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Sample records for primary amoebic meningoencephalitis

  1. Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis with subsequent organ procurement: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2011-10-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare and rapidly fatal disease caused by the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. It is a diagnosis rarely seen by medical personnel, yet this amoeba is frequently encountered by people who frequent freshwater bodies of water in certain states. The disease primarily affects children and young adults who swim or take part in water sports in the waters in which the amoeba thrive. The disease presents with symptomatology similar to bacterial meningitis: headache, stiff neck, altered mental status, seizures, and coma with a quick progression to death. Rapid diagnosis is imperative to facilitate prompt treatment, although PAM has 95% mortality. There have been only 10 survivors reported in medical literature. This disease is a public-health risk to those living in affected areas of the country. Healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the disease as well, and, although recovery is rare, focus on prevention and risk reduction strategies is imperative. It is not completely understood why, of the millions of people are exposed to freshwater with the amoeba, only a few become infected with it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have suggested that all freshwater areas should always assume a level of risk in waters, even when signage is not posted. This case study will review a fatal case of Naegleria fowleri infection in a young patient and will include the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, nursing and public health implications, and organ procurement that occurred with the patient.

  2. Primary amoebic meningo-encephalitis in an indoor heat-exchange swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Cursons, R T; Brown, T J; Keys, E A; Gordon, E H; Leng, R H; Havill, J H; Hyne, B E

    1979-10-24

    The case history, identification and isolation of the aetiological agent of a case of primary amoebic meningo-encephalitis (PAM) contracted in an indoor heat-exchange pool are presented. The isolated strain (MsM) is compared with known strains of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Naegleria.

  3. Sensitivity to amphotericin B of a Naegleria sp. isolated from a case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Rodney F.

    1969-01-01

    An amoeba of the genus Naegleria causing fatal meningoencephalitis in a human subject has been investigated for its sensitivity to several drugs. Penicillin, sulphadiazine, chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline hydrochloride, streptomycin, methotrexate, emetine, quinine, and metronidazole had no effect on the organism in vitro at levels in excess of those likely to be attained therapeutically in the brain. Amphotericin B was highly amoebicidal in vitro and protected mice from infection with the organism. Used in high dosage by the intraventricular as well as the intravenous route, this drug might be successful in the treatment of further cases of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. PMID:5798635

  4. Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri: an old enemy presenting new challenges.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    First discovered in 1899, Naegleria fowleri is a protist pathogen, known to infect the central nervous system and produce primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. The most distressing aspect is that the fatality rate has remained more than 95%, despite our advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Although rare worldwide, most cases have been reported in the United States, Australia, and Europe (France). A large number of cases in developing countries go unnoticed. In particular, religious, recreational, and cultural practices such as ritual ablution and/or purifications, Ayurveda, and the use of neti pots for nasal irrigation can contribute to this devastating infection. With increasing water scarcity and public reliance on water storage, here we debate the need for increased awareness of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis and the associated risk factors, particularly in developing countries.

  5. Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis Caused by Naegleria fowleri: An Old Enemy Presenting New Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    First discovered in 1899, Naegleria fowleri is a protist pathogen, known to infect the central nervous system and produce primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. The most distressing aspect is that the fatality rate has remained more than 95%, despite our advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Although rare worldwide, most cases have been reported in the United States, Australia, and Europe (France). A large number of cases in developing countries go unnoticed. In particular, religious, recreational, and cultural practices such as ritual ablution and/or purifications, Ayurveda, and the use of neti pots for nasal irrigation can contribute to this devastating infection. With increasing water scarcity and public reliance on water storage, here we debate the need for increased awareness of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis and the associated risk factors, particularly in developing countries. PMID:25121759

  6. Fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in a Norwegian tourist returning from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Reiakvam, Olaug Marie; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Hermansen, Nils Olav; Holberg-Petersen, Mona; Antal, Ellen-Ann; Gaustad, Knut; Førde, Ingrid Schage; Heger, Bernt

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare disease caused by the free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri. Infection occurs by insufflation of water containing amoebae into the nasal cavity, and is usually associated with bathing in freshwater. Nasal irrigation is a more rarely reported route of infection. Case presentation: A fatal case of PAM in a previously healthy Norwegian woman, acquired during a holiday trip to Thailand, is described. Clinical findings were consistent with rapidly progressing meningoencephalitis. The cause of infection was discovered by chance, owing to the unexpected detection of N. fowleri DNA by a PCR assay targeting fungi. A conclusive diagnosis was established based on sequencing of N. fowleri DNA from brain biopsies, supported by histopathological findings. Nasal irrigation using contaminated tap water is suspected as the source of infection. Conclusion: The clinical presentation of PAM is very similar to severe bacterial meningitis. This case is a reminder that when standard investigations fail to identify a cause of infection in severe meningoencephalitis, it is of crucial importance to continue a broad search for a conclusive diagnosis. PAM should be considered as a diagnosis in patients with symptoms of severe meningoencephalitis returning from endemic areas. PMID:28348761

  7. Isolation of the etiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis from artifically heated waters.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A R; Tyndall, R L; Coutant, C C; Willaert, E

    1977-12-01

    To determine whether artificial heating of water by power plant discharges facilitates proliferation of the pathogenic free-living amoebae that cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, water samples (250 ml) were taken from discharges within 3,000 feet (ca. 914.4 m) of power plants and were processed for amoeba culture. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri grew out of water samples from two of five lakes and rivers in Florida and from one of eight man-made lakes in Texas. Pathogenic N. fowleri did not grow from water samples taken from cooling towers and control lakes, the latter of which had no associated power plants. The identification of N. fowleri was confirmed by pathogenicity in mice and by indirect immunofluorescence analyses, by using a specific antiserum.

  8. A case report: primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in a young Zambian adult.

    PubMed

    Chomba, Mashina; Mucheleng'anga, Luchenga A; Fwoloshi, Sombo; Ngulube, Joseph; Mutengo, Mable M

    2017-08-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fulminant disease of the brain caused by Naegleria fowleri. Although the disease is rare, the case fatality rate is very high. In this report, we describe the first case of PAM in Zambia. The patient presented with sudden onset of seizures and fever on admission. On physical examination he was febrile, comatose and with a stiff neck. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collected on admission did not reveal any organism on microscopy or culture but showed elevated white cell count. A working diagnosis of severe septicemia with acute meningoencephalitis was then made and the patient was started on IV Cephtriaxone (2 g) twice daily. Despite receiving treatment, his condition deteriorated. A second CSF sample collected on day 3 was also negative for bacteria and other organisms. However, a repeat CSF sample collected on day 8 revealed numerous motile organisms that were identified as Naegleria on microscopy and confirmed to be N. fowleri on polymerase chain reaction. The patient died on day 8 of hospital admission after having received one dose of Amphotericin B (50 mg). Features consistent with PAM were detected on autopsy. The isolation of N. fowleri in this patient calls for increased awareness among clinical and laboratory staff on suspected PAM cases to promptly diagnose and effectively manage the disease.

  9. The epidemiology of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in the USA, 1962-2008.

    PubMed

    Yoder, J S; Eddy, B A; Visvesvara, G S; Capewell, L; Beach, M J

    2010-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living, thermophilic amoeba ubiquitous in the environment, causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rare but nearly always fatal disease of the central nervous system. While case reports of PAM have been documented worldwide, very few individuals have been diagnosed with PAM despite the vast number of people who have contact with fresh water where N. fowleri may be present. In the USA, 111 PAM case-patients have been prospectively diagnosed, reported, and verified by state health officials since 1962. Consistent with the literature, case reports reveal that N. fowleri infections occur primarily in previously healthy young males exposed to warm recreational waters, especially lakes and ponds, in warm-weather locations during summer months. The annual number of PAM case reports varied, but does not appear to be increasing over time. Because PAM is a rare disease, it is challenging to understand the environmental and host-specific factors associated with infection in order to develop science-based, risk reduction messages for swimmers.

  10. Review of clinical presentations in Thai patients with primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2004-03-08

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a very rare but deadly infection of the central nervous system. Since the disease was first identified in 1965, fewer than 200 cases have been observed worldwide. The author performed a literature review of the reports of PAM in Thailand in order to study the clinical summary of PAM among Thai patients. This study was designed as a descriptive retrospective study. A literature review of the papers concerning PAM in Thailand was performed. According to this study, there have been at least 12 reports of PAM in Thailand, of which 2 cases were nonlethal. The mean age was 15.2 +/- 16.1 years with a male:female ratio of about 2:1. History of risk behaviors such as suffocation of surface water during swimming was demonstrated in 6 cases. Also, 2 interesting cases involved possible water contact according to the Thai tradition and culture. Concerning the patients' clinical features, fever, headache, impaired consciousness, and stiff neck were seen in all cases. However, some unusual presentations such as intermittent abdominal pain and convulsion were also seen in this series. Similar to worldwide findings, most cases occurred during the summer months. Most of the cases involved young males from rural provinces in various regions of Thailand. Concerning the laboratory investigation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile presented the polymorphonuclear (PMN) pleomorphic with hypoglycorhachia pattern. Trophozoite could be identified in all but 2 cases in this series. PAM is sporadically reported in Thailand but remains a public health issue. The clinical diagnosis of PAM is usually difficult as many clinicians are unfamiliar with the disease. The prognosis outcome is usually grave although broad medications are prescribed.

  11. Assessing the Risk of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis from Swimming in the Presence of Environmental Naegleria fowleri

    PubMed Central

    Cabanes, Pierre-André; Wallet, France; Pringuez, Emmanuelle; Pernin, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri amoebae cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Because of the apparent conflict between their ubiquity and the rarity of cases observed, we sought to develop a model characterizing the risk of PAM after swimming as a function of the concentration of N. fowleri. The probability of death from PAM as a function of the number of amoebae inhaled is modeled according to results obtained from animals infected with amoeba strains. The calculation of the probability of inhaling one or more amoebae while swimming is based on a double hypothesis: that the distribution of amoebae in the water follows a Poisson distribution and that the mean quantity of water inhaled while swimming is 10 ml. The risk of PAM for a given concentration of amoebae is then obtained by summing the following products: the probability of inhaling n amoebae × the probability of PAM associated with inhaling these n amoebae. We chose the lognormal model to assess the risk of PAM because it yielded the best analysis of the studentized residuals. Nonetheless, the levels of risk thereby obtained cannot be applied to humans without correction, because they are substantially greater than those indicated by available epidemiologic data. The curve was thus adjusted by a factor calculated with the least-squares method. This provides the PAM risk in humans as a function of the N. fowleri concentration in the river. For example, the risk is 8.5 × 10−8 at a concentration of 10 N. fowleri amoebae per liter. PMID:11425704

  12. Review of Clinical Presentations in Thai Patients With Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2004-01-01

    Context: Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a very rare but deadly infection of the central nervous system. Since the disease was first identified in 1965, fewer than 200 cases have been observed worldwide. Objective: The author performed a literature review of the reports of PAM in Thailand in order to study the clinical summary of PAM among Thai patients. Design: This study was designed as a descriptive retrospective study. A literature review of the papers concerning PAM in Thailand was performed. Results: According to this study, there have been at least 12 reports of PAM in Thailand, of which 2 cases were nonlethal. The mean age was 15.2 ± 16.1 years with a male:female ratio of about 2:1. History of risk behaviors such as suffocation of surface water during swimming was demonstrated in 6 cases. Also, 2 interesting cases involved possible water contact according to the Thai tradition and culture. Concerning the patients' clinical features, fever, headache, impaired consciousness, and stiff neck were seen in all cases. However, some unusual presentations such as intermittent abdominal pain and convulsion were also seen in this series. Similar to worldwide findings, most cases occurred during the summer months. Most of the cases involved young males from rural provinces in various regions of Thailand. Concerning the laboratory investigation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile presented the polymorphonuclear (PMN) pleomorphic with hypoglycorhachia pattern. Trophozoite could be identified in all but 2 cases in this series. Conclusion: PAM is sporadically reported in Thailand but remains a public health issue. The clinical diagnosis of PAM is usually difficult as many clinicians are unfamiliar with the disease. The prognosis outcome is usually grave although broad medications are prescribed. PMID:15208515

  13. Comparison of the clinical presentations of Naegleria fowleri primary amoebic meningoencephalitis with pneumococcal meningitis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Saad Shaukat, Muhammad Hamza; Ahmed, Bilal; Beg, Mohammad Asim; Kadir, Muhammad Masood; Mahmood, Syed Faisal

    2016-08-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare but fatal infection caused by Naegleria fowleri. The infection is acquired by deep nasal irrigation with infected water. Patients present with signs and symptoms similar to pneumococcal meningitis, leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment and hence high mortality. We conducted a case-control study comparing culture proven cases of PAM with pneumococcal meningitis presenting to our center between April 2008 and September 2014. Only patients with blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid cultures positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae during the same time period were included for comparison. There were 19 cases of PAM and pneumococcal meningitis, each. When comparing PAM with pneumococcal meningitis, patients with PAM were more likely to be male (89.5 vs. 36.8 %), younger (mean age: 30 vs. 59 years), present with seizures (42.1 vs. 5.3 %). Both groups of patients presented with similar vital signs and there were no remarkable differences on physical examinations, Glasgow Coma Scale scores, laboratory and radiological investigations and cerebrospinal fluid parameters. PAM was also more likely to present if the city's average maximum temperature was higher in the previous week (mean: 34.6 vs. 30 °C). There was history of fresh water contact in only one patient. On multivariate analysis, PAM was more likely if patients presented when the city's average maximum temperature was high, being young males. PAM and pneumococcal meningitis remain virtually indistinguishable; however, these predictive features should be validated in a prospective study and may lead to a viable algorithm for early management of these patients.

  14. Naegleria fowleri That Induces Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis: Rapid Diagnosis and Rare Case of Survival in a 12-Year-Old Caucasian Girl.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrew L; Reed, Tameika; Stewart, Charlotte; Levy, Rebecca A

    2016-05-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare and almost always fatal disease that is caused by Naegleria fowleri, a freshwater thermophilic amoeba. Our case involves an adolescent female who presented with fever of unknown origin. A lumbar puncture was performed, and the Wright-Giemsa and Gram stained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytospin slides showed numerous organisms. Experienced medical technologists in the microbiology and hematology laboratories identified the organisms as morphologically consistent with Naegleria species. The laboratory made a rapid diagnosis and alerted emergency department care providers within 75 minutes. The patient was treated for PAM with amphotericin, rifampin, azithromycin, fluconazole and aggressive supportive therapy including dexamethasone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was contacted, and miltefosine, an investigational medication, was started. Additional treatment included an intraventricular shunt and controlled hypothermia in order to mitigate potential cerebral edema. Our patient is a rare success story, as she was diagnosed swiftly, successfully treated, and survived PAM. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Fatal primary meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Shariq, Ali; Afridi, Faisal Iqbal; Farooqi, Badar Jahan; Ahmed, Sumaira; Hussain, Arif

    2014-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a free living parasite which habitats in fresh water reservoirs. It causes a fatal nervous system infection known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis by invading through cribriform plate of nose and gaining entry into brain. We report a case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri in Karachi, Pakistan, in a 42 years old male poultry farm worker having no history of swimming. Clinical course was fulminant and death occurred within one week of hospital admission. Naegleria fowleri was detected by wet mount technique in the sample of cerebrospinal fluid collected by lumbar puncture of patient. This is a serious problem and requires immediate steps to prevent general population to get affected by this lethal neurological infection.

  16. Intranasal coadministration of the Cry1Ac protoxin with amoebal lysates increases protection against Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; López-Revilla, Rubén; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo A; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2004-08-01

    Cry1Ac protoxin has potent mucosal and systemic adjuvant effects on antibody responses to proteins or polysaccharides. In this work, we examined whether Cry1Ac increased protective immunity against fatal Naegleria fowleri infection in mice, which resembles human primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) than IgA anti-N. fowleri responses were elicited in the serum and tracheopulmonary fluids of mice immunized by the intranasal or intraperitoneal route with N. fowleri lysates either alone or with Cry1Ac or cholera toxin. Superior protection against a lethal challenge with 5 x 10(4) live N. fowleri trophozoites was achieved for immunization by the intranasal route. Intranasal immunization of N. fowleri lysates coadministered with Cry1Ac increased survival to 100%; interestingly, immunization with Cry1Ac alone conferred similar protection to that achieved with amoebal lysates alone (60%). When mice intranasally immunized with Cry1Ac plus lysates were challenged with amoebae, both IgG and IgA mucosal responses were rapidly increased, but only the increased IgG response persisted until day 60 in surviving mice. The brief rise in the level of specific mucosal IgA does not exclude the role that this isotype may play in the early defense against this parasite, since higher IgA responses were detected in nasal fluids of mice intranasally immunized with lysates plus either Cry1Ac or cholera toxin, which, indeed, were the treatments that provided the major protection levels. In contrast, serum antibody responses do not seem to be related to the protection level achieved. Both acquired and innate immune systems seem to play a role in host defense against N. fowleri infection, but further studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms involved in protective effects conferred by Cry1Ac, which may be a valuable tool to improve mucosal vaccines.

  17. Intranasal Coadministration of the Cry1Ac Protoxin with Amoebal Lysates Increases Protection against Naegleria fowleri Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A.; López-Revilla, Rubén; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo A.; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2004-01-01

    Cry1Ac protoxin has potent mucosal and systemic adjuvant effects on antibody responses to proteins or polysaccharides. In this work, we examined whether Cry1Ac increased protective immunity against fatal Naegleria fowleri infection in mice, which resembles human primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) than IgA anti-N. fowleri responses were elicited in the serum and tracheopulmonary fluids of mice immunized by the intranasal or intraperitoneal route with N. fowleri lysates either alone or with Cry1Ac or cholera toxin. Superior protection against a lethal challenge with 5 × 104 live N. fowleri trophozoites was achieved for immunization by the intranasal route. Intranasal immunization of N. fowleri lysates coadministered with Cry1Ac increased survival to 100%; interestingly, immunization with Cry1Ac alone conferred similar protection to that achieved with amoebal lysates alone (60%). When mice intranasally immunized with Cry1Ac plus lysates were challenged with amoebae, both IgG and IgA mucosal responses were rapidly increased, but only the increased IgG response persisted until day 60 in surviving mice. The brief rise in the level of specific mucosal IgA does not exclude the role that this isotype may play in the early defense against this parasite, since higher IgA responses were detected in nasal fluids of mice intranasally immunized with lysates plus either Cry1Ac or cholera toxin, which, indeed, were the treatments that provided the major protection levels. In contrast, serum antibody responses do not seem to be related to the protection level achieved. Both acquired and innate immune systems seem to play a role in host defense against N. fowleri infection, but further studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms involved in protective effects conferred by Cry1Ac, which may be a valuable tool to improve mucosal vaccines. PMID:15271892

  18. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri, Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Sadia; Beg, Mohammad Asim; Mahmood, Syed Faisal; Bandea, Rebecca; Sriram, Rama; Noman, Fatima; Ali, Farheen; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Zafar, Afia

    2011-02-01

    We report 13 cases of Naegleria fowleri primary amebic meningoencephalitis in persons in Karachi, Pakistan, who had no history of aquatic activities. Infection likely occurred through ablution with tap water. An increase in primary amebic meningoencephalitis cases may be attributed to rising temperatures, reduced levels of chlorine in potable water, or deteriorating water distribution systems.

  19. Amoebic meningoencephalitis and disseminated infection caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in a Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Gjeltema, Jenessa L; Troan, Brigid; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Liu, Lindy; Da Silva, Alexandre J; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Tobias, Jeremy R; Loomis, Michael R; De Voe, Ryan S

    2016-02-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 22-year-old male gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) housed in a zoo was evaluated for signs of lethargy, head-holding, and cervical stiffness followed by development of neurologic abnormalities including signs of depression, lip droop, and tremors. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination under general anesthesia revealed a tooth root abscess and suboptimal body condition. A CBC and serum biochemical analysis revealed mild anemia, neutrophilia and eosinopenia consistent with a stress leukogram, and signs consistent with dehydration. Subsequent CSF analysis revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and markedly increased total protein concentration. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Despite treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and additional supportive care measures, the gorilla's condition progressed to an obtunded mentation with grand mal seizures over the course of 10 days. Therefore, the animal was euthanized and necropsy was performed. Multifocal areas of malacia and hemorrhage were scattered throughout the brain; on histologic examination, these areas consisted of necrosis and hemorrhage associated with mixed inflammation, vascular necrosis, and intralesional amoebic trophozoites. Tan foci were also present in the kidneys and pancreas. Immunohistochemical testing positively labeled free-living amoebae within the brain, kidneys, eyes, pancreas, heart, and pulmonary capillaries. Subsequent PCR assay of CSF and frozen kidney samples identified the organism as Balamuthia mandrillaris, confirming a diagnosis of amoebic meningoencephalitis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Infection with B mandrillaris has been reported to account for 2.8% of captive gorilla deaths in North America over the past 19 years. Clinicians working with gorillas should have a high index of suspicion for this diagnosis when evaluating and treating animals with signs of centrally localized neurologic disease.

  20. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis diagnosed in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    McCool, J A; Spudis, E V; McLean, W; White, J; Visvesvara, G S

    1983-01-01

    Reported is a case of primary amebic meningoencephalitis diagnosed in the emergency department. The patient, a previously healthy teenager, developed Naegleria meningoencephalitis after swimming in a freshwater public pool. The Naegleria caused acute fulminating infection culminating in the death of the patient 36 hours after admission. Results of a spinal tap, together with the history of swimming in warm fresh water, led to the emergency department diagnosis.

  1. [Amebic meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Toshihide

    2009-02-01

    It has been reported that amebic meningoencephalitis is caused by some rhizopods, which are taxonomically different from Entamoeba histolytica which is well known as the causative agent of amebic dysentery. Different types of human meningoencephalitis have been reported to be caused by amphizoic amebae, which are not obligatorily parasitic (endozoic) but are usually free-living (exozoic) in nature, i.e., in environmental water and soil: Naegleria fowleri causes acute primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Acanthamoeba spp. and Balamuthia mandrillaris produce chronic and opportunistic granulomatous amebic (meningo) encephalitis (GAE). Further, most recently, Sappinia diploidea has been identified as an agent that causes comparatively acute type of encephalitis.

  2. Five cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Mexicali, Mexico: study of the isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Lares-Villa, F; De Jonckheere, J F; De Moura, H; Rechi-Iruretagoyena, A; Ferreira-Guerrero, E; Fernandez-Quintanilla, G; Ruiz-Matus, C; Visvesvara, G S

    1993-01-01

    Five Naegleria strains isolated from patients with primary amebic meningoencephalitis and one strain isolated from the water of an artificial canal were investigated. All strains were pathogenic for mice when instilled intranasally and showed cytopathic effects in Vero cell cultures. Their growth characteristics (isolation and subculture at 45 degrees C), serological results, and isoenzyme patterns permitted us to identify the six strains as Naegleria fowleri. This is the first time that Naegleria fowleri has been isolated from patients with primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Mexico. Images PMID:8458963

  3. Emergence of Balamuthia mandrillaris meningoencephalitis in India.

    PubMed

    Khurana, S; Hallur, V; Goyal, M K; Sehgal, R; Radotra, B D

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of fatal chronic meningoencephalitis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in immunocompetent men. Diagnosis of amoebic meningoencephalitis was made ante-mortem in one case and postmortem in another by histopathological examination and confirmed by demonstration of B. mandrillaris deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

  4. Successful Treatment of an Adolescent with Naegleria fowleri Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linam, W. Matthew; Ahmed, Mubbasheer; Cope, Jennifer R.; Chu, Craig; Visvesvara, Govinda S.; da Silva, Alexandre J.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Green, Jerril

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a thermophilic free-living ameba that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis. Infections are nearly always fatal. We present the third well-documented survivor of this infection in North America. Survival most likely resulted from a combination of early identification and treatment, use of a combination of antimicrobials including miltefosine and management of elevated intracranial pressure based on traumatic brain injury principles. PMID:25667249

  5. [Meningoencephalitis tuberculosis--primary isolation of resistant M. tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Bajramović, Nermina; Koluder, Nada; Dautović, Sajma; Muratović, Planinka

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the main causes of serious diseases in developing countries. Despite of decreasing tuberculosis in industrial countries, diseases is not eradicated. In last fifth years the picture of diseases is changed with large number atypical cases. Factor that is responsible for this are variable and includes primary infection in old ages, or problems that are in relation with immigration of populations. Tuberculosis meningitis disease witch appears mostly in childhood with high incidence in first three years of life. Most cases tuberculosis meningitis are caused with human types of tuberculosis bacillus, while bovines type is responsible for less than 5% of cases, but there are also reported cases of tuberculosis meningitis caused 3% atypical mycobacterium. In report is described a girl in age of two years sick of tuberculosis meningitis, she come from Kosovo, with positive epidemiological anamnesis. When she came to the hospital diseases had all clinical manifestation of serious meningoencefalitis. Very soon signs of decompensate hydrocephalus are developed. In the culture of cerebrospinalis fluid isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary resistant on etambutol and rifampicin.

  6. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri in a South American tapir.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Alarcón, F; Bradley, G A; Houser, B S; Visvesvara, G S

    1997-05-01

    Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Balamuthia mandrillaris are known to cause fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease in human beings. N. fowleri causes acute, fulminating primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which generally leads to death within 10 days. Acanthamoeba spp. and B. mandrillaris cause chronic granulomatous amebic encephalitis, which may last for 8 weeks. Acanthamoeba spp. and B. mandrillaris also cause CNS disease in animals. N. fowleri, however, has been described only in human beings. This report is the first of PAM in an animal, a South American tapir. Dry cough, lethargy, and coma developed in the animal, and its condition progressed to death. At necropsy, lesions were seen in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and lungs. The CNS had severe, suppurative meningoencephalitis with many neutrophils, fibrin, plasma cells, and amebas. Amebas were 6.5 microns to 9 microns in diameter and had a nucleus containing a large nucleolus. Amebas in the sections reacted with a monoclonal antibody specific for N. fowleri in the immunofluorescent assay and appeared bright green.

  7. Amoebic dysentery.

    PubMed

    Marie, Chelsea; Petri, William Arthur

    2013-08-30

    Amoebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. It is transmitted in areas where poor sanitation allows contamination of drinking water and food with faeces. In these areas, up to 40% of people with diarrhoea may have amoebic dysentery. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of drug treatments for amoebic dysentery in endemic areas? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 6 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: diiodohydroxyquinoline (iodoquinol), diloxanide, emetine, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, and tinidazole.

  8. Amoebic dysentery

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Amoebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. It is transmitted in areas where poor sanitation allows contamination of drinking water and food with faeces. In these areas, up to 40% of people with diarrhoea may have amoebic dysentery. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of drug treatments for amoebic dysentery in endemic areas? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to July 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 11 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: emetine, metronidazole, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, and tinidazole. PMID:19454043

  9. Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis: What Have We Learned in the Last Five Years?

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Jennifer R.; Ali, Ibne K.

    2016-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a devastating infection of the brain caused by the thermophilic free-living ameba, Naegleria fowleri. Infection can occur when water containing the ameba enters the body through the nose, usually during recreational water activities such as swimming or diving. Historically, in the United States, cases were mostly reported from the warmer southern-tier states. In the last five years, several notable changes have been documented in PAM epidemiology including a northward expansion of infections and new types of water exposures. The recent reports of two PAM survivors provide hope for improved outcomes with early diagnosis and aggressive treatment. Advanced molecular laboratory tools such as genome sequencing might provide more insight into the pathogenicity of Naegleria fowleri. Clinicians treating patients with meningitis and warm freshwater exposure are encouraged to consider PAM in their differential diagnoses. PMID:27614893

  10. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Florida: a case report and epidemiological review of Florida cases.

    PubMed

    Budge, Philip J; Lazensky, Becky; Van Zile, Kathleen W; Elliott, Karen E; Dooyema, Carrie A; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Beach, Michael J; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2013-04-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare but nearly always fatal infection of the central nervous system caused by the thermophilic, free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. Since its first description in 1965 through 2010, 118 cases have been reported in the U.S.; all cases are related to environmental exposure to warm freshwater; most have occurred in children and adolescents and are associated with recreational water activities, such as swimming, diving, or playing in freshwater lakes, ponds, or rivers. Over one-fourth of all national PAM cases have occurred in Florida. The authors describe here a fatal case of PAM in a resident of northeast Florida and the ensuing environmental and public health investigation; they also provide a review of all cases of PAM in Florida from 1962 to 2010 and discuss public health responses to PAM in Florida, highlighting opportunities for positive collaboration between state and local environmental health specialists, epidemiologists, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  11. Seasonal primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in the south: summertime is PAM time.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James

    2012-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a typically fatal, free-living amebic infection of the central nervous system (CNS), is caused by the thermophilic, freshwater protozoan, Naegleria fowleri. More than 145 cases of PAM have been reported worldwide, with most reported cases in the United States (US). Since annual PAM case clusters in the US and worldwide have demonstrated recent increases over background cases, the objectives of this investigation included (1) an epidemiological and statistical analysis of a 2007 cluster of six PAM cases in the southern US, nested in a retrospective review of 121 confirmed US cases of PAM over the period, 1937 to 2007; and (2) a statistical analysis of all existing demographic, temporal, and behavioral risk factors for PAM. Significant risk factors for PAM in the United States included male sex and warm recreational freshwater exposures in seasonal patterns (July - August) in southern tier states, including Louisiana. Although there have been a few recent survivors of PAM treated with combinations of intensive critical care, antifungals, and synergistic antibiotics, case fatality rates for PAM remain very high. PAM is best prevented by combinations of public health educational and behavioral modification strategies. Further investigations will be required to determine the significance of freshwater wakeboarding as a significant risk factor for PAM and to determine any dose-response effects of global warming on rising freshwater temperatures and the growth of aquatic Naegleria fowleri.

  12. Serum antibodies to Balamuthia mandrillaris, a free-living amoeba recently demonstrated to cause granulomatous amoebic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z H; Ferrante, A; Carter, R F

    1999-05-01

    Free-living amoebae cause three well-defined disease entities: a rapidly fatal primary meningoencephalitis, a chronic granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE), and a chronic amoebic keratitis. GAE occurs in immunocompromised persons. Recently, another type of free-living amoeba, Balamuthia mandrillaris, has been shown to cause GAE. The finding that this amoeba has caused infection in some healthy children has raised the possibility that humans may lack immunity to B. mandrillaris. Human serum was examined for the presence of surface antibodies specific for this amoeba by immunofluorescence. Sera from adults contained titers of 1/64-1/256 of anti-B. mandrillaris antibodies (IgM and IgG classes), which did not cross-react with other amoebae. Cord blood contained very low antibody levels, but levels similar to those in adults were seen in serum of 1- to 5-year-old children.

  13. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection.

  14. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection. PMID:25374871

  15. Notes from the Field: Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Associated with Exposure to Swimming Pool Water Supplied by an Overland Pipe - Inyo County, California, 2015.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard O; Cope, Jennifer R; Moskowitz, Marvin; Kahler, Amy; Hill, Vincent; Behrendt, Kaleigh; Molina, Louis; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Beach, Michael J

    2016-04-29

    On June 17, 2015, a previously healthy woman aged 21 years went to an emergency department after onset of headache, nausea, and vomiting during the preceding 24 hours. Upon evaluation, she was vomiting profusely and had photophobia and nuchal rigidity. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid was consistent with meningitis.* She was empirically treated for bacterial and viral meningoencephalitis. Her condition continued to decline, and she was transferred to a higher level of care in another facility on June 19, but died shortly thereafter. Cultures of cerebrospinal fluid and multiple blood specimens were negative, and tests for West Nile, herpes simplex, and influenza viruses were negative. No organisms were seen in the cerebrospinal fluid; however, real-time polymerase chain reaction testing by CDC was positive for Naegleria fowleri, a free-living thermophilic ameba found in warm freshwater that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis, an almost universally fatal infection.

  16. Meningoencephalitis due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri in ruminants in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Benterki, Mohamed Seghir; Ayachi, Ammar; Bennoune, Omar; Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal infection in most cases, caused by the amoeba flagellate Naegleria fowleri. This report describes the first cases of PAM in Algeria, in a cow and a ewe from Batna, north-eastern Algeria. The death of both ruminants occurred a week after the first clinical manifestations. The cerebrospinal fluid, after staining with May-Grünwald-Giemsa, showed the presence of amoebae cells. Histological sections revealed numerous amoebae in all parts of the brain. The presence of N. fowleri was confirmed using a species-specific real-time PCR in histological tissue sections. The two PAM cases were reported during the hot season, and the source of infection is very likely the water where the cattle came to drink. Particular attention should be focused on this type of infection in aquatic environments when the temperature is high and preventive measures must be taken to avoid the proliferation of N. fowleri. PMID:26979770

  17. Fatal Naegleria fowleri Meningoencephalitis, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Scaglia, Massimo; Gatti, Simonetta; Rossetti, Flavio; Alaggio, Rita; Laverda, Anna Maria; Zhou, Ling; Xiao, Lihua; Visvesvara, Govinda S.

    2004-01-01

    We report the first case of primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Italy, in a 9-year-old boy. Clinical course was fulminant, and diagnosis was made by identifying amebas in stained brain sections and by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. Naegleria fowleri was characterized as genotype I on the basis of polymerase chain reaction test results. PMID:15504272

  18. [Mycoplasma Pneumoniae-Induced Meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Özel, C; Dafotakis, M; Nikoubashman, O; Litmathe, J; Matz, O; Schöne, U

    2015-07-01

    In clinical practice, secondary infections of the central nervous system (CNS) represent rare yet severe complications of their respective primary infections. In this case report, we describe a 22-year-old patient with a medical history of Asthma bronchiale, who developed significant neurological deficits after a respiratory infection. The neurological symptoms progressed despite antibiotic therapy with vancomycin, ampicillin and ceftriaxone. The patient's cerebrospinal fluid and a cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) furnished evidence of acute meningoencephalitis. Microbiological assessment confirmed an acute mycoplasma pneumonia infection. Changing the patient's antibiotic regimen to minocycline and prednisolone led to significant clinical improvement. Pathomechanisms and therapeutic options to treat meningoencephalitis will be discussed in the following. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. The first association of a primary amebic meningoencephalitis death with culturable Naegleria fowleri in tap water from a US treated public drinking water system.

    PubMed

    Cope, Jennifer R; Ratard, Raoult C; Hill, Vincent R; Sokol, Theresa; Causey, Jonathan Jake; Yoder, Jonathan S; Mirani, Gayatri; Mull, Bonnie; Mukerjee, Kimberly A; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Doucet, Meggie; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Poole, Charla N; Akingbola, Olugbenga A; Ritter, Jana M; Xiong, Zhenggang; da Silva, Alexandre J; Roellig, Dawn; Van Dyke, Russell B; Stern, Harlan; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael J

    2015-04-15

    Naegleria fowleri is a climate-sensitive, thermophilic ameba found in warm, freshwater lakes and rivers. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is almost universally fatal, occurs when N. fowleri-containing water enters the nose, typically during swimming, and migrates to the brain via the olfactory nerve. In August 2013, a 4-year-old boy died of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology in a Louisiana hospital. Clinical and environmental testing and a case investigation were initiated to determine the cause of death and to identify potential exposures. Based on testing of cerebrospinal fluid and brain specimens, the child was diagnosed with PAM. His only reported water exposure was tap water; in particular, tap water that was used to supply water to a lawn water slide on which the child had played extensively prior to becoming ill. Water samples were collected from both the home and the water distribution system that supplied the home and tested; N. fowleri was identified in water samples from both the home and the water distribution system. This case is the first reported PAM death associated with culturable N. fowleri in tap water from a US treated drinking water system. This case occurred in the context of an expanding geographic range for PAM beyond southern states, with recent case reports from Minnesota, Kansas, and Indiana. This case also highlights the role of adequate disinfection throughout drinking water distribution systems and the importance of maintaining vigilance when operating drinking water systems using source waters with elevated temperatures. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. The First Association of a Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Death with Culturable Naegleria fowleri in Tap Water from a U.S. Treated Public Drinking Water System

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Jennifer R.; Ratard, Raoult C.; Hill, Vincent R.; Sokol, Theresa; Causey, Jonathan Jake; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Mirani, Gayatri; Mull, Bonnie; Mukerjee, Kimberly A.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Doucet, Meggie; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Poole, Charla N.; Akingbola, Olugbenga A.; Ritter, Jana; Xiong, Zhenggang; da Silva, Alexandre; Roellig, Dawn; Van Dyke, Russell; Stern, Harlan; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naegleria fowleri is a climate-sensitive, thermophilic ameba found in warm, freshwater lakes and rivers. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is almost universally fatal, occurs when N. fowleri–containing water enters the nose, typically during swimming, and N. fowleri migrates to the brain via the olfactory nerve. In August 2013, a 4-year-old child died of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology in a Louisiana hospital. Methods Clinical and environmental testing and a case investigation were initiated to determine the cause of death and to identify potential exposures. Results Based on testing of CSF and brain specimens, the child was diagnosed with PAM. His only reported water exposure was tap water; in particular, tap water that was used to supply water to a lawn water slide on which the child had played extensively prior to becoming ill. Water samples were collected from both the home and the water distribution system that supplied the home and tested; N. fowleri were identified in water samples from both the home and the water distribution system. Conclusions This case is the first reported PAM death associated with culturable N. fowleri in tap water from a U.S. treated drinking water system. This case occurred in the context of an expanding geographic range for PAM beyond southern tier states with recent case reports from Minnesota, Kansas, and Indiana. This case also highlights the role of adequate disinfection throughout drinking water distribution systems and the importance of maintaining vigilance when operating drinking water systems using source waters with elevated temperatures. PMID:25595746

  1. Amoebic ulcer of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Satya; Ananthakrishnan, N.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Topno, Margaret; Aurora, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    This is a report of a rare entity—an amoebic ulcer of the penis. The gross loss of glans and terminal urethra was repaired by a new technique using an island based anterolateral dartos flap. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:7122377

  2. Scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jun-Young; Han, Mi Ah; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2013-12-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi induces vasculitis leading to symptoms of systemic organ invasion including meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of scrub typhus patients to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and the therapeutic outcomes, and to determine the predictor factors. Cases were 22 patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and controls were 303 patients without meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of pneumonitis was associated with the occurrence of scrub typhus meningitis and meningoencephalitis (odds ratio [OR] 8.9; P < 0.001; confidence interval [CI] 2.9-27.2). Although appropriate antimicrobials such as doxycycline agents were administered at an early stage, meningitis or meningoencephalitis still occurred in some cases. Physicians should be aware that meningitis or meningoencephalitis may develop during appropriate drug therapy such as doxycycline. Close observation and great care are essential for patients with risk factors, particularly pneumonitis.

  3. [Amoebic liver abscess: echographic aspects].

    PubMed

    Niang, H E; Ka, M M; Badiane, M; Ba, A; Konde, L; Lamouche, P

    1994-01-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is the most frequent location of the extra-intestine amibiasis with an epidemio-endemic repartition in our areas. We are reporting in this study the main echographic patterns that can be found. 117 documents were collected and studied between 1982 and 1988 in the main hospitals of Dakar (SENEGAL). Most of the patients were young, the range of age being between 25 and 55 years old and 83% of them, were male. The diagnosis of the amoebic liver abscess was evocated on the basis of the following clinical and biological symptoms: 54.38% of painful haetomegaly, 42.10% of pleuro-pulmonary and digestive signs, 3.50% of long lasting isolated fever, non specific biological sign of inflammation, 74.57% of positive hemaglutination test. An echographic test was performed before the anti-parasitic treatment with an echotomograph PHILIPS SDR 1500 in real time using a probe of 3 MHZ. The amoebic abscess of liver was detected by the echography in all cases. The unique abscess (83.10%) was the most frequent form. It was localized in the right liver (64%) and had an heterogeneous echostructure (55.70%). The hypo-echogeneous form (36.50%) was the earlier stage of the collecting abscess. The liquid form (07.80%) was observed in the latter stages of the disease. Some difficulties to determine the amoebic abscess may appear when primitive liver cancer or pyogensus abscess are present. In these cases it is necessary to analyse the liquid of ponction to be affirmative.

  4. Meningoencephalitis due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri in ruminants in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Benterki, Mohamed Seghir; Ayachi, Ammar; Bennoune, Omar; Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal infection in most cases, caused by the amoeba flagellate Naegleria fowleri. This report describes the first cases of PAM in Algeria, in a cow and a ewe from Batna, north-eastern Algeria. The death of both ruminants occurred a week after the first clinical manifestations. The cerebrospinal fluid, after staining with May-Grünwald-Giemsa, showed the presence of amoebae cells. Histological sections revealed numerous amoebae in all parts of the brain. The presence of N. fowleri was confirmed using a species-specific real-time PCR in histological tissue sections. The two PAM cases were reported during the hot season, and the source of infection is very likely the water where the cattle came to drink. Particular attention should be focused on this type of infection in aquatic environments when the temperature is high and preventive measures must be taken to avoid the proliferation of N. fowleri. © M. Benterki et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  5. Amebic Meningoencephalitis and Keratitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    DH, Kinde H, Uzal FA, Manzer MD. Seasonal meningoencephalitis in Holstein cattle caused by Naegleria fowleri. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2005;17:605-609. 10...GS, Dubey JP. Naegleria folwleri – associated encephalitis in a cow from Costa Rica. Vet Parasitol. 2006;139: 221-223. 56. Rideout BA, Gardiner CH...15-22. 57. Visvesvara GS, De Jonckheere JF, Sriram R, et al. Isolation and molecular analysis of Naegleria fowleri from a cow brain that died of

  6. [Metalloproteinases in meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Pastuszka, Ewa; Pabin, Agata; Radkowski, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis remains a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in antibiotic treatment and critical care, mortality rate in bacterial meningoencephalitis is close to 25%. Moreover, neurological and neuropsychological sequelae emerge in up to 50% of survivors. Adverse outcome is significantly associated with events secondary to meningitis and damage of the blood-brain barrier. Several studies conducted on animals confirmed that matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP), a family of enzymes with major actions in the remodeling of exracellural matrix components facilitate this process which results in acute neurological complications. Gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9), the most complex family member, through degradation of gelatine and collagen IV play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain's inflamatory diseases (e.g. Guillian-Barre syndrom) and contribute to spreading the disease beyond the central nervous system. Infection (bacterial, viral or fungal) can lead to increased concentration and activity of metalloproteinases due to excessive enzyme's secretion or decrease in level of its natural inhibitors. A detailed analysis of those enzymes could help in developing new diagnostic and prognostic markers for meningoencephalitis and could facilitate new treatment approaches.

  7. Relapsing polychondritis with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Monica; Hu, Mengjun; Zussman, Jamie; Worswick, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease of the cartilaginous structures of the body with many systemic manifestations including meningoencephalitis (ME). We present a case of a man with RP-associated ME that was responsive to steroid treatment. An updated literature review of 7 cases of RP-associated ME also is provided. Early diagnosis of this condition may be of benefit to this select population of patients, and further research regarding the prognosis, mechanisms, and treatment of RP may be necessary in the future.

  8. Scrub Typhus Meningitis or Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jun-Young; Han, Mi Ah; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2013-01-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi induces vasculitis leading to symptoms of systemic organ invasion including meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of scrub typhus patients to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and the therapeutic outcomes, and to determine the predictor factors. Cases were 22 patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and controls were 303 patients without meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of pneumonitis was associated with the occurrence of scrub typhus meningitis and meningoencephalitis (odds ratio [OR] 8.9; P < 0.001; confidence interval [CI] 2.9–27.2). Although appropriate antimicrobials such as doxycycline agents were administered at an early stage, meningitis or meningoencephalitis still occurred in some cases. Physicians should be aware that meningitis or meningoencephalitis may develop during appropriate drug therapy such as doxycycline. Close observation and great care are essential for patients with risk factors, particularly pneumonitis. PMID:24166036

  9. Pathogenesis of amoebic encephalitis: Are the amoebae being credited to an 'inside job' done by the host immune response?

    PubMed

    Baig, Abdul Mannan

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic free living amoeba like Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Balamuthia mandrillaris are known to cause fatal "amoebic meningoencephalitis" by acquiring different route of entries to the brain. The host immune response to these protist pathogens differs from each another, as evidenced by the postmortem gross and microscopic findings from the brains of the affected patients. Cited with the expression of 'brain eating amoeba' when the infection is caused by N. fowleri, this expression is making its way into parasitology journals and books. The impression that it imparts is, as if the brain damage is substantially due to the enzymes and toxins produced by this amoeba. A detailed review of the literature, analysis of archived specimens and with our experimental assays, here we establish that with N. fowleri, Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., the infections result in an extensive brain damage that in fact is substantially caused by the host immune response rather than the amoeba. Due to the comparatively larger sizes of these pathogens and the prior exposure of the amoebal antigen to the human body, the host immune system launches an amplified response that not only breaches the blood brain barrier (BBB), but also becomes the major cause of brain damage in Amoebic meningoencephalitis. It is our understanding that for N. fowleri the host immune response is dominated by acute inflammatory cytokines and that, in cases of Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., it is the type IV hypersensitivity reaction that fundamentally not only contributes to disruption and leakiness of the blood brain barrier (BBB) but also causes the neuronal damage. The further intensification of brain damage is done by toxins and enzymes secreted by the amoeba, which causes the irreversible brain damage.

  10. [Mechanism of Cryptococcus Meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are fungal pathogens that cause diseases in humans. Cryptococcal species mainly enter the body by inhalation and in most cases are eliminated by host defense mechanisms. Some cases, however, progress to pneumonia and subsequent dissemination of the infection to the central nervous system (CNS), leading to meningoencephalitis. Cryptococcus can cross the blood-brain barrier transcellularly, paracellularly and through infected phagocytes (the Trojan horse mechanism). The reason for the tropism of Cryptococcus to the CNS could be partially explained by the abundance of inositol in the brain, which causes the hyaluronic acid in fungal cells to bind to host CD44 receptors. There are differences in the clinical characteristics of C. neoformans and C. gattii. HIV infection is the most common risk factor for cryptococcosis due to C. neoformans, whereas C. gattii infection with CNS involvement is frequently found in otherwise healthy individuals exposed to plant propagules found in tropical and subtropical regions. As the virulence traits of C. neoformans contributing to CNS disease, high macrophage uptake and laccase activity are associated with the fungal burden and the rate of clearance of the infection from the brain. Recent reports suggested that the C. gattii VGII strain suppresses host immune responses in the lung and causes more lung infections than CNS diseases. Furthermore, the anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies are a risk factor for CNS infection by the C. gattii VGI strain. To understand the mechanism by which Cryptococcus causes CNS disease, it is important to consider the specific characteristics of the species and the molecular types.

  11. Discovery of new intracellular pathogens by amoebal coculture and amoebal enrichment approaches.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, Nicolas; Aeby, Sébastien; Lienard, Julia; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-10-27

    Intracellular pathogens such as legionella, mycobacteria and Chlamydia-like organisms are difficult to isolate because they often grow poorly or not at all on selective media that are usually used to cultivate bacteria. For this reason, many of these pathogens were discovered only recently or following important outbreaks. These pathogens are often associated with amoebae, which serve as host-cell and allow the survival and growth of the bacteria. We intend here to provide a demonstration of two techniques that allow isolation and characterization of intracellular pathogens present in clinical or environmental samples: the amoebal coculture and the amoebal enrichment. Amoebal coculture allows recovery of intracellular bacteria by inoculating the investigated sample onto an amoebal lawn that can be infected and lysed by the intracellular bacteria present in the sample. Amoebal enrichment allows recovery of amoebae present in a clinical or environmental sample. This can lead to discovery of new amoebal species but also of new intracellular bacteria growing specifically in these amoebae. Together, these two techniques help to discover new intracellular bacteria able to grow in amoebae. Because of their ability to infect amoebae and resist phagocytosis, these intracellular bacteria might also escape phagocytosis by macrophages and thus, be pathogenic for higher eukaryotes.

  12. Discovery of New Intracellular Pathogens by Amoebal Coculture and Amoebal Enrichment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier, Nicolas; Aeby, Sébastien; Lienard, Julia; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as legionella, mycobacteria and Chlamydia-like organisms are difficult to isolate because they often grow poorly or not at all on selective media that are usually used to cultivate bacteria. For this reason, many of these pathogens were discovered only recently or following important outbreaks. These pathogens are often associated with amoebae, which serve as host-cell and allow the survival and growth of the bacteria. We intend here to provide a demonstration of two techniques that allow isolation and characterization of intracellular pathogens present in clinical or environmental samples: the amoebal coculture and the amoebal enrichment. Amoebal coculture allows recovery of intracellular bacteria by inoculating the investigated sample onto an amoebal lawn that can be infected and lysed by the intracellular bacteria present in the sample. Amoebal enrichment allows recovery of amoebae present in a clinical or environmental sample. This can lead to discovery of new amoebal species but also of new intracellular bacteria growing specifically in these amoebae. Together, these two techniques help to discover new intracellular bacteria able to grow in amoebae. Because of their ability to infect amoebae and resist phagocytosis, these intracellular bacteria might also escape phagocytosis by macrophages and thus, be pathogenic for higher eukaryotes. PMID:24192667

  13. [Amoebic liver abscess: observations in seven patients].

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Gopegui, Enrique; Serra, Teresa; Leyes, María; Delibes, Carla; Salvá, Francisco; Pérez, José L

    2004-11-01

    The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with amoebic liver abscess are described. Laboratory, clinical, and epidemiological records of all patients with amoebic liver abscess diagnosed from 1991 to 2002 at Hospital Universitario Son Dureta (Palma de Mallorca, Spain), a 980-bed referral hospital in the Balearic Islands, were retrospectively reviewed. Seven patients were diagnosed with amoebic liver abscesses and all were residing in Mallorca. Two patients had developed the disease after travelling to endemic areas (India and Thailand), and another, from Ecuador, had been diagnosed four months after coming to Spain from his country of origin. In the remaining four patients, no apparent link with endemic areas was observed, nor was travel out of Spain recorded. Therefore, these cases were thought to have originated in Spain, though this circumstance could not be conclusively proven. Two of the seven patients had human inmunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. An amoebic etiology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of liver abscess in our area, even in the absence of a clear related epidemiological history.

  14. [Recurrent purulent bacterial meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Janeczko, J; Pogorzelska, E; Lipowski, D; Przyjałkowski, W; Rzadkiewicz, E

    2001-01-01

    During the period of 25 years there were 55 patients treated in our Institute because of recurrent purulent bacterial meningoencephalitis(rpbme). This group consisted of 42 males (76%) and 13 (24%) females, the prevalent number (53%) of patients being under 21 years of age. The diagnosis of rpbme was based on the commonly accepted criteria and confirmed by the laboratory results of CSF examination. The cause of the recurrences was established considering the skull X-ray examination, CT and MRI. The evaluation of the clinical status was based on the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). During the first hospitalisation, severe or critic clinical status was noted in 42 patients (76%) and moderate in 13 (24%). The subsequent recurrences were mostly moderate, rarely severe or mild. The number of recurrences varied from 1 to 9. During the first hospitalisation, the etiologic factor was detected in 39 patients (71%), i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae in 28 (51%), Neisseria meningitidis in 8 (14%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in 2 and 1 patients respectively. In 37 patients (67%) rpbme developed following cranial trauma, in 18 cases (33%) with single or comminuted fractures of the anterior cranial fossa (in 4 cases accompanied by CSF nasal exsudate). In 4 it followed neurosurgical intervention, in 3 it accompanied recurrent purulent highmorities, in 1 case--after removal of the nasal polyps and subsequent CSF nasal exsudate, and in 1 patient with recurrent mastoiditis. In 6 cases (11%) the cause of the recurrences remained unelucidated. The clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic difficulties and the causative treatment of rpbme are discussed. In the authors' opinion, surgical treatment of the communication between the CSF and the external environment prevents the recurrences and is the only successful way of treatment. Special attention is drawn to the great diagnostic value of CT and MRI. The use of other modern techniques, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET

  15. [Granulomatous amoebic meningoencephalitis by Balamuthia mandrillaris: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Cuevas P, Mónica; Smoje P, Gabriela; Jofré M, Leonor; Ledermann D, Walter; Noemí H, Isabel; Berwart C, Francisco; Latorre L, Juan J; González B, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    The free-living amebas Naegleria and Acanthamoeba are recognized as causal agents of central nervous system infections. Recently a third free-living ameba, Balamuthia mandrillaris, was identified as the causal agent of granulomatous encephalitis in humans. We report a case of Balamuthia encephalitis in an immunocompetent school-age girl who presented cutaneous lesions that compromised the central portion of the face. The skin biopsy revealed granulomatous lesion with positive PCR for non-tuberculous Mycobacterium. We started treatment for atypical extrapulmonary mycobacteriosis. Nevertheless, the child was readmitted six months later, with progressive neurological involvement, dying about one year after the onset of cutaneous symptoms. The brain necropsy showed the presence of B. mandrillaris cysts and trophozoites. Balamuthia mandrillaris infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with chronic granulomatous disease with neurologic symptoms.

  16. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a cow.

    PubMed

    Rissi, D R; Barros, C S L

    2013-09-01

    An 18-month-old Charolais cow developed depression and drooling and was submitted for necropsy after euthanasia. The cow was 1 of 50 moved between 2 farms approximately 5 days before the onset of clinical disease. Gross findings included swollen and hemorrhagic areas of malacia in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Microscopically there was a necrotizing meningoencephalitis with intranuclear astrocytic and neuronal eosinophilic viral inclusions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cerebral cortex as well as in the basal nuclei and thalamus. The gross and microscopic findings were consistent with necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by bovine herpesvirus (BHV-1 or BHV-5), and the diagnosis was confirmed by detection of bovine herpesviral antigen on fresh samples of brain via fluorescent antibody test using a monoclonal antibody against BHV-1 glycoprotein C.

  17. Management of Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Womack, Tanea; Bohlmeyer, Teri; Sellers, Brenda; Hays, Allison; Patel, Kalpesh; Lizarazo, Jairo; Lockhart, Shawn R; Siddiqui, Wajid; Marr, Kieren A

    2015-03-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. By inhalation and subsequent pulmonary infection, it may disseminate to the CNS and cause meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Most cases occur in immunosuppressed hosts, including patients with HIV/AIDS, patients receiving immunosuppressing drugs, and solid organ transplant recipients. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in individuals with apparently healthy immune systems. A growing number of cases are caused by C gattii, with infections occurring in both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals. In the majority of documented cases, treatment of C gattii infection of the CNS requires aggressive management of raised intracranial pressure along with standard antifungal therapy. Early cerebrospinal fluid evacuation is often needed through placement of a percutaneous lumbar drain or ventriculostomy. Furthermore, pharmacological immunosuppression with a high dose of dexamethasone is sometimes needed to ameliorate a persistently increased inflammatory response and to reduce intracranial pressure. In this Grand Round, we present the case of an otherwise healthy adolescent female patient, who, despite aggressive management, succumbed to C gattii meningoencephalitis. We also present a review of the existing literature and discuss optimum clinical management of meningoencephalitis caused by C gattii.

  18. Management of Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Womack, Tanea; Bohlmeyer, Teri; Sellers, Brenda; Hays, Allison; Patel, Kalpesh; Lizarazo, Jairo; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Siddiqui, Wajid; Marr, Kieren A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. By inhalation and subsequent pulmonary infection, it may disseminate to the CNS and cause meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Most cases occur in immunosuppressed hosts, including patients with HIV/AIDS, patients receiving immunosuppressing drugs, and solid organ transplant recipients. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in individuals with apparently healthy immune systems. A growing number of cases are caused by C. gattii, with infections occurring in both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals. In the majority of documented cases, treatment of C. gattii infection of the CNS requires aggressive management of raised intracranial pressure along with standard antifungal therapy. Early cerebrospinal fluid evacuation is often needed through placement of a percutaneous lumbar drain or ventriculostomy. Furthermore, pharmacological immunosuppression with a high dose of dexamethasone is sometimes needed to ameliorate a persistently increased inflammatory response and to reduce intracranial pressure. In this Grand Round, we present the case of an otherwise healthy adolescent female patient, who, despite aggressive management, succumbed to C. gattii meningoencephalitis. We also present a review of the existing literature and discuss optimum clinical management of meningoencephalitis caused by C. gattii. PMID:25467646

  19. Balamuthia mandrillaris Encephalitis: Survival of a Child With Severe Meningoencephalitis and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Paul; Burke, Christopher; McCrossin, David; Campbell, Robert; Cherian, Sarah; Shahab, Mohammad Shekeeb; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Nourse, Clare

    2014-03-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris causes granulomatous amoebic encephalitis, which is frequently fatal. There are few reports of survival in children. A 4-year-old child developed severe meningoencephalitis with multiple intracranial ring-enhancing lesions. Empiric therapy was commenced after a biopsy was performed, and the patient had a good clinical response. Molecular testing and indirect immunofluorescence later confirmed the diagnosis of Balamuthia encephalitis. Diagnosis of Balamuthia encephalitis is often delayed. The literature is reviewed with particular reference to reported survival. Prompt tissue diagnosis and initiation of therapy are common features among survivors. In previous reports, miltefosine was not used to treat children, but it was well tolerated in this case and should be considered as a therapeutic option.

  20. [COMPLICATED AMOEBIC APENDICITIS.REPORT OF A CASE

    PubMed

    Casavilca Zambrano, Sandro; Gomez Anchante, Victor; Cisneros Gallegos, Eduardo

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of acute abdomen that is operated with the presumptive diagnosis of complicated acute appendicitis. In the histologic examination we make the diagnosis of complicated amoebic appendicitis. We discuss clinical manifestations and histopathologic findings of this unusual presentation of amoebic infection.

  1. Virus meningo-encephalitis in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Vesenjak-Zmijanac, J.; Bedjanič, M.; Rus, S.; Kmet, J.

    1955-01-01

    An organism was isolated from the blood of a patient clinically diagnosed as suffering from virus meningo-encephalitis; the organism causes illness and death in white mice. The antigen prepared from the brains of mice infected with this organism fixes complement with sera from typical cases of virus meningo-encephalitis. From its biological and serological characteristics, the isolated organism appears to belong to the group of neurotropic viruses and to be the causative agent of virus meningo-encephalitis in Slovenia. PMID:14378996

  2. Amoebic forms of Blastocystis spp. - evidence for a pathogenic role.

    PubMed

    Rajamanikam, Arutchelvan; Govind, Suresh Kumar

    2013-10-11

    Blastocystis spp. are one of the most prevalent parasites isolated from patients suffering from diarrhea, flatulence, constipation and vomiting. It's pathogenicity and pathophysiology remains controversial to date. Protease activity and amoebic forms have been reported previously in symptomatic isolates but there has been no conclusive evidence provided to correlate the protease activity and any specific life cycle stage of the parasite thus far. Symptomatic isolates with amoebic form were tested for protease activity and compared with symptomatic and asymptomatic isolates without amoebic form for 10 days culture period. The present study demonstrates an elevated protease activity in cultures having a higher percentage of amoebic forms seen in symptomatic isolates. The growth curve demonstrated a significantly (p < 0.05) higher average number of parasite counts in asymptomatic compared to symptomatic isolates. Symptomatic isolates showed amoebic forms with percentages ranging from 5% to 17%. Elevated protease activity was demonstrated in isolates that had higher percentages of amoebic forms with intense bands at higher molecular weight proteases (60 - 100 kDa). As days of culture proceeded, the protease quantification also showed a steady increase. This study elucidates a correlation between protease activity and percentage of amoebic forms. The finding implies that these forms could play a role in exacerbation of intestinal symptoms during Blastocystis spp. infection.

  3. Amoebic forms of Blastocystis spp. - evidence for a pathogenic role

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Blastocystis spp. are one of the most prevalent parasites isolated from patients suffering from diarrhea, flatulence, constipation and vomiting. It’s pathogenicity and pathophysiology remains controversial to date. Protease activity and amoebic forms have been reported previously in symptomatic isolates but there has been no conclusive evidence provided to correlate the protease activity and any specific life cycle stage of the parasite thus far. Methods Symptomatic isolates with amoebic form were tested for protease activity and compared with symptomatic and asymptomatic isolates without amoebic form for 10 days culture period. Results The present study demonstrates an elevated protease activity in cultures having a higher percentage of amoebic forms seen in symptomatic isolates. The growth curve demonstrated a significantly (p < 0.05) higher average number of parasite counts in asymptomatic compared to symptomatic isolates. Symptomatic isolates showed amoebic forms with percentages ranging from 5% to 17%. Elevated protease activity was demonstrated in isolates that had higher percentages of amoebic forms with intense bands at higher molecular weight proteases (60 – 100 kDa). As days of culture proceeded, the protease quantification also showed a steady increase. Conclusion This study elucidates a correlation between protease activity and percentage of amoebic forms. The finding implies that these forms could play a role in exacerbation of intestinal symptoms during Blastocystis spp. infection. PMID:24499467

  4. [Complications of purulent meningoencephalitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rubin, A N; Shcherbuk, Yu A; Lyapin, A P

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of 19 cases of meningoencephalitis was made in infants aged under one year old. The disease was complicated by chronic subdural hematomas in 11 patients and by hydrocephalus in 8 patients. The article presents the strategy, treatment results and diagnostic procedures volume. Based on their work, the authors made a conclusion that meningoencephalitis required an emergency neurosurgical interference in order to avoid complications in convalescence period.

  5. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from pluvial floods by amoebal coculture.

    PubMed

    Schalk, J A C; Docters van Leeuwen, A E; Lodder, W J; de Man, H; Euser, S; den Boer, J W; de Roda Husman, A M

    2012-06-01

    Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria were isolated by amoebal coculture from pluvial floods after intense rainfall and from water collected at sewage treatment plants. Several isolated L. pneumophila strains belonged to sequence types that have been previously identified in patients.

  6. Risk of fatal amebic meningoencephalitis from waterborne Naegleria fowleri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, William H.; Brenniman, Gary R.

    1989-03-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal disease of the central nervous system caused primarily by the free-living ameba, Naegleria fowleri. PAM is primarily associated with swimming in various types of fresh water. World literature was reviewed in order to derive a risk analysis model that would be helpful in the management of PAM. The management of PAM risk is difficult, and the prevention of PAM is almost impossible. However, it is reassuring that the cases and risks estimated by the risk model are usually small, with individual annual risk on the order of 10-6.

  7. Sarcocystis-associated meningoencephalitis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is rare in raptors. An adult female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with progressive neurological signs was euthanized after several months of treatment. The predominant histological lesion was lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis involving the ...

  8. Unexpected postmortem diagnosis of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent child

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Karimi, Mehran; Navabii, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba spp. is a rare opportunistic infection, difficult to diagnose and treat, which causes death in almost all cases. Here, the authors report a 5-year-old Iranian immunocompetent girl who died of fulminant acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in Iran. PMID:22679147

  9. Aseptic meningoencephalitis mimicking transient ischaemic attacks.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, V; Milionis, H; Cordier, M; Eskandari, A; Ntaios, G; Michel, P

    2013-04-01

    To highlight meningoencephalitis as a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) mimic and suggest clinical clues for differential diagnosis. This was an observational study of consecutively admitted patients over a 9.75-year period presenting as TIAs at a stroke unit. A total of 790 patients with TIAs and seven with TIA-like symptoms but a final diagnosis of viral meningoencephalitis were recognised. The most frequent presentations of meningoencephalitis patients were acute sensory hemisyndrome (6) and cognitive deficits (5). Signs of meningeal irritation were minor or absent on presentation. Predominantly lymphocytic pleocytosis, hyperproteinorachia and a normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum glucose index (in 5 out of 6 documented patients) were present. Meningeal thickening on a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was the only abnormal imaging finding. Six patients received initial vascular treatment; one thrombolysed. Finally, six patients were treated with antivirals and/or antibiotics. Although neither bacterial nor viral agents were identified on extensive testing, viral meningoencephalitis was the best explanation for all clinical and laboratory findings. Aseptic meningoencephalitis should be part of the differential diagnosis in patients presenting as TIA. The threshold for a lumbar puncture in such patients should be set individually and take into account the presence of mild meningeal symptoms, age and other risk factors for vascular disease, the results of brain imaging and the basic diagnostic work-up for a stroke source.

  10. Unique topographic distribution of greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Terzo, Eloisa; McConnell, J Fraser; Shiel, Robert E; McAllister, Hester; Behr, Sebastien; Priestnall, Simon L; Smith, Ken C; Nolan, Catherine M; Callanan, John J

    2012-01-01

    Greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis is an idiopathic breed-associated fatal meningoencephalitis with lesions usually occurring within the rostral cerebrum. This disorder can only be confirmed by postmortem examination, with a diagnosis based upon the unique topography of inflammatory lesions. Our purpose was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease. Four Greyhounds with confirmed Greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis were evaluated by MR imaging. Lesions predominantly affected the olfactory lobes and bulbs, frontal, and frontotemporal cortical gray matter, and caudate nuclei bilaterally. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2 weighted spin-echo (T2W) sequences were most useful to assess the nature, severity, extension, and topographic pattern of lesions. Lesions were predominantly T2-hyperintense and T1-isointense with minimal or absent contrast enhancement.

  11. Imported amoebic liver abscess in France.

    PubMed

    Cordel, Hugues; Prendki, Virginie; Madec, Yoann; Houze, Sandrine; Paris, Luc; Bourée, Patrice; Caumes, Eric; Matheron, Sophie; Bouchaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, amoebic liver abscess (ALA) can be found in individuals in non-endemic areas, especially in foreign-born travelers. We performed a retrospective analysis of ALA in patients admitted to French hospitals between 2002 and 2006. We compared imported ALA cases in European and foreign-born patients and assessed the factors associated with abscess size using a logistic regression model. We investigated 90 ALA cases. Patient median age was 41. The male:female ratio was 3.5:1. We were able to determine the origin for 75 patients: 38 were European-born and 37 foreign-born. With respect to clinical characteristics, no significant difference was observed between European and foreign-born patients except a longer lag time between the return to France after traveling abroad and the onset of symptoms for foreign-born. Factors associated with an abscess size of more than 69 mm were being male (OR = 11.25, p<0.01), aged more than 41 years old (OR = 3.63, p = 0.02) and being an immigrant (OR = 11.56, p = 0.03). Percutaneous aspiration was not based on initial abscess size but was carried out significantly more often on patients who were admitted to surgical units (OR = 10, p<0.01). The median time to abscess disappearance for 24 ALA was 7.5 months. In this study on imported ALA was one of the largest worldwide in terms of the number of cases included males, older patients and foreign-born patients presented with larger abscesses, suggesting that hormonal and immunological factors may be involved in ALA physiopathology. The long lag time before developing ALA after returning to a non-endemic area must be highlighted to clinicians so that they will consider Entamoeba histolytica as a possible pathogen of liver abscesses more often.

  12. Fulminant amoebic enteritis that developed in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Goto, Mayako; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-06-25

    We present a case of a 30-year-old postpartum woman who delivered by caesarean section at 34 weeks. On postoperative day 9, she was admitted to our hospital in shock. Emergency abdominal surgery was performed. Massive purulent ascites collected in the abdominal cavity and was associated with intestinal necrosis, which extended from the ascending colon to one-third of the descending colon. The necrotic lesion was excised, and an artificial anus was constructed at the ileum end. A histological finding on the 15th day indicated the possibility of amoebic enteritis, and the patient was started on metronidazole therapy. The diarrhoea improved dramatically after metronidazole treatment was started. The patient was able to walk unassisted on the 45th day and was subsequently discharged. Amoebic enteritis has been thought to be epidemic in developing countries, but today, the incidence of amoebic enteritis as a sexually transmitted disease is increasing in developed countries.

  13. Protection against Naegleria fowleri infection in mice immunized with Cry1Ac plus amoebic lysates is dependent on the STAT6 Th2 response.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Yepez, M; Rojas-Hernandez, S; Rodriguez-Monroy, M A; Terrazas, L I; Moreno-Fierros, L

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that intranasal administration of Cry1Ac protoxin alone or in combination with amoebic lysates increases protection against Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis in mice. Those results suggested that both antibody responses and innate immune mechanisms may be participating in the protective effects observed. The present study was aimed to investigate whether the STAT6-induced Th2 immune response is essential for the resistance to N. fowleri infection, conferred by immunization with amoebic lysates plus Cry1Ac. STAT6-deficient (STAT6-/-) and wild-type (STAT6+/+) BALB/c mice were immunized by the intranasal route with a combination of N. fowleri lysates plus Cry1Ac, and subsequently challenged with lethal doses of N. fowleri trophozoites. STAT6+/+ mice displayed 100% protection, while no protection was observed in STAT6-/- mice. Significantly higher titres of Th2-associated IgG1 as well as interleukin-4 (IL-4) were found in STAT6+/+ mice, whereas in STAT6-/- mice significantly more IL-12 and IFN-gamma as well as significantly higher titres of Th1-associated IgG2a were detected. Thus, whereas protected STAT6+/+-immunized mice elicited a Th-2 type inclined immune response that produced predominantly humoral immunity, unprotected STAT6-/- mice exhibited a polarized Th1 type cellular response. These findings suggest that the STAT6-signalling pathway is critical for defence against N. fowleri infection.

  14. First report of Entamoeba histolytica infection from Timor-Leste--acute amoebic colitis and concurrent late development of amoebic liver abscess in returned travellers to Australia.

    PubMed

    Nourse, Clare B; Robson, Jennifer M; Whitby, Michael R; Francis, Josh R

    2016-02-01

    This communication reports invasive amoebic colitis and late onset amoebic liver abscess in three members of a group of 12 Australian travellers to Timor-Leste (TL). This is the first report of Entamoeba histolytica infection from TL. Clinicians in Australia need to consider amoebiasis in the differential diagnosis in travellers returning with colitis, abdominal pain and fever. Presentation with amoebic liver abscess months after exposure is rare but should be suspected in symptomatic individuals with a relevant history of travel.

  15. Imported Amoebic Liver Abscess in France

    PubMed Central

    Cordel, Hugues; Prendki, Virginie; Madec, Yoann; Houze, Sandrine; Paris, Luc; Bourée, Patrice; Caumes, Eric; Matheron, Sophie; Bouchaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, amoebic liver abscess (ALA) can be found in individuals in non-endemic areas, especially in foreign-born travelers. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of ALA in patients admitted to French hospitals between 2002 and 2006. We compared imported ALA cases in European and foreign-born patients and assessed the factors associated with abscess size using a logistic regression model. Results We investigated 90 ALA cases. Patient median age was 41. The male:female ratio was 3.5∶1. We were able to determine the origin for 75 patients: 38 were European-born and 37 foreign-born. With respect to clinical characteristics, no significant difference was observed between European and foreign-born patients except a longer lag time between the return to France after traveling abroad and the onset of symptoms for foreign-born. Factors associated with an abscess size of more than 69 mm were being male (OR = 11.25, p<0.01), aged more than 41 years old (OR = 3.63, p = 0.02) and being an immigrant (OR = 11.56, p = 0.03). Percutaneous aspiration was not based on initial abscess size but was carried out significantly more often on patients who were admitted to surgical units (OR = 10, p<0.01). The median time to abscess disappearance for 24 ALA was 7.5 months. Conclusions/Significance In this study on imported ALA was one of the largest worldwide in terms of the number of cases included males, older patients and foreign-born patients presented with larger abscesses, suggesting that hormonal and immunological factors may be involved in ALA physiopathology. The long lag time before developing ALA after returning to a non-endemic area must be highlighted to clinicians so that they will consider Entamoeba histolytica as a possible pathogen of liver abscesses more often. PMID:23951372

  16. Entamoeba histolytica antigenic protein detected in pus aspirates from patients with amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Othman, Nurulhasanah; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Yahya, Maya Mazuwin; Leow, Voon Meng; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and is endemic in many underdeveloped countries. We investigated antigenic E. histolytica proteins in liver abscess aspirates using proteomics approach. Pus samples were first tested by real-time PCR to confirm the presence of E. histolytica DNA and the corresponding serum samples tested for E. histolytica-specific IgG by a commercial ELISA. Proteins were extracted from three and one pool(s) of pus samples from ALA and PLA (pyogenic liver abscess) patients respectively, followed by analysis using isoelectric focussing, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Unpurified pooled serum samples from infected hamsters and pooled human amoebic-specific IgG were used as primary antibodies. The antigenic protein band was excised from the gel, digested and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF and LC-MS/MS. The results using both primary antibodies showed an antigenic protein band of ∼14kDa. Based on the mass spectrum analysis, putative tyrosine kinase is the most probable identification of the antigenic band.

  17. Prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín; Morán-Mendoza, Onofre; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel F; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Mandeville, Peter B; Tapia-Pérez, J Humberto; Sánchez-Reyna, Martín; Sánchez-Rodríguez, José Juan; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify the variables that predict the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses. Methods We prospectively carried out a case–control study on a cohort of patients who had been diagnosed with amoebic liver abscesses using clinical, ultrasonic, and serologic methods. Patients with pyogenic abscesses, negative ELISA tests for amoebiasis, immunosuppression status, or previous abdominal surgery were excluded. All patients received metronidazole, and those who demonstrated 4 days of unfavorable clinical responses received percutaneous or surgical draining of the abscess. Demographic, laboratory, and ultrasonographic characteristics were assessed as prognostic indications of failure. Results Of 40 patients with amoebic liver abscess, 24 (mean age: 36.7±11.2 years) responded to medical treatment and 16 (41.8±11.6 years) required drainage, including 14 patients who underwent percutaneous drainage and two patients who required surgery. The albumin level, abscess volume, abscess diameter, and alkaline phosphatase level were all statistically significant (P<0.05) on the bivariate analysis. The highest (>99%) sensitivity and negative predictive value were observed for an abscess volume >500 ml and diameter >10 cm, while the best specificity and positive predictive value were achieved with the combination of low serum albumin level, high alkaline phosphatase level, and large abscess volume or diameter. Conclusions The prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses include low albumin, high alkaline phosphatase, and large abscess volume or diameter. The combination of these variables is a useful and easy tool for determining appropriate therapy. PMID:23265424

  18. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from Pluvial Floods by Amoebal Coculture

    PubMed Central

    Docters van Leeuwen, A. E.; Lodder, W. J.; de Man, H.; Euser, S.; den Boer, J. W.; de Roda Husman, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria were isolated by amoebal coculture from pluvial floods after intense rainfall and from water collected at sewage treatment plants. Several isolated L. pneumophila strains belonged to sequence types that have been previously identified in patients. PMID:22467504

  19. Insight into cross-talk between intra-amoebal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Amoebae are phagocytic protists where genetic exchanges might take place between amoeba-resistant bacteria. These amoebal pathogens are able to escape the phagocytic behaviour of their host. They belong to different bacterial phyla and often show a larger genome size than human-infecting pathogens. This characteristic is proposed to be the result of frequent gene exchanges with other bacteria that share a sympatric lifestyle and contrasts with the genome reduction observed among strict human pathogens. Results We sequenced the genome of a new amoebal pathogen, Legionella drancourtii, and compared its gene content to that of a Chlamydia-related bacterium, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae. Phylogenetic reconstructions identified seven potential horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) between the two amoeba-resistant bacteria, including a complete operon of four genes that encodes an ABC-type transporter. These comparisons pinpointed potential cases of gene exchange between P. acanthamoebae and Legionella pneumophila, as well as gene exchanges between other members of the Legionellales and Chlamydiales orders. Moreover, nine cases represent possible HGTs between representatives from the Legionellales or Chlamydiales and members of the Rickettsiales order. Conclusions This study identifies numerous gene exchanges between intracellular Legionellales and Chlamydiales bacteria, which could preferentially occur within common inclusions in their amoebal hosts. Therefore it contributes to improve our knowledge on the intra-amoebal gene properties associated to their specific lifestyle. PMID:22047552

  20. Tinidazole in treatment of amoebic liver abscess in children.

    PubMed Central

    Scragg, J N; Proctor, E M

    1977-01-01

    Tinidazole as a single drug therapy given in a single dose daily for 5 or 3 days was put to rigorous test in malnourished children. Of 25 children with amoebic liver abscess, 23 were cured. The 2 remaining cases required surgical drainage followed by other amoebicides, one subsequently dying from complicating bronchopneumonia. PMID:869571

  1. Pituitary tumor apoplexy presenting as infective meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Cagnin, Annachiara; Marcante, Andrea; Orvieto, Enrico; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    We report on a case of a 80-year-old man who developed progressive drowsiness with headache, fever and signs of meningeal irritation 2 days after a head trauma. Suspecting an infective meningoencephalitis, the patient was treated with wide spectrum antibiotic and antiviral therapy. Brain CT scan revealed a previously unknown pituitary expansive lesion. A brain MRI study confirmed the presence of an intrasellar lesion, which presented remarkable contrast ring enhancement, and showed non-specific inflammatory tissue on the clivus, possibly responsible of the clinical features of sterile meningitis. A biopsy proven diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy was made. This case highlights MRI as an important investigation for earlier recognition of pituitary apoplexy that can present with a clinical picture resembling an infective meningoencephalitis.

  2. Zika Virus Meningoencephalitis in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Schwartzmann, Pedro V; Ramalho, Leandra N Z; Neder, Luciano; Vilar, Fernando C; Ayub-Ferreira, Sílvia M; Romeiro, Marília F; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Dos Santos, Antonio C; Schmidt, André; Figueiredo, Luiz T M; Arena, Ross; Simões, Marcus V

    2017-03-01

    The World Health Organization considers the Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas a global public health emergency. The neurologic complications due to ZIKV infection comprise microcephaly, meningoencephalitis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. We describe a fatal case of an adult patient receiving an immunosuppressive regimen following heart transplant. The patient was admitted with acute neurologic impairment and experienced progressive hemodynamic instability and mental deterioration that finally culminated in death. At autopsy, a pseudotumoral form of ZIKV meningoencephalitis was confirmed. Zika virus infection was documented by reverse trancriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence and electron microscopy of the brain parenchyma and cerebral spinal fluid. The sequencing of the viral genome in this patient confirmed a Brazilian ZIKV strain. In this case, central nervous system involvement and ZIKV propagation to other organs in a disseminated pattern is quite similar to that observed in other fatal Flaviviridae viral infections.

  3. Fatal meningoencephalitis due to Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Kwong, K L; Que, T L; Wong, S N; So, K T

    1997-12-01

    We report the first case of fatal anthrax meningoencephalitis in Hong Kong over the past 60 years. A 13 year-old boy presented with right lower quadrant pain, diarrhoea and progressive headache. Lumbar puncture yielded gram positive bacilli initially thought to be Bacillus cereus, a contaminant. He was treated with ampicillin and cefotaxime, but died 3 days after hospitalization. The organism isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid was later identified as Bacillus anthracis.

  4. Neonate with Mycoplasma hominis meningoencephalitis given moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Wildenbeest, Joanne G; Said, Ines; Jaeger, Bregje; van Hest, Reinier M; van de Beek, Diederik; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2016-11-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a commensal organism in the genitourinary tract that can cause life-threatening CNS infections in neonates after intrauterine infection or through vertical transmission during birth. We present a case of an 11-day-old neonate presenting with fever and supporting laboratory evidence of a CNS infection. No systemic maternal infection or maternal genitourinary tract infection occurred at the time of delivery. Empirical treatment was initiated, consisting of amoxicillin, cefotaxime, and aciclovir. After clinical deterioration, 16S ribosomal DNA PCR in cerebrospinal fluid detected M hominis, antibiotic treatment was switched to moxifloxacin, and pharmacokinetic data were obtained. This Grand Round illustrates the challenges that exist in the diagnosis and treatment of M hominis meningoencephalitis: bacterial cultures are often negative and recommended empirical antimicrobials do not provide adequate antimicrobial coverage. Optimal antimicrobial treatment regimens for M hominis meningoencephalitis are unknown. Although we describe successful treatment of a neonate with a complicated M hominis meningoencephalitis with moxifloxacin, caution with fluoroquinolone monotherapy (including moxifloxacin) has to be taken into account because resistance to fluoroquinolones has previously been described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. HSV-2 meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent young man: what is the pathogenesis and what is the treatment?

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gerlinger, Mp; Greffe, S; Meffre, A; Grenet, J; Au, S; Bojanova, M; Rouveix, E; Rozenberg, F

    2015-08-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is rarely caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) after the neonatal period. The pathogenesis of HSV-2 encephalitis is not known and its treatment has not been discussed. We report a case of mild meningoencephalitis secondary to HSV-2 primary infection after sexual risk behaviour in a healthy young man. The diagnosis was established upon clinical, biological and electroencephalographic criteria. Aciclovir treatment led to rapid clinical improvement. This case highlights HSV-2 as a rare cause of meningoencephalitis, and questions the management of this rare manifestation of HSV-2 infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Amoebic liver abscess in a patient initially diagnosed with pneumonia: case report and discussion of relevant literature].

    PubMed

    Kurt, Özgür; Aktaş, Neslihan; Çalışkan, Can; Karatuna, Onur; Aygün, Hande; Akyar, Işın

    2015-03-01

    In one-third of the patients with amoebiasis, amoebic liver abscess (ALA) may occur after the penetration of amoebic trophozoites through the intestinal wall. ALA is seen mostly among men aged 20-45 years with a serious clinical outcome, with fever and abdominal pain on the right upper quadrant. Most patients have no recent history of amoebic colitis; indeed, they have neither gastrointestinal complaints nor Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) cysts/trophozoites in their stools. Therefore, ultrasonography and serology are primary in ALA diagnosis, while searching for E. histolytica DNA in abscess fluid using PCR has been preferred as an effective and reliable method, lately. Early antimicrobial therapy is effective; however, for cases irresponsive to therapy after 72 hours and with large abscess, drainage or surgical intervention is indicated. If left untreated, ALA may disseminate to other organs and cause death. The data concerning the extra-intestinal manifestations of amebiasis in Turkey are limited. Here, a rare case of a young man with an initial diagnosis of pneumonia followed by the identification of ALA after radiological interventions and laboratory tests is presented and the relevant literature is discussed.

  7. Inflammation, complement, ischemia and amoebic survival in acute experimental amoebic liver abscesses in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Olivos-García, A; Nequiz-Avendaño, M; Tello, E; Martínez, R D; González-Canto, A; López-Vancell, R; García de León, M C; Montfort, I; Pérez-Tamayo, R

    2004-08-01

    We have examined the role of inflammatory cells, ischemia and serum complement on the development of acute experimental amoebic liver abscess in hamsters (AEALAH). In hamsters made leukopenic by whole body radiation (800 rad) and daily intraperitoneal glycogen injections, the absence of inflammatory cells and liver tissue damage surrounding the parasites resulted in their rapid (24 h) disappearance from the liver, which showed no lesions. Focal liver ischemia, always present in control AEALAH with inflammation and tissue destruction, was reproduced in radiated hamsters by injection of amoebae mixed with Superdex microspheres, but again in the absence of inflammation, amoebae caused no liver damage and disappeared in 24 h. In hamsters made hypocomplementemic by injection of purified cobra venom factor (CVF), amoebae caused AEALA indistinguishable from controls, but in leukopenic + hypocomplementemic hamsters, amoebae were unable to produce lesions and disappeared from the liver in 48 h. We conclude that inflammation and tissue damage are required for the survival of amoebae in AEALAH and for the progression of the experimental disease.

  8. Taking a bite: Amoebic trogocytosis in Entamoeba histolytica and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Katherine S

    2015-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a diarrheal pathogen with the ability to cause profound host tissue damage. This organism possesses contact-dependent cell killing activity, which is likely to be a major contributor to tissue damage. E. histolytica trophozoites were recently shown to ingest fragments of living human cells. It was demonstrated that this process, termed amoebic trogocytosis, contributes to cell killing. Recent advances in ex vivo and 3-D cell culture approaches have shed light on mechanisms for tissue destruction by E. histolytica, allowing amoebic trogocytosis to be placed in the context of additional host and pathogen mediators of tissue damage. In addition to its relevance to pathogenesis of amoebiasis, an appreciation is emerging that intercellular nibbling occurs in many organisms, from protozoa to mammals.

  9. Branch portal vein pyaemia secondary to amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Conor; Sohan, Oliver; Murray, Lois; Fox, Thomas Peter

    2015-06-08

    We describe a case of a young returning traveller who contracted amoebic dysentery while visiting India. She presented to a major London Hospital several months later with features suggestive of amoebic liver abscesses, a known sequelae of amoebiasis. MRI with intravenous contrast demonstrated an area of likely occlusion of the portal vein. The patient was treated with intravenous metronidazole for 10 days followed by diloxanide furoate, an intraluminal agent. The largest abscess was drained acutely under ultrasound guidance. The portal vein occlusion was treated medically without the use of anticoagulation. A repeat ultrasound at 6 weeks post-treatment confirmed patency of the portal vein indicating spontaneous recanalisation with antimicrobial therapy alone. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Branch portal vein pyaemia secondary to amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Conor; Sohan, Oliver; Murray, Lois; Fox, Thomas Peter

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a young returning traveller who contracted amoebic dysentery while visiting India. She presented to a major London Hospital several months later with features suggestive of amoebic liver abscesses, a known sequelae of amoebiasis. MRI with intravenous contrast demonstrated an area of likely occlusion of the portal vein. The patient was treated with intravenous metronidazole for 10 days followed by diloxanide furoate, an intraluminal agent. The largest abscess was drained acutely under ultrasound guidance. The portal vein occlusion was treated medically without the use of anticoagulation. A repeat ultrasound at 6 weeks post-treatment confirmed patency of the portal vein indicating spontaneous recanalisation with antimicrobial therapy alone. PMID:26055593

  11. Fatal Human Meningoencephalitis due to Halicephalobus Nematodes, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Müllges, Wolfgang; Keppler, Marc; Brehm, Klaus; Ondrejka, Sarah L.; Muntau, Birgit; Tannich, Egbert; Müller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Tappe, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Halicephalobus nematodes, causative agents of severe meningoencephalitis in horses, have rarely been reported in humans. In this study, the clinical, serological, cytokine, and histopathological findings of a rapidly progressive and eventually fatal meningoencephalitis in a previously healthy human are described. The helminth was finally diagnosed by specific polymerase chain reactions from post mortem tissue. PMID:26125032

  12. Chronic Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis by Prototheca Wickerhamii in an Immunocompetent Boy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ari; Choe, Yong-Joon; Chang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Duckhee; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Hong, Seok Ho; Lee, Jina; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2017-07-01

    Human protothecosis is mainly a cutaneous infection caused by the Prototheca species. Prototheca wickerhamii is an established pathogen of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in dogs, but no eosinophilic pleocytosis of the cerebrospinal fluid has been reported in human cases of meningitis. Herein, we report a case of chronic protothecosis manifesting eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent boy.

  13. Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis diagnosed by trophozoites in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Goh, L M L; Marrone, J R

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis has not been described in the modern literature, which is distinct from that caused by free-living amoebae. We report the first case of E. histolytica meningoencephalitis without liver or brain abscesses. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed 2 + very motile trophozoites. Our patient was successfully treated with intravenous metronidazole. PMID:25356319

  14. Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis diagnosed by trophozoites in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Goh, L M L; Marrone, J R

    2013-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis has not been described in the modern literature, which is distinct from that caused by free-living amoebae. We report the first case of E. histolytica meningoencephalitis without liver or brain abscesses. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed 2 + very motile trophozoites. Our patient was successfully treated with intravenous metronidazole.

  15. Underestimated Amoebic Appendicitis among HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Yano, Hideaki; Murata, Yukinori; Igari, Toru; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Yagita, Kenji; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entamoeba histolytica is not a common causative agent of acute appendicitis. However, amoebic appendicitis can sometimes be severe and life threatening, mainly due to a lack of awareness. Also, its frequency, clinical features, and pathogenesis remain unclear. The study subjects were HIV-1-infected individuals who presented with acute appendicitis and later underwent appendectomy at our hospital between 1996 and 2014. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preserved appendix specimens were reexamined by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and PCR to identify undiagnosed amoebic appendicitis. Appendectomies were performed in 57 patients with acute appendicitis. The seroprevalence of E. histolytica was 33% (14/43) from the available stored sera. Based on the medical records, only 3 cases were clinically diagnosed as amoebic appendicitis, including 2 diagnosed at the time of appendectomy and 1 case diagnosed by rereview of the appendix after the development of postoperative complications. Retrospective analyses using PAS staining and PCR identified 3 and 3 more cases, respectively. Thus, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 cases (15.8%) in the present study. Apart from a significantly higher leukocyte count in E. histolytica-positive patients than in negative patients (median, 13,760 versus 10,385 cells/μl, respectively, P = 0.02), there were no other differences in the clinical features of the PCR-positive and -negative groups. In conclusion, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 (15.8%) of the appendicitis cases. However, only 3, including one diagnosed after intestinal perforation, were diagnosed before the present analyses. These results strongly suggest there is frequently a failure to detect trophozoites in routine examination, resulting in an underestimation of the incidence of amoebic appendicitis. PMID:27847377

  16. Underestimated Amoebic Appendicitis among HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Watanabe, Koji; Yano, Hideaki; Murata, Yukinori; Igari, Toru; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Yagita, Kenji; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is not a common causative agent of acute appendicitis. However, amoebic appendicitis can sometimes be severe and life threatening, mainly due to a lack of awareness. Also, its frequency, clinical features, and pathogenesis remain unclear. The study subjects were HIV-1-infected individuals who presented with acute appendicitis and later underwent appendectomy at our hospital between 1996 and 2014. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preserved appendix specimens were reexamined by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and PCR to identify undiagnosed amoebic appendicitis. Appendectomies were performed in 57 patients with acute appendicitis. The seroprevalence of E. histolytica was 33% (14/43) from the available stored sera. Based on the medical records, only 3 cases were clinically diagnosed as amoebic appendicitis, including 2 diagnosed at the time of appendectomy and 1 case diagnosed by rereview of the appendix after the development of postoperative complications. Retrospective analyses using PAS staining and PCR identified 3 and 3 more cases, respectively. Thus, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 cases (15.8%) in the present study. Apart from a significantly higher leukocyte count in E. histolytica-positive patients than in negative patients (median, 13,760 versus 10,385 cells/μl, respectively, P = 0.02), there were no other differences in the clinical features of the PCR-positive and -negative groups. In conclusion, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 (15.8%) of the appendicitis cases. However, only 3, including one diagnosed after intestinal perforation, were diagnosed before the present analyses. These results strongly suggest there is frequently a failure to detect trophozoites in routine examination, resulting in an underestimation of the incidence of amoebic appendicitis. Copyright © 2016 Kobayashi et al.

  17. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in five Chihuahua dogs.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R J; Dickinson, P J; Kube, S A; Moore, P F; Couto, S S; Vernau, K M; Sturges, B K; Lecouteur, R A

    2008-05-01

    An acute to chronic idiopathic necrotizing meningoencephalitis was diagnosed in 5 Chihuahua dogs aged between 1.5 and 10 years. Presenting neurologic signs included seizures, blindness, mentation changes, and postural deficits occurring from 5 days to 5.5 months prior to presentation. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses from 2 of 3 dogs sampled were consistent with an inflammatory disease. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of 2 dogs demonstrated multifocal loss or collapse of cortical gray/white matter demarcation hypointense on T1-weighted images, with T2-weighted hyperintensity and slight postcontrast enhancement. Multifocal asymmetrical areas of necrosis or collapse in both gray and white matter of the cerebral hemispheres was seen grossly in 4 brains. Microscopically in all dogs, there was a severe, asymmetrical, intensely cellular, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis usually with cystic necrosis in subcortical white matter. There were no lesions in the mesencephalon or metencephalon except in 1 dog. Immunophenotyping defined populations of CD3, CD11d, CD18, CD20, CD45, CD45 RA, and CD79a immunoreactive inflammatory cells varying in density and location but common to acute and chronic lesions. In fresh frozen lesions, both CD1b,c and CD11c immunoreactive dendritic antigen-presenting cells were also identified. Immunoreactivity for canine distemper viral (CDV) antigen was negative in all dogs. The clinical signs, distribution pattern, and histologic type of lesions bear close similarities to necrotizing meningoencephalitis as described in series of both Pug and Maltese breed dogs and less commonly in other breeds.

  18. Bilateral Frosted Branch Angiitis in a Patient with Tuberculous Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Liping; Du, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yusheng

    2015-06-01

    To present a case of frosted branch angiitis with tuberculous meningoencephalitis who was followed up for 18 months after treatment. Case report. A 19-year-old female with tuberculous meningoencephalitis complained of bilateral blurred vision, and presented with frosted branch angiitis and macula edema in both eyes. Treatment with systemic glucocorticoid and standard anti-tuberculosis medicine totally resolved the retinal periphlebitis and macular edema, with vision improvement achieved at the 18-month follow-up. Frosted branch angiitis could be secondary to tuberculous meningoencephalitis. Based on standard anti-tuberculosis medicine, systemic glucocorticoid may help in the remission of frosted branch angiitis.

  19. Amoebic liver abscess with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment by interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajit K; Gupta, Saumya; Hariprasad, Sudarsan; Kumar, Ashish; Ghuman, Samarjit S; Gupta, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is most common extra-intestinal presentation of amoebiasis. It is rarely complicated with vascular involvement including thrombosis of hepatic vein or IVC and pseudo-aneurysm of hepatic artery. We describe a case of hepatic artery pseudo-aneurysm as a complication of amoebic liver abscess treated with percutaneous embolization.

  20. Contribution of Amoebic Coculture to Recovery of Legionella Isolates from Respiratory Samples: Prospective Analysis over a Period of 32 Months

    PubMed Central

    Suet, A.; Ginevra, C.; Campese, C.; Slimani, S.; Ader, F.; Che, D.; Lina, G.; Jarraud, S.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the contribution of amoebic coculture to the recovery of Legionella spp. from 379 respiratory samples. The sensitivity of axenic culture was 42.1%. The combination of axenic culture with amoebic coculture increased the Legionella isolation rate to 47.1%. Amoebic coculture was particularly efficient in isolating Legionella spp. from respiratory samples contaminated with oropharyngeal flora. PMID:22322354

  1. Fulminant amoebic colitis: a clinicopathological study of 30 cases.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rachana; Gupte, Prajakta A; Joshi, Amita S

    2015-04-01

    To review the clinical and pathological factors associated with fulminant amoebic colitis (FAC) requiring colonic resection and its outcome. We retrospectively identified adult patients admitted to our centre between June 2007 and December 2011 with FAC who underwent colonic resection and were diagnosed with amoebic colitis based on the presence of trophozoites on histological examination. The clinical details were extracted from the medical notes and correlated with the pathological findings. Thirty patients (18 men and 12 women) met the inclusion criteria. Their mean age was 50.1 years (range 21-89). The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain, vomiting and fever. More than half the patients (16/30) had underlying conditions associated with immunosuppression including diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis. Pathological investigation of colonic resections showed predominantly right-sided involvement with geographic colonic ulcers covered with a creamy-white pseudomembrane, perforations, gangrenous changes, amoeboma and lesions mimicking inflammatory bowel disease. All showed basophilic dirty necrosis with abundant nuclear debris and amoebic trophozoites on histological examination. 21/30 patients (70%) had involvement beyond the caecum. 17/30 patients (57%) died. Those with involvement beyond the caecum were more likely to die (15/21, 71.4%) than those with less extensive disease. FAC presents as acute abdomen and can mimic appendicitis, ischaemic bowel disease, tuberculosis and malignancy. Comorbidities causing immunosuppression frequently associated. Mortality remains high despite surgery, so FAC should be suspected in every case of acute abdomen with colonic perforation if associated with typical gross and microscopic findings and a history of stay in an endemic area. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Amoebic cervicitis mimicking posterior wall fibroid: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soma; Nagarsenkar, Ajit; Chandra, Savita; Sahasrabhojanee, Mrinalini; Sawant, Dheeraj

    2014-08-01

    Amoebiasis of the uterine cervix is an extremely rare entity, and presentation as fibroid uterus has not been reported, to the best of our knowledge in our extensive search of the English literature. It can clinically simulate cervical malignancy by virtue of surface papillomatous and overall ulcerated and necrotic appearance. We present a case of amoebic infection of the cervix in a 45-year-old female which was suspected to be a posterior wall fibroid with degeneration until a histopathological examination of the surgical specimen revealed the presence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. The patient recovered after surgery and antiamoebic therapy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm; a rare complication of amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anam; Pal, Khawaja Muhammad Inam; Khan, Hussain Ijaz

    2011-08-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) is an infrequently encountered entity, usually seen secondary to blunt or penetrating trauma. The clinical presentation is often due to complications such as intrahepatic or intraperitoneal bleeding as a result of rupture of the pseudoaneurysm. Diagnosis is frequently delayed and made by splanchnic angiography. HAP associated with a liver abscess, has very rarely been described in the literature. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with amoebic liver abscess and right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm which was suspected on high resolution contrast-enhanced abdominal computer tomography (CT). The lesion was confirmed by arteriography and treated prophylactically with transcatheteter embolization.

  4. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis following meningoencephalitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Elias, Matthew D; Narula, Sona; Chu, Andrew S

    2014-04-01

    Meningoencephalitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are both neurological disease processes, but there have been few cases of meningoencephalitis progressing to ADEM in the pediatric population. A case of a 4-year-old girl with an initial diagnosis of meningoencephalitis is presented here, whose initial presentation was manifested by prolonged fever, gray matter signal abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, and a markedly irritable mental status. As her neurological examination changed with focal abnormalities, a repeat magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated new areas of both gray and white matter signal abnormality, consistent with ADEM. Her symptoms and imaging findings completely resolved with a course of methylprednisolone. Based on the literature and this current case, it is our recommendation to consider ADEM as a diagnosis if meningoencephalitis is not improving.

  5. [Anthrax meningoencephalitis: a case following a cutaneous lesion in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Ziadi, A; Hachimi, A; Soraa, N; Tassi, N; Nejmi, H; Elkhayari, M; Samkaoui, M A

    2014-05-01

    Anthrax meningoencephalitis is very rare especially following skin location. We report a case of meningoencephalitis secondary to skin lesion. The diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and confirmed by microbiological tests. Its evolution remains fatal despite aggressive resuscitation. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Resveratrol relieves Angiostrongylus cantonensis - Induced meningoencephalitis by activating sirtuin-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Chih; Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Chen, Ke-Min; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2017-09-01

    Resveratrol, a natural herbal compound found in high levels in grapes and red wine, is frequently used as activator of sirtuin-1. This study investigated the potential function of sirtuin-1 in regulating angiostrongyliasis meningoencephalitis in resveratrol-treated mice. Mice were subjected to meningoencephalitis to study the protective effect of resveratrol against meningoencephalitis and investigate the effects of sirtuin-1 activation on brain. Results demonstrated that sirtuin-1 level decreased in mice with meningoencephalitis and significantly increased in resveratrol-treated mice. Moreover, resveratrol treatment significantly reduced eosinophil counts, p65, Interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-33, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity, claudin-5 degradation, and blood-brain barrier permeability. By contrast, the anti-inflammatory factor IL-10 was significantly increased in resveratrol-treated mice. Resveratrol treatment was partially beneficial in controlling the pathological processes of angiostrongyliasis meningoencephalitis. The results demonstrate the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol against Angiostrongylus cantonensis-induced eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in mice. Treatment with sirtuin-1 agonist was given within a therapeutic window after A. cantonensis infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pan-Genome Analysis of Brazilian Lineage A Amoebal Mimiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Felipe L.; Bajrai, Leena; Abrahao, Jonatas S.; Kroon, Erna G.; Dornas, Fabio P.; Andrade, Kétyllen R.; Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Pilotto, Mariana R.; Robert, Catherine; Benamar, Samia; La Scola, Bernard; Colson, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Since the recent discovery of Samba virus, the first representative of the family Mimiviridae from Brazil, prospecting for mimiviruses has been conducted in different environmental conditions in Brazil. Recently, we isolated using Acanthamoeba sp. three new mimiviruses, all of lineage A of amoebal mimiviruses: Kroon virus from urban lake water; Amazonia virus from the Brazilian Amazon river; and Oyster virus from farmed oysters. The aims of this work were to sequence and analyze the genome of these new Brazilian mimiviruses (mimi-BR) and update the analysis of the Samba virus genome. The genomes of Samba virus, Amazonia virus and Oyster virus were 97%–99% similar, whereas Kroon virus had a low similarity (90%–91%) with other mimi-BR. A total of 3877 proteins encoded by mimi-BR were grouped into 974 orthologous clusters. In addition, we identified three new ORFans in the Kroon virus genome. Additional work is needed to expand our knowledge of the diversity of mimiviruses from Brazil, including if and why among amoebal mimiviruses those of lineage A predominate in the Brazilian environment. PMID:26131958

  8. Ultrasound-guided needle aspiration of amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, A.; Ramani, R.; Kumar, M. S.; Lakhkar, B. N.; Kundaje, G. N.

    1993-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out on 200 patients with clinically, ultrasonographically and serologically confirmed amoebic liver abscess. The role of ultrasound-guided needle aspiration in addition to medications was evaluated compared to drug treatment alone. Both the groups were monitored clinically and sonographically for up to 6 months after diagnosis. The initial response (after 15 days) was better in the aspirated group (P < 0.05) but resolution of abscess after 6 months were similar. There was a more rapid clinical response in the aspirated group, particularly in those with larger (> 6 cm) abscesses and there were no complications. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided needle aspiration is a safe diagnostic and therapeutic approach which enhances clinical recovery, accelerates resolution, especially in large abscesses, and prevents complications. PMID:8346134

  9. Pathological and immunological features of canine necrotising meningoencephalitis and granulomatous meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuyuki; Park, Eunsil; Tsuboi, Masaya; Chambers, James K; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Necrotising meningoencephalitis (NME) and granulomatous meningoencephalitis (GME) are idiopathic inflammatory diseases of the canine central nervous system (CNS). Typical NME occurs predominantly in small breeds of dogs, such as Pug, Maltese and Yorkshire terriers. Although there is no specific breed predisposition to GME, toy and terrier breeds appear to be overrepresented. Recent molecular investigations have identified genetic risk factors for NME in Pug, Maltese and other toy breed dogs; however, details of the pathogenesis of this disease remain to be clarified. NME is characterised pathologically by necrotic lesions with mononuclear cell infiltration in the meninges and perivascular spaces. On the basis of the distribution pattern of major necrotic foci, NME can be divided into cortex dominant and white matter dominant types; the latter is designated necrotising leucoencephalitis (NLE). Lesions in GME are characterised by the accumulation of lymphocytes and macrophages with epithelioid morphology, forming granulomas around blood vessels. Some common genetic factors and/or some additional triggers, such as infection or vaccination, may play a role in the pathogenesis of NME, NLE and GME; however, the host immune responses may define the pathological phenotypes. Different cytokine and chemokine responses are seen in NME, NLE and GME, whilst autoantibodies against astrocytes are detected predominantly in NME. This review focuses on the pathological and immunological characteristics of these canine idiopathic inflammatory CNS disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Amoebic liver abscess: ultrasonographic characteristics and results of different therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Widjaya, P; Bilić, A; Babić, Z; Ljubicić, N; Bakula, B; Pilas, V

    1991-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out on 33 patients with clinically, serologically and ultrasonographically confirmed amoebic liver abscess. All patients were randomly treated with metronidazole and chlorochin or a combination of medicamentous therapy and percutaneous drainage. Ultrasonographic characteristics of amoebic liver abscesses were rotound or oval shape, usually hypoechogenic content with specific dorsal sonic enhancement, and in the majority of cases, location near liver capsule. Shorter duration of amoebic liver abscess resolution time in the group of patients treated with the combined therapy was observed particularly in the first four weeks of the treatment. The authors concluded that percutaneous drainage in combination with medicamentous therapy represents a successful therapeutic approach in the treatment of amoebic liver abscesses.

  11. Intractable pneumococcal meningoencephalitis associated with a TNF-α antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Jae; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Seo; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Hee Tae; Kim, Seung H

    2014-09-15

    A 34-year-old man was treated with a TNF-α antagonist for ankylosing spondylitis, and this subsequently developed a CNS infection. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse subcortical white matter lesions. Streptococcus pneumoniae was cultured from the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. The patient died of multifocal widespread brain damage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, despite intensive antibacterial medication. Pneumococcal meningoencephalitis can occur in association with TNF-α antagonists. Clinicians should be aware of both the risk of fatal bacterial meningoencephalitis associated with TNF-α antagonists and the possibility of an unusual presentation of bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. A rare cause of cerebral venous thrombosis: cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Senadim, Songul; Alpaydin Baslo, Sezin; Tekin Güveli, Betül; Dedei Daryan, Metin; Kantaroglu, Elif; Ozturk, Oya; Atakli, Dilek

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is a serious central nervous system infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, seen mostly in immunocompromised hosts and less in immunocompetent patients. The vast majority of cryptococcosis cases are seen as human immunodeficiency virus infections with advanced immunosuppression. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis are the most common clinical manifestations. Nevertheless, immunocompetent patients with CM are rarely reported. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of CM. Here, we report an immunocompetent patient with CM from a non-endemic area, who presented with an acute onset and atypical symptoms associated with cerebral venous thrombosis.

  13. The Rapid Effectiveness of Minocycline against Scrub Typhus Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Tameto; Shimazaki, Haruo; Sawada, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is associated with various clinical symptoms. However, the pathogenesis of scrub typhus infection remains to be elucidated. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with consciousness disturbance and suspected meningoencephalitis. The patient's laboratory data showed deterioration and were indicative of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). A whole body examination to detect the trigger disease revealed an eschar, which is a characteristic of scrub typhus, on his back. His symptoms showed dramatic improvement after the administration of minocycline (MINO). This case report highlights that the clinical course of a case of scrub typhus meningoencephalitis that was cured with MINO.

  14. Human herpesvirus 1 meningoencephalitis after trigeminal neuralgia surgery.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Benito, Natividad; Montes, Guillermo; Pomar, Virginia; Molet, Joan; Rabella, Núria

    2013-07-01

    We report a case of human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1) meningoencephalitis in a patient who underwent trigeminal neuralgia surgery. Although this surgery has been reported to increase the risk of mucocutaneous HHV-1 recurrence, to our knowledge, an association between trigeminal surgery and HHV-1 encephalitis has not been previously described.

  15. [Tuberculous meningoencephalitis revealed by psychiatric disorders: about a case].

    PubMed

    Mouhadi, Khalid; Boulahri, Tarik; Rouimi, Abdelhadi

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculous meningoencephalitis is fairly frequent in endemic countries and it is the most severe form of tuberculosis. Therapeutic failure is common because of diagnostic delay. This delay is primarily due to a wide clinical polymorphism and, in particular, to misleading forms. We here report a rare clinical case of tuberculous meningitis in a patient in prodromal phase of psychosis.

  16. Lausannevirus, a giant amoebal virus encoding histone doublets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vincent; Bertelli, Claire; Collyn, François; Casson, Nicola; Telenti, Amalio; Goesmann, Alexander; Croxatto, Antony; Greub, Gilbert

    2011-06-01

    Large viruses infecting algae or amoebae belong to the NucleoCytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) and present genotypic and phenotypic characteristics that have raised major interest among microbiologists. Here, we describe a new large virus discovered in Acanthamoeba castellanii co-culture of an environmental sample. The virus, referred to as Lausannevirus, has a very limited host range, infecting Acanthamoeba spp. but being unable to infect other amoebae and mammalian cell lines tested. Within A. castellanii, this icosahedral virus of about 200 nm exhibits a development cycle similar to Mimivirus, with an eclipse phase 2 h post infection and a logarithmic growth leading to amoebal lysis in less than 24 h. The 346 kb Lausannevirus genome presents similarities with the recently described Marseillevirus, sharing 89% of genes, and thus belongs to the same family as confirmed by core gene phylogeny. Interestingly, Lausannevirus and Marseillevirus genomes both encode three proteins with predicted histone folds, including two histone doublets, that present similarities to eukaryotic and archaeal histones. The discovery of Lausannevirus and the analysis of its genome provide some insight in the evolution of these large amoebae-infecting viruses.

  17. Ankyrin-repeat proteins from sponge symbionts modulate amoebal phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mary T H D; Liu, Michael; Thomas, Torsten

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria-eukaryote symbiosis occurs in all stages of evolution, from simple amoebae to mammals, and from facultative to obligate associations. Sponges are ancient metazoans that form intimate symbiotic interactions with complex communities of bacteria. The basic nutritional requirements of the sponge are in part satisfied by the phagocytosis of bacterial food particles from the surrounding water. How bacterial symbionts, which are permanently associated with the sponge, survive in the presence of phagocytic cells is largely unknown. Here, we present the discovery of a genomic fragment from an uncultured gamma-proteobacterial sponge symbiont that encodes for four proteins, whose closest known relatives are found in a sponge genome. Through recombinant approaches, we show that these four eukaryotic-like, ankyrin-repeat proteins (ARP) when expressed in Eschericha coli can modulate phagocytosis of amoebal cells and lead to accumulation of bacteria in the phagosome. Mechanistically, two ARPs appear to interfere with phagosome development in a similar way to reduced vacuole acidification, by blocking the fusion of the early phagosome with the lysosome and its digestive enzymes. Our results show that ARP from sponge symbionts can function to interfere with phagocytosis, and we postulate that this might be one mechanism by which symbionts can escape digestion in a sponge host.

  18. Modulation of amoebic hepatic abscess by the parasympathetic system.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Ortega, M; Quintanar-Stephano, A; García Lorenzana, M; Campos-Esparza, M R; Silva-Briano, M; Adabache-Ortíz, A; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Rodríguez, M G; Ventura-Juárez, J

    2011-01-01

    The neuro-immune network, in which the vagus nerve is involved, provides feedback between its afferent branches for signalling central nervous system from sites of injury through cytokines and its efferent branches, which release acetylcholine, an anti-inflammatory neurotransmitter. For gain insight into the parasympathetic mechanisms participating in the inflammatory response in the liver, we studied the effects of a vagotomy on the innate immune response in hamsters with amoebic liver abscess. At 7 days post-infection, compared to the control, liver parasympathectomy resulted in a larger abscess size, a greater production of collagen fibres, fewer trophozoites, increased serum levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ and increased numbers of IL-10 and IFN-γ-positive cells in situ, with no change in the number of macrophages and NK cells. Data indicate that the vagotomy disrupted the inflammatory response, causing an increase in the response against infection, then could favour the innervation of the liver by the sympathetic nervous system and would then take the control of the immune response by stimulating the conversion of macrophages to epithelioid cells; and through increased IL-10 production would induce the hepatic stellar cells to become myofibroblast collagen producer cells, thus forming a barrier of collagen and blocking trophozoite migration. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. MENINGOENCEPHALITIS DUE TO VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS IN AIDS PATIENTS. REPORT OF ELEVEN CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María F; Vittar, Natalia; Banco, María C; Priarone, Maia; Mammana, Lilia; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    Neurological complications of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are infrequent and include various clinical pictures. The reactivation of VZV in patients with AIDS is generally associated with an acute and severe meningoencephalitis. We report the epidemiological, clinical and virological data from 11 consecutive patients with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and central nervous system (CNS) involvement due to VZV. All patients were male and seropositive for HIV. The primary risk factor for HIV infection was unprotected sexual contact. The median of CD4 T cell count was 142 cells/µL. All of them presented signs and symptoms of meningoencephalitis. Six patients (54.5%) presented pleocytosis; they all showed high CSF protein concentrations with a median of 2.1 g/dL. Polymerase chain reaction of cerebrospinal fluid specimen was positive for VZV in all of them and they were treated with intravenous acyclovir at doses of 30/mg/kg/day for 21 days. Overall survival was 63% (7 of 11 patients). The four dead patients had low cellular counts in CSF, below the median of this parameter. VZV should be included among the opportunistic pathogens that can involve CNS with a diffuse and severe meningoencephalitis in patients with advanced HIV/AIDS disease.

  20. MENINGOENCEPHALITIS DUE TO VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS IN AIDS PATIENTS. REPORT OF ELEVEN CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    CORTI, Marcelo; VILLAFAÑE, María F.; VITTAR, Natalia; BANCO, María C.; PRIARONE, Maia; MAMMANA, Lilia; GILARDI, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are infrequent and include various clinical pictures. The reactivation of VZV in patients with AIDS is generally associated with an acute and severe meningoencephalitis. We report the epidemiological, clinical and virological data from 11 consecutive patients with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and central nervous system (CNS) involvement due to VZV. All patients were male and seropositive for HIV. The primary risk factor for HIV infection was unprotected sexual contact. The median of CD4 T cell count was 142 cells/µL. All of them presented signs and symptoms of meningoencephalitis. Six patients (54.5%) presented pleocytosis; they all showed high CSF protein concentrations with a median of 2.1 g/dL. Polymerase chain reaction of cerebrospinal fluid specimen was positive for VZV in all of them and they were treated with intravenous acyclovir at doses of 30/mg/kg/day for 21 days. Overall survival was 63% (7 of 11 patients). The four dead patients had low cellular counts in CSF, below the median of this parameter. VZV should be included among the opportunistic pathogens that can involve CNS with a diffuse and severe meningoencephalitis in patients with advanced HIV/AIDS disease. PMID:27049704

  1. Misdiagnosed amoebic colitis leading to severe dysentery and necrotizing colitis--report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Trine H; Christiansen, Jens J; Eivindson, Martin V; Larsen, Carsten S; Tøttrup, Anders

    2014-03-01

    We present a case of amoebic colitis, misdiagnosed as inflammatory bowel disease and treated with corticosteroids, leading to severe necrotizing enterocolitis. We review the literature on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of amoebic dysentery, with special emphasis on the association between immunosuppressive treatment and the development of severe invasive amoebiasis.

  2. Amoebae-resisting bacteria isolated from human nasal swabs by amoebal coculture.

    PubMed

    Greub, Gilbert; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2004-03-01

    Amoebae feed on bacteria, and few bacteria can resist their microbicidal ability. Amoebal coculture could therefore be used to selectively grow these amoebae-resisting bacteria (ARB), which may be human pathogens. To isolate new ARB, we performed amoebal coculture from 444 nasal samples. We recovered 7 (1.6%) ARB from 444 nasal swabs, including 4 new species provisionally named Candidatus Roseomonas massiliae, C. Rhizobium massiliae, C. Chryseobacterium massiliae, and C. Amoebinatus massiliae. The remaining isolates were closely related to Methylobacterium extorquens, Bosea vestrii, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Thus, amoebal coculture allows the recovery of new bacterial species from heavily contaminated samples and might be a valuable approach for the recovery of as-yet unrecognized emerging pathogens from clinical specimens.

  3. Long-term immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine plus prednisolone for necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a Pekingese dog.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong-In; Kim, Ju-Won; Park, Hee-Myung

    2012-06-01

    A 4-year-old intact female Pekingese dog was presented with ataxia and seizure episodes. Based on magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis results, meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology was suspected. The present case survived for 1,096 days under cyclosporine plus prednisolone therapy and was definitively diagnosed with necrotizing meningoencephalitis. This report describes the clinical findings, serial magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and pathologic features of a necrotizing meningoencephalitis and long-term survival after cyclosporine with prednisolone therapy.

  4. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges as manifestation of pneumococcal meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Periodic Lateralized Epileptiform Discharges (PLEDs) are usually seen in the context of destructive structural lesions of the cortex, more frequently in acute ischemic stroke and less common in tumours and meningoencephalitis, specially herpes simplex virus. Its origin and prognosis are uncertain but it is known that PLEDs are linked to epilectic seizures, including status epilepticus. We report on a 75-year old woman with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis who presented altered level of consciousness, acute focal deficits, convulsive seizures and PLEDs in left hemisphere. The finding of PLEDs on the electroencephalogram is related to focal lesions of heterogeneous origin, which up to date, have not been documented in pneumococcal infections of the central nervous system. Our case highlights the importance of identifying and addressing any modifiable etiologic factors of PLEDs. PMID:21703002

  5. Meningoencephalitis in a dog due to Trichosporon montevideense.

    PubMed

    Bryan, L K; Porter, B F; Wickes, B L; Spaulding, K A; Kerwin, S C; Lawhon, S D

    2014-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis due to infection with Trichosporon montevideense was diagnosed in a 4-year-old dog with a brief clinical history of rapidly progressing neurological signs that culminated in a comatose state. No significant gross lesions were found at post-mortem examination. Microscopically, a few scattered areas of pyogranulomatous inflammation with a few small, non-pigmented fungal hyphae were found within the cerebrum surrounding the lateral ventricles. A Trichosporon sp. was identified through culture of the brain and species was determined via sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the Trichosporon rRNA gene. DNA in-situ hybridization confirmed the diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Trichosporon-associated meningoencephalitis in a dog. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clostridium chauvoei-associated meningoencephalitis in a calf.

    PubMed

    2016-01-16

    ·Meningoencephalitis in a calf associated with Clostridium chauvoei infection. ·Bovine papular stomatitis in calves. ·Otitis media due to Mycoplasma bovis in calves. ·Sporadic porcine abortion due to Nocardia species. ·Spotty liver disease in hens. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for September 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  7. First Human Case of Fatal Halicephalobus gingivalis Meningoencephalitis in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, April; Moore, Casey V.; Gasser, Robin B.; Nelson, Renjy; Koehler, Anson V.; Bradbury, Richard S.; Speare, Rick; Dhatrak, Deepak; Weldhagen, Gerhard F.

    2015-01-01

    Halicephalobus gingivalis (previously Micronema deletrix) is a free-living nematode known to cause opportunistic infections, mainly in horses. Human infections are very rare, but all cases described to date involved fatal meningoencephalitis. Here we report the first case of H. gingivalis infection in an Australian human patient, confirmed by nematode morphology and sequencing of ribosomal DNA. The implications of this case are discussed, particularly, the need to evaluate real-time PCR as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25694532

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Patel, Shital M; Flash, Charlene A; Stager, Charles E; Goodman, Jerry C; Woc-Colburn, Laila

    2014-07-01

    As a result of global migration, a significant number of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection now live in the United States, Canada, many countries in Europe, and other non-endemic countries. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis is a rare cause of ring-enhancing lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that can closely mimic central nervous system (CNS) toxoplasmosis. We report a case of CNS Chagas reactivation in an AIDS patient successfully treated with benznidazole and antiretroviral therapy in the United States.

  9. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with viral meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Namba, Tomoko; Harada, Tamaki; Sakai, Kanaki; Takeji, Masanobu; Takahara, Ken; Uzu, Takashi; Yamauchi, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    A 53-year-old male was admitted to our hospital for a high fever. He suffered a change in personality, memory loss and disorientation as well. The findings of cerebrospinal fluid showed monocytosis, but the titers of glucose, C1 and ADA were all normal. Although there was no bacterium in the CSF, the patient's electroencephalography finding was abnormal. We diagnosed his condition as viral meningoencephalitis and started treatment with antiviral agents. Blood chemistry showed serum sodium of 130 mEq/l and plasma osmolarity was reduced to 272 mOsm/kg, while urine osmolarity was high at 353 mOsm/kg. Two potential causes of hyponatremia in this patient were the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). Physical findings revealed a contracted extracellular fluid volume, strongly suggesting the presence of CSWS. The massive urine sodium loss overcoming sodium intake supported this diagnosis. After treatment with vigorous sodium and volume replacement for over 4 weeks, hyponatremia as well as meningoencephalitis were improved without any complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on CSWS in a patient with viral meningoencephalitis.

  10. Nitric Oxide Is Protective in Listeric Meningoencephalitis of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Remer, K. A.; Jungi, T. W.; Fatzer, R.; Täuber, M. G.; Leib, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causes meningoencephalitis in humans. In rodents, listeriosis is associated with granulomatous lesions in the liver and the spleen, but not with meningoencephalitis. Here, infant rats were infected intracisternally to generate experimental listeric meningoencephalitis. Dose-dependent effects of intracisternal inoculation with L. monocytogenes on survival and activity were noted; 104 L. monocytogenes organisms induced a self-limiting brain infection. Bacteria invaded the basal meninges, chorioid plexus and ependyme, spread to subependymal tissue and hippocampus, and disappeared by day 7. This was paralleled by recruitment and subsequent disappearance of macrophages expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine accumulation, an indication of nitric oxide (NO⋅) production. Treatment with the spin-trapping agent α-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) dramatically increased mortality and led to bacterial numbers in the brain 2 orders of magnitude higher than in control animals. Treatment with the selective iNOS inhibitor l-N6-(1-iminoethyl)-lysine (L-NIL) increased mortality to a similar extent and led to 1 order of magnitude higher bacterial counts in the brain, compared with controls. The numbers of bacteria that spread to the spleen and liver did not significantly differ among L-NIL-treated, PBN-treated, and control animals. Thus, the infant rat brain is able to mobilize powerful antilisterial mechanisms, and both reactive oxygen and NO⋅ contribute to Listeria growth control. PMID:11349080

  11. Cerebral Ventriculitis Associated with Otogenic Meningoencephalitis in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Ching; Chang, Ya-Pei

    2015-01-01

    A dog was evaluated for rapidly progressive mentation change, ataxia, and tetraparesis. The dog's neurological status deteriorated drastically. It became comatose with bilateral mydriasis, and the pupillary light reflex was absent. An anti-inflammatory dose of methylprednisolone was administered, and temporary stabilization of neurological status was achieved. MRI findings were suggestive of ventriculitis and meningoencephalitis originating from the left tympanic cavity. A gadolinium leakage phenomenon was noted, likely resulting from severe damage to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier during the inflammatory process. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid and materials in the left tympanic cavity further confirmed the diagnosis. Following surgical and antibiotic treatment, the dog recovered well with only a mild residual head tilt. Seven months after surgery, the dog had a recurrent infection of the left tympanic cavity without intracranial involvement. A second surgery led to an uneventful recovery, and the dog was clinically normal except for a mild head tilt 3 yr after the initial presentation. This is the first report describing ventriculitis associated with otogenic meningoencephalitis in dogs and a gadolinium leakage phenomenon displayed on MRI. The long-term outcome of ventriculitis-complicated otogenic meningoencephalitis in dogs could be satisfied with prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans meningoencephalitis in a patient with polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Buchta, Vladimír; Prášil, Petr; Vejsová, Marcela; Mottl, Roman; Kutová, Radka; Drahošová, Marcela; Plíšek, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    Case of 59-year-old male with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a number of comorbidities, who has developed meningoencephalitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii with polyarteritis nodosa diagnosed during hospitalization, was presented. Before evidence of meningoencephalitis, the patient was being treated with ketoconazole and low doses of fluconazole (200 mg/day) for alleged candidiasis. The dosage was increased (800 mg/day) following laboratory diagnosis of C. neoformans based on positive latex agglutination test and biochemical identification of encapsulated yeast isolated from the blood and CSF. Later, the yeast identification was confirmed by sequencing analysis. Owing to inadequate clinical response, fluconazole therapy was switched to voriconazole (400 mg/day) and later to intravenous amphotericin B (1.0 mg/kg per day). Despite of a temporary stabilization and improvement, which correlated with decline of cryptococcal antigen titers (from 1:1024 to 1:8), after 6 weeks, the patient's underlying condition deteriorated due to severe pancolitis and serious nosocomial bacterial infections. The patient died of multiorgan failure several days later. Our case demonstrates a possible connection between the development of life-threatening cryptococcosis and an autoimmune vasculitis disease and emphasizes that the outcome of the management of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is highly dependent on early diagnosis, adequate treatment, including dosage, and last but not least control of underlying disease and risk factors.

  13. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M; Scott, Steven J; Cerda-Gonzalez, Sofia

    2014-12-01

    A 4-year-old 26-kg (57.2-lb) spayed female Staffordshire Bull Terrier mix was evaluated because of a 24-hour history of cluster seizures. Neurologic examination revealed altered mentation and multifocal intracranial signs; MRI was performed. The MRI findings included multifocal, asymmetric forebrain lesions affecting both the gray and white matter, an area suggestive of focal necrosis, and loss of corticomedullary distinction. A midline shift and caudal transtentorial herniation were noted, suggestive of greater than normal intracranial pressure. Because the dog's clinical signs worsened despite medical treatment and additional evidence of increased intracranial pressure, bilateral craniectomy and durectomy were performed. Histologic evaluation of a brain biopsy specimen revealed bilateral and asymmetric areas of necrosis in the subcortical white matter and adjacent gray matter. At the periphery of the necrotic areas, there was increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Virchow-Robin spaces were expanded by CD3+ lymphocytes. Results of immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue were negative for canine distemper virus, Neospora canis, and Toxoplasma gondii. These clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings were compatible with necrotizing meningoencephalitis. The dog's neurologic status continued to worsen following surgery. Repeated MRI revealed ongoing signs of increased intracranial pressure, despite the bilateral craniectomy. The owners elected euthanasia. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs other than small or toy breeds that have signs suggestive of inflammatory disease.

  14. Fever of Unknown Origin in a Patient with Confirmed West Nile Virus Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sabre, Alexander; Farricielli, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV), an RNA arbovirus and member of the Japanese encephalitis virus antigenic complex, causes a wide range of clinical symptoms, from asymptomatic to encephalitis and meningitis. Nearly all human infections of WNV are due to mosquito bites with birds being the primary amplifying hosts. Advanced age is the most important risk factor for neurological disease leading most often to poor prognosis in those afflicted. We report a case of WNV meningoencephalitis in a 93-year-old Caucasian male who presented with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and nuchal rigidity that rapidly decompensated within 24 h to a persistent altered mental state during inpatient stay. The patient's ELISA antibody titers confirmed pathogenesis of disease by WNV; he given supportive measures and advanced to an excellent recovery. In regard to the approach of FUO, it is important to remain impartial yet insightful to all elements when determining pathogenesis in atypical presentation. PMID:25580318

  15. Nuclease activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 promotes intracellular infection of amoebal host cells.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Felizza F; Mallama, Celeste A; Fairbairn, Stephanie G; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts.

  16. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  17. Temperature-sensitive mutants of the slime mould Physarum polycephalum. I. Mutants of the amoebal phase.

    PubMed

    Wheals, A E; Grant, W D; Jockusch, B M

    1976-11-24

    A replica plating method for isolating it amoebal mutants of Physarum polycephalum has been devised. Temperature-sensitive mutations occur at a frequency after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of 10(-3) per survivor, are stable but are not usually expressed in the plasmodia formed from these amoebae in clones. Some of these mutants appear to be cell-cycle stage specific.

  18. Diffuse perforated necrotising amoebic colitis with histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual presenting as an acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Badyal, Rama Kumari; Gupta, Rajesh; Vaiphei, Kim

    2013-06-27

    Perforated necrotising amoebic colitis associated with intestinal histoplasmosis has rarely been reported in an immunocompetent individual. Radiology and preoperative features are non-specific and requires histopathological examination for a definitive diagnosis. Hence, this condition needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of complicated infective colitis.

  19. Counter immunoelectrophoresis as a rapid screening test for amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Tosswill, J H; Ridley, D S; Warhurst, D C

    1980-01-01

    Counter immunoelectrophoresis using cellulose acetate as the supporting medium was used as a rapid screening test for amoebic abscess. All the sera from 40 cases gave positive results. No false positives were obtained, but the results in intestinal amoebiasis were less reliable. An attempt was made to account for discrepancies in previous reports. PMID:6987273

  20. Successful treatment of Balamuthia mandrillaris amoebic infection with extensive neurological and cutaneous involvement.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Dalila Y; Seas, Carlos; Bravo, Francisco; Legua, Pedro; Ramos, Cesar; Cabello, Alfonso M; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2010-07-15

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris is an uncommon infection for which there is no optimal therapy. We describe a young, female patient who presented with extensive cutaneous and neurological involvement and who recovered after receiving prolonged treatment with miltefosine, fluconazole, and albendazole.

  1. Fatal Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis Caused by Acanthamoeba in a Patient With Kidney Transplant: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Bello, Nancy; Becker, Jennifer; Zangeneh, Tirdad

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) due to Acanthamoeba is almost a uniformly fatal infection in immune-compromised hosts despite multidrug combination therapy. We report a case of GAE in a female who received a deceased donor kidney graft. She was treated with a combination of miltefosine, pentamidine, sulfadiazine, fluconazole, flucytosine, and azithromycin. PMID:26280011

  2. Diffuse perforated necrotising amoebic colitis with histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual presenting as an acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Badyal, Rama Kumari; Gupta, Rajesh; Vaiphei, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Perforated necrotising amoebic colitis associated with intestinal histoplasmosis has rarely been reported in an immunocompetent individual. Radiology and preoperative features are non-specific and requires histopathological examination for a definitive diagnosis. Hence, this condition needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of complicated infective colitis. PMID:23814195

  3. Infection of Acanthamoeba polyphaga with Simkania negevensis and S. negevensis Survival within Amoebal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Simona; Dvoskin, Bella; Mathias, Mazit; Friedman, Maureen G.

    2001-01-01

    Simkania negevensis, a novel microorganism belonging to the family Simkaniaceae in the order Chlamydiales, has an intracellular developmental cycle during which two morphological entities, elementary bodies (EB) and reticulate bodies (RB), are seen by electron microscopy. Rates of seropositivity to the organism are high in certain population groups, and S. negevensis has been associated with respiratory illness in humans. This study reports for the first time the ability of S. negevensis to survive and grow inside Acanthamoeba polyphaga in addition to its known ability to grow in cell cultures of human or simian origin. Infectivity of S. negevensis and growth in amoebae were monitored by immunoperoxidase assays. Long-term persistence and exponential growth of S. negevensis in amoebal trophozoites were demonstrated by infectivity assays and by electron microscopy. EB and dividing RB of S. negevensis were observed within inclusion bodies inside A. polyphaga. When S. negevensis-infected A. polyphaga amoebae were exposed to adverse conditions resulting in encystation of the amoebae, several possible outcomes were observed: cysts containing both normal amoebic cytoplasm and S. negevensis; cysts in which S. negevensis cells were relegated to the space between cyst walls; and cysts containing S. negevensis, but apparently lacking amoebal cytoplasm. S. negevensis within dried amoebal cysts was capable of long-term survival. The possibility that amoebae may have a role in natural transmission of S. negevensis needs to be investigated. PMID:11571186

  4. Influence of intra-amoebic and other growth conditions on the surface properties of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J; Lambert, P A; Brown, M R

    1993-01-01

    The surface properties of Legionella pneumophila were examined by analyzing outer membrane (OM) proteins, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and cellular fatty acids after growth within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and in vitro under various nutrient-depleted conditions. Intra-amoeba-grown legionellae were found to differ in several respects from cells grown in vitro; most notably, they contained a 15-kDa OM protein and a monounsaturated straight-chain fatty acid (18:1(9)). These compounds were also found in abundant quantities in the host amoeba. Immunoblot analysis of intra-amoeba-grown legionellae with antiacanthamoebic serum revealed that both the bacterial whole cells and Sarkosyl-extracted OMs contained amoebic antigens. The findings suggest that the 15-kDa OM protein is likely to be of amoebic origin and associates with the OM of the bacterium. It is proposed that disruption of amoebic membranes, as a result of intra-amoebic infection, may liberate macromolecules, including a 15-kDa polypeptide, a major constituent of the amoebic membrane, which adhere to the surface of the legionellae. Growth under specific nutrient depletions also had a significant effect on the surface composition of L. pneumophila. Cells grown under phosphate depletion were markedly sensitive to protease K digestion and contained lower levels of LPS, as observed by silver staining of the digests on polyacrylamide gels. Intra-amoeba-grown cells contained more bands than the in vitro-grown organisms, reflecting further differences in the nature of the LPS. The whole-cell fatty acids of the phosphate-depleted cells were appreciably different from those of cells grown under other nutritional conditions. We found no evidence for expression of iron-regulated OM proteins under iron depletion. Images PMID:8335382

  5. Case Report: Zika Virus Meningoencephalitis and Myelitis and Associated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Faruq; Burns, Joseph D; Agameya, Ahmed; Patel, Avignat; Alfaqih, Mohammad; Small, Juan E; Ooi, Winnie

    2017-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has a wide clinical spectrum of associated neurologic disease including microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome but, despite its known neurotropism, ZIKV meningoencephalitis and myelitis have been rare complications. We describe a case of ZIKV meningoencephalitis and probable myelitis and its associated magnetic resonance imaging findings that rapidly resolved during recovery in a previously healthy adult.

  6. A novel cause of chronic viral meningoencephalitis: Cache Valley virus

    PubMed Central

    Suan, Dan; Duggins, Andrew; Schubert, Ryan D.; Khan, Lillian M.; Sample, Hannah A.; Zorn, Kelsey C.; Rodrigues Hoffman, Aline; Blick, Anna; Shingde, Meena; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Immunodeficient patients are particularly vulnerable to neuroinvasive infections that can be challenging to diagnose. Metagenomic next generation sequencing can identify unusual or novel microbes and is therefore well suited for investigating the etiology of chronic meningoencephalitis in immunodeficient patients. Methods We present the case of a 34‐year‐old man with X‐linked agammaglobulinemia from Australia suffering from 3 years of meningoencephalitis that defied an etiologic diagnosis despite extensive conventional testing, including a brain biopsy. Metagenomic next generation sequencing of his cerebrospinal fluid and brain biopsy tissue was performed to identify a causative pathogen. Results Sequences aligning to multiple Cache Valley virus genes were identified via metagenomic next generation sequencing. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry subsequently confirmed the presence of Cache Valley virus in the brain biopsy tissue. Interpretation Cache Valley virus, a mosquito‐borne orthobunyavirus, has only been identified in 3 immunocompetent North American patients with acute neuroinvasive disease. The reported severity ranges from a self‐limiting meningitis to a rapidly fatal meningoencephalitis with multiorgan failure. The virus has never been known to cause a chronic systemic or neurologic infection in humans. Cache Valley virus has also never previously been detected on the Australian continent. Our research subject traveled to North and South Carolina and Michigan in the weeks prior to the onset of his illness. This report demonstrates that metagenomic next generation sequencing allows for unbiased pathogen identification, the early detection of emerging viruses as they spread to new locales, and the discovery of novel disease phenotypes. Ann Neurol 2017;82:105–114 PMID:28628941

  7. A novel cause of chronic viral meningoencephalitis: Cache Valley virus.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael R; Suan, Dan; Duggins, Andrew; Schubert, Ryan D; Khan, Lillian M; Sample, Hannah A; Zorn, Kelsey C; Rodrigues Hoffman, Aline; Blick, Anna; Shingde, Meena; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2017-07-01

    Immunodeficient patients are particularly vulnerable to neuroinvasive infections that can be challenging to diagnose. Metagenomic next generation sequencing can identify unusual or novel microbes and is therefore well suited for investigating the etiology of chronic meningoencephalitis in immunodeficient patients. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with X-linked agammaglobulinemia from Australia suffering from 3 years of meningoencephalitis that defied an etiologic diagnosis despite extensive conventional testing, including a brain biopsy. Metagenomic next generation sequencing of his cerebrospinal fluid and brain biopsy tissue was performed to identify a causative pathogen. Sequences aligning to multiple Cache Valley virus genes were identified via metagenomic next generation sequencing. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry subsequently confirmed the presence of Cache Valley virus in the brain biopsy tissue. Cache Valley virus, a mosquito-borne orthobunyavirus, has only been identified in 3 immunocompetent North American patients with acute neuroinvasive disease. The reported severity ranges from a self-limiting meningitis to a rapidly fatal meningoencephalitis with multiorgan failure. The virus has never been known to cause a chronic systemic or neurologic infection in humans. Cache Valley virus has also never previously been detected on the Australian continent. Our research subject traveled to North and South Carolina and Michigan in the weeks prior to the onset of his illness. This report demonstrates that metagenomic next generation sequencing allows for unbiased pathogen identification, the early detection of emerging viruses as they spread to new locales, and the discovery of novel disease phenotypes. Ann Neurol 2017;82:105-114. © 2017 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi Meningoencephalitis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Patel, Shital M.; Flash, Charlene A.; Stager, Charles E.; Goodman, Jerry C.; Woc-Colburn, Laila

    2014-01-01

    As a result of global migration, a significant number of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection now live in the United States, Canada, many countries in Europe, and other non-endemic countries. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis is a rare cause of ring-enhancing lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that can closely mimic central nervous system (CNS) toxoplasmosis. We report a case of CNS Chagas reactivation in an AIDS patient successfully treated with benznidazole and antiretroviral therapy in the United States. PMID:24891470

  9. [Prevention of tick-borne meningoencephalitis--summary report].

    PubMed

    Vlcková, J; Rupes, V; Kollárová, H; Horáková, D

    2011-09-01

    Tick-borne meningoencephalitis is a zoonosis that shows an upward trend. The causative agent is an RNA virus of the family Flaviviridae whose vector in Central Europe is the castor bean tick (Ixodes ricinus). The infection is most often transmitted via tick bite or, less commonly, by the alimentary route, through the consumption of unpasteurized milk of infected animals. Preventive measures consist in personal protection from ticks, exceptionally in blanket treatment with contact insecticides, in preventing consumption of unpasteurized milk and dairy products from areas with a high incidence of tick-borne encephalitis, and particularly in vaccination of the susceptible population.

  10. Chew on this: Amoebic trogocytosis and host cell killing by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica was named “histolytica” (histo-: tissue; lytic-: dissolving) for its ability to destroy host tissues. Direct killing of host cells by the amoebae is likely to be the driving factor that underlies tissue destruction, but the mechanism was unclear. We recently showed that after attaching to host cells, amoebae bite off and ingest distinct host cell fragments, and that this contributes to cell killing. Here we review this process, termed “amoebic trogocytosis” (trogo-: nibble), and how this process interplays with phagocytosis, or whole cell ingestion, in this organism. “Nibbling” processes have been described in other microbes and in multicellular organisms. The discovery of amoebic trogocytosis in E. histolytica may also shed light on an evolutionarily conserved process for intercellular exchange. PMID:26070402

  11. Computed tomography of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in 3 Yorkshire Terriers.

    PubMed

    Ducoté, J M; Johnson, K E; Dewey, C W; Walker, M A; Coates, J R; Berridge, B R

    1999-01-01

    A necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Yorkshire terriers has recently been reported in 6 dogs in Switzerland, 1 dog in Japan and 1 dog in the United States. The purpose of this report is to describe the computed tomographic (CT) findings in 3 dogs with this disease, and to correlate the CT abnormalities with the clinical and pathologic findings in each case. Three Yorkshire Terriers between 2 and 10 years old were evaluated. Physical and neurologic examinations, complete blood count (CBC), serum biochemistry profile, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and CT scan were performed on all 3 dogs. Brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) were evaluated for 2 dogs. Two dogs were euthanized at the owners' request and necropsies were performed. Neurologic examination findings were consistent with a multifocal/diffuse encephalitis involving the cerebrum and brainstem in all 3 dogs. Complete blood count and biochemistry profiles were normal. Elevated protein concentration and a mononuclear pleocytosis were demonstrated in 2 of 3 dogs on cerebrospinal fluid evaluation. Multifocal, extensive areas of decreased opacity throughout the cerebral hemispheres, asymmetric ventriculomegaly, and lack of contrast enhancement were appreciated on CT images of all three dogs. No mass effect was seen. These findings correlated well with pathologic findings at necropsy, which included multiple malacic cavitations within the brain, representing areas of locally extensive necrosis. CT abnormalities in combination with signalment, clinical findings and cerebrospinal fluid analysis should facilitate a presumptive diagnosis of Yorkshire Terrier necrotizing meningoencephalitis.

  12. Vitamin D deficiency decreases survival of bacterial meningoencephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Marija; Sostmann, Nadine; Bertsch, Thomas; Mecke, Marianne; Nessler, Stefan; Manig, Anja; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Triebel, Jakob; Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2015-01-07

    Meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli is associated with high rates of mortality and risk of neurological sequelae in newborns and infants and in older or immunocompromised adults. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. In vivo, we studied the effects of vitamin D3 on survival and the host's immune response in experimental bacterial meningoencephalitis in mice after intracerebral E. coli infection. To produce different systemic vitamin D3 concentrations, mice received a low, standard, or high dietary vitamin D3 supplementation. Bacterial titers in blood, spleen, and brain homogenates were determined. Leukocyte infiltration was assessed by histological scores, and tissue cytokine or chemokine concentrations were measured. Mice fed a diet with low vitamin D3 concentration died earlier than control animals after intracerebral infection. Vitamin D deficiency did not inhibit leukocyte recruitment into the subarachnoid space and did not lead to an increased density of bacteria in blood, spleen, or brain homogenates. The release of proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 was decreased and the release of anti-inflammatory IL-10 was increased in mice fed a diet with high vitamin D3 supplementation. Our observations suggest a detrimental role of vitamin D deficiency in bacterial central nervous system infections. Vitamin D may exert immune regulatory functions.

  13. Neurogenic pulmonary edema following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Reiichiro; Sugita, Yasuo; Arakawa, Kenji; Nakashima, Shinji; Umeno, Yumi; Todoroki, Keita; Yoshida, Tomoko; Takase, Yorihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Oshima, Koichi; Yano, Hirohisa

    2015-08-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. Only a few cases of NPE after Cryptococcal meningitis have been reported. We report a case of NPE following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. A 40-year-old man with no medical history was hospitalized for disturbance of consciousness. Blood glucose level was 124 mg/dL. Non-contrast head computed tomography showed no abnormalities. Lumbar puncture revealed a pressure of over 300 mm H2 O and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) confirmed a white blood cell count of 65/mm(3) . The CSF glucose level was 0 mg/dL. The patient was empirically started on treatment for presumptive bacterial and viral meningitis. Four days after, the patient died in a sudden severe pulmonary edema. Autopsy was performed. We found at autopsy a brain edema with small hemorrhage of the right basal ganglia, severe pulmonary edema and mild cardiomegaly. Histologically, dilated Virchow-Robin spaces, crowded with Cryptococci were observed. In the right basal ganglia, Virchow-Robin spaces were destroyed with hemorrhage and Cryptococci spread to parenchyma of the brain. No inflammatory reaction of the lung was seen. Finally, acute pulmonary edema in this case was diagnosed as NPE following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. After autopsy, we found that he was positive for serum antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  14. Macroarray assay for differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Venter, Marietjie; Zaayman, Dewald; van Niekerk, Stephanie; Stivaktas, Voula; Goolab, Shivani; Weyer, Jacqueline; Paweska, Janusz T; Swanepoel, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Many cases of acute febrile illness with nervous manifestations go undiagnosed, partly because the potential pathogens are not investigated routinely. To develop a multiplex PCR-based macroarray for detection of 29 pathogens associated with febrile disease, aseptic meningitis and meningoencephalitis in southern Africa, including common viruses, bacteria, parasites and selected arboviruses. Pathogens were identified by hybridization of PCR amplicons to probes on a macroarray chip, followed by colorimetric detection. Positive control specimens for all 29 targets were detected with high sensitivity. Twenty-seven clinical samples previously found positive for various etiologies of febrile disease and meningoencephalitis, including less common infections such as Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever, Rift Valley fever, West Nile and rabies were all identified. Testing of a blinded panel of 16 specimens in triplicate demonstrated high repeatability. Screening of 138 specimens from patients with febrile and/or neurological signs that could not be solved in routine investigations yielded 5 additional diagnoses. A highly sensitive, specific and easily interpreted test was developed to detect 29 pathogens associated with febrile and nervous disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Legionella-like and other amoebal pathogens as agents of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, T. J.; Raoult, D.; La Scola, B.; Birtles, R. J.; de Carolis, E.

    2001-01-01

    We tested serum specimens from three groups of patients with pneumonia by indirect immunofluorescence against Legionella-like amoebal pathogens (LLAPs) 1-7, 9, 10, 12, 13; Parachlamydia acanthamoeba strains BN 9 and Hall's coccus; and Afipia felis. We found that LLAPs play a role (albeit an infrequent one) in community-acquired pneumonia, usually as a co-pathogen but sometimes as the sole identified pathogen. PMID:11747734

  16. Treatment of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis with voriconazole and miltefosine in an immunocompetent soldier.

    PubMed

    Webster, Duncan; Umar, Imran; Umar, Imram; Kolyvas, George; Bilbao, Juan; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Duplisea, Kevin; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Visvesvara, Govinda S

    2012-10-01

    A 38-year-old male immunocompetent soldier developed generalized seizures. He underwent surgical debulking and a progressive demyelinating pseudotumor was identified. Serology and molecular testing confirmed a diagnosis of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba sp. in this immunocompetent male. The patient was treated with oral voriconazole and miltefosine with Acanthamoeba titers returning to control levels and serial imaging demonstrating resolution of the residual lesion.

  17. Different behavior of myeloperoxidase in two rodent amoebic liver abscess models.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Baquero, Andrea; Cárdenas Jaramillo, Luz María; Gutiérrez-Meza, Manuel; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Rivera-Aguilar, Víctor; Miliar-García, Angel; Pacheco-Yepez, Judith

    2017-01-01

    The protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amoebiasis, which can spread to the liver and form amoebic liver abscesses. Histological studies conducted with resistant and susceptible models of amoebic liver abscesses (ALAs) have established that neutrophils are the first cells to contact invasive amoebae at the lesion site. Myeloperoxidase is the most abundant enzyme secreted by neutrophils. It uses hydrogen peroxide secreted by the same cells to oxidize chloride ions and produce hypochlorous acid, which is the most efficient microbicidal system of neutrophils. In a previous report, our group demonstrated that myeloperoxidase presents amoebicidal activity in vitro. The aim of the current contribution was to analyze in vivo the role of myeloperoxidase in a susceptible (hamsters) and resistant (Balb/c mice) animal models of ALAs. In liver samples of hamsters and mice inoculated intraportally with Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites, the number of neutrophils in ALAs was determined by enzymatic activity. The presence of myeloperoxidase was observed by staining, and its expression and activity were quantified in situ. A significant difference existed between the two animal models in the number of neutrophils and the expression and activity of myeloperoxidase, which may explain the distinct evolution of amoebic liver abscesses. Hamsters and mice were treated with an MPO inhibitor (4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide). Hamsters treated with ABAH showed no significant differences in the percentage of lesions or in the percentage of amoebae damaged compared with the untreated hamsters. ABAH treated mice versus untreated mice showed larger abscesses and a decreased percentage of damaged amoebae in these lesion at all stages of evolution. Further studies are needed to elucidate the host and amoebic mechanisms involved in the adequate or inadequate activation and modulation of myeloperoxidase.

  18. Different behavior of myeloperoxidase in two rodent amoebic liver abscess models

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Baquero, Andrea; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Rivera-Aguilar, Víctor; Miliar-García, Angel; Pacheco-Yepez, Judith

    2017-01-01

    The protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amoebiasis, which can spread to the liver and form amoebic liver abscesses. Histological studies conducted with resistant and susceptible models of amoebic liver abscesses (ALAs) have established that neutrophils are the first cells to contact invasive amoebae at the lesion site. Myeloperoxidase is the most abundant enzyme secreted by neutrophils. It uses hydrogen peroxide secreted by the same cells to oxidize chloride ions and produce hypochlorous acid, which is the most efficient microbicidal system of neutrophils. In a previous report, our group demonstrated that myeloperoxidase presents amoebicidal activity in vitro. The aim of the current contribution was to analyze in vivo the role of myeloperoxidase in a susceptible (hamsters) and resistant (Balb/c mice) animal models of ALAs. In liver samples of hamsters and mice inoculated intraportally with Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites, the number of neutrophils in ALAs was determined by enzymatic activity. The presence of myeloperoxidase was observed by staining, and its expression and activity were quantified in situ. A significant difference existed between the two animal models in the number of neutrophils and the expression and activity of myeloperoxidase, which may explain the distinct evolution of amoebic liver abscesses. Hamsters and mice were treated with an MPO inhibitor (4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide). Hamsters treated with ABAH showed no significant differences in the percentage of lesions or in the percentage of amoebae damaged compared with the untreated hamsters. ABAH treated mice versus untreated mice showed larger abscesses and a decreased percentage of damaged amoebae in these lesion at all stages of evolution. Further studies are needed to elucidate the host and amoebic mechanisms involved in the adequate or inadequate activation and modulation of myeloperoxidase. PMID:28796788

  19. Treatment of Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis with Voriconazole and Miltefosine in an Immunocompetent Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Duncan; Umar, Imram; Kolyvas, George; Bilbao, Juan; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Duplisea, Kevin; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Visvesvara, Govinda S.

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old male immunocompetent soldier developed generalized seizures. He underwent surgical debulking and a progressive demyelinating pseudotumor was identified. Serology and molecular testing confirmed a diagnosis of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba sp. in this immunocompetent male. The patient was treated with oral voriconazole and miltefosine with Acanthamoeba titers returning to control levels and serial imaging demonstrating resolution of the residual lesion. PMID:22869634

  20. [Drainage of amoebic liver abscess by single incision laparoscopic surgery. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Parrao-Alcántara, Iris Jocelyn; Montes-Hernández, Jesús Manuel; Vega-Pérez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery has increased recently due to successful results, achieved in several procedures. The aim of the present work is to present the first case in which single incision laparoscopy is used for the drainage of an amoebic liver abscess. A 44-year-old man presented with intense right upper quadrant pain, generalised jaundice, tachycardia, fever, hepatomegaly and a positive Murphy's sign. Laboratory results revealed an increased plasma bilirubin, elevated alkaline phosphatase and transaminases, leucocytosis, negative viral panel for hepatitis, and positive antibodies against Entamoeba histolytica. On an abdominal computed tomography a 15 × 12.1 cm hypodense lesion was observed in the patient's liver, identified as an amoebic liver abscess. Analgesics and antibiotics were started and subsequently the patient was submitted to laparoscopic drainage of the abscess using a single port approach. Drainage and irrigation of the abscess was performed. Four days later the patient was discharged without complications. Management of amoebic liver abscess is focused on the elimination of the infectious agent and obliteration of the abscess cavity in order to prevent its complications, especially rupture. Laparoscopic surgery has proved to be a safe and effective way to manage this entity. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of an amoebic liver abscess extending into the hepatic subcapsular space.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kazuya; Masuda, Sakue; Uojima, Haruki; Ichita, Chikamasa; Tokoro, Shinnosuke; Sasaki, Akiko; Egashira, Hideto; Kimbara, Takeshi; Kako, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report a case of an amoebic liver abscess (ALA) successfully treated with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided liver abscess drainage (EUS-LAD). A 37-year-old male with a liver abscess was referred to our hospital due to disease progression despite receiving antibiotic therapy. Computed tomography showed an intrahepatic abscess extending into the hepatic subcapsular space. The abscess could not be punctured through the hepatic parenchyma percutaneously due to the presence of hepatic subcapsular lesions. Hence, EUS-LAD was performed via the transhepatic approach through the stomach. A 5-Fr pigtail-type nasocystic tube was inserted into the abscess through the hepatic parenchyma, with no procedure-related complications. The contents of the abscess had the appearance of anchovy paste which made us suspect an amoebic abscess; therefore, we started antibiotic therapy with metronidazole. Afterwards, serum anti-amoebic antibodies were found to be positive and the diagnosis of ALA was confirmed. Two weeks later, the size of the abscess decreased, and the patient's clinical symptoms disappeared. Hence, the tube was removed. There were no signs of recurrence during the follow-up period. The use of EUS-LAD for pyogenic or tuberculous abscesses has been reported previously. EUS-LAD for an ALA, similar to that for other liver abscesses, is an effective alternative to percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage or surgical treatment.

  2. Unexpected postmortem diagnosis of Acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pemán, J; Jarque, I; Frasquet, J; Alberola, C; Salavert, M; Sanz, J; Gomila, B; Esteban, G

    2008-07-01

    Meningoencephalitis caused by pathogenic free-living amebas is usually fatal. Only a few cases of Acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis, diagnosed at autopsy, have been reported following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We here report a case of Acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with rapidly evolving neurologic symptoms that remained unexplained. Magnetic resonance imaging failed to show brain lesions and cerebrospinal fluid was negative for microbiological cultures. Definite diagnosis was an unexpected autopsy finding. As overall and teaching hospital autopsy rates are declining worldwide, we must emphasize the need of autopsy exams if we want to improve our knowledge as the best way to care for our patients.

  3. Leptomyxid ameba, a new agent of amebic meningoencephalitis in humans and animals.

    PubMed Central

    Visvesvara, G S; Martinez, A J; Schuster, F L; Leitch, G J; Wallace, S V; Sawyer, T K; Anderson, M

    1990-01-01

    Amebae belonging to the order Leptomyxida are regarded as innocuous soil organisms incapable of infecting mammals. We report here the isolation of a leptomyxid ameba from the brain of a pregnant baboon (Papio sphinx) that died of meningoencephalitis at the San Diego Zoo Wild Animal Park. By using rabbit anti-leptomyxid serum in the immunofluorescence assay, we have identified the leptomyxid ameba in the brain sections of a number of human encephalitic cases from around the world as well as a few cases of meningoencephalitis in animals in the United States, which suggests that the leptomyxid amebae are potential etiologic agents of fatal meningoencephalitis in humans and animals. Images PMID:2280005

  4. Meningoencephalitis in two stranded California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) caused by aberrant trematode migration.

    PubMed

    Fauquier, Deborah; Gulland, Frances; Haulena, Martin; Dailey, Murray; Rietcheck, Randall L; Lipscomb, Thomas P

    2004-10-01

    Meningoencephalitis caused by aberrant trematode migration is described in two California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) admitted to a rehabilitation hospital between May and August 2001. Both animals displayed seizure activity and were euthanized due to poor response to therapy. Gross abnormal findings included liver flukes (Zalophotrema hepaticum) in the bile ducts and areas of swelling and necrosis in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. Histopathology revealed meningoencephalitis with necrosis, hemorrhage, and many trematode eggs within the brain. In one sea lion, an adult trematode was found on the surface of the cerebrum. These are believed to be the first reported cases of meningoencephalitis caused by aberrant trematode migration in pinnipeds.

  5. Cerebral salt wasting following tuberculous meningoencephalitis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Lad, Vijay; Shanbag, Preeti

    2012-04-01

    In patients with central nervous system disease, life-threatening hyponatremia can result from either the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone or cerebral salt wasting. Clinical manifestations of the two conditions may be similar, but their pathogeneses and management protocols are different. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome is a disorder in which excessive natriuresis and hyponatremia occurs in patients with intracranial diseases. We report a 6-month-old girl with CSWS associated with tuberculous meningoencephalitis. She was diagnosed as having CSWS on the basis of hypovolemia, polyuria, natriuresis, and the relatively high level of fractional excretion of uric acid. Aggressive replacement of urine salt and water losses using 0.9% or 3% sodium chloride was done. Fludrocortisone was started at 0.1 mg twice daily on the seventh day of admission and was continued for 17 days.

  6. [Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis presenting with treatable cognitive impairment and involuntary movement].

    PubMed

    Ikumi, Kazuhiro; Yokoi, Katsunori; Ando, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The patient is a 72-year-old Japanese woman. Seven years prior to admission, multiple nodules in her left lung were found. Bronchoscopic biopsy of the nodules did not provide a confirmative diagnosis, and probable diagnosis of cryptococcosis was made. Follow-up CT scan of the chest revealed reduction in size of the lung nodules. She was admitted to our hospital due to progressive cognitive impairment and difficulty in walking that lasted for 5 months. On admission, athetotic involuntary movement was observed in her lower extremities, predominantly in the right side. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture of the patient were positive for Cryptococcus neoformans. Antifungal drugs resolved the cognitive impairment, the difficulty in walking, and the involuntary movement. We assessed the cognitive impairment and observed the clinical improvement of the patient, with the use of neuropsychological examinations. To our knowledge, there has been only a few reported case of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis presenting with treatable cognitive impairment and involuntary movement.

  7. Acute autonomic, sensory and motor neuropathy associated with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Satoko; Sugie, Kazuma; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Sugie, Miho; Hirano, Makito; Ueno, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    We report the first case of acute autonomic, motor and sensory neuropathy (AASMN) associated with meningoencephalitis. A 62-year-old man presented with fever, neck stiffness, and coma. Respiratory failure developed. Magnetic resonance images showed an abnormality in the medial temporal lobe. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis with a high protein level. Intensive care gradually improved the consciousness level, but paralysis of the four extremities persisted. Nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating sensory and motor polyneuropathy. Severe orthostatic hypotension, urinary retention, and constipation were also present. Clinical autonomic tests suggested both sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction. After intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, motor and sensory symptoms resolved rapidly; dysautonomia resolved gradually over the next 2 months. The response to immunological therapy and the presence of antecedent infection suggest that AASMN is a postinfectious, immune-mediated, autonomic, sensory and motor nervous system dysfunction.

  8. [Anthrax meningoencephalitis: a case report and review of Turkish literature].

    PubMed

    Metan, Gökhan; Uysal, Burcu; Coşkun, Ramazan; Perçin, Duygu; Doğanay, Mehmet

    2009-10-01

    The incidence of anthrax is decreasing in Turkey, however, it is still endemic in some regions of the country. Although central nervous system involvement is rare in cases with anthrax, high mortality rates are significant. Here, we report a 46-years old woman who was anthrax meningoencephalitis. The patient was from Yozgat located in Central Anatolia, Turkey. Her history revealed that following peeling the skin of sheeps and consuming their meat a week ago, a lesion developed in her left forearm and she had been treated with penicilin G with the diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax in a local health center. The patient was admitted to the emergency room of our hospital due to increased headache and loss of conciousness and diagnosed as anthrax meningitis. Crytallized penicilin G (24 MU/day IV) and vancomycin (2 g/day IV) were initiated. The macroscopy of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample was haemorrhagic, white blood cell count was 40/mm3 (80% of neutrophil) and Gram staining of CSF yielded abundant gram-positive bacilli. The diagnosis was confirmed by the isolation of Bacillus anthracis from CSF culture. Although the isolate was susceptible to penicillin and dexamethasone was added to the treatment, the patient died. Review of the Turkish literature revealed seven cases of anthrax with central nervous system involvement between 1980-2008. One of the patients was an 11-years old boy and the others were adults aged between 19 and 64 years. The source of the infection was skin in four patients and inhalation in one patient. The most common findings in all of the patients were inhabitance in rural area, haemorrhagic CSF and loss of all patients despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, anthrax meningitis and meningoencephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of haemorrhagic meningitis in areas where anthrax is endemic and high rate of mortality despite appropriate therapy should always be kept in mind.

  9. An outbreak of caprine meningoencephalitis due to Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Karavanis, Emmanouel; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Xexaki, Anna; Govaris, Alexandros; Kritas, Spyridon K

    2013-11-01

    Five 1-month-old kid goats from a local herd in Kozani (northwest Greece) developed neurological disorders characterized by decreased appetite, ataxia, and head pressing. The animals received a 3-day course of treatment with intramuscular administration of enrofloxacin and ketoprofen. However, no significant clinical improvement was achieved, and 2 kids died. The remaining 3 animals were euthanized, and a necropsy was performed within 1 hr. Macroscopic lesions were confined to the central nervous system, with congestion and petechiae in the meninges. Microscopic lesions in all 3 animals revealed multifocal acute meningoencephalitis characterized by infiltrations composed of mononuclear inflammatory cells, lesser numbers of lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Additionally, in the kidney, there was multifocal expansion of the glomerular tufts by eosinophilic amorphous material, multifocal interstitial hemorrhages, and multifocal glomerular hypercellularity. The above noted lesions are consisted with an acute ongoing nephropathy indicative of a septicemic-toxemic procedure at its primary stages. Small, gray bacterial colonies, 3-4 mm in diameter, were obtained in pure culture from the brain of all 3 necropsied animals and were confirmed as Escherichia coli O157:H7 by use of phenotypic and genotypic methods. The isolates were sensitive to cefuroxime, ceftazidime, and gentamicin. In contrast, resistance to enrofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline was displayed. Additionally the bacterial isolates were found to carry a plasmid that harbored qnrS, sulII, and tetB genes that contribute to high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, co-trimoxazole, and tetracycline, respectively.

  10. Rapid glia expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines in experimental Klebsiella pneumoniae meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Li; Chiu, Chien-Tsai; Huang, Ya-Ni; Chang, Che-Feng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2007-05-01

    The host immune/inflammatory response following CNS infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae remains poorly understood. Using a rat model of K. pneumoniae meningoencephalitis, we investigated the temporal profiles of brain proinflammatory cytokines and their cellular sources. Leukocyte counts significantly increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at 2 h after K. pneumoniae inoculation into the rat brain but were still much lower than blood leukocyte counts. However, concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and IL-6 in CSF were much higher than the simultaneously collected serum levels. The rapid increase in brain expression of these cytokines at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels occurred earlier than the onset of leukocytosis. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed the presence of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 in astrocytes and microglia. Exposure of primary culture of glial cells to K. pneumoniae also resulted in time-dependent increases in the concentration of these cytokines in the culture media. Taken together, our results suggest that glial cells are an important early source of proinflammatory cytokines during K. pneumonia infection of CNS.

  11. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Vermamoeba vermiformis relationships: bacterial multiplication and protection in amoebal-derived structures.

    PubMed

    Cateau, Estelle; Maisonneuve, Elodie; Peguilhan, Samuel; Quellard, Nathalie; Hechard, Yann; Rodier, Marie-Helene

    2014-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a bacteria involved in healthcare-associated infections, can be found in hospital water systems. Other microorganisms, such as Free Living amoebae (FLA), are also at times recovered in the same environment. Amongst these protozoa, many authors have reported the presence of Vermamoeba vermiformis. We show here that this amoeba enhances S. maltophilia growth and harbors the bacteria in amoebal-derived structures after 28 days in harsh conditions. These results highlight the fact that particular attention should be paid to the presence of FLA in hospital water systems, because of their potential implication in survival and growth of pathogenic bacterial species.

  12. Modulation of endogenous Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (ICP) 1 expression in Entamoeba histolytica affects amoebic adhesion to Extracellular Matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans. During tissue invasion, amoebic adhesion to host components is an important event for host cell death leading to successful invasion and infection. Among amoebic virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin is known to be major adhesion factor to host cells. In this study, we investigated the role of amoebic secreted CP (Cysteine Proteases) in amoebic adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) protein using CP inhibitor and E. histolytica strains in which the endogenous inhibitor of cysteine protease (ICP) 1 gene was overexpressed (ICP1(+)) or repressed by antisense small RNA-mediated gene silencing (ICP1(-)). We found that pretreatment of wild-type amoebae with CP inhibitor E64, or thiol-group modifiers such as diamide and N-Ethylmaleimide resulted in a significant decrease in adhesion to laminin and collagen ECM proteins. Furthermore, ICP1(+) strain, with a reduction of secreted CP activity, exhibited reduced ability by 40% to adhere to laminin. In contrast, ICP1(-) strain, with a 1.9-fold increase of secreted CP activity, showed a two-fold increase in amoebic adherence to laminin compared to the control strain. In addition, total amount of secreted CP5 was decreased in ICP1(+) amoeba. Conversely, total amount of secreted CP1 and mature-form CP5 were increased in ICP1(-) amoeba. We also found that ICP1 was secreted into extracellular milieu. These results suggest that secreted CP activity by E. histolytica may be an important factor affecting adhesion to host proteins, and regulation of CP secretion by ICP plays a major role in pathogenesis. This study provides insight into the CP-mediated tissue pathogenesis in amoeba-invaded lesions during human amoebiasis.

  13. Cross-reactivity of the 31 kDa antigen of Angiostrongylus cantonensis - Dealing with the immunodiagnosis of meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Morassutti, Alessandra L; Rascoe, Lisa N; Handali, Sukwan; DA Silva, Alexandre J; Wilkins, Patricia P; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    The primary causative agent of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis (EoM) in endemic regions is the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The occurrence of EoM was previously restricted to countries in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands; however, more recently, it has been reported from other regions, including Brazil. The commonly used diagnosis is detection of specific antibody reactivity to the 31 kDa antigen, which is derived from female worm somatic extracts. Here we report the occurrence of cross-reactivity to this antigen in sera from other parasitic infections, especially those that may cause EoM, such as gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, hydatidosis and strongyloidiasis. We also demonstrated that the cross-reactivity, in part, is dependent of the concentration of antigen used in Western blot assays. We discuss the importance of these findings on the interpretation of this test.

  14. Interactions of bacterial and amoebal populations in soil microcosms with fluctuating moisture content.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R J; Woods, L E; Coleman, D C; Fairbanks, B C; McClellan, J F; Cole, C V

    1982-04-01

    Sterilized soil samples (20 g of soil per 50-ml flask), amended with 600 mug of glucose-carbon and 60 mug of NH(4)-N . g of dry soil, were inoculated with bacteria (Pseudomonas paucimobilis) alone or with bacteria and amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga). We used wet-dry treatments, which involved air drying the samples to a moisture content of approximately 2% and remoistening the samples three times during the 83-day experiment. Control treatments were kept moist. In the absence of amoebae, bacterial populations were reduced by the first drying to about 60% of the moist control populations, but the third drying had no such effect. With amoebae present, bacterial numbers were not significantly affected by the dryings. Amoebal grazing reduced bacterial populations to 20 to 25% of the ungrazed bacterial populations in both moisture treatments. Encystment was an efficient survival mechanism for amoebae subjected to wet-dry cycles. The amoebal population was entirely encysted in dry soil, but the total number of amoebae was not affected by the three dryings. Growth efficiencies for amoebae feeding on bacteria were 0.33 and 0.39 for wet-dry and constantly moist treatments, respectively, results that compared well with those previously reported for Acanthamoeba spp.

  15. Interactions of Bacterial and Amoebal Populations in Soil Microcosms with Fluctuating Moisture Content

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, R. J.; Woods, L. E.; Coleman, D. C.; Fairbanks, B. C.; McClellan, J. F.; Cole, C. V.

    1982-01-01

    Sterilized soil samples (20 g of soil per 50-ml flask), amended with 600 μg of glucose-carbon and 60 μg of NH4-N · g of dry soil−1, were inoculated with bacteria (Pseudomonas paucimobilis) alone or with bacteria and amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga). We used wet-dry treatments, which involved air drying the samples to a moisture content of approximately 2% and remoistening the samples three times during the 83-day experiment. Control treatments were kept moist. In the absence of amoebae, bacterial populations were reduced by the first drying to about 60% of the moist control populations, but the third drying had no such effect. With amoebae present, bacterial numbers were not significantly affected by the dryings. Amoebal grazing reduced bacterial populations to 20 to 25% of the ungrazed bacterial populations in both moisture treatments. Encystment was an efficient survival mechanism for amoebae subjected to wet-dry cycles. The amoebal population was entirely encysted in dry soil, but the total number of amoebae was not affected by the three dryings. Growth efficiencies for amoebae feeding on bacteria were 0.33 and 0.39 for wet-dry and constantly moist treatments, respectively, results that compared well with those previously reported for Acanthamoeba spp. PMID:16345984

  16. Entamoeba histolytica acetyl-CoA synthetase: biomarker of acute amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Huat, Lim Boon; Garcia, Alfonso Olivos; Ning, Tan Zi; Kin, Wong Weng; Noordin, Rahmah; Azham, Siti Shafiqah Anaqi; Jie, Lee Zhi; Ching, Guee Cher; Chong, Foo Phiaw; Dam, Pim Chau

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) antigen(s) recognized by moribound amoebic liver abscess hamsters. Methods Crude soluble antigen of E. histolytica was probed with sera of moribund hamsters in 1D- and 2D-Western blot analyses. The antigenic protein was then sent for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-AI to produce the recombinant E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS) protein. A customised ELISA was developed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the recombinant protein. Results A ∼75 kDa protein band with a pI value of 5.91-6.5 was found to be antigenic; and not detected by sera of hamsters in the control group. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the protein to be the 77 kDa E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS). The customised ELISA results revealed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity when tested against infected (n=31) and control group hamsters (n=5) serum samples, respectively. Conclusions This finding suggested the significant role of EhACS as a biomarker for moribund hamsters with acute amoebic liver abscess (ALA) infection. It is deemed pertinent that future studies explore the potential roles of EhACS in better understanding the pathogenesis of ALA; and in the development of vaccine and diagnostic tests to control ALA in human populations. PMID:25182945

  17. Bacterial-type oxygen detoxification and iron-sulfur cluster assembly in amoebal relict mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Maralikova, Barbora; Ali, Vahab; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; van der Giezen, Mark; Henze, Katrin; Tovar, Jorge

    2010-03-01

    The assembly of vital reactive iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cofactors in eukaryotes is mediated by proteins inherited from the original mitochondrial endosymbiont. Uniquely among eukaryotes, however, Entamoeba and Mastigamoeba lack such mitochondrial-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins and possess instead an analogous bacterial-type system acquired by lateral gene transfer. Here we demonstrate, using immunomicroscopy and biochemical methods, that beyond their predicted cytosolic distribution the bacterial-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins NifS and NifU have been recruited to function within the relict mitochondrial organelles (mitosomes) of Entamoeba histolytica. Both Nif proteins are 10-fold more concentrated within mitosomes compared with their cytosolic distribution suggesting that active Fe-S protein maturation occurs in these organelles. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy showed that amoebal mitosomes are minute but highly abundant cellular structures that occupy up to 2% of the total cell volume. In addition, protein colocalization studies allowed identification of the amoebal hydroperoxide detoxification enzyme rubrerythrin as a mitosomal protein. This protein contains functional Fe-S centres and exhibits peroxidase activity in vitro. Our findings demonstrate the role of analogous protein replacement in mitochondrial organelle evolution and suggest that the relict mitochondrial organelles of Entamoeba are important sites of metabolic activity that function in Fe-S protein-mediated oxygen detoxification.

  18. Major histocompatibility complex class II alleles and haplotypes associated with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Shiel, R E; Kennedy, L J; Nolan, C M; Mooney, C T; Callanan, J J

    2014-09-01

    Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis is a breed-restricted canine neuroinflammatory disorder affecting young greyhounds in Ireland. A genetic risk factor is suspected because of the development of disease in multiple siblings and an inability to identify a causative infectious agent. The aim of this study was to examine potential associations between dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype and the presence of the disease. DLA three locus haplotypes were determined in 31 dogs with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis and in 115 healthy control dogs using sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. All dogs were unrelated at the parental level. Two haplotypes (DRB1*01802/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 and DRB1*01501/DQA1*00601/DQB1*02201) were significantly (P = 0.0099 and 0.037) associated with the presence of meningoencephalitis, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.531 (1.168-26.19) and 3.736 (1.446-9.652), respectively. These results confirm that there is an association between DLA class II haplotype and greyhound meningoencephalitis, suggesting an immunogenetic risk factor for the development of the disease. Greyhound meningoencephalitis may be a suitable model for human neuroinflammatory diseases with an immunogenetic component. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Biofilm is associated with chronic streptococcal meningoencephalitis in fish.

    PubMed

    Isiaku, A I; Sabri, M Y; Ina-Salwany, M Y; Hassan, M D; Tanko, P N; Bello, M B

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are aggregates of attached microbial organisms whose existence on tissues is often recognised as a mechanism for the establishment of most chronic diseases. Herein we investigated the ability of piscine Streptococcus agalactiae, an important aquatic pathogen, for adaptation to this sessile lifestyle in vitro and in the brain of a tilapia fish model. Piscine S. agalactiae exhibited a weak attachment to polystyrene plates and expressed a low biofilm phenotype under the study conditions. Furthermore, fluorescent in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed discrete aggregates of attached S. agalactiae within brain tissues and around meningeal surfaces. They were embedded in an exopolysaccharide containing matrix, intractable to inflammatory response and showed some level of resistance to penicillin despite proven susceptibility on sensitivity test. Intracellular bacterial aggregates were also observed, moreover, antibody mediated response was not demonstrated during infection. Nucleated erythrocytes appear to facilitate brain invasion possibly via the Trojan horse mechanism leading to a granulomatous inflammation. We have demonstrated that biofilm is associated with persistence of S. agalactiae and the development of chronic meningoencephalitis in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Establishment of a rat model for canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME).

    PubMed

    Park, E-S; Uchida, K; Nakayama, H

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenesis of necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), necrotizing leukoencephalitis (NLE), and granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) is still uncertain, although they are considered immune-mediated diseases. The purpose of the present study is to generate a rodent model(s) of these diseases. Rats were injected with rat cerebral or cerebellar homogenate. Rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbr) exhibited vacuolar or malacic changes mainly in the cerebral cortex. CD3-positive T cells and Iba-1-positive and CD163-negative microglia infiltrated and activated around the lesions. IgG deposited in the glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-positive glia limitans from the early phase, and CD3-positive T cells attached to GFAP-positive astrocytes. Autoantibodies against GFAP were detected in the sera. These pathological features of Cbr rats were consistent with those of canine NME. In contrast, rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbe) exhibited demyelinating lesions with inflammatory reactions in the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. The presence of demyelination and autoantibodies against myelin proteins in Cbe rats was similar to murine experimental autoimmune encephalitis and differed from NME, NLE, and GME. All the present findings indicate that autoantibodies together with microglia and T cells may play a major role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic canine meningoencephalomyelitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Severe auditory processing disorder secondary to viral meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pillion, Joseph P; Shiffler, Dorothy E; Hoon, Alexander H; Lin, Doris D M

    2014-06-01

    To describe auditory function in an individual with bilateral damage to the temporal and parietal cortex. Case report. A previously healthy 17-year old male is described who sustained extensive cortical injury following an episode of viral meningoencephalitis. He developed status epilepticus and required intubation and multiple anticonvulsants. Serial brain MRIs showed bilateral temporoparietal signal changes reflecting extensive damage to language areas and the first transverse gyrus of Heschl on both sides. The patient was referred for assessment of auditory processing but was so severely impaired in speech processing that he was unable to complete any formal tests of his speech processing abilities. Audiological assessment utilizing objective measures of auditory function established the presence of normal peripheral auditory function and illustrates the importance of the use of objective measures of auditory function in patients with injuries to the auditory cortex. Use of objective measures of auditory function is essential in establishing the presence of normal peripheral auditory function in individuals with cortical damage who may not be able to cooperate sufficiently for assessment utilizing behavioral measures of auditory function.

  2. MENINGOENCEPHALITIS AND PNEUMONITIS DUE TO WESTERN EQUINE VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Ichelson, David L.

    1956-01-01

    In a series of 20 cases here presented in a study of Western equine encephalitis, only ten were conclusively proven by serological or histopathological methods, while the other ten were presumptively cases of that disease. Involvement of the spinal cord was of relatively low incidence. In only one case of four in which autopsy was done could the Western equine virus be demonstrated in the cerebral tissues. There was a rather high incidence of involvement of the respiratory tree. A high proportion of patients had complaints referable to the respiratory tract. Physical signs denoting disease of both the upper and lower respiratory tract, x-ray evidence showing bronchial and pulmonary involvement, and autopsy evidence of bronchopneumonia were noted frequently. All patients had fever as well as symptoms and physical signs of central nervous system disease. Differential diagnosis posed many interesting and challenging problems. The clinical features were those of meningoencephalitis and never a “flu-like” syndrome, although in several of the cases diagnosis could not be made with certainty for several days, until meningeal signs developed, and usually the patients were treated with one or several antibiotics during that time. In all cases in which a neutralization test for the Western equine virus was done, the result was either positive or inconclusive. Results of complement fixation tests were significant in only six cases. In seven of 13 cases in which x-ray films of the chest were made, streaks of increased density were noted. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:18732027

  3. Update on Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Ana Cristina Arámburu; Yoshimura, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is caused by a variety of helminthic infections. These worm-specific infections are named after the causative worm genera, the most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Worm parasites enter an organism through ingestion of contaminated water or an intermediate host and can eventually affect the central nervous system (CNS). These infections are potentially serious events leading to sequelae or death, and diagnosis depends on currently limited molecular methods. Identification of parasites in fluids and tissues is rarely possible, while images and clinical examinations do not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Treatment usually requires the concomitant administration of corticoids and anthelminthic drugs, yet new compounds and their extensive and detailed clinical evaluation are much needed. Eosinophilia in fluids may be detected in other infectious and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic disease, drug use, and prosthesis reactions. Thus, distinctive identification of eosinophils in fluids is a necessary component in the etiologic diagnosis of CNS infections. PMID:19366917

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Mumps Meningoencephalitis with Bilateral Hippocampal Lesions without Preceding Acute Parotitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ah Reum; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kang, Young Hye; Cho, Soon Gu; Choi, Seong Hye; Baek, Ji Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Meningitis is a common central nervous system (CNS) complication of the mumps, a viral infection, but encephalitis and meningoencephalitis are less common in mumps. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings of acute mumps meningoencephalitis in a 32-year-old male who showed bilateral hippocampal lesions without preceding parotitis. Although it is rare, hippocampal involvement should be considered a CNS complication of mumps infection.

  5. Unsuccessful cyclosporine plus prednisolone therapy for autoimmune meningoencephalitis in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong-In; Lee, Hee-Chun; Ha, Jeongim; Jung, Hae-Won; Jeon, Joon-Hyeok; Moon, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Cho, Kyu-Woan

    2013-12-30

    A 4-year-old female Maltese (case 1), a 9-year-old castrated male shih tzu (case 2) and 2-year-old female Pomeranian (case 3) presented with neurological signs, such as head tilt, ataxia, circling and paresis. The three cases were tentatively diagnosed as having meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology based on computed tomography scan and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. All patients were managed with cyclosporine plus prednisolone therapy. The survival times of the three patients were 170, 70 and 21 days, respectively. After the cases died, we performed necropsy and histopathological examination for definitive diagnosis. Based on the necropsy, histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations, cases 1, 2 and 3 were definitely diagnosed as having necrotizing meningoencephalitis, necrotizing leukoencephalitis and granulomatous meningoencephalitis, respectively. This case report demonstrated the clinical findings, brain CT characteristics and histopathological and immunohistochemical features of NME, NLE and GME in dogs and discussed the reason for the relatively short survival times under cyclosporine plus prednisolone therapy.

  6. Reciprocal functions of Cryptococcus neoformans copper homeostasis machinery during pulmonary infection and meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tian-Shu; Ju, Xiao; Gao, Hui-Ling; Wang, Tao; Thiele, Dennis J; Li, Jia-Yi; Wang, Zhan-You; Ding, Chen

    2014-11-24

    Copper homeostasis is important for virulence of the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, which can cause lethal meningoencephalitis in humans. Cryptococcus cells encounter high copper levels in the lung, where infection is initiated, and low copper levels in the brain. Here we demonstrate that two Cryptococcus copper transporters, Ctr1 and Ctr4, differentially influence fungal survival during pulmonary infection and the onset of meningoencephalitis. Protein Ctr1 is rapidly degraded under the high-copper conditions found in infected lungs, and its loss has no effect in fungal virulence in mice. By contrast, deleting CTR4 results in a hypervirulent phenotype. Overexpressing either Ctr1 or Ctr4 leads to profound reductions in fungal burden in the lung. However, during the onset of meningoencephalitis, expression of the copper transporters is induced and is critical for Cryptococcus virulence. Our work demonstrates that the fungal cells switch between copper detoxification and acquisition to address different copper stresses in the host.

  7. Pituitary adenoma apoplexy with initial presentation mimicking bacterial meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yi; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chen, Hsien-Chih

    2009-05-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare but life-threatening disorder. Clinical presentation of this condition includes severe headache, impaired consciousness, fever, visual disturbance, and variable ocular paresis. Signs of meningeal irritation are very rare. However, if present and associated with headache, fever, and pleocytosis, meningeal irritation may lead to misinterpretation as infectious meningoencephalitis. To the best of our knowledge, pituitary apoplexy with an initial presentation mimicking infectious meningoencephalitis had rarely been reported in the literature. Here, we report a 57-year-old man who had acute severe headache, high fever, neck stiffness, disturbance in consciousness, and left ocular paresis. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, an elevated C-reactive protein level, and neutrophilic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid. Because bacterial meningoencephalitis was suspected, empiric antibiotic therapy was administered but in vain. Further examinations indicated a diagnosis of pituitary adenoma with apoplexy. After the immediate administration of intravenous corticosteroid supplement and surgical decompression, the patient recovered.

  8. Protozoal meningoencephalitis in sea otters (Enhydra lutris): a histopathological and immunohistochemical study of naturally occurring cases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, N J; Dubey, J P; Lindsay, D S; Cole, R A; Meteyer, C U

    2007-01-01

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is considered to be an important cause of mortality in the California sea otter (Enhydra lutris). Thirty nine of 344 (11.3%) California (CA) and Washington state (WA) sea otters examined from 1985 to 2004 had histopathological evidence of significant protozoal meningoencephalitis. The aetiological agents and histopathological changes associated with these protozoal infections are described. The morphology of the actively multiplicative life stages of the organisms (tachyzoites for Toxoplasma gondii and merozoites for Sarcocystis neurona) and immunohistochemical labelling were used to identify infection with S. neurona (n=22, 56.4%), T. gondii (n=5, 12.8%) or dual infection with both organisms (n=12, 30.8%). Active S. neurona was present in all dual infections, while most had only the latent form of T. gondii. In S. neurona meningoencephalitis, multifocal to diffuse gliosis was widespread in grey matter and consistently present in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. In T. gondii meningoencephalitis, discrete foci of gliosis and malacia were more widely separated, sometimes incorporated pigment-laden macrophages and mineral, and were found predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Quiescent tissue cysts of T. gondii were considered to be incidental and not a cause of clinical disease and mortality. Protozoal meningoencephalitis was diagnosed more frequently in the expanding population of WA sea otters (10 of 31, 32.3%) than in the declining CA population (29 of 313, 9.3%). Among sea otters with protozoal meningoencephalitis, those that had displayed neurological signs prior to death had active S. neurona encephalitis, supporting the conclusion that S. neurona is the most significant protozoal pathogen in the central nervous system of sea otters.

  9. Protozoal Meningoencephalitis in Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris): a Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study of Naturally Occuring Cases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Dubey, J.P.; Lindsay, D.S.; Cole, R.A.; Meteyer, C.U.

    2007-01-01

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is considered to be an important cause of mortality in the California sea otter (Enhydra lutris). Thirty nine of 344 (11.3%) California (CA) and Washington state (WA) sea otters examined from 1985 to 2004 had histopathological evidence of significant protozoal meningoencephalitis. The aetiological agents and histopathological changes associated with these protozoal infections are described. The morphology of the actively multiplicative life stages of the organisms (tachyzoites for Toxoplasma gondii and merozoites for Sarcocystis neurona) and immunohistochemical labelling were used to identify infection with S. neurona (n=22, 56.4%), T. gondii (n=5, 12.8%) or dual infection with both organisms (n=12, 30.8%). Active S. neurona was present in all dual infections, while most had only the latent form of T. gondii. In S. neurona meningoencephalitis, multifocal to diffuse gliosis was widespread in grey matter and consistently present in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. In T. gondii meningoencephalitis, discrete foci of gliosis and malacia were more widely separated, sometimes incorporated pigment-laden macrophages and mineral, and were found predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Quiescent tissue cysts of T. gondii were considered to be incidental and not a cause of clinical disease and mortality. Protozoal meningoencephalitis was diagnosed more frequently in the expanding population of WA sea otters (10 of 31, 32.3%) than in the declining CA population (29 of 313, 9.3%). Among sea otters with protozoal meningoencephalitis, those that had displayed neurological signs prior to death had active S. neurona encephalitis, supporting the conclusion that S. neurona is the most significant protozoal pathogen in the central nervous system of sea otters.

  10. Meningitis and Meningoencephalitis among Israel Defense Force Soldiers: 20 Years Experience at the Hadassah Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Pikkel, Yoav Y; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Eliahou, Ruth; Honig, Asaf

    2015-11-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis pose major risks of morbidity and mortality. To describe 20 years of experience treating infections of the central nervous system in Israel Defense Force (IDF) soldiers, including the common presentations, pathogens and sequelae, and to identify risk groups among soldiers. All soldiers who were admitted to the Hadassah University Medical Center (both campuses: Ein Kerem and Mt. Scopus) due to meningitis and meningoencephalitis from January 1993 to January 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical, laboratory and radiologic data were reviewed from their hospital and army medical corps files. Attention was given to patients' military job description, i.e., combat vs. non-combat soldier, soldiers in training, and medical personnel. We identified 97 cases of suspected meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Six were mistakenly filed and these patients were found to have other disorders. Four soldiers were diagnosed with epidural abscess and five with meningitis due to non-infectious in flammatory diseases. Eighty-two soldiers in active and reserve duty had infectious meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Of these, 46 (56.1%) were combat soldiers and 31 (37.8%) non-combat; 20 (29.2%) were soldiers in training, 10 (12.2%) were training staff and 8 (9.8%) were medical staff. The main pathogens were enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus an d Neisseria meningitidis. In our series, soldiers in training, combat soldiers and medical personnel had meningitis and meningoencephalitis more than other soldiers. Enteroviruses are highly infectious pathogens and can cause outbreaks. N. meningitidis among IDF soldiers is still a concern. Early and aggressive treatment with steroids should be considered especially in robust meningoencephalitis cases.

  11. Fulminant amoebic colitis: a rare fierce presentation of a common pathology.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Abdul Rehman; Jawad, Ahmed; Fazal, Fariha; Sayyed, Raza

    2013-04-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with fulminant amoebic colitis (FAC) over a 20 year period in an urban tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. After consideration for inclusion and exclusion criteria 25 cases were identified as FAC with the most common presentations being abdominal pain (84%). Nineteen (76%) underwent laparotomy for peritonitis with evidence of: colonic perforation in 10 (40%); faecal peritonitis in eight (32%); bowel gangrene in one (4%); and intra-abdominal abscess in two (8%). Nine (36%) deaths were recorded in the series - eight (53%) in the operated group and one (16.6%) in the medically-treated group. The optimal outcome can be achieved in FAC with aggressive resuscitation, intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics, including metronidazole, and total colectomy without anastomosis in patients with peritonitis.

  12. Mutations in Novel Lipopolysaccharide Biogenesis Genes Confer Resistance to Amoebal Grazing in Synechococcus elongatus

    PubMed Central

    Effner, Emily E.; Iglesias-Sánchez, Maria José; Golden, Susan S.

    2016-01-01

    In natural and artificial aquatic environments, population structures and dynamics of photosynthetic microbes are heavily influenced by the grazing activity of protistan predators. Understanding the molecular factors that affect predation is critical for controlling toxic cyanobacterial blooms and maintaining cyanobacterial biomass production ponds for generating biofuels and other bioproducts. We previously demonstrated that impairment of the synthesis or transport of the O-antigen component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enables resistance to amoebal grazing in the model predator-prey system consisting of the heterolobosean amoeba HGG1 and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (R. S. Simkovsky et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:16678–16683, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1214904109). In this study, we used this model system to identify additional gene products involved in the synthesis of O antigen, the ligation of O antigen to the lipid A-core conjugated molecule (including a novel ligase gene), the generation of GDP-fucose, and the incorporation of sugars into the lipid A core oligosaccharide of S. elongatus. Knockout of any of these genes enables resistance to HGG1, and of these, only disruption of the genes involved in synthesis or incorporation of GDP-fucose into the lipid A-core molecule impairs growth. Because these LPS synthesis genes are well conserved across the diverse range of cyanobacteria, they enable a broader understanding of the structure and synthesis of cyanobacterial LPS and represent mutational targets for generating resistance to amoebal grazers in novel biomass production strains. PMID:26921432

  13. Occult Amoebic Liver Abscess as Cause of Extensive Inferior Vena Cava and Hepatic Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leslie; Burute, Nishigandha; Haider, Ehsan; Serrano, Pablo E; O'Shea, Timothy; Siegal, Deborah

    2017-07-03

    The most common extraintestinal complication of Entamoeba histolytica is amoebic liver abscess (ALA). Hepatic vein and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis are rare but well-documented complications of ALA, typically attributed to mechanical compression and inflammation associated with a large abscess. We present a case of a previously healthy 43-year-old Canadian man presenting with constitutional symptoms and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. He was found to have thrombophlebitis of the IVC, accessory right hepatic vein, and bilateral iliac veins. Extensive investigations for thrombophilia were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver demonstrated a 3.2-cm focal area of parenchymal abnormality that was reported as presumptive hepatocellular carcinoma, and a 1.9-cm lesion in the caudate lobe with diffusion restriction and peripheral rim enhancement. Despite multiple biopsy attempts, a histopathological diagnosis was not achieved. Abdominal pain and fever 4 months later prompted repeat ultrasound demonstrating a 10.4- × 12.0-cm rim-enhancing fluid attenuation lesion felt to represent a liver abscess. Thick dark "chocolate brown" drainage from the lesion and positive serology for E. histolytica confirmed the diagnosis of ALA acquired from a previous trip to Cuba. The patient was started on treatment with metronidazole and paromomycin and repeat abdominal ultrasound demonstrated resolution of the abscess. This case is the first to demonstrate extensive IVC thrombosis secondary to a relatively small occult ALA and emphasizes the thrombogenic potential of ALA. Amoebic infection should be considered as a rare cause of IVC thrombosis in the correct clinical context.

  14. Investigation of Legionella Contamination in Bath Water Samples by Culture, Amoebic Co-Culture, and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Methods.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Akiko; Kimura, Akio; Kawabuchi-Kurata, Takako; Adachi, Shinichi; Furuhata, Katsunori; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-10-19

    We investigated Legionella contamination in bath water samples, collected from 68 bathing facilities in Japan, by culture, culture with amoebic co-culture, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and real-time qPCR with amoebic co-culture. Using the conventional culture method, Legionella pneumophila was detected in 11 samples (11/68, 16.2%). Contrary to our expectation, the culture method with the amoebic co-culture technique did not increase the detection rate of Legionella (4/68, 5.9%). In contrast, a combination of the amoebic co-culture technique followed by qPCR successfully increased the detection rate (57/68, 83.8%) compared with real-time qPCR alone (46/68, 67.6%). Using real-time qPCR after culture with amoebic co-culture, more than 10-fold higher bacterial numbers were observed in 30 samples (30/68, 44.1%) compared with the same samples without co-culture. On the other hand, higher bacterial numbers were not observed after propagation by amoebae in 32 samples (32/68, 47.1%). Legionella was not detected in the remaining six samples (6/68, 8.8%), irrespective of the method. These results suggest that application of the amoebic co-culture technique prior to real-time qPCR may be useful for the sensitive detection of Legionella from bath water samples. Furthermore, a combination of amoebic co-culture and real-time qPCR might be useful to detect viable and virulent Legionella because their ability to invade and multiply within free-living amoebae is considered to correlate with their pathogenicity for humans. This is the first report evaluating the efficacy of the amoebic co-culture technique for detecting Legionella in bath water samples.

  15. Investigation of Legionella Contamination in Bath Water Samples by Culture, Amoebic Co-Culture, and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Akiko; Kimura, Akio; Kawabuchi-Kurata, Takako; Adachi, Shinichi; Furuhata, Katsunori; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated Legionella contamination in bath water samples, collected from 68 bathing facilities in Japan, by culture, culture with amoebic co-culture, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and real-time qPCR with amoebic co-culture. Using the conventional culture method, Legionella pneumophila was detected in 11 samples (11/68, 16.2%). Contrary to our expectation, the culture method with the amoebic co-culture technique did not increase the detection rate of Legionella (4/68, 5.9%). In contrast, a combination of the amoebic co-culture technique followed by qPCR successfully increased the detection rate (57/68, 83.8%) compared with real-time qPCR alone (46/68, 67.6%). Using real-time qPCR after culture with amoebic co-culture, more than 10-fold higher bacterial numbers were observed in 30 samples (30/68, 44.1%) compared with the same samples without co-culture. On the other hand, higher bacterial numbers were not observed after propagation by amoebae in 32 samples (32/68, 47.1%). Legionella was not detected in the remaining six samples (6/68, 8.8%), irrespective of the method. These results suggest that application of the amoebic co-culture technique prior to real-time qPCR may be useful for the sensitive detection of Legionella from bath water samples. Furthermore, a combination of amoebic co-culture and real-time qPCR might be useful to detect viable and virulent Legionella because their ability to invade and multiply within free-living amoebae is considered to correlate with their pathogenicity for humans. This is the first report evaluating the efficacy of the amoebic co-culture technique for detecting Legionella in bath water samples. PMID:26492259

  16. Baylisascaris procyonis–Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Previously Healthy Adult, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michael J.; Halabi, Cathra; Wietek, Natalie; LaRiviere, Alejandro; Shah, Maulik; Wilson, Michael R.; Chin-Hong, Peter; Douglas, Vanja; Kazacos, Kevin R.; Babik, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    After severe neurocognitive decline developed in an otherwise healthy 63-year-old man, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and enhancing lesions. The patient tested positive for antibodies to Baylisascaris spp. roundworms, was treated with albendazole and dexamethasone, and showed improvement after 3 months. Baylisascariasis should be considered for all patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:27434260

  17. Meningoencephalitis and Compartmentalization of the Cerebral Ventricles Caused by Enterobacter sakazakii

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Martin B.; Allen, Stephen D.; Neal, Patricia; Reynolds, Janet

    1981-01-01

    A necrotizing meningoencephalitis complicated by ventricular compartmentalization and abscess formation caused by Enterobacter sakazakii in a previously healthy 5-week-old female is described. A detailed description of the isolate is presented. This communication firmly establishes the pathogenicity of E. sakazakii. PMID:7287892

  18. Baylisascaris procyonis-Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Previously Healthy Adult, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Charles; Reid, Michael J; Halabi, Cathra; Witek, Natalie; LaRiviere, Alejandro; Shah, Maulik; Wilson, Michael R; Chin-Hong, Peter; Douglas, Vanja; Kazacos, Kevin R; Babik, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    After severe neurocognitive decline developed in an otherwise healthy 63-year-old man, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and enhancing lesions. The patient tested positive for antibodies to Baylisascaris spp. roundworms, was treated with albendazole and dexamethasone, and showed improvement after 3 months. Baylisascariasis should be considered for all patients with eosinophilic meningitis.

  19. Late Ebola virus relapse causing meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael; Rodger, Alison; Bell, David J; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Filipe, Ana; Gifford, Robert J; Hopkins, Susan; Hughes, Joseph; Jabeen, Farrah; Johannessen, Ingolfur; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos; Lackenby, Angie; Lester, Rebecca; Liu, Rebecca S N; MacConnachie, Alisdair; Mahungu, Tabitha; Martin, Daniel; Marshall, Neal; Mepham, Stephen; Orton, Richard; Palmarini, Massimo; Patel, Monika; Perry, Colin; Peters, S Erica; Porter, Duncan; Ritchie, David; Ritchie, Neil D; Seaton, R Andrew; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Templeton, Kate; Warren, Simon; Wilkie, Gavin S; Zambon, Maria; Gopal, Robin; Thomson, Emma C

    2016-07-30

    There are thousands of survivors of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa. Ebola virus can persist in survivors for months in immune-privileged sites; however, viral relapse causing life-threatening and potentially transmissible disease has not been described. We report a case of late relapse in a patient who had been treated for severe Ebola virus disease with high viral load (peak cycle threshold value 13.2). A 39-year-old female nurse from Scotland, who had assisted the humanitarian effort in Sierra Leone, had received intensive supportive treatment and experimental antiviral therapies, and had been discharged with undetectable Ebola virus RNA in peripheral blood. The patient was readmitted to hospital 9 months after discharge with symptoms of acute meningitis, and was found to have Ebola virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). She was treated with supportive therapy and experimental antiviral drug GS-5734 (Gilead Sciences, San Francisco, Foster City, CA, USA). We monitored Ebola virus RNA in CSF and plasma, and sequenced the viral genome using an unbiased metagenomic approach. On admission, reverse transcriptase PCR identified Ebola virus RNA at a higher level in CSF (cycle threshold value 23.7) than plasma (31.3); infectious virus was only recovered from CSF. The patient developed progressive meningoencephalitis with cranial neuropathies and radiculopathy. Clinical recovery was associated with addition of high-dose corticosteroids during GS-5734 treatment. CSF Ebola virus RNA slowly declined and was undetectable following 14 days of treatment with GS-5734. Sequencing of plasma and CSF viral genome revealed only two non-coding changes compared with the original infecting virus. Our report shows that previously unanticipated, late, severe relapses of Ebola virus can occur, in this case in the CNS. This finding fundamentally redefines what is known about the natural history of Ebola virus infection. Vigilance should be maintained in the thousands of Ebola survivors

  20. Pituitary apoplexy can mimic acute meningoencephalitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Gregory, Stephen; Jaiganesh, Thiagarajan

    2011-10-05

    Pituitary apoplexy is an uncommon but life-threatening condition that is often overlooked and underdiagnosed. We report a 45-year-old man who presented to our emergency department with a sudden onset headache, acute confusion, signs of meningeal irritation and ophthalmoplegia. An initial diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made, which was amended to pituitary apoplexy following thorough investigation within the emergency department.A 45-year-old man was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with a history of sudden onset of frontal headache and acute confusion. His wife provided the history. There was no significant past medical history of diabetes, hypertension, recent travel abroad, exposure to sick contacts, involvement in outdoor pursuits such as hiking/cave diving, or trauma. He worked in a bank and had been well until 24 h prior to the onset of sudden headache, which was gradually worsening in nature and associated with increasing confusion. The patient's wife reported that he had neither experienced any fevers, night sweats, or coryzal symptoms nor received any recent vaccinations. He was not on any regular medications. He was a non-smoker and occasionally consumed alcohol. There was no significant family history. On examination in the ED, his temperature was 37.6°C, his pulse was 110/min, and he was normotensive and normoglycaemic. A macular blanching rash was noted over the patient's trunk. The patient was disoriented to time and place. Neurological examination revealed reduced GCS (11/15-E3, M6, V2), marked neck stiffness, a positive Kernig's sign and a right sixth nerve palsy.A provisional diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made and the patient was started on a course of intravenous antibiotics with benzyl penicillin 1.2 g, cefotaxime 2 g and acyclovir 750 mg. Baseline blood investigations revealed hyponatraemia (122 mmol/l), a white-cell count of 11 × 109/l and a C-reactive protein > 250. Due to the sudden onset of the

  1. Pituitary apoplexy can mimic acute meningoencephalitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is an uncommon but life-threatening condition that is often overlooked and underdiagnosed. We report a 45-year-old man who presented to our emergency department with a sudden onset headache, acute confusion, signs of meningeal irritation and ophthalmoplegia. An initial diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made, which was amended to pituitary apoplexy following thorough investigation within the emergency department. A 45-year-old man was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with a history of sudden onset of frontal headache and acute confusion. His wife provided the history. There was no significant past medical history of diabetes, hypertension, recent travel abroad, exposure to sick contacts, involvement in outdoor pursuits such as hiking/cave diving, or trauma. He worked in a bank and had been well until 24 h prior to the onset of sudden headache, which was gradually worsening in nature and associated with increasing confusion. The patient's wife reported that he had neither experienced any fevers, night sweats, or coryzal symptoms nor received any recent vaccinations. He was not on any regular medications. He was a non-smoker and occasionally consumed alcohol. There was no significant family history. On examination in the ED, his temperature was 37.6°C, his pulse was 110/min, and he was normotensive and normoglycaemic. A macular blanching rash was noted over the patient's trunk. The patient was disoriented to time and place. Neurological examination revealed reduced GCS (11/15-E3, M6, V2), marked neck stiffness, a positive Kernig's sign and a right sixth nerve palsy. A provisional diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made and the patient was started on a course of intravenous antibiotics with benzyl penicillin 1.2 g, cefotaxime 2 g and acyclovir 750 mg. Baseline blood investigations revealed hyponatraemia (122 mmol/l), a white-cell count of 11 × 109/l and a C-reactive protein > 250. Due to the sudden onset of the

  2. A novel alpha-Proteobacterium, Nordella oligomobilis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated by using amoebal co-cultures.

    PubMed

    La Scola, Bernard; Barrassi, Lina; Raoult, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Using an amoebal co-culture procedure, a novel alpha-Proteobacterium phylogenetically close to two uncultured aquatic bacteria was isolated. On the basis of phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we propose the new genus and species Nordella oligomobilis gen. nov., sp. nov. The genus Nordella forms a well separated taxon in the order Rhizobiales within the alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria. Its close relatives are environmental uncultured bacteria.

  3. Amoebal Endosymbiont Neochlamydia Genome Sequence Illuminates the Bacterial Role in the Defense of the Host Amoebae against Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kasumi; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Hayashida, Kyoko; Matsuo, Junji; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinji; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Kaori; Nagai, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the obligate intracellular amoebal endosymbiont Neochlamydia S13, an environmental chlamydia strain, has an amoebal infection rate of 100%, but does not cause amoebal lysis and lacks transferability to other host amoebae. The underlying mechanism for these observations remains unknown. In this study, we found that the host amoeba could completely evade Legionella infection. The draft genome sequence of Neochlamydia S13 revealed several defects in essential metabolic pathways, as well as unique molecules with leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and ankyrin domains, responsible for protein-protein interaction. Neochlamydia S13 lacked an intact tricarboxylic acid cycle and had an incomplete respiratory chain. ADP/ATP translocases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and secretion systems (types II and III) were well conserved, but no type IV secretion system was found. The number of outer membrane proteins (OmcB, PomS, 76-kDa protein, and OmpW) was limited. Interestingly, genes predicting unique proteins with LRRs (30 genes) or ankyrin domains (one gene) were identified. Furthermore, 33 transposases were found, possibly explaining the drastic genome modification. Taken together, the genomic features of Neochlamydia S13 explain the intimate interaction with the host amoeba to compensate for bacterial metabolic defects, and illuminate the role of the endosymbiont in the defense of the host amoebae against Legionella infection. PMID:24747986

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Mumps Meningoencephalitis with Bilateral Hippocampal Lesions without Preceding Acute Parotitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ah Reum; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kang, Young Hye; Cho, Soon Gu; Choi, Seong Hye; Baek, Ji Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Meningitis is a common central nervous system (CNS) complication of the mumps, a viral infection, but encephalitis and meningoencephalitis are less common in mumps. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings of acute mumps meningoencephalitis in a 32-year-old male who showed bilateral hippocampal lesions without preceding parotitis. Although it is rare, hippocampal involvement should be considered a CNS complication of mumps infection. PMID:28246518

  5. Is Cryptococcus gattii a Primary Pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.; Saijo, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    The two etiologic agents of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii, have been commonly designated as either an opportunistic pathogen for the first species or as a primary pathogen for the second species. Such a distinction has been based on epidemiological findings that the majority of patients presenting meningoencephalitis caused by C. neoformans are immunocompromised while C. gattii infection has been reported more often in immunocompetent patients. A recent report, however, showed that GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) neutralizing antibodies were prevalent in the plasma of “apparently immunocompetent” C. gattii patients with meningoencephalitis. Because GM-CSF is essential for differentiation of monocytes to macrophages and modulating the immune response, it is not surprising that the lack of GM-CSF function predisposes otherwise healthy individuals to infection via inhalation of environmental pathogens such as C. gattii. Since the test for anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies is not included in routine immunological profiling at most hospitals, healthy patients with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies are usually categorized as immunocompetent. It is likely that a comprehensive immunological evaluation of patients with C. gattii meningoencephalitis, who had been diagnosed as immunocompetent, would reveal a majority of them had hidden immune dysfunction. This paper reviews the relationship between GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies and the risk for C. gattii infection with CNS involvement. PMID:27795955

  6. Host-Microbe Interactions and Defense Mechanisms in the Development of Amoebic Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Santi-Rocca, Julien; Rigothier, Marie-Christine; Guillén, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Amoebiasis by Entamoeba histolytica is a major public health problem in developing countries and leads to several thousand deaths per year. The parasite invades the intestine (provoking diarrhea and dysentery) and the liver, where it forms abscesses (amoebic liver abscesses [ALAs]). The liver is the organ responsible for filtering blood coming from the intestinal tract, a task that implies a particular structure and immune features. Amoebae use the portal route and break through the sinusoidal endothelial barrier to reach the hepatic parenchyma. When faced with systemic and cell-mediated defenses, trophozoites adapt to their new environment and modulate host responses, leading to parasite survival and the formation of inflammatory foci. Cytopathogenic effects and the onset of inflammation may be caused by diffusible products originating from parasites and/or immune cells either by their secretion or by their release after cell death. Liver infection thus results from the interplay between E. histolytica and hepatic cells. Despite its importance in terms of public health burden, the lack of integrated data on ALA genesis means that we have only an incomplete description of the initiation and development of hepatic amoebiasis. Here, we review the main steps of ALA development as well as the responses triggered in both the host and the parasite. Transcriptome studies highlighted parasite factors involved in adherence to human cells, cytopathogenic effects, and adaptative and stress responses. An understanding of their role in ALA development will help to unravel the host-pathogen interactions and their evolution throughout the infection. PMID:19136434

  7. Morphological Findings in Trophozoites during Amoebic Abscess Development in Misoprostol-Treated BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Cano, Andrés; Gaytán-Ochoa, Rocío; Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto; Erosa de la Vega, Gilberto; González-Horta, Carmen; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    During amoebic liver abscess (ALA) formation in susceptible animals, immune response is regulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) dependent mechanisms. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of misoprostol (MPL), a PGE1 analogue, on ALA formation in BALB/c mice. Male mice from BALB/c strain were intrahepatically infected with 7.5 × 10(5) trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and treated with 10(-4) M of MPL daily until sacrifice at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection (p.i.). ALA formation was evaluated at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection; trophozoite morphology was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Results showed an increase in frequency of ALA formation in infected and MPL-treated mice only at 2 days p.i. (P = 0.03). A significant diminution in the size of trophozoites was detected in abscesses from mice independently of MPL treatment (from 5.8 ± 1.1 µm at 2 days p.i. to 2.7 ± 1.9 µm at 7 days p.i.) compared with trophozoites dimensions observed in susceptible hamsters (9.6 ± 2.7 µm) (P < 0.01). These results suggest that MPL treatment may modify the adequate control of inflammatory process to allow the persistence of trophozoites in the liver; however, natural resistance mechanisms cannot be discarded.

  8. Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Vanzzini-Zago, Virginia; Hernandez-Martinez, Dolores; Gonzalez-Robles, Arturo; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Ramirez-Flores, Elizabeth; Oregon-Miranda, Eric; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Martinez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely distributed worldwide. Some genera included in this group act as opportunistic pathogens causing fatal encephalitis and Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a sight-threatening infection of the cornea associated with the use of soft contact lenses that could even end in blindness if an early diagnosis and treatment are not achieved. Furthermore, the numbers of AK cases keep rising worldwide mainly due to an increase of contact lens wearers and lack of hygiene in the maintenance of lenses and their cases. In Mexico, no cases of AK have been described so far although the isolation of other pathogenic FLA such as Naegleria fowleri and Balamuthia mandrillaris from both clinical and environmental sources has been reported. The present study reports two cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis diagnosed in two patients admitted to the Hospital "Luis Sánchez Bulnes" for Blindness Prevention in Mexico City, Mexico. Corneal scrapes and contact lenses were checked for the presence of Acanthamoeba strains in both patients. Strains were axenized after initial isolation to classify at the genotype level. After sequencing the diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) region located on the 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene of Acanthamoeba, genotype T3 and genotype T4 were identified in clinical case 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of AK in Mexico in the literature and the first description of Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic infection.

  9. Morphological Findings in Trophozoites during Amoebic Abscess Development in Misoprostol-Treated BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aceves-Cano, Andrés; Gaytán-Ochoa, Rocío; Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto; Erosa de la Vega, Gilberto; González-Horta, Carmen; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    During amoebic liver abscess (ALA) formation in susceptible animals, immune response is regulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) dependent mechanisms. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of misoprostol (MPL), a PGE1 analogue, on ALA formation in BALB/c mice. Male mice from BALB/c strain were intrahepatically infected with 7.5 × 105 trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and treated with 10−4 M of MPL daily until sacrifice at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection (p.i.). ALA formation was evaluated at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection; trophozoite morphology was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Results showed an increase in frequency of ALA formation in infected and MPL-treated mice only at 2 days p.i. (P = 0.03). A significant diminution in the size of trophozoites was detected in abscesses from mice independently of MPL treatment (from 5.8 ± 1.1 µm at 2 days p.i. to 2.7 ± 1.9 µm at 7 days p.i.) compared with trophozoites dimensions observed in susceptible hamsters (9.6 ± 2.7 µm) (P < 0.01). These results suggest that MPL treatment may modify the adequate control of inflammatory process to allow the persistence of trophozoites in the liver; however, natural resistance mechanisms cannot be discarded. PMID:26090455

  10. Criblamydia sequanensis, a new intracellular Chlamydiales isolated from Seine river water using amoebal co-culture.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vincent; Casson, Nicola; Greub, Gilbert

    2006-12-01

    Accumulating evidence supports a role for Chlamydia-related organisms as emerging pathogens for human and animals. Assessment of their pathogenicity requires strain availability, at least for animal models and serological studies. As these obligate intracellular species are able to grow inside amoebae, we used co-culture with Acanthamoeba castellanii in an attempt to recover new Chlamydia-related species from river water. We isolated two strains from eight water samples. The first strain is a new Parachlamydia acanthamoebae strain that differs from previously described isolates by only two bases in the complete 16S rRNA gene sequence. The second isolate is the first representative of a new Chlamydiales family, as demonstrated by genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, ADP/ATP translocase and RnpB encoding genes. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization and electron microscopy, we demonstrated that it grows in high numbers in amoebae, where it exhibits a Chlamydia-like developmental cycle with reticulate bodies and star-like elementary bodies. Based on these results, we propose to name this new species 'Criblamydia sequanensis'. This work confirmed that amoebal co-culture is a relevant method to isolate new chlamydiae, and that it can be successfully applied to ecosystems colonized with a complex microbial community.

  11. Minimal model of a cell connecting amoebic motion and adaptive transport networks.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Shirakawa, Tomohiro; Niizato, Takayuki; Haruna, Taichi

    2008-08-21

    A cell is a minimal self-sustaining system that can move and compute. Previous work has shown that a unicellular slime mold, Physarum, can be utilized as a biological computer based on cytoplasmic flow encapsulated by a membrane. Although the interplay between the modification of the boundary of a cell and the cytoplasmic flow surrounded by the boundary plays a key role in Physarum computing, no model of a cell has been developed to describe this interplay. Here we propose a toy model of a cell that shows amoebic motion and can solve a maze, Steiner minimum tree problem and a spanning tree problem. Only by assuming that cytoplasm is hardened after passing external matter (or softened part) through a cell, the shape of the cell and the cytoplasmic flow can be changed. Without cytoplasm hardening, a cell is easily destroyed. This suggests that cytoplasmic hardening and/or sol-gel transformation caused by external perturbation can keep a cell in a critical state leading to a wide variety of shapes and motion.

  12. Lipid Composition of Multilamellar Bodies Secreted by Dictyostelium discoideum Reveals Their Amoebal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Valérie E.; Lessire, René; Domergue, Frédéric; Fouillen, Laetitia; Filion, Geneviève; Sedighi, Ahmadreza

    2013-01-01

    When they are fed with bacteria, Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae produce and secrete multilamellar bodies (MLBs), which are composed of membranous material. It has been proposed that MLBs are a waste disposal system that allows D. discoideum to eliminate undigested bacterial remains. However, the real function of MLBs remains unknown. Determination of the biochemical composition of MLBs, especially lipids, represents a way to gain information about the role of these structures. To allow these analyses, a protocol involving various centrifugation procedures has been developed to purify secreted MLBs from amoeba-bacterium cocultures. The purity of the MLB preparation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and by immunofluorescence using H36, an antibody that binds to MLBs. The lipid and fatty acid compositions of pure MLBs were then analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively, and compared to those of amoebae as well as bacteria used as a food source. While the bacteria were devoid of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), these two polar lipid species were major classes of lipids in MLBs and amoebae. Similarly, the fatty acid composition of MLBs and amoebae was characterized by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, while cyclic fatty acids were found only in bacteria. These results strongly suggest that the lipids constituting the MLBs originate from the amoebal metabolism rather than from undigested bacterial membranes. This opens the possibility that MLBs, instead of being a waste disposal system, have unsuspected roles in D. discoideum physiology. PMID:23748431

  13. Scrub Typhus Outbreak in a Remote Primary School, Bhutan, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Stephen; Tshering, Dorji; Phuntsho, Kelzang; Tshering, Karchung; Stenos, John

    2017-01-01

    Scrub typhus in Bhutan was first reported in 2009. We investigated an outbreak of scrub typhus in a remote primary school during August–October 2014. Delay in recognition and treatment resulted in 2 deaths from meningoencephalitis. Scrub typhus warrants urgent public health interventions in Bhutan. PMID:28726604

  14. Prostatic sequestration of Cryptococcus neoformans in immunocompromised persons treated for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ndimbie, O K; Dekker, A; Martinez, A J; Dixon, B

    1994-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome who was successfully treated for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis with amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. He died from other sequelae of acquired immune deficiency syndrome two years later. An autopsy revealed prominent cryptococcal prostatitis. Cryptococci were neither found in the central nervous system nor in other anatomic sites. The autopsy files yielded seven other cases of men with a history of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. The possibility that the prostate sequesters Cryptococcus neoformans thereby contributing to systemic relapse is explored. The qualify as a sequestration, cyptococci must be cultured from the prostate, or from a midstream voided specimen after prostatic massage, and the prostate must be the only focus of infection.

  15. Sarcocystis sp.-associated meningoencephalitis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Olson, Erik J; Wünschmann, Arno; Dubey, J P

    2007-09-01

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is uncommon in raptors. An adult female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was euthanized after several months of treatment for progressive neurologic signs. The predominant histologic lesion was lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis involving the cerebrum and cerebellum. There was a marked segmental loss of granular cells and Purkinje cells, as well as segmental atrophy of the molecular layer in the cerebellum. Protozoal merozoites and schizonts were observed in the gray matter of the cerebellum. Ultrastructurally, the merozoites were classified as a species of Sarcocystis due to the lack of rhoptries. Immunohistochemistry of the agent revealed a positive reaction for Sarcocystis neurona, while sections were negative for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Sarcocystis sp. infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis in bald eagles with chronic neurologic disease.

  16. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in CSF from Three Patients with Meningoencephalitis by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ming; Zhou, Jiali; Zhu, Yicheng; Zhang, Yinxin; Lv, Xia; Sun, Ruixue; Shen, Ao; Ren, Haitao; Cui, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Encephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is rare but sometimes fatal. Early diagnosis is difficult using routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, while next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used for the detection and characterization of pathogens. Methods This study set up and applied unbiased NGS to detect L. monocytogenes in CSF collected from three cases of clinically suspected listeria meningoencephalitis. Results Three cases of patients with acute/subacute meningoencephalitis are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging and blood cultures led to a suspected diagnosis of L. monocytogenes, while the CSF cultures were negative. Unbiased NGS of CSF identified and sequenced reads corresponding to L. monocytogenes in all three cases. Conclusions This is the first report highlighting the feasibility of applying NGS of CSF as a diagnostic method for central nervous system (CNS) L. monocytogenes infection. Routine application of this technology in clinical microbiology will significantly improve diagnostic methods for CNS infectious diseases. PMID:27486935

  17. BK virus associated meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient treated with HAART

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, José E; Fink, Maria C; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Delbue, Serena; Ferrante, Pasquale; Dauar, Rafi F; Filho, Francisco Bonasser; Nogueira, Roberta Schiavon; Calore, Eduardo E; Pannuti, Claudio S; Trujillo, J Roberto; de Oliveira, Augusto C Penalva

    2007-01-01

    A severely immune-suppressed AIDS patient was suspected of suffering from BK virus (BKV) meningoencephalitis, after being studied for common causes of neurological complications of co-infectious origin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and brain samples, confirmed the presence of BKV. His clinical condition improved along with the regression of brain lesions, after modifications on his antiretroviral regime. Five months after discharge, the patient was readmitted because of frequent headaches, and a marked inflammatory reaction was evidenced by a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The symptoms paralleled a rising CD4+ lymphocyte count, and immune reconstitution syndrome was suspected. This is the first non-postmortem report of BKV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient, showing clinical and radiographic improvement solely under HAART. PMID:17559655

  18. Septicemia and meningoencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in two neonatal llamas.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Ian K; Ilha, Marcia; Anis, Eman; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2017-09-01

    Listeriosis is a disease of humans and domestic mammals (mainly ruminants) with variable manifestations, primarily encephalitis, septicemia, and abortion. Although Listeria monocytogenes readily causes illness in ruminants, the prevalence among domestic South American camelids (llamas and alpacas) is low and has not been documented in their wild counterparts, the vicuna and guanaco. We describe herein the clinical signs, autopsy findings, and histopathology of septicemia and suppurative meningoencephalitis caused by L. monocytogenes in 2 neonatal llamas ( Llama glama) from the same herd. L. monocytogenes was isolated in pure culture and identified by real-time PCR on fresh and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of the brain from both crias. This presentation of septicemic listeriosis with meningoencephalitis in 2 animals from the same group is unusual, especially among llamas.

  19. Presence of herpesvirus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with tick-borne encephalitis and enteroviral meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Labská, Klára; Roubalová, Kateřina; Pícha, Dušan; Marešová, Vilma

    2015-07-01

    Reactivation of HHVs in the CNS due to inflammation has not been well described yet. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of HHV DNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of immunocompetent patients with meningoencephalitis of other than HHV origin. The secondary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of herpesvirus co-infection on the clinical course and patient outcome. Ninety-six patients with clinically and laboratory proven tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and 77 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of enteroviral meningitis (EVM), along with a control group of 107 patients without evidence of inflammation in the CSF were retrospectively tested by nested PCR for the presence of DNA of the neurotropic herpesviruses HSV1, HSV2, VZV, and HHV6 in the CSF. The clinical course, laboratory tests, antiviral treatment, and neurological complications in a 6-month follow-up were compared between the groups positive or negative for HHV DNA in the CSF. HHV DNA was found in the CSF of 12 (6.9%) patients (6.3% and 7.8% in the TBE and EVM groups, respectively) and in 1 (0.9%) control patient. None of the patients had recent blisters or rash. The clinical course was comparably mild in all patients. No permanent neurological sequelae were observed. Only the CSF total protein level was significantly higher in HHV DNA-positive than in HHV-negative patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Delayed diagnosis of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis due to negative cryptococcal antigen test.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Bernhard; Bally, Frank; Hewer, Ekkehard; Sendi, Parham

    2013-01-29

    Cryptococcus spp. commonly causes infection in immunocompromised hosts. Clinical presentation of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is variable, but headache, fever and a high intracranial pressure should suggest the diagnosis. The cryptococcal antigen test is a specific and sensitive rapid test that can be performed on blood or cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of CM in a patient with previously undetected lymphocytopenia. Because cryptococcal antigen test results were negative, diagnosis and treatment were delayed.

  1. Acute meningoencephalitis associated with echovirus 9 infection in Sri Lanka, 2009.

    PubMed

    Danthanarayana, Nayomi; Williams, David T; Williams, Simon Hedley; Thevanesam, Vasanthi; Speers, David J; Fernando, M S S

    2015-12-01

    The aetiology of acute meningoencephalitis in Sri Lankan children and adults is poorly understood. This study was carried out to determine pathogens responsible for meningoencephalitis in Sri Lanka. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was performed using cerebrospinal fluid samples (22 adult and 17 pediatric) collected from August to December 2009 from patients clinically diagnosed with acute meningoencephalitis at two tertiary care hospitals in Sri Lanka. Routine microbiology for bacterial pathogens together with in-house RT-PCR and PCR assays for the detection of dengue viruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, chikungunya virus, enteroviruses, mumps virus, measles virus, herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2, and varicella zoster virus were performed. Bacterial pathogens were not isolated from any patient specimens. However, from nine of the paediatric patients aged 1 month to 10 years (mean age 5.2 years) echovirus 9 (E-9; family Picornaviridae, genus Enterovirus,species Enterovirus B ) was detected by RT-PCR. All nine patients presented with fever, six had headache, and seven had vomiting. Neck stiffness indicating meningitis was present in six of the patients. Phylogenetic analysis of partial VP1 and VP4-VP2 genes showed these E-9 strains to be most closely related to E-9 strains detected in CSF from Korea and France in 2005 and 2006. The remaining patients were negative for all other viruses tested. E-9 was the most common cause of acute meningoencephalitis in the tested paediatric population from Sri Lanka in 2009, which likely reflects circulation of this E-9 strain between Europe and Asia over several years.

  2. Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity in Critically Ill Children with Encephalitis and Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Farias-Moeller, Raquel; Carpenter, Jessica L; Dean, Nathan; Wells, Elizabeth M

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction in pediatric patients with acquired brain injury is often encountered and greatly understudied. We sought to identify the incidence of Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity (PSH) in critically ill pediatric patients with meningoencephalitis and encephalitis, associated risk factors and influence on outcome. Children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with a diagnosis of meningoencephalitis and/or encephalitis were identified from a single institution Neurocritical Care database. The patients were stratified as having a bacterial or non-bacterial cause of their meningoencephalitis/encephalitis. Data from their hospitalization was supplemented with a retrospective review of the electronic medical record. PSH was defined as episodic lability in heart rate and/or blood pressure, hyperthermia, diaphoresis, dystonic posturing, tachypnea and/or agitation without any other cause. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test and chi-squared to compare outcomes and risk factors between patients with PSH and without. PSH was found in 41 % of children studied. Subgroup analysis revealed patients with non-bacterial encephalitis were more likely to experience PSH (51 %) as compared to those with bacterial causes (27 %). Fever and/or seizures on presentation and female gender were associated with higher occurrence of PSH but only in the non-bacterial etiology group. There were trends toward increased length of PICU and overall hospital stay for patients with PSH. PSH was found in a high percentage of our patients with significant variation in risk factors and outcome noted between patients with bacterial and nonbacterial causes of their meningoencephalitis/encephalitis.

  3. [Case of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis leading to discovery of early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ijyuuin, Toshiro; Umehara, Fujio

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year old man was brought to our hospital because of acute onset of fever and consciousness disturbance. He had been hemodialyzed three times a week because of chronic renal failure since 13 years ago. Neurological examination revealed deteriorated consciousness and neck stiffness. A lumbar puncture yielded clouded fluid with a WBC 7,912/mm³ (polymorphonuclear cells 88%, mononuclear cells 12%), 786 mg/dl of protein and 4 mg/dl of glucose (blood glucose 118 mg/dl). Brain CT and MRI were unremarkable. He was treated with ceftriaxone and ampicillin. Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from the blood sample, but not from cerebrospinal fluid. The patient responded promptly to antibiotics therapy (ampicillin 3g/day, ceftriaxone 1g/day), and within several days he became lucid and afebrile. Isolated S. salivarius was sensitive for ampicillin and ceftriaxone. We diagnosed this case as S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis. A gastrointestinal diagnostic workup revealed an asymptomatic gastric adenocarcinoma. S. salivarius is a common inhabitant of the oral mucosa that has been associated with infection in different sites. Meningeal infection by S. salivarius generally related to neoplasia of colon or iatrogenia, has been described on few occasions. This is the first report of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis associated with gastric neoplasm. Neurologist should be aware of the association of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis and gastrointestinal disease.

  4. [EEG examination in patients with purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis--literature review and own observations].

    PubMed

    Kepa, Lucjan; Oczko-Grzesik, Barbara; Warakomska, Iwona; Stolarz, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the literature review on EEG examination in purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis as well as own observations carried out in 42 patients with this neuroinfection treated in I Department of Infectious Diseases of Medical University of Silesia in Bytom between 1989-2001. In 19 patients the result of the first examination was abnormal and the degree of EEG patterns pathology correlated with the severity of their clinical condition. Abnormal electroencephalogram was also noted in 7 cases in the control examination. Two of this group of patients died and in two cases pathological EEG patterns preceded epileptic seizures during further hospitalization. Besides, the conversion of normal at the beginning into abnormal EEG patterns was found in cases of purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis various complications, e.g. brain abscess. The obtained results indicate that EEG examination carried out in the acute phase of purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis may be helpful in the estimation of severity of patient's clinical state. Performing of EEG examination in series during and after hospitalization may be useful for monitoring the course of the disease and prognosis of its outcome.

  5. Meningoencephalitis and Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. coinfection in a dolphin in Italy.

    PubMed

    Grattarola, Carla; Giorda, Federica; Iulini, Barbara; Pintore, Maria Domenica; Pautasso, Alessandra; Zoppi, Simona; Goria, Maria; Romano, Angelo; Peletto, Simone; Varello, Katia; Garibaldi, Fulvio; Garofolo, Giuliano; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Marsili, Letizia; Bozzetta, Elena; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dondo, Alessandro; Mignone, Walter; Casalone, Cristina

    2016-02-25

    Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. can infect a wide range of species, including humans. In cetaceans, meningoencephalitis has been associated with T. gondii and Brucella spp. infection, whereas to our knowledge, L. monocytogenes infection has not previously been reported. Meningoencephalitis and L. monocytogenes, T. gondii and Brucella spp. were identified by means of both direct and indirect laboratory techniques in an adult female striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba found stranded in January 2015 on the Ligurian Sea coast, northwestern Italy. The animal was emaciated, and histopathology disclosed severe meningoencephalitis. The nature of the inflammatory response and intra-lesional protozoa were consistent with a mixed infection by L. monocytogenes, T. gondii and Brucella spp. We believe this is an unprecedented case of infection by 3 zoonotic pathogens and also the first bacteriologically confirmed case report of neurolisteriosis in cetaceans. Cerebral toxoplasmosis and neurobrucellosis may have led to the animal's disorientation and stranding, with L. monocytogenes having likely exacerbated the coinfection leading to the demise of this dolphin.

  6. Unsuccessful Cyclosporine plus Prednisolone Therapy for Autoimmune Meningoencephalitis in Three Dogs

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, Dong-In; LEE, Hee-Chun; HA, Jeongim; JUNG, Hae-Won; JEON, Joon-Hyeok; MOON, Jong-Hyun; LEE, Jae-Hoon; KIM, Na-Hyun; SUR, Jung-Hyang; KANG, Byeong-Teck; CHO, Kyu-Woan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 4-year-old female Maltese (case 1), a 9-year-old castrated male shih tzu (case 2) and 2-year-old female Pomeranian (case 3) presented with neurological signs, such as head tilt, ataxia, circling and paresis. The three cases were tentatively diagnosed as having meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology based on computed tomography scan and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. All patients were managed with cyclosporine plus prednisolone therapy. The survival times of the three patients were 170, 70 and 21 days, respectively. After the cases died, we performed necropsy and histopathological examination for definitive diagnosis. Based on the necropsy, histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations, cases 1, 2 and 3 were definitely diagnosed as having necrotizing meningoencephalitis, necrotizing leukoencephalitis and granulomatous meningoencephalitis, respectively. This case report demonstrated the clinical findings, brain CT characteristics and histopathological and immunohistochemical features of NME, NLE and GME in dogs and discussed the reason for the relatively short survival times under cyclosporine plus prednisolone therapy. PMID:23955394

  7. West Nile virus meningoencephalitis in a Suri alpaca and Suffolk ewe.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Michael; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Schwartz, Kent; Berkland, Loretta

    2004-01-01

    The first confirmed cases of West Nile virus (WNV) in the Western Hemisphere were reported in the state of New York in 1999. Since then, the virus has spread throughout the eastern and central United States and continues to extend westward. This report describes clinical signs and microscopic lesions associated with WNV infection in a Suffolk ewe and an alpaca, 2 species in which the disease has not been reported previously. In late August 2002, a 4.5-year-old female alpaca developed an acute onset of clinical signs characterized by torticollis, hyperesthesia, ataxia, recumbency, and altered mentation. The animal died 3.5 days after the onset of clinical signs. Microscopic examination of the brain revealed a mild to moderate, diffuse, lymphoplasmacytic meningoencephalitis. In early September 2002, a 3-year-old Suffolk ewe developed a rapidly progressive illness characterized by ataxia and convulsions. The apparent duration from onset of clinical signs until death was less than 8 hours. The ewe had a moderate, diffuse, lymphoplasmacytic meningoencephalitis with focal gliosis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays and immunohistochemistry on the brain were positive for WNV in both animals. These cases demonstrate that WNV is capable of causing sporadic, fatal, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis in alpacas and sheep.

  8. Toscana meningoencephalitis: a comparison to other viral central nervous system infections

    PubMed Central

    Jaijakul, Siraya; Arias, Cesar A.; Hossein, Monir; Arduino, Roberto C.; Wootton, Susan H.; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Background Toscana virus (TOSV) is an emerging pathogen causing central nervous system (CNS) infection in Mediterranean countries, mostly during summer season. Objectives To compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics of Toscana CNS infections to the most common viral pathogens seen in the United States. Study Design We performed a case series of patients with 41 TOSV infection and compared the clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, imaging results and clinical outcomes to the most commonly recognized viral causes of meningoencephalitis in the US (enterovirus (n=60), herpes simplex virus (n=48), and west nile virus (n=30) from our multi-center study of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis syndromes in the Greater Houston area. Results TOSV infection occurs in different age groups compared to enterovirus, HSV, and WNV. All infections most frequently occur during summer-fall except HSV which distributes throughout the year. All patients with TOSV had history of travel to endemic areas. There are differences in clinical presentation and CSF findings comparing TOSV and enterovirus, HSV, and WNV infection. There are no significant differences in outcomes of each infection except WNV meningoencephalitis which had a poorer outcome compared to TOSV infection. Conclusions TOSV is an emerging pathogen that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with CNS infections and a recent travel history to endemic areas. PMID:22867730

  9. Entamoeba histolytica calreticulin: an endoplasmic reticulum protein expressed by trophozoites into experimentally induced amoebic liver abscesses.

    PubMed

    González, Enrique; de Leon, Maria del Carmen García; Meza, Isaura; Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Gariglio, Patricio; Silva-Olivares, Angelica; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Shibayama, Mineko; Morán, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Limón, Angelica; Rojas, Liliana; Hernández, Eric G; Cerritos, René; Ximenez, Cecilia

    2011-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica calreticulin (EhCRT) is remarkably immunogenic in humans (90-100% of invasive amoebiasis patients). Nevertheless, the study of calreticulin in this protozoan is still in its early stages. The exact location, biological functions, and its role in pathogenesis are yet to be fully understood. The aim of the present work is to determine the location of EhCRT in virulent trophozoites in vivo and the expression of the Ehcrt gene during the development of experimentally induced amoebic liver abscesses (ALA) in hamsters. Antibodies against recombinant EhCRT were used for the immunolocalization of EhCRT in trophozoites through confocal microscopy; immunohistochemical assays were also performed on tissue sections of ALAs at different times after intrahepatic inoculation. The expression of the Ehcrt gene during the development of ALA was estimated through both in situ RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. Confocal assays of virulent trophozoites showed a distribution of EhCRT in the cytoplasmic vesicles of different sizes. Apparently, EhCRT is not exported into the hepatic tissue. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated an over-expression of the Ehcrt gene at 30 min after trophozoite inoculation, reaching a peak at 1-2 h; thereafter, the expression fell sharply to its original levels. These results demonstrate for the first time in an in vivo model of ALA, the expression of Ehcrt gene in E. histolytica trophozoites and add evidence that support CRT as a resident protein of the ER in E. histolytica species. The in vivo experiments suggest that CRT may play an important role during the early stages of the host-parasite relationship, when the parasite is adapting to a new environment, although the protein seems to be constitutively synthesized. Moreover, trophozoites apparently do not export EhCRT into the hepatic tissue in ALA.

  10. Long-term survival and virulence of Mycobacterium leprae in amoebal cysts.

    PubMed

    Wheat, William H; Casali, Amy L; Thomas, Vincent; Spencer, John S; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Williams, Diana L; McDonnell, Gerald E; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Brennan, Patrick J; Jackson, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Leprosy is a curable neglected disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and peripheral nerves and manifests clinically in various forms ranging from self-resolving, tuberculoid leprosy to lepromatous leprosy having significant pathology with ensuing disfiguration disability and social stigma. Despite the global success of multi-drug therapy (MDT), incidences of clinical leprosy have been observed in individuals with no apparent exposure to other cases, suggestive of possible non-human sources of the bacteria. In this study we show that common free-living amoebae (FLA) can phagocytose M. leprae, and allow the bacillus to remain viable for up to 8 months within amoebic cysts. Viable bacilli were extracted from separate encysted cocultures comprising three common Acanthamoeba spp.: A. lenticulata, A. castellanii, and A. polyphaga and two strains of Hartmannella vermiformis. Trophozoites of these common FLA take up M. leprae by phagocytosis. M. leprae from infected trophozoites induced to encyst for long-term storage of the bacilli emerged viable by assessment of membrane integrity. The majority (80%) of mice that were injected with bacilli extracted from 35 day cocultures of encysted/excysted A. castellanii and A. polyphaga showed lesion development that was similar to mice challenged with fresh M. leprae from passage mice albeit at a slower initial rate. Mice challenged with coculture-extracted bacilli showed evidence of acid-fast bacteria and positive PCR signal for M. leprae. These data support the conclusion that M. leprae can remain viable long-term in environmentally ubiquitous FLA and retain virulence as assessed in the nu/nu mouse model. Additionally, this work supports the idea that M. leprae might be sustained in the environment between hosts in FLA and such residence in FLA may provide a macrophage-like niche contributing to the higher-than-expected rate of leprosy transmission despite a significant decrease in human reservoirs

  11. Reevaluation of an Acanthamoeba Molecular Diagnostic Algorithm following an Atypical Case of Amoebic Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Rachel; Cunanan, Marlou; Jackson, Jonathan; Ali, Ibne Karim M; Chong-Kit, Ann; Gasgas, Jason; Tian, Jinfang; Ralevski, Filip; Boggild, Andrea K

    2015-10-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) is a potentially blinding infection, the prompt diagnosis of which is essential for limiting ocular morbidity. We undertook a quality improvement initiative with respect to the molecular detection of acanthamoebae in our laboratory because of an unusual case of discordance. Nine ATCC strains of Acanthamoeba and 40 delinked, biobanked, surplus corneal scraping specimens were analyzed for the presence of acanthamoebae with four separate real-time PCR assays. The assay used by the Free-Living and Intestinal Amebas Laboratory of the CDC was considered the reference standard, and the performance characteristics of each individual assay and pairs of assays were calculated. Outcome measures were sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Of 49 included specimens, 14 (28.6%) were positive by the gold standard assay, and 35 (71.4%) were negative. The sensitivities of the individual assays ranged from 64.3% to 92.9%, compared to the gold standard, while the specificities ranged from 88.6% to 91.4%. The PPVs and NPVs ranged from 69.2% to 78.6% and from 86.1% to 96.9%, respectively. Combinations of assay pairs led to improved performance, with sensitivities ranging from 92.9% to 100% and specificities ranging from 97.1% to 100%. ATCC and clinical strains of Acanthamoeba that failed to be detected by certain individual assays included Acanthamoeba castellanii, Acanthamoeba culbertsoni, and Acanthamoeba lenticulata. For three clinical specimens, false negativity of the gold standard assay could not be excluded. Molecular diagnostic approaches, especially combinations of highly sensitive and specific assays, offer a reasonably performing, operator-independent, rapid strategy for the detection of acanthamoebae in clinical specimens and are likely to be more practical than either culture or direct microscopic detection.

  12. The anti-amoebic activity of some medicinal plants used by AIDS patients in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sawangjaroen, Nongyao; Phongpaichit, S; Subhadhirasakul, S; Visutthi, M; Srisuwan, N; Thammapalerd, N

    2006-05-01

    The anti-amoebic activities of chloroform, methanol and water extracts from 12 Thai medicinal plants (39 extracts) commonly used by AIDS patients in southern Thailand were screened, at a concentration of 1,000 microg/ml, against Entamoeba histolytica strain HTH-56:MUTM and strain HM1:IMSS growing in vitro. The extracts were incubated with 2x10(5) E. histolytica trophozoites/ml of medium at 37 degrees C under anaerobic conditions for 24 h. The cultures were examined with an inverted microscope and scored (1-4) according to the appearance and numbers of the trophozoites. The extracts that caused inhibition were selected and retested using the same conditions but with concentrations that ranged from 31.25 to 1,000 microg/ml using E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS, and the IC(50) values for each extract were calculated. The chloroform extracts from Alpinia galanga (IC(50) 55.2 microg/ml), Barleria lupulina (IC(50) 78.5 microg/ml), Boesenbergia pandurata (IC(50) 45.8 microg/ml), Piper betle (IC(50) 91.1 microg/ml) and Piper chaba (IC(50) 71.4 microg/ml) and the methanol extract from B. pandurata (IC(50) 57.6 microg/ml) were all classified as "active", i.e. with an IC(50) of less than 100 microg/ml, whereas those from Murraya paniculata (IC(50) 116.5 microg/ml) and Zingiber zerumbet (IC(50) 196.9 microg/ml) were classified as being "moderately active". The IC(50) of a standard drug, metronidazole, was 1.1 microg/ml.

  13. Long-term Survival and Virulence of Mycobacterium leprae in Amoebal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, William H.; Casali, Amy L.; Thomas, Vincent; Spencer, John S.; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Williams, Diana L.; McDonnell, Gerald E.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Brennan, Patrick J.; Jackson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a curable neglected disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and peripheral nerves and manifests clinically in various forms ranging from self-resolving, tuberculoid leprosy to lepromatous leprosy having significant pathology with ensuing disfiguration disability and social stigma. Despite the global success of multi-drug therapy (MDT), incidences of clinical leprosy have been observed in individuals with no apparent exposure to other cases, suggestive of possible non-human sources of the bacteria. In this study we show that common free-living amoebae (FLA) can phagocytose M. leprae, and allow the bacillus to remain viable for up to 8 months within amoebic cysts. Viable bacilli were extracted from separate encysted cocultures comprising three common Acanthamoeba spp.: A. lenticulata, A. castellanii, and A. polyphaga and two strains of Hartmannella vermiformis. Trophozoites of these common FLA take up M. leprae by phagocytosis. M. leprae from infected trophozoites induced to encyst for long-term storage of the bacilli emerged viable by assessment of membrane integrity. The majority (80%) of mice that were injected with bacilli extracted from 35 day cocultures of encysted/excysted A. castellanii and A. polyphaga showed lesion development that was similar to mice challenged with fresh M. leprae from passage mice albeit at a slower initial rate. Mice challenged with coculture-extracted bacilli showed evidence of acid-fast bacteria and positive PCR signal for M. leprae. These data support the conclusion that M. leprae can remain viable long-term in environmentally ubiquitous FLA and retain virulence as assessed in the nu/nu mouse model. Additionally, this work supports the idea that M. leprae might be sustained in the environment between hosts in FLA and such residence in FLA may provide a macrophage-like niche contributing to the higher-than-expected rate of leprosy transmission despite a significant decrease in human reservoirs

  14. Experimental amoebic liver abscess in hamsters caused by trophozoites of a Brazilian strain of Entamoeba dispar.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Silva, Maria Angélica; Santos, Helena Lúcia Carneiro; Peralta, Regina Saramago; Peralta, José Mauro; de Macedo, Heloisa Werneck

    2013-05-01

    It has been claimed that amoebic molecules such as amoebapore, galactose/N-acetyl galactosamine inhibitable lectin, and cysteine proteases are responsible for host tissue destruction and are present in both pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and non-pathogenic Entamoeba dispar. Some reports have provided evidence that after infection with E. dispar, pathological changes may occur in some humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate E. dispar pathogenicity by comparing it to the pathogenicity of E. histolytica through liver abscesses induced in hamsters. Syrian golden hamsters were challenged by intrahepatic inoculation with the 03C E. dispar strain or with two strains of E. histolytica (HM1:IMSS and EGG) to compare their virulence grades. As control groups, we used bacterial flora and Pavlova's modified medium. Lesions were verified at 1, 3 and 6 days after inoculation. Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed to characterize each strain using EdP1/EdP2 and EhP1/EhP2 primers. The EGG and HM1:IMSS E. histolytica strains and 03C E. dispar were able to cause liver lesions. The EGG strain caused extensive hepatic abscesses, and trophozoites were found in the lesions throughout the three periods of study. The HM1:IMSS strain caused smaller abscesses when compared to EGG lesions; however, trophozoites were observed at 1 and 3 days after inoculation. The 03C E. dispar strain caused intermediate abscesses when compared to the others; trophozoites were observed in all periods analyzed. The EGG strain caused progressive evolution of the injury, which differed from the HM1:IMSS and 03C strains. These results strongly suggest that the 03C E. dispar strain is pathogenic in the experimental hamster model. Additional studies are necessary to identify potential factors that regulate the manifestation of virulence of this strain and others. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation between fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in 5 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byeong-Teck; Kim, Seung-Gon; Lim, Chae-Young; Gu, Su-Hyun; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Young-Bo; Kim, Dae-Young; Woo, Eung-Je; Cho, Zang-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the [18F]2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings of encephalitis in dogs and assessed the role of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of meningoencephalitis. The medical records, magnetic resonance (MR), and FDG-PET images of 3 dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), 1 dog with granulomatous meningoencephalitis (GME), and 1 dog with meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology (MUE) were reviewed. On the FDG-PET, glucose hypometabolism was identified in the dog with NME, whereas hypermetabolism was noted in the dog with GME. The T2-weighted images (WI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were characterized by hyperintensity, whereas the signal intensity of the lesions on the T1-WI images was variable. The metabolic changes on the brain FDG-PET corresponded well to the hyper- and hypointense lesions seen on the MR imaging. This type of tomography (FDG-PET) aided in the differentiation of different types of inflammatory meningoencephalitis when the metabolic data was combined with clinical and MR findings. PMID:21119865

  16. Detection of Free-Living Amoebae Using Amoebal Enrichment in a Wastewater Treatment Plant of Gauteng Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Muchesa, P.; Mwamba, O.; Barnard, T. G.; Bartie, C.

    2014-01-01

    Free-living amoebae pose a potential health risk in water systems as they may be pathogenic and harbor potential pathogenic bacteria known as amoebae resistant bacteria. Free-living amoebae were observed in 150 (87.2%) of the environmental water samples. In particular, Acanthamoeba sp. was identified in 22 (12.8%) using amoebal enrichment and confirmed by molecular analysis. FLA were isolated in all 8 stages of the wastewater treatment plant using the amoebal enrichment technique. A total of 16 (9.3%) samples were positive for FLA from influent, 20 (11.6%) from bioreactor feed, 16 (9.3%) from anaerobic zone, 16 (9.3%) from anoxic zone, 32 (18.6%) from aerators, 16 (9.3%) from bioreactor effluent, 11 (6.4%) from bioreactor final effluent, and 45 (26.2%) from maturation pond. This study provides baseline information on the occurrence of amoebae in wastewater treatment plant. This has health implications on receiving water bodies as some FLA are pathogenic and are also involved in the transmission and dissemination of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25530964

  17. Diagnostic tests for amoebic liver abscess: comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE).

    PubMed

    Restrepo, M I; Restrepo, Z; Elsa Villareal, C L; Aguirre, A; Restrepo, M

    1996-01-01

    The liver abscess is the most frequent extraintestinal complication of intestinal amoebiasis: its diagnosis is suggested by the clinical picture but it must be confirmed by paraclinic tests. Themost stringent diagnosis requires identification of E. histolytica. But this is possible only in a few cases. Serological tests greatly improve the diagnosis of this severe complication of amoebiasis. We compared the Enzyme Linfed Immunosorbent Assay and the Counterimmunoelectrophoresis techniques. Both techniques were used to detect amoebic antibodies in 50 control patients, 30 patients with liver abscess and 30 patients with intestinal amoebiasis. All the sera from control patients gave negative results in both techniques. When analysing the sera from patients with intestinal amoebiasis, 10% of them were positive by ELISA but non by CIE. The sera of patients with liver abscess, we found that 90% were positive by the ELISA method and 66.6% by the CIE technique. In patients with amoebic liver abscess, the results showed that the ELISA was more sensitive than the CIE, as it presented a higher sensitivity (100%) than that of the CIE technique (66%).

  18. Amoebic PI3K and PKC is required for Jurkat T cell death induced by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-08-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amebiasis. During infection, adherence of E. histolytica through Gal/GalNAc lectin on the surface of the amoeba can induce caspase-3-dependent or -independent host cell death. Phosphorylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) in E. histolytica play an important function in the adhesion, killing, or phagocytosis of target cells. In this study, we examined the role of amoebic PI3K and PKC in amoeba-induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat T cells. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with E. histolytica trophozoites, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were markedly increased compared to those of cells incubated with medium alone. However, when amoebae were pretreated with a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin before being incubated with E. histolytica, E. histolytica-induced PS externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were significantly reduced compared to results for amoebae pretreated with DMSO. In addition, pretreatment of amoebae with a PKC inhibitor, staurosporine strongly inhibited Jurkat T cell death. However, E. histolytica-induced cleavage of caspase-3, -6, and -7 were not inhibited by pretreatment of amoebae with wortmannin or staurosporin. In addition, we found that amoebic PI3K and PKC have an important role on amoeba adhesion to host compartment. These results suggest that amebic PI3K and PKC activation may play an important role in caspase-independent cell death in Entamoeba-induced apoptosis.

  19. Amoebic PI3K and PKC Is Required for Jurkat T Cell Death Induced by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim

    2014-01-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amebiasis. During infection, adherence of E. histolytica through Gal/GalNAc lectin on the surface of the amoeba can induce caspase-3-dependent or -independent host cell death. Phosphorylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) in E. histolytica play an important function in the adhesion, killing, or phagocytosis of target cells. In this study, we examined the role of amoebic PI3K and PKC in amoeba-induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat T cells. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with E. histolytica trophozoites, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were markedly increased compared to those of cells incubated with medium alone. However, when amoebae were pretreated with a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin before being incubated with E. histolytica, E. histolytica-induced PS externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were significantly reduced compared to results for amoebae pretreated with DMSO. In addition, pretreatment of amoebae with a PKC inhibitor, staurosporine strongly inhibited Jurkat T cell death. However, E. histolytica-induced cleavage of caspase-3, -6, and -7 were not inhibited by pretreatment of amoebae with wortmannin or staurosporin. In addition, we found that amoebic PI3K and PKC have an important role on amoeba adhesion to host compartment. These results suggest that amebic PI3K and PKC activation may play an important role in caspase-independent cell death in Entamoeba-induced apoptosis. PMID:25246714

  20. Inherited CARD9 deficiency in otherwise healthy children and adults with Candida species-induced meningoencephalitis, colitis, or both.

    PubMed

    Lanternier, Fanny; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Barbati, Elisa; Chaussade, Hélène; Koumar, Yatrika; Levy, Romain; Denis, Blandine; Brunel, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Sophie; Loop, Michèle; Peeters, Julie; de Selys, Ariel; Vanclaire, Jean; Vermylen, Christiane; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Chatzis, Olga; Liu, Luyan; Migaud, Mélanie; Pedergnana, Vincent; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Netea, Mihai G; De Bruycker, Jean J; Bernard, Louis; Reynes, Jacques; Amazrine, Noureddine; Abel, Laurent; Van der Linden, Dimitri; Harrison, Tom; Picard, Capucine; Lortholary, Olivier; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Invasive infections of the central nervous system (CNS) or digestive tract caused by commensal fungi of the genus Candida are rare and life-threatening. The known risk factors include acquired and inherited immunodeficiencies, with patients often displaying a history of multiple infections. Cases of meningoencephalitis, colitis, or both caused by Candida species remain unexplained. We studied 5 previously healthy children and adults with unexplained invasive disease of the CNS, digestive tract, or both caused by Candida species. The patients were aged 39, 7, 17, 37, and 26 years at the time of infection and were unrelated, but each was born to consanguineous parents of Turkish (2 patients), Iranian, Moroccan, or Pakistani origin. Meningoencephalitis was reported in 3 patients, meningoencephalitis associated with colitis was reported in a fourth patient, and the fifth patient had colitis only. Inherited caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9) deficiency was recently reported in otherwise healthy patients with other forms of severe disease caused by Candida, Trichophyton, Phialophora, and Exophiala species, including meningoencephalitis but not colitis caused by Candida and Exophiala species. Therefore we sequenced CARD9 in the 5 patients. All patients were found to be homozygous for rare and deleterious mutant CARD9 alleles: R70W and Q289* for the 3 patients with Candida albicans-induced meningoencephalitis, R35Q for the patient with meningoencephalitis and colitis caused by Candida glabrata, and Q295* for the patient with Candida albicans-induced colitis. Regardless of their levels of mutant CARD9 protein, the patients' monocyte-derived dendritic cells responded poorly to CARD9-dependent fungal agonists (curdlan, heat-killed C albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Exophiala dermatitidis). Invasive infections of the CNS or digestive tract caused by Candida species in previously healthy children and even adults might be caused by inherited CARD9

  1. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in atypical dog breeds: a case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J J; Schatzberg, S J; Vernau, K M; Summers, B A; Porter, B F; Siso, S; Young, B D; Levine, J M

    2014-01-01

    Canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) is a fatal, noninfectious inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. NME has been reported only in a small number of dog breeds, which has led to the presumption that it is a breed-restricted disorder. Our objective was to describe histopathologically confirmed NME in dog breeds in which the condition has not been reported previously and to provide preliminary evidence that NME affects a wider spectrum of dog breeds than previously reported. Four dogs with NME. Archives from 3 institutions and from 1 author's (BS) collection were reviewed to identify histopathologically confirmed cases of NME in breeds in which the disease has not been reported previously. Age, sex, breed, survival from onset of clinical signs, and histopathologic findings were evaluated. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis was identified in 4 small dog breeds (Papillon, Shih Tzu, Coton de Tulear, and Brussels Griffon). Median age at clinical evaluation was 2.5 years. Histopathologic abnormalities included 2 or more of the following: lymphoplasmacytic or histiocytic meningoencephalitis or encephalitis, moderate-to-severe cerebrocortical necrosis, variable involvement of other anatomic locations within the brain (cerebellum, brainstem), and absence of detectable infectious agents. Until now, NME has only been described in 5 small dog breeds. We document an additional 4 small breeds previously not shown to develop NME. Our cases further illustrate that NME is not a breed-restricted disorder and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for dogs with signalment and clinical signs consistent with inflammatory brain disease. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis Relapse after an 8 Year Delay: An Interplay of Infection and Immune Reconstitution?

    PubMed Central

    Katchanov, Juri; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nielsen, Kirsten; Branding, Gordian; Arastéh, Keikawus; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Meintjes, Graeme; Boulware, David R.; Stocker, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a symptomatic relapse of HIV-related cryptococcal meningoencephalitis 8 years after the first diagnosis on the background of immune reconstitution. The findings as well as the clinical course suggests a combination of smouldering localized infection and enhanced inflammatory reaction related to immune restoration due to antiretroviral therapy. A combination of antifungal and anti-inflammatory therapy resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Our case challenges the concept that immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and microbiological relapse are dichotomous entities. PMID:25505049

  3. Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis relapse after an eight-year delay: an interplay of infection and immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nielsen, Kirsten; Branding, Gordian; Arastéh, Keikawus; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Meintjes, Graeme; Boulware, David R; Stocker, Hartmut

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a symptomatic relapse of HIV-related cryptococcal meningoencephalitis eight years after the first diagnosis on the background of immune reconstitution. The findings as well as the clinical course suggests a combination of smouldering localised infection and enhanced inflammatory reaction related to immune restoration due to antiretroviral therapy. A combination of antifungal and anti-inflammatory therapy resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Our case challenges the concept that immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and microbiological relapse are dichotomous entities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Sarcocystis neurona-associated meningoencephalitis and description of intramuscular sarcocysts in a fisher (Martes pennanti).

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Richard W; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Lindsay, David S

    2005-01-01

    A free-ranging juvenile fisher (Martes pennanti) with ataxia, lethargy, stupor, and intermittent, whole-body tremors was examined postmortem. Microscopically, the fisher had protozoal meningoencephalitis caused by Sarcocystis neurona, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism testing, and genetic sequencing. Sarcocysts found in the skeletal muscle of the fisher were negative for S. neurona by PCR, but were morphologically similar to previous light and electron microscopy descriptions of S. neurona. This is the first report of clinical neural S. neurona infection in a fisher.

  5. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis due to Toxocara canis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jose E; Sztajnbok, Jaques; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2003-09-01

    Toxocariasis is usually manifested as visceral larva migrans. Nervous system involvement is a rare complication. In this report, we describe one case of meningoencephalitis due to Toxocara canis and review the literature. We report a previously healthy two-year-old boy who was admitted after 24 hours of severe neurologic symptoms with marked eosinophilic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid and a single subcortical lesion detected by cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Both serum and spinal fluid tested positive for T. canis. Initial treatment with thiabendazole was ineffective. After marked improvement in clinical and laboratory results were achieved using albendazole and corticosteroids, the child was discharged.

  6. Streptococcus suis Meningoencephalitis with Seizure from Raw Pork Ingestion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Teerasukjinda, Ornusa; Yee, Melvin; Chung, Heath H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus suis meningoencephalitis is a rare but increasingly important condition. Good history taking will give clues to the diagnosis. This is the fourth case report in the United States. Case: A 52-year-old Filipino man who recently returned from a trip to the Philippines was admitted with classic symptoms of bacterial meningitis. His cerebrospinal fluid culture grew Streptococcus suis. His clinical course was complicated by seizures, hearing loss, and permanent tinnitus. Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware of this emerging disease especially in patients with recent travel history to endemic areas. Early recognition and appropriate management could potentially prevent complications. PMID:25285249

  7. Imaging diagnosis--meningoencephalitis secondary to suppurative rhinitis and meningoencephalocele infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Alana J; Scrivani, Peter V; Caserto, Brian G; Ruby, Rebecca E; Loftus, John P; de Lahunta, Alexander; Noden, Drew M

    2014-01-01

    Nasal encephaloceles (meningoceles or meningoencephaloceles) are rare and not reported to be infected or coupled with a facial deformity in dogs. This report describes an older dog with acute worsening of seizures due to suppurative meningoencephalitis with coexisting suppurative rhinitis and infection of a meningoencephalocele. Additionally, the dog had a facial deformity for at least 5 years. The results of necropsy, computed tomography, and postmortem magnetic resonance imaging are compared. The development of nasal encephaloceles is discussed, including the potential role of early trauma, and whether separation of neural ectoderm from the surface ectoderm is part of the pathogenesis. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Spinal cord involvement in a child with raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Teresa G; Madhavan, Vandana L; Peters, Jurriaan M; Kazacos, Kevin R; Silvera, V Michelle

    2012-03-01

    A 14-month-old previously healthy boy developed progressively worsening neurological symptoms secondary to eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with myelitis caused by raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) infection. MRI demonstrated T2 hyperintensity and enhancement of the cerebral white matter, cerebellum and spinal cord. Prior case reports have described signal abnormality within the brains of patients with raccoon roundworm neural larva migrans (NLM). This is a unique case in which spinal cord involvement was established by imaging. Knowledge of this combination of imaging findings expands the known imaging phenotype of this noteworthy infection.

  9. Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis in an HIV-negative patient from the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Ericson L; Valqui, Willi; Vilchez, Luis; Evangelista, Lourdes; Crispin, Sarita; Tello, Mercedes; Navincopa, Marcos; Béjar, Vilma; Gonzáles, José; Ortega-Loayza, Alex G

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent Peruvian patient from the Andes with a one-month history of meningoencephalitis. Cryptococcus gattii was identified from a cerebrospinal fluid culture through assimilation of D-proline and D-tryptophan as the single nitrogen source. Initially, the patient received intravenous antifungal therapy with amphotericin B. The patient was discharged 29 days after hospitalization and continued with oral fluconazole treatment for ten weeks. During this period, the patient showed clinical improvement with slight right-side residual weakness. Through this case report, we confirm the existence of this microorganism as an infectious agent in Peru.

  10. Recombinant canine distemper virus strain Snyder Hill expressing green or red fluorescent proteins causes meningoencephalitis in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, M; Nguyen, D T; Silin, D; Lyubomska, O; de Vries, R D; von Messling, V; McQuaid, S; De Swart, R L; Duprex, W P

    2012-07-01

    The propensity of canine distemper virus (CDV) to spread to the central nervous system is one of the primary features of distemper. Therefore, we developed a reverse genetics system based on the neurovirulent Snyder Hill (SH) strain of CDV (CDV(SH)) and show that this virus rapidly circumvents the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barriers to spread into the subarachnoid space to induce dramatic viral meningoencephalitis. The use of recombinant CDV(SH) (rCDV(SH)) expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or red fluorescent protein (dTomato) facilitated the sensitive pathological assessment of routes of virus spread in vivo. Infection of ferrets with these viruses led to the full spectrum of clinical signs typically associated with distemper in dogs during a rapid, fatal disease course of approximately 2 weeks. Comparison with the ferret-adapted CDV(5804P) and the prototypic wild-type CDV(R252) showed that hematogenous infection of the choroid plexus is not a significant route of virus spread into the CSF. Instead, viral spread into the subarachnoid space in rCDV(SH)-infected animals was triggered by infection of vascular endothelial cells and the hematogenous spread of virus-infected leukocytes from meningeal blood vessels into the subarachnoid space. This resulted in widespread infection of cells of the pia and arachnoid mater of the leptomeninges over large areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The ability to sensitively assess the in vivo spread of a neurovirulent strain of CDV provides a novel model system to study the mechanisms of virus spread into the CSF and the pathogenesis of acute viral meningitis.

  11. Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Strain Snyder Hill Expressing Green or Red Fluorescent Proteins Causes Meningoencephalitis in the Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, M.; Nguyen, D. T.; Silin, D.; Lyubomska, O.; de Vries, R. D.; von Messling, V.; McQuaid, S.; De Swart, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    The propensity of canine distemper virus (CDV) to spread to the central nervous system is one of the primary features of distemper. Therefore, we developed a reverse genetics system based on the neurovirulent Snyder Hill (SH) strain of CDV (CDVSH) and show that this virus rapidly circumvents the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barriers to spread into the subarachnoid space to induce dramatic viral meningoencephalitis. The use of recombinant CDVSH (rCDVSH) expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or red fluorescent protein (dTomato) facilitated the sensitive pathological assessment of routes of virus spread in vivo. Infection of ferrets with these viruses led to the full spectrum of clinical signs typically associated with distemper in dogs during a rapid, fatal disease course of approximately 2 weeks. Comparison with the ferret-adapted CDV5804P and the prototypic wild-type CDVR252 showed that hematogenous infection of the choroid plexus is not a significant route of virus spread into the CSF. Instead, viral spread into the subarachnoid space in rCDVSH-infected animals was triggered by infection of vascular endothelial cells and the hematogenous spread of virus-infected leukocytes from meningeal blood vessels into the subarachnoid space. This resulted in widespread infection of cells of the pia and arachnoid mater of the leptomeninges over large areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The ability to sensitively assess the in vivo spread of a neurovirulent strain of CDV provides a novel model system to study the mechanisms of virus spread into the CSF and the pathogenesis of acute viral meningitis. PMID:22553334

  12. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by Sarcocystis falcatula in bare-faced ibis (Phimosus infuscatus).

    PubMed

    Konradt, Guilherme; Bianchi, Matheus Viezzer; Leite-Filho, Ronaldo Viana; da Silva, Bruna Zafalon; Soares, Rodrigo Martins; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Driemeier, David

    2017-02-01

    The infection by S. falcatula is commonly associated with respiratory disease in captive psittacine birds, with a few case reports of this protozoan causing encephalitis in wild birds. We describe the clinical, pathological, and molecular aspects of an infection by S. falcatula in a bare-faced ibis (Phimosus infuscatus). Clinically, wing paralysis and mild motor incoordination were observed. At necropsy, the telencephalic cortex showed multifocal to coalescing yellowish soft areas. Histologically, multifocal to coalescent nonsuppurative necrotizing meningoencephalitis of telencephalic cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem was observed. Necrotic areas showed multiple protozoan organism characteristics of Sarcocystis sp. schizonts in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells or lying free in the neuropil. Partial genetic sequences of the gene encoding cytochrome b (CYTB), the gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (RPOB) and the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) from Sarcocystis sp. schizonts revealed that the parasite had ITS-1 sequences that were 100% identical to the homologous alleles from Sarcocystis sp. shed by Didelphis albiventris in Brazil. RPOB and CYTB sequences were 100% identical to homologous of S. falcatula available in Genbank. Thus, this is the first report of necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by S. falcatula in bare-faced ibis (P. infuscatus).

  13. Spinal Arachnoiditis as a Complication of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in Non-HIV Previously Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Panackal, Anil A; Komori, Mika; Kosa, Peter; Khan, Omar; Hammoud, Dima A; Rosen, Lindsey B; Browne, Sarah K; Lin, Yen-Chih; Romm, Elena; Ramaprasad, Charu; Fries, Bettina C; Bennett, John E; Bielekova, Bibiana; Williamson, Peter R

    2017-02-01

    Cryptococcus can cause meningoencephalitis (CM) among previously healthy non-HIV adults. Spinal arachnoiditis is under-recognized, since diagnosis is difficult with concomitant central nervous system (CNS) pathology. We describe 6 cases of spinal arachnoiditis among 26 consecutively recruited CM patients with normal CD4 counts who achieved microbiologic control. We performed detailed neurological exams, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping and biomarker analysis before and after adjunctive immunomodulatory intervention with high dose pulse corticosteroids, affording causal inference into pathophysiology. All 6 exhibited severe lower motor neuron involvement in addition to cognitive changes and gait disturbances from meningoencephalitis. Spinal involvement was associated with asymmetric weakness and urinary retention. Diagnostic specificity was improved by MRI imaging which demonstrated lumbar spinal nerve root enhancement and clumping or lesions. Despite negative fungal cultures, CSF inflammatory biomarkers, sCD27 and sCD21, as well as the neuronal damage biomarker, neurofilament light chain (NFL), were elevated compared to healthy donor (HD) controls. Elevations in these biomarkers were associated with clinical symptoms and showed improvement with adjunctive high dose pulse corticosteroids. These data suggest that a post-infectious spinal arachnoiditis is an important complication of CM in previously healthy individuals, requiring heightened clinician awareness. Despite microbiological control, this syndrome causes significant pathology likely due to increased inflammation and may be amenable to suppressive therapeutics. Published by Oxford University Press for the Clinical Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Mannheimia haemolytica A1-induced fibrinosuppurative meningoencephalitis in a naturally-infected Holstein-Friesian calf.

    PubMed

    Aschenbroich, S; Nemeth, N; Rech, R; Briggs, R; Sanchez, S; Brown, C

    2013-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an opportunistic bacterium that is widely recognized among the bovine respiratory disease complex as the predominant pathogen causing broncho- and pleuropneumonia in cattle. Among the characterized M. haemolytica serotypes, A1 is the major cause of severe pulmonary lesions in cattle. This report describes post-mortem findings in a Holstein-Friesian calf with fibrinosuppurative meningoencephalitis and fibrinonecrotizing, haemorrhagic broncho- and pleuropneumonia, from which M. haemolytica and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) were isolated. Microscopical evaluation showed expansion of the brainstem and cerebellar leptomeninges by neutrophils and fibrin, associated with gram-negative coccobacilli. Occasional blood vessels within the midbrain and cerebellum contained fibrin thrombi. Bacterial culture of cerebellum and lung yielded M. haemolytica with unusually high haemolytic activity. The isolates were confirmed as serotype A1 by rapid plate agglutination. Lung tissue was positive for BVDV by polymerase chain reaction. The broncho- and pleuropneumonia in this calf were consistent with typical mannheimiosis due to serotype A1; however, extrapulmonary infections due to M. haemolytica, as seen in this case, are rarely reported. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of a natural BVDV and M. haemolytica co-infection associated with fibrinosuppurative meningoencephalitis in a calf. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The rationale for integrated childhood meningoencephalitis surveillance: a case study from Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Touch, Sok; Hills, Susan; Rani, Manju; Samnang, Chham; Khalakdina, Asheena; Jacobson, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Problem Recent progress in vaccine availability and affordability has raised prospects for reducing death and disability from neurological infections in children. In many Asian countries, however, the epidemiology and public health burden of neurological diseases such as Japanese encephalitis and bacterial meningitis are poorly understood. Approach A sentinel surveillance system for Japanese encephalitis was developed and embedded within the routine meningoencephalitis syndromic surveillance system in Cambodia in 2006. The sentinel surveillance system was designed so surveillance and laboratory testing for other etiologies of neurological infection could be incorporated. Local setting The Communicable Disease Control department of the Ministry of Health in Cambodia worked with partners to establish the sentinel surveillance system. Relevant changes The sentinel surveillance system has provided important information on the disease burden of Japanese encephalitis in Cambodia and is now providing a platform for expansion to incorporate laboratory testing for other vaccine-preventable neurological infections in children. Lessons learned Sentinel surveillance systems, when linked to syndromic reporting systems, can characterize the epidemiology of meningoencephalitis and identify the proportion of hospital-based neurological infection in children that is vaccine preventable. Integrated systems enable consistency in data collection, analysis and information dissemination, and they enhance the capacity of public health managers to provide more credible and integrated information to policy-makers. This will assist decision-making about the potential role of immunization in reducing the incidence of childhood neurological infections. PMID:19551241

  16. [Varicella zoster virus-induced meningoencephalitis complicated with orbital apex syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wakida, Kenji; Sakurai, Takeo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    A 69-year-old male was admitted to hospital with clouded consciousness and abnormal behavior. His body temperature was 38.2 degree Celsius upon admission and he was somnolent. Herpes zoster was observed along the first division of the trigeminal nerve on the right side of the face. The right palpebra was severely swollen, and the right eye showed a dilated pupil, loss of light reflex, and total ophthalmoplegia. A spinal tap revealed pleocytosis and increased proteins, and a DNA-PCR test for varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was positive. Optic neuritis was diagnosed based on fundoscopy. Following acyclovir administration, the patient regained full consciousness and the rash was alleviated; however, visual acuity did not recover. VZV-induced meningoencephalitis complicated with orbital apex syndrome is rarely observed. We suspect that VZV initially infected the nasociliary nerve at the distal end of the first division of trigeminal nerve and spread to the adjacent optic, oculomotor, trochlear, and abducens nerves, resulting in VZV-induced meningoencephalitis complicated with orbital apex syndrome.

  17. Importance of Follow-Up Cerebrospinal Fluid Analysis in Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwenkenbecher, Philipp; Stoll, Matthias; Conzen, Josef; Bolat, Seza; Vonberg, Ralf-Peter; Wurster, Ulrich; Trebst, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis represents a serious infection of the central nervous system, where reliable prognostic factors during the disease course are needed. Twenty-one patients diagnosed with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in a German university hospital from 1999 to 2013 were analysed retrospectively. CSF parameters were analysed prior to therapy and during antifungal treatment and were compared between patients who survived or deceased. Fifteen patients clinically improved after antifungal therapy, while six patients died. No differences were observed between the outcome groups for the CSF parameters cell count, lactate, total protein, and CSF-serum albumin quotients (QAlb). Follow-up examinations of serum cryptococcal antigen titer and CSF cell count have shown that these parameters cannot be used to monitor the efficacy of antifungal therapy as well. In contrast, the course of QAlb during therapy was indicative for the outcome as a possible prognostic marker. In patients with clinical improvement QAlb values were falling under therapy, while rising QAlb values were found in patients with fatal outcome indicating a continuing dysfunction of the blood-CSF barrier. In conclusion, our results indicate that, among the various CSF parameters, the course of QAlb presents a promising marker that might be used to monitor the efficacy of antifungal therapy. PMID:25374433

  18. Limited Activity of Miltefosine in Murine Models of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis and Disseminated Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Najvar, Laura K.; Bocanegra, Rosie; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Sorrell, Tania C.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Miltefosine is an alkyl phosphocholine with good oral bioavailability and in vitro activity against Cryptococcus species that has gained interest as an additional agent for cryptococcal infections. Our objective was to further evaluate the in vivo efficacy of miltefosine in experimental in vivo models of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and disseminated cryptococcosis. Mice were infected intracranially or intravenously with either C. neoformans USC1597 or H99. Miltefosine treatment (1.8 to 45 mg/kg of body weight orally once daily) began at either 1 h or 1 day postinoculation. Fluconazole (10 mg/kg orally twice daily) or amphotericin B deoxycholate (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally once daily) served as positive controls. In our standard models, miltefosine did not result in significant improvements in survival or reductions in fungal burden against either C. neoformans isolate. There was a trend toward improved survival with miltefosine at 7.2 mg/kg against disseminated cryptococcosis with the H99 strain but only at a low infecting inoculum. In contrast, both fluconazole and amphotericin B significantly improved survival in mice with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and disseminated cryptococcosis due to USC1597. Amphotericin B also improved survival against both cryptococcal infections caused by H99. Combination therapy with miltefosine demonstrated neither synergy nor antagonism in both models. These results demonstrate limited efficacy of miltefosine and suggest caution with the potential use of this agent for the treatment of C. neoformans infections. PMID:23165465

  19. Sudden psychotic episode probably due to meningoencephalitis and Chlamydia pneumoniae acute infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Since 9% to 20% of all cases of acute psychosis presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) are due to a general medical condition, cautious medical workup should be mandatory in such patients. Differential diagnosis must consider conditions as diverse as renal failure or CNS infection. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection usually causes a self-limited respiratory syndrome. Rarely, acute neurological complications occur, with acute meningoencephalitis most frequently reported. Diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and is difficult to confirm. Case report We describe a 22 year-old female Caucasian who, three days after a mild pharingitis, developed an acute psychosis with exuberant symptoms interspersed with periods of lucidity, in a background of normal consciousness and orientation. Initial medical and imagiological workup were inconclusive. After 20 days of unsuccessful treatment with antipsychotics she developed a high fever and was re-evaluated medically. Lumbar puncture revealed an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid. MRI showed irregular thickening and nodularity of the lateral ventricles' lining. An anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae IgM antibody titter of 85 IU/ml was detected. All symptoms cleared after treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of acute CP-associated meningoencephalitis manifesting as an acute psychotic episode. It illustrates the principle that non-organic psychiatric syndromes must remain a diagnosis of exclusion in first-time acute psychosis. PMID:16164756

  20. Symptomatic palatal myoclonus with ear click after tick-borne meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pogorzelski, Robert; Drozdowski, Wieslaw; Rogowski, Marek

    2006-08-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old patient, who was diagnosed and treated for a tick-borne meningoencephalitis. Three months after the treatment he started to complain of annoying, cracks-resembling, rhythmical sounds, coming from the inside of his head to both his ears. Physical examination revealed rhythmical oscillations of the soft palate with a frequency of 100-120 per minute and a clock ticking noise synchronic with the palate tremor. Electromyography revealed continuous motor unit activity at rest in the tensor veli palatini muscle. Palatal myoclonus (PM) as a result of tick-borne meningoencephalitis was diagnosed. Treatment with several medications was started with no effect, then botulinum toxin was administered under EMG guidance to both sides of the patient's soft palate with great improvement. A 5-year follow-up and continuation of botulinum toxin injections with only minor and reversible side effects proved the treatment efficacy and safety. In the article we present a case of symptomatic palatal myoclonus with ear click and shortly discuss its aetiology, types and treatment options. We also stress the efficacy and safety of PM treatment with repetitive injections of botulinum toxin.

  1. [A 16-year-old boy with meningoencephalitis with auto-antibody against glutamate receptor].

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Shiho; Shimono, Masayuki; Kato, Ayako; Takano, Kenichi; Shiota, Naoki; Takahashi, Yukitoshi

    2008-01-01

    We herein report a 16-year-old boy who presented with fever and generalized convulsion. His symptoms progressively worsened, and electroencephalography (EEG) showed status with bi-frontal focus. One month after the initial presentation, examination of the cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis, an increase in the IgG index and a positive oligoclonal IgG band. Brain MRI suggested slightly high signal intensity in the cerebral gray matter on FLAIR images. We considered that the patient had autoimmune meningoencephalitis, and therefore treated him with methyl-predonisolone pulse therapy, which substantially improved both his clinical condition and EEG findings. Before the therapy, the IgM and IgG auto-antibodies against glutamate receptor (GluR) epsilon 2 and delta 2 were positive, however they became negative after the therapy. In conclusion, some cases of meningoencephalitis with auto-antibodies against GluR may show an electrical status, mild brain MRI findings, and a good response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy. These clinical features were quite different from those observed for cases of Rasmussen's encephalitis.

  2. Two cases of possible neuro-Sweet disease with meningoencephalitis as the initial manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Makimoto, Go; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Yamakawa, Chizuru; Fujii, Daiki; Ikeda-Sakai, Yasuko; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Abe, Koji

    2012-01-01

    We report 2 cases that were considered to be neuro-Sweet disease. They initially manifested with meningoencephalitis and no skin lesions, and rapidly improved with corticosteroid therapy. In both cases, patients complained of meningitic symptoms such as fever and headache, and HLA-B54 and -Cw1 turned out to be positive over the clinical course. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed increased levels of lymphocytes and protein. In case #1, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) showed high-intensity signals in the right dorsal medulla oblongata, bilateral dorsal midbrain, and left thalamus. In case #2, FLAIR and DWI showed high-intensity signals in the bilateral cerebellar cortex and left caudate nucleus. Symptoms and MRI images were markedly improved in both cases after corticosteroid pulse therapy. According to published diagnostic criteria, these 2 cases were considered possible neuro-Sweet disease. These cases suggest that the combination of meningoencephalitis and HLA specificity is important to consider the possibility of neuro-Sweet disease, even without skin lesions. PMID:22593809

  3. Enteroviral Meningoencephalitis Complicated by Central Diabetes Insipidus in a Neonate: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Jones, Garrett; Muriello, Michael; Patel, Aloka; Logan, Latania

    2015-06-01

    Enterovirus is a known cause of central nervous system infection in the neonatal population and typically has a benign course; however, neurologic complications have been reported. We describe what we believe to be the first documented case of enteroviral meningoencephalitis complicated by central diabetes insipidus in a neonate.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae GD201008-001, Isolated in China from Tilapia with Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjin; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a whole-genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae strain GD201008-001, a pathogen causing meningoencephalitis in cultural tilapia in China. The genome sequence provides opportunities to understand the piscine GBS pathogenicity and its genetic basis associated with host tropism. PMID:23144401

  5. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae GD201008-001, isolated in China from tilapia with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangjin; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2012-12-01

    This work describes a whole-genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae strain GD201008-001, a pathogen causing meningoencephalitis in cultural tilapia in China. The genome sequence provides opportunities to understand the piscine GBS pathogenicity and its genetic basis associated with host tropism.

  6. Amoebicidal Activity of Essential Oil of Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants in an Amoebic Liver Abscess Hamster Model.

    PubMed

    Avila-Blanco, Manuel Enrique; Rodríguez, Martín Gerardo; Moreno Duque, José Luis; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic disease that extends worldwide and is a public health problem in developing countries. Metronidazole is the drug recommended in the treatment of amebiasis, but its contralateral effects and lack of continuity of treatment induce low efficiency, coupled with the appearance of resistant amoebic strains. Therefore, the search of new compounds with amoebicidal activity is urgent and important. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antiamoebic activity of the essential oil Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants. It exhibited an IC50 = 0.7 mg/mL against trophozoites. The oral administration of essential oil (8 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg) to hamster infected with Entamoeba histolytica reverted the infection. Ascaridole was identified as the main component of essential oil of D. ambrosioides. The identification of amoebicidal activity of Ascaridole gives support to the traditional use. Further studies with Ascaridole will be carried out to understand the mechanism involved.

  7. Immunohistochemical characterization of the initial stages of Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    The initial stages of Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis in mice were immunohistochemically characterized following the first 8 h post-intranasal inoculation. The events found after 8 h were: (1) amebas in contact with the mucous layer of the olfactory epithelium, (2) numerous parasites eliminated by extensive shedding of the mucous layer, and (3) many organisms reaching the nasal epithelium. In contrast to other works, we observed that after 24 h, amebas invaded the epithelium, without evidence of the disruption of the nasal mucosa. In addition some trophozoites invading through the respiratory epithelium were observed, suggesting an additional invasion route. The inflammatory response detected was scarce until 30 h post-inoculation. After 96 h, the inflammatory response was severe in the olfactory bulb and brain, and the tissue damage great. Consequently, an inflammatory reaction may enhance tissue damage but apparently does not destroy amebas which seem to proliferate in the olfactory bulb.

  8. Toxoplasma gondii meningoencephalitis without cerebral MRI findings in a patient with ulcerative colitis under immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulos, S F; Stamouli, V; Dimitropoulou, D; Spiliopoulou, A; Panos, G; Anastassiou, E D; Marangos, M; Spiliopoulou, I

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common opportunistic infection of the central nervous system in immunosupressed patients. It is usually presented as a space-occupying lesion detected by cerebral computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The diffuse form of the disease (diffuse toxoplasmic meningoencephalitis) lacks the characteristic cerebral radiologic findings rendering pre-mortem diagnosis much more difficult. Herein, we describe a case of toxoplasmic menincoencephalitis, without evidence of cerebral space-occupying lesions, in a patient with ulcerative colitis under combined therapy with systemic glucocorticoids and azathioprine. Diagnosis was based on microscopic examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the parasite, whereas, RT-PCR for Toxoplasma gondii was negative. Taking into consideration the limitations of molecular methods, investigation of the etiology of meningeal involvement in patients under immunosuppressive therapy presenting positive serology of previous T. gondii infection, should include microscopic examination of CSF for parasite presence.

  9. Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein as a Specific Marker for Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in Pug Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MIYAKE, Hizuru; INOUE, Akiko; TANAKA, Miho; MATSUKI, Naoaki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT To evaluate the ability of serum glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) concentration as a diagnostic marker for canine central nervous system (CNS) disorders, sera from dogs with various CNS (n=47) and non-CNS (n=56) disorders were measured for GFAP by using an ELISA kit. Healthy Beagles (n=15) and Pug dogs (n=12) were also examined as controls. Interestingly, only Pug dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) showed elevated serum GFAP concentrations (<0.01 to 1.14 ng/ml), while other breeds of dogs with NME did not. Among the Pug dogs with NME, serum GFAP concentrations did not correlate with their clinical features, such as ages or survival times. Our data indicate the usefulness of serum GFAP as a novel marker for Pug dogs with NME. PMID:23856761

  10. A Case of Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Choroidal Tuberculous Granuloma Associated with Tuberculous Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sunghyuk; Chang, Woohyok

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare case of oculomotor nerve palsy and choroidal tuberculous granuloma associated with tuberculous meningoencephalitis. A 15-year-old male visited our hospital for an acute drop of the left eyelid and diplopia. He has been on anti-tuberculous drugs (isoniazid, rifampin) for 1 year for his tuberculous encephalitis. A neurological examination revealed a conscious clear patient with isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy, which manifested as ptosis, and a fundus examination revealed choroidal tuberculoma. Other anti-tuberculous drugs (pyrazinamide, ethambutol) and a steroid (dexamethasone) were added. After 3 months on this medication, ptosis of the left upper eyelid improved and the choroidal tuberculoma decreasedin size, but a right homonymous visual field defect remained. When a patient with tuberculous meningitis presents with abrupt onset oculomotor nerve palsy, rapid re-diagnosis should be undertaken and proper treatment initiated, because the prognosis is critically dependent on the timing of adequate treatment. PMID:18784452

  11. Human Parechovirus 3: The Most Common Viral Cause of Meningoencephalitis in Young Infants.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Christian; Harrison, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) were initially classified as echoviruses. HPeVs occur worldwide, comprising up to 17 genotypes. HPeV1 and HPeV3 are most common. Clinical disease varies somewhat among genotypes. HPeV1 causes mostly gastrointestinal infections. HPeV3's prominence is due to its causing sepsis syndromes and central nervous system (CNS) infections in young infants. Currently, HPeV3 is the most common single cause of aseptic meningitis/meningoencephalitis in infants less than 90 days old in North America, usually with biannual summer-fall seasonality. HPeV3 CNS infections usually lack cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Mortality and sequelae are uncommon, usually accompanying initially severe or neurologically complicated acute illnesses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis due to migrating plant foreign bodies in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Dennis, M M; Pearce, L K; Norrdin, R W; Ehrhart, E J

    2005-11-01

    Regional suppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis of variable chronicity was diagnosed in three young dogs residing in Colorado. Grass awns were grossly identified in the right occipital cortex of one dog and in the right lateral ventricle of another. Intralesional plant material was microscopically evident in the dura mater overlying the right occipital cortex of the third dog. One grass awn was identified as a floret of Hordeum jabatum. In each case, aerobic culture of brain tissue identified multiple isolates of bacteria. The dogs presented with clinically variable, rapidly progressive neurologic dysfunction, including tetraplegia, depressed mentation, and episodic extensor rigidity, ataxia, circling, stupor, vocalization, and head-pressing. Encephalitis due to bacteria introduced from migrating plant foreign material is a potential sequela of intranasal, periocular, or pharyngeal foreign bodies.

  13. [Intrathecal interferon therapy in chronic echovirus meningoencephalitis in Bruton type agammaglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    von der Wense, A; Herrmann, B; Deppermann, R; Harms, F; Wehinger, H

    1998-01-01

    A 9-year-old body with X-linked agammaglobulinemia developed chronic enteroviral meningoencephalitis (CEMA) caused by echovirus type 6. Intravenous treatment with selected immunoglobulin charges containing high titers against echovirus type 6 or combination with beta-interferon did not result in improvement. After implantation of a Rickham reservoir and periodical administration of intraventricular and intravenous immunoglobulin the virus recurred rapidly each time treatment was stopped. After 20 months of treatment the patient received a combined therapy with beta-interferon and selected immunoglobulin. Both drugs were given by lumbar puncture, intravenously and via Rickham reservoir. Subsequently echovirus type 6 could not be isolated in culture or PCR. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis disappeared. The remission is lasting for more than three years. Intrathecal and intraventricular beta-interferon therapy for CEMA is being reported for the first time. Facing the unfavourable prognosis of the disease this mode of treatment is a new therapeutic approach following failure of other therapies.

  14. SPECT scans for monitoring response to pleconaril therapy in chronic enteroviral meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tormey, V J; Buscombe, J R; Johnson, M A; Thomson, A P J; Webster, A D B

    2003-02-01

    Chronic enteroviral meningoencephalitis (CEMA) is a rare complication of immunodeficient individuals and may present as insidious intellectual deterioration. Diagnosis requires isolation or PCR identification of enterovirus from the CSF. Pleconaril, a novel anti-picornaviral compound is available on a compassionate release basis to treat patients with potentially life threatening enteroviral infection. Non-invasive neuroimaging is an important new technique for both the diagnosis of encephalitis and as an objective assessment of response to treatment. We report two immunodeficient patients, one with common variable immunodeficiency and one with HIV, with an insidious presentation of CEMA. In both patients, perfusion single photon emission tomography scans were effective in monitoring treatment, correlating with clinical and virological response to pleconaril.

  15. Birds of a feather: an uncommon cause of pneumonia and meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Anne-Marie; Khare, Divya; Kavi, Jay

    2016-09-12

    A 61-year-old man was admitted with a 1-week history of influenza-like symptoms during a period of increased influenza virus activity. He soon developed type 2 respiratory failure and became increasingly drowsy. He later suffered a convulsive episode in the intensive care unit (ICU) which self-terminated. Initial clinical findings suggested community-acquired pneumonia and meningoencephalitis. However, a detailed history revealed that he was a pet bird-keeper, which raised a suspicion of ornithosis. Chlamydia psittaci DNA was detected in sputum by PCR. He was started on appropriate antibiotics and made a full recovery. We present this uncommon cause of pneumonia as an example of the importance of accurate history-taking to ensure a correct diagnosis for optimal management. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Meningoencephalitis in a polar bear caused by equine herpesvirus 9 (EHV-9).

    PubMed

    Donovan, T A; Schrenzel, M D; Tucker, T; Pessier, A P; Bicknese, B; Busch, M D M; Wise, A G; Maes, R; Kiupel, M; McKnight, C; Nordhausen, R W

    2009-11-01

    A 12-year-old female polar bear (Ursus maritimus) developed a sudden onset of muscle tremors, erratic circling, increased blinking, head shaking, and ptyalism, which progressed to partial and generalized seizures. Ancillary diagnostic tests were inconclusive, and the only significant laboratory finding was nonsuppurative pleocytosis of cerebrospinal fluid. Euthanasia was elected. Microscopic evaluation demonstrated multifocal, random nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis involving most prominently the rostral cerebral cortex, as well as the thalamus, midbrain, and rostral medulla. Lesions consisted of inflammation, neuronal necrosis, gliosis, and both neuronal and glial basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antibody reactive to several equine herpesviruses was positive within affected areas of the brain, and polymerase chain reaction conclusively demonstrated the presence of only equine herpesvirus 9. The clinical and morphologic features of this case resemble other fatal herpesvirus encephalitides derived from interspecies transmission and underscore the need for extreme caution when managing wild or captive equids.

  17. Meningoencephalitis in a Boelen's python (Morelia boeleni) associated with paramyxovirus infection.

    PubMed

    West, G; Garner, M; Raymond, J; Latimer, K S; Nordhausen, R

    2001-09-01

    An adult male Boelen's python, Morelia boeleni, presented with acute neurologic disease and was euthanatized. Histologic examination revealed nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis. Occasional eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions were noted in glial cells. On the basis of clinical signs and histopathology, inclusion body disease of boid snakes was suspected, but inclusions were not seen in other organs commonly affected with the disease. Moreover, electron microscopy revealed that the inclusions contained stacks of filaments 13-14 nm wide. With the use of a generic paramyxovirus cDNA probe, sections of brain and esophageal ganglion demonstrated hybridization. The findings indicate that paramyxovirus was the likely cause of the encephalomyelitis in this python, and this virus should be included in the differential diagnosis of pythons exhibiting central nervous system disease.

  18. Rapid Fatal Outcome of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in a Non-HIV Immunocompromised Patient with a Low Fluconazole Susceptibility Isolate: A Case Report from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoarivelo, Rivonirina A.; Randriamampionona, Njary; Rakotomalala, Angelot F.; Razafinambinintsoa, Tiana; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe; Randria, Mamy J. D. D.; Cornet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is considered rare in HIV-negative individuals. In Madagascar, the epidemiology of cryptococcosis has not yet been well described, neither in immunocompetent nor in immunocompromised patients. We report here the first Malagasy detailed case of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in a non-HIV immunocompromised adult patient carrying a low fluconazole susceptibility isolate. We emphasize the importance of early and accurate diagnosis to meet the challenges of managing cryptococcosis in developing countries. PMID:28078149

  19. [Successful treatment for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis complicated by cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Potapenko, V G; Konovalenko, I B; Oksema, E V; Filippova, L N; Dulaeva, E N; Derevyannykh, N A; Krasnoruzhsky, A I; Klimovich, A V; Klimko, N N; Medvedeva, N V

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a common agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is one of the rare causes of severe hyponatremia in patients with CNS diseases. The paper describes the first clinical case of a patient, whose onset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was complicated by cryptococcal meningoencephalitis presenting with mental disorders and severe electrolytic imbalance. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B and fluconazole could alleviate an infectious process and metabolic disturbances.

  20. Zebra-borne neurotropic equid herpesvirus 1 meningoencephalitis in a Thomson's gazelle ( Eudorcas thomsonii).

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Kanako; Kim, Kenneth; Langohr, Ingeborg; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K; Pirie, Gordon; Yanai, Tokuma; Haridy, Mohie; Gaschen, Lorrie; Del Piero, Fabio

    2017-07-01

    We describe the histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of a case of meningoencephalitis in a Thomson's gazelle ( Eudorcas thomsonii) naturally infected with zebra-borne equid herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) and the implications for the molecular detection of zebra-borne EHV-1. A 4-y-old female Thomson's gazelle was submitted for postmortem examination; no gross abnormalities were noted except for meningeal congestion. Microscopic evaluation demonstrated multifocal nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis with intranuclear eosinophilic and amphophilic inclusion bodies and EHV-9 antigen in neurons. PCR demonstrated the presence of a herpesvirus with a nucleotide sequence 99-100% identical to the corresponding sequences of zebra-borne EHV-1 and of EHV-9 strains. To determine whether EHV-1 or EHV-9 was involved, a PCR with a specific primer set for EHV-9 ORF59/60 was used. The sequence was identical to that of 3 recognized zebra-borne EHV-1 strains and 91% similar to that of EHV-9. This isolate was designated as strain LM2014. The partial glycoprotein G ( gG) gene sequence of LM2014 was also identical to the sequence of 2 zebra-borne EHV-1 strains (T-529 isolated from an onager, 94-137 from a Thomson's gazelle). The histologic lesions of encephalitis and antigen localization in this gazelle indicate prominent viral neurotropism, and lesions were very similar to those seen in EHV-1- and EHV-9-infected non-equid species. Histologic lesions caused by EHV-9 and zebra-borne EHV-1 are therefore indistinguishable.

  1. Long-term survival in a dog with meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces species.

    PubMed

    Song, Rachel B; Vitullo, Carina A; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Daniels, Joshua B

    2015-07-01

    A 2-year-old, female spayed Golden Retriever dog was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for evaluation of ataxia, cervical pain, 1 episode of acute collapse, dull mentation, and inappetence. Physical examination revealed an elevated temperature of 39.7°C and severe cervical pain. Blood work revealed a mature neutrophilia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis with no infectious agents. A presumptive diagnosis of steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis was made, and corticosteroid therapy was started. The patient improved initially but experienced a vestibular episode characterized by falling and vertical nystagmus. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed an epidural abscess in the cervical vertebral canal and diffuse meningeal enhancement in the brain and cranial cervical spine. Abscess drainage revealed degenerate neutrophils and several filamentous, branching organisms. Culture of the initial CSF using an enrichment broth revealed growth of a Gram-positive organism 5 days after fluid collection. The isolate was identified by partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Actinomyces spp. The patient was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics. Our study reports the long-term survival after medical treatment of bacterial meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces sp. infection in a dog. Bacterial meningoencephalitis should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients with cervical pain and fever, even when a nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis is found on CSF analysis. Culture of the CSF with use of an enrichment broth should be considered in all cases of neutrophilic pleocytosis to rule out infections of the central nervous system. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of two Entamoeba histolytica strains with different virulence phenotypes identifies peroxiredoxin as an important component of amoebic virulence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul H; Zhang, Xiaochun; Guo, Jianhua; Townsend, R Reid; Stanley, Samuel L

    2006-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan intestinal parasite that causes amoebic colitis and amoebic liver abscess. To identify virulence factors of E. histolytica, we first defined the phenotypes of two E. histolytica strains, HM-1:IMSS, the prototype virulent strain, and E. histolytica Rahman, a strain that was reportedly less virulent than HM-1:IMSS. We found that compared with HM-1:IMSS, Rahman has a defect in erythrophagocytosis and the ability to cause amoebic colitis in human colonic xenografts. We used differential in-gel 2D electrophoresis to compare the proteome of Rahman and HM-1:IMSS, and identified six proteins that were differentially expressed above a fivefold level between the two organisms. These included two proteins with antioxidative properties (peroxiredoxin and superoxide dismutase), and three proteins of unknown function, grainin 1, grainin 2 and a protein containing a LIM-domain. Overexpression of peroxiredoxin in Rahman rendered the transgenic trophozoites more resistant to killing by H2O2 in vitro, and infection with Rahman trophozoites expressing higher levels of peroxiredoxin was associated with higher levels of intestinal inflammation in human colonic xenografts, and more severe disease based on histology. In contrast, higher levels of grainin appear to be associated with a reduced virulence phenotype, and E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS trophozoites infecting human intestinal xenografts show marked decreases in grainin expression. Our data indicate that there are definable molecular differences between Rahman and HM-1:IMSS that may explain the phenotypic differences, and identify peroxiredoxin as an important component of virulence in amoebic colitis.

  3. Mucosal delivery of ACNPV baculovirus driving expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment confers protection against amoebic liver abscess in hamster.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Laclette, J P; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, J C

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine.

  4. Mucosal Delivery of ACNPV Baculovirus Driving Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment Confers Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Ruiz, DM; Laclette, JP; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, JC

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine. PMID:22110386

  5. Avian influenza A (H5N1) infection with respiratory failure and meningoencephalitis in a Canadian traveller.

    PubMed

    Rajabali, Naheed; Lim, Thomas; Sokolowski, Colleen; Prevost, Jason D; Lee, Edward Z

    2015-01-01

    In an urban centre in Alberta, an otherwise healthy 28-year-old woman presented to hospital with pleuritic chest and abdominal pain after returning from Beijing, China. After several days, this was followed by headache, confusion and, ultimately, respiratory failure, coma and death. Microbiology yielded influenza A subtype H5N1 from various body sites and neuroimaging was consistent with meningoencephalitis. While H5N1 infections in humans have been reported in Asia since 1997, this is the first documented case of H5N1 influenza in the Western Hemisphere. The present case demonstrated the typical manifestation of H5N1 influenza but, for the first time, also confirmed previous suggestions from human and animal studies that H5N1 is neurotropic and can manifest with neurological symptoms and meningoencephalitis.

  6. Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Captive Black and White Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) Caused by Acanthamoeba T4 Genotype.

    PubMed

    Gaide, N; Pelandakis, M; Robveille, C; Albaric, O; Jouvion, G; Souchon, M; Risler, A; Abadie, J

    2015-11-01

    A mature male, black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) died in a zoological garden after a 4-day history of lethargy and non-responsive convulsions. Necropsy and histopathological examinations revealed acute necrotizing and haemorrhagic meningoencephalitis with intralesional amoebas confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Acanthamoeba T4 genotype was identified as the causative agent of the brain lesion, based on amplification and sequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA genes. The presence of free-living amoebas in water and mud from the lemur's environment was investigated by morphological and molecular analyses. The two predominant genera, representing 80% of isolated amoebas, were Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp. All Acanthamoeba isolates belonged to the T4 genotype. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of a meningoencephalitis due to Acanthamoeba T4 genotype in Lemuridae with concurrent analysis of pathological tissues and environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Locked-in syndrome after basilary artery thrombosis by mucormycosis masquerading as meningoencephalitis in a lymphoma patient.

    PubMed

    Maffini, Fausto; Cocorocchio, Emilia; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Bonomo, Guido; Peccatori, Fedro; Chiapparini, Laura; Vincenzo, Silvia Di; Martinelli, Giovanni; Viale, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Locked-in syndrome is a rare clinical syndrome due to basilary artery thrombosis generally associated with trauma, vascular, or cardiac malformation. It can present as various types of clinical evolution and occasionally masquerades as other pathological conditions, such as infective meningoencephalitis. These complications are the cause of diagnostic delay, if not promptly recognised, followed by patient death. We report the case of a 42-year-old female with a systemic B and cutaneous T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, with a severe neutropenia lasting over a year, who eventually developed a rapid and fatal fungal mucormycosis sepsis following a skin infection on her right arm, associated with locked-in syndrome and meningoencephalitis.

  8. Recovery from a possible cytomegalovirus meningoencephalitis-induced apparent brain stem death in an immunocompetent man: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rahardjo, Theresia Monica; Maskoen, Tinni Trihartini; Redjeki, Ike Sri

    2016-08-26

    Recovery from cytomegalovirus meningoencephalitis with brain stem death in an immunocompetent patient is almost impossible. We present a remarkable recovery from a possible cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent man who had severe neurological syndromes, suggesting brain stem death complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. A 19-year-old Asian man presented at our hospital's emergency department with reduced consciousness and seizures following high fever, headache, confusion, and vomitus within a week before arrival. He was intubated and sent to our intensive care unit. He had nuchal rigidity and tetraparesis with accentuated tendon reflexes. Electroencephalography findings suggested an acute structural lesion at his right temporal area or an epileptic state. A cerebral spinal fluid examination suggested viral infection. A computed tomography scan was normal at the early stage of disease. Immunoglobulin M, immunoglobulin G anti-herpes simplex virus, and immunoglobulin M anti-cytomegalovirus were negative. However, immunoglobulin G anti-cytomegalovirus was positive, which supported a diagnosis of cytomegalovirus meningoencephalitis. His clinical condition deteriorated, spontaneous respiration disappeared, cranial reflexes became negative, and brain stem death was suspected. Therapy included antivirals, corticosteroids, antibiotics, anticonvulsant, antipyretics, antifungal agents, and a vasopressor to maintain hemodynamic stability. After 1 month, he showed a vague response to painful stimuli at his supraorbital nerve and respiration started to appear the following week. After pneumonia and pleural effusion were resolved, he was weaned from the ventilator and moved from the intensive care unit on day 90. This case highlights several important issues that should be considered. First, the diagnosis of brain stem death must be confirmed with caution even if there are negative results of brain stem death test for a long period. Second, cytomegalovirus

  9. Ganciclovir and Foscarnet Therapy of Cytomegalovirus-Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Hemodialysis Patient With Liver Transplantation: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, G W; Hong, H L; Lee, I H; Ahn, K S; Kim, J D; Choi, D L

    2016-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in patients with liver transplantation (LT) remains a highly prevalent complication with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. However, CMV-associated meningoencephalitis is rarely diagnosed, and treatment is very difficult. The aim of the present report is to review the experience of successful treatment with combined ganciclovir and foscarnet of CMV-associated meningoencephalitis refractory to ganciclovir alone in a hemodialysis (HD) patient after LT. A 54-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease on HD developed a seizure with loss of consciousness. She had received a liver transplant 4 months before. Blood CMV polymerase chain reaction was positive, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was compatible with viral meningitis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed extensive dural thickening with enhancement and a round ring-like enhancement in the left centrum semiovale. She was diagnosed with CMV-associated meningoencephalitis. At that time, ganciclovir was started intravenously. After that, there were no improvements in mental state, CSF analysis, or brain MRI. Intravenous foscarnet at reduced dose was added to ganciclovir therapy. With combined ganciclovir and foscarnet, there was a slight improvement in her mental state and brain MRI.

  10. Characterization of a new pathogenic Acanthamoeba Species, A. byersi n. sp., isolated from a human with fatal amoebic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Nerad, Thomas A; Visvesvara, Govinda S

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are free-living amoebae that are ubiquitous in natural environments. They can cause cutaneous, nasopharyngeal, and disseminated infection, leading to granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) in immunocompromised individuals. In addition, they can cause amoebic keratitis in contact lens wearers. Acanthamoeba GAE is almost always fatal because of difficulty and delay in diagnosis and lack of optimal antimicrobial therapy. Here, we report the description of an unusual strain isolated from skin and brain of a GAE patient. The amoebae displayed large trophozoites and star-shaped cysts, characteristics for acanthamoebas belonging to morphology Group 1. However, its unique morphology and growth characteristics differentiated this new strain from other Group 1 species. DNA sequence analysis, secondary structure prediction, and phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene confirmed that this new strain belonged to Group 1, but that it was distinct from the other sequence types within that group. Thus, we hereby propose the establishment of a new species, Acanthamoeba byersi n. sp. as well as a new sequence type, T18, for this new strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Group 1 Acanthamoeba that is indisputably pathogenic in humans.

  11. Modulation of the reaction rate of regulating protein induces large morphological and motional change of amoebic cell.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shin I; Sasai, Masaki

    2007-03-21

    Morphologies of moving amoebae are categorized into two types. One is the "neutrophil" type in which the long axis of cell roughly coincides with its moving direction. This type of cell extends a leading edge at the front and retracts a narrow tail at the rear, whose shape has been often drawn as a typical amoeba in textbooks. The other one is the "keratocyte" type with widespread lamellipodia along the front side arc. Short axis of cell in this type roughly coincides with its moving direction. In order to understand what kind of molecular feature causes conversion between two types of morphologies, and how two typical morphologies are maintained, a mathematical model of amoebic cells is developed. This model describes movement of cell and intracellular reactions of activator, inhibitor and actin filaments in a unified way. It is found that the producing rate of activator is a key factor of conversion between two types. This model also explains the observed data that the keratocyte type cells tend to rapidly move along a straight line. The neutrophil type cells move along a straight line when the moving velocity is small, but they show fluctuated motions deviating from a line when they move as fast as the keratocyte type cells. Efficient energy consumption in the neutrophil type cells is predicted.

  12. Amoebicidal Activity of Essential Oil of Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants in an Amoebic Liver Abscess Hamster Model

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Blanco, Manuel Enrique; Rodríguez, Martín Gerardo; Moreno Duque, José Luis; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic disease that extends worldwide and is a public health problem in developing countries. Metronidazole is the drug recommended in the treatment of amebiasis, but its contralateral effects and lack of continuity of treatment induce low efficiency, coupled with the appearance of resistant amoebic strains. Therefore, the search of new compounds with amoebicidal activity is urgent and important. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antiamoebic activity of the essential oil Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants. It exhibited an IC50 = 0.7 mg/mL against trophozoites. The oral administration of essential oil (8 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg) to hamster infected with Entamoeba histolytica reverted the infection. Ascaridole was identified as the main component of essential oil of D. ambrosioides. The identification of amoebicidal activity of Ascaridole gives support to the traditional use. Further studies with Ascaridole will be carried out to understand the mechanism involved. PMID:24757495

  13. Evaluation of intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Inés; Richter, Henning; Beckmann, Katrin; Meier, Dieter; Dennler, Matthias; Kircher, Patrick R

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate metabolite concentrations of the brains of dogs with intracranial neoplasia or noninfectious meningoencephalitis by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3.0 T. ANIMALS 29 dogs with intracranial lesions (14 with neoplasia [3 oligodendromas, 3 glioblastomas multiformes, 3 astrocytomas, 2 lymphomas, and 3 meningiomas] and 15 is with noninfectious meningoencephalitis) and 10 healthy control dogs. PROCEDURES Short echo time, single voxel (1)H-MRS at 3.0 T was performed on neoplastic and noninfectious inflammatory intracranial lesions identified with conventional MRI. Metabolites of interest included N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline, creatine, myoinositol, the glutamine-glutamate complex (Glx), glutathione, taurine, lactate, and lipids. Data were analyzed with postprocessing fitting algorithm software. Metabolite concentrations relative to brain water content were calculated and compared with results for the healthy control dogs, which had been previously evaluated with the same (1)H MRS technique. RESULTS NAA, creatine, and Glx concentrations were reduced in the brains of dogs with neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis, whereas choline concentration was increased. Concentrations of these metabolites differed significantly between dogs with neoplasia and dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. Concentrations of NAA, creatine, and Glx were significantly lower in dogs with neoplasia, whereas the concentration of choline was significantly higher in dogs with neoplasia. Lipids were predominantly found in dogs with high-grade intra-axial neoplasia, meningioma, and necrotizing meningoencephalitis. A high concentration of taurine was found in 10 of 15 dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE (1)H MRS provided additional metabolic information about intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs.

  14. A severe manifestation of primary HIV-1 infection in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Joana; Póvoas, Marta Isabel; Cruz, Carla; Teixeira, Andrea

    2014-10-03

    Primary HIV infection (PHI) is symptomatic in 50-90% of patients with symptoms resembling infectious mononucleosis. The diagnosis, however, is seldom made at first presentation. Clinically severe presentations during primary HIV type 1 infection are considered to occur infrequently. We report a case of a severe manifestation of PHI with meningoencephalitis in the setting of HIV seroconversion in an adolescent girl. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. [Meningoencephalitis caused by West Nile virus in a renal transplant recipient].

    PubMed

    Ertilav, Muhittin; Ozkul, Aykut; Zeytinoğlu, Ayşın; Sen, Sait; Sipahi, Savaş; Töz, Hüseyin; Kitiş, Omer; Eraslan, Cenk

    2014-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection which is asymptomatic or mild in normal population, it may cause serious clinical conditions leading to death in eldery and immunosupressed patients. The virus is mainly transmitted by mosquito bites, however transfusion, transplantation, transplasental and nosocomial ways have also been reported to be responsible for viral transmission. It is known that WNV may cause life-threatining conditions such as central nervous system (CNS) infections especially in bone marrow and solid organ transplant recipients. In this report, the first case of WNV encephalitis in an immunosuppressed patient with renal transplant in Turkey was presented. A 25-year-old male patient admitted to our hospital with the complaints of generalized myalgia, nausea and vomiting, after the 24. day of renal transplantation from a live donor. Since he developed diffuse tonic clonic seizures during his follow up, he was diagnosed as meningoencephalitis with the results of cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MR) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry. Bacterial and fungal cultures of blood and CSF yielded negative results. CMV antigenemia test and CMV IgM in blood, and nucleic acid tests for CMV, EBV, HSV-1/2, VZV, HHV-6, enterovirus and parvovirus in CSF were also negative. However, WNV RNA was detected in CSF by an in-house reverse transcriptase (RT) nested PCR method. The sequence analysis (GenBank BLAST) of the virus showed that it had 99% similarity with Lineage-1 WNV strains. To define the transmission way of the virus to the recipient, WNV-RNA was searched in the renal biopsy sample and found negative by RT nested PCR. The clinical condition of the patient was improved with supportive therapy and by the de-escalation of immunosuppressive drugs [Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; 1 g/day), cyclosporin (1 mg/kg/day)]. However WNV meningoencephalitis recurred one month later. The patient presented with fever, myalgia, confusions, leukocytosis, anemia, and repeating WNV

  16. Biology and pathogenesis of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Ali, Ibne Karim M; Cope, Jennifer R; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a protist pathogen that can cause lethal brain infection. Despite decades of research, the mortality rate related with primary amoebic meningoencephalitis owing to N. fowleri remains more than 90%. The amoebae pass through the nose to enter the central nervous system killing the host within days, making it one of the deadliest opportunistic parasites. Accordingly, we present an up to date review of the biology and pathogenesis of N. fowleri and discuss needs for future research against this fatal infection.

  17. Long-term neuropsychological sequelae in HIV-seronegative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts: a cine MRI study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Chen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Hsu, Nai-Wen; Lin, Wei-Ming; Kung, Chia-Te; Lin, Wei-Che

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocephalus in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is most commonly managed with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. This study applied cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate initial disease severity on long-term cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics and associated neuropsychological sequelae in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts. Eighteen human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients (10 with shunts versus 8 without shunts) were compared with 32 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent complete neurologic examination and neuropsychological testing. Cine MRI was conducted to evaluate CSF flow parameters. Initial CSF laboratory analysis and imaging findings were correlated with present CSF flow parameters and neuropsychological scores. Patients without shunts had higher average flow than controls, suggesting chronic hydrocephalus. Initial Evans ratios and CSF glucose levels were associated with CSF peak velocity and flow. Worsening CSF flow parameters correlated with decreased neuropsychological performance. CSF flow parameter differences between the cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients both with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts could be detected by cine MRI and correlated with acute stage disease severity and chronic stage neuropsychological results. Cine MRI is useful for assessing the chronic hydrocephalus that may lead to neuropsychological deficits in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients.

  18. Detection of donor-derived CMV-specific T cells in cerebrospinal fluid in a case of CMV meningoencephalitis after cord blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Kato, Ruri; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Okada, Masaya; Kaida, Katsuji; Ishii, Shinichi; Yoshihara, Satoshi; Inoue, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Kyoko; Tamaki, Hiroya; Soma, Toshihiro; Ogawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) meningoencephalitis is a rather rare complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We describe here the case of a 59-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia who developed CMV meningoencephalitis after cord blood transplantation. The patient presented with a sudden onset of neurological symptoms, such as convulsion, on day 37. The analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample revealed an increase in the number of cells, which were of donor (cord blood) origin, consisting mainly of T cells. No bacteria were detected in the CSF sample. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the CSF sample was positive for CMV, but was negative for HHV-6, adenovirus, or BK virus. The patient was diagnosed with CMV meningoencephalitis and received cidofovir. His neurological symptoms were gradually improved and completely disappeared by day 60. CMV-specific dextramer-positive CD8(+) T cells were detected in the peripheral blood and CSF samples, with the frequency being much higher in the CSF. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the appearance of CMV-specific T cells in CSF samples from a patient with CMV meningoencephalitis. Cord blood-derived CMV-specific T cells may develop early after transplantation, enter the intrathecal compartment, and likely contribute to the regulation of CMV-meningoencephalitis.

  19. Long-Term Neuropsychological Sequelae in HIV-Seronegative Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis Patients with and without Ventriculoperitoneal Shunts: A Cine MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Chen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Hsu, Nai-Wen; Lin, Wei-Ming; Kung, Chia-Te; Lin, Wei-Che

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hydrocephalus in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is most commonly managed with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. This study applied cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate initial disease severity on long-term cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics and associated neuropsychological sequelae in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts. Methods. Eighteen human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients (10 with shunts versus 8 without shunts) were compared with 32 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent complete neurologic examination and neuropsychological testing. Cine MRI was conducted to evaluate CSF flow parameters. Initial CSF laboratory analysis and imaging findings were correlated with present CSF flow parameters and neuropsychological scores. Results. Patients without shunts had higher average flow than controls, suggesting chronic hydrocephalus. Initial Evans ratios and CSF glucose levels were associated with CSF peak velocity and flow. Worsening CSF flow parameters correlated with decreased neuropsychological performance. Conclusions. CSF flow parameter differences between the cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients both with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts could be detected by cine MRI and correlated with acute stage disease severity and chronic stage neuropsychological results. Cine MRI is useful for assessing the chronic hydrocephalus that may lead to neuropsychological deficits in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients. PMID:25948879

  20. Diagnosis of chronic brucellar meningitis and meningoencephalitis: the results of the Istanbul-2 study.

    PubMed

    Erdem, H; Kilic, S; Sener, B; Acikel, C; Alp, E; Karahocagil, M; Yetkin, F; Inan, A; Kecik-Bosnak, V; Gul, H C; Tekin-Koruk, S; Ceran, N; Demirdal, T; Yilmaz, G; Ulu-Kilic, A; Ceylan, B; Dogan-Celik, A; Nayman-Alpat, S; Tekin, R; Yalci, A; Turhan, V; Karaoglan, I; Yilmaz, H; Mete, B; Batirel, A; Ulcay, A; Dayan, S; Seza Inal, A; Ahmed, S S; Tufan, Z K; Karakas, A; Teker, B; Namiduru, M; Savasci, U; Pappas, G

    2013-02-01

    No detailed data exist in the literature on the accurate diagnosis of chronic brucellar meningitis or meningoencephalitis. A multicentre retrospective chart review was performed at 19 health centres to determine sensitivities of the diagnostic tests. This study included 177 patients. The mean values of CSF biochemical test results were as follows: CSF protein, 330.64 ± 493.28 mg/dL; CSF/ blood-glucose ratio, 0.35 ± 0.16; CSF sodium, 140.61 ± 8.14 mMt; CSF leucocyte count, 215.99 ± 306.87. The sensitivities of the tests were as follows: serum standard tube agglutination (STA), 94%; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) STA, 78%; serum Rose Bengal test (RBT), 96%; CSF RBT, 71%; automated blood culture, 37%; automated CSF culture, 25%; conventional CSF culture, 9%. The clinician should use every possible means to diagnose chronic neurobrucellosis. The high seropositivitiy in brucellar blood tests must facilitate the use of blood serology. Although STA should be preferred over RBT in CSF in probable neurobrucellosis other than the acute form of the disease, RBT is not as weak as expected. Moreover, automated culture systems should be applied when CSF culture is needed. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  1. Retrospective Study of Etiologic Agents Associated with Nonsuppurative Meningoencephalitis in Stranded Cetaceans in the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Susan; Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Arbelo, Manuel; Zucca, Daniele; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen natural cases of etiologically undetermined encephalitides in free-ranging cetaceans were studied retrospectively. Histological examination of the brains revealed variable degrees of nonsuppurative encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, characterized predominantly by perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates. A PCR assay was used on brain and other available tissues to detect the presence of morbillivirus, herpesvirus, West Nile virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and Brucella spp. In addition, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed on selected tissues to determine the presence of morbilliviral antigens. Six animals (5 striped dolphins and 1 common dolphin) showed IHC and/or molecular evidence of morbilliviral antigens and/or genomes, mainly in brain tissue. Conventional nested PCR detected herpesviral DNA in brain tissue samples from two striped dolphins. There was no evidence of West Nile virus, T. gondii, or Brucella spp. in any of the brain tissue samples examined. The information presented here increases the number of confirmed morbillivirus-positive cases within the Canarian archipelago from two previously reported cases to eight. Furthermore, a new nested-PCR method for the detection of morbillivirus is described here. Regarding herpesvirus, the phylogenetic analysis performed in the current study provides valuable information about a possible pathogenic branch of cetacean alphaherpesviruses that might be responsible for some fatal cases worldwide. PMID:24759718

  2. Establishment of a model of Streptococcus iniae meningoencephalitis in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Baums, C G; Hermeyer, K; Leimbach, S; Adamek, M; Czerny, C-P; Hörstgen-Schwark, G; Valentin-Weigand, P; Baumgärtner, W; Steinhagen, D

    2013-07-01

    Streptococcus iniae is an invasive pathogen causing meningitis and other lesions in various fish species. Furthermore, S. iniae is an emerging zoonotic agent that causes cellulitis in man. The aims of this study were to establish an intraperitoneal infection model for S. iniae in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and to develop a new histopathological scoring system to reflect the degree and extent of inflammation as well as the presence of necrosis in the brain and eye. Intraperitoneal administration of 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) led to 80% mortality and numerous fish developing clinical signs of central nervous system dysfunction. Microscopical examination of four regions of the brain (olfactory bulb, cerebellum, cerebrum and optical lobe) and the eye revealed the presence of lymphohistiocytic leptomeningitis, meningoencephalitis and endophthalmitis. Lesions were dominated by macrophages that often contained intracellular bacteria. Necrosis was recorded in some cases. Bacteriological screening revealed that multiple organs, including brain and eye, were infected with S. iniae and S. iniae colonized the scales and gills in high number. S. iniae was detected in tank water during the first week post infection, suggesting that infected tilapia might shed up to 3 × 10(7) CFU of S. iniae within 24 h. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction allowed confirmation of the challenge strain by detection of the virulence factors simA, scpI, cpsD, pgi, pgm and sagA.

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Streptococcus Pneumoniae Meningoencephalitis after Transsphenoidal Surgery: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Nobuyuki; FUKUHARA, Noriaki; FUKUI, Takahito; YAMAGUCHI-OKADA, Mitsuo; NISHIOKA, Hiroshi; YAMADA, Shozo

    2014-01-01

    We report three extremely rare cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis (SPM) after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). Between 2004 and 2010, we experienced three cases of severe SPM after surgery out of 1,965 patients undergoing TSS (0.15%). The three cases included a 4-year-old boy with a large cystic craniopharyngioma, a 40-year-old man with a non-functioning pituitary adenoma, and a 55-year-old man with acromegaly. The similarity among these SPM patients was that severe clinical events occurred suddenly 1–2 months postoperatively without any history of sinusitis or pneumonia. Despite intensive care these patients notably had residual neurological sequelae. In no case was rhinorrhea associated with SPM. It should be noted that SPM was not detected from bacterial cultures of the sphenoidal sinus mucous membranes (BCSM) obtained during TSS in two of the patients examined. Severe postoperative SPM can occur suddenly without cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage within 2 months after surgery and requires emergency treatment. Reduced resistance to infection may play a role in the occurrence of SPM in our three patients. Our study indicates that BCSM is not useful for predicting postoperative meningitis. PMID:24418784

  4. Retrospective study of etiologic agents associated with nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis in stranded cetaceans in the canary islands.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Eva; Sánchez, Susan; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Arbelo, Manuel; Zucca, Daniele; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Nineteen natural cases of etiologically undetermined encephalitides in free-ranging cetaceans were studied retrospectively. Histological examination of the brains revealed variable degrees of nonsuppurative encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, characterized predominantly by perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates. A PCR assay was used on brain and other available tissues to detect the presence of morbillivirus, herpesvirus, West Nile virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and Brucella spp. In addition, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed on selected tissues to determine the presence of morbilliviral antigens. Six animals (5 striped dolphins and 1 common dolphin) showed IHC and/or molecular evidence of morbilliviral antigens and/or genomes, mainly in brain tissue. Conventional nested PCR detected herpesviral DNA in brain tissue samples from two striped dolphins. There was no evidence of West Nile virus, T. gondii, or Brucella spp. in any of the brain tissue samples examined. The information presented here increases the number of confirmed morbillivirus-positive cases within the Canarian archipelago from two previously reported cases to eight. Furthermore, a new nested-PCR method for the detection of morbillivirus is described here. Regarding herpesvirus, the phylogenetic analysis performed in the current study provides valuable information about a possible pathogenic branch of cetacean alphaherpesviruses that might be responsible for some fatal cases worldwide. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans hyperfilamentous strain is hypervirulent in a murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Feretzaki, Marianna; Hardison, Sarah E; Wormley, Floyd L; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen that causes lethal infections of the lung and central nervous system in immunocompromised individuals. C. neoformans has a defined bipolar sexual life cycle with a and α mating types. During the sexual cycle, which can occur between cells of opposite mating types (bisexual reproduction) or cells of one mating type (unisexual reproduction), a dimorphic transition from yeast to hyphal growth occurs. Hyphal development and meiosis generate abundant spores that, following inhalation, penetrate deep into the lung to enter the alveoli, germinate, and establish a pulmonary infection growing as budding yeast cells. Unisexual reproduction has been directly observed only in the Cryptococcus var. neoformans (serotype D) lineage under laboratory conditions. However, hyphal development has been previously associated with reduced virulence and the serotype D lineage exhibits limited pathogenicity in the murine model. In this study we show that the serotype D hyperfilamentous strain XL280α is hypervirulent in an animal model. It can grow inside the lung of the host, establish a pulmonary infection, and then disseminate to the brain to cause cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Surprisingly, this hyperfilamentous strain triggers an immune response polarized towards Th2-type immunity, which is usually observed in the highly virulent sibling species C. gattii, responsible for the Pacific Northwest outbreak. These studies provide a technological advance that will facilitate analysis of virulence genes and attributes in C. neoformans var. neoformans, and reveal the virulence potential of serotype D as broader and more dynamic than previously appreciated.

  6. [Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Epidemiology and mortality risk factors in pre- and post-HAART era].

    PubMed

    Cabello Úbeda, Alfonso; Fortes Alen, José; Gadea, Ignacio; Mahillo, Ignacio; Górgolas, Miguel; Fernández Guerrero, Manuel L

    2016-05-06

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is an uncommon entity, but remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with AIDS. Review of CM cases in a university hospital. The diagnosis was determined by isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans in cerebrospinal fluid. Morbidity and mortality was assessed at 12 weeks (early mortality) and between 3 and 18 months after diagnosis (late mortality). We analyzed 32 patients from 2,269 AIDS cases (1.41%). 10 patients between 1990-1996 and 22 between 1997-2014. Cryptococcal antigen in CSF was positive in all cases, with titers>1,024 in 19 patients (63%); this group had lower CD4+ counts (40 ± 33 vs. 139 ± 78 cel/μL) and greater disseminated involvement. After a first CM episode the relapse rate was 34%. Global mortality rate was 28% (9/32), much higher in the pre-HAART era. CM morbidity and mortality is related to severe immunodeficiency, disseminated disease, high titers of antigen in CSF and delayed initiation of HAART. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Cryptococcus neoformans Hyperfilamentous Strain Is Hypervirulent in a Murine Model of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Feretzaki, Marianna; Hardison, Sarah E.; Wormley, Floyd L.; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen that causes lethal infections of the lung and central nervous system in immunocompromised individuals. C. neoformans has a defined bipolar sexual life cycle with a and α mating types. During the sexual cycle, which can occur between cells of opposite mating types (bisexual reproduction) or cells of one mating type (unisexual reproduction), a dimorphic transition from yeast to hyphal growth occurs. Hyphal development and meiosis generate abundant spores that, following inhalation, penetrate deep into the lung to enter the alveoli, germinate, and establish a pulmonary infection growing as budding yeast cells. Unisexual reproduction has been directly observed only in the Cryptococcus var. neoformans (serotype D) lineage under laboratory conditions. However, hyphal development has been previously associated with reduced virulence and the serotype D lineage exhibits limited pathogenicity in the murine model. In this study we show that the serotype D hyperfilamentous strain XL280α is hypervirulent in an animal model. It can grow inside the lung of the host, establish a pulmonary infection, and then disseminate to the brain to cause cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Surprisingly, this hyperfilamentous strain triggers an immune response polarized towards Th2-type immunity, which is usually observed in the highly virulent sibling species C. gattii, responsible for the Pacific Northwest outbreak. These studies provide a technological advance that will facilitate analysis of virulence genes and attributes in C. neoformans var. neoformans, and reveal the virulence potential of serotype D as broader and more dynamic than previously appreciated. PMID:25093333

  8. Prognostic factors for 1-week survival in dogs diagnosed with meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, I; Volk, H A; Van Ham, L; De Decker, S

    2016-08-01

    Although long-term outcomes of meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology (MUA) in dogs have been evaluated, little is known about short-term survival and initial response to therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible prognostic factors for 7-day survival after diagnosis of MUA in dogs. Medical records were reviewed for dogs diagnosed with MUA between 2006 and 2015. Previously described inclusion criteria were used, as well as 7-day survival data for all dogs. A poor outcome was defined as death within 1 week. Of 116 dogs that met inclusion criteria, 30 (26%) died within 7 days of diagnosis. Assessed variables included age, sex, bodyweight, duration of clinical signs and treatment prior to diagnosis, venous blood glucose and lactate levels, white blood cell count on complete blood count, total nucleated cell count/total protein concentration/white blood cell differentiation on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, presence of seizures and cluster seizures, mentation at presentation, neuroanatomical localisation, imaging findings and treatment after diagnosis. Multivariate analysis identified three variables significantly associated with poor outcome; decreased mentation at presentation, presence of seizures, and increased percentage of neutrophils on CSF analysis. Despite initiation of appropriate treatment, more than a quarter of dogs died within 1 week of diagnosis of MUA, emphasising the need for evaluation of short-term prognostic factors. Information from this study could aid clinical staff to provide owners of affected dogs with prognostic information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrathecal Synthesis of Immunoglobulins in Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis Due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Dorta-Contreras, Alberto Juan; Reiber, Hansotto

    1998-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis due to the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which is endemic to Cuba, occurs in children and is due to accidental contact with soil snails. The course is less often fatal than in adult patients in southeastern Asia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from 24 pediatric patients were analyzed and evaluated in CSF/serum quotient diagrams (Reiber graphs) to characterize the neuroimmunological response and the blood-CSF barrier dysfunction that occur in the course of the disease. At the time of the first diagnostic lumbar puncture, together with eosinophilic pleocytosis (1,920 ± 400 cells/μl), intermediate blood-CSF barrier dysfunction (i.e., an increased CSF/serum albumin quotient) with no intrathecal immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, and IgM class response was observed in all cases. Seven days later, at the time of early clinical recovery, the blood-CSF barrier dysfunction was normalized in 75% of the patients, but meanwhile, intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis emerged in all cases, as either a two-class response (IgG and IgA in 85% of the patients) or a three-class response (IgG, IgA, and IgM; 30%). The fraction of eosinophilic cells (40%) remained large despite a decreasing total cell count. The neuroimmunological pattern of this inflammatory response to the parasite and its toxins is discussed with regard to the CSF patterns of other infectious diseases caused by bacteria or viruses. PMID:9665947

  10. Detection of virus in CSF from the cases with meningoencephalitis by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hongzhi; Shen, Ao; Lv, Xia; Yang, Xunzhe; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Yanhuan; Zhang, Yinxin; Gong, Yanping; Ni, Peixiang; Wu, Honglong; Zhu, Yicheng; Cui, Liying

    2016-04-01

    We screened for viral DNA in cerebrospinal fluid samples using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to diagnose CNS viral infections. We collected CSF samples from four cases with clinically suspected viral meningoencephalitis. DNA extracted from the samples was analyzed with NGS, and the results were further validated using PCR. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) was detected in the CSF of two patients, HSV-2 and human herpes virus type 3 (HHV-3, VZV) in the CSF of two other patients separately. The number of unique reads of the identified viral genes ranged from 144 to 44205 (93.51 to 99.57%). The coverage of identified viral genes ranged from 12 to 98% with a depth value of 1.1 to 35, respectively. The results were further confirmed using PCR in three cases. The clinical presentation and outcomes of these four cases were consistent with the diagnostic results of NGS. NGS of CSF samples can be used as a diagnostic assay for CNS viral infection. Its further application for "pan-viral" or even "pan-microbial" screening of CSF might influence the diagnosis of CNS infectious diseases.

  11. Meningoencephalitis of unknown origin: investigation of prognostic factors and outcome using a standard treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, M; Smith, P M; Garosi, L

    2013-05-18

    Meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (MUO) is a common inflammatory CNS disease in dogs, with a variable and unpredictable outcome. MRI and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) features were prospectively evaluated to establish their utility as prognostic markers for predicting mortality, relapse and long-term outcome in 39 dogs with MUO. MRI and CSF analysis were performed at initial diagnosis and three months into treatment with prednisolone and cytosine arabinoside. When possible, MRI was repeated every 12 months thereafter. Median survival time was 26 days. All deaths occurred within 52 days of diagnosis (22/39; 56 per cent). One-third (13/39) died within 72 hours of diagnosis. Outcome was good or excellent in 12/17 surviving dogs. Loss of the cerebral sulci and foramen magnum herniation on MRI were associated with increased risk of mortality. An abnormal CSF analysis at the three-month re-examination was associated with increased risk of relapse (P=0.04). The combination of MRI and CSF analysis provided a greater sensitivity for predicting relapse than one modality alone. Discontinuing treatment before MRI lesions resolved always resulted in relapse. The presence of certain MRI characteristics may indicate an increased risk of mortality. Dogs alive three months following diagnosis have a very low risk of death due to MUO.

  12. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Micafungin in Experimental Hematogenous Candida Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Hope, William W.; Mickiene, Diana; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Kelaher, Amy M.; Hughes, Joanna E.; Cotton, Margaret P.; Bacher, John; Keirns, James J.; Buell, Donald; Heresi, Gloria; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Groll, Andreas H.; Drusano, George L.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematogenous Candida meningoencephalitis (HCME) is a relatively frequent manifestation of disseminated candidiasis in neonates that is associated with significant mortality and neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The outcome following antifungal therapy is often suboptimal with few therapeutic options. A limited amount of clinical data suggests that echinocandins may have a role in treatment of HCME. Methods We therefore studied the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of micafungin in a rabbit model of neonatal HCME, and bridged the results to neonates using population pharmacokinetics and Monte Carlo simulation. Results Micafungin exhibited linear plasma pharmacokinetics in the range 0.25-16 mg/kg. Micafungin penetrated most compartments of the central nervous system (CNS), but only following dosages >2 mg/kg. Micafungin was not reliably found in cerebrospinal fluid. With few exceptions, drug penetration into the various CNS subcompartments was not statistically different in infected versus non-infected rabbits. A dose-microbiological response relationship was apparent within the brain and near-maximal effect was apparent following dosages of approximately 8 mg/kg. Monte Carlo simulations revealed near-maximal antifungal effect was attained at neonatal dosages of 12-15 mg/kg. Conclusions These results provide a foundation for clinical trials of micafungin in neonates with HCME, and a model for antimicrobial bridging studies from bench-to-bedside in pediatric patients. PMID:18171300

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles in children with enterovirus 71-associated meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Li, Shuxian; Zheng, Jianfeng; Cai, Chunyan; Ye, Bin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe neurological complications including meningoencephalitis (ME) in some patients with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). However, to date no studies have reported changes in cytokine concentrations and their correlations with clinical variables in patients with ME following EV71 infection. In this study, responses of Th1/Th2 cytokine, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with EV71-related HFMD with ME and patients with febrile convulsions (FC) were analyzed using cytometric bead array technology. It was found that CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were significantly higher in patients with EV71-related ME than in those with FC. Additionally, both CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were correlated with CSF cytology, fever duration and duration of hospital stay. More interestingly, a positive correlation between CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations was observed. Finally, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that when a cutoff value of 9.40 pg/mL was set for IL-6, the sensitivity and specificity were 84.5% and 85.5%, respectively, for discriminating EV71-related ME from FC. In conclusion, IL-6 and IFN-γ may be associated with EV71-induced neuropathology. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Intrathecal synthesis of IgE in children with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Hernández, Hermes Fundora; Barroso, Jesús Callol; Sanchez-Martinez, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by the helminth Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is an emerging infectious disease in America. The objective of this paper was to determine if the intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin E is produced during the acute phase of the disease. Methods Thirteen patients, mean age 4.5 years were studied; a diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed and serum samples taken. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was quantified by nephelometry. Control patients had other infections or other neurological diseases. Results The mean cell count in the CSF was 500 × 10-6 cells/L and of these 23% were eosinophils. In blood the eosinophils were 13%. The chief symptoms of the patients were migraine, vomiting and fever and 50% presented some meningeal signs. IgE intrathecal synthesis analyzed by the corresponding quotient diagram (Reibergram) was observed in all patients. No intrathecal IgE synthesis was seen in control patients. Conclusion Intrathecal synthesis of IgE demonstrates the participation of this immunoglobulin in the destruction of the third stage larvae of the parasite in the CSF. The test should be considered in our environment as a tool to aid diagnosis. PMID:19032790

  15. Meningoencephalitis in cats in Austria: a study of infectious causes, including Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Rebel-Bauder, Barbara; Kassl, Christine; Leschnik, Michael; Url, Angelika

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Despite comprehensive diagnostics, the aetiology of meningoencephalitis (ME) in cats often remains undetermined. As a result of recently published surveys, Encephalitozoon cuniculi has gained growing importance in cats not only with ocular disorders, but also with central nervous system disease. Therefore, it was hypothesised that E cuniculi may be an underestimated pathogen in the development of feline non-suppurative and/or granulomatous ME. Methods As a first step, histopathological sections of the brain of cats with encephalopathy were retrospectively reviewed to identify cases of granulomatous ME. In a second step, an immunohistochemical screening for detection of E cuniculi was performed in cases with ME of unknown origin. Results In 59/89 (66.3%) cats with ME, an aetiologically relevant pathogen was detected. Forty-three of 89 (48.3%) cats had a diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis. In 14/89 (15.7%) cats, protozoan cysts were identified and infection with Toxoplasma gondii was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in all cases. In 2/89 (2.3%) cats with granulomatous ME, fungal organisms were identified. Thirty of 89 (33.7%) cats with ME of unknown origin that underwent IHC for the detection of E cuniculi remained negative. Conclusions and relevance The results of this study suggest that E cuniculi is unlikely to be directly associated with (non-suppurative and/or granulomatous) ME in cats in Austria.

  16. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit.

  17. Meningoencephalitis associated with Carnobacterium maltaromaticum-like bacteria in stranded juvenile salmon sharks (Lamna ditropis).

    PubMed

    Schaffer, P A; Lifland, B; Van Sommeran, S; Casper, D R; Davis, C R

    2013-05-01

    Juvenile salmon sharks beach yearly along the California coast, primarily during late summer and early fall. Fresh, frozen, and formalin-fixed tissues from 19 stranded salmon sharks were collected for examination. Histopathology revealed meningitis or meningoencephalitis in 18 of 19 shark brains with intralesional bacteria observed in 6 of the affected brains. Bacterial culture of fresh or frozen brain, liver, and/or heart blood from 13 sharks yielded pure cultures characterized molecularly and/or biochemically as belonging to the genus Carnobacterium. The 16s ribosomal DNA sequence of 7 tissue isolates from 7 separate sharks was 99% homologous to C. maltaromaticum (GenBank FJ656722.1). Sequence of the large ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer region (ISR) was 97% homologous to C. maltaromaticum (AF374295.1). This is the first report of Carnobacterium infection in any shark species, and the authors posit that brain infection caused by Carnobacterium is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in juvenile salmon sharks found stranded along the Pacific coast of California.

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) cerebritis versus Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus on chronic corticosteroid therapy: the diagnostic importance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of lactic acid levels.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Lucas M; Petelin, Andrew; Cunha, Burke A

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a motile, aerobic, Gram-positive intracellular bacillus that causes enteritis, meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or subacute bacterial endocarditis. Patients with impaired T-lymphocyte function/cell-mediated immunity are predisposed to intracellular pathogens, e.g., L. monocytogenes. In adults, infection by L. monocytogenes of the central nervous system (CNS) clinically manifests as either acute bacterial meningitis or meningoencephalitis. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presenting with headache and fever, SLE cerebritis must be differentiated from acute bacterial meningitis by lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Neuropathogenic viruses are the most common causes of meningoencephalitis. The most rapid and accurate way to differentiate bacterial meningoencephalitis from nonbacterial meningoencephalitis is CSF lactic acid levels. We present a patient receiving chronic corticosteroid therapy and manifesting SLE and severe L. monocytogenes meningoencephalitis. An early diagnosis of L. meningoencephalitis was achieved by demonstrating a very highly elevated level of lactic acid in his CSF, days before CSF and blood cultures tested positive for L. monocytogenes. In this patient, the highly elevated levels of lactic acid in his CSF ruled out both viral meningoencephalitis and SLE cerebritis. The case was complicated by communicating hydrocephalus, and the patient later underwent placement of a shunt. He completed 6 weeks of meningeal dosed ampicillin. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Burden of major diarrheagenic protozoan parasitic co-infection among amoebic dysentery cases from North East India: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nath, Joyobrato; Hussain, Gulzar; Singha, Baby; Paul, Jaishree; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal diarrheagenic polyparasitic infections are among the major public health concerns in developing countries. Here we examined stool specimens by microscopy, DNA dot blot and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to evaluate the co-infection of four principal protozoans among amoebic dysentery cases from Northeast Indian population. The multiplex PCR confirmed Entamoeba histolytica (8.1%), Entamoeba dispar (4.8%) and mixed infection of both the parasites (3.4%) in 68 of 356 stool specimens that were positive in microscopy and/or HMe probe based DNA dot blot screening. The prevailing parasite that co-exists with E. histolytica was Giardia duodenalis (34.1%), followed by Enterocytozoon bieneusi (22.0%), Cryptosporidium parvum (14.6%) and Cyclospora cayetanensis (7.3%, P = 0.017). Symptomatic participants (odds ratio (OR) = 4.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06, 15.68; P = 0.041), monsoon season (OR = 7.47; 95% CI = 1.40, 39.84; P = 0.046) and participants with family history of parasitic infection (OR = 4.50; 95% CI = 1.16, 17.51; P = 0.030) have significant association with overall co-infection rate. According to molecular consensus, comprehensive microscopy yielded 3.4% (12/356) false-negative and 7.6% (27/356) false-positive outcome, suggesting an improved broad-spectrum PCR-based diagnostic is required to scale down the poor sensitivity and specificity as well as implementation of integrated control strategy.

  20. Differentially expressed proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Phil; Bridle, Andrew; Leef, Melanie; Wilson, Richard; Nowak, Barbara F

    2014-09-01

    The external surfaces of fish, such as gill and skin, are covered by mucus, which forms a thin interface between the organism and water. Amoebic gill disease (AGD) is a parasitic condition caused by Neoparamoeba perurans that affects salmonids worldwide. This disease induces excessive mucus production in the gills. The host immune response to AGD is not fully understood, and research tools such as genomics and proteomics could be useful in providing further insight. Gill and skin mucus samples were obtained from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which were infected with N. perurans on four successive occasions. NanoLC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to identify proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon affected by AGD. A total of 186 and 322 non-redundant proteins were identified in gill and skin mucus respectively, based on stringent filtration criteria, and statistics demonstrated that 52 gill and 42 skin mucus proteins were differentially expressed in mucus samples from AGD-affected fish. By generating protein-protein interaction networks, some of these proteins formed part of cell to cell signalling and inflammation pathways, such as C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein 1, granulin, cathepsin, angiogenin-1. In addition to proteins that were entirely novel in the context in the host response to N. perurans, our results have confirmed the presence of protein markers in mucus that have been previously predicted on the basis of modified mRNA expression, such as anterior gradient-2 protein, annexin A-1 and complement C3 factor. This first proteomic analysis of AGD-affected salmon provides new information on the effect of AGD on protein composition of gill and skin mucus. Future research should focus on better understanding of the role these components play in the response against infection with N. perurans.

  1. Scrub typhus meningoencephalitis, a diagnostic challenge for clinicians: A hospital based study from North-East India

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, M. D.; Hussain, Masaraf; Lyngdoh, Monaliza; Sharma, Shriram; Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is a known complication of scrub typhus which range from mild meningitis to frank meninigoencephalitis. Aims and objectives: To study the clinical feature, laboratory parameters and response to treatment of scrub typhus meningitis/meningoencephalitis. Methods and Materials: This is a hospital based prospective observational study from North Eastern India. Diagnosis was based on clinical features and positive serological test (Weil's Felix test and IgM antibody card test). Results: 13 patients of scrub typhus with features of meningitis/meningoencephalitis were included. The mean duration of fever before presentation was 5.61±3.08 days and 4 (30.76 %) patients had eschar. Altered sensorium, headache, seizure and meningeal sign were present in 13 (100%), 13 (100%), 6 (46.15%) and 10 (76.92%) patients respectively. Mean CSF protein, glucose and Adenosine deaminase was 152.16±16.88mg/dl, 55.23±21.7mg/dl, and 16.98±7.37U/L respectively. Mean total count of CSF leukocyte and lymphocyte percentage was 46.07±131 cell/cumm and 98.66±3.09% respectively. Tablet doxycycline with or without injection azithromycin was used and that shows good response 15.38% of patients died and all of them had multi organ dysfunction. Conclusion: Meningoencephalitis is a common manifestation of scrub typhus and diagnosis requires high degree of clinical suspicion which if diagnosed early and specific treatment started, patients usually recover completely with few complications. PMID:26752890

  2. First report of Brucella ceti-associated meningoencephalitis in a long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas.

    PubMed

    Davison, Nicholas J; Brownlow, Andrew; McGovern, Barry; Dagleish, Mark P; Perrett, Lorraine L; Dale, Emma-Jane; Koylass, Mark; Foster, Geoffrey

    2015-10-27

    Fatal Brucella ceti infection with histological lesions specific to the central nervous system has been described in only 3 species of cetaceans: striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba, Atlantic white-sided dolphins Lagenorhynchus acutus and short-beaked common dolphins Delphinus delphis. This paper describes the first report of a B. ceti-associated meningoencephalitis in a long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas, showing the increasing range of species susceptibility. Brucella was recovered in larger numbers from cerebrospinal fluid than from brain tissue and is the sample of choice for isolation.

  3. A Retrospective Cohort Study of Lesion Distribution of HIV-1 Infection Patients With Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shuang; Li, Xueqin; Shi, Yanbin; Liu, Jinxin; Zhang, Mengjie; Gu, Tenghui; Pan, Shinong; Song, Liucun; Xu, Jinsheng; Sun, Yan; Zhao, Qingxia; Lu, Zhiyan; Lu, Puxuan; Li, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this paper is to correlate the MRI distribution of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in HIV-1 infection patients with CD4 T cell count and immune reconstitution effect. A large retrospective cohort study of HIV patients from multi-HIV centers in China was studied to demonstrate the MRI distribution of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and its correlation with the different immune status. The consecutive clinical and neuroimaging data of 55 HIV-1-infected patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis collected at multi-HIV centers in China during the years of 2011 to 2014 was retrospectively analyzed. The enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups based on the distribution of lesions. One group of patients had their lesions at the central brain (group 1, n = 34) and the other group of patients had their lesions at the superficial brain (group 2, n = 21). We explored their MRI characterization of brain. In addition, we also compared their CD4 T cell counts and immune reconstitution effects between the 2 groups based on the imaging findings. No statistical difference was found in terms of age and gender between the 2 groups. The medians of CD4 T cell counts were 11.67 cells/mm3 (3.00–52.00 cells/mm3) in group 1 and 42.00 cells/mm3 (10.00–252.00 cells/mm3) in group 2. Statistical difference of CD4 T cell count was found between the 2 groups (P = 0.023). Thirteen patients in group 1 (13/34) and 12 patients in group 2 (12/21) received highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Patients of group 2 received HAART therapy more frequently than patients of group 1 (P = 0.021). Central and superficial brain lesions detected by MR imaging in HIV-1-infected patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis are in correlation with the host immunity and HAART therapy. PMID:26871791

  4. [Cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs and cats with symptoms of meningitis/meningoencephalitis. Part 3].

    PubMed

    Grevel, V; Machus, B

    1992-04-01

    A review of the literature of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology of different forms of meningitis/meningoencephalomyelitis in dogs and cats is given. Eight dogs and three cats with signs of meningitis/meningoencephalitis are presented. Four dogs and one cat improved to normal for 1-3 years. The results of CSF cytology of cases whose etiology could not be determined are compared with those of thirteen dogs with distemper. In 8 of 13 sediments eosinophilic inclusions in monocytes and macrophages were found.

  5. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) Receptor Deletion or Antagonism Attenuates Severe HSV-1 Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Pedroso, Vinicius Sousa Pietra; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that may cause severe encephalitis. The exacerbated immune response against the virus contributes to the disease severity and death. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a mediator capable of inducing increase in vascular permeability, production of cytokines on endothelial cells and leukocytes. We aimed to investigate the activation of PAF receptor (PAFR) and its contribution to the severity of the inflammatory response in the brain following HSV-1 infection. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and PAFR deficient (PAFR(-/-)) mice were inoculated intracranially with 10(4) plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1. Visualization of leukocyte recruitment was performed using intravital microscopy. Cells infiltration in the brain tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. Brain was removed for chemokine assessment by ELISA and for histopathological analysis. The pharmacological inhibition by the PAFR antagonist UK-74,505 was also analyzed. In PAFR(-/-) mice, there was delayed lethality but no difference in viral load. Histopathological analysis of infected PAFR(-/-) mice showed that brain lesions were less severe when compared to their WT counterparts. Moreover, PAFR(-/-) mice showed less TCD4(+), TCD8(+) and macrophages in brain tissue. This reduction of the presence of leukocytes in parenchyma may be mechanistically explained by a decrease in leukocytes rolling and adhesion. PAFR(-/-) mice also presented a reduction of the chemokine CXCL9 in the brain. In addition, by antagonizing PAFR, survival of C57BL/6 infected mice increased. Altogether, our data suggest that PAFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental HSV-1 meningoencephalitis, and its blockade prevents severe disease manifestation.

  6. Ventricular pneumocephalus, cervical subarachnoid pneumorrhachis, and meningoencephalitis in a dog following rhinotomy for chronic fungal rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Launcelott, Zoë A; Palmisano, Mathew P; Stefanacci, Joseph D; Whitney, Beth L

    2016-02-15

    A 5-year-old 35.8-kg (78.8-lb) neutered male Labrador Retriever was evaluated for chronic nasal discharge associated with a fungal infection. The dog had previously been prescribed antimicrobials and antifungal treatment, but owner compliance was lacking. Bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, mild ulceration of the left nasal commissure, and hyperkeratosis of the dorsal nasal planum were present. Computed tomography revealed destruction of the intranasal structures, focal lysis of the cribriform plate, and invasion of a soft-tissue mass into the frontal cortex. Rhinoscopy revealed a large pale mass in the caudal aspect of the right nasal passage; a biopsy sample was consistent with Aspergillus sp on histologic evaluation. Initial treatment included medical management with an antifungal agent. Approximately 3 months later, a large fungal granuloma in the right frontal sinus was removed and debridement was performed via dorsal rhinotomy. One month after surgery, the dog was evaluated for signs of cervical pain and altered mentation. An MRI and CSF analysis were performed; diagnoses of ventricular pneumocephalus, subarachnoid pneumorrhachis, and meningoencephalitis were made. Management included oxygen therapy and administration of antimicrobials, analgesics, and antifungal medications. On follow-up 9 months after initial evaluation, neurologic deficits were reportedly resolved, and the dog was doing well. This report emphasizes the importance of prompt, appropriate treatment of fungal rhinitis in dogs. Although rare, pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis should be included as differential diagnoses for neurologic signs following treatment for this condition. In this dog, the complications were not considered severe and improved over time with supportive care.

  7. Intracerebral infection with dengue-3 virus induces meningoencephalitis and behavioral changes that precede lethality in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue, one of the most important arboviral diseases of humans, may cause severe systemic disease. Although dengue virus (DENV) has been considered to be a non-neurotropic virus, dengue infection has been associated recently with a series of neurological syndromes, including encephalitis. In this work, we evaluated behavioral changes and inflammatory parameters in C57BL/6 mice infected with non-adapted dengue virus 3 (DENV-3) genotype I. Methods C57BL/6 mice received 4 × 103 PFU of DENV-3 by an intracranial route. We evaluated the trafficking of leukocytes in brain microvasculature using intravital microscopy, and evaluated chemokine and cytokine profiling by an ELISA test at 3 and 6 days post infection (p.i.). Furthermore, we determined myeloperoxidase activity and immune cell populations, and also performed histopathological analysis and immunostaining for the virus in brain tissue. Results All animals developed signs of encephalitis and died by day 8 p.i. Motor behavior and muscle tone and strength parameters declined at day 7 p.i. We observed increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in brain microvasculature of infected mice at days 3 and 6 p.i. The infection was followed by significant increases in IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL2, CCL5, CXCL1, and CXCL2. Histological analysis showed evidence of meningoencephalitis and reactive gliosis. Increased numbers of neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in brain of infected animals, notably at day 6 p.i. Cells immunoreactive for anti-NS-3 were visualized throughout the brain. Conclusion Intracerebral infection with non-adapted DENV-3 induces encephalitis and behavioral changes that precede lethality in mice. PMID:21388530

  8. A retrospective research of HIV-negative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with acute/subacute onset.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Chen, Q; Xie, Z; Wang, D; Li, M; Zhang, X; Man, Y; Lao, J; Chen, N; Zhou, L

    2016-02-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) may present as an acute, subacute, or chronic infection. It manifests as a chronic process in over 75 % of cases, but, sometimes, it presents with a more acute onset, mostly in HIV-associated patients. Until now, there has been no study performed on the clinical features of HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset. We collected 106 HIV-negative patients diagnosed with CM in our hospital during a 15-year period, analyzed their epidemiological and clinical features, as well as the outcomes, and explored the independent prognosis factors and the factors related to the survival time among them. We found that impaired consciousness (23.4 % vs. 3.4 %, p = 0.017) was more common in CM patients with acute/subacute onset, while decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose (51.9 % vs. 75.9 %, p = 0.026) was less common. The ratio of CSF glucose/blood glucose [odds ratio (OR) 0.04, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.004-0.262, p = 0.02], impaired consciousness (OR 5.09, 95 % CI 1.477-17.522, p = 0.01), and hospitalization length (OR 0.98, 95 % CI 0.977-0.999, p = 0.04) were indicated to be not only independent prognosis factors in HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset, but also factors significantly related to the survival time. The results of our study demonstrated that the contact history and potential history risk factors would not affect the onset process of HIV-negative CM patients, and the mortality, hospitalization length, and survival time has not been related to the onset process. However, the ratio of CSF glucose/blood glucose, consciousness level, and hospitalization length of the HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset should be of greater focus in the clinical work.

  9. Comparative Efficacies of Antibiotics in a Rat Model of Meningoencephalitis Due to Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Christian; Leib, Stephen L.; Bentue-Ferrer, Daniele; Täuber, Martin G.

    1999-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of amoxicillin-gentamicin, trovafloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and the combination of trovafloxacin with TMP-SMX were compared in a model of meningoencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes in infant rats. At 22 h after intracisternal infection, the cerebrospinal fluid was cultured to document meningitis, and the treatment was started. Treatment was instituted for 48 h, and efficacy was evaluated 24 h after administration of the last dose. All tested treatment regimens exhibited significant activities in brain, liver, and blood compared to infected rats receiving saline (P < 0.001). In the brain, amoxicillin plus gentamicin was more active than all of the other regimens, and trovafloxacin was more active than TMP-SMX (bacterial titers of 4.1 ± 0.5 log10 CFU/ml for amoxicillin-gentamicin, 5.0 ± 0.4 log10 CFU/ml for trovafloxacin, and 5.8 ± 0.5 log10 CFU/ml for TMP-SMX; P < 0.05). In liver, amoxicillin-gentamicin and trovafloxacin were similarly active (2.8 ± 0.8 and 2.7 ± 0.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively) but more active than TMP-SMX (4.4 ± 0.6 log10 CFU/ml; P < 0.05). The combination of trovafloxacin with TMP-SMX did not alter the antibacterial effect in the brain, but it did reduce the effect of trovafloxacin in the liver. Amoxicillin-gentamicin was the most active therapy in this study, but the activity of trovafloxacin suggests that further studies with this drug for the treatment of Listeria infections may be warranted. PMID:10390217

  10. Comparative efficacies of antibiotics in a rat model of meningoencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Michelet, C; Leib, S L; Bentue-Ferrer, D; Täuber, M G

    1999-07-01

    The antibacterial activities of amoxicillin-gentamicin, trovafloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and the combination of trovafloxacin with TMP-SMX were compared in a model of meningoencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes in infant rats. At 22 h after intracisternal infection, the cerebrospinal fluid was cultured to document meningitis, and the treatment was started. Treatment was instituted for 48 h, and efficacy was evaluated 24 h after administration of the last dose. All tested treatment regimens exhibited significant activities in brain, liver, and blood compared to infected rats receiving saline (P < 0.001). In the brain, amoxicillin plus gentamicin was more active than all of the other regimens, and trovafloxacin was more active than TMP-SMX (bacterial titers of 4.1 +/- 0.5 log10 CFU/ml for amoxicillin-gentamicin, 5.0 +/- 0.4 log10 CFU/ml for trovafloxacin, and 5.8 +/- 0.5 log10 CFU/ml for TMP-SMX; P < 0.05). In liver, amoxicillin-gentamicin and trovafloxacin were similarly active (2.8 +/- 0.8 and 2.7 +/- 0.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively) but more active than TMP-SMX (4.4 +/- 0. 6 log10 CFU/ml; P < 0.05). The combination of trovafloxacin with TMP-SMX did not alter the antibacterial effect in the brain, but it did reduce the effect of trovafloxacin in the liver. Amoxicillin-gentamicin was the most active therapy in this study, but the activity of trovafloxacin suggests that further studies with this drug for the treatment of Listeria infections may be warranted.

  11. Amoebal Coculture of “Mycobacterium massiliense” sp. nov. from the Sputum of a Patient with Hemoptoic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Greub, Gilbert; Gevaudan, Marie-José; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2004-01-01

    A nonphotochromogenic, rapidly growing Mycobacterium strain was isolated in pure culture from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar fluid of a patient with hemoptoic pneumonia by using axenic media and an amoebal coculture system. Both isolates grew in less than 7 days at 24 to 37°C with an optimal growth temperature of 30°C. The isolates exhibited biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles overlapping those of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium chelonae, and Mycobacterium immunogenum, indicating that they belonged to M. chelonae-M. abscessus group. They differed from M. abscessus in β-galactosidase, β-N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, and β-glucuronidase activities and by the lack of nitrate reductase and indole production activities, as well as in their in vitro susceptibilities to minocycline and doxycycline. These isolates and M. abscessus differed from M. chelonae and M. immunogenum by exhibiting gelatinase and tryptophane desaminase activities. Their 16S rRNA genes had complete sequence identity with that of M. abscessus and >99.6% similarity with those of M. chelonae and M. immunogenum. Further molecular investigations showed that partial hsp65 and sodA gene sequences differed from that of M. abscessus by five and three positions over 441 bp, respectively. Partial rpoB and recA gene sequence analyses showed 96 and 98% similarities with M. abscessus, respectively. Similarly, 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequence of the isolates differed from that of M. abscessus by a A→G substitution at position 60 and a C insertion at position 102. Phenotypic and genotypic features of these two isolates indicated that they were representative of a new mycobacterial species within the M. chelonae-M. abscessus group. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that these isolates were perhaps recently derived from M. abscessus. We propose the name of “Mycobacterium massiliense” for this new species. The type strain has been deposited in the Collection

  12. Acute lead poisoning with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in calves on a farm receiving land application of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, C.R.; Tuomari, D.; Reddy, C.; Logan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    A total of 3 cases of acute lead poisoning in calves was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis of biological samples, presence of an acute lead exposure source, clinical signs of impaired vision in one case and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in another case. One of two other calves which died approximately 2 months earlier had nervous signs and it is likely that they also had lead poisoning. Dams of two of the cases did not have elevated lead levels. Municipal sewage sludge had been applied to most fields on the farm during the preceding 5 year period. There had been approximately a doubling of the lead content in the soil; however, the foodstuffs produced on the farm had low lead concentrations. The extremely high lead levels in the abomasal contents and feces of calves eliminated sludge as the source of the lead in this acute poisoning episode. The contents of oil filters, accessible to calves but not to adult cattle, had lead levels as high as 26,922 micrograms/g and was the most likely lead source responsible for this lead intoxication. It appears that the manifestation of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in lead poisoning cases may occur in young calves as well as in cows and in acute as well as in chronic intoxications.

  13. Toscana virus meningo-encephalitis: an important differential diagnosis for elderly travellers returning from Mediterranean countries.

    PubMed

    Veater, James; Mehedi, Farhan; Cheung, Chee Kay; Nabarro, Laura; Osborne, Jane; Wong, Nicholas; Wiselka, Martin; Tang, Julian W

    2017-08-29

    Elderly patients have a long list of differentials for causes of acute confusion and altered consciousness levels, including infectious agents. In addition, elderly, retired patients often have more time to travel for tourism, particularly to exotic, warmer locations. Mediterranean countries such as Spain and Italy are popular holiday destinations for British and other tourists, especially during the winter months. However, these warm climates allow insect vectors to proliferate, increasing the risk of exposure to endemic vectorborne viral infections whilst on vacation. Such infections may not be routinely considered by geriatric medical teams. An 87-year old gentleman presented with a three-day history of worsening confusion, lethargy, ataxia, and fevers following a trip to Spain, where he may have sustained a sandfly bite. By the time of admission, he had a reduced GCS, was hallucinating, and was incontinent of urine and faeces, though blood pressure and heart rate were normal. He also appeared hyperaesthetic, and found even capillary blood sugar testing extremely painful. He had no history of cognitive defect or other neurological conditions. He had been previously independently active, with frequent trips to Spain where he maintained a holiday home. He probably sustained a sandfly bite during this most recent trip, whilst cleaning out a shed. Acute and convalescent sera demonstrated IgG antibodies to Toscana virus at extremely high titres of ≥1:10,000 by immunofluorescence assay, though no Toscana virus RNA was detectable in these sera by the time of presentation. Toscana virus should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patients presenting with meningo-encephalitis who have recently returned from a Mediterranean country. Testing for Toscana virus infection is performed by serological testing on acute/convalescent paired sera, and/or a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay on blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) if presenting within 5 days of

  14. Methyl-CpG binding protein 2, receptors of innate immunity and receptor for advanced glycation end-products in human viral meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Maslinska, Danuta; Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Maslinski, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal host defense reaction to infections and tissue injury. In pathology, the process of inflammation is deregulated by various environmental factors, prolonged activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), induction of epigenetic machinery or expression of receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). In the present study, we examined immunoexpression of proteins participating in the above-mentioned mechanisms, in the brain of patients with viral meningoencephalitis. The results showed that depending on the period of the disease, the process of inflammation is deregulated in different ways. In an early period of viral meningoencephalitis, we found numerous so-called microglial nodules which were strongly immunopositive to methyl-CpG protein 2 (MeCP2). This protein is an epigenetic factor important for methylation of DNA; therefore, our results suggest that cells collected in the nodules may participate in modification of the host defense reaction. Moreover, in the early period of viral meningoencephalitis, we found that Purkinje cells of the cerebellum contain TLR3 or TLR9 receptors that can recognize viral pathogens and may activate a self-destructive mechanism in these neurons. In the later (advanced) period of viral meningoencephalitis, despite some of the above observations, RAGE protein was detected in the brain of adult and aging patients. It means that in this period of the disease, the inflammatory process may be deregulated by numerous post-translationally modified proteins that are transported to the brain after binding with activated RAGE. In addition, young patients appeared more susceptible to viral infections than adult and aging patients, because most of them died during the early period of meningoencephalitis.

  15. Corticosteroids for the management of severe intracranial hypertension in meningoencephalitis caused by Cryptococcus gattii: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Maciel, R-A; Ferreira, L-S; Wirth, F; Rosa, P-D; Aves, M; Turra, E; Goldani, L-Z

    2017-03-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in meningitis caused by Cryptococcus gattii in immunocompetent patients after initiation of antifungal therapy appears to be the result of paradoxical antifungal treatment-induced clinical deterioration due to improved local immune responses to cryptococcal organisms. Recent anecdotal reports have suggested a favorable clinical response to corticosteroids in select patients with C. gattii central nervous system (CNS) infections. In this report, we describe a 65-year-old patient with meningoencephalitis caused by C. gattii who developed persistent intracranial hypertension and was successfully managed with antifungal therapy, repeated lumbar puncture and corticosteroids. Our observations suggest a possible benefit of dexamethasone in the management of select cases of C. gattii CNS infection with intracranial hypertension. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term use of steroids in select patients with C. gattii with intracranial hypertension.

  16. CHAGASIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN AN HIV INFECTED PATIENT WITH MODERATE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION: PROLONGED SURVIVAL AND CHALLENGES IN THE HAART ERA.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Renata; Kassab, Maria José; Freitas, Vera Lucia Teixeira de; Silva, Sheila Cristina Vicente da; Bezerra, Rita C; Khoury, Zarifa; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Vidal, José E

    2015-12-01

    The reactivation of Chagas disease in HIV infected patients presents high mortality and morbidity. We present the case of a female patient with confirmed Chagasic meningoencephalitis as AIDS-defining illness. Interestingly, her TCD4+ lymphocyte cell count was 318 cells/mm3. After two months of induction therapy, one year of maintenance with benznidazol, and early introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the patient had good clinical, parasitological and radiological evolution. We used a qualitative polymerase chain reaction for the monitoring of T. cruzi parasitemia during and after the treatment. We emphasize the potential value of molecular techniques along with clinical and radiological parameters in the follow-up of patients with Chagas disease and HIV infection. Early introduction of HAART, prolonged induction and maintenance of antiparasitic therapy, and its discontinuation are feasible, in the current management of reactivation of Chagas disease.

  17. CHAGASIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN AN HIV INFECTED PATIENT WITH MODERATE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION: PROLONGED SURVIVAL AND CHALLENGES IN THE HAART ERA

    PubMed Central

    BUCCHERI, Renata; KASSAB, Maria José; de FREITAS, Vera Lucia Teixeira; da SILVA, Sheila Cristina Vicente; BEZERRA, Rita C.; KHOURY, Zarifa; SHIKANAI-YASUDA, Maria Aparecida; VIDAL, José E.

    2015-01-01

    The reactivation of Chagas disease in HIV infected patients presents high mortality and morbidity. We present the case of a female patient with confirmed Chagasic meningoencephalitis as AIDS-defining illness. Interestingly, her TCD4+ lymphocyte cell count was 318 cells/mm3. After two months of induction therapy, one year of maintenance with benznidazol, and early introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the patient had good clinical, parasitological and radiological evolution. We used a qualitative polymerase chain reaction for the monitoring of T. cruzi parasitemia during and after the treatment. We emphasize the potential value of molecular techniques along with clinical and radiological parameters in the follow-up of patients with Chagas disease and HIV infection. Early introduction of HAART, prolonged induction and maintenance of antiparasitic therapy, and its discontinuation are feasible, in the current management of reactivation of Chagas disease. PMID:27049711

  18. Presumptive meningoencephalitis secondary to extension of otitis media/interna caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus in a cat.

    PubMed

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Daniels, Joshua B

    2011-08-01

    A 5-year-old castrated male domestic longhair cat was presented with neurological signs consistent with a central vestibular lesion and left Horner's syndrome. Computed tomography images revealed hyperattenuating, moderately contrast-enhancing material within the left tympanic bulla, most consistent with left otitis media/interna. Marked neutrophilic pleocytosis was identified on cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (SEZ) was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. Intracranial extension of otitis media/interna is relatively infrequent in small animals. There are no reports of otitis media/interna caused by SEZ in dogs or cats. This is the first report of otitis media/interna and presumptive secondary meningoencephalitis caused by SEZ in a cat. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Case Report: Disseminated Shewanella algae Infection with Meningoencephalitis in a Traveler Secondary to Marine Injury in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Brulliard, Caroline; Traversier, Nicolas; Allyn, Jérôme; Schaeffer, Christopher; Bouchet, Bruno; Allou, Nicolas

    2017-06-12

    Marine microorganisms such as Shewanella spp., Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. can cause sepsis secondary to a wound infection in the context of swimming. These microorganisms are most often susceptible to fluoroquinolones. Here, we report a unique case of Shewanella algae bacteremia associated with meningoencephalitis and disseminated via hematogenous spread secondary to a skin injury. The patient suffered the injury while swimming in saline water during a cruise holiday in Madagascar, and she was initially treated with amoxicillin. The neurological evolution was unsatisfactory. Better knowledge of such infections (and especially of the context in which they occur), as well as greater familiarity with the susceptibility profile of different marine microorganisms would have allowed health professionals to provide presumptive microbiological diagnosis and effective treatment earlier.

  20. Cryptococcal Neuroradiological Lesions Correlate with Severity during Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in HIV-Positive Patients in the HAART Era

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Caroline; Dromer, Françoise; Lévêque, Christophe; Chartier, Loïc; Cordoliani, Yves-Sébastien; Fontanet, Arnaud; Launay, Odile; Lortholary, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis has an overall global mortality rate of 20% in AIDS patients despite antifungals. There is a need for additional means of precise assessment of disease severity. We thus studied the radiological brain images available from 62 HIV-positive patients with cryptococcocal meningoencephalitis to analyse the brain lesions associated with cryptococcosis in relationship with disease severity, and the respective diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) versus computed tomography (CT). In this retrospective multicenter analysis, two neuroradiologists blindly reviewed the brain imaging. Prospectively acquired clinical and mycological data were available at baseline and during follow-up. Baseline images were abnormal on 92% of the MR scans contrasting with 53% of the CT scans. MR/CT cryptococcosis-related lesions included mass(es) (21%/9%), dilated perivascular spaces (46%/5%) and pseudocysts (8%/4%). The presence compared to absence of cryptococcosis-related lesions was significantly associated with high serum (78% vs. 42%, p = 0.008) and CSF (81% vs. 50%, p = 0.024) antigen titers, independently of neurological abnormalities. MR detected significantly more cryptococcosis-related lesions than CT for 17 patients who had had both investigations (76% vs. 24%, p = 0.005). In conclusion, MR appears more effective than CT for the evaluation of AIDS-associated cerebral cryptococcosis. Furthermore, brain imaging is an effective tool to assess the initial disease severity in this setting. Given this, we suggest that investigation for cryptococcosis-related lesions is merited, even in the absence of neurological abnormality, if a high fungal burden is suspected on the basis of high serum and/or CSF antigen titers. PMID:18414656

  1. Pharmacodynamics of Liposomal Amphotericin B and Flucytosine for Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis: Safe and Effective Regimens for Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Lucy; Livermore, Joanne; Sharp, Andrew D.; Goodwin, Joanne; Gregson, Lea; Howard, Susan J.; Felton, Timothy W.; Schwartz, Julie A.; Neely, Michael N.; Harrison, Thomas S.; Perfect, John R.; Hope, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is a lethal infection with relatively few therapeutic options. The optimal dosage of liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) alone or in combination with flucytosine is not known. Methods. A murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis was used. The fungal density in the brain was determined using quantitative cultures. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic relationships were determined for LAmB and flucytosine administered alone. The effect of the combination was described using the Greco model and a mathematical model. The results were bridged to humans. Results. Inoculation resulted in hematogenous dissemination and logarithmic growth within the central nervous system. There was histological evidence of multifocal infection throughout the brain. Both LAmB and flucytosine produced a dose-dependent reduction in fungal burden. The effect of the combination of agents in the brain was additive. Bridging studies suggested that a human dosage of LAmB 3 mg/kg/d resulted in a submaximal antifungal effect. Regimens of LAmB 6 mg/kg/d alone, LAmB 3 mg/kg/d plus flucytosine 50 mg/kg/d, and LAmB 3 mg/kg/d plus flucytosine 100 mg/kg/d all resulted in near-maximal antifungal activity. Conclusions. Potential regimens for further study in clinical trials include LAmB 6 mg/kg/d alone, LAmB 3 mg/kg/d plus flucytosine 50 mg/kg/d, and LAmB 3 mg/kg/d plus flucytosine 100 mg/kg/d. PMID:23599314

  2. A Retrospective Cohort Study of Lesion Distribution of HIV-1 Infection Patients With Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis on MRI: Correlation With Immunity and Immune Reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shuang; Li, Xueqin; Shi, Yanbin; Liu, Jinxin; Zhang, Mengjie; Gu, Tenghui; Pan, Shinong; Song, Liucun; Xu, Jinsheng; Sun, Yan; Zhao, Qingxia; Lu, Zhiyan; Lu, Puxuan; Li, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to correlate the MRI distribution of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in HIV-1 infection patients with CD4 T cell count and immune reconstitution effect.A large retrospective cohort study of HIV patients from multi-HIV centers in China was studied to demonstrate the MRI distribution of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and its correlation with the different immune status.The consecutive clinical and neuroimaging data of 55 HIV-1-infected patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis collected at multi-HIV centers in China during the years of 2011 to 2014 was retrospectively analyzed. The enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups based on the distribution of lesions. One group of patients had their lesions at the central brain (group 1, n = 34) and the other group of patients had their lesions at the superficial brain (group 2, n = 21). We explored their MRI characterization of brain. In addition, we also compared their CD4 T cell counts and immune reconstitution effects between the 2 groups based on the imaging findings.No statistical difference was found in terms of age and gender between the 2 groups. The medians of CD4 T cell counts were 11.67 cells/mm (3.00-52.00 cells/mm) in group 1 and 42.00 cells/mm (10.00-252.00 cells/mm) in group 2. Statistical difference of CD4 T cell count was found between the 2 groups (P = 0.023). Thirteen patients in group 1 (13/34) and 12 patients in group 2 (12/21) received highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Patients of group 2 received HAART therapy more frequently than patients of group 1 (P = 0.021).Central and superficial brain lesions detected by MR imaging in HIV-1-infected patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis are in correlation with the host immunity and HAART therapy.

  3. Efficacy of an Abbreviated Induction Regimen of Amphotericin B Deoxycholate for Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis: 3 Days of Therapy Is Equivalent to 14 Days

    PubMed Central

    Livermore, Joanne; Howard, Susan J.; Sharp, Andrew D.; Goodwin, Joanne; Gregson, Lea; Felton, Timothy; Schwartz, Julie A.; Walker, Catherine; Moser, Bill; Müller, Werner; Harrison, Thomas S.; Perfect, John R.; Hope, William W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is an urgent global health problem. Induction regimens using 14 days of amphotericin B deoxycholate (dAmB) are considered the standard of care but may not be suitable for resource-poor settings. We investigated the efficacy of conventional and abbreviated regimens of dAmB for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in both murine and rabbit models of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. We examined the extent to which immunological effectors contribute to the antifungal effect. We bridged the results to humans as a first critical step to define regimens suitable for further study in clinical trials. There were significant differences in the murine plasma-versus-cerebrum dAmB concentration-time profiles. dAmB was detectable in the cerebrum throughout the experimental period, even following the administration of only three doses of 3 mg/kg. dAmB induced a fungistatic effect in the cerebrum with a 2- to 3-log10 CFU/g reduction compared with controls. The effect of 3 days of therapy was the same as that of daily therapy for 14 days. There was no evidence of increased numbers of CD3+ CD4+ or CD3+ CD8+ cells in treated mice to account for the persistent antifungal effect of an abbreviated regimen. The administration of dAmB at 1 mg/kg/day for 3 days was the same as daily therapy in rabbits. The bridging studies suggested that a human regimen of 0.7 mg/kg/day for 3 days resulted in nearly maximal antifungal activity in both the cerebrum and cerebrospinal fluid. An abbreviated regimen (3 days of therapy) of dAmB appears to be just as effective as conventional induction therapy for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:24473125

  4. Suppurative otitis and ascending meningoencephalitis associated with Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae in a captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) with toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Giannitti, Federico; Schapira, Andrea; Anderson, Mark; Clothier, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    A 6-year-old female Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at a zoo in California developed acute ataxia and left-sided circling. Despite intensive care, clinical signs progressed to incoordination and prostration, and the animal was euthanized. At necropsy, the left tympanic cavity was filled with homogeneous suppurative exudate that extended into the cranium expanding the meninges and neuroparenchyma in the lateral and ventral aspect of the caudal ipsilateral brainstem and medulla oblongata. Microscopically, the brainstem showed regional severe suppurative meningoencephalitis with large numbers of neutrophils, fewer macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with fibrin, necrotic cellular debris, hemorrhage, and mineralization, with numerous intralesional Gram-negative bacilli. Bacteroides spp. and Porphyromonas spp. were isolated on anaerobic culture from the meninges, and the bacteria were further characterized by partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae. Bacterial aerobic culture from the meninges yielded very low numbers of mixed flora and Proteus spp., which were considered contaminants. Culture of Mycoplasma spp. from middle ear and meninges was negative. Additionally, Toxoplasma gondii cysts were detected by immunohistochemistry in the heart and brain, and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were detected in serum. The genera Bacteroides and Porphyromonas have been associated with oral disease in marsupials; but not with otitis and meningoencephalitis. The results of the present work highlight the importance of performing anaerobic cultures in the diagnostic investigation of cases of suppurative otitis and meningoencephalitis in macropods. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar Calreticulin: Inhibition of Classical Complement Pathway and Differences in the Level of Expression in Amoebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ximénez, Cecilia; González, Enrique; Nieves, Miriam E.; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; García de León, Ma del Carmen; Morán, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Rojas, Liliana; Hernández, Eric G.; Partida, Oswaldo; Cerritos, René

    2014-01-01

    The role of calreticulin (CRT) in host-parasite interactions has recently become an important area of research. Information about the functions of calreticulin and its relevance to the physiology of Entamoeba parasites is limited. The present work demonstrates that CRT of both pathogenic E. histolytica and nonpathogenic E. dispar species specifically interacted with human C1q inhibiting the activation of the classical complement pathway. Using recombinant EhCRT protein, we demonstrate that CRT interaction site and human C1q is located at the N-terminal region of EhCRT. The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy experiments show that CRT and human C1q colocalize in the cytoplasmic vesicles and near to the surface membrane of previously permeabilized trophozoites or are incubated with normal human serum which is known to destroy trophozoites. In the presence of peripheral mononuclear blood cells, the distribution of EhCRT and C1q is clearly over the surface membrane of trophozoites. Nevertheless, the level of expression of CRT in situ in lesions of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in the hamster model is different in both Entamoeba species; this molecule is expressed in higher levels in E. histolytica than in E. dispar. This result suggests that EhCRT may modulate some functions during the early moments of the host-parasite relationship. PMID:24860808

  6. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar Calreticulin: inhibition of classical complement pathway and differences in the level of expression in amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Ximénez, Cecilia; González, Enrique; Nieves, Miriam E; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; García de León, Ma Del Carmen; Morán, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Rojas, Liliana; Hernández, Eric G; Partida, Oswaldo; Cerritos, René

    2014-01-01

    The role of calreticulin (CRT) in host-parasite interactions has recently become an important area of research. Information about the functions of calreticulin and its relevance to the physiology of Entamoeba parasites is limited. The present work demonstrates that CRT of both pathogenic E. histolytica and nonpathogenic E. dispar species specifically interacted with human C1q inhibiting the activation of the classical complement pathway. Using recombinant EhCRT protein, we demonstrate that CRT interaction site and human C1q is located at the N-terminal region of EhCRT. The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy experiments show that CRT and human C1q colocalize in the cytoplasmic vesicles and near to the surface membrane of previously permeabilized trophozoites or are incubated with normal human serum which is known to destroy trophozoites. In the presence of peripheral mononuclear blood cells, the distribution of EhCRT and C1q is clearly over the surface membrane of trophozoites. Nevertheless, the level of expression of CRT in situ in lesions of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in the hamster model is different in both Entamoeba species; this molecule is expressed in higher levels in E. histolytica than in E. dispar. This result suggests that EhCRT may modulate some functions during the early moments of the host-parasite relationship.

  7. Immunization with a tetramer derivative of an anti-inflammatory pentapeptide produced by Entamoeba histolytica protects gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) against experimental amoebic abscess of the liver.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Scherer, Juan Antonio; Cárdenas, Guadalupe; López-Osuna, Martha; Velázquez, Juan Raymundo; Rico, Guadalupe; Isibasi, Armando; Maldonado, María del Carmen; Morales, María Esther; Fernández-Diez, Jorge; Kretschmer, Roberto R

    2004-01-01

    Axenically grown Entamoeba histolytica produces a pentapeptide (Met-Gln-Cys-Asn-Ser) with several anti-inflammatory properties, including the inhibition of human monocyte locomotion (Monocyte Locomotion Inhibitory Factor (MLIF)). A construct displays the same effects as the native material. It remains to be seen if MLIF is used, or even produced in vivo by the tissue-invading parasite. If MLIF were to be relevant in invasive amoebiasis, immunizing against it could diminish this parasite advantage and prevent lesions. KLH-linked MLIF mixed with Freund's adjuvant was too aggressive an immunizing material to answer this question. However, immunization with a tetramer of MLIF (but not a scrambled version of MLIF) around a lysine core (MLIF-MAPS), that displays increased antigenicity, yet lacks excessive innate immunity activation, completely protects gerbils against amoebic abscess of the liver caused by the intraportal injection of virulent E. histolytica. Liver abscesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes were not prevented. Invasive E. histolytica may produce the parent protein of MLIF in vivo, and if appropriately cleaved, it may play a role in invasive amoebiasis. MLIF may join new vaccination strategies against amoebiasis.

  8. Antioxidant defense of Nrf2 vs pro-inflammatory system of NF-κB during the amoebic liver infection in hamster.

    PubMed

    Aldaba-Muruato, Liseth R; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin H; Campos-Esparza, María Del R; Macías-Pérez, José R; Márquez-Muñoz, Nayeli A; Villalobos-Santos, Ana G; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2017-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA), which course with an uncontrolled inflammation and nitro-oxidative stresses, although it is well known that amoeba has an effective defence mechanisms against this toxic environment, the underlying molecular factors responsible for progression of tissue damage remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine during the acute stage of ALA in hamsters, the involvement of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), which are activated in response to oxidative stress. From 12 h post-infection the ALA was visible, haematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome stains were consistent with these observations, and alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase serum activities were increased too. At 48 h after infection, liver glycogen content was significantly reduced. Western blot analyses showed that 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal peaked at 12 h, while glycogen synthase kinase-3β, cleaved caspase-3, pNF-κB, interleukin-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α were overexpressed from 12 to 48 h post-infection. Otherwise, Nrf2 and superoxide dismutase-1, decreased at 48 h and catalase declined at 36 and 48 h. Furthermore, heme oxygenase-1 was increased at 12 and 24 h and decreased to normal levels at 36 and 48 h. These findings suggest for the first time that the host antioxidant system of Nrf2 is influenced during ALA.

  9. A multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction panel for detecting neurologic pathogens in dogs with meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-Ik; Chang, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis (ME) is a common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system in dogs. Clinically, ME has both infectious and non-infectious causes. In the present study, a multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (mqPCR) panel was optimized for the detection of eight canine neurologic pathogens (Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus spp., Neospora caninum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Ehrlichia canis, and canine distemper virus [CDV]). The mqPCR panel was subsequently applied to 53 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from dogs with ME. The analytic sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection, expressed as molecules per 1 µL of recombinant vector) was 3.8 for CDV, 3.7 for Ehrlichia canis, 3.7 for Bartonella spp., 3.8 for Borrelia burgdorferi, 3.7 for Blastomyces dermatitidis, 3.7 for Cryptococcus spp., 38 for Neospora caninum, and 3.7 for Toxoplasma gondii. Among the tested CSF samples, seven (15%) were positive for the following pathogens in decreasing order of frequency: Cryptococcus spp. (3/7), Blastomyces dermatitidis (2/7), and Borrelia burgdorferi (2/7). In summary, use of an mqPCR panel with high analytic sensitivity as an initial screen for infectious agents in dogs with ME could facilitate the selection of early treatment strategies and improve outcomes. PMID:26040611

  10. Simultaneous detection of 13 viruses involved in meningoencephalitis using a newly developed multiplex PCR Mag-array system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaodan; Wu, Rui; Shi, Ming; Zhou, Linfu; Wu, Mengli; Yang, Yining; An, Xinyue; Dai, Wen; Tian, Liang; Zhang, Chen; Ma, Xuejun; Zhao, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The early detection and identification of pathogens in central nervous system viral infections associated with neurological disease increases the survival rate. However, the limitations of current diagnostic methods contribute to a lack of proper diagnosis in 62% of patients. Therefore, a robust method for detecting multiple viruses in a single reaction with high specificity, throughput, and speed is required. A multiplex PCR Mag-Array (MPMA) system was developed that integrates three strategies: chimeric primer design, temperature switch PCR, and MagPlex-TAG techniques. The MPMA was used to amplify 13 target viral sequences simultaneously, with plasmids containing specific viral sequences as standard samples. To evaluate its clinical performance, 177 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were tested. The MPMA system presented high specificity and efficiency in detecting a control panel of 13 plasmids. Among 177 CSF samples, consistent results were achieved for 19 samples pre-tested using a commercial kit. Viral pathogens were found in 28/138 undiagnosed samples, with herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2) being predominant. The 20 non-infectious samples revealed negative results. Compared to sequencing methods, sensitivity for detecting HSV-1 and HSV-2 was 100% and 98.78%, respectively, and specificity was 100% and 98.22%, respectively. A robust MPMA system that can simultaneously and reliably detect 13 meningoencephalitis-associated viruses with high specificity, throughput, and speed has been developed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and long-term survival in large breed dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, I; Volk, H A; De Decker, S

    2016-08-06

    Although several studies indicate that meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology (MUA) might affect every dog breed at every age, little is known about clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and long-term survival in large breed dogs. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and long-term survival between large and small/medium breed dogs diagnosed with MUA. One hundred and eleven dogs met the inclusion criteria. 28 (25 per cent) dogs were considered large breed dogs compared with 83 (75 per cent) small/medium breed dogs. Large breed dogs presented significantly more often with a decreased mentation. Age, gender, duration of clinical signs prior to diagnosis, presence of seizures or cluster seizures, variables on complete blood count and cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and all variables on MRI were not significantly different between small/medium and large breed dogs. Median survival time was 281 and 106 days for the large and small/medium breed dogs, respectively, with no significant difference in survival curves for both groups. Although considered not typically affected by MUA, 25 per cent of dogs included in this study were considered large breed dogs. Therefore, MUA should be included in the differential diagnosis for large breed dogs presenting with intracranial neurological signs. If diagnosed with MUA, large breed dogs also carried a guarded prognosis. British Veterinary Association.

  12. The presence of Brucella ceti ST26 in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) with meningoencephalitis from the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Alba, Patricia; Terracciano, Giuliana; Franco, Alessia; Lorenzetti, Serena; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Fichi, Gianluca; Eleni, Claudia; Zygmunt, Michel S; Cloeckaert, Axel; Battisti, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    Brucella spp. was isolated from brain, lung and intestinal lymph nodes of a dead adult male striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) found stranded on the Tyrrhenian coast (Tuscany, Italy) of the Mediterranean Sea in February 2012. Brucella spp. was associated with moderate to severe lesions of meningoencephalitis. A co-infection by Toxoplasma gondii was also demonstrated at brain level by means of molecular and histopathologic methods. The Brucella isolate was further characterized based on a fragment-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach, consisting of a set of five specific PCRs, targeting specific chromosomal IS711 locations for marine mammal Brucellae, as described previously. The isolate was thus classified as Brucella ceti I; V fragment-positive (or B. ceti dolphin type), according to previous studies. Multi Locus Sequence Analysis demonstrated that the isolate belongs to Sequence Type 26, while omp2 (omp2a and omp2b genes) sequence analysis further confirmed the isolate belonged to this group of strains. This is the first report of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in the Mediterranean Sea, and represents a further observation that this strain group is associated with hosts of the Family Delphinidae, and particularly with the striped dolphins, also in the Mediterranean area, thus constituting a further biological hazard of concern for this vulnerable subpopulation.

  13. Interferon-gamma and cortisol levels in cerebrospinal fluid and its relationship to the etiology of aseptic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Holub, M; Beran, O; Lacinová, Z; Cinek, O; Chalupa, P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the concentrations of Th1/Th2 cytokines and cortisol in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM). The study enrolled 37 patients with AM and 11 control subjects. CSF concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were analyzed using cytokine bead array and flow cytometry; CSF cortisol concentrations were measured by a RIA method. Cortisol was detected in 37 CSF samples (100%) from patients with AM, and it was significantly elevated in comparison to control subjects. IFN-gamma was detected in 32 CSF samples (86.5%) and IL-10 was detectable in 9 CSF samples (24.3%). The CSF cortisol levels correlated negatively with the duration of AM. The intrathecal concentration of IFN-gamma correlated positively with CSF numbers of leukocytes and lymphocytes, and negatively with the duration of AM. The etiology of AM influenced the CSF cortisol concentration, which was significantly higher in patients with tick-borne encephalitis when compared to persons with AM of unknown origin and control subjects. The results indicate that the prevailing intrathecal immune reaction during AM is shifted to a Th1-like response, whereas anti-inflammatory response in the brain is executed by the effect of cortisol.

  14. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs associates with dog leukocyte antigen class II and resembles acute variant forms of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Greer, K A; Wong, A K; Liu, H; Famula, T R; Pedersen, N C; Ruhe, A; Wallace, M; Neff, M W

    2010-08-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) is a disorder of Pug Dogs that appears to have an immune etiology and high heritability based on population studies. The present study was undertaken to identify a genetic basis for the disease. A genome-wide association scan with single tandem repeat (STR) markers showed a single strong association near the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) complex on CFA12. Fine resolution mapping with 27 STR markers on CFA12 further narrowed association to the region containing DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and, -DQB1 genes. Sequencing confirmed that affected dogs were more likely to be homozygous for specific alleles at each locus and that these alleles were linked, forming a single high risk haplotype. The strong DLA class II association of NME in Pug Dogs resembles that of human multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, NME appears to have an autoimmune basis, involves genetic and nongenetic factors, has a relatively low incidence, is more frequent in females than males, and is associated with a vascularly orientated nonsuppurative inflammation. However, NME of Pug Dogs is more aggressive in disease course than classical human MS, appears to be relatively earlier in onset, and involves necrosis rather than demyelination as the central pathobiologic feature. Thus, Pug Dog encephalitis (PDE) shares clinical features with the less common acute variant forms of MS. Accordingly, NME of Pug Dogs may represent a naturally occurring canine model of certain idiopathic inflammatory disorders of the human central nervous system.

  15. Acute West Nile Virus Meningoencephalitis Diagnosed Via Metagenomic Deep Sequencing of Cerebrospinal Fluid in a Renal Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M R; Zimmermann, L L; Crawford, E D; Sample, H A; Soni, P R; Baker, A N; Khan, L M; DeRisi, J L

    2017-03-01

    Solid organ transplant patients are vulnerable to suffering neurologic complications from a wide array of viral infections and can be sentinels in the population who are first to get serious complications from emerging infections like the recent waves of arboviruses, including West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus, Zika virus, and Dengue virus. The diverse and rapidly changing landscape of possible causes of viral encephalitis poses great challenges for traditional candidate-based infectious disease diagnostics that already fail to identify a causative pathogen in approximately 50% of encephalitis cases. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl on immunosuppression for a renal transplant who presented with acute meningoencephalitis. Traditional diagnostics failed to identify an etiology. RNA extracted from her cerebrospinal fluid was subjected to unbiased metagenomic deep sequencing, enhanced with the use of a Cas9-based technique for host depletion. This analysis identified West Nile virus (WNV). Convalescent serum serologies subsequently confirmed WNV seroconversion. These results support a clear clinical role for metagenomic deep sequencing in the setting of suspected viral encephalitis, especially in the context of the high-risk transplant patient population.

  16. Impact of rituximab-associated B-cell defects on West Nile virus meningoencephalitis in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Marilyn E.; Quan, Dianna; Ho, Joseph T.; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B. K.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Grazia, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that West Nile virus (WNV) neuroinvasive disease occurs more frequently in both solid organ and human stem cell transplant recipients. The effect of concomitant anti-B-cell therapy with rituximab, a CD20+ monoclonal antibody, on WNV infection in this population, however, has not been reported. We describe a case of a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency who underwent single lung transplantation in 2005 and was maintained on tacrolimus, cytoxan and prednisone. More recently, she had received two courses of rituximab for recurrent A2–A3 grade rejection with concomitant capillaritis and presented six months later with rapid, fulminant WNV meningoencephalitis. Her diagnosis was made by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) PCR but serum and CSF WNV IgM and IgG remained negative. She received WNV-specific hyperimmune globulin (Omr-Ig-Am®) through a compassionate protocol. She experienced a rapidly progressive and devastating neurological course despite treatment and died three wk after onset of her symptoms. Autopsy revealed extensive meningoencephalomyelitis. PMID:19659514

  17. A multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction panel for detecting neurologic pathogens in dogs with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Ik; Chang, Dong-Woo; Na, Ki-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis (ME) is a common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system in dogs. Clinically, ME has both infectious and non-infectious causes. In the present study, a multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (mqPCR) panel was optimized for the detection of eight canine neurologic pathogens (Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus spp., Neospora caninum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Ehrlichia canis, and canine distemper virus [CDV]). The mqPCR panel was subsequently applied to 53 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from dogs with ME. The analytic sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection, expressed as molecules per 1 mL of recombinant vector) was 3.8 for CDV, 3.7 for Ehrlichia canis, 3.7 for Bartonella spp., 3.8 for Borrelia burgdorferi, 3.7 for Blastomyces dermatitidis, 3.7 for Cryptococcus spp., 38 for Neospora caninum, and 3.7 for Toxoplasma gondii. Among the tested CSF samples, seven (15%) were positive for the following pathogens in decreasing order of frequency: Cryptococcus spp. (3/7), Blastomyces dermatitidis (2/7), and Borrelia burgdorferi (2/7). In summary, use of an mqPCR panel with high analytic sensitivity as an initial screen for infectious agents in dogs with ME could facilitate the selection of early treatment strategies and improve outcomes.

  18. Primary varicella infection presenting with headache and elevated intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Oded; Shefer-Averbuch, Noa; Garty, Ben Zion

    2015-05-01

    Primary varicella infection may be associated with neurologic complications, such as cerebritis and meningoencephalitis. Several cases of varicella infection with elevated intracranial pressure have been reported. We describe a 13-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with a clinical picture of headaches and elevated intracranial pressure as the only manifestation of primary varicella zoster infection. The working diagnosis at first was pseudotumor cerebri based on complaints of headache of 2 weeks' duration, in addition to vomiting and papilledema, without fever or skin eruption. On lumbar puncture, opening pressure was 420 mmH2O, but mild pleocytosis and mildly elevated protein level ruled out the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. Our patient had no history of previous varicella infection, and she did not receive the varicella zoster vaccine. Serology tests, done on admission and repeated 2 months later, suggested primary varicella infection. The literature on varicella infection associated with pseudotumor cerebri or elevated intracranial pressure is reviewed.

  19. Refractory Cryptococcus neoformans Meningoencephalitis in an Immunocompetent Patient: Paradoxical Antifungal Therapy-Induced Clinical Deterioration Related to an Immune Response to Cryptococcal Organisms.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideto; Takayama, Ayami; Fujiki, Yohei; Ito, Takumi; Kitaoka, Haruko

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of refractory Cryptococcus neoformans meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent woman. Her clinical symptoms did not improve with 6 months of antifungal therapy, and MRI abnormalities, indicating severe meningeal and cerebral inflammation, persisted despite a decreasing cryptococcal antigen titer. The patient continued to deteriorate despite antifungal therapy, and her condition clearly improved following treatment with adjunctive corticosteroid. We postulate that the paradoxical antifungal therapy-related clinical deterioration was due to an immune response to cryptococcal organisms, which responded to corticosteroids. These observations provide rationale for a further evaluation of corticosteroids in the management of select cases of C. neoformans central nervous system infection.

  20. Genetic and pathological characteristics of Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans from meningoencephalitis in autochthonous goats and mouflons, Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Maestrale, Caterina; Masia, Mariangela; Pintus, Davide; Lollai, Stefano; Kozel, Thomas R; Gates-Hollingsworth, Marcellene A; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Cabras, Pierangela; Pirino, Salvatore; D'Ascenzo, Vittoria; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2015-06-12

    In this study, we examined in Sardinia the brain of 555 autochthonous sheep, 50 goats, and 4 mouflons which were found affected by neurological signs. We found 6 goats and one mouflon with meningoencephalitis caused by Cryptococcus sp. There was no evidence of cryptococcal infections in any of the examined sheep. MLST genotyping on Cryptococcus sp. isolates identified Cryptococcus gatti genotype AFLP4/VGI and Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans genotype AFLP2/VNIV. Phylogenetically, all Cryptococcus gattii isolates fell within the autochthonous animal, human and environmental Mediterranean isolate cluster, forming a distinct branch along with environmental strains from Alicante, in the southern Mediterranean coast of Spain.

  1. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin; Fehling, Helena; Matthiesen, Jenny; Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ernst, Thomas; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-08-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1-A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1-B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. "Non-pathogenicity" included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while "pathogenicity" comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica.

  2. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-01-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1–A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1–B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. “Non-pathogenicity” included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while “pathogenicity” comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica. PMID:27575775

  3. Reduced total hardness of fresh water enhances the efficacy of bathing as a treatment for amoebic gill disease in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S D; Powell, M D

    2003-10-01

    The current treatment for amoebic gill disease (AGD)-affected Atlantic salmon involves bathing sea-caged fish in fresh water, often sourced from local dams, for 3-4 h. In both a small-scale laboratory and an on-farm field experiment, the effects of water hardness on the efficacy of freshwater bathing were assessed. Results showed that soft fresh water (19.3-37.4 mg L(-1) CaCO3), whether it be naturally soft city mains water or artificially softened dam water, was more efficacious at alleviating AGD in affected fish than hard fresh water (173-236.3 mg L(-1) CaCO3). Soft freshwater bathing significantly reduced viable gill amoebae numbers (from 73.9 to 40.9% of total count) and significantly alleviated gill pathology, both gross and histological. Following bathing, gross gill pathological scores of soft freshwater bathed fish lagged 2 weeks behind hard freshwater bathed fish. Significant gill lesion fragmentation, and shedding of lesion-associated hyperplastic tissue, was accompanied by a significant reduction in AGD-affected gill filaments in soft freshwater bathed fish. Furthermore, soft freshwater bathing alleviated the blood plasma electrolyte imbalance seen in control (sea water) and hard freshwater bathed fish. This study showed that the use of soft fresh water for bathing AGD-affected Atlantic salmon could be an improvement to the current method of treatment. Not only does it reduce gill amoeba numbers, but also, it is of a therapeutic advantage with the potential to reduce bathing frequency.

  4. A study on the usefulness of Techlab Entamoeba histolytica II antigen detection ELISA in the diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zeehaida, M; Wan Nor Amilah, W A W; Amry, A R; Hassan, S; Sarimah, A; Rahmah, N

    2008-12-01

    Amoebic serodiagnosis at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan employs an indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA) which detects anti-Entamoeba histolytica antibodies in patients' serum samples. In an amoebiasis endemic area such as Kelantan, interpretation of a positive IHA result can be problematic due to the high background antibody levels. The TechLab E. histolytica II ELISA is a commercial kit for detection of specific Gal/GalNAc lectin antigen in stool samples, and has been reported to be able to detect the antigen in serum samples from patients with amoebic liver abscess (ALA). Thus in this study we investigated the usefulness of TechLab E. histolytica II ELISA for diagnosis of ALA by comparing it with IHA. This is a cross sectional study involving 58 suspected ALA patients who were admitted to the surgical ward, HUSM, Kelantan. The diagnosis of ALA was established based on clinical symptoms and signs, ultrasound and/or CT scan results. The serum specimens obtained from the patients were tested with IHA (Dade Behring Diagnostics, Marburg, Germany) and TechLab E. histolytica II ELISA (Techlab, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Of the 58 patients, 72.4% (42) were positive by IHA and only 8.6% (5) were positive by the TechLab E. histolytica II ELISA. Agreement between the IHA and ELISA was poor (kappa value 0.019, p=0.691). There was also no correlation between ELISA results and IHA antibody titers. The TechLab E. histolytica II ELISA was not sensitive in detecting amoebic antigen in samples from ALA patients. In addition the results of the test did not correlate with the IHA anti-E. histolytica antibody titres. Therefore, the TechLab E. histolytica II ELISA was found not to be useful for serological diagnosis of ALA at HUSM.

  5. Effect of a constant rate infusion of cytosine arabinoside on mortality in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, M; Thomson, S; Smith, P; Garosi, L

    2016-07-01

    Administration of cytosine arabinoside (CA) by continuous rate infusion (CRI) has pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic advantages over traditional intermittent dosing. Whether these advantages translate into clinical efficacy remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of CRI of CA in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (MUO) and to compare outcomes with a group of historical control dogs treated with conventional intermittent subcutaneous (SC) administration of CA; both groups received adjunctive prednisolone. It was hypothesised that a CRI of CA for 24 h at 100 mg/m(2) would improve survival and lesion resolution compared with conventional SC delivery of 50 mg/m(2) every 12 h for 48 h. Eighty dogs with suspected MUO were recruited from consecutive dogs presenting with suspected MUO from 2006 to 2015. All dogs underwent routine clinical evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. There were 39 dogs in the SC group and 41 dogs in the CRI group; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Survival at 3 months was 22/39 (44%) with SC delivery versus 37/41 (90%) with CRI. No dose-limiting toxicities were noted for either group. The resolution rate of magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities at the 3 month re-examination were substantially improved in the CRI group versus the SC group. The CRI regimen produced a survival advantage over the SC route of administration without clinically significant toxicity. These data supports the routine use of CRI at first presentation for the treatment of MUO in dogs. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurological, visual, and MRI brain scan findings in 87 South African patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Loyse, A; Moodley, A; Rich, P; Molloy, S F; Bicanic, T; Bishop, L; Rae, W I D; Bhigjee, A I; Loubser, N D; Michowicz, A J; Wilson, D; Harrison, T S

    2015-06-01

    HIV-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is a leading cause of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Neuroradiological data is however limited to case reports and small case series from developed countries and/or immunocompetent patients. Eighty seven patients aged ≥18 hospitalized with a first episode of CM had magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging during the first two weeks of admission. A subset of eleven patients had follow-up scans approximately one month from their initial MRI scan. All had prospectively-recorded detailed neurological and visual examinations. An abnormal finding on neurological examination was detected in 33 (39%) patients. 38 (48%) patients experienced some visual loss. Neuroradiological lesions presumed to be cryptococcosis-related, as defined by the presence of dilated Virchow Robin spaces, pseudocysts or cryptococcomas, enhancing nodules, hydrocephalus, meningitis, focal perilesional oedema and infarcts, were detected in 55 (63%) patients. MRI findings suggestive of a second diagnosis were found in 18 (21%) patients. Visual loss was associated with the presence of cryptococcal-related lesions (p = 0.02). Blindness was associated with raised intracranial pressure (ICP) (p = 0.02). Of eleven patients with paired scans, brain swelling was identified on the initial scan in only one patient. The majority of patients had MRI brain scan abnormalities presumed secondary to CM. Dilated Virchow Robin spaces were the commonest neuroradiological lesion. Visual loss was associated with the degree of cerebral involvement as reflected by the presence of MRI abnormalities. Blindness was associated with the presence of raised ICP. Initial generalised brain swelling does not appear to be common, but further studies with paired scans are needed. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Computational identification of putative miRNAs and their target genes in pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Padmashree, Dyavegowda; Swamy, Narayanaswamy Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a parasitic unicellular free living eukaryotic amoeba. The parasite spreads through contaminated water and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular pathogenesis. Hence, we analyzed the parasite genome for miRNAs (microRNAs) that are non-coding, single stranded RNA molecules. We identified 245 miRNAs using computational methods in N. fowleri, of which five miRNAs are conserved. The predicted miRNA targets were analyzed by using miRanda (software) and further studied the functions by subsequently annotating using AmiGo (a gene ontology web tool).

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Leads to Claudin-5 Degradation via the NF-κB Pathway in BALB/c Mice with Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ping-Sung; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2013-01-01

    The epithelial barrier regulates the movement of ions, macromolecules, immune cells and pathogens. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in the degradation of tight junction protein during infection with rat nematode lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The results showed that phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB was increased in mice with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Treatment with MG132 reduced the phosphorylation of NF-κB and the activity of MMP-9, indicating upregulation of MMP-9 through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Claudin-5 was reduced in the brain but elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), implying that A. cantonensis infection caused tight junction breakdown and led to claudin-5 release into the CSF. Degradation of claudin-5 coincided with alteration of the blood-CSF barrier permeability and treatment with the MMP inhibitor GM6001 attenuated the degradation of claudin-5. These results suggested that degradation of claudin-5 was caused by MMP-9 in angiostrongyliasis meningoencephalitis. Claudin-5 could be used for the pathophysiologic evaluation of the blood-CSF barrier breakdown and tight junction disruption after infection with A. cantonensis. PMID:23505411

  9. Comparison of nested-multiplex, Taqman & SYBR Green real-time PCR in diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess in a tertiary health care institute in India

    PubMed Central

    Dinoop, K.P.; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Mandal, Jharna; Swaminathan, R.P.; Narayanan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Amoebiasis is a common parasitic infection caused by Entamoeba histolytica and amoebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of amoebiasis. The aim of this study was to standardise real-time PCR assays (Taqman and SYBR Green) to detect E. histolytica from liver abscess pus and stool samples and compare its results with nested-multiplex PCR. Methods: Liver abscess pus specimens were subjected to DNA extraction. The extracted DNA samples were subjected to amplification by nested-multiplex PCR, Taqman (18S rRNA) and SYBR Green real-time PCR (16S-like rRNA assays to detect E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii). The amplification products were further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was done for nested-multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR and the area under the curve was calculated for evaluating the accuracy of the tests to dignose ALA. Results: In all, 17, 19 and 25 liver abscess samples were positive for E. histolytica by nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green and Taqman real-time PCR assays, respectively. Significant differences in detection of E. histolytica were noted in the real-time PCR assays evaluated (P<0.0001). The nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green real-time PCR and Taqman real-time PCR evaluated showed a positivity rate of 34, 38 and 50 per cent, respectively. Based on ROC curve analysis (considering Taqman real-time PCR as the gold standard), it was observed that SYBR Green real-time PCR was better than conventional nested-multiplex PCR for the diagnosis of ALA. Interpretation & conclusions: Taqman real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA had the highest positivity rate evaluated in this study. Both nested multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR assays utilized were evaluated to give accurate results. Real-time PCR assays can be used as the gold standard in rapid and reliable diagnosis, and appropriate management of amoebiasis, replacing the

  10. Production of recombinant Entamoeba histolytica pyruvate phosphate dikinase and its application in a lateral flow dipstick test for amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Amoebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common clinical manifestation of extraintestinal amoebiasis especially in developing countries, causing up to 100 000 fatal cases annually. Accurate and early diagnosis is important to prevent the disease complications, however its diagnosis still poses many challenges due to the limitations of the available detection tools. Pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), an excretory-secretory protein of E. histolytica, has been reported as a potential diagnostic marker for ALA, hence it may be exploited in the development of a new test for ALA. Methods Recombinant PPDK (rPPDK) was expressed, purified and evaluated by Western blot. In parallel, recombinant galactose-and-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine inhibitable lectin (Gal/GalNAc lectin) was produced and tested similarly. The protein identity was confirmed by analysis using MALDI-TOF/TOF. A lateral flow dipstick (LFD) test using rPPDK was subsequently developed (rPPDK-LFD) and evaluated for serodiagnosis of ALA. Results rPPDK was expressed as soluble protein after 4 hours of induction with 1 mM isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) at 30°C. Purification using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) resin yielded 1.5 mg of rPPDK from 1 L of culture with estimated molecular mass of 98 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Western blots using sera from patients with ALA, healthy individuals and other diseases probed with anti-human IgG4-HRP showed the highest sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (100%); as compared to blots using IgG and IgG1 as secondary antibodies. Moreover, rPPDK showed better specificity when compared to rGal/GalNAc lectin. In the development of the LFD test, the optimum amount of rPPDK was 0.625 μg per dipstick and the optimum working concentration of colloidal gold conjugated anti-human IgG4 was optical density (OD) 5 (1.7 μg of anti-human IgG4). Evaluation of rPPDK-LFD using ALA patients and controls serum samples showed 87% diagnostic sensitivity and 100

  11. A genomic island present along the bacterial chromosome of the Parachlamydiaceae UWE25, an obligate amoebal endosymbiont, encodes a potentially functional F-like conjugative DNA transfer system

    PubMed Central

    Greub, Gilbert; Collyn, François; Guy, Lionel; Roten, Claude-Alain

    2004-01-01

    the Parachlamydia-related symbiont was an intracellular bacteria. It suggests that this heterologous DNA was acquired from a phylogenetically-distant bacteria sharing an amoebal vacuole. Since Parachlamydiaceae are emerging agents of pneumonia, this GI might be involved in pathogenicity. In future, conjugative systems might be developed as genetic tools for Chlamydiales. PMID:15615594

  12. Scanning electron microscopic study of human neuroblastoma cells affected with Naegleria fowleri Thai strains.

    PubMed

    Tiewcharoen, Supathra; Rabablert, Jundee; Chetanachan, Pruksawan; Junnu, Virach; Worawirounwong, Dusit; Malainual, Nat

    2008-10-01

    In order to understand the pathogenesis of Naegleria fowleri in primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, the human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) and African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells were studied in vitro. Amoeba suspension in cell-culture medium was added to the confluent monolayer of SK-N-MC and Vero cells. The cytopathic activity of N. fowleri trophozoites in co-culture system was elucidated by scanning electron microscope at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h. Two strains of N. fowleri displayed well-organized vigorous pseudopods in Nelson's medium at 37 degrees C. In co-culture, the target monolayer cells were damaged by two mechanisms, phagocytosis by vigorous pseudopods and engulfment by sucker-like apparatus. N. fowleri trophozoites produced amoebostomes only in co-culture with SK-N-MC cells. In contrast, we could not find such apparatus in the co-culture with Vero cells. The complete destruction time (100%) at 1:1 amoeba/cells ratio of SK-N-MC cells (1 day) was shorter than the Vero cells (12 days). In conclusion, SK-N-MC cells were confirmed to be a target model for studying neuropathogenesis of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

  13. Dog leukocyte antigen class II-associated genetic risk testing for immune disorders of dogs: simplified approaches using Pug dog necrotizing meningoencephalitis as a model.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Niels; Liu, Hongwei; Millon, Lee; Greer, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    A significantly increased risk for a number of autoimmune and infectious diseases in purebred and mixed-breed dogs has been associated with certain alleles or allele combinations of the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex containing the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 genes. The exact level of risk depends on the specific disease, the alleles in question, and whether alleles exist in a homozygous or heterozygous state. The gold standard for identifying high-risk alleles and their zygosity has involved direct sequencing of the exon 2 regions of each of the 3 genes. However, sequencing and identification of specific alleles at each of the 3 loci are relatively expensive and sequencing techniques are not ideal for additional parentage or identity determination. However, it is often possible to get the same information from sequencing only 1 gene given the small number of possible alleles at each locus in purebred dogs, extensive homozygosity, and tendency for disease-causing alleles at each of the 3 loci to be strongly linked to each other into haplotypes. Therefore, genetic testing in purebred dogs with immune diseases can be often simplified by sequencing alleles at 1 rather than 3 loci. Further simplification of genetic tests for canine immune diseases can be achieved by the use of alternative genetic markers in the DLA class II region that are also strongly linked with the disease genotype. These markers consist of either simple tandem repeats or single nucleotide polymorphisms that are also in strong linkage with specific DLA class II genotypes and/or haplotypes. The current study uses necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs as a paradigm to assess simple alternative genetic tests for disease risk. It was possible to attain identical necrotizing meningoencephalitis risk assessments to 3-locus DLA class II sequencing by sequencing only the DQB1 gene, using 3 DLA class II-linked simple tandem repeat markers, or with a small single nucleotide polymorphism array

  14. Subarachnoid small vein occlusion due to inflammatory fibrosis-a possible mechanism for cerebellar infarction in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoshiteru; Ohtomo, Satoru; Arai, Hiroaki; Ohtoh, Takashi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-08-09

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) causes cerebral infarction, typically, lacunar infarction in the basal ganglia. However, massive cerebral infarction leading to death is rare and its pathophysiology is unclear. We report a case of CM causing massive cerebellar infarction, which led to cerebral herniation and death. A 56-year-old man who suffered from dizziness and gait disturbance for one month was admitted to our hospital and subsequently diagnosed with a cerebellar infarction. He had a past medical history of hepatitis type B virus infection and hepatic failure. Although the findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imitated an arterial infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, an accompanying irregular peripheral edema was observed. The ischemic lesion progressed, subsequently exerting a mass effect and leading to impaired consciousness. External and internal decompression surgeries were performed. Cryptococcus neoformans was confirmed in the surgical specimen, and the patient was diagnosed with CM. In addition, venule congestion in the parenchyma was observed with extensive fibrosis and compressed veins in the subarachnoid space. The patient died 26 days after admission. Autopsy revealed that pathological changes were localized in the cerebellum. C. neoformans can induce extensive fibrosis of the subarachnoid space, which may compress small veins mechanically inducing venule congestion and massive cerebral infarction. In such cases, the clinical course can be severe and even rapidly fatal. An atypical pattern of infarction on MRI should alert clinicians to the possibility of C. neoformans infection.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Venezuelan HIV+-AIDS Patient: Pathological Diagnosis Confirmed by PCR Using Formalin-Fixed- and Paraffin-Embedded-Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Céspedes, Ghislaine; Romero, Sandra; Fuentes, Isabel; Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A.; Cañavate, Carmen; Flores-Chávez, María

    2014-01-01

    Coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infectious agents have been recognized since the early 90s. In the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV+ patients, parasitic protozoans like Toxoplasma gondii have been described as responsible for the space occupying lesions (SOL) developed. However, the involvement of Trypanosoma cruzi is also described but appears to be less frequent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and transplant recipients, associated with necrotizing myocarditis and neurological symptoms related to the occurrence of necrotizing pseudotumoral encephalitis (NPE) and meningoencephalitis (NME). The present work aims to present a Venezuelan case of NME associated with the coinfection of HIV and a T. cruzi-like trypanosomatid as well as its evolution and diagnosis by histopathological techniques, electron microscopy, and PCR methods using formalin-fixed- (FF-) and paraffin-embedded- (PE-) tissues. Postmortem cytological studies of leptomeninges imprints reveal the presence of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma sp. Histopathological and electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify an amastigote stage and to reject the involvement of other opportunistic microorganisms as the etiological agent of the SOL. The definitive confirmation of T. cruzi as the etiological agent was achieved by PCR suggesting that the NME by T. cruzi was due to a reactivation of Chagas' disease. PMID:25763312

  16. Role of the suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) during meningoencephalitis caused by Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5).

    PubMed

    Aparecida Silva Barbosa, Aline; Freitas Versiani, Alice; Fonseca da Cunha Sousa, Larissa; Silva de Miranda, Aline; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; Brant, Fátima; Silva, Daniele Gonçalves; Luisa Quintino-de-Carvalho, Iracema; Marianetti Soriani, Frederico; Guimarães da Fonseca, Flávio; César Vasconcelos, Anilton; da Silva Barcelos, Lucíola; Martins Teixeira, Mauro; Lúcio Teixeira, Antônio; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga

    2016-08-01

    The role of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in meningoencephalitis caused by Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5) was evaluated by intracranial infection in C57BL/6 wild-type mice (WT) and SOCS2 deficient mice (SOCS2(-/-)). Both infected groups presented weight loss, ruffled fur and hunched posture. Additionally, infected SOCS2(-/-) mice showed swollen chamfer and progressive depression. Infected WT animals developed mild meningitis, characterized by infiltration of mononuclear cells. Moreover, viral DNA was detected in liver and lung from infected WT group. This group also showed elevated brain levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, CXCL1 and CCL5, when compared with non-infected WT animals. Brain inflammation was exacerbated in infected SOCS2(-/-) mice with widespread distribution of the virus and increased brain levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-12, CXCL1 and CCL5, when compared with WT infected mice. Moreover, infected SOCS2 deficient mice exhibited reduced brain mRNA expression of IFNα and IFNβ and increased expression of mRNA of SOCS1, compared with infected WT mice. Taken together, our study provides an insight into the role of SOCS2 in modulating the immune response to BoHV-5 infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis associated with rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis) migration in two nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) and an opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Martha F; Fenton, Heather; Cleveland, Christopher A; Elsmo, Elizabeth J; Yabsley, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, was the cause of neural larval migrans in two nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) and one Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) from the southeastern United States. Histologic findings in all three cases included eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with variable numbers of nematode larvae in the meninges or the neuroparenchyma. In two of the three cases, nematodes were extracted from brain tissue via a "squash prep" method. Identification of the nematodes was confirmed by amplification and sequence analysis of the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene from all three cases. Sequences (704bp) from the two cases from Louisiana were identical and 99.7% similar to nematodes detected in the armadillo from Florida. As A. cantonensis is now considered endemic in the southern United States, it should be considered as an important differential for any wild or domestic animal or human patient with neurological signs and eosinophilic meningitis. Many wildlife species frequently consume snails and slugs and could serve as sentinels for the detection of this parasite in regions where the presence of this parasite has not been confirmed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of neural larval migrans due to A. cantonensis in an armadillo and provides additional documentation that this nematode can cause disease in wildlife species in the southeastern United States.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a Venezuelan HIV⁺-AIDS patient: pathological diagnosis confirmed by PCR using formalin-fixed- and paraffin-embedded-tissues.

    PubMed

    Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Céspedes, Ghislaine; Romero, Sandra; Fuentes, Isabel; Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A; Cañavate, Carmen; Flores-Chávez, María

    2014-01-01

    Coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infectious agents have been recognized since the early 90s. In the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV(+) patients, parasitic protozoans like Toxoplasma gondii have been described as responsible for the space occupying lesions (SOL) developed. However, the involvement of Trypanosoma cruzi is also described but appears to be less frequent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and transplant recipients, associated with necrotizing myocarditis and neurological symptoms related to the occurrence of necrotizing pseudotumoral encephalitis (NPE) and meningoencephalitis (NME). The present work aims to present a Venezuelan case of NME associated with the coinfection of HIV and a T. cruzi-like trypanosomatid as well as its evolution and diagnosis by histopathological techniques, electron microscopy, and PCR methods using formalin-fixed- (FF-) and paraffin-embedded- (PE-) tissues. Postmortem cytological studies of leptomeninges imprints reveal the presence of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma sp. Histopathological and electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify an amastigote stage and to reject the involvement of other opportunistic microorganisms as the etiological agent of the SOL. The definitive confirmation of T. cruzi as the etiological agent was achieved by PCR suggesting that the NME by T. cruzi was due to a reactivation of Chagas' disease.

  19. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is PRIMARY HYPERPARATH YROIDIS M? The body’s parathyroid glands—four pea-sized glands in the neck—produce parathyroid hormone (PTH). Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a condition ...

  20. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues.

  1. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  2. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY EVALUATING ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MIDLINE BRAIN SHIFT ON MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SURVIVAL IN DOGS DIAGNOSED WITH MENINGOENCEPHALITIS OF UNKNOWN ETIOLOGY.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Bonnie J; Barnes Heller, Heidi L; White, Jennifer M

    2017-01-01

    Difficulty has been encountered when trying to identify ante mortem prognostic indicators for dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology (MUE). Identifying MRI imaging parameters associated with prognosis may impact treatment decision-making for clinician and owner. Our hypotheses for this retrospective cohort study are that dogs diagnosed with MUE that had midline shift on brain MRI would have a poorer survival compared to dogs without midline shift; and that younger age, lower weight, and low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell count would be correlated with improved survival. Medical records were reviewed from two institutions. Inclusion criteria included: clinical signs referable to intracranial disease, brain MRI at presentation, abnormal CSF analysis, and negative infectious disease testing. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated for midline shift using the T2-weighted transverse image at the interthalamic adhesion and at the site of maximal deviation. Fifty-two dogs met the inclusion criteria. Median midline deviation was 0.12 cm. Median survival for dogs with no shift was 906 days and with shift was 84 days. Survival was not significantly different between groups (P = 0.11). This remained true when correcting for age (P = 0.22) and CSF TNCC (total nucleated cell count) (P = 0.12). Age at the time of diagnosis (P = 0.02) and CSF TNCC (P = 0.03) were significantly associated with survival. Cerebrospinal fluid protein value (P = 0.84) and weight (P = 0.82) were not significantly associated with survival. In this study of 52 dogs with MUE, MRI evidence of midline brain shift between 0.04 and 0.3 cm at the level of the interthalamic adhesion was not associated with shorter survival. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  3. Cerebellar mutism caused by primary varicella infection in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ilknur; Özkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2014-06-01

    Varicella (chickenpox) is a common childhood infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which is often self-limiting and usually benign. Although uncommon, neurologic complications of varicella have been documented that include postinfectious cerebellar ataxia, meningoencephalitis, Reye syndrome, myelitis, optic neuritis, stroke, Guillain-Barré syndrome, seventh cranial nerve palsy, and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. In this case study, the authors describe a 7-year-old girl who presented with varicella skin rash with unsteady gait and anarthria on day 2, and her condition was attributed to cerebellar mutism. To date, this complication has never been reported in a child with primary varicella infection. Therefore, this case study documents a rare but serious complication of childhood chickenpox.

  4. Identification of novel genetic risk loci in Maltese dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis and evidence of a shared genetic risk across toy dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Barber, Renee M; Schatzberg, Scott J; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Porter, Brian F; Vernau, Karen M; Keesler, Rebekah I; Matiasek, Kaspar; Flegel, Thomas; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa; Mariani, Christopher L; Johnson, Gayle C; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) affects toy and small breed dogs causing progressive, often fatal, inflammation and necrosis in the brain. Genetic risk loci for NME previously were identified in pug dogs, particularly associated with the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex on chromosome 12, but have not been investigated in other susceptible breeds. We sought to evaluate Maltese and Chihuahua dogs, in addition to pug dogs, to identify novel or shared genetic risk factors for NME development. Genome-wide association testing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Maltese dogs with NME identified 2 regions of genome-wide significance on chromosomes 4 (chr4:74522353T>A, p = 8.1×10-7) and 15 (chr15:53338796A>G, p = 1.5×10-7). Haplotype analysis and fine-mapping suggests that ILR7 and FBXW7, respectively, both important for regulation of immune system function, could be the underlying associated genes. Further evaluation of these regions and the previously identified DLA II locus across all three breeds, revealed an enrichment of nominal significant SNPs associated with chromosome 15 in pug dogs and DLA II in Maltese and Chihuahua dogs. Meta-analysis confirmed effect sizes the same direction in all three breeds for both the chromosome 15 and DLA II loci (p = 8.6×10-11 and p = 2.5×10-7, respectively). This suggests a shared genetic background exists between all breeds and confers susceptibility to NME, but effect sizes might be different among breeds. In conclusion, we identified the first genetic risk factors for NME development in the Maltese, chromosome 4 and chromosome 15, and provide evidence for a shared genetic risk between breeds associated with chromosome 15 and DLA II. Last, DLA II and IL7R both have been implicated in human inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, suggesting that similar pharmacotherapeutic targets across species should be investigated.

  5. Identification of Novel Genetic Risk Loci in Maltese Dogs with Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis and Evidence of a Shared Genetic Risk across Toy Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Schatzberg, Scott J.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Porter, Brian F.; Vernau, Karen M.; Keesler, Rebekah I.; Matiasek, Kaspar; Flegel, Thomas; Miller, Andrew D.; Southard, Teresa; Mariani, Christopher L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Huentelman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) affects toy and small breed dogs causing progressive, often fatal, inflammation and necrosis in the brain. Genetic risk loci for NME previously were identified in pug dogs, particularly associated with the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex on chromosome 12, but have not been investigated in other susceptible breeds. We sought to evaluate Maltese and Chihuahua dogs, in addition to pug dogs, to identify novel or shared genetic risk factors for NME development. Genome-wide association testing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Maltese dogs with NME identified 2 regions of genome-wide significance on chromosomes 4 (chr4:74522353T>A, p = 8.1×10−7) and 15 (chr15:53338796A>G, p = 1.5×10−7). Haplotype analysis and fine-mapping suggests that ILR7 and FBXW7, respectively, both important for regulation of immune system function, could be the underlying associated genes. Further evaluation of these regions and the previously identified DLA II locus across all three breeds, revealed an enrichment of nominal significant SNPs associated with chromosome 15 in pug dogs and DLA II in Maltese and Chihuahua dogs. Meta-analysis confirmed effect sizes the same direction in all three breeds for both the chromosome 15 and DLA II loci (p = 8.6×10–11 and p = 2.5×10−7, respectively). This suggests a shared genetic background exists between all breeds and confers susceptibility to NME, but effect sizes might be different among breeds. In conclusion, we identified the first genetic risk factors for NME development in the Maltese, chromosome 4 and chromosome 15, and provide evidence for a shared genetic risk between breeds associated with chromosome 15 and DLA II. Last, DLA II and IL7R both have been implicated in human inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, suggesting that similar pharmacotherapeutic targets across species should be investigated. PMID:25393235

  6. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... parathyroid glands. Most people with primary hyperparathyroidism have no family history of the disorder, but some cases can be linked to an inherited problem. For example, familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is a rare, inherited syndrome that causes multiple ...

  7. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Madkhali, Tarıq; Alhefdhi, Amal; Chen, Herbert; Elfenbein, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder caused by overactivation of parathyroid glands resulting in excessive release of parathyroid hormone. The resultant hypercalcemia leads to a myriad of symptoms. Primary hyperparathyroidism may increase a patient’s morbidity and even mortality if left untreated. During the last few decades, disease presentation has shifted from the classic presentation of severe bone and kidney manifestations to most patients now being diagnosed on routine labs. Although surgery is the only curative therapy, many advances have been made over the past decades in the diagnosis and the surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism. The aim of this review is to summarize the characteristics of the disease, the work up, and the treatment options. PMID:26985167

  8. [Primary hyperoxaluria].

    PubMed

    Cochat, Pierre; Fargue, Sonia; Bacchetta, Justine; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Sabot, Jean-François; Harambat, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    Primary hyperoxalurias are rare recessive inherited inborn errors of glyoxylate metabolism. They are responsible for progressive renal involvement, which further lead to systemic oxalate deposition, which can even occur in infants. Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is the most common form in Europe and is due to alanine-glyoxylate aminostransferase deficiency, a hepatic peroxisomal pyridoxin-dependent enzyme. Therefore primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is responsible for hyperoxaluria leading to aggressive stone formation and nephrocalcinosis. As glomerular filtration rate decreases, systemic oxalate storage occurs throughout all the body, and mainly in the skeleton. The diagnosis is first based on urine oxalate measurement, then on genotyping, which may also allow prenatal diagnosis to be proposed. Conservative measures - including hydration, crystallization inhibitors and pyridoxine - are safe and may allow long lasting renal survival, provided it is given as soon as the diagnosis has been even suspected. No dialysis procedure can remove enough oxalate to compensate oxalate overproduction from the sick liver, therefore a combined liver and kidney transplantation should be planned before advanced renal disease has occurred, in order to limit/avoid systemic oxalate deposition. In the future, primary hyperoxaluria type 1 may benefit from hepatocyte transplantation, chaperone molecules, etc.

  9. The effect of thermal pollution on the distribution of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    De Jonckheere, J.; Van Dijck, P.; Van de Voorde, H.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution in the environment of Naegleria fowleri, the causal agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis has been investigated in this study. N. fowleri was isolated only from a thermally polluted canal. These amoebaflagellates were not isolated from another thermally polluted canal in the neighbourhood indicating that, apart from high temperature, other factors are involved in the selective proliferation of N. fowleri. This species was absent in all other samples originating from two canals, a stream, two lakes, several reservoirs and slow sandfilters of a water supply service and also a water distribution network. Many other amoebae able to grow at 42 degrees C. were found in different places. Most of the N. fowleri strains isolated were not virulent for mice, although they showed all the characteristics of the pathogenic strains. PMID:1097497

  10. Occurrence and pathogenicity of Naegleria fowleri in artificially heated waters.

    PubMed Central

    Sykora, J L; Keleti, G; Martinez, A J

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in thermal discharges, recipient waters, and cooling towers of eight power plants located in western Pennsylvania was investigated for 2 years in conjunction with several environmental measurements. Pathogenic N. fowleri was detected in one cooling tower and in the discharge, receiving waters, or both of five of eight localities. The occurrence of this organism was related to elevated temperatures, but no significant correlation was found for other biological and chemical parameters. Laboratory experiments on the effect of pH on pathogenic N. fowleri documented 100% survival at a range from 2.1 to 8.15. Higher pH reduced or killed the amoebae. No case of human primary amoebic meningoencephalitis occurred during the study. PMID:6847189

  11. Concentration of Naegleria fowleri in natural waters used for recreational purposes in Sonora, Mexico (November 2007-October 2008).

    PubMed

    Lares-Villa, Fernando; Hernández-Peña, Claudia

    2010-09-01

    A survey was designed to know the concentration of Naegleria fowleri in recreational areas in Hornos, Sonora, during a year. Samples were taken monthly at La Isleta and Las Palmas and the total amoeba counts were obtained by the most probable number method (MPN). The identification of N. fowleri was made by PCR. The maximum concentration of total thermophilic amoebae was 9175 MPN/L for La Isleta and 3477 MPN/L for Las Palmas. Thermophilic Naegleria were present mainly during summer and fall. October's concentrations were up to 201 MPN/L, at both places. The maximum concentrations of N. fowleri were 201 MPN/L and 18 MPN/L for La Isleta and Las Palmas respectively, and were isolated from August to October. The presence of N. fowleri in these particular natural bodies of water reinforces the need for adaptation of preventive measures to avoid cases of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

  12. Characterization of a Drinking Water Distribution Pipeline Terminally Colonized by Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Matthew J; Halstrom, Samuel; Wylie, Jason T; Walsh, Tom; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2016-03-15

    Free-living amoebae, such as Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Vermamoeba spp., have been identified as organisms of concern due to their role as hosts for pathogenic bacteria and as agents of human disease. In particular, N. fowleri is known to cause the disease primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) and can be found in drinking water systems in many countries. Understanding the temporal dynamics in relation to environmental and biological factors is vital for developing management tools for mitigating the risks of PAM. Characterizing drinking water systems in Western Australia with a combination of physical, chemical and biological measurements over the course of a year showed a close association of N. fowleri with free chlorine and distance from treatment over the course of a year. This information can be used to help design optimal management strategies for the control of N. fowleri in drinking-water-distribution systems.

  13. Detection of the free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri by using conventional and real-time PCR based on a single copy DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The amoeba-flagellate Naegleria fowleri is a causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This thermophilic species occurs worldwide and tends to proliferate in warm aquatic environment. The PAM cases remain rare but this infection is mostly fatal. Here, we describe a single copy region which has been cloned and sequenced, and was used for both conventional and real-time PCR. Targeting a single-copy DNA sequence allows to directly quantify the N. fowleri cells. The real-time PCR results give a detection limit of 1 copy per reaction with high reproducibility without the need of a Taqman probe. This procedure is of interest as compared to other procedures which are mostly based on the detection of multi-copy DNA associated with a Taqman probe.

  14. Primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Auchus, Richard J; Nwariaku, Fiemu E

    2007-11-01

    Primary aldosteronism is one of the few potentially curable forms of hypertension. This article highlights recent advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this relatively common secondary form of hypertension. These topics include the recognition that this disorder is more prevalent than previously assumed, the identification of high-risk populations that benefit most from screening, and the improved approaches to screening, diagnosis, localization, and treatment. This review uses illustrative examples to describe our approach to these patients.

  15. Primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Govett, G; White, J

    1989-07-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a pathological entity due to excessive secretion of parathormone from a single or multiple parathyroid glands. The biochemical hallmark of this disorder is an elevated serum calcium. The relationship of the parathyroid glands with the thymus gland in fetal development accounts for the occasional aberrant location of the parathyroids. By utilizing computed tomography or nuclear scanning or both preoperatively, the surgeon can isolate the hyperfunctioning adenoma and resect it, thus minimizing potential complications.

  16. [Primary aldosteronism].

    PubMed

    Amar, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Primary aldosteronism affects 6% of hypertensive patients. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient with severe or resistant hypertension or hypertension associated with hypokalemia. The screening test consists on the assessment of the aldosterone to renin ratio. In case of an elevated ratio, the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism is confirmed by either elevated concentrations of basal plasma and/or urinary aldosterone or absence of suppression of aldosterone during dynamic test (including the saline infusion test). CT aims to ensure the absence of adrenal carcinoma and to study the morphology of the adrenals. The unilateral or bilateral type of aldosterone secretion is based on the realization of an adrenal venous sampling. When the hypersecretion is unilateral, the treatment consists of adrenalectomy leading to cure of hypertension in 42% of cases, improvement in 40% of cases. For patient with bilateral disease or who don't want to undergo surgery, treatment is based on spironolactone usually at doses of 25 or 50 mg in combination with other antihypertensives drugs such as diuretics or calcium channel blockers.

  17. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Leonardo; Bilezikian, John

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several generations, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHTP) has undergone a change in its clinical presentation in many countries from a symptomatic disease to an asymptomatic one. The reasons for this change in clinical presentation are related to the widespread use of biochemical screening tests, to the measurement of PTH more routinely in the evaluation of metabolic bone disease and to the status of vitamin D sufficiency in the population. Along with recognition of a broader clinical spectrum of disease, including a more recently recognized normocalcemic variant, has come an appreciation that the evaluation of classic target organs that can be affected in PHPT, such as the skeleton and the kidneys, require more advanced imaging technology for complete evaluation. It is clear that even in asymptomatic patients, evidence for microstructural disease in the skeleton and calcifications in the kidneys can be demonstrated often. Potential non-classical manifestations of PHPT related to neurocognition and the cardiovascular system continue to be of interest. As a result of these advances, revised guidelines for the management of asymptomatic PHPT have been recently published to help the clinician determine whether surgery is appropriate or whether a more conservative approach is acceptable. PMID:27508075

  18. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bilezikian, John P; Cusano, Natalie E.; Khan, Aliya A.; Liu, Jian-Min; Marcocci, Claudio; Bandeira, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common disorder in which parathyroid hormone (PTH) is excessively secreted from one or more of the four parathyroid glands. A single benign parathyroid adenoma is the cause in most people. However, multiglandular disease is not rare and is typically seen in familial PHPT syndromes. The genetics of PHPT is usually monoclonal when a single gland is involved and polyclonal when multiglandular disease is present. The genes that have been implicated in PHPT include proto-oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes. Hypercalcaemia is the biochemical hallmark of PHPT. Usually, the concentration of PTH is frankly increased but can remain within the normal range, which is abnormal in the setting of hypercalcaemia. Normocalcaemic PHPT, a variant in which the serum calcium level is persistently normal but PTH levels are increased in the absence of an obvious inciting stimulus, is now recognized. The clinical presentation of PHPT varies from asymptomatic disease (seen in countries where biochemical screening is routine) to classic symptomatic disease in which renal and/or skeletal complications are observed. Management guidelines have recently been revised to help the clinician to decide on the merits of a parathyroidectomy or a non-surgical course. This Primer covers these areas with particular attention to the epidemiology, clinical presentations, genetics, evaluation and guidelines for the management of PHPT. PMID:27194212

  19. Primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Víctor; Torres, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2014-05-21

    Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) occurs due to an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder of the metabolism of glyoxylate, which causes excessive oxalate production. The most frequent and serious disorder is due to enzyme deficit of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (PH type I) specific to hepatic peroxisome. As oxalate is not metabolised in humans and is excreted through the kidneys, the kidney is the first organ affected, causing recurrent lithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and early renal failure. With advance of renal failure, particularly in patients on haemodialysis (HD), calcium oxalate is massively deposited in tissues, which is known as oxalosis. Diagnosis is based on family history, the presence of urolithiasis and/or nephrocalcinosis, hyperoxaluria, oxalate deposits in tissue forming granulomas, molecular analysis of DNA and enzyme analysis if applicable. High diagnostic suspicion is required; therefore, unfortunately, in many cases it is diagnosed after its recurrence following kidney transplantation. Conservative management of this disease (high liquid intake, pyridoxine and crystallisation inhibitors) needs to be adopted early in order to delay kidney damage. Treatment by dialysis is ineffective in treating excess oxalate. After the kidney transplant, we normally observe a rapid appearance of oxalate deposits in the graft and the results of this technique are discouraging, with very few exceptions. Pre-emptive liver transplantation, or simultaneous liver and kidney transplants when there is already irreversible damage to the kidney, is the treatment of choice to treat the underlying disease and suppress oxalate overproduction. Given its condition as a rare disease and its genetic and clinical heterogeneity, it is not possible to gain evidence through randomised clinical trials. As a result, the recommendations are established by groups of experts based on publications of renowned scientific rigour. In this regard, a group of European experts (OxalEurope) has

  20. A biochemical comparison of proteases from pathogenic naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Tsutsumi, Victor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2007-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the etiologic agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Proteases have been suggested to be involved in tissue invasion and destruction during infection. We analyzed and compared the complete protease profiles of total crude extract and conditioned medium of both pathogenic N. fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi trophozoites. Using SDS-PAGE, we found differences in the number and molecular weight of proteolytic bands between the two strains. The proteases showed optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 35 degrees C for both strains. Inhibition assays showed that the main proteolytic activity in both strains is due to cysteine proteases although serine proteases were also detected. Both N. fowleri and N. gruberi have a variety of different protease activities at different pH levels and temperatures. These proteases may allow the amoebae to acquire nutrients from different sources, including those from the host. Although, the role of the amoebic proteases in the pathogenesis of PAM is not clearly defined, it seems that proteases and other molecules of the parasite as well as those from the host, could be participating in the damage to the human central nervous system.

  1. [Primary lipodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Capeau, J; Magré, J; Lascols, O; Caron, M; Béréziat, V; Vigouroux, C

    2007-02-01

    Primary lipodystrophies represent a heterogeneous group of very rare diseases with a prevalence of less than 1 case for 100.000, inherited or acquired, caracterized by a loss of body fat either generalized or localized (lipoatrophy). In some forms, lipoatrophy is associated with a selective hypertrophy of other fat depots. Clinical signs of insulin resistance are often present: acanthosis nigricans, signs of hyperandrogenism. All lipodystrophies are associated with dysmetabolic alterations with insulin resistance, altered glucose tolerance or diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia leading to a risk of acute pancreatitis. Chronic complications are those resulting from diabetes involving the retina, kidney and nerves, cardiovascular complications and steatotic liver lesions that could result in cirrhosis. Genetic forms of generalized lipodystrophy (or Berardinelli-Seip syndrome) result, in most cases, from recessive mutations in one of two genes: either BSCL2 coding seipin or BSCL1 coding AGPAT2, an acyl-transferase involved in triglyceride synthesis. Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (Lawrence syndrome) is of unknown origin but is sometimes associated with signs of autoimmunity. Partial lipodystrophies can be familial with dominant transmission. Heterozygous mutations have been identified in the LMNA gene encoding nuclear lamin A/C belonging to the nuclear lamina, or in PPARG encoding the adipogenic transcription factor PPARgamma. Some less typical lipodystrophies, associated with signs of premature aging, have been linked to mutations in LMNA or in the ZMPSTE24 gene encoding the protease responsible for the maturation of prelamin A into lamin A. Acquired partial lipodystrophy (Barraquer-Simons syndrome) is characterized by cephalothoracic fat loss. Its aetiology is unknown but mutations in LMNB2, encoding the lamina protein lamin B2, could represent susceptibility factors. Highly active antiretroviral treatments for HIV infection are currently the most frequent cause

  2. Broadly reactive pan-paramyxovirus reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis for the detection of Canine distemper virus in a case of canine meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology

    PubMed Central

    Schatzberg, Scott J.; Li, Qiang; Porter, Brian F.; Barber, Renee M.; Claiborne, Mary Kate; Levine, Jonathan M.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Israel, Sarah K.; Young, Benjamin D.; Kiupel, Matti; Greene, Craig; Ruone, Susan; Anderson, Larry; Tong, Suxiang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immunologic protection associated with routine vaccination protocols, Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains an important pathogen of dogs. Antemortem diagnosis of systemic CDV infection may be made by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or immunohistochemical testing for CDV antigen; central nervous system infection often requires postmortem confirmation via histopathology and immunohistochemistry. An 8-month-old intact male French Bulldog previously vaccinated for CDV presented with multifocal neurologic signs. Based on clinical and postmortem findings, the dog’s disease was categorized as a meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology. Broadly reactive, pan-paramyxovirus RT-PCR using consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers, combined with sequence analysis, identified CDV amplicons in the dog’s brain. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CDV antigens, and a specific CDV RT-PCR based on the phosphoprotein gene identified a wild-type versus vaccinal virus strain. This case illustrates the utility of broadly reactive PCR and sequence analysis for the identification of pathogens in diseases with unknown etiology. PMID:19901287

  3. Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Naegleria fowleri Induce Inflammatory Responses in BV-2 Microglial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyoung; Kang, Jung-Mi; Kim, Tae Im; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2017-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba that is found in diverse environmental habitats, can cause a type of fulminating hemorrhagic meningoencephalitis, primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), in humans. The pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, but it is likely to be primarily caused by disruption of the host's nervous system via a direct phagocytic mechanism by the amoeba. Naegleria fowleri trophozoites are known to secrete diverse proteins that may indirectly contribute to the pathogenic function of the amoeba, but this factor is not clearly understood. In this study, we analyzed the inflammatory responses in BV-2 microglial cells induced by excretory and secretory proteins of N. fowleri (NfESP). Treatment of BV-2 cells with NfESP induced the expression of various cytokines and chemokines, including the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α and TNF-α. NfESP-induced IL-1α and TNF-α expression in BV-2 cells were regulated by p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. NfESP-induced IL-1α and TNF-α production in BV-2 cells were effectively downregulated by inhibition of NF-kB and AP-1. These results collectively suggest that NfESP stimulates BV-2 cells to release IL-1α and TNF-α via NF-kB- and AP-1-dependent MAPK signaling pathways. The released cytokines may contribute to inflammatory responses in microglia and other cell types in the brain during N. fowleri infection.

  4. Acute/subacute cerebral infarction (ASCI) in HIV-negative adults with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM): a MRI-based follow-up study and a clinical comparison to HIV-negative CM adults without ASCI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Lui, Chun-Chung; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tan, Teng-Yeow; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-01-26

    Acute/subacute cerebral infarction (ASCI) in HIV-negative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) adults has rarely been examined by a series of MRI-based follow-up study. We studied a series of MRI follow-up study of CM adults and compared the clinical characters of those with ASCI and those without ASCI. The clinical characteristics and a series of brain MRI findings of seven CM adults with ASCI were enrolled for analysis. The clinical characteristics of another 30 HIV-negative CM adults who did not have ASCI were also included for a comparative analysis. The seven HIV-negative CM adults with ASCI were four men and three women, aged 46-78 years. Lacunar infarction was the type of ASCI, and 86% (6/7) of the ACSI were multiple infarctions distributed in both the anterior and posterior cerebrovascular territories. The seven CM patients with ASCI were significantly older and had a higher rate of DM and previous stroke than the other 30 CM adults without ASCI. They also had a higher incidence of consciousness disturbance at presentation and had a poor prognosis. ASCI was found in 18.9% (7/37) of HIV-negative CM adults. Serial MRI follow-up studies may allow a better delineation of ASCI in this specific group of infectious disease and multiple lacunar infarctions was the most common type. Older in age and presence of DM and previous stroke were the significant underlying conditions. CM patients with ASCI also had a poor therapeutic outcome.

  5. A newly designed radiation therapy protocol in combination with prednisolone as treatment for meningoencephalitis of unknown origin in dogs: a prospective pilot study introducing magnetic resonance spectroscopy as monitor tool.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Katrin; Carrera, Inés; Steffen, Frank; Golini, Lorenzo; Kircher, Patrick R; Schneider, Uwe; Bley, Carla Rohrer

    2015-01-31

    A plethora of treatment options have been described for canine meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (MUO), yet a gold standard has not been established. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to document the effect of a newly designed 30 Gray (Gy) radiation therapy (RT) protocol plus corticosteroids as treatment for focal and multifocal MUO, to monitor clinical and imaging changes during the course of the disease with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton MR Spectroscopy (H-1 MRS) and to detect the occurrence of radiation related side effects. Six dogs (3 with focal and 3 with multifocal lesions) were included in the study. The RT protocol used consisted of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The neurological status of all six dogs improved during RT, with 3 of 6 cases returning to a normal condition. One dog was euthanized early during follow-up (<3 weeks after end of RT). Three month follow up MRI was normal in one dog and improved in 3 dogs and H-1 MRS normalized in 4. In the dog without improvement of the MRI lesions, the N-acetyl aspartate continued to decrease, while choline and creatine concentrations remained stable during that time. This dog was euthanized 18 month after the end of RT due to relapse. One dog was lost to follow up 12 month after completion of RT. The other 3 dogs are still alive at the time of writing. RT with 30 Gy in 10 fractions can provide an additional option for anti-inflammatory treatment of focal and multifocal MUO. The protocol used for treatment monitoring was feasible while no side effects of RT could be observed during the follow up period. Moreover, H-1 MRS could represent a new and non-invasive tool to control the progression of the disease during the treatment course.

  6. Primary intraosseous malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the skull: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Mee; Lee, Ghi Jai; Koh, Young-Cho; Kwon, O-Ki; Park, Yong-Koo

    2003-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare primary neoplasm that constitutes less than 1% of the malignant tumors of bone, and involvement of the skull is very rare. We present a case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the skull, presenting an intraosseous lesion in a 43-yr-old woman. She had a rapidly growing, tender mass in the right parietal region. A plain radiograph showed an osteolytic lesion of the right parietal bone. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the lesion showed heterogeneous low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and slightly high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. No evidence of an extraosseous extension to the adjacent dura and soft tissue was found, and a wide excision of the parietal bone was performed. Histologically, the tumor was a typical MFH displaying pleomorphic spindle cells in a storiform pattern. The results of immunohistochemical stainings revealed that the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and p53, and negative for smooth muscle actin, S100 protein, desmin, and MyoD1. Three months later, a mainly cystic, recurrent mass was developed at the previously operated site. Before the resection, we first performed the percutaneous aspiration cytology, revealing diagnostic multinucleated pleomorphic cells. Thereafter, she had to receive repetitive resections of recurrent or residual lesions, and she died of postoperative meningoencephalitis two years after the first operation. PMID:12923345

  7. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    MedlinePlus

    Primary progressive aphasia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Primary progressive aphasia (uh-FAY-zhuh) is a rare nervous system (neurological) syndrome ... your ability to communicate. People with primary progressive aphasia can have trouble expressing their thoughts and understanding ...

  8. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  9. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  10. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  11. Primary mesenteric hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Jitendra Kumar; Gupta, Rajni; Mohanti, Satyabrot; Kumar, Surender

    2012-07-09

    Hydatid disease mostly caused by Echinococcus granulosus is a common parasitic infestation of the liver. Most common sites are liver (70%) and lungs (25%). Intraperitoneal hydatid cyst is found in 13% and it is usually secondary to rupture of primary hepatic cyst. Primary intraperitoeal hydatid cyst is rare (2%). Primary hydatid cyst in mesentery is very rare. In this article, the author presents a case of primary mesenteric hydatid cyst with chronic pain in lower abdomen.

  12. Primary mesenteric hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Jitendra Kumar; Gupta, Rajni; Mohanti, Satyabrot; Kumar, Surender

    2012-01-01

    Hydatid disease mostly caused by Echinococcus granulosus is a common parasitic infestation of the liver. Most common sites are liver (70%) and lungs (25%). Intraperitoneal hydatid cyst is found in 13% and it is usually secondary to rupture of primary hepatic cyst. Primary intraperitoeal hydatid cyst is rare (2%). Primary hydatid cyst in mesentery is very rare. In this article, the author presents a case of primary mesenteric hydatid cyst with chronic pain in lower abdomen. PMID:22778458

  13. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  14. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  15. Primary Intraosseous Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Primary intraosseous meningiomas are a subtype of primary extradural meningiomas. They represent approximately two-thirds of extradural meningiomas and fewer than 2% of meningiomas overall. These tumors originate within the bones of the skull and can have a clinical presentation and radiographic differential diagnosis different from those for intradural meningiomas. Primary intraosseous meningiomas are classified based on location and histopathologic characteristics. Treatment is primarily surgical resection with wide margins if possible. Sparse literature exists regarding the use of adjuvant therapies. The literature regarding primary intraosseous meningiomas consists primarily of clinical case reports and case series. This literature is reviewed and summarized in this article.

  16. Naturally Acquired Canine Herpesvirus-Associated Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Jager, Mason C; Sloma, Erica A; Shelton, Morgan; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-09-01

    Canid alphaherpesvirus 1 (CHV) causes morbidity and mortality in susceptible puppies. While the neuropathology of experimentally infected puppies has been detailed, characterization of naturally acquired infections is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the histologic, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization features of CHV encephalitis in the dog. Six female and 11 male puppies ranging in age from stillborn to 57 days old were included. Histologically, lesions included multifocal glial nodules (16/17, 94%), meningeal infiltrates (15/17, 88%), and cerebellar cortical necrosis (6/9, 67%); however, robust inflammation was not a significant feature in any of the cases. Immunohistochemistry for CD3, CD20, MAC387, and Iba1 was performed. Although T cells predominated over B cells, the overall number of cells was small in all cases both within the glial nodules and the meninges. In 16 of 16 (100%) cases, glial nodules were diffusely immunoreactive for Iba1; however, limited or no immunoreactivity for MAC387 was present. In situ hybridization directed at the CHV thymidine kinase gene revealed CHV nucleic acid in the granule neurons of the cerebellar folia (8/9; 89%), endothelial cells in the meninges and parenchyma (12/17, 71%), and individual randomly distributed neurons (6/17, 35%). These results clarify the pathology of naturally acquired CHV infection and indicate that developing cerebellar granule neurons are an important site of viral replication.

  17. Medics in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Some time ago a flyer on "Medics in Primary School" came the author's way. It described a programme for making placements in primary schools available to medical students. The benefits of the program to medical students and participating schools were highlighted, including opportunities to develop communication skills and demystify…

  18. Using Primary Source Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explores the use of primary sources when teaching about U.S. slavery. Includes primary sources from the Gilder Lehrman Documents Collection (New York Historical Society) to teach about the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War, such as a proclamation from Lord Dunmore offering freedom to slaves who joined his army. (CMK)

  19. Primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kitai, A

    1986-07-01

    Development of primary care in Japan in still relatively unorganized and unstructured. As mentioned above, the author describes some strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese primary care system. In addressing the weaknesses the following suggestions are offered for the Japanese primary care delivery system: Increase the number of emergency rooms for all day, especially on holidays and at night. Introduce an appointment system. Introduce an open system of hospitals. Coordinate with public hospitals and primary care clinics. Organize the referral system between private practitioners and community hospitals. Increase the number of paramedical staff. Strengthen group practice among primary care physicians. Increase the establishment of departments of primary care practice with government financial incentives to medical schools and teaching hospitals. Develop a more active and direct teaching role for primary care practice or family practice at undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Improve and maintain present health insurance payment method, shifting from quantity of care to quality and continuity of care. Introduce formal continuing education. Introduce formal training programs of primary care and strengthen ambulatory care teaching programs.

  20. Primary osteosarcoma of breast

    PubMed Central

    Gull, Sadaf; Patil, Prashant; Spence, Roy AJ

    2011-01-01

    Primary osteosarcoma of breast is rare. The authors present a case of a 51-year-old female who was admitted with a large necrotising tumour involving the right breast. CT scan confirmed chest wall invasion along with a solitary lung metastasis. She underwent a primary mastectomy with chest wall reconstruction. Unfortunately 3 months later she developed local recurrence. PMID:22688473

  1. Using Primary Source Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explores the use of primary sources when teaching about U.S. slavery. Includes primary sources from the Gilder Lehrman Documents Collection (New York Historical Society) to teach about the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War, such as a proclamation from Lord Dunmore offering freedom to slaves who joined his army. (CMK)

  2. EMR Curriculum Guide: Primary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruschmeier, Veronica M., Ed.; Rockwell, Linda, Ed.

    Presented is a curriculum guide for educable mentally retarded children in primary and intermediate grades which specifies behavioral and interim objectives in the areas of basic verbal and arithmetic skills, vocational competencies, social competencies, and physical skills. Objectives such as the following are identified at the primary level:…

  3. Bilateral primary writing tremor.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Jimenez; Cabrera-Valdivia; Orti-Pareja; Gasalla; Tallon-Barranco; Zurdo

    1998-11-01

    Primary writing tremor is a task-specific tremor that is considered to be unilateral. We report a 59-year-old man with a 5-year history of a typical primary writing tremor in the right hand who developed similar symptoms in the left hand. Copyright 1998 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  4. Transforming Primary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Mike

    2011-01-01

    What is good mathematics teaching? What is mathematics teaching good for? Who is mathematics teaching for? These are just some of the questions addressed in "Transforming Primary Mathematics", a highly timely new resource for teachers which accessibly sets out the key theories and latest research in primary maths today. Under-pinned by findings…

  5. Primary Science Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Liz Lawrence has recently finished her term as Chair of Primary Science Committee (PSC). She is one of the 41 hub leaders who have led and mentored 192 schools across England and British Forces' schools in Germany, to achieve the first ever nationally recognised awards to celebrate excellence in primary science. In this article, the author writes…

  6. Transforming Primary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Mike

    2011-01-01

    What is good mathematics teaching? What is mathematics teaching good for? Who is mathematics teaching for? These are just some of the questions addressed in "Transforming Primary Mathematics", a highly timely new resource for teachers which accessibly sets out the key theories and latest research in primary maths today. Under-pinned by findings…

  7. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature.

  8. Primary Intraocular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Faia, Lisa J.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Primary intraocular lymphoma, recently suggested to be renamed primary retinal lymphoma, is a subset of primary central nervous system lymphoma and is usually an aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Between 56% and 85% of patients who initially present with primary intraocular lymphoma alone will develop cerebral lesions. Patients typically complain of decreased vision and floaters, most likely secondary to the chronic vitritis and subretinal lesions. The diagnosis of primary intraocular lymphoma can be difficult to make and requires tissue for diagnosis. The atypical lymphoid cells are large and display a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, prominent nucleoli, and basophilic cytoplasm. Flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, cytokine analysis, and gene rearrangements also aid in the diagnosis. Local and systemic treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation, are employed, although the relapse rate remains high. PMID:19653715

  9. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  10. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000282.htm Primary biliary cirrhosis To use the sharing features on this page, ... and leads to scarring of the liver called cirrhosis. This is called biliary cirrhosis. Causes The cause ...

  11. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  12. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  13. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  14. Primary infertility (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  15. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  16. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  17. Primary Meningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Palta, Manisha; Riedel, Richard F.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Cummings, Thomas J.; Green, Scott; Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13). Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) systemic therapy. PMID:21772793

  18. Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Mehus, Christopher J.; Hawkins, J. David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C.; Metzler, Carol W.; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V. Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2017-01-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are: (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings. PMID:27498167

  19. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  20. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morton, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. Less than 50 cases of pregnancy in women with primary aldosteronism have been reported, suggesting the disorder is significantly underdiagnosed in confinement. Accurate diagnosis is complicated by physiological changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in pregnancy, leading to a risk of false negative results on screening tests. The course of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is highly variable, although overall it is associated with a very high risk of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The optimal management of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is unclear, with uncertainty regarding the safety of mineralocorticoid antagonists and amiloride, their relative efficacy compared with the antihypertensive medications commonly used during pregnancy, and as to whether prognosis is improved by laparoscopic adrenalectomy where an adrenal adenoma can be demonstrated.

  1. Primary care research ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R; Murphy, E; Crosland, A

    1995-01-01

    Research activity in primary care is increasing rapidly, and raises a range of specific ethical issues. Many of these relate to the involvement of individuals in the community who are not seeking medical care and to the impact of research participation on relationships between general practitioners and their patients. The ethical issues pertinent to a range of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in primary care are identified and considered. PMID:8554844

  2. Corrective Primary Impression Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Aquaviva; Dua, Neha; Herekar, Manisha

    2010-01-01

    The article describes a simple, quick and corrective technique for making the preliminary impression. It records the extensions better as compared to the impressions made using only impression compound. This technique is accurate and gives properly extended custom tray. Any deficiencies seen in the compound primary impression are corrected using this technique hence, this technique is called as a “corrective primary impression technique”. PMID:20502648

  3. Critical primary survey injuries.

    PubMed

    DeArmond, Dan; Carpenter, Andrea J; Calhoon, John H

    2008-01-01

    The primary survey as established by the advanced trauma life support protocol includes a directed history and physical exam aimed at the rapid diagnosis of life-threatening thoracic injuries. Most of these injuries can and should be found and treated during the initial evaluation of the patient without the need for additional diagnostic studies. In this article we review the role of the primary survey in the diagnosis and treatment of major thoracic injuries.

  4. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  5. Primary headache disorders.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2013-07-01

    Primary headache disorders include migraine, tension-type headaches, and the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs). "Primary" refers to a lack of clear underlying causative pathology, trauma, or systemic disease. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing; hemicrania continua, although classified separately by the International Headache Society, shares many features of both migraine and the TACs. This article describes the features and treatment of these disorders.

  6. Primary actinomycosis of hand

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Sanghamitra; Dash, Muktikesh; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Sahu, Rani; Panda, Pritilata

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous suppurative disease having the propensity for extension to the contagious tissue with the formation of multiple discharging sinus tracts. Primary actinomycosis of extremity is a very uncommon clinical entity and is commonly considered as a soft-tissue infection. We report here, a case of primary actinomycosis of the upper extremity in a 24-year-old male who was treated successfully with surgical excision and extended period of antimicrobial treatment. PMID:25538911

  7. Primary cerebral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai; Kong, Xiangyi; Mao, Gengsheng; Qiu, Ming; Zhu, Haibo; Zhou, Lei; Nie, Qingbin; Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Primary intracranial melanomas are uncommon and constitute approximately 1% of all melanoma cases and 0.07% of all brain tumors. In nature, these primary melanomas are very aggressive and can spread to other organs. We report an uncommon case of primary cerebral malignant melanoma—a challenging diagnosis guided by clinical presentations, radiological features, and surgical biopsy results, aiming to emphasize the importance of considering primary melanoma when making differential diagnoses of intracranial lesions. We present a rare case of a primary cerebral melanoma in the left temporal lobe. The mass appeared iso-hypodense on brain computed tomography (CT), short signal on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (T1WI) and long signal on T2WI. It was not easy to make an accurate diagnosis before surgery. We showed the patient's disease course and reviewed related literatures, for readers’ reference. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report and any accompanying images. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. After surgery, the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma. The patient was discharged without any complications and went on to receive adjuvant radiochemotherapy. It is difficult to diagnose primary cerebral melanoma in the absence of any cutaneous melanosis. A high index of clinical suspicion along with good pathology reporting is the key in diagnosing these extremely rare tumors. PMID:28121927

  8. Teaching primary care obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith B.; Jordan, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences and recommendations for recruitment of family physicians who practise and teach primary care obstetrics. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Setting Six primary care obstetrics groups in Edmonton, Alta, that were involved in teaching family medicine residents in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Alberta. Participants Twelve family physicians who practised obstetrics in groups. All participants were women, which was reasonably representative of primary care obstetrics providers in Edmonton. Methods Each participant underwent an in-depth interview. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The investigators independently reviewed the transcripts and then analyzed the transcripts together in an iterative and interpretive manner. Main findings Themes identified in this study include lack of confidence in teaching, challenges of having learners, benefits of having learners, and recommendations for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. While participants described insecurity and challenges related to teaching, they also identified positive aspects, and offered suggestions for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. Conclusion Despite describing poor confidence as teachers and having challenges with learners, the participants identified positive experiences that sustained their interest in teaching. Supporting these teachers and recruiting more such role models is important to encourage family medicine learners to enter careers such as primary care obstetrics. PMID:24627402

  9. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options.

  10. Other primary headaches

    PubMed Central

    Bahra, Anish

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Other Primary Headaches’ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ‘alarm clock headache’, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review. PMID:23024566

  11. Primary care development zones.

    PubMed

    Beardshaw, V; Gordon, P; Plamping, D

    1993-01-30

    Most commentators on the Tomlinson report have agreed with its emphasis on improving primary and community care. The three elements of such a strategy are a remedial programme to bring primary care up to national standards, a programme to provide such services to people with non-standard needs such as mobile Londoners, ethnic minorities, and homeless people, and the development of an expanded model of primary care. No one model will be appropriate across all of London. The process should start with an audit of existing resources and services within each community, together with an analysis of needs. From this would develop a local programme with specific plans for investment in premises, staffing, training, and management. New contractual mechanisms may be needed to attract practitioners, improve their premises, secure out of hours services, and provide medical cover for community beds. There should also be incentives for closer working between primary and secondary services. No developments on the scale needed for London have been carried out in primary care within the lifetime of the NHS--but their success will be critical to the calibre of health services for Londoners into the next century.

  12. Primary pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Avila Martínez, Régulo José; Marrón Fernández, Carmen; Hermoso Alarza, Fátima; Zuluaga Bedoya, Mauricio; Meneses Pardo, José Carlos; Gámez García, A Pablo

    2013-09-01

    To describe the characteristics and the result of surgical treatment in a series of patients with primary pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma (PSC). A descriptive study of 11 patients with primary PSC who were treated by the Thoracic Surgery Department at the Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre in Madrid (Spain) between 2005 and 2009. We analyzed age, gender, histologic type, pathological stage, type of surgery and survival (in months). Ten patients were male and 11 were smokers; mean age of was 55. The pathologic stages were: 4 stage IIA, 3 stage IIB, 2 stage IB and 2 stage IA. The most frequent histologic type was pleomorphic carcinoma, which was found in 5 cases. Complete resection was performed in 10 cases, and 7 received adjuvant therapy. Seven are disease-free after a mean follow-up period of 49 months. Complete surgery in the initial stages of primary PSC can improve survival. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary pulmonary meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shucheng; Chen, Li; Mao, Yuping; Tong, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Primary extracranial meningiomas are rare outside the head and neck region. Patient concerns: A 44-year-old female patient had chest pain for more than 1 year. Diagnoses: Preoperative chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a nodule in the right lower lobe, 1.8 cm in diameter. Tumor tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry for vimentin and S-100. Interventions: Histopathologically, the tumor was characterized by whorled nests of spindle-shaped cells accompanied by psammoma bodies. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated tumor cell positivity for vimentin and S-100. This case was diagnosed as a primary pulmonary meningioma. The tumor was removed by a thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection. Outcomes: Postoperative cranial and spinal CT scan did not show any intracranial or spinal mass. No recurrence of the tumor was reported at the time of writing up this case report. Lessons: A primary pulmonary meningioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis workup of pulmonary nodules. PMID:28489736

  14. Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bilezikian, John P.; Silverberg, Shonni J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common disorder of mineral metabolism characterized by incompletely regulated, excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone from one or more of the parathyroid glands. The historical view of this disease describes two distinct entities marked by two eras. When primary hyperparathyroidism was first discovered about 80 years ago, it was always symptomatic with kidney stones, bone disease and marked hypercalcemia. With the advent of the multichannel autoanalyzer about 40 years ago, the clinical phenotype changed to a disorder characterized by mild hypercalcemia and the absence of classical other features of the disease. We may now be entering a 3rd era in the history of this disease in which patients are being discovered with normal total and ionized serum calcium concentrations but with parathyroid hormone levels that are consistently elevated. In this article, we describe this new entity, normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism, a forme fruste of the disease. PMID:20485897

  15. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinbo; Hu, Zhijian; Wu, Junwei; Bai, Lishan; Chai, Xinqun

    2011-11-19

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor is rare and poses a challenge for diagnosis and management. We presented a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in a 53-year-old female with a complaint of right upper abdominal pain. Computer tomography scans revealed a hypervascular mass in segment 4 of the liver. An ultrasonography-guided biopsy showed a carcinoid tumor. No other lesions were found by the radiological investigations. Surgery resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor. Three years later, recurrence was found and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed. After transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, the patient has been free of symptom and had no radiological disease progression for over 6 months. Surgical resection combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is effective to offer excellent palliation.

  16. Plume primary smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastenet, J. C.

    1993-06-01

    The exhaust from a solid propellant rocket motor usually contains condensed species. These particles, also called 'Primary Smoke', are often prejudicial to missile detectability and to the guidance system. To avoid operational problems it is necessary to know and quantify the effects of particles on all aspects of missile deployment. A brief description of the origin of the primary smoke is given. It continues with details of the interaction between particles and light as function of both particles and light properties (nature, size, wavelength, etc). The effects of particles on plume visibility, attenuation of an optical beam propagated through the plume and the contribution of particles on optical signatures of the plume are also described. Finally, various methods used in NATO countries to quantify the primary smoke effects are discussed.

  17. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  18. [Primary care in Ireland].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-03-27

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Melatonin for primary insomnia?

    PubMed

    2009-07-01

    Melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland, has a key role in regulating circadian rhythms, most importantly, the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin's action has led to its being tried as a treatment for a wide range of sleep disorders, such as jet lag, primary insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption and sleep problems in children with neuro-developmental disorders. Until recently, it had not been licensed in the UK for any indication. Prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin - Lundbeck) has now been licensed as a treatment for primary insomnia. Here we consider whether this product has a place in the management of people with this condition.

  20. Fibrositis and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Carette, S; Lefrançois, L

    1988-09-01

    The prevalence of fibrositis was determined in 100 patients with subclinical or biochemical primary hypothyroidism. Nineteen patients reported symptoms of joint and/or muscle pain with stiffness. Five of these patients presented 7 or more tender points on examination, thus allowing a diagnosis of fibrositis to be made in only 5% of the total group. Symptomatic improvement after thyroid hormone replacement occurred in 10 of the 19 patients, including 3 of those with fibrositis. There were no significant changes in tender points. Our data indicate that fibrositis is uncommon in patients with primary hypothyroidism despite the frequent occurrence of symptoms suggestive of this syndrome.

  1. Primary appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Behera, Prativa Kumari; Rath, Pramod Kumar; Panda, Rabiratna; Satpathi, Sanghamitra; Behera, Rajan

    2011-04-01

    Primary Adenocarcinomas of the appendix are extremely rare tumor. We report a case of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a 40 year old lady misdiagnosed as having acute appendicitis. All the routine investigations were within normal limit. USG of abdomen showed dilated appendix with little fluid collection adjacent to it and no other abnormality was seen which suggested acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy was done and excised appendix was sent for histopathological examination. Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the appendix was confirmed after histopathological examination. Right hemicolectomy was done as a second stage procedure. As some cases are incidentally discovered, this case emphasizes that histological examination of all appendicectomy specimens is mandatory.

  2. Does primary fibromyalgia exist?

    PubMed

    Forslind, K; Fredriksson, E; Nived, O

    1990-10-01

    Twenty-one of 25 consecutive primary fibromyalgia or fibrositis patients, identified during a 5-year period in a tertiary care day-ward for pain syndromes, were re-examined. Fifteen fulfilled criteria for fibromyalgia but unexpectedly, all cases had either psychiatric disturbance or thyroid dysfunction. Of the four patients not seen at follow-up, two had developed neurological diseases, another rheumatoid arthritis and one other hypothyroidism. Thus, after 5 years no patient fulfilled the criteria for primary fibromyalgia. Women occupied as manual workers were over-represented. Most patients reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy. None of the patients has been able to return to full time work.

  3. Amoebic anal fistula: new insight into an old disease.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vivek; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Mishra, Kiran; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2014-04-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman underwent fistulectomy for low trans-sphincteric anal fistula along with curettage for an associated abscess extending proximally for half a centimeter into the intersphincteric plane. The roof of the cavity became clearly visible after satisfactory culmination of the surgical procedure. Histopathological examination of the fistulous tract and the curetted granulation tissue revealed presence of multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica exhibiting erythrophagocytosis in the background of mixed inflammatory infiltrate. This case report provides the outlook that yields the novel insight into the possible role of Entamoeba histolytica in the pathogenesis and persistence of the fistulous tract.

  4. Tinidazole in treatment of acute amoebic dysentery in children.

    PubMed Central

    Scragg, J N; Rubidge, C J; Proctor, E M

    1976-01-01

    The excellent results obtained in this trial indicate that tinidazole is a drug worthy of extensive evaluation in the treatment of amoebiasis, as three single daily doses is a simple form of treatment. The drug was well tolerated and free from any toxic effects. PMID:779664

  5. Minimum-Risk Path Finding by an Adaptive Amoebal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Iima, Makoto; Ueda, Tetsuo; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Saigusa, Tetsu; Tero, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Ryo; Showalter, Kenneth

    2007-08-01

    When two food sources are presented to the slime mold Physarum in the dark, a thick tube for absorbing nutrients is formed that connects the food sources through the shortest route. When the light-avoiding organism is partially illuminated, however, the tube connecting the food sources follows a different route. Defining risk as the experimentally measurable rate of light-avoiding movement, the minimum-risk path is exhibited by the organism, determined by integrating along the path. A model for an adaptive-tube network is presented that is in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  6. Identification and epidemiological typing of Naegleria fowleri with DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Kilvington, S; Beeching, J

    1995-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a small free-living amoeboflagellate found in warm water habitats worldwide. The organism is pathogenic to humans, causing fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. When monitoring the environment for the presence of N. fowleri, it is important to reliably differentiate the organism from other closely related but nonpathogenic species. To this end, we have developed species-specific DNA probes for use in the rapid identification of N. fowleri from the environment. Samples were taken from the thermal springs in Bath, England, and cultured for amoebae. Of 84 isolates of thermophilic Naegleria spp., 10 were identified as N. fowleri by probe hybridization. The identity of these isolates was subsequently confirmed by their specific whole-cell DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). One DNA clone was found to contain a repeated element that detected chromosomal RFLPs that were not directly visible on agarose gels. This enabled the further differentiation of strains within geographically defined whole-cell DNA RFLP groups. N. fowleri DNA probes represent a specific and potentially rapid method for the identification of the organism soon after primary isolation from the environment. PMID:7793928

  7. Primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Portocarrero-Ortíz, Lesly; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas have only rarely been reported. Craniopharyngiomas involve usually the sellar and suprasellar region, but can be originated from cell remnants of the obliterated craniopharyngeal duct or metaplastic change of andenohypophyseal cells. We present the first case of a primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma. Presentation of case A 35-year old woman presented with a one-year history of headache and diplopia. MRI showed a large frontotemporal cystic lesion. Tumor resection was performed with a keyhole endoscopic frontal lateral approach. The pathological features showed an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma with a cholesterol granuloma reaction. Discussion There have been reported different localizations for primary ectopic craniopharyngioma. Our case presented a lobulated frontotemporal cystic mass formed by a dense eosinophilic proteinaceous material dystrophic calcifications and cholesterol crystals, with epithelial remnants. No tumor regrowth was observed in the magnetic resonance image 27 months postoperatively. Conclusion Primary ectopic craniopharyngioma is a rare entity with a pathogenesis that remains uncertain. This is an unusual anatomic location associated with unique clinical findings. PMID:25725331

  8. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Cancer.gov

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  9. Primary Art Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton Unified School District 373, KS.

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary Grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Art. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide begins with a list of topics for art expression. The main body of the guide contains 15 color-coded sections on the following subjects: 1) mobiles and folded paper; 2) collage and photo montage; 3) square paper and mosaics; 4) wax paper and…

  10. From Primary to Secondary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    This author discusses her decision to move to secondary school to teach mathematics, after having taught and been a mathematics manager in primary schools for six years. She states that this was a valuable experience and sparked her interest in the transition experiences of students, particularly in mathematics. Research (Evangelou et al, 2008,…

  11. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and personality change. An increased risk of other disease. In addition to bile duct and liver damage, people with primary biliary cirrhosis are likely to have other metabolic or immune system disorders, including thyroid problems, limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome) and rheumatoid arthritis. ...

  12. Primary Standards Laboratory report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) for the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL). This report summarizes metrology activities that received emphasis in the first half of 1990 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL system-wide Standards and Calibration Program.

  13. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of liver cancer every 6 to 12 months. Health care providers use blood tests, ultrasound, or both to check for signs of ... make the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A health care provider uses the test selectively when he or she is concerned that ...

  14. Primary utilization of birch

    Treesearch

    Henry W. Saunders

    1969-01-01

    From an industry point-of-view, procurement of raw material and primary manufacture present problems today and challenges for tomorrow. So that you may become more familiar with the white birch industry and more specifically with Saunders Brothers, I will briefly explain some of the products we manufacture and some of the methods we use to make them. In some ways, we...

  15. New Primary School Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Culture (Trinidad and Tobago).

    This official syllabus of Trinidad and Tobago's primary schools gives detailed guidelines on the teaching objectives of each curriculum area and how these can best be realized, as well as descriptions of the subject matter. The curriculum is divided into three levels: Level I (5- to 7-year-olds), Level II (7- to 9-year-olds) and Level III (10+- to…

  16. Healthcare is primary

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2nd National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on “healthcare” in India. The theme of this conference was “Healthcare is Primary.” The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the “general health system” instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, “family medicine” (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation. PMID:26985402

  17. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  18. Philosophy in Primary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2012-01-01

    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education" Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on "Philosophy for Children in Transition", so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just…

  19. Pre-Primary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands). Inst. for Educational Research.

    This document is the Project Europe 2000 Pre-primary Education report of the European Cultural Foundation. The objective of the study was to determine the trends in the child-school-society relation, so that educational planning could be constructed in the context of future needs. To aid in this analysis, data was collected concerning the…

  20. Primary Premier for Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author talks about the Association for Science Education (ASE) Primary Science Committee's (PSC) March 2009 meeting which was held in Belfast as guests of ASE Northern Ireland. To mark the auspicious occasion of a body that usually meets four times a year in the Hatfield HQ crossing the Irish Sea to be hosted by its Celtic cousins, a Lord…

  1. Writing for Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Tara, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, two short pieces are presented to show educators just what a good article and a good review could have in them. This article has been written for the purpose of illustrating a good example, but is also representative of the type of content the editors encourage in "Primary Science": practical and active, with images. They also…

  2. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  3. Beginning Primary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacklin, Angela; Griffiths, Vivienne; Robinson, Carol

    2006-01-01

    This book supports primary teachers' early professional development and learning, tackling key questions and concerns that new teachers might face in their early careers, such as: How will I get through the first term? When will I feel like a "real" teacher? What can I expect from my first years in teaching? Drawing on the experiences of beginning…

  4. Primary Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Vida Jo

    1968-01-01

    Children will enjoy creative writing in the primary grades if they are given inspiration, time to write, and the opportunity to share their work with classmates. A second-grade class began a creative writing project by listening to poetry and selecting poems to memorize and recite. This stimulated and encouraged them to evaluate and to write…

  5. Primary Premier for Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author talks about the Association for Science Education (ASE) Primary Science Committee's (PSC) March 2009 meeting which was held in Belfast as guests of ASE Northern Ireland. To mark the auspicious occasion of a body that usually meets four times a year in the Hatfield HQ crossing the Irish Sea to be hosted by its Celtic cousins, a Lord…

  6. Philosophy in Primary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2012-01-01

    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education" Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on "Philosophy for Children in Transition", so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just…

  7. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  8. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  9. Spirometry in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  10. [Primary hyperaldosteronism in cats].

    PubMed

    Willi, B; Kook, P H; Quante, S; Boretti, F; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N S; Grest, P; Scherrer, O; Riond, B; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Nussberger, J; Reusch, C E

    2012-12-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism is a clinical syndrome characterized by an elevated aldosterone secretion by the adrenals. The present case series describes 7 cats with primary hyperaldosteronism, which were presented between 2002 and 2011. Common clinical symptoms were weakness, anorexia, cervical ventroflexion and blindness. All cats showed hypokalemia. In 6 cats, blood pressure was determined: 5 cats showed hypertension, of which 4 animals exhibited retinal detachment and blindness. In the ultrasonographic examination, unilateral adrenomegaly was present in 6 cats whereas one animal showed normal adrenals. In 4 cats, the serum aldosterone concentration was above the reference range. Five cats underwent unilateral adrenalectomy, which was accomplished uneventfully and returned the electrolytes back to normal. Histopathological examination of the adrenals revealed 2 carcinomas and 4 adenomas; one cat with ultrasonographic normal adrenals exhibited bilateral nodular hyperplasia.

  11. Transsexual primary care.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Christopher O

    2010-08-01

    Transsexual presentations in primary care stress mainstream health care physical resources, institutional organization, and the cultural flexibility of providers and interdisciplinary staff. This article describes the ethical landscape, examines gender identity culture, and considers gender reassignment physiology. Nurse practitioners are challenged to advocate for this population. Sources for the discussion derive from published institutional guidelines, institutional and civic policies, web-based information in the public domain, and professional journal articles. Advocacy for cultural sensitivity, institutional policy change,and professional integrity will determine healthcare quality for this population. Advocacy for cultural awareness and institutional change has begun in larger institutions and metropolitan areas, but is necessary across primary care settings. Caring for transsexuals requires knowledge of anatomical reassignments, hormonal therapy effects, and cultural sensitivities particular to the gender identity community. Healthcare screening and physical exam modifications for these presentations require forethought and appropriate adjustments.

  12. Primary immunodeficiencies: 2009 update

    PubMed Central

    Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Fischer, Alain; Geha, Raif. S.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chapel, Helen; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Hammartröm, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D.; Puck, Jennifer; Roifman, Chaim; Seger, Reinhard; Wedgwood, Josiah

    2009-01-01

    More than 50 years after Ogdeon Bruton’s discovery of congenital agammaglobulinemia, human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) continue to unravel novel molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern development and function of the human immune system. This report provides the updated classification of PIDs, that has been compiled by the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) Expert Committee of Primary Immunodeficiencies after its biannual meeting, in Dublin (Ireland) in June 2009. Since the appearance of the last classification in 2007, novel forms of PID have been discovered, and additional pathophysiology mechanisms that account for PID in humans have been unraveled. Careful analysis and prompt recognition of these disorders is essential to prompt effective forms of treatment and thus to improve survival and quality of life in patients affected with PIDs. PMID:20004777

  13. [Basics of primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Claudia; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva; Hernández-Martínez, Ana Rosa; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, the etiology are the defects in the development or function of the immune system. The principal PID manifestations are the infections in early age, malignancy and diseases of immune dysregulation as autoimmunity and allergy. PIDs are genetics disorders and most of them are inherited as autosomal recessive, also this group of diseases is more prevalent in males and in childhood. The antibody immunodeficiency is the PID more common in adults. The more frequent disorders are the infections in the respiratory tract, abscesses, candidiasis, diarrhea, BCGosis etc. Initial approach included a complete blood count and quantification of immunoglobulins. The delay in diagnosis could be explained due to a perception that the recurrent infections are normal process or think that they are exclusively of childhood. The early diagnosis of PID by primary care physicians is important to opportune treatment and better prognosis.

  14. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Zhang, Chong; Feng, Zhiying; Ni, Yiming

    2008-08-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a two-week history of palpitations and shortness of breath, aggravated for two days and was believed to be pulmonary hypertension. Emergency heart ultrasound after admission presented a massive pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary artery. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery embolectomy. The patient demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics after the operation. Histologic and immunohistochemical assays were performed and a diagnosis was made as primary pulmonary artery sarcoma arising from the left pulmonary artery. Resection of the tumor is recommended for the treatment of this rare malignant tumor. The corresponding chemotherapy, follow-up and prognosis are described as well in this case report.

  15. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Kapur, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically relevant short- and long-term benefits for low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, chronic neck pain, and headache. The integration of acupuncture into a primary care setting also appears to be cost-effective. Furthermore, the practice of acupuncture in primary care involves rigorous training, financial discipline, and art of communication. When it is done correctly, acupuncture proves to be beneficial for both patients and providers. PMID:20189001

  16. Primary hyperparathyroidism and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Calcifications in the kidneys may occur in the parenchyma (nephrocalcinosis), pelvis renis (nephrolithiasis) or ureters (ureterolithiasis). Several factors may protect against stone formation or promote precipitation of stones. Most stones contain calcium, and the hypercalciuria seen in primary hyperparathyroidism is a contributing factor to stone formation in the kidneys and urinary tract. In early case series, renal stone formation was frequent, whereas the proportion of patients with symptomatic renal stones has declined in recent years. However, a substantial proportion of patients presents with asymptomatic nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis. Before diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism, renal stone events are more frequent than in the general population. However, even after surgical cure, an increased rate of renal stone events may be seen. This may to some extent be the result of stones or calcifications already present at the time of diagnosis or sequelae to prior stones such as infections or ureter strictures.

  17. [Primary care in Italy].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-05-25

    Italy is not a country where Spanish doctors emigrate, as there is an over-supply of health care professionals. The Italian Servizio Sanitario Nazionale has some differences compared to the Spanish National Health System. The Servizio Sanitario Nazionale is financed by national and regional taxes and co-payments. There are taxes earmarked for health, and Primary Care receives 50% of the total funds. Italian citizens and residents in Italy have the right to free health cover. However, there are co-payments for laboratory and imaging tests, pharmaceuticals, specialist ambulatory services, and emergencies. Co-payments vary in the different regions. The provision of services is regional, and thus fragmentation and major inequities are the norm. Doctors in Primary Care are self-employed and from 2000 onwards, there are incentives to work in multidisciplinary teams. Salary is regulated by a national contract and it is the sum of per-capita payments and extra resources for specific activities. Responsibilities are similar to those of Spanish professionals. However, medical care is more personal. Relationships between Primary Care and specialised care depend on the doctors' relationships. Primary Care doctors are gatekeepers for specialised care, except for gynaecology, obstetrics and paediatrics. Specialised training is compulsory in order to work as general practitioner. The Italian Health Care System is a national health system like the Spanish one. However, health care professionals are self-employed, and there are co-payments. In spite of co-payments, Italians have one of the highest average life expectancy, and they support a universal and publicly funded health-care system. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. [Multiple primary pulmonary carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Guitart, A C; Gómez, G; Estrada, G; Rodríguez, C; León, C; Cornudella, R

    1991-02-01

    Three cases of multiple simultaneous primary lung carcinomas are presented, in which diagnosis was established by post-surgery pathological exam. In all three cases, chest X-ray showed pulmonary masses suggestive or clinical malignancy, and pre-surgery pathological diagnosis or squamous lung carcinoma. During thoracotomy or in the resected segment, a second lesion we confirmed which made resection necessary being this second lesion classified as lung adenocarcinoma.

  19. [Primary orthostatic tremor].

    PubMed

    Bottin, P; Sadzot, B; Hotermans, C

    2005-02-01

    Primary orthostatic tremor is a particular tremor exclusively present when a subject is standing. Patients experience a severe disabling sense of unsteadiness. Walking, sitting and lying down are unaffected Neurological examination and cerebral imagery are normal most of the time. Electromyography in standing position confirms the diagnosis in showing a regular rapid tremor with a frequency of 12 to 18 Hz. Its physiopathology is partially unknown. A few symptomatic therapies can be proposed.

  20. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.