006-2007), we speculate that Bering Sea primary productivity is likely to rise under conditions of future warming and sea ice loss.

  1. Stabilization of nickel by aluminum- and iron-rich ceramic materials: Reaction pathways and product leaching behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Kaimin

    The feasibility of stabilizing nickel-laden sludge with commonly available ceramic precursors was investigated. Nickel aluminate spinel (NiAl2O 4) was the immobilization phase produced when NiO was sintered with aluminum-rich precursors, including gamma-Al2O3, corundum, kaolinite and mullite. Analogously, nickel ferrite spinel (NiFe2O 4) was the stable phase produced by firing NiO with hematite, as an iron-rich precursor. By using gamma-Al2O3 as the precursor, the NiAl2O4 formation mechanism was a reaction between NiO and gamma-Al2O3 at lower temperatures (990°C), while the reaction was between NiO and corundum at higher temperatures. When sintering NiO with kaolinite, nickel can be efficiently incorporated in NiAl2O4 by two mechanisms: (i) a low temperature reaction with a defect spinel, and (ii) a high temperature reaction with mullite. Nickel-incorporation efficiency was quantitatively estimated by powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. With 3-hours sintering, NiFe2O 4 (trevorite) formation took place above 600°C with more than 95% nickel incorporation efficiency achieved above 1000°C; while NiAl 2O4 crystallized above 1000°C with an efficiency >90% above 1250°C. In using kaolinite and mullite as precursors, nickel is not incorporated in any silicon-containing phase. The kinetic factors responsible for nickel incorporation efficiency from different precursors were revealed through investigation of product microstructures. Moreover, four raw material mixing procedures were compared, with the ball-milled slurries demonstrating the highest nickel incorporation efficiency. Prolonged leach tests of NiO, NiAl2O4, NiFe 2O4 and sintered kaolinite + NiO samples were carried out using the TCLP extraction fluids #1 and #2 to evaluate the durability of sintered products. Over longer leaching periods, spinel proved superior to NiO for immobilization of nickel, although NiFe2O4 appears slightly more leachable than NiAl2O4. With TCLP extraction fluid #1 (pH 4.9), the

  2. Fabrication of Porous Aluminum Using Gases Intrinsically Contained in Aluminum Alloy Die Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Utsunomiya, Takao

    2009-06-01

    Closed-cell porous aluminum was fabricated using gases intrinsically contained in aluminum alloy die castings without using a blowing agent. By incorporating the friction stir processing technique, porous aluminum with a porosity of more than 50 pct was successfully obtained at a holding temperature of 923 to 948 K and a holding time of 10 minutes. This proposed die-casting route has high potential for fabricating porous aluminum at a low cost by a higher productivity process.

  3. Aluminum: Industry of the future

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

  4. Primary production dynamics in a pristine groundwater influenced coastal lagoon of the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Gómez, Israel; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.

    2006-06-01

    Dzilam lagoon is a shallow (0.6 m mean depth) ecosystem with 9.4 km 2 surface area, located in the north coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, and connected to the Gulf of Mexico through a permanent inlet. Freshwater input is possible through numerous sinkholes distributed throughout the lagoon, which also represent a continuous source of nitrate and silicate. The low anthropogenic influence has maintained a pristine condition in Dzilam lagoon, manifested in a spatial heterogeneity of water quality and primary production strongly related to the environmental fluctuations. To determine the annual variability of primary production and identify the factors controlling it, 12 monthly samplings were undertaken at six stations, from September 1998 to August 1999. Thus, physical-chemical parameters, inorganic nutrients concentrations, chlorophyll- a, phytoplankton production and seagrass biomass were measured. The water residence time in Dzilam lagoon is higher during dry season due to the significant evaporation rate, and shorter in rainy season because of increase in precipitation and volume of groundwater discharge. The multivariate analysis results suggest that the salinity gradient, changes in aquatic vegetation biomass, and the remineralized nutrients in sediments constitute key processes depicting the water quality and net primary production in Dzilam lagoon. Furthermore, the biogeochemical benthic processes, combined with a longer stay of phytoplankton cells within the lagoon, enhanced primary production in the water column during dry season, as opposite as rainy period, when the inferior water residence time yielded lower production values. The seagrasses ( Halodule wrightii and Ruppia maritima) showed the highest biomass (110.5 g dw/m 2/d) in dry season, while the lowest recordings were observed during cold fronts, with a salient belowground contribution (rhizomes and roots). Seagrasses and phytoplankton participation to the total primary production in Dzilam lagoon

  5. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Sanz-Martín, M.; Mesa, E.; Arrieta, J. M.; Chierici, M.; Hendriks, I. E.; García-Corral, L. S.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; Delgado, A.; Reigstad, M.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145-2,099 μatm however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  6. Definition of primary mode of action of a combination product. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-08-25

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its combination product regulations to define "mode of action'' (MOA) and "primary mode of action" (PMOA). Along with these definitions, the final rule sets forth an algorithm the agency will use to assign combination products to an agency component for regulatory oversight when the agency cannot determine with reasonable certainty which mode of action provides the most important therapeutic action of the combination product. Finally, the final rule will require a sponsor to base its recommendation of the agency component with primary jurisdiction for regulatory oversight of its combination product by using the PMOA definition and, if appropriate, the assignment algorithm. The final rule is intended to promote the public health by codifying the agency's criteria for the assignment of combination products in transparent, consistent, and predictable terms.

  7. Responses of primary production, leaf litter decomposition and associated communities to stream eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Dunck, Bárbara; Lima-Fernandes, Eva; Cássio, Fernanda; Cunha, Ana; Rodrigues, Liliana; Pascoal, Cláudia

    2015-07-01

    We assessed the eutrophication effects on leaf litter decomposition and primary production, and on periphytic algae, fungi and invertebrates. According to the subsidy-stress model, we expected that when algae and decomposers were nutrient limited, their activity and diversity would increase at moderate levels of nutrient enrichment, but decrease at high levels of nutrients, because eutrophication would lead to the presence of other stressors and overwhelm the subsidy effect. Chestnut leaves (Castanea sativa Mill) were enclosed in mesh bags and immersed in five streams of the Ave River basin (northwest Portugal) to assess leaf decomposition and colonization by invertebrates and fungi. In parallel, polyethylene slides were attached to the mesh bags to allow colonization by algae and to assess primary production. Communities of periphytic algae and decomposers discriminated the streams according to the trophic state. Primary production decomposition and biodiversity were lower in streams at both ends of the trophic gradient.

  8. Consumers regulate nutrient limitation regimes and primary production in seagrass ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Allgeier, Jacob E; Yeager, Lauren A; Layman, Craig A

    2013-02-01

    Consumer-mediated nutrient supply is increasingly recognized as an important functional process in many ecosystems. Yet, experimentation at relevant spatial and temporal scales is needed to fully integrate this bottom-up pathway into ecosystem models. Artificial reefs provide a unique approach to explore the importance of consumer nutrient supply for ecosystem function in coastal marine environments. We used bioenergetics models to estimate community-level nutrient supply by fishes, and relevant measures of primary production, to test the hypothesis that consumers, via excretion of nutrients, can enhance primary production and alter nutrient limitation regimes for two dominant primary producer groups (seagrass and benthic microalgae) around artificial reefs. Both producer groups demonstrated marked increases in production, as well as shifts in nutrient limitation regimes, with increased fish-derived nutrient supply. Individuals from the two dominant functional feeding groups (herbivores and mesopredators) supplied nutrients at divergent rates and ratios from one another, underscoring the importance of community structure for nutrient supply to primary producers. Our findings demonstrate that consumers, through an underappreciated bottom-up mechanism in marine environments, can alter nutrient limitation regimes and primary production, thereby fundamentally affecting the way these ecosystems function.

  9. Evaluation of bio-optical algorithms to remotely sense marine primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Beatrice; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    1994-01-01

    In situ bio-optical measurements from several oceanographic campaigns were analyzed to derive a direct relationship between water column primary production P (sub t) ocean color as expressed by the ratio of reflectances R (sub 1) at 440 nm and R (sub 3) at 550 nm and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR). The study is restricted to the Morel case I waters for which the following algorithm is proposed: log (P(sub f)) = -4.286 - 1.390 log (R(sub 1)/R(sub3)) + 0.621 log (PAR), with P(sub t) in g C m(exp -2)/d and PAR in J m(exp -2)/d. Using this algorithm the rms accuracy of primary production estimate is 0.17 on a logarithmic scale, i.e., a factor of 1.5. Using spectral reflectance measurements in the entire visible spectral range, the central wavelength, spectral bandwidth, and radiometric noise level requirements are investigated for the channels to be used by an ocean color space mission dedicated to estimating global marine primary production and the associated carbon fluxes. Nearly all the useful information is provided by two channels centered at 440 nm and 550 nm, but the accuracy of primary production estimate appears weakly sensitive to spectral bandwidth, which, consequently, may be enlarged by several tens of nanometers. The sensitivity to radiometric noise, on the contrary, is strong, and a noise equivalent reflectance of 0.005 degraded the accuracy on the primary production estimate by a factor 2 (0.14-0.25 on a logarithmic scale). The results should be applicable to evaluating the primary production of oligotrophic and mesotrophic waters, which constitute most of the open ocean.

  10. Primary productivity and nitrogen assimilation with identifying the contribution of urea in Funka Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Isao; Hisatoku, Takatsugu; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Maita, Yoshiaki

    2015-06-01

    Primary production is supported by utilization of several forms of nitrogen (N), such as nitrate, ammonium, and urea. Nevertheless, only few studies have measured the concentration and uptake of urea despite its importance as a nitrogenous nutrient for phytoplankton. We measured primary productivity monthly at four depths within the euphotic zone using a clean technique and the 13C method by a 24 h in situ mooring incubation over a year in Funka Bay, a subarctic coastal area in Japan, to make better updated estimates (re-evaluation) of annual primary production. Nitrogenous (N) nutrient assimilation rates (nitrate, ammonium and urea) were also measured to elucidate the relative contributions of these nutrients to autotrophic production and to distinguish between new and regenerated production. The estimated annual primary production was 164 g C m-2, which was 40-60% higher than the previously reported values in the bay. Use of a clean technique and more frequent measurement during the spring bloom may have contributed to the higher rates. The production during the spring bloom was 56.5 g C m-2, accounting for 35% of the annual production. The maximum daily productivity occurred in the bloom at 1.4 g C m-2 d-1, which is one of the highest values among the world embayments. The annual primary production in the bay was classified as mesotrophic state based on the classification by Cloern et al. (2014). The assimilation rate of nitrate was maximal at 54 nmol N L-1 h-1 during the bloom. During the post-bloom periods with nitrate depleted conditions, assimilation rates of ammonium and urea increased and accounted for up to 85% of the total N assimilation. The assimilation rate of urea was almost comparable to that of ammonium throughout the year. Taking urea into account, the f-ratio ranged from 0.15 under the nitrate-depleted conditions to 0.8 under the spring bloom conditions. These ratios were overestimated by 50% and 10%, respectively, if urea uptake was eliminated

  11. Study on photosynthetic parameters and primary production of marine phytoplankton in Minnan-Taiwan Shoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian; Li, Wen-Quan

    1994-03-01

    Carbon assimilation rates were determined in situ in the Minnan-Taiwan Shoal with the C-14 tracer method. Seasonal variations of photosynthetic parameters of marine phytoplankton were measured together with determination of Chl a and carbon content. Experimental results indicated that the average carbon-specific carbon accumulation rate is 0.85 d-1, mean primary productivity is 0.55 g C (m2d)-1. Temperature effect on the growth of the algae can be described by the model of Goldman and Carpenter. Supplementation of nutrients brought up by the upwelling in summer caused the observably high primary productivities in autumn.

  12. Baroclinic Features In The Irish Sea: Modelling Their Impact On Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. T.; Proctor, R.

    Seasonal cycles in the Irish Sea have been simulated with a 3-dimensional hydrody- namic model capable of resolving the internal baroclinic radius of deformation. The main features of the hydrodynamics are reproduced, most notably the thermally strat- ifed 'gyre' region west of the Isle of Man and the associated tidal fronts. Ecosystem dynamics have been coupled to the hydrodynamics with the emphasis on primary production. Additional 1-dimensional coupled model experiments indicate the role that the 3-dimensional baroclinic processes play in determining primary production and show why 1-dimensional model simulations need to be treated with care in areas where baroclinic currents exist.

  13. Eutrophication and consumer control of new England salt marsh primary productivity.

    PubMed

    Bertness, Mark D; Crain, Caitlin; Holdredge, Christine; Sala, Nicholas

    2008-02-01

    Although primary productivity in salt marshes is thought to be controlled by physical forces, recent evidence suggests that human disturbances can drive a switch to consumer control in these ecologically valuable ecosystems. We tested the hypothesis that nitrogen enrichment can trigger consumer control in salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, with (1) a field experiment in which we manipulated nutrient availability (with nutrient additions) and insect herbivory (with insecticide application), (2) a survey of 20 salt marshes that examined the relationship between marsh nutrient status and herbivore pressure, and (3) insect herbivore removal at high and low nutrient input sites to directly test the hypothesis that nutrient enrichment is increasing insect herbivory in these marshes. Experimental nitrogen eutrophication initially increased plant productivity but eventually led to reduced plant biomass due to insect herbivory, and our surveys revealed that marsh nitrogen supply was a good predictor of herbivore damage to plants. Insects had minimal impacts on primary productivity in pristine marshes, but suppressed primary productivity in eutrophic salt marshes by 50-75%. Thus, eutrophication is currently triggering consumer suppression of primary productivity in New England salt marshes and may ultimately jeopardize the ecological and societal services these systems provide.

  14. The effects of temporal variability of mixed layer depth on primary productivity around Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissett, W. Paul; Meyers, Mark B.; Walsh, John J.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations in primary production and surface chlorophyll concentrations, as measured by ship and satellite around Bermuda, were simulated with a numerical model. In the upper 450 m of the water column, population dynamics of a size-fractionated phytoplankton community were forced by daily changes of wind, light, grazing stress, and nutrient availability. The temporal variations of production and chlorophyll were driven by changes in nutrient introduction to the euphotic zone due to both high- and low-frequency changes of the mixed layer depth within 32 deg-34 deg N, 62 deg-64 deg W between 1979 and 1984. Results from the model derived from high-frequency (case 1) changes in the mixed layer depth showed variations in primary production and peak chlorophyll concentrations when compared with results from the model derived from low-frequency (case 2) mixed layer depth changes. Incorporation of size-fractionated plankton state variables in the model led to greater seasonal resolution of measured primary production and vertical chlorophyll profiles. The findings of this study highlight the possible inadequacy of estimating primary production in the sea from data of low-frequency temporal resolution and oversimplified biological simulations.

  15. Diatom Abundance in Surface Sediments: A Quantitative Proxy for Primary Productivity at the Global Level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrantes, F. F. G.; Lopes, C.; Romero, O. E.; Matos, L.; Rufino, M. M.; Magalhaes, V. H.; Cermeno, P.

    2014-12-01

    Diatom abundance and assemblage composition has for long been considered one of the best proxies for primary production, in particular for low latitude coastal upwelling areas, where they constitute the dominant phytoplankton. To investigate productivity conditions at those upwelling systems at any time and at the global level would be of great use for C export estimations and climate modeling, since primary production and C export in those systems is of major importance in controlling Earth's climate. To assess the value of the diatom sediment record at the global level, total abundance of marine diatoms was determined for 730 sites distributed by the five most important coastal upwelling systems of the modern ocean, and compared to several meaningful ecological parameters. Investigations of the satellite estimated primary productivity; upwelling index; water column physical properties and nutrient content, reveal a clear relation between sediment diatom abundance and primary production - although different between areas. Furthermore, upwelled waters [Si] appear as a determinant factor of the observed global diatom distribution.

  16. Impact of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter on UV Inhibition of Primary Productivity in the Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Brown, Christopher W.

    1996-01-01

    A model was developed to assess the impact of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on phytoplankton production within the euphotic zone. The rate of depth-integrated daily gross primary productivity within the euphotic zone was evaluated as a function of date, latitude, CDONI absorption characteristics, chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration, vertical stratification, and phytoplankton sensitivity to UV radiation (UVR). Results demonstrated that primary production was enhanced in the upper 30 m of the water column by the presence of CDOM, where predicted increases in production due to the removal of damaging UVR more than offset its reduction resulting from the absorption of photosynthetically usable radiation. At greater depths, where little UVR remained, primary production was always reduced due to removal by CDOM of photosynthetically usable radiation. When CDOM was distributed homogeneously within the euphotic zone, the integral over z [(GPP)(sub ez)], was reduced under most bio-optical (i.e. solar zenith angle, and CDOM absorption, and ozone concentration) and photophysiological production at depth was greater than the enhancement of production at the surface.

  17. Primary productivity by phytoplankton in the tidal, fresh Potomac River, Maryland, May 1980 to August 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, R.R.; Pollock, S.O.

    1983-01-01

    Primary productivity by phytoplankton was measured on samples collected from the Potomac Tidal River, Maryland. The studies were performed monthly from May 1980 to September 1981. Additional studies were done once a week in August 1980, twice a week from August 4 to 8, 1980 and twice in September 1980. Depth-integrated samples were collected at five stations and incubated in boxes that were exposed to natural sunlight. The boxes were covered with neutral density filters transmitting 100 , 65, 32, 16, and 6 percent surface light. River water was pumped continuously over the samples. The extinction of light in the water column by phytoplankton was measured when samples were collected. Experiments were performed to select a method for routine productivity analysis. No difference was found between productivity: (1) determined in situ and in boxes; (2) measured in 300 ml and (4) calculated from short term (4 hours) and long term (10-24 hours) incubations. There were higher productivity differences in samples that were rotated among different light intensities every 15 minutes (simulating mixing) than those remaining stationary. Respiration was significantly less in samples pumped through a hose from those collected using a depth-integrating sampler. Depth-integrated primary productivity was determined from the productivity data using an equation modified from one reported in the literature. Depth-integrated gross primary productivity was highest in August 1980 and 1981 and lowest in January 1980. (USGS)

  18. Effects of aluminum on phosphate metabolism in rats: a possible interaction with vitamin D3 renal production.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Stella T; Navoni, Julio; Millen, Néstor; del Carmen Contini, María; Gonzalez, Marcela; Elías, María Mónica

    2004-11-01

    The effect of chronic aluminum (Al) administration on the phosphorous (Pi) metabolism of different target tissues was studied. Male Wistar rats received aluminum lactate for 3 months (5.75 mg/kg bodyweight of Al, i.p., three times per week). The animals were studied at the end of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd month of treatment. They were housed individually in metabolic cages for 4 days to study Pi and calcium (Ca) balance. Daily food and water intakes were recorded for all animals and urine and feces were collected for Pi and calcium assays. After 3 months the Pi intestinal absorption and the Pi deposition in bone were studied using 32Pi. Another group of rats was treated daily for 7 days with calcitriol (0.08 microg/kg body weight in sesame oil, i.p.) and the Pi balance was studied for the last 4 days. The results indicated that chronic administration of Al affected simultaneously the Pi and calcium balance, with a significant diminution of calcium and increased Pi accretion in bones, together with a diminution in the intestinal absorption of Pi. The treatment of the rats with calcitriol promoted a normalized Pi balance in Al treated rats. These findings suggest that Al could modify the Pi metabolism acting directly on intestine, kidney and bone, or indirectly through possible changes in the levels of vitamin D3.

  19. Nutrient concentrations and primary productivity at the Peros Banhos and Salomon atolls in the Chagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, R. F.; Drew, E. A.

    1984-02-01

    Coral atolls are areas of high biological productivity even though they are usually located in regions of the tropical ocean characterized by low primary production and extremely low levels of vital dissolved nutrient materials. Recent studies have indicated the possible importance of in situ dinitrogen fixation on shallow reef flats in supplementing low oceanic nitrate levels and thus contributing to the maintenance of high reef productivity. Variations in the structure of atolls may have a direct bearing on the accumulation of fixed nitrogen and other nutrient materials, and consequently on lagoonal and reefal primary productivity. This paper investigates the effect of differing atoll configurations by comparing neighbouring, but structurally dissimilar, mid-ocean atolls. The findings are discussed in terms of ecosystem function and possible influences on the structural evolution of atolls.

  20. Benthic primary production in an upwelling-influenced coral reef, Colombian Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Hauffe, Torsten; Pizarro, Valeria; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In Tayrona National Natural Park (Colombian Caribbean), abiotic factors such as light intensity, water temperature, and nutrient availability are subjected to high temporal variability due to seasonal coastal upwelling. These factors are the major drivers controlling coral reef primary production as one of the key ecosystem services. This offers the opportunity to assess the effects of abiotic factors on reef productivity. We therefore quantified primary net (Pn) and gross production (Pg) of the dominant local primary producers (scleractinian corals, macroalgae, algal turfs, crustose coralline algae, and microphytobenthos) at a water current/wave-exposed and-sheltered site in an exemplary bay of Tayrona National Natural Park. A series of short-term incubations was conducted to quantify O2 fluxes of the different primary producers during non-upwelling and the upwelling event 2011/2012, and generalized linear models were used to analyze group-specific O2 production, their contribution to benthic O2 fluxes, and total daily benthic O2 production. At the organism level, scleractinian corals showed highest Pn and Pg rates during non-upwelling (16 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1), and corals and algal turfs dominated the primary production during upwelling (12 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1, respectively). At the ecosystem level, corals contributed most to total Pn and Pg during non-upwelling, while during upwelling, corals contributed most to Pn and Pg only at the exposed site and macroalgae at the sheltered site, respectively. Despite the significant spatial and temporal differences in individual productivity of the investigated groups and their different contribution to reef productivity, differences for daily ecosystem productivity were only present for Pg at exposed with higher O2 fluxes during non-upwelling compared to upwelling. Our findings therefore indicate that total benthic primary productivity of local autotrophic reef communities is

  1. Effects of fluoride emissions from a modern primary aluminum smelter on a local population of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    SciTech Connect

    Suttie, J.S.; Dickie, R.; Clay, A.B.; Nielsen, P.; Mahan, W.E.; Baumann, D.P.; Hamilton, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of fluoride emissions from a modern aluminum smelter on concentrations of skeletal fluoride and dental fluorosis in a resident population of white-tailed deer was studied. The smelter was located on Mount Holly Plantation in South Carolina, and concentrations of skeletal fluoride in the deer collected at Mount Holly increased approximately five-fold 3 yr after the operation began. Increases in skeletal fluoride of less than two-fold were observed in deer obtained from Medway Plantation which has its nearest boundary 1.6 km from the smelter site. No dental fluorosis was observed in deer collected at Medway Plantation, but mild dental fluorosis was observed in a significant number of deer collected at Mount Holly Plantation. The dental fluorosis that was observed was not associated with incisor wear or with fluoride-induced molar wear. Osteofluorosis of mandibles or metacarpals was not observed in any of the deer obtained from either plantation. The data obtained from this study indicated that the presence of a modern aluminum smelter caused a detectable increase in concentration of skeletal fluoride in the resident population of white-tailed deer, but that no adverse health effects were seen.

  2. Primary production in the tropical continental shelf seas bordering northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnas, Miles J.; Carpenter, Edward J.

    2016-10-01

    Pelagic primary production (14C uptake) was measured 81 times between 1990 and 2013 at sites spanning the broad, shallow Northern Australian Shelf (NAS; 120-145°E) which borders the Australian continent. The mean of all areal production measurements was 1048±109 mg C m-2 d-1 (mean±95% CI). Estimates of areal primary production were correlated with integral upper-euphotic zone chlorophyll stocks (above the 50% and 20% light penetration depths) accessible to ocean color remote sensing and total water column chlorophyll standing crop, but not surface (0-2 m) chlorophyll concentrations. While the NAS is subject to a well characterized monsoonal climate regime (austral summer-NW monsoon -wet: austral winter- SE monsoon -dry), most seasonal differences in means of regional-scale chlorophyll standing crop (11-33 mg Chl m-2 for 12 of 15 season-region combinations) and areal primary production (700-1850 mg C m- day-1 for 12 of 15 season-region combinations) fell within a 3-fold range. Apart from the shallow waters of the Torres Strait and northern Great Barrier Reef, picoplankton (<2 μm size fraction) dominated chlorophyll standing crop and primary production with regional means of picoplankton contributions ranging from 45 to >80%. While the range of our post-1990 areal production estimates overlaps the range of production estimates made in NAS waters during 1960-62, the mean of post-1990 estimates is over 2-fold greater. We regard the difference to be due to improvements in production measurement techniques, particularly regarding the reduction of potential metal toxicity and incubations in more realistic light regimes.

  3. Twenty-million-year relationship between mammalian diversity and primary productivity.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Susanne A; Eronen, Jussi T; Schnitzler, Jan; Hof, Christian; Janis, Christine M; Mulch, Andreas; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Graham, Catherine H

    2016-09-27

    At global and regional scales, primary productivity strongly correlates with richness patterns of extant animals across space, suggesting that resource availability and climatic conditions drive patterns of diversity. However, the existence and consistency of such diversity-productivity relationships through geological history is unclear. Here we provide a comprehensive quantitative test of the diversity-productivity relationship for terrestrial large mammals through time across broad temporal and spatial scales. We combine >14,000 occurrences for 690 fossil genera through the Neogene (23-1.8 Mya) with regional estimates of primary productivity from fossil plant communities in North America and Europe. We show a significant positive diversity-productivity relationship through the 20-million-year record, providing evidence on unprecedented spatial and temporal scales that this relationship is a general pattern in the ecology and paleo-ecology of our planet. Further, we discover that genus richness today does not match the fossil relationship, suggesting that a combination of human impacts and Pleistocene climate variability has modified the 20-million-year ecological relationship by strongly reducing primary productivity and driving many mammalian species into decline or to extinction.

  4. Bacterial and primary production in the pelagic zone of the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, A. F.; Romanova, N. D.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2010-10-01

    Data on the bacterial and primary production, which were obtained simultaneously for the same water samples, are presented for three regions of the Kara Sea. The samples were collected for the transect westwards of the Yamal Peninsula, along the St. Anna Trough, and the transect in Ob Bay. Direct counts of the DAPI-stained bacterial cells were performed. The bacterial production and grazing rates were determined using a direct method when metabolic inhibitors vancomycin and penicillin were added. The primary production rates were estimated using the 14C method. The average primary production was 112.6, 58.5, and 28.7 mg C m-2 day-1, and the bacterial production was 12.8, 48.9, and 81.6 mg C m-2 day-1 along the Yamal Peninsula, the St. Anna Trough, and Ob Bay, respectively. The average bacterial carbon demand was 34.6, 134.5, and 220.4 mg C m-2 day-1 for these regions, respectively. The data obtained lead us to conclude that the phytoplankton-synthesized organic matter is generally insufficient to satisfy the bacterial carbon demand and may be completely assimilated via the heterotrophic processes in the marine ecosystems. Therefore, the bacterial activity and, consequently, the amount of the synthesized biomass (i.e., the production) both depend directly on the phytoplankton’s condition and activity. We consider these relationships to be characteristics of the Kara Sea’s biota.

  5. Twenty-million-year relationship between mammalian diversity and primary productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Susanne A.; Eronen, Jussi T.; Schnitzler, Jan; Hof, Christian; Janis, Christine M.; Mulch, Andreas; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Graham, Catherine H.

    2016-01-01

    At global and regional scales, primary productivity strongly correlates with richness patterns of extant animals across space, suggesting that resource availability and climatic conditions drive patterns of diversity. However, the existence and consistency of such diversity–productivity relationships through geological history is unclear. Here we provide a comprehensive quantitative test of the diversity–productivity relationship for terrestrial large mammals through time across broad temporal and spatial scales. We combine >14,000 occurrences for 690 fossil genera through the Neogene (23–1.8 Mya) with regional estimates of primary productivity from fossil plant communities in North America and Europe. We show a significant positive diversity–productivity relationship through the 20-million-year record, providing evidence on unprecedented spatial and temporal scales that this relationship is a general pattern in the ecology and paleo-ecology of our planet. Further, we discover that genus richness today does not match the fossil relationship, suggesting that a combination of human impacts and Pleistocene climate variability has modified the 20-million-year ecological relationship by strongly reducing primary productivity and driving many mammalian species into decline or to extinction. PMID:27621451

  6. Twenty-million-year relationship between mammalian diversity and primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Susanne A.; Eronen, Jussi T.; Schnitzler, Jan; Hof, Christian; Janis, Christine M.; Mulch, Andreas; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Graham, Catherine H.

    2016-09-01

    At global and regional scales, primary productivity strongly correlates with richness patterns of extant animals across space, suggesting that resource availability and climatic conditions drive patterns of diversity. However, the existence and consistency of such diversity-productivity relationships through geological history is unclear. Here we provide a comprehensive quantitative test of the diversity-productivity relationship for terrestrial large mammals through time across broad temporal and spatial scales. We combine >14,000 occurrences for 690 fossil genera through the Neogene (23-1.8 Mya) with regional estimates of primary productivity from fossil plant communities in North America and Europe. We show a significant positive diversity-productivity relationship through the 20-million-year record, providing evidence on unprecedented spatial and temporal scales that this relationship is a general pattern in the ecology and paleo-ecology of our planet. Further, we discover that genus richness today does not match the fossil relationship, suggesting that a combination of human impacts and Pleistocene climate variability has modified the 20-million-year ecological relationship by strongly reducing primary productivity and driving many mammalian species into decline or to extinction.

  7. Global Net Primary Production Predicted from Vegetation Class, Precipitation, and Temperature.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net Primary Production (NPP), the difference between CO2 fixed by photosynthesis and CO2 lost to autotrophic respiration, is one of the most important components of the carbon cycle. Our goal was to develop a simple regression model to estimate global NPP using climate and land cover data. Approxima...

  8. Multi-scale analyses reveal robust relations between solar induced fluorescence and gross primary production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remotely sensed solar induced fluorescence (SIF) has shown great promise for probing spatiotemporal variations in terrestrial gross primary production (GPP), the largest component flux of the global carbon cycle. However, scale mismatches between SIF and ground-based GPP have posed challenges toward...

  9. Increased Light-Use Efficiency Sustains Net Primary Productivity of Shaded Coffee Plants In Agroforestry System.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Fabien; Roupsard, Olivier; le Maire, Guerric; Guillemot, Joannès; Casanoves, Fernando; Lacointe, André; Vaast, Philippe; Allinne, Clémentine; Audebert, Louise; Cambou, Aurélie; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Defrenet, Elsa; Duursma, Remko A; Jarri, Laura; Jourdan, Christophe; Khac, Emmanuelle; Leandro, Patricia; Medlyn, Belinda E; Saint-André, Laurent; Thaler, Philippe; Van den Meersche, Karel; Barquero Aguilar, Alejandra; Lehner, Peter; Dreyer, Erwin

    2017-04-06

    In agroforestry systems, shade trees strongly affect the physiology of the undergrown crop. However, a major paradigm is that the reduction in absorbed photosynthetically active radiation is, to a certain extent, compensated by an increase in light-use efficiency, thereby reducing the difference in net primary productivity between shaded and non-shaded plants. Due to the large spatial heterogeneity in agroforestry systems and the lack of appropriate tools, the combined effects of such variables have seldom been analysed, even though they may help understand physiological processes underlying yield dynamics. In this study, we monitored net primary productivity, during two years, on scales ranging from individual coffee plants to the entire plot. Absorbed radiation was mapped with a 3D-model (MAESPA). Light-use efficiency and net assimilation rate were derived for each coffee plant individually. We found that although irradiance was reduced by 60% below crowns of shade trees, coffee light-use efficiency increased by 50%, leaving net primary productivity fairly stable across all shade levels. Variability of aboveground net primary productivity of coffee plants was caused primarily by the age of the plants and by intraspecific competition among them (drivers usually overlooked in the agroforestry literature) rather than by the presence of shade trees.

  10. Resource and Production, A Primary Unit in Cultural Geography. Pupil Text and Workbook and Teacher Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imperatore, William

    This is an instructional unit in cultural geography for the primary grades. The major objective of the unit, which is comprised of a Pupil Text/Workbook and Teacher Manual, is to develop the geographic concepts labeled resource and production. Teaching strategies used include the Pestalozzian method of asking leading questions to draw the students…

  11. Global 4 km resolution monthly gridded Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) data set derived from FLUXNET2015

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Hargrove, William W.; Collier, Nathan

    2016-08-01

    This data set contain global gridded surfaces of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) at 2 arc minute (approximately 4 km) spatial resolution monthly for the period of 2000-2014 derived from FLUXNET2015 (released July 12, 2016) observations using a representativeness based upscaling approach.

  12. Enhanced biogas production using cow manure to stabilize co-digestion of whey and primary sludge.

    PubMed

    Shilton, A; Powell, N; Broughton, A; Pratt, C; Pratt, S; Pepper, C

    2013-01-01

    Increasing biogas production from municipal anaerobic digesters via additional loading with industrial/agricultural wastes offers a low-cost, sustainable energy generation option of significant untapped potential. In this work, bench-top reactors were used to mimic a full-scale primary sludge digester operating at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.4 kg COD/m3 d and a 20 d hydraulic retention time (HRT). Co-digestion of whey with primary sludge was sustained at a loading rate of 3.2 kg COD/m3 d (17 d HRT) and boosted gas production to 151% compared to primary sludge digestion alone. Addition of chemical alkalinity enabled co-digestion of whey with primary sludge to be maintained at an elevated OLR of 6.4 kg COD/m3 d (11 d HRT) with gas production increased to 208%. However, when the chemical addition was simply replaced by cow manure, stable operation was maintained at OLRs of 5.2-6.9 kg COD/m3 d (11-14 d HRT) with gas production boosted up to 268%.

  13. The Potential of Carbonyl Sulfide as a Tracer for Gross Primary Productivity at Flux Tower Sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional/continental scale studies of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) seasonal dynamics and leaf level studies of plant OCS uptake have shown a close relationship to CO2 dynamics and uptake, suggesting potential for OCS as a tracer for gross primary productivity (GPP). Canopy CO2 and OCS differen...

  14. Critical soil water period for primary production in Chihuahuan Desert ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In desert ecosystems where water is the main limiting factor, it is expected that net primary production (NPP) is largely determined by precipitation. However, precipitation alone often explains only a small portion of the variation in NPP, and the critical precipitation period for NPP varies by pla...

  15. Legacies of precipitation fluctuations on primary production: Theory and data synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of arid to sub-humid ecosystems displays a closer association with precipitation when considered across space, based on multiyear averages for different locations, than through time, based on year to year change at single locations. Here, we p...

  16. Legacies of precipitation fluctuations on primary production: theory and data synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability of above-ground net primary production (ANPP) of arid to sub-humid ecosystems displays a closer association with precipitation when considered across space (based on multiyear averages for different locations) than through time (based on year-to-year change at single locations). Here, we...

  17. Modeling the Response of Nutrient Concentrations and Primary Productivity in Lake Michigan to Nutrient Loading Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality model, LM3 Eutro, will be used to estimate the response of nutrient concentrations and primary productivity in Lake Michigan to nutrient loading scenarios. This work is part of a larger effort, the Future Midwestern landscapes study, that will estimate the produc...

  18. A comparison of global estimates of marine primary production from ocean color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Mary-Elena; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Schmeltz, Marjorie; Noguchi Aita, Maki; Antoine, David; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Asanuma, Ichio; Aumont, Olivier; Barber, Richard; Behrenfeld, Michael; Bidigare, Robert; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Campbell, Janet; Ciotti, Aurea; Dierssen, Heidi; Dowell, Mark; Dunne, John; Esaias, Wayne; Gentili, Bernard; Gregg, Watson; Groom, Steve; Hoepffner, Nicolas; Ishizaka, Joji; Kameda, Takahiko; Le Quéré, Corinne; Lohrenz, Steven; Marra, John; Mélin, Frédéric; Moore, Keith; Morel, André; Reddy, Tasha E.; Ryan, John; Scardi, Michele; Smyth, Tim; Turpie, Kevin; Tilstone, Gavin; Waters, Kirk; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2006-03-01

    The third primary production algorithm round robin (PPARR3) compares output from 24 models that estimate depth-integrated primary production from satellite measurements of ocean color, as well as seven general circulation models (GCMs) coupled with ecosystem or biogeochemical models. Here we compare the global primary production fields corresponding to eight months of 1998 and 1999 as estimated from common input fields of photosynthetically-available radiation (PAR), sea-surface temperature (SST), mixed-layer depth, and chlorophyll concentration. We also quantify the sensitivity of the ocean-color-based models to perturbations in their input variables. The pair-wise correlation between ocean-color models was used to cluster them into groups or related output, which reflect the regions and environmental conditions under which they respond differently. The groups do not follow model complexity with regards to wavelength or depth dependence, though they are related to the manner in which temperature is used to parameterize photosynthesis. Global average PP varies by a factor of two between models. The models diverged the most for the Southern Ocean, SST under 10C, and chlorophyll concentration exceeding 1 mg Chl m-3. Based on the conditions under which the model results diverge most, we conclude that current ocean-color-based models are challenged by high-nutrient low-chlorophyll conditions, and extreme temperatures or chlorophyll concentrations. The GCM-based models predict comparable primary production to those based on ocean color: they estimate higher values in the Southern Ocean, at low SST, and in the equatorial band, while they estimate lower values in eutrophic regions (probably because the area of high chlorophyll concentrations is smaller in the GCMs). Further progress in primary production modeling requires improved understanding of the effect of temperature on photosynthesis and better parameterization of the maximum photosynthetic rate.

  19. Food webs obscure the strength of plant diversity effects on primary productivity.

    PubMed

    Seabloom, Eric W; Kinkel, Linda; Borer, Elizabeth T; Hautier, Yann; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Tilman, David

    2017-04-01

    Plant diversity experiments generally find that increased diversity causes increased productivity; however, primary productivity is typically measured in the presence of a diverse food web, including pathogens, mutualists and herbivores. If food web impacts on productivity vary with plant diversity, as predicted by both theoretical and empirical studies, estimates of the effect of plant diversity on productivity may be biased. We experimentally removed arthropods, foliar fungi and soil fungi from the longest-running plant diversity experiment. We found that fungi and arthropods removed a constant, large proportion of biomass leading to a greater reduction of total biomass in high diversity plots. As a result, the effect of diversity on measured plant productivity was much higher in the absence of fungi and arthropods. Thus, diversity increases productivity more than reported in previous studies that did not control for the effects of heterotrophic consumption.

  20. Method using selected carbons to react with Al2O and Al vapors in the carbothermic production of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, Richard J.; Li, Yun; Carkin, Gerald

    2005-02-01

    In a method for recovering Al from an off-gas (3,4) produced during carbothermic reduction of aluminum utilizing at least one smelter (1,2), the off-gas (3,4) is directed to an enclosed reactor (5) which is fed a supply of wood charcoal (7) having a porosity of from about 50 vol. % to 85 vol. % and an average pore diameter of from about 0.05 .mu.m to about 2.00 .mu.m, where the wood charcoal (7) contacts the off-gas (3,4) to produce at least Al.sub.4 C.sub.3 (6), which is passed back to the smelter (1,2).

  1. Sea-ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates off East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukaerts, Arnout; Cavagna, Anne-Julie; Fripiat, François; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Dehairs, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Antarctic pack ice comprises about 90% of the sea ice in the southern hemisphere and plays an important structuring role in Antarctic marine ecosystems, yet measurements of ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates remain scarce. During the early austral spring of 2012, measurements for primary production rates and uptake of two nitrogen substrates (nitrate and ammonium) were conducted at 5 stations in the East Antarctic pack ice (63-66°S, 115-125°E). Carbon uptake was low (3.52 mg C m-2 d-1) but a trend of increased production was observed towards the end of the voyage suggesting pre-bloom conditions. Significant snow covers reaching, up to 0.8 m, induced strong light limitation. Two different regimes were observed in the ice with primarily nitrate based 'new' production (f-ratio: 0.80-0.95) at the bottom of the ice cover, due to nutrient-replete conditions at the ice-water interface, and common for pre-bloom conditions. In the sea-ice interior, POC:PN ratios (20-70) and higher POC:Chl a ratios suggested the presence of large amounts of detrital material trapped in the ice and here ammonium was the prevailing nitrogen substrate. This suggests that most primary production in the sea-ice interior was regenerated and supported by a microbial food web, recycling detritus.

  2. Prioritising Carbon Sequestration Areas in Southern Queensland using Time Series MODIS Net Primary Productivity (NPP) Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apan, A.; Suarez Cadavid, L. A.; Richardson, L.; Maraseni, T.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method that will use satellite imagery to identify areas of high forest growth and productivity, as a primary input in prioritising revegetation sites for carbon sequestration. Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data, this study analysed the annual net primary production (NPP) values (gC/m2) of images acquired from 2000 to 2013, covering the Condamine Catchment in southeast Queensland, Australia. With the analysis of annual rainfall data during the same period, three transitions of "normal to dry" years were identified to represent the future climate scenario considered in this study. The difference in the corresponding NPP values for each year was calculated, and subsequently averaged to the get the "Mean of Annual NPP Difference" (MAND) map. This layer identified the areas with increased net primary production despite the drought condition in those years. Combined with key thematic maps (i.e. regional ecosystems, land use, and tree canopy cover), the priority areas were mapped. The results have shown that there are over 42 regional ecosystem (RE) types in the study area that exhibited positive vegetation growth and productivity despite the decrease in annual rainfall. However, seven (7) of these RE types represents the majority (79 %) of the total high productivity area. A total of 10,736 ha were mapped as priority revegetation areas. This study demonstrated the use of MODIS-NPP imagery to map vegetation with high carbon sequestration rates necessary in prioritising revegetation sites.

  3. Primary productivity and the carrying capacity for herring in NE Pacific marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. Ian; Schweigert, Jacob F.

    2008-05-01

    The carrying capacity for Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasi) and its relationship to primary productivity was examined for eight populations in the NE Pacific and eastern Bering Sea. Data on biomass (ages 3 and older) and catches of herring in British Columbia (Georgia Strait, west coast Vancouver Island, Central Coast, Queen Charlotte Islands, Prince Rupert) and Alaska (Sitka, Prince William Sound, eastern Bering Sea) during the second half of the 20th Century derived from analytical stock assessments were used to calculate annual surplus production of herring. There was considerable interannual variability in herring productivity among all populations, however, only three (Georgia Strait, Prince Rupert, Prince William Sound) showed significant differences in mean productivity on decadal time scales (productivity regimes). Carrying capacity for the most recent productivity regime for each population was estimated using the Schaefer surplus production model. Mean annual primary productivity was estimated from remotely-sensed (SeaWiFS) chlorophyll data for British Columbia and Sitka ecosystems, and from in situ chlorophyll data for Prince William Sound and the eastern Bering Sea. The carrying capacity for herring populations in the NE Pacific ranged from 28,000 to 250,000 tonnes, and to 325,000 tonnes in the eastern Bering Sea. When considered on the basis of their distributional area, the west coast of Vancouver Island and Georgia Strait populations had the highest carrying capacity per unit area (9.3-13.8 tonnes km -2) and the eastern Bering Sea had the lowest (0.7 tonnes km -2). There is a significant positive linear relationship between the productivity of herring populations at carrying capacity and primary productivity on a per unit area basis. Although similar direct relationships have been observed between phytoplankton standing stock (as chlorophyll biomass) and total catches of resident fish populations from these regions, such a direct relationship was

  4. Trends in primary production in the California Current detected with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahru, Mati; Kudela, Raphael; Manzano-Sarabia, Marlenne; Mitchell, B. Greg

    2009-02-01

    Several ocean primary production algorithms using satellite data were evaluated on a large archive of net primary production (NPP) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) measurements collected by the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations program in the California Current. The best algorithm matching in situ data was found by empirically adjusting the Behrenfeld-Falkowski Vertically Generalized Production Model. Satellite-derived time series of NPP were calculated for the California Current area. Significant increase in NPP and Chl-a annual peak levels, i.e., the "bloom magnitude," were found along the coasts of the California Current as well as other major eastern boundary currents for the period of modern ocean color data (1997-2007). The reasons for this increase are not clear but are associated with various environmental conditions.

  5. Production of avian influenza virus vaccine using primary cell cultures generated from host organs.

    PubMed

    Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Riaz, Muhammad Suleman; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Afzal, Farhan; Farooq, Muhammad Sabir

    2013-06-01

    The global availability of a therapeutically effective influenza virus vaccine during a pandemic remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical industry. Long production time, coupled with decreased supply of embryonated chicken eggs (ECE), significantly affects the conventional vaccine production. Transformed cell lines have attained regulatory approvals for vaccine production. Based on the fact that the avian influenza virus would infect the cells derived from its natural host, the viral growth characteristics were studied on chicken embryo-derived primary cell cultures. The viral propagation was determined on avian origin primary cell cultures, transformed mammalian cell lines, and in ECE. A comparison was made between these systems by utilizing various cell culture-based assays. In-vitro substrate susceptibility and viral infection characteristics were evaluated by performing hemagglutination assay (HA), 50 % tissue culture infectious dose (TCID₅₀) and monitoring of cytopathic effects (CPE) caused by the virus. The primary cell culture developed from chicken embryos showed stable growth characteristics with no contamination. HA, TCID₅₀, and CPE exhibited that these cell systems were permissive to viral infection, yielding 2-10 times higher viral titer as compared to mammalian cell lines. Though the viral output from the ECE was equivalent to the chicken cell culture, the time period for achieving it was decreased to half. Some of the prerequisites of inactivated influenza virus vaccine production include generation of higher vial titer, independence from exogenous sources, and decrease in the production time lines. Based on the tests, it can be concluded that chicken embryo primary cell culture addresses these issues and can serve as a potential alternative for influenza virus vaccine production.

  6. Invariable biomass-specific primary production of taxonomically discrete picoeukaryote groups across the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Grob, Carolina; Hartmann, Manuela; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, Dave J

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (< 3 µm) are responsible for > 40% of total primary production at low latitudes such as the North-Eastern tropical Atlantic. In the world ocean, warmed by climate changes, the expected gradual shift towards smaller primary producers could render the role of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes even more important than they are today. Little is still known, however, about how the taxonomic composition of this highly diverse group affects primary production at the basin scale. Here, we combined flow cytometric cell sorting, NaH¹⁴CO₃ radiotracer incubations and class-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes to determine cell- and biomass-specific inorganic carbon fixation rates and taxonomic composition of two major photosynthetic picoeukaryote groups on a ∼7500-km-long latitudinal transect across the Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic Meridional Transect, AMT19). We show that even though larger cells have, on average, cell-specific CO₂ uptake rates ∼5 times higher than the smaller ones, the average biomass-specific uptake is statistically similar for both groups. On the other hand, even at a high taxonomic level, i.e. class, the contributions to both groups by Prymnesiophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Pelagophyceae are significantly different (P < 0.001 in all cases). We therefore conclude that these group's carbon fixation rates are independent of the taxonomic composition of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes across the Atlantic Ocean. Because the above applies across different oceanic regions the diversity changes seem to be a secondary factor determining primary production.

  7. A multi-sensor remote sensing approach for measuring primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, Catherine

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed to develop a multi-sensor remote sensing method for computing marine primary productivity from space, based on the capability to measure the primary ocean variables which regulate photosynthesis. The three variables and the sensors which measure them are: (1) downwelling photosynthetically available irradiance, measured by the VISSR sensor on the GOES satellite, (2) sea-surface temperature from AVHRR on NOAA series satellites, and (3) chlorophyll-like pigment concentration from the Nimbus-7/CZCS sensor. These and other measured variables would be combined within empirical or analytical models to compute primary productivity. With this proposed capability of mapping primary productivity on a regional scale, we could begin realizing a more precise and accurate global assessment of its magnitude and variability. Applications would include supplementation and expansion on the horizontal scale of ship-acquired biological data, which is more accurate and which supplies the vertical components of the field, monitoring oceanic response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, correlation with observed sedimentation patterns and processes, and fisheries management.

  8. The Influence of Sea Ice on Primary Production in the Southern Ocean: A Satellite Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Walker O., Jr.; Comiso, Josefino C.

    2007-01-01

    Sea ice in the Southern Ocean is a major controlling factor on phytoplankton productivity and growth, but the relationship is modified by regional differences in atmospheric and oceanographic conditions. We used the phytoplankton biomass (binned at 7-day intervals), PAR and cloud cover data from SeaWiFS, ice concentrations data from SSM/I and AMSR-E, and sea-surface temperature data from AVHRR, in combination with a vertically integrated model to estimate primary productivity throughout the Southern Ocean (south of 60"s). We also selected six areas within the Southern Ocean and analyzed the variability of the primary productivity and trends through time, as well as the relationship of sea ice to productivity. We found substantial interannual variability in productivity from 1997 - 2005 in all regions of the Southern Ocean, and this variability appeared to be driven in large part by ice dynamics. The most productive regions of Antarctic waters were the continental shelves, which showed the earliest growth, the maximum biomass, and the greatest areal specific productivity. In contrast, no large, sustained blooms occurred in waters of greater depth (> 1,000 m). We suggest that this is due to the slightly greater mixed layer depths found in waters off the continental shelf, and that the interactive effects of iron and irradiance (that is, increased iron requirements in low irradiance environments) result in the limitation of phytoplankton biomass over large regions of the Southern Ocean.

  9. Carbon production and export from Biscayne Bay, Florida. I. Temporal patterns in primary production, seston and zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Michael R.; Reeve, M. R.; Froggatt, J. L.

    1983-07-01

    Five stations along a transect from the western shore of Biscayne Bay, Florida to the Florida Current were sampled monthly for one year. The variability and amount of seston particulate organic carbon, adenosine triphosphate, chlorophyll a, primary production and zooplankton decreased along the seaward transect. The greater inshore biomass and variability of seston were the result of the allochthonous input of detritus and inorganic nutrients via terrestrial runoff. Annual primary production in this subtropical coastal lagoon ranged from 13 to 46 g C m -2 yr -1. Chlorophyll a in the bay ranged from 1 to 3 mg chlorophyll a m -2. In contrast, chlorophyll a in the surface centimetre of the sediment ranged from 50 to 300 mg chlorophyll a m -2. In this clear, shallow (2 to 3 m), oligotrophic lagoon, over 90% of total primary production is by submerged macrophytes and benthic algae. The high zooplankton biomass in the bay is most likely sustained by macrophyte detritus and the resuspension of benthic diatoms by the high winds associated with summer squalls and winter cold fronts.

  10. Studies of slow-positron production using low-energy primary electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.

    1999-04-20

    Slow-positron beams produced from negative-work-function solid-state moderators have found numerous applications in condensed matter physics. There are potential advantages in using low-energy primary electron beams for positron production, including reduced radiation damage to single-crystal moderators and reduced activation of nearby components. We present numerical calculations of positron yields and other beam parameters for various target-moderator configurations using the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) [1] and Advanced Photon Source (APS) [2] electron linacs [3] as examples of sources for the primary electron beams. The status of experiments at these facilities is reviewed.

  11. Annual primary production: Patterns and mechanisms of change in a nutrient-rich tidal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Cole, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    Although nutrient supply often underlies long-term changes in aquatic primary production, other regulatory processes can be important. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a complex of tidal waterways forming the landward portion of the San Francisco Estuary, has ample nutrient supplies, enabling us to examine alternate regulatory mechanisms over a 21-yr period. Delta-wide primary productivity was reconstructed from historical water quality data for 1975–1995. Annual primary production averaged 70 g C m−2, but it varied by over a factor of five among years. At least four processes contributed to this variability: (1) invasion of the clam Potamocorbula amurensis led to a persistent decrease in phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a) after 1986; (2) a long-term decline in total suspended solids—probably at least partly because of upstream dam construction—increased water transparency and phytoplankton growth rate; (3) river inflow, reflecting climate variability, affected biomass through fluctuations in flushing and growth rates through fluctuations in total suspended solids; and (4) an additional pathway manifesting as a long-term decline in winter phytoplankton biomass has been identified, but its genesis is uncertain. Overall, the Delta lost 43% in annual primary production during the period. Given the evidence for food limitation of primary consumers, these findings provide a partial explanation for widespread Delta species declines over the past few decades. Turbid nutrient-rich systems such as the Delta may be inherently more variable than other tidal systems because certain compensatory processes are absent. Comparisons among systems, however, can be tenuous because conclusions about the magnitude and mechanisms of variability are dependent on length of data record.  

  12. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  13. Seasonality of oceanic primary production and its interannual variability from 1998 to 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher W.; Schollaert Uz, Stephanie; Corliss, Bruce H.

    2014-08-01

    The seasonality of primary productivity plays an important role in nutrient and carbon cycling. We quantify the seasonality of satellite-derived, oceanic net primary production (NPP) and its interannual variability during the first decade of the SeaWiFS mission (1998 to 2007) using a normalized seasonality index (NSI). The NSI, which is based upon production half-time, t(1/2), generally becomes progressively more episodic with increasing latitude in open ocean waters, spanning from a relatively constant rate of primary productivity throughout the year (mean t(1/2) ~5 months) in subtropical waters to more pulsed events (mean t(1/2) ~3 months) in subpolar waters. This relatively gradual, poleward pattern in NSI differs from recent estimates of phytoplankton bloom duration, another measure of seasonality, at lower latitudes (~40°S-40°N). These differences likely reflect the temporal component of production assessed by each metric, with NSI able to more fully capture the irregular nature of production characteristic of waters in this zonal band. The interannual variability in NSI was generally low, with higher variability observed primarily in frontal and seasonal upwelling zones. The influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation on this variability was clearly evident, particularly in the equatorial Pacific, where primary productivity was anomalously episodic from the date line east to the coast of South America in 1998. Yearly seasonality and the magnitude of annual production were generally positively correlated at mid-latitudes and negatively correlated at tropical latitudes, particularly in a region bordering the Pacific equatorial divergence. This implies that increases of annual production in the former region are attained over the course of a year by shorter duration but higher magnitude NPP events, while in the latter areas it results from an increased frequency or duration of similar magnitude events. Statistically significant trends in the seasonality

  14. Bio-optical modeling of primary production on regional scales: the Bermuda BioOptics project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Westberry, T. K.; O'Brien, M. C.; Nelson, N. B.; Michaels, A. F.; Morrison, J. R.; Scott, A.; Caporelli, E. A.; Sorensen, J. C.; Maritorena, S.; Garver, S. A.; Brody, E. A.; Ubante, J.; Hammer, M. A.

    Regional to global scale estimates of primary production must rely on remotely sensed quantities. Here, we characterize in situ light-primary production relationships and assess the predictive capability of several global primary production models using a 6-yr time series collected as part of the US JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS). The consistency and longevity of this data set provide an excellent opportunity to evaluate bio-optical modeling methodologies and their predictive capabilities for estimating rates of water-column-integrated primary production, ∫PP, for use with satellite ocean-color observations. We find that existing and regionally tuned parameterizations for vertically integrated chlorophyll content and euphotic zone depth do not explain much of the observed variability at this site. Fortunately, the use of these parameterizations for light availability and harvesting capacity has little influence upon modeled rates of ∫PP. Site-specific and previously published global models of primary production both perform poorly and account for less than 40% of the variance in ∫PP. A sensitivity analysis is performed to demonstrate the importance of light-saturated rates of primary production, P sat∗, compared with other photophysiological parameters. This is because nearly one-half of ∫PP occurs under light-saturated conditions. Unfortunately, we were unable to derive a simple parameterization for P sat∗that significantly improves prediction of ∫PP. The failure of global ∫PP models to encapsulate a major portion of the observed variance is due in part to the restricted range of ∫PP observations for this site. A similar result is found comparing global chlorophyll-reflectance algorithms to the present observations. More importantly, we demonstrate that there exists a time-scale (roughly 200 d) above which the modeled distributions of ∫PP are consistent with the observational data. By low-pass filtering the observed and modeled

  15. Relationships between primary production and irradiance in coral reef algal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Shallow water algal turf communities are the major primary producers on coral reefs. High rates of primary production are maintained despite extremely high light intensities and exposure to ultraviolet wavelengths. The relationships between the light intensity and primary production in these assemblages are typical of algae adapted to a high light environment (low ..cap alpha.. (initial slope), high I/sub k/ (saturating light intensity), and high I/sub c/ (compensation point light intensity)). Seasonal variations in algal standing crop due to herbivory and daylength result in some characteristic photoadaptive changes in ..cap alpha.. I/sub k/, and I/sub c/ and changes in Pnet/sub max/ rates (maximum net photosynthetic rate achieved at light saturation) on both a chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. and an areal basis. Exposure to UV wavelength results in significantly higher respiration rates but no changes in ..cap alpha.., Pnet/sub max/, or I/sub k/, when compared with these parameters for the same algal communities incubated at the same light intensities without UV wavelengths. The apparent lack of photoinhibition in these algae allows calculation of the daily integrated production from the P vs. I parameters. This integrated production is highest in July (3.1 +/- 0.2 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/) and is reduced by 30% from this maximum in December (2.1 +/- 0.1 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/).

  16. Assessing the impact of urbanization on regional net primary productivity in Jiangyin County, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Liu, M; An, S; Chen, J M; Yan, P

    2007-11-01

    Urbanization is one of the most important aspects of global change. The process of urbanization has a significant impact on the terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. The Yangtze Delta region has one of the highest rates of urbanization in China. In this study, carried out in Jiangyin County as a representative region within the Yangtze Delta, land use and land cover changes were estimated using Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery. With these satellite data and the BEPS process model (Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator), the impacts of urbanization on regional net primary productivity (NPP) and annual net primary production were assessed for 1991 and 2002. Landsat-based land cover maps in 1991 and 2002 showed that urban development encroached large areas of cropland and forest. Expansion of residential areas and reduction of vegetated areas were the major forms of land transformation in Jiangyin County during this period. Mean NPP of the total area decreased from 818 to 699 gCm(-2)yr(-1) during the period of 1991 to 2002. NPP of cropland was only reduced by 2.7% while forest NPP was reduced by 9.3%. Regional annual primary production decreased from 808 GgC in 1991 to 691 GgC in 2002, a reduction of 14.5%. Land cover changes reduced regional NPP directly, and the increasing intensity and frequency of human-induced disturbance in the urbanized areas could be the main reason for the decrease in forest NPP.

  17. Microbial primary production on an Arctic glacier is insignificant in comparison with allochthonous organic carbon input.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Tranter, Martyn; Benning, Liane G; Rehák, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Cryoconite holes are unique freshwater environments on glacier surfaces, formed when solar-heated dark debris melts down into the ice. Active photoautotrophic microorganisms are abundant within the holes and fix inorganic carbon due to the availability of liquid water and solar radiation. Cryoconite holes are potentially important sources of organic carbon to the glacial ecosystem, but the relative magnitudes of autochthonous microbial primary production and wind-borne allochthonous organic matter brought are unknown. Here, we compare an estimate of annual microbial primary production in 2006 on Werenskioldbreen, a Svalbard glacier, with the organic carbon content of cryoconite debris. There is a great disparity between annual primary production (4.3 mug C g(-1) year(-1)) and the high content of organic carbon within the debris (1.7-4.5%, equivalent to 8500-22 000 mug C g(-1) debris). Long-term accumulation of autochthonous organic matter is considered unlikely due to ablation dynamics and the surface hydrology of the glacier. Rather, it is more likely that the majority of the organic matter on Werenskioldbreen is allochthonous. Hence, although glacier surfaces can be a significant source of organic carbon for glacial environments on Svalbard, they may be reservoirs rather than oases of high productivity.

  18. Efficiency of chlorophyll in gross primary productivity: A proof of concept and application in crops.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Viña, Andrés; Arkebauer, Timothy; Schepers, James S

    2016-08-20

    One of the main factors affecting vegetation productivity is absorbed light, which is largely governed by chlorophyll. In this paper, we introduce the concept of chlorophyll efficiency, representing the amount of gross primary production per unit of canopy chlorophyll content (Chl) and incident PAR. We analyzed chlorophyll efficiency in two contrasting crops (soybean and maize). Given that they have different photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4), leaf structures (dicot vs. monocot) and canopy architectures (a heliotrophic leaf angle distribution vs. a spherical leaf angle distribution), they cover a large spectrum of biophysical conditions. Our results show that chlorophyll efficiency in primary productivity is highly variable and responds to various physiological and phenological conditions, and water availability. Since Chl is accessible through non-destructive, remotely sensed techniques, the use of chlorophyll efficiency for modeling and monitoring plant optimization patterns is practical at different scales (e.g., leaf, canopy) and under widely-varying environmental conditions. Through this analysis, we directly related a functional characteristic, gross primary production with a structural characteristic, canopy chlorophyll content. Understanding the efficiency of the structural characteristic is of great interest as it allows explaining functional components of the plant system.

  19. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  20. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity.

  1. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C

    2015-01-13

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity.

  2. Importance of seep primary production to Lophelia pertusa and associated fauna in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Erin L.; Cordes, Erik E.; Macko, Stephen A.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the importance of seep primary production to the nutrition of Lophelia pertusa and associated communities and examine local trophic interactions, we analyzed stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur compositions in seven quantitative L. pertusa community collections. A significant seep signature was only detected in one of the 35 species tested ( Provanna sculpta, a common seep gastropod) despite the presence of seep fauna at the three sample sites. A potential predator of L. pertusa was identified ( Coralliophila sp.), and a variety of other trophic interactions among the fauna occupying the coral framework were suggested by the data, including the galatheid crab Munidopsis sp. 2 feeding upon hydroids and the polychaete Eunice sp. feeding upon the sabellid polychaete Euratella sp. Stable carbon abundances were also determined for different sections of L. pertusa skeleton representing different stages in the growth and life of the aggregation. There was no temporal trend detected in the skeleton isotope values, suggesting that L. pertusa settles in these areas only after seepage has largely subsided. Isotope values of individual taxa that were collected from both L. pertusa and vestimentiferan habitats showed decreasing reliance upon seep primary production with average age of the vestimentiferan aggregation, and finally, no seep signature was detected in the coral collections. Together our data suggest that it is the presence of authigenic carbonate substrata, a product of past seep microbial activity, as well as hydrodynamic processes that drive L. pertusa occurrence at seep sites in the Gulf of Mexico, not nutritional dependence upon primary production by seep microbes.

  3. Performance of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry based estimates of primary productivity in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C.; Suggett, D. J.; Cherukuru, N.; Ralph, P. J.; Doblin, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Capturing the variability of primary productivity in highly dynamic coastal ecosystems remains a major challenge to marine scientists. To test the suitability of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf) for rapid assessment of primary productivity in estuarine and coastal locations, we conducted a series of paired analyses estimating 14C carbon fixation and primary productivity from electron transport rates with a Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer MkII, from waters on the Australian east coast. Samples were collected from two locations with contrasting optical properties and we compared the relative magnitude of photosynthetic traits, such as the maximum rate of photosynthesis (Pmax), light utilisation efficiency (α) and minimum saturating irradiance (EK) estimated using both methods. In the case of FRRf, we applied recent algorithm developments that enabled electron transport rates to be determined free from the need for assumed constants, as in most previous studies. Differences in the concentration and relative proportion of optically active substances at the two locations were evident in the contrasting attenuation of PAR (400-700 nm), blue (431 nm), green (531 nm) and red (669 nm) wavelengths. FRRF-derived estimates of photosynthetic parameters were positively correlated with independent estimates of 14C carbon fixation (Pmax: n = 19, R2 = 0.66; α: n = 21, R2 = 0.77; EK: n = 19, R2 = 0.45; all p < 0.05), however primary productivity was frequently underestimated by the FRRf method. Up to 81% of the variation in the relationship between FRRf and 14C estimates was explained by the presence of pico-cyanobacteria and chlorophyll-a biomass, and the proportion of photoprotective pigments, that appeared to be linked to turbidity. We discuss the potential importance of cyanobacteria in influencing the underestimations of FRRf productivity and steps to overcome this potential limitation.

  4. Estimating the Capacity of Gross Primary Production from Global Observation Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Soyama, Noriko; Thanyaparaneedkul, Juthasinee; Furumi, Shinobu; Daigo, Motomasa

    2012-07-01

    Estimation of Gross Primary Production with high accuracy is important for understanding the carbon cycle. For estimating gross primary production, photosynthesis process was considers into two parts. One is the capacity and another is the reduction which is influenced by environmental conditions such as weather conditions of vapor pressure difference and soil moisture. The capacity estimation part is reported in this conference. For a leaf, it is well known photosynthesis capacity is mainly depend on amount of chlorophyll and enzyme. Chlorophyll contents reflect the color of a leaf. Since we focus on the chlorophyll contents for estimating the capacity of the gross primary production. It was reported by J. Thanyapraneedkul (2012) that vegetation index of the ratio of green band and near infrared was linear relationship with chlorophyll contents of a leaf, and was a linear relationship with the maximum photosynthesis at light saturation of light response curve with less stress conditions using flux data. The index is suitable for global observing satellite, because the spectral bands are available. Using the index and empirical relationship developed by J. Thanyapraneedkul, the light response curve with less stress can be estimated from the vegetation index. In this study, firstly, the global distribution of the index was studied. The regions of high index value in winter time were correspond to tropical rainforest. Next, the capacity of gross primary production was estimated using the light response curve using the index. The GPP capacity of the almost all regions was higher than MODIS GPP. For the tropical rain forest regions, the GPP capacity value was similar with MODIS GPP product.

  5. Primary production enhancement in a shallow seamount (Gorringe — Northeast Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Ana Paula; Coutinho, Teresa Pereira; Cabeçadas, Graça; Brogueira, Maria José; Coca, Josep; Ramos, Manuela; Calado, Gonçalo; Duarte, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    Gorringe bank is a shallow seamount having its summit within the euphotic layer. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the interaction of ocean currents with shallow water seamounts, as the Gorringe, has a significant effect on local upwelling and primary production. Three hydrographic surveys were carried out: one in autumn (October 2011) and two in summer (June and July 2012). Physical (salinity, temperature), chemical (nutrients, dissolved oxygen, pH, total alkalinity and suspended particulate matter) and biological (chlorophyll, pelagic primary production and phytoplankton composition and abundance) variables were measured and/or determined in the area of Gorringe Bank, in particular over and around the Ormonde and Gettysburg peaks. Multivariate analyses (PCA and MDS) were applied to environmental and phytoplankton data. Statistical analysis of historical satellite and model data was also carried out in order to analyze local hydrographic conditions and to compare sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentrations over the peaks and off the peaks in different seasons. Pelagic primary production, measured by Dissolved Oxygen methodology, reached values up to 24.10 mg C m- 3 h- 1 in the vicinity of the peaks. Phytoplankton abundance ranged from 2.2 × 103 to 14 × 103 cells L- 1, being the community composed mainly of chain-forming Diatoms like Chaetoceros sp., Dactyliosolen spp., Hemiaulus hauckii and Pseudonitzschia spp., in summer months, in zones of high hydrodynamics of the peaks. By contrast, at locations away of the seamount summits and in autumn, Coccolithophores species reached the same or higher percentage in total abundance than Diatoms, being Discosphaera tubifer and Calcidiscus leptoporus cf. the most abundant species. The combined results indicate the presence of a seasonal effect of Gorringe summits on local upwelling and enhancement of primary production reflected in higher abundance of phytoplankton in the vicinity of the

  6. Primary production in a tropical large lake: the role of phytoplankton composition.

    PubMed

    Darchambeau, F; Sarmento, H; Descy, J-P

    2014-03-01

    Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in tropical large lakes vary at different time scales, from seasons to centuries. We provide a dataset made of 7 consecutive years of phytoplankton biomass and production in Lake Kivu (Eastern Africa). From 2002 to 2008, bi-weekly samplings were performed in a pelagic site in order to quantify phytoplankton composition and biomass, using marker pigments determined by HPLC. Primary production rates were estimated by 96 in situ (14)C incubations. A principal component analysis showed that the main environmental gradient was linked to a seasonal variation of the phytoplankton assemblage, with a clear separation between diatoms during the dry season and cyanobacteria during the rainy season. A rather wide range of the maximum specific photosynthetic rate (PBm) was found, ranging between 1.15 and 7.21 g carbong(-1)chlorophyll ah(-1), and was best predicted by a regression model using phytoplankton composition as an explanatory variable. The irradiance at the onset of light saturation (Ik) ranged between 91 and 752 μE m(-2)s(-1) and was linearly correlated with the mean irradiance in the mixed layer. The inter-annual variability of phytoplankton biomass and production was high, ranging from 53 to 100 mg chlorophyll am(-2) (annual mean) and from 143 to 278 g carbon m(-2)y(-1), respectively. The degree of seasonal mixing determined annual production, demonstrating the sensitivity of tropical lakes to climate variability. A review of primary production of other African great lakes allows situating Lake Kivu productivity in the same range as that of lakes Tanganyika and Malawi, even if mean phytoplankton biomass was higher in Lake Kivu.

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt. GGGGGG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Primary...

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt. GGGGGG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Primary...

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt. GGGGGG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Primary...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt. GGGGGG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Primary...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt. GGGGGG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Primary...

  12. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  13. Casting Protocols for the Production of Open Cell Aluminum Foams by the Replication Technique and the Effect on Porosity

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo Luna, Erardo M.; Barari, Farzad; Woolley, Robert; Goodall, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Metal foams are interesting materials from both a fundamental understanding and practical applications point of view. Uses have been proposed, and in many cases validated experimentally, for light weight or impact energy absorbing structures, as high surface area heat exchangers or electrodes, as implants to the body, and many more. Although great progress has been made in understanding their structure-properties relationships, the large number of different processing techniques, each producing material with different characteristics and structure, means that understanding of the individual effects of all aspects of structure is not complete. The replication process, where molten metal is infiltrated between grains of a removable preform material, allows a markedly high degree of control and has been used to good effect to elucidate some of these relationships. Nevertheless, the process has many steps that are dependent on individual “know-how”, and this paper aims to provide a detailed description of all stages of one embodiment of this processing method, using materials and equipment that would be relatively easy to set up in a research environment. The goal of this protocol and its variants is to produce metal foams in an effective and simple way, giving the possibility to tailor the outcome of the samples by modifying certain steps within the process. By following this, open cell aluminum foams with pore sizes of 1–2.36 mm diameter and 61% to 77% porosity can be obtained. PMID:25548938

  14. Comparing the impact of the 2003 and 2010 heatwaves on Net Primary Production in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Ana; Gouveia, Célia M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Running, Steve W.

    2013-04-01

    Climate variability is known to influence primary productivity on land ecosystems (Nemani et al., 2003). In particular, extreme climatic events such as major droughts and heatwaves are known to have severe impact on primary productivity and, therefore, to affect significantly the carbon dioxide uptake by land ecosystems at regional (Ciais et al., 2005) or even global scale (Zhao and Running, 2010). In the last decade, Europe was struck by two outstanding heatwaves, the 2003 event in Western Europe and the recent 2010 episode over Eastern Europe. Both were characterised by record breaking temperatures at the daily, weekly, monthly and seasonal scales, although the amplitude and spatial extent of the 2010 mega-heatwave surpassed the 2003 event (Barriopedro et al., 2011). This work aims to assess the influence of both mega-heatwaves on yearly Net Primary Production (NPP) and seasonal Net Photosynthesis (NP), which corresponds to the difference between Gross Primary Production and maintenance respiration. The work relies on yearly NPP and monthly NP data derived from satellite imagery obtained from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor at 1km spatial resolution. Data were selected for the period between 2000 and 2011 over a region extending from 34.6N to 73.5N and 12.1W to 46.8E, covering Eurasia. In 2010 very low primary production anomalies are observed over a very large area in Eastern Europe, at the monthly, seasonal and yearly scale. In western Russia, yearly NPP anomalies fall below 50% of average. These widespread negative anomalous values of NP fields over the western Russia region match the patterns of very high temperature values combined with below-average precipitation, at the seasonal (summer) scale. Moreover, the impact of the heatwave is not only evident at the regional level but also at the wider continental (European) scale and is significantly more extensive and intense than the corresponding heatwave of 2003 in Western Europe

  15. Phenotyping and auto-antibody production by liver-infiltrating B cells in primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian K; Guevel, Bardia T; Reynolds, Gary M; Gupta Udatha, D B R K; Henriksen, Eva Kristine Klemsdal; Stamataki, Zania; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Liaskou, Evaggelia

    2017-02-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are immune-mediated biliary diseases that demonstrate prominent and restricted genetic association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. In PBC, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are specific and used as diagnostic biomarkers. PSC-relevant auto-antibodies remain controversial despite a distinct HLA association that mirrors archetypical auto-antigen driven disorders. Herein, we compared antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) in PSC and PBC liver explants to determine if liver-infiltrating ASCs represent an opportune and novel source of disease-relevant auto-antibodies. Using enzymatic digestion and mechanical disruption, liver mononuclear cells (LIMCs) were isolated from fresh PSC and PBC explants and plasmablast (CD19+CD27+CD38(hi)CD138-) and plasma cell (CD19+CD27+CD38(hi)CD138+) ASCs were enumerated by flow cytometry. We observed 45-fold fewer plasma cells in PSC explants (n = 9) compared to PBC samples (n = 5, p < 0.01) and 10-fold fewer IgA-, IgG- and IgM-positive ASCs (p < 0.05). Liver-infiltrating ASCs from PSC and PBC explants were functional and produced similar concentrations of IgA, IgG and IgM following 2 weeks of culture. Antibody production by PBC ASCs (n = 3) was disease-specific as AMA to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit (PDC-E2) was detected by immunostaining, immunoblotting and ELISA. Antibody profiling of PSC supernatants (n = 9) using full-length recombinant human protein arrays (Cambridge Protein Arrays) revealed reactivities to nucleolar protein 3 (5/9) and hematopoietic cell-specific Lyn substrate 1 (3/9). Array analysis of PBC supernatants (n = 3) detected reactivities to PDC-E2 and hexokinase 1 (3/3). In conclusion, we detected unique frequencies of liver-infiltrating ASCs in PSC and PBC and in so doing, highlight a feasible approach for understanding disease-relevant antibodies in PSC.

  16. Impact of sea-ice biology on overall primary production in a biophysical model of the pan-Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Frédéric

    2012-08-01

    The contribution of sea-ice biology and impact of Arctic warming on overall primary production in a Pan-Arctic ocean model are investigated in a 57 year (1950-2006) simulation at coarse resolution using a simple ecosystem model. The ice biology model formally represents the growth and aggregation of micro algae into an ice-water interface, nearly undisturbed by surface mixed layer dynamics. The importance of this so-called ‘ice-algae’ stems from their significant contribution to the total primary production (up to 50% depending on the locations, according to observations described in Gosselin et al. (1997). Simple 1D tests reveal that, depending on their initial biomass and light availability, ice algae can affect the temporal variation of surface nutrients, while they marginally impact the total primary production, or the long term position of the nutricline. The sea-ice primary production is found in the model to be as high as 40% of the total primary production depending on the location and 7.5% for the whole Arctic. The modeled primary production of the ocean is negatively correlated to the September ice cover whereas the production in the ice is more weakly positively correlated. Because of the negative correlation between sea ice cover and pelagic primary production, the short term response to the continuing ice decline will be an increased total production as seen in the model, while the ice algae production would decline.

  17. Using Carbon Isotopes in Cenozoic Soil Carbonates to Quantify Primary Productivity from Mid-Latitude Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caves, J. K.; Kramer, S. H.; Ibarra, D. E.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of pedogenic carbonates (δ13Ccarb) from paleosols has been extensively used as a proxy to estimate atmospheric pCO2 over the Phanerozoic. However, a number of other factors - including the concentration of plant-respired CO2 and the isotopic composition of both atmospheric and plant-respired carbon - influence the δ13C of pedogenic carbonates. For example, δ13Ccarb records from the mid-latitudes in central Asia and western North America show increasing trends in δ13Ccarb despite decreasing pCO2 during the late Cenozoic, which suggests that other factors play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates. Instead, we suggest that these records are primarily recording changes in primary productivity rather than changes in atmospheric pCO2 and therefore propose a novel use of paleosol carbonate records to understand paleo-ecosystem dynamics. Here, we compile existing paleosol carbonate records, and present three new records from Wyoming, to estimate soil respiration and primary productivity in western North America during the Paleogene and early Neogene. We observe both an overall increase in δ13Ccarb after the early Eocene, and spatially heterogeneous δ13Ccarb values across western US basins. We combine this δ13Ccarb data with compilations of atmospheric pCO2 to estimate soil respiration and plant productivity. The long-term increase in δ13Ccarb indicates a decrease in plant productivity as conditions became more arid across much of the western US, congruent with both records of regional uplift and of global cooling. Furthermore, significant spatial heterogeneity in δ13Ccarb indicates that regional factors, such as the presence of paleolakes and/or local paleotopography may have provided a second-order control on local and regional productivity. Thus, our results provide a first-order estimate linking changes in primary productivity with regional tectonics and global climatic change.

  18. Global human appropriation of net primary production doubled in the 20th century

    PubMed Central

    Krausmann, Fridolin; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Gingrich, Simone; Haberl, Helmut; Bondeau, Alberte; Gaube, Veronika; Lauk, Christian; Plutzar, Christoph; Searchinger, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Global increases in population, consumption, and gross domestic product raise concerns about the sustainability of the current and future use of natural resources. The human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) provides a useful measure of human intervention into the biosphere. The productive capacity of land is appropriated by harvesting or burning biomass and by converting natural ecosystems to managed lands with lower productivity. This work analyzes trends in HANPP from 1910 to 2005 and finds that although human population has grown fourfold and economic output 17-fold, global HANPP has only doubled. Despite this increase in efficiency, HANPP has still risen from 6.9 Gt of carbon per y in 1910 to 14.8 GtC/y in 2005, i.e., from 13% to 25% of the net primary production of potential vegetation. Biomass harvested per capita and year has slightly declined despite growth in consumption because of a decline in reliance on bioenergy and higher conversion efficiencies of primary biomass to products. The rise in efficiency is overwhelmingly due to increased crop yields, albeit frequently associated with substantial ecological costs, such as fossil energy inputs, soil degradation, and biodiversity loss. If humans can maintain the past trend lines in efficiency gains, we estimate that HANPP might only grow to 27–29% by 2050, but providing large amounts of bioenergy could increase global HANPP to 44%. This result calls for caution in refocusing the energy economy on land-based resources and for strategies that foster the continuation of increases in land-use efficiency without excessively increasing ecological costs of intensification. PMID:23733940

  19. Ocean Primary Production Estimates from Terra MODIS and Their Dependency on Satellite Chlorophyll Alpha Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark; Carder, Kendall; Campbell, Janet; Clark, Dennis; Evans, Robert; Brown, Otis; Kearns, Ed; Kilpatrick, Kay; Balch, W.

    2003-01-01

    Simplistic models relating global satellite ocean color, temperature, and light to ocean net primary production (ONPP) are sensitive to the accuracy and limitations of the satellite estimate of chlorophyll and other input fields, as well as the primary productivity model. The standard MODIS ONPP product uses the new semi-analytic chlorophyll algorithm as its input for two ONPP indexes. The three primary MODIS chlorophyll Q estimates from MODIS, as well as the SeaWiFS 4 chlorophyll product, were used to assess global and regional performance in estimating ONPP for the full mission, but concentrating on 2001. The two standard ONPP algorithms were examined with 8-day and 39 kilometer resolution to quantify chlorophyll algorithm dependency of ONPP. Ancillary data (MLD from FNMOC, MODIS SSTD1, and PAR from the GSFC DAO) were identical. The standard MODIS ONPP estimates for annual production in 2001 was 59 and 58 GT C for the two ONPP algorithms. Differences in ONPP using alternate chlorophylls were on the order of 10% for global annual ONPP, but ranged to 100% regionally. On all scales the differences in ONPP were smaller between MODIS and SeaWiFS than between ONPP models, or among chlorophyll algorithms within MODIS. Largest regional ONPP differences were found in the Southern Ocean (SO). In the SO, application of the semi-analytic chlorophyll resulted in not only a magnitude difference in ONPP (2x), but also a temporal shift in the time of maximum production compared to empirical algorithms when summed over standard oceanic areas. The resulting increase in global ONPP (6-7 GT) is supported by better performance of the semi-analytic chlorophyll in the SO and other high chlorophyll regions. The differences are significant in terms of understanding regional differences and dynamics of ocean carbon transformations.

  20. Global human appropriation of net primary production doubled in the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Krausmann, Fridolin; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Gingrich, Simone; Haberl, Helmut; Bondeau, Alberte; Gaube, Veronika; Lauk, Christian; Plutzar, Christoph; Searchinger, Timothy D

    2013-06-18

    Global increases in population, consumption, and gross domestic product raise concerns about the sustainability of the current and future use of natural resources. The human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) provides a useful measure of human intervention into the biosphere. The productive capacity of land is appropriated by harvesting or burning biomass and by converting natural ecosystems to managed lands with lower productivity. This work analyzes trends in HANPP from 1910 to 2005 and finds that although human population has grown fourfold and economic output 17-fold, global HANPP has only doubled. Despite this increase in efficiency, HANPP has still risen from 6.9 Gt of carbon per y in 1910 to 14.8 GtC/y in 2005, i.e., from 13% to 25% of the net primary production of potential vegetation. Biomass harvested per capita and year has slightly declined despite growth in consumption because of a decline in reliance on bioenergy and higher conversion efficiencies of primary biomass to products. The rise in efficiency is overwhelmingly due to increased crop yields, albeit frequently associated with substantial ecological costs, such as fossil energy inputs, soil degradation, and biodiversity loss. If humans can maintain the past trend lines in efficiency gains, we estimate that HANPP might only grow to 27-29% by 2050, but providing large amounts of bioenergy could increase global HANPP to 44%. This result calls for caution in refocusing the energy economy on land-based resources and for strategies that foster the continuation of increases in land-use efficiency without excessively increasing ecological costs of intensification.

  1. Costs, Productivity, and the Utilization of Physicians’s Extenders in Air Force Primary Medicine Clinics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    on ex- tenders to deliver primary medicine. It was prepared as part of the Project AIR FORCE research study effort "Air Force Medical Resources...assistance and review as well as the results of their own research, upon which we draw throughout the report. Richard Buddin initiated the production...Adele Palmer reviewed an earlier version of the report. We are particularly grateful to those in the Air Force who worked with us. The Office of the

  2. Impacts of Temperature on Primary Productivity and Respiration in Naturally Structured Macroalgal Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Leigh W.; Schiel, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Rising global temperatures caused by human-mediated change has already triggered significant responses in organismal physiology, distribution and ecosystem functioning. Although the effects of rising temperature on the physiology of individual organisms are well understood, the effect on community-wide processes has remained elusive. The fixation of carbon via primary productivity is an essential ecosystem function and any shifts in the balance of primary productivity and respiration could alter the carbon balance of ecosystems. Here we show through a series of tests that respiration of naturally structured algal assemblages in southern New Zealand greatly increases with rising temperature, with implications for net primary productivity (NPP). The NPP of in situ macroalgal assemblages was minimally affected by natural temperature variation, possibly through photo-acclimation or temperature acclimation responses, but respiration rates and compensating irradiance were negatively affected. However, laboratory experiments testing the impacts of rising temperature on several photosynthetic parameters showed a decline in NPP, increasing respiration rates and increasing compensating irradiance. The respiration Q10 of laboratory assemblages (the difference in metabolic rates over 10°C) averaged 2.9 compared to a Q10 of 2 often seen in other autotrophs. However, gross primary productivity (GPP) Q10 averaged 2, indicating that respiration was more severely affected by rising temperature. Furthermore, combined high irradiance and high temperature caused photoinhibition in the laboratory, and resulted in 50% lower NPP at high irradiance. Our study shows that communities may be more severely affected by rising global temperatures than would be expected by responses of individual species. In particular, enhanced respiration rates and rising compensation points have the potential to greatly affect the carbon balance of macroalgal assemblages through declines in sub-canopy NPP

  3. Seasonal distribution of net primary production by functional groups in Chihuahuan Desert, and the role of seasonal precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In hot deserts, precipitation is the principal driver for net primary production.  This study tested two hypotheses regarding aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and the effects of precipitation on ANPP in the Chihuahuan Desert, with emphasis on differences among seasons and among functional g...

  4. Caribbean Spiny Lobster Fishery Is Underpinned by Trophic Subsidies from Chemosynthetic Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Nicholas D; Newton, Jason; Attrill, Martin J

    2016-12-19

    The Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, is one of the most valuable fisheries commodities in the Central American region, directly employing 50,000 people and generating >US$450 million per year [1]. This industry is particularly important to small island states such as The Bahamas, which exports more lobster than any other country in the region [1]. Several factors contribute to this disproportionally high productivity, principally the extensive shallow-water banks covered in seagrass meadows [2], where fishermen deploy artificial shelters for the lobsters to supplement scarce reef habitat [3]. The surrounding seabed communities are dominated by lucinid bivalve mollusks that live among the seagrass root system [4, 5]. These clams host chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts in their gills that synthesize organic matter using reduced sulfur compounds, providing nutrition to their hosts [6]. Recent studies have highlighted the important role of the lucinid clam symbiosis in maintaining the health and productivity of seagrass ecosystems [7, 8], but their biomass also represents a potentially abundant, but as yet unquantified, food source to benthic predators [9]. Here we undertake the first analysis of Caribbean spiny lobster diet using a stable isotope approach (carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur) and show that a significant portion of their food (∼20% on average) is obtained from chemosynthetic primary production in the form of lucinid clams. This nutritional pathway was previously unrecognized in the spiny lobster's diet, and these results are the first empirical evidence that chemosynthetic primary production contributes to the productivity of commercial fisheries stocks.

  5. Diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care 1

    PubMed Central

    Roseira, Camila Eugenia; da Silva, Darlyani Mariano; Passos, Isis Pienta Batista Dias; Orlandi, Fabiana Souza; Padoveze, Maria Clara; de Figueiredo, Rosely Moralez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: identify the compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care and assess possible differences in the compliance among the services characterized as Primary Health Care Service and Family Health Service. Method: quantitative, observational, descriptive and inferential study with the application of structure, process and outcome indicators of the health care product processing at ten services in an interior city of the State of São Paulo - Brazil. Results: for all indicators, the compliance indices were inferior to the ideal levels. No statistically significant difference was found in the indicators between the two types of services investigated. The health care product cleaning indicators obtained the lowest compliance index, while the indicator technical-operational resources for the preparation, conditioning, disinfection/sterilization, storage and distribution of health care products obtained the best index. Conclusion: the diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing at the services assessed indicates that the quality of the process is jeopardized, as no results close to ideal levels were obtained at any service. In addition, no statistically significant difference in these indicators was found between the two types of services studied. PMID:27878220

  6. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony size in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Laidre, Kristin L; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Nyeland, Jens; Mosbech, Anders; Boertmann, David

    2008-12-07

    Sea ice loss will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We quantified spring-time trends in sea ice recession around each of 46 thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) colonies in west Greenland across 20 degrees of latitude and investigated the magnitude and timing of the associated spring-time primary production. A geographical information system was used to extract satellite-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979-1987) and the Defence Meteorological Satellite Programs Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI, 1987-2004), and satellite-based observations of chlorophyll a from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS: EOS-Terra satellite) in weekly intervals in circular buffers around each colony site (150 km in radius). Rapid recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom and associated trophic cascade in water gradually exposed to solar radiation. This pattern was largely absent from lower latitudes where little to no sea ice resulted in a temporally variable primary production bloom driven by nutrient cycling and upwelling uncoupled to ice. The relationship between the rate and variability of sea ice recession and colony size of thick-billed murres shows that periodical confinement of the trophic cascade at high latitudes determines the carrying capacity for Arctic seabirds during the breeding period.

  7. Effects of global brightening on primary production and hypoxia in Ise Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoji; Kanno, Ariyo; Shinohara, Ryuichiro

    2014-07-01

    In many parts of the world, annual mean surface solar radiation (SSR) has undergone significant decadal changes; however, its effect on the coastal water environment has not been investigated. This study investigates the effects of changes in the SSR on hypoxia and the primary production of phytoplankton in a eutrophic bay in Japan (Ise Bay), where the annual SSR increased by 13.3% from 1980 to 2010. We numerically simulated the hydrodynamics and ecosystem of 2010 using a three-dimensional model (case O). We used this model to simulate the case where SSR was reduced by 10% (case A) and estimated the effect of an increase in SSR from the difference between case O and case A. With the 10% increase in SSR, the primary production in the bay increased by only 2.8%. This limited increase was the result of the negative effects by the nonlinearity of the light limitation function (including the photoinhibition) and the limitation in PO4-P availability and a significant positive effect by the increased water temperature. Similarly, the overall volume of hypoxic water increased, and in August, it increased by 5.8%. This is because water temperature and biomass such as phytoplankton increased with the increase in SSR; consequently, all oxygen consumption terms such as biological respiration also increased. These results imply that recent global brightening has the potential to amplify the primary production and hypoxia in a eutrophic bay.

  8. Effects of anthropogenic fragmentation on primary productivity and soil carbon storage in temperate mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Cojoc, Emilia Ionela; Postolache, Carmen; Olariu, Bogdan; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the most severe anthropogenic pressures exerted on ecosystem's biodiversity. Empirical studies to date focused with an overriding interest on the effects of habitat loss or habitat fragmentation per se on species richness patterns detrimental to biogeochemical processes. To account for changes in ecosystem fluxes, we investigated how anthropogenic fragmentation affects primary productivity and carbon storage in temperate mountain grasslands. A field study was conducted to assess the influence of grassland isolation on soil carbon stocks, N availability, species biomass, and plant functional groups distribution. We tested the hypothesis that increased isolation of grassland, within the land cover, decreases soil carbon stocks, and available N nutrient as well as aboveground biomass. Soil carbon concentration decreased with isolation but increased near the forest edge. We found significant differences in aboveground biomass distribution and relative contribution of plant functional groups between isolation conditions. The magnitude of edge effect on carbon stocks, N availability, and primary productivity intensified with increasing isolation as a consequence of the additive influence of edges. Our study reveals that the potential creation of artificially isolated patches diminished primary productivity, N availability, and C stocks. However, in highly managed landscapes, grazing pressure is an additional factor that changes biomass and nutrients patterns. We emphasize that spatial configuration of the landscape has a major role in modulating ecological flows and ecosystem service supply, in addition to changes in species richness.

  9. Connectedness of land use, nutrients, primary production, and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Andrews, Caroline S.; Kroger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explored the strength of connectedness among hierarchical system components associated with oxbow lakes in the alluvial valley of the Lower Mississippi River. Specifically, we examined the degree of canonical correlation between land use (agriculture and forests), lake morphometry (depth and size), nutrients (total nitrogen and total phosphorus), primary production (chlorophyll-a), and various fish assemblage descriptors. Watershed (p < 0.01) and riparian (p = 0.02) land use, and lake depth (p = 0.05) but not size (p = 0.28), were associated with nutrient concentrations. In turn, nutrients were associated with primary production (p < 0.01), and primary production was associated with sunfish (Centrarchidae) assemblages (p < 0.01) and fish biodiversity (p = 0.08), but not with those of other taxa and functional guilds. Multiple chemical and biological components of oxbow lake ecosystems are connected to landscape characteristics such as land use and lake depth. Therefore, a top-down hierarchical approach can be useful in developing management and conservation plans for oxbow lakes in a region impacted by widespread landscape changes due to agriculture.

  10. 24 CFR 3282.362 - Production Inspection Primary Inspection Agencies (IPIAs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... difficult to remove without defacing it. It shall be etched on .032 in. thick aluminum plate. The label... failure to obtain full acceptance resulted from the fact that the Secretary or the Secretary's agent...

  11. 24 CFR 3282.362 - Production Inspection Primary Inspection Agencies (IPIAs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... difficult to remove without defacing it. It shall be etched on .032 in. thick aluminum plate. The label... failure to obtain full acceptance resulted from the fact that the Secretary or the Secretary's agent...

  12. 24 CFR 3282.362 - Production Inspection Primary Inspection Agencies (IPIAs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... difficult to remove without defacing it. It shall be etched on .032 in. thick aluminum plate. The label... failure to obtain full acceptance resulted from the fact that the Secretary or the Secretary's agent...

  13. The Hotspot for (Global) One Health in Primary Food Production: Aflatoxin M1 in Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Frazzoli, Chiara; Gherardi, Paola; Saxena, Navneet; Belluzzi, Giancarlo; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    One Health involves the multifaceted environment-animal-human web: nevertheless, the role of toxicological issues has yet to be fully explored in this context. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contamination of feeds is a risk for the health of several farm animals, including fishes; milk is the only food of animal origin where a significant feed-food carry over may occur. The main AFB1-related compound present in milk is the hydroxy-metabolite aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). Besides contamination of raw milk, AFM1 is of concern for the whole dairy chain; AFM1 may also contaminate the milk of several other ruminants used for milk/dairy production. In a One Health perspective, milk represents a sentinel matrix for AFB1 vulnerability of the agro-food system, that is crucial in a phase when food/nutritional security becomes a global issue and climatic changes may affect agricultural productions. In the global setting, food chain exposure to long-term toxicants, such as AFM1, is a growing concern for economically developing countries, whereas global trade and climatic change makes AFM1 an emerging hot issue in economically developed countries as well. We critically review the state of the art on AFM1 risk assessment and risk management using two scenarios as case studies: a European Union country where the health system aims at ensuring a high-level protection of food chain (Italy) and the world's largest (and economically developing) producer of dairy products by volume (India). The case studies are used to provide building blocks for a global One Health framework.

  14. The Hotspot for (Global) One Health in Primary Food Production: Aflatoxin M1 in Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoli, Chiara; Gherardi, Paola; Saxena, Navneet; Belluzzi, Giancarlo; Mantovani, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    One Health involves the multifaceted environment-animal-human web: nevertheless, the role of toxicological issues has yet to be fully explored in this context. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contamination of feeds is a risk for the health of several farm animals, including fishes; milk is the only food of animal origin where a significant feed-food carry over may occur. The main AFB1-related compound present in milk is the hydroxy-metabolite aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). Besides contamination of raw milk, AFM1 is of concern for the whole dairy chain; AFM1 may also contaminate the milk of several other ruminants used for milk/dairy production. In a One Health perspective, milk represents a sentinel matrix for AFB1 vulnerability of the agro-food system, that is crucial in a phase when food/nutritional security becomes a global issue and climatic changes may affect agricultural productions. In the global setting, food chain exposure to long-term toxicants, such as AFM1, is a growing concern for economically developing countries, whereas global trade and climatic change makes AFM1 an emerging hot issue in economically developed countries as well. We critically review the state of the art on AFM1 risk assessment and risk management using two scenarios as case studies: a European Union country where the health system aims at ensuring a high-level protection of food chain (Italy) and the world’s largest (and economically developing) producer of dairy products by volume (India). The case studies are used to provide building blocks for a global One Health framework. PMID:28210616

  15. Partial decoupling of primary productivity from upwelling in the California Current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Lionel; Deutsch, Curtis; McWilliams, James C.; Frenzel, Hartmut; Liang, Jun-Hong; Colas, François

    2016-07-01

    Coastal winds and upwelling of deep nutrient-rich water along subtropical eastern boundaries yield some of the ocean's most productive ecosystems. Simple indices of coastal wind strength have been extensively used to estimate the timing and magnitude of biological productivity on seasonal and interannual timescales and underlie the prediction that anthropogenic climate warming will increase the productivity by making coastal winds stronger. The effect of wind patterns on regional net primary productivity is not captured by such indices and is poorly understood. Here we present evidence, using a realistic model of the California Current system and satellite measurements, that the observed slackening of the winds near the coast has little effect on near-shore phytoplankton productivity despite a large reduction in upwelling velocity. On the regional scale the wind drop-off leads to substantially higher production even when the total upwelling rate remains the same. This partial decoupling of productivity from upwelling results from the impact of wind patterns on alongshore currents and the eddies they generate. Our results imply that productivity in eastern boundary upwelling systems will be better predicted from indices of the coastal wind that account for its offshore structure.

  16. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  18. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  4. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  6. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  7. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  9. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  14. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  16. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  17. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  18. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  19. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  1. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  2. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  4. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  5. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  7. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  13. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  14. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  16. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  17. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  18. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  19. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  3. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  4. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  5. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  6. Two hundred years of aluminum ... or is it aluminium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2008-08-01

    Two hundred years ago the word aluminum was used for the first time when a new metal was produced by the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy. Later work has shown that this metal was not pure, but rather an aluminum-iron alloy. This article commemorates the anniversary of aluminum production with a look back at the metal’s origins.

  7. The puzzle of HCN in comets: Is it both a product and a primary species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M.; Bonev, B.; Charnley, S.; Cordiner, M.; DiSanti, M.; Gibb, E.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Paganini, L.; Villanueva, G.

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular-cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: - HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H_2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. If much HCN is sometimes produced in the coma, its adoption as a water proxy could introduce unwanted bias to taxonomies based on composition. - HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing, with NH_3 being the dominant nitrile. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. - The stereoisomer HNC is regarded as a product species, thought to result from coma chemistry involving HCN. But, could another reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? - The production rate for CN greatly exceeds the possible production from HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN radicals in them. - The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets, but in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. Is prompt emission from vibrationally excited HCN responsible? - With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H_2O, CH_3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). We will present the

  8. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady state conditions in phosphorus controlled chemostats (N : P = 29, growth rate of μ = 0.2 d-1). 14C incubations were accomplished to determine primary production (PP), comprised by particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C), and the concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO), and of high molecular weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) as major components of ER. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (<0.40 μm, <1000 kDa, <100 kDa and <10 kDa) of DO14C and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady state growth, corresponding to ∼4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size (<10 kDa) fraction of HMW-dCCHO exhibited a similar sugar composition, dominated by high percentages of glucose (74-80 Mol%), the composition of HMW-dCCHO size-classes >10 kDa was significantly different with higher Mol% of arabinose. Mol% of acidic sugars increased and Mol% glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  9. Holocene primary productivity and the atmosphere/ocean linkage in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, J. A.; Finney, B.; Anderson, L.; Barron, J. A.; Hayes, S. M.; Sliwinski, M.; Mix, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work in the temperate fjords of the Gulf of Alaska, located in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean, has demonstrated a positive link between modern atmosphere/ocean dynamics and accumulation of biogenic sediments during the last 100 years, where intensified Aleutian Low atmospheric pressure cell regimes correspond to peaks in export primary productivity (Addison et al., 2013). Here, this work is extended by examining the last 7500 years of biogenic sedimentation from marine sediment core EW0408-33JC (57.16°N, 135.36°W, 144 m water depth), which is constrained by 17 age-control points spaced every ~500 years. We use bromine (Br) intensities measured by core-scanning XRF with a 2-mm sampling resolution as a geochemical proxy for past primary productivity. These Br intensities are calibrated to organic Br concentrations using a combination of quantitative WD-XRF methods and synchrotron-radiation Br speciation studies, with cross-verification provided by low-resolution analyses of other productivity proxies, including biogenic silica (opal), total organic carbon (TOC), and organic matter δ13C ratios. Our findings indicate distinct centennial-to-millennial changes, with positive productivity excursions between 7500-7000, 6500-6000, 5000-3500, 2500-1500, and 1000-500 INTCAL13 yr BP. We compare the timing of these excursions against a compilation of marine and terrestrial paleoclimate records sensitive to forcing by the Aleutian Low to determine if the positive relationship between atmosphere/ocean dynamics and marine primary productivity has remained consistent over the last 7500 years. Other potential forcing mechanisms (e.g., solar insolation, irradiance) are also considered. Reference: Addison, J.A., Finney, B., Jaeger, J., Stoner, J., Norris, R., & Hangsterfer, A., 2013, Integrating satellite observations and modern climate measurements with the recent sedimentary record: an example from Southeast Alaska. JGR-Oceans, v. 118, 18 pgs.

  10. A multi-sites analysis on the ozone effects on Gross Primary Production of European forests.

    PubMed

    Proietti, C; Anav, A; De Marco, A; Sicard, P; Vitale, M

    2016-06-15

    Ozone (O3) is both a greenhouse gas and a secondary air pollutant causing adverse impacts on forests ecosystems at different scales, from cellular to ecosystem level. Specifically, the phytotoxic nature of O3 can impair CO2 assimilation that, in turn affects forest productivity. This study aims to evaluate the effects of tropospheric O3 on Gross Primary Production (GPP) at 37 European forest sites during the time period 2000-2010. Due to the lack of carbon assimilation data at O3 monitoring stations (and vice-versa) this study makes a first attempt to combine high resolution MODIS Gross Primary Production (GPP) estimates and O3 measurement data. Partial Correlations, Anomalies Analysis and the Random Forests Analysis (RFA) were used to quantify the effects of tropospheric O3 concentration and its uptake on GPP and to evaluate the most important factors affecting inter-annual GPP changes. Our results showed, along a North-West/South-East European transect, a negative impact of O3 on GPP ranging from 0.4% to 30%, although a key role of meteorological parameters respect to pollutant variables in affecting GPP was found. In particular, meteorological parameters, namely air temperature (T), soil water content (SWC) and relative humidity (RH) are the most important predictors at 81% of test sites. Moreover, it is interesting to highlight a key role of SWC in the Mediterranean areas (Spanish, Italian and French test sites) confirming that, soil moisture and soil water availability affect vegetation growth and photosynthesis especially in arid or semi-arid ecosystems such as the Mediterranean climate regions. Considering the pivotal role of GPP in the global carbon balance and the O3 ability to reduce primary productivity of the forests, this study can help in assessing the O3 impacts on ecosystem services, including wood production and carbon sequestration.

  11. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  12. Effects of sea ice cover on satellite-detected primary production in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kahru, Mati; Lee, Zhongping; Mitchell, B Greg; Nevison, Cynthia D

    2016-11-01

    The influence of decreasing Arctic sea ice on net primary production (NPP) in the Arctic Ocean has been considered in multiple publications but is not well constrained owing to the potentially large errors in satellite algorithms. In particular, the Arctic Ocean is rich in coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) that interferes in the detection of chlorophyll a concentration of the standard algorithm, which is the primary input to NPP models. We used the quasi-analytic algorithm (Lee et al 2002 Appl. Opti. 41, 5755-5772. (doi:10.1364/AO.41.005755)) that separates absorption by phytoplankton from absorption by CDOM and detrital matter. We merged satellite data from multiple satellite sensors and created a 19 year time series (1997-2015) of NPP. During this period, both the estimated annual total and the summer monthly maximum pan-Arctic NPP increased by about 47%. Positive monthly anomalies in NPP are highly correlated with positive anomalies in open water area during the summer months. Following the earlier ice retreat, the start of the high-productivity season has become earlier, e.g. at a mean rate of -3.0 d yr(-1) in the northern Barents Sea, and the length of the high-productivity period has increased from 15 days in 1998 to 62 days in 2015. While in some areas, the termination of the productive season has been extended, owing to delayed ice formation, the termination has also become earlier in other areas, likely owing to limited nutrients.

  13. Patterns of new versus recycled primary production in the terrestrial biosphere.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Cory C; Houlton, Benjamin Z; Smith, W Kolby; Marklein, Alison R; Reed, Sasha C; Parton, William; Del Grosso, Stephen J; Running, Steven W

    2013-07-30

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability regulate plant productivity throughout the terrestrial biosphere, influencing the patterns and magnitude of net primary production (NPP) by land plants both now and into the future. These nutrients enter ecosystems via geologic and atmospheric pathways and are recycled to varying degrees through the plant-soil-microbe system via organic matter decay processes. However, the proportion of global NPP that can be attributed to new nutrient inputs versus recycled nutrients is unresolved, as are the large-scale patterns of variation across terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we combined satellite imagery, biogeochemical modeling, and empirical observations to identify previously unrecognized patterns of new versus recycled nutrient (N and P) productivity on land. Our analysis points to tropical forests as a hotspot of new NPP fueled by new N (accounting for 45% of total new NPP globally), much higher than previous estimates from temperate and high-latitude regions. The large fraction of tropical forest NPP resulting from new N is driven by the high capacity for N fixation, although this varies considerably within this diverse biome; N deposition explains a much smaller proportion of new NPP. By contrast, the contribution of new N to primary productivity is lower outside the tropics, and worldwide, new P inputs are uniformly low relative to plant demands. These results imply that new N inputs have the greatest capacity to fuel additional NPP by terrestrial plants, whereas low P availability may ultimately constrain NPP across much of the terrestrial biosphere.

  14. The role of mesoscale eddies for primary production along the ice edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, Annette

    2016-04-01

    The ice-edge is a favorable area for the generation of mesoscale eddies. Because of the high latitudes, these eddies are often order of 10 km, but have been observed up to 50 km. The physical surface manifestation can be remotely observed by SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar), but the corresponding patterns of phytoplankton are hard to observe by ocean color because of the presence of ice and clouds. Because these eddies will transport fresh-water it is likely that they influence the stratification and thus the local blooming conditions. A regional model for the Fram Strait with resolution 3.5 km has been set up as a coupled physical-biogeochemical model, HYCOM-NORWECOM, nested into a 15-km basin-scale model for the North Atlantic and Arctic. The biogeochemical model represents nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton. The 3.5 km resolution model is adequate to resolve the largest eddies in the region, while smaller eddies and submesoscale processes are not resolved. Patches of higher primary production are present close to the ice edge, despite nutrient availability being comparable to adjacent regions. During late summer the biomass and primary production close to the ice edge is dominated by diatoms and closely follows the mesoscale structures. Here we investigate whether theses eddies play a role primarily in redistributing the water with high production and if the eddies themselves contribute to enhancement or reduction in the production.

  15. The Puzzle of HCN in Comets: Is it both a Product and a Primary Species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Paganini, Lucas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: 1. HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. 2. HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. 3. The stereoisomer HNC is now confirmed as a product species. Could reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? 4. The production rate for CN greatly exceeds that of HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN. Several puzzling lines of evidence raise issues about the origin of HCN: a. The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets - in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. b. With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H2O, CH3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). c. The nucleus-centered rotational temperatures measured for H2O and other species (C2H6, CH3OH) usually agree within error, but those for HCN are often slightly smaller. d. In comet ISON, ALMA maps of HCN and the dust continuum show a slight displacement 80 km) in the centroids. We will

  16. Thin layer chromatography-spray mass spectrometry: a method for easy identification of synthesis products and UV filters from TLC aluminum foils.

    PubMed

    Himmelsbach, Markus; Waser, Mario; Klampfl, Christian W

    2014-06-01

    A straightforward procedure for direct mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of spots from thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates, without the need of an external ion source, was developed using the aluminum plate backing as spray tip. The spots were cut out shaped as a tip with a 60° angle, mounted in front of the MS orifice, and after addition of a spray solvent spectra were obtained immediately. A high-resolution time-of-flight MS was used since the method is of particular interest for rapid identification or confirmation of spots from TLC plates. The practical benefits of this technique were demonstrated by detection of by-products of organic reactions, by identification of degradation products, and by accurate confirmation of spots when UV filters in sunscreens were analyzed by TLC. Employing the described method TLC spots can be evaluated fast without the need of an external ion source or devices for analyte transfer from TLC to MS, only a basic MS instrument and a high-voltage power supply is required.

  17. Modelling the seasonality of subsurface light and primary production in the Arabian Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal changes in mixed-layer depth and phytoplankton biomass in the Arabian Sea are assessed with climatologies of ship-based hydrographic measurements and ocean-color observations from satellite.  At the close of the intermonsoons in November and especially May, the open Arabian Sea resembles the stereotypic, unperturbed tropical ocean, with a thin oligotrophic mixed layer and a pronounced subsurface chlorophyll maximum.  Both the northeast and southwest monsoons disrupt this typical tropical hydrography through mixed-layer deepening and eutrophication in the central and northern Arabian Sea.  Computations using a spectral model of light penetration suggest that seasonal changes in mixed-layer thickness and phytoplankton concentration result in pronounced fluctuations through the annual cycle in the radiant flux reaching the base of the mixed layer.  At the close of the fall and spring intermonsoons the base of the model euphotic zone is in the thermocline across all of the open Arabian Sea.  The euphotic zone appears to rise into the mixed layer of the northern Arabian Sea during both the winter and summer monsoons.  Strong seasonality in total primary production and its partitioning between the mixed layer and thermocline is predicted byb a photo-synthesis-irradiance model for a site in the western Arabian Sea (14.36° N, 57.38° E).  Modeled mixed-layer primary production depicts an intense peak for the southwest monsoon and a secondary northeast monsoon peak separated by intermonsoon period of low production.  During the fall and spring intermonsoons, in the presence of a subsurface clorophyll maximum, the model estimate of primary production in the thermocline exceeds that in the mixed layer.  Our model calculations suggest that the subsurface clorophyll maximum present in the Arabian Sea during the spring intermonsoon is a precursor of the regional, summer, phytoplankton bloom.

  18. Cadmium-isotopic evidence for increasing primary productivity during the Late Permian anoxic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Horner, Tristan J.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Bingen, Bernard; Rehkämper, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Earth's most extreme extinction event near the end of the Late Permian decimated more than 90% of all extant marine species. Widespread and intensive oceanic anoxia almost certainly contributed to the catastrophe, though the driving mechanisms that sustained such conditions are still debated. Of particular interest is whether water column anoxia was a consequence of a 'stagnant ocean', or if it was controlled by increases in nutrient supply, primary productivity, and subsequent heterotrophic respiration. Testing these competing hypotheses requires deconvolving sedimentary/bottom water redox conditions from changes in surface water productivity in marine sediments. We address this issue by studying marine shales from East Greenland and the mid-Norwegian shelf and combining sedimentary redox proxies with cadmium-isotopic analyses. Sedimentary nitrogen-isotopic data, pyrite framboid analyses, and organic and inorganic shale geochemistry reveal sulfidic conditions with vigorous upwelling, and increasingly anoxic conditions with a strengthening upwelling in the Greenland and Norwegian sections, respectively. Detailed analysis of sedimentary metal budgets illustrates that Cd is primarily associated with organic carbon and records primary geochemical signatures, thus enabling reconstruction of surface water nutrient utilization. Cadmium-isotopic analyses of the authigenic shale fraction released by inverse aqua regia digestion yield an average δ114Cd110 of + 0.15 ± 0.01 ‰ (2 SE, n = 12; rel. NIST SRM 3108), indicative of incomplete surface water nutrient utilization up-section. The constant degree of nutrient utilization combined with strong upwelling requires increasing primary productivity - and not oceanic stagnation - to balance the larger nutrient fluxes to both study sites during the development of the Late Permian water column anoxia. Overall, our data illustrate that if bottom water redox and upwelling can be adequately constrained, Cd-isotopic analyses of

  19. Inter-annual Variability of Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in Regenerating Tropical Dry Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, J. S.; Becknell, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, there are now more secondary forests regenerating following anthropogenic disturbance than primary forests. However, carbon dynamics in secondary tropical forests in general, and seasonally dry forests in particular, have not been as well studied as primary wet forests. Young, regenerating forests may be more sensitive to climatic variability than older forests because of their dynamic demographic rates. Similarly, seasonally dry tropical forests may be particularly sensitive to changes in precipitation, as tree growth is highly constrained by water availability. We examined how inter-annual variability in precipitation affected above-ground net primary productivity in chronosequences of dry forest in Costa Rica. Our sites included three forest cover types, whose distribution is linked to edaphic variation. Over our 6-yr dataset, annual rainfall varied from 1110 to 3040mm, with a 5-6 month dry season. ANPP ranged from 2.96 to 18.98 Mg ha-1 across sites that have been recovering for 7 to 67 years. Fine litter production dominated ANPP, and increased with forest age but not annual rainfall. By contrast, woody stem growth did not vary among forests that differed in age, but increased as a function of annual rainfall. These results differed by forest type. Lowland oak forests on low fertility soil had the lowest productivity and responses to rainfall, whereas forests on the highest fertility soils showed large increases in woody production with rainfall. Consistent with our expectation, younger forests on the intermediate soil type had higher variability in ANPP than older forests, but this was not significant for forests on the poor or high fertility soils. Our results highlight several important findings: 1) different components of ANPP vary in their responses to inter-annual variation in rainfall, 2) forest responses to climatic variability depend on species composition, which varies consistently with soil type in this landscape.

  20. Marine foods sourced from farther as their use of global ocean primary production increases.

    PubMed

    Watson, Reg A; Nowara, Gabrielle B; Hartmann, Klaas; Green, Bridget S; Tracey, Sean R; Carter, Chris G

    2015-06-16

    The growing human population must be fed, but historic land-based systems struggle to meet expanding demand. Marine production supports some of the world's poorest people but increasingly provides for the needs of the affluent, either directly by fishing or via fodder-based feeds for marine and terrestrial farming. Here we show the expanding footprint of humans to utilize global ocean productivity to feed themselves. Our results illustrate how incrementally each year, marine foods are sourced farther from where they are consumed and moreover, require an increasing proportion of the ocean's primary productivity that underpins all marine life. Though mariculture supports increased consumption of seafood, it continues to require feeds based on fully exploited wild stocks. Here we examine the ocean's ability to meet our future demands to 2100 and find that even with mariculture supplementing near-static wild catches our growing needs are unlikely to be met without significant changes.

  1. Marine foods sourced from farther as their use of global ocean primary production increases

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Reg A.; Nowara, Gabrielle B.; Hartmann, Klaas; Green, Bridget S.; Tracey, Sean R.; Carter, Chris G.

    2015-01-01

    The growing human population must be fed, but historic land-based systems struggle to meet expanding demand. Marine production supports some of the world's poorest people but increasingly provides for the needs of the affluent, either directly by fishing or via fodder-based feeds for marine and terrestrial farming. Here we show the expanding footprint of humans to utilize global ocean productivity to feed themselves. Our results illustrate how incrementally each year, marine foods are sourced farther from where they are consumed and moreover, require an increasing proportion of the ocean's primary productivity that underpins all marine life. Though mariculture supports increased consumption of seafood, it continues to require feeds based on fully exploited wild stocks. Here we examine the ocean's ability to meet our future demands to 2100 and find that even with mariculture supplementing near-static wild catches our growing needs are unlikely to be met without significant changes. PMID:26079714

  2. Scale-up and economic analysis of biodiesel production from municipal primary sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Olkiewicz, Magdalena; Torres, Carmen M; Jiménez, Laureano; Font, Josep; Bengoa, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Municipal wastewater sludge is a promising lipid feedstock for biodiesel production, but the need to eliminate the high water content before lipid extraction is the main limitation for scaling up. This study evaluates the economic feasibility of biodiesel production directly from liquid primary sludge based on experimental data at laboratory scale. Computational tools were used for the modelling of the process scale-up and the different configurations of lipid extraction to optimise this step, as it is the most expensive. The operational variables with a major influence in the cost were the extraction time and the amount of solvent. The optimised extraction process had a break-even price of biodiesel of 1232 $/t, being economically competitive with the current cost of fossil diesel. The proposed biodiesel production process from waste sludge eliminates the expensive step of sludge drying, lowering the biodiesel price.

  3. Regenerated primary production dominates in a periodically upwelling shelf ecosystem, northeast New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, S. J.; Zeldis, J. R.; Nodder, S. D.; Gall, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first field measured primary production values for an intermittently upwelling shelf ecosystem in the Hauraki Gulf, northeast New Zealand. Phytoplankton uptake rates of 13C and 15N were used to determine the relative importance of new (15NO3- ) versus regenerated nutrients (15NH4+ and 15N-urea) to productivity, and to test the hypothesis that the upwelling system supports high export of organic material, acting as a net sink for CO2. From early spring to early summer (1996-1997), deep NO3--rich waters upwelled onto the shelf and into the inner gulf, producing a short-lived low-level predominantly NO3--fuelled bloom (surface chlorophyll-a (chl-a) >1.0 mg m-3) in early spring. From late spring onwards, mixed layer NO3- concentrations were depleted to often lower levels than NH4+ and urea (∼0.1 mmol m-3), with mid-water chl-a maxima associated with the top of the nitracline fuelled predominantly by regenerated nutrients. By late summer, upwelling had ceased, with intrusions of low-nutrient subtropical oceanic surface water producing oligotrophic conditions. NH4+ and urea uptake nearly always exceeded NO3- uptake throughout the euphotic zone, even within the nitracline, with relative preference index (RPI) estimates giving RPIUrea>RPINH>RPINO, and low uptake f ratios (generally f<0.3), supporting the physiological preference of phytoplankton for reduced forms of nitrogen. Despite periods of upwelling producing relatively high levels of integrated NO3- (typically 25-150 mmol NO3- m-2) across the shelf from early spring to early summer, the highest integrated total production (1266 mg C m-2 d-1) and specific uptake rates of C/chl-a were obtained in late summer. In the inner gulf and on the mid-shelf, these higher late summer production rates coincided with low integrated chl-a biomass and NO3- inventories. There was no correlation of chl-a with C uptake in either surface waters (r2=0.0115), or in the euphotic zone (r2=0.0232) for the compiled data set

  4. Landscape level influence: aquatic primary production in the Colorado River of Glen and Grand canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yard, M. D.; Kennedy, T.; Yackulic, C. B.; Bennett, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Irregular features common to canyon-bound regions intercept solar incidence (photosynthetic photon flux density [PPFD: μmol m-2 s-1]) and can affect ecosystem energetics. The Colorado River in Grand Canyon is topographically complex, typical of most streams and rivers in the arid southwest. Dam-regulated systems like the Colorado River have reduced sediment loads, and consequently increased water transparency relative to unimpounded rivers; however, sediment supply from tributaries and flow regulation that affects erosion and subsequent sediment transport, interact to create spatial and temporal variation in optical conditions in this river network. Solar incidence and suspended sediment loads regulate the amount of underwater light available for aquatic photosynthesis in this regulated river. Since light availability is depth dependent (Beer's law), benthic algae is often exposed to varying levels of desiccation or reduced light conditions due to daily flow regulation, additional factors that further constrain aquatic primary production. Considerable evidence suggests that the Colorado River food web is now energetically dependent on autotrophic production, an unusual condition since large river foodwebs are typically supported by allochthonous carbon synthesized and transported from terrestrial environments. We developed a mechanistic model to account for these regulating factors to predict how primary production might be affected by observed and alternative flow regimes proposed as part of ongoing adaptive management experimentation. Inputs to our model include empirical data (suspended sediment and temperature), and predictive relationships: 1) solar incidence reaching the water surface (topographic complexity), 2) suspended sediment-light extinction relationships (optical properties), 3) unsteady flow routing model (stage-depth relationship), 4) channel morphology (photosynthetic area), and 5) photosynthetic-irradiant response for dominant algae (Cladophora

  5. Primary productivity and the prospects for biofuels in the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, G. J.; Callaghan, T. V.

    1983-09-01

    Estimates of land use and plant productivity are combined to predict total annual primary production in the UK as 252 million tonnes dry matter (10.5 t ha-1yr-1). Annual above ground production is predicted to be 165 Mt (6.9 t ha-1yr-1). Within these totals, intensive agriculture contributes 60%, productive woodland 8%, natural vegetation 26% and urban vegetation 5%. However, only 25% of total plant production is cropped by man and animals, and most of this is subsequently discarded as wastes and residues. 2112 PJ of organic material is available for fuel without reducing food or fibre production, but since much of this could not be economically collected, 859 PJ is calculated as a more realistic biofuel contribution by the year 2000. After deducting 50% conversion losses, this could save P1 billion (1979 prices) in oil imports. Short rotation energy plantations, forest residues, coppice woodlands, animal and crop wastes, industrial and domestic wastes, catch crops, natural vegetation and urban vegetation all have immediate or short term potential as biofuel sources. Sensitive planning is required to reduce environmental impact, but in some cases more diverse wildlife habitats may be created.

  6. Quantifying and mapping the human appropriation of net primary production in earth's terrestrial ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Haberl, Helmut; Erb, K. Heinz; Krausmann, Fridolin; Gaube, Veronika; Bondeau, Alberte; Plutzar, Christoph; Gingrich, Simone; Lucht, Wolfgang; Fischer-Kowalski, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP), the aggregate impact of land use on biomass available each year in ecosystems, is a prominent measure of the human domination of the biosphere. We present a comprehensive assessment of global HANPP based on vegetation modeling, agricultural and forestry statistics, and geographical information systems data on land use, land cover, and soil degradation that localizes human impact on ecosystems. We found an aggregate global HANPP value of 15.6 Pg C/yr or 23.8% of potential net primary productivity, of which 53% was contributed by harvest, 40% by land-use-induced productivity changes, and 7% by human-induced fires. This is a remarkable impact on the biosphere caused by just one species. We present maps quantifying human-induced changes in trophic energy flows in ecosystems that illustrate spatial patterns in the human domination of ecosystems, thus emphasizing land use as a pervasive factor of global importance. Land use transforms earth's terrestrial surface, resulting in changes in biogeochemical cycles and in the ability of ecosystems to deliver services critical to human well being. The results suggest that large-scale schemes to substitute biomass for fossil fuels should be viewed cautiously because massive additional pressures on ecosystems might result from increased biomass harvest. PMID:17616580

  7. Net primary productivity of forest stands in New Hampshire estimated from Landsat and MODIS satellite data

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Christopher; Gross, Peggy; Genovese, Vanessa; Smith, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Background A simulation model that relies on satellite observations of vegetation cover from the Landsat 7 sensor and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate net primary productivity (NPP) of forest stands at the Bartlett Experiment Forest (BEF) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Results Net primary production (NPP) predicted from the NASA-CASA model using 30-meter resolution Landsat inputs showed variations related to both vegetation cover type and elevational effects on mean air temperatures. Overall, the highest predicted NPP from the NASA-CASA model was for deciduous forest cover at low to mid-elevation locations over the landscape. Comparison of the model-predicted annual NPP to the plot-estimated values showed a significant correlation of R2 = 0.5. Stepwise addition of 30-meter resolution elevation data values explained no more than 20% of the residual variation in measured NPP patterns at BEF. Both the Landsat 7 and the 250-meter resolution MODIS derived mean annual NPP predictions for the BEF plot locations were within ± 2.5% of the mean of plot estimates for annual NPP. Conclusion Although MODIS imagery cannot capture the spatial details of NPP across the network of closely spaced plot locations as well as Landsat, the MODIS satellite data as inputs to the NASA-CASA model does accurately predict the average annual productivity of a site like the BEF. PMID:17941989

  8. Increased Primary Production from an Exotic Invader Does Not Subsidize Native Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Jacob E.; Allen, Phil S.; McMillan, Brock R.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plants have tremendous potential to enrich native food webs by subsidizing net primary productivity. Here, we explored how a potential food subsidy, seeds produced by the aggressive invader cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is utilized by an important guild of native consumers – granivorous small mammals – in the Great Basin Desert, USA. In a series of field experiments we examined 1) how cheatgrass invasion affects the density and biomass of seed rain at the ecosystem-level; 2) how seed resources from cheatgrass numerically affect granivorous small mammals; and 3) how the food preferences of native granivores might mediate the trophic integration of cheatgrass seeds. Relative to native productivity, cheatgrass invasion increased the density and biomass of seed rain by over 2000% (P < 0.01) and 3500% (P < 0.01), respectively. However, granivorous small mammals in native communities showed no positive response in abundance, richness, or diversity to experimental additions of cheatgrass seeds over one year. This lack of response correlated with a distinct preference for seeds from native grasses over seeds from cheatgrass. Our experiments demonstrate that increased primary productivity associated with exotic plant invasions may not necessarily subsidize consumers at higher trophic levels. In this context, cheatgrass invasion could disrupt native food webs by providing less-preferred resources that fail to enrich higher trophic levels. PMID:26244345

  9. Estimating oceanic primary productivity from ocean color remote sensing: A strategic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zhongping; Marra, John; Perry, Mary Jane; Kahru, Mati

    2015-09-01

    It has long been realized that approaches using satellite ocean-color remote sensing are the only feasible means to quantify primary productivity (PP) adequately for the global ocean. Through decades of dedicated efforts and with the help of various satellite ocean-color missions, great progresses have been achieved in obtaining global PP as well as its spatial and temporal variations. However, there still exist wide differences between satellite estimations and in situ measurements, as well as large discrepancies among results from different models. The reasons for these large differences are many, which include uncertainties in measurements, errors in satellite-derived products, and limitations in the modeling approaches. Unlike previous round-robin reports on PP modeling where the performance of specific models was evaluated and compared, here we try to provide a candid overview of three primary modeling strategies and the nature of present satellite ocean-color products. We further highlight aspects where efforts should be focused in the coming years, with the overarching goal of reducing the gaps between satellite modeling and in situ measurements.

  10. Quantifying and mapping the human appropriation of net primary production in earth's terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Haberl, Helmut; Erb, K Heinz; Krausmann, Fridolin; Gaube, Veronika; Bondeau, Alberte; Plutzar, Christoph; Gingrich, Simone; Lucht, Wolfgang; Fischer-Kowalski, Marina

    2007-07-31

    Human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP), the aggregate impact of land use on biomass available each year in ecosystems, is a prominent measure of the human domination of the biosphere. We present a comprehensive assessment of global HANPP based on vegetation modeling, agricultural and forestry statistics, and geographical information systems data on land use, land cover, and soil degradation that localizes human impact on ecosystems. We found an aggregate global HANPP value of 15.6 Pg C/yr or 23.8% of potential net primary productivity, of which 53% was contributed by harvest, 40% by land-use-induced productivity changes, and 7% by human-induced fires. This is a remarkable impact on the biosphere caused by just one species. We present maps quantifying human-induced changes in trophic energy flows in ecosystems that illustrate spatial patterns in the human domination of ecosystems, thus emphasizing land use as a pervasive factor of global importance. Land use transforms earth's terrestrial surface, resulting in changes in biogeochemical cycles and in the ability of ecosystems to deliver services critical to human well being. The results suggest that large-scale schemes to substitute biomass for fossil fuels should be viewed cautiously because massive additional pressures on ecosystems might result from increased biomass harvest.

  11. Phytoplankton absorption, photosynthetic parameters, and primary production off Baja California: summer and autumn 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Hernández, Elsa; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Nájera-Martínez, Sila; Baumgartner, Timothy; Kahru, Mati; Greg Mitchell, B.

    2004-03-01

    To estimate ocean primary production at large space and time scales, it is necessary to use models combined with ocean-color satellite data. Detailed estimates of primary production are typically done at only a few representative stations. To get survey-scale estimates of primary production, one must introduce routinely measured Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) into models. For best precision, models should be based on accurate parameterizations developed from optical and photosynthesis data collected in the region of interest. To develop regional model parameterizations 14C-bicarbonate was used to estimate in situ primary production and photosynthetic parameters (α* ,Pm* , and Ek) derived from photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments from IMECOCAL cruises to the southern California Current during July and October 1998. The P-E experiments were done for samples collected from the 50% surface light depth for which we also determined particle and phytoplankton absorption coefficients (ap, aφ, and aφ*). Physical data collected during both surveys indicated that the 1997-1998 El Niño was abating during the summer of 1998, with a subsequent transition to the typical California Current circulation and coastal upwelling conditions. Phytoplankton chl-a and in situ primary production were elevated at coastal stations for both surveys, with the highest values during summer. Phytoplankton specific absorption coefficients in the blue peak (aφ* (440)) ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 m2 (mg Chl-a)-1 with largest values in offshore surface waters. In general aφ* was lower at depth compared to the surface. P-E samples were collected at the 50% light level that was usually in the surface mixed layer. Using α* and spectral absorption, we estimated maximum photosynthetic quantum yields (φmax; mol C/mol quanta). φmax values were lowest in offshore surface waters, with a total range of 0.01-0.07. Mean values of φmax for July and October were 0.011 and 0.022, respectively. In July Pm* was

  12. Aluminum Company of America, Massena, NY

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alcoa, Inc. has owned and operated an aluminum product manufacturing facility called Alcoa West facility in the Town of Massena, New York, since 1903. In connection with its past operations at the facility, Alcoa released hazardous substances, including

  13. Aluminum toxicity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Devi, S Rama; Rikiishi, Sanae; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2002-01-01

    Potential mechanisms of Al toxicity measured as Al-induced inhibition of growth in cultured tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum, nonchlorophyllic cell line SL) and pea (Pisum sativum) roots were investigated. Compared with the control treatment without Al, the accumulation of Al in tobacco cells caused instantaneously the repression of mitochondrial activities [monitored by the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and the uptake of Rhodamine 123] and, after a lag of about 12 h, triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, respiration inhibition, ATP depletion, and the loss of growth capability almost simultaneously. The presence of an antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisol, during Al treatment of SL cells prevented not only ROS production but also ATP depletion and the loss of growth capability, suggesting that the Al-triggered ROS production seems to be a cause of ATP depletion and the loss of growth capability. Furthermore, these three late events were similarly repressed in an Al-tolerant cell line (ALT301) isolated from SL cells, suggesting that the acquisition of antioxidant functions mimicking butylated hydroxyanisol can be a mechanism of Al tolerance. In the pea root, Al also triggered ROS production, respiration inhibition, and ATP depletion, which were all correlated with inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, we conclude that Al affects mitochondrial functions, which leads to ROS production, probably the key critical event in Al inhibition of cell growth.

  14. Estimating crop net primary production using inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2013-06-03

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale and over national and continental extents. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. A new Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois in years 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), shortwave radiation data estimated using Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that correspond to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. The modeling framework represented well the gradient of NPP across Iowa and Illinois, and also well represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 980 g C m-2 yr-1 and 420 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Estimated gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from AgI-LUE were in close agreement with eddy flux tower estimates. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  15. Benthic Primary Production Budget of a Caribbean Reef Lagoon (Puerto Morelos, Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Malik S.; Jantzen, Carin; Haas, Andreas F.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    High photosynthetic benthic primary production (P) represents a key ecosystem service provided by tropical coral reef systems. However, benthic P budgets of specific ecosystem compartments such as macrophyte-dominated reef lagoons are still scarce. To address this, we quantified individual and lagoon-wide net (Pn) and gross (Pg) primary production by all dominant functional groups of benthic primary producers in a typical macrophyte-dominated Caribbean reef lagoon near Puerto Morelos (Mexico) via measurement of O2 fluxes in incubation experiments. The photosynthetically active 3D lagoon surface area was quantified using conversion factors to allow extrapolation to lagoon-wide P budgets. Findings revealed that lagoon 2D benthic cover was primarily composed of sand-associated microphytobenthos (40%), seagrasses (29%) and macroalgae (27%), while seagrasses dominated the lagoon 3D surface area (84%). Individual Pg was highest for macroalgae and scleractinian corals (87 and 86 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area d−1, respectively), however seagrasses contributed highest (59%) to the lagoon-wide Pg. Macroalgae exhibited highest individual Pn rates, but seagrasses generated the largest fraction (51%) of lagoon-wide Pn. Individual R was highest for scleractinian corals and macroalgae, whereas seagrasses again provided the major lagoon-wide share (68%). These findings characterise the investigated lagoon as a net autotrophic coral reef ecosystem compartment revealing similar P compared to other macrophyte-dominated coastal environments such as seagrass meadows and macroalgae beds. Further, high lagoon-wide P (Pg: 488 and Pn: 181 mmol O2 m−2 lagoon area d−1) and overall Pg:R (1.6) indicate substantial benthic excess production within the Puerto Morelos reef lagoon and suggest the export of newly synthesised organic matter to surrounding ecosystems. PMID:24367570

  16. Cellular microenvironment dictates androgen production by murine fetal Leydig cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen M; Muszynski, Jessica L; Strotman, Lindsay N; Lewis, Samantha R; O'Connell, Rachel L; Beebe, David J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3-5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture.

  17. Primary productivity of snow algae communities on stratovolcanoes of the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, T L; Havig, J

    2017-03-01

    The majority of geomicrobiological research conducted on glacial systems to date has focused on glaciers that override primarily carbonate or granitic bedrock types, with little known of the processes that support microbial life in glacial systems overriding volcanic terrains (e.g., basalt or andesite). To better constrain the role of the supraglacial ecosystems in the carbon and nitrogen cycles, to gain insight into microbiome composition and function in alpine glacial systems overriding volcanic terrains, and to constrain potential elemental sequestration or release through weathering processes associated with snow algae communities, we examined the microbial community structure and primary productivity of snow algae communities on stratovolcanoes in the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest. Here, we present the first published values for carbon fixation rates of snow algae communities on glaciers in the Pacific Northwest. We observed varying levels of light-dependent carbon fixation on supraglacial and periglacial snowfields at Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams, and North Sister. Recovery of abundant 18S rRNA transcripts affiliated with photoautotrophs and 16S rRNA transcripts affiliated with heterotrophic bacteria is consistent with previous studies indicating the majority of primary productivity on snow and ice can be attributed to photoautotrophs. In contrast to previous observations of glacial ecosystems, our geochemical, isotopic, and microcosm data suggest these assemblages are not limited by phosphorus or fixed nitrogen availability. Furthermore, our data indicate these snow algae communities actively sequester Fe, Mn, and P leached from minerals sourced from the local rocks. Our observations of light-dependent primary productivity on snow are consistent with similar studies in polar ecosystems; however, our data may suggest that DIC may be a limiting nutrient in contrast to phosphorus or fixed nitrogen as has been observed in other glacial ecosystems. Our data

  18. Net primary productivity of subalpine meadows in Yosemite National Park in relation to climate variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Peggy E.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Yee, Julie L.; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Cole, David N.; McDougald, Neil K.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Subalpine meadows are some of the most ecologically important components of mountain landscapes, and primary productivity is important to the maintenance of meadow functions. Understanding how changes in primary productivity are associated with variability in moisture and temperature will become increasingly important with current and anticipated changes in climate. Our objective was to describe patterns and variability in aboveground live vascular plant biomass in relation to climatic factors. We harvested aboveground biomass at peak growth from four 64-m2 plots each in xeric, mesic, and hydric meadows annually from 1994 to 2000. Data from nearby weather stations provided independent variables of spring snow water content, snow-free date, and thawing degree days for a cumulative index of available energy. We assembled these climatic variables into a set of mixed effects analysis of covariance models to evaluate their relationships with annual aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and we used an information theoretic approach to compare the quality of fit among candidate models. ANPP in the xeric meadow was negatively related to snow water content and thawing degree days and in the mesic meadow was negatively related to snow water content. Relationships between ANPP and these 2 covariates in the hydric meadow were not significant. Increasing snow water content may limit ANPP in these meadows if anaerobic conditions delay microbial activity and nutrient availability. Increased thawing degree days may limit ANPP in xeric meadows by prematurely depleting soil moisture. Large within-year variation of ANPP in the hydric meadow limited sensitivity to the climatic variables. These relationships suggest that, under projected warmer and drier conditions, ANPP will increase in mesic meadows but remain unchanged in xeric meadows because declines associated with increased temperatures would offset the increases from decreased snow water content.

  19. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  20. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, R.O.; Keller, R.; Yao, N.P.

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (A1S) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  1. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Keller, Rudolf; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1981-01-01

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (AlS) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  2. Uncertainty analysis of terrestrial net primary productivity and net biome productivity in China during 1901-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junjiong; Zhou, Xuhui; Luo, Yiqi; Zhang, Guodong; Yan, Wei; Li, Jiaxuan; Li, Bo; Dan, Li; Fisher, Joshua B.; Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Yong; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jain, Atul K.; Mao, Jiafu; Meng, Jihua; Michalak, Anna M.; Parazoo, Nicholas C.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Sun, Rui; Tao, Fulu; Tian, Hanqin; Wei, Yaxing; Zeng, Ning; Zhu, Qiuan; Zhu, Wenquan

    2016-05-01

    Despite the importance of net primary productivity (NPP) and net biome productivity (NBP), estimates of NPP and NBP for China are highly uncertain. To investigate the main sources of uncertainty, we synthesized model estimates of NPP and NBP for China from published literature and the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). The literature-based results showed that total NPP and NBP in China were 3.35 ± 1.25 and 0.14 ± 0.094 Pg C yr-1, respectively. Classification and regression tree analysis based on literature data showed that model type was the primary source of the uncertainty, explaining 36% and 64% of the variance in NPP and NBP, respectively. Spatiotemporal scales, land cover conditions, inclusion of the N cycle, and effects of N addition also contributed to the overall uncertainty. Results based on the MsTMIP data suggested that model structures were overwhelmingly important (>90%) for the overall uncertainty compared to simulations with different combinations of time-varying global change factors. The interannual pattern of NPP was similar among diverse studies and increased by 0.012 Pg C yr-1 during 1981-2000. In addition, high uncertainty in China's NPP occurred in areas with high productivity, whereas NBP showed the opposite pattern. Our results suggest that to significantly reduce uncertainty in estimated NPP and NBP, model structures should be substantially tested on the basis of empirical results. To this end, coordinated distributed experiments with multiple global change factors might be a practical approach that can validate specific structures of different models.

  3. Worldwide estimates and bibliography of net primary productivity derived from pre-1982 publications

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, G.; Lieth, H.F.H.; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Olson, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    An extensive compilation of more than 700 field estimates of net primary productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems worldwide was synthesized in Germany in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although the Osnabrueck data set has not been updated since the 1980s, it represents a wealth of information for use in model development and validation. This report documents the development of this data set, its contents, and its recent availability on the Internet from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics. Caution is advised in using these data, which necessarily include assumptions and conversions that may not be universally applicable to all sites.

  4. Comparing global models of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP): Global pattern and differentiation by major biomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kicklighter, D.W.; Bondeau, A.; Schloss, A.L.; Kaduk, J.; McGuire, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    Annual and seasonal net primary productivity estimates (NPP) of 15 global models across latitudinal zones and biomes are compared. The models simulated NPP for contemporary climate using common, spatially explicit data sets for climate, soil texture, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Differences among NPP estimates varied over space and time. The largest differences occur during the summer months in boreal forests (50??to 60??N) and during the dry seasons of tropical evergreen forests. Differences in NPP estimates are related to model assumptions about vegetation structure, model parameterizations, and input data sets.

  5. Global land-surface primary productivity based upon Nimbus-7 37 GHz data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Accumulation and renewal of organic matter as quantified through net primary productivity (NPP) is considered a very major function of the biosphere, and its estimation is crucial in understanding the carbon cycle. A physically-based model relating NPP to the difference of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (Delta T) observed at 37 GHz frequency of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on board the Nimbus-7 satellite is used for fitting areally averaged values of NPP and Delta T for five biomes. The land-surface NPP within 80 deg N to 55 deg S is then calculated using the Delta T data and compared with other estimates.

  6. Fecal chlorophyll describes the link between primary production and consumption in a terrestrial herbivore.

    PubMed

    Christianson, David; Creel, Scott

    2009-07-01

    Spatiotemporal variation in primary productivity is known to have strong and far-reaching effects on herbivore ecology, but this relationship is often studied indirectly at broad scales, in part due to the difficulty in measuring selection for green biomass by individual animals. In aquatic systems, the concentration of chlorophyll in herbivore feces has been used as a direct measure of the consumption of photosynthetic primary production, but this method has not been applied to terrestrial systems. We measured chlorophyll concentration in feces from elk (Cervus elaphus) experiencing large fluctuations in primary production in the winter to spring transition over three years. We compared temporal trends in fecal chlorophyll with trends in fecal nitrogen, grass chlorophyll, grass digestible nitrogen, and landscape-level primary productivity (as described by the normalized difference vegetation index or NDVI). We also directly examined the relationship between fecal chlorophyll and NDVI. Temporal trends in fecal chlorophyll were strong and well described by piecewise regression (adjusted coefficient of determination, r(2)a = 0.881-0.888), showing uniformly low concentrations throughout winter followed by an abrupt, rapid increase beginning on different Julian days (88, 91, or 110) each year. Changes in fecal chlorophyll closely matched the temporal trend in the chlorophyll and digestible nitrogen concentration of forage grasses collected directly from elk feeding sites. Fecal chlorophyll also tracked broad temporal patterns in fecal nitrogen and NDVI, but discrepancies between the indexes may highlight preferences or constraints on selectivity for green biomass in elk. Spatially and temporally matched NDVI and fecal chlorophyll estimates were uncorrelated until NDVI reached approximately half its seasonal range. Combined, these data describe important patterns in selection for nutritious, green biomass in a temperate herbivore that would be difficult to study without

  7. Toward Describing the Effects of Ozone Depletion on Marine Primary Productivity and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    This project was aimed at improved predictions of the effects of UVB and ozone depletion on marine primary productivity and carbon flux. A principal objective was to incorporate a new analytical description of photosynthesis as a function of UV and photosynthetically available radiation (Cullen et. al., Science 258:646) into a general oceanographic model. We made significant progress: new insights into the kinetics of photoinhibition were used in the analysis of experiments on Antarctic phytoplankton to generate a general model of UV-induced photoinhibition under the influence of ozone depletion and vertical mixing. The way has been paved for general models on a global scale.

  8. Algal pigments record shifts in dominant primary productivity through the Holocene in an arctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, C.; Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The character and magnitude of primary productivity in arctic lakes is largely controlled by climate. Organic compounds derived from pigments and preserved in lake sediments allow reconstruction of past abundances of algae that do not leave silicious microfossils. Fossil algal pigments are abundant in lake sediment and can be accurately quantified using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Several groups of algae produce unique pigments that can be used to reconstruct their past abundance. In Qivitu Highlands Lake, eastern central Baffin Island, the ratio of pigments diatoxantin and lutein exhibits coherent changes through the Holocene. Diatoxanthin is produced by diatoms and chrysophytes, whereas lutein is produced by green algae and higher plants. Because these pigments are the dominant carotenoids in the sediment, they serve as proxies for the dominant group of primary producers. During the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the past century, lutein is much more abundant than diatoxanthin. During Neoglacial cooling and into the Little Ice Age, diatoxanthin becomes the dominant carotenoid. This shift reveals that there was a change in not only the magnitude of algal production, but also the most abundant type. The adaptation of aquatic algal assemblages to changing climate suggests that gross changes in primary productivity may not be suitable to track the abundance of one type of algal microfossil (such as diatoms) without considering the other algal groups. Higher plants also produce lutein, and its abundance is additionally influenced by the presence of terrestrial organic matter as well as aquatic macrophyte plants. We hypothesize that the prevalence of lutein during warm summers is due to a longer ice-free season, allowing the development of a greater biomass of green algae and macrophyte plants as well as possible increases of terrestrial higher plant communities. This is part of a larger study where the lutein to diatoxanthin ratio is compared to organic

  9. Hydrologic remediation for the Deepwater Horizon incident drove ancillary primary production increase in coastal swamps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; Johnson, Darren; Roberts, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    As coastal wetlands subside worldwide, there is an urgency to understand the hydrologic drivers and dynamics of plant production and peat accretion. One incidental test of the effects of high rates of discharge on forested wetland production occurred in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident, in which all diversions in Louisiana were operated at or near their maximum discharge level for an extended period to keep offshore oil from threatened coastal wetlands. Davis Pond Diversion was operated at six times the normal discharge levels for almost 4 months, so that Taxodium distichum swamps downstream of the diversion experienced greater inundation and lower salinity. After this remediation event in 2010, above-ground litter production increased by 2.7 times of production levels in 2007–2011. Biomass of the leaf and reproductive tissues of several species increased; wood litter was minimal and did not change during this period. Root production decreased in 2010 but subsequently returned to pre-remediation values in 2011. Both litter and root production remained high in the second growing season after hydrologic remediation. Annual tree growth (circumference increment) was not significantly altered by the remediation. The potential of freshwater pulses for regulating tidal swamp production is further supported by observations of higher T. distichum growth in lower salinity and/or pulsed environments across the U.S. Gulf Coast. Usage of freshwater pulses to manage altered estuaries deserves further consideration, particularly because the timing and duration of such pulses could influence both primary production and peat accretion.

  10. Net primary production of a temperate deciduous forest exhibits a threshold response to increasing disturbance severity.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Haëntjens, Ellen J; Curtis, Peter S; Fahey, Robert T; Vogel, Christoph S; Gough, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    The global carbon (C) balance is vulnerable to disturbances that alter terrestrial C storage. Disturbances to forests occur along a continuum of severity, from low-intensity disturbance causing the mortality or defoliation of only a subset of trees to severe stand- replacing disturbance that kills all trees; yet considerable uncertainty remains in how forest production changes across gradients of disturbance intensity. We used a gradient of tree mortality in an upper Great Lakes forest ecosystem to: (1) quantify how aboveground wood net primary production (ANPP,) responds to a range of disturbance severities; and (2) identify mechanisms supporting ANPPw resistance or resilience following moderate disturbance. We found that ANPPw declined nonlinearly with rising disturbance severity, remaining stable until >60% of the total tree basal area senesced. As upper canopy openness increased from disturbance, greater light availability to the subcanopy enhanced the leaf-level photosynthesis and growth of this formerly light-limited canopy stratum, compensating for upper canopy production losses and a reduction in total leaf area index (LAI). As a result, whole-ecosystem production efficiency (ANPPw/LAI) increased with rising disturbance severity, except in plots beyond the disturbance threshold. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for a nonlinear relationship between ANPPw, and disturbance severity, in which the physiological and growth enhancement of undisturbed vegetation is proportional to the level of disturbance until a threshold is exceeded. Our results have important ecological and management implications, demonstrating that in some ecosystems moderate levels of disturbance minimally alter forest production.

  11. Quantifying subtropical North Pacific gyre mixed layer primary productivity from Seaglider observations of diel oxygen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David P.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Doney, Scott C.; Karl, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Using autonomous underwater gliders, we quantified diurnal periodicity in dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and temperature in the subtropical North Pacific near the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Station ALOHA during summer 2012. Oxygen optodes provided sufficient stability and precision to quantify diel cycles of average amplitude of 0.6 µmol kg-1. A theoretical diel curve was fit to daily observations to infer an average mixed layer gross primary productivity (GPP) of 1.8 mmol O2 m-3 d-1. Cumulative net community production (NCP) over 110 days was 500 mmol O2 m-2 for the mixed layer, which averaged 57 m in depth. Both GPP and NCP estimates indicated a significant period of below-average productivity at Station ALOHA in 2012, an observation confirmed by 14C productivity incubations and O2/Ar ratios. Given our success in an oligotrophic gyre where biological signals are small, our diel GPP approach holds promise for remote characterization of productivity across the spectrum of marine environments.

  12. Primary structure of the human fgr proto-oncogene product p55/sup c-fgr/

    SciTech Connect

    Katamine, S.; Notario, V.; Rao, C.D.; Miki, T.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Tronick, S.R.; Robbins, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    Normal human c-fgr cDNA clones were constructed by using normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell mRNA as a template. Nucleotide sequence analysis of two such clones revealed a 1,587-base-pair-long open reading frame which predicted the primary amino acid sequence of the c-fgr translational product. Homology of this protein with the v-fgr translational product stretched from codons 128 to 516, where 32 differences among 388 codons were observed. Sequence similarity with human c-src, c-yes, and fyn translations products began at amino acid position 76 of the predicted c-fgr protein and extended nearly to its C-terminus. In contrast, the stretch of 75 amino acids at the N-terminus demonstrated a greatly reduced degree of relatedness to these same proteins. To verify the deduced amino acid sequence, antibodies were prepared against peptides representing amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of the predicted c-fgr translational product. Both antibodies specifically recognized a 55-kilodalton protein expressed in COS-1 cells transfected with a c-fgr cDNA expression plasmid. Moreover, the same protein was immunoprecipitated from an Epstein-Barr virus-infected Burkitt's lymphoma cell line which expressed c-fgr mRNA but not in its uninfected fgr mRNA-negative counterpart. These findings identified the 55-kilodalton protein as the product of the human fgr proto-oncogene.

  13. Cleaning products and air fresheners: exposure to primary and secondary air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaroff, William W.; Weschler, Charles J.

    Building occupants, including cleaning personnel, are exposed to a wide variety of airborne chemicals when cleaning agents and air fresheners are used in buildings. Certain of these chemicals are listed by the state of California as toxic air contaminants (TACs) and a subset of these are regulated by the US federal government as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). California's Proposition 65 list of species recognized as carcinogens or reproductive toxicants also includes constituents of certain cleaning products and air fresheners. In addition, many cleaning agents and air fresheners contain chemicals that can react with other air contaminants to yield potentially harmful secondary products. For example, terpenes can react rapidly with ozone in indoor air generating many secondary pollutants, including TACs such as formaldehyde. Furthermore, ozone-terpene reactions produce the hydroxyl radical, which reacts rapidly with organics, leading to the formation of other potentially toxic air pollutants. Indoor reactive chemistry involving the nitrate radical and cleaning-product constituents is also of concern, since it produces organic nitrates as well as some of the same oxidation products generated by ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Few studies have directly addressed the indoor concentrations of TACs that might result from primary emissions or secondary pollutant formation following the use of cleaning agents and air fresheners. In this paper, we combine direct empirical evidence with the basic principles of indoor pollutant behavior and with information from relevant studies, to analyze and critically assess air pollutant exposures resulting from the use of cleaning products and air fresheners. Attention is focused on compounds that are listed as HAPs, TACs or Proposition 65 carcinogens/reproductive toxicants and compounds that can readily react to generate secondary pollutants. The toxicity of many of these secondary pollutants has yet to be evaluated. The inhalation

  14. Corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This new handbook presents comprehensive coverage of the corrosion behavior of aluminum and aluminum alloys, with emphasis on practical information about how to select and process these materials in order to prevent corrosion attack. Described are the characteristics of these materials and the influences of composition, mechanical working, heat treatment, joining methods, microstructure, and environmental variables on their corrosion.

  15. ALUMINUM-CONTAINING POLYMERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, *POLYMERIZATION, *POLYMERS, ACRYLIC RESINS, ALKYL RADICALS, CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, COPOLYMERIZATION, LIGHT TRANSMISSION, STABILITY, STYRENES, TRANSPARENT PANELS.

  16. Mapping the global flow of aluminum: from liquid aluminum to end-use goods.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Jonathan M; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Demand for aluminum in final products has increased 30-fold since 1950 to 45 million tonnes per year, with forecasts predicting this exceptional growth to continue so that demand will reach 2-3 times today's levels by 2050. Aluminum production uses 3.5% of global electricity and causes 1% of global CO2 emissions, while meeting a 50% cut in emissions by 2050 against growing demand would require at least a 75% reduction in CO2 emissions per tonne of aluminum produced--a challenging prospect. In this paper we trace the global flows of aluminum from liquid metal to final products, revealing for the first time a complete map of the aluminum system and providing a basis for future study of the emissions abatement potential of material efficiency. The resulting Sankey diagram also draws attention to two key issues. First, around half of all liquid aluminum (~39 Mt) produced each year never reaches a final product, and a detailed discussion of these high yield losses shows significant opportunities for improvement. Second, aluminum recycling, which avoids the high energy costs and emissions of electrolysis, requires signification "dilution" (~ 8 Mt) and "cascade" (~ 6 Mt) flows of higher aluminum grades to make up for the shortfall in scrap supply and to obtain the desired alloy mix, increasing the energy required for recycling.

  17. A conceptual model of primary productivity in shallow streams using biomass simulation. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.C.; McDonnell, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    A conceptual model for primary productivity was developed for application to rooted aquatic macrophytes in streams to assist studies of eutrophication and control of water quality in supplementing outputs of dissolved oxygen (DO) models of pollution loads. This model included a first-order differential equation of biomass, with specific rates for photosynthesis, respiration, and death. A model component was developed to describe available light spatially/temporally in the weed bed, as reduced from extraterrestrial solar radiation. A DO model component included terms for photosynthetic production, plant respiration, and a benthal sink due to dead plant matter decay. The latter, a first-order exponential oxygen sink, had not been previously included in DO models.

  18. The Whale Pump: Marine Mammals Enhance Primary Productivity in a Coastal Basin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Joe; McCarthy, James J.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that microbes, zooplankton, and fish are important sources of recycled nitrogen in coastal waters, yet marine mammals have largely been ignored or dismissed in this cycle. Using field measurements and population data, we find that marine mammals can enhance primary productivity in their feeding areas by concentrating nitrogen near the surface through the release of flocculent fecal plumes. Whales and seals may be responsible for replenishing 2.3×104 metric tons of N per year in the Gulf of Maine's euphotic zone, more than the input of all rivers combined. This upward “whale pump” played a much larger role before commercial harvest, when marine mammal recycling of nitrogen was likely more than three times atmospheric N input. Even with reduced populations, marine mammals provide an important ecosystem service by sustaining productivity in regions where they occur in high densities. PMID:20949007

  19. Observation and simulation of net primary productivity in Qilian Mountain, western China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Zhu, Q; Chen, J M; Wang, Y Q; Liu, J; Sun, R; Tang, S

    2007-11-01

    We modeled net primary productivity (NPP) at high spatial resolution using an advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) image of a Qilian Mountain study area using the boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS). Two key driving variables of the model, leaf area index (LAI) and land cover type, were derived from ASTER and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Other spatially explicit inputs included daily meteorological data (radiation, precipitation, temperature, humidity), available soil water holding capacity (AWC), and forest biomass. NPP was estimated for coniferous forests and other land cover types in the study area. The result showed that NPP of coniferous forests in the study area was about 4.4 tCha(-1)y(-1). The correlation coefficient between the modeled NPP and ground measurements was 0.84, with a mean relative error of about 13.9%.

  20. Validation of Satellite Derived Primary Production Models in the Northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanova, P. V.; Bashmachnikov, I. L.; Brotas, V.

    2016-08-01

    With all the variety of models used for calculation of primary production of phytoplankton (PP) from remote sensing data, a choice of the most realistic one for a particular ocean region remains a non-trivial issue. In this work, we estimate PP in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean (200 - 510 N and 100 - 400 W) from 1998 to 2005 using three frequently used models: VGPM (Vertically Generalized Production Model), PSM (Platt and Sathyendranath Model) and Aph-PP model (Absorption Based Model). The modeled results are then compared with in situ observations of PP. The results show a close similarity in PP patterns obtained by different models, but the absolute modeled values differ substantially. In the Northeast Atlantic, PSM is found reproducing better the observed seasonal and spatial variability of PP as compared to the two other models. However, PSM slightly underestimates the PP values.