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Sample records for primary astrocytes exposed

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christina L.; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L.; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 +/- 10.56 ppm, 136.0 +/- 31.73 ppm and 62.37 +/- 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.Titanium dioxide (Ti

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christina L; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-28

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 ± 10.56 ppm, 136.0 ± 31.73 ppm and 62.37 ± 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.

  3. Ornithine decarboxylase activity is affected in primary astrocytes but not in secondary cell lines exposed to 872 MHz RF radiation.

    PubMed

    Höytö, A; Juutilainen, J; Naarala, J

    2007-06-01

    The effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on cellular ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity were studied in fibroblasts, two neural cell lines and primary astrocytes. Several exposure times and exposure levels were used, and the fields were either unmodulated or modulated according to the characteristics of the Global System for Mobile (GSM) communications. Murine L929 fibroblasts, rat C6 glioblastoma cells, human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and rat primary astrocytes were exposed to RF radiation at 872 MHz in a waveguide exposure chamber equipped with water cooling. Cells were exposed for 2, 8, or 24 hours to continuous wave (CW) RF radiation or to a GSM type signal pulse modulated at 217 Hz, at specific absorption rates of 1.5, 2.5, or 6.0 W/kg. Cellular ODC activities of cell samples were assayed. ODC activity in rat primary astrocytes was decreased statistically significantly (p values from 0.003 to <0.001) and consistently in all experiments performed at two exposure levels (1.5 and 6.0 W/kg) and using GSM modulated or CW radiation. In the secondary cell lines, ODC activity was generally not affected. ODC activity was affected by RF radiation in rat primary neural cells, but the secondary cells used in this study showed essentially no response to similar RF radiation. In contrast to some previous studies, no differences between the modulated and continuous wave signals were detected. Further studies with primary astrocytes are warranted to confirm the present findings and to explore the mechanisms of the effects.

  4. Liposomal clodronate selectively eliminates microglia from primary astrocyte cultures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in astrocyte biology because astrocytes have been demonstrated to play prominent roles in physiological and pathological conditions of the central nervous system, including neuroinflammation. To understand astrocyte biology, primary astrocyte cultures are most commonly used because of the direct accessibility of astrocytes in this system. However, this advantage can be hindered by microglial contamination. Although several authors have warned regarding microglial contamination in this system, complete microglial elimination has never been achieved. Methods The number and proliferative potential of contaminating microglia in primary astrocyte cultures were quantitatively assessed by immunocytologic and flow cytometric analyses. To examine the utility of clodronate for microglial elimination, primary astrocyte cultures or MG-5 cells were exposed to liposomal or free clodronate, and then immunocytologic, flow cytometric, and gene expression analyses were performed. The gene expression profiles of microglia-eliminated and microglia-contaminated cultures were compared after interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulation. Results The percentage of contaminating microglia exceeded 15% and continued to increase because of their high proliferative activity in conventional primary astrocyte cultures. These contaminating microglia were selectively eliminated low concentration of liposomal clodronate. Although primary microglia and MG-5 cells were killed by both liposomal and free clodronate, free clodronate significantly affected the viability of astrocytes. In contrast, liposomal clodronate selectively eliminated microglia without affecting the viability, proliferation or activation of astrocytes. The efficacy of liposomal clodronate was much higher than that of previously reported methods used for decreasing microglial contamination. Furthermore, we observed rapid tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1b gene induction in conventional primary astrocyte

  5. Accumulation of silver nanoparticles by cultured primary brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Luther, Eva M; Koehler, Yvonne; Diendorf, Joerg; Epple, Matthias; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-09-16

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are components of various food industry products and are frequently used for medical equipment and materials. Although such particles enter the vertebrate brain, little is known on their biocompatibility for brain cells. To study the consequences of an AgNP exposure of brain cells we have treated astrocyte-rich primary cultures with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgNP. The incubation of cultured astrocytes with micromolar concentrations of AgNP for up to 24 h resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of silver, but did not compromise the cell viability nor lower the cellular glutathione content. In contrast, the incubation of astrocytes for 4 h with identical amounts of silver as AgNO(3) already severely compromised the cell viability and completely deprived the cells of glutathione. The accumulation of AgNP by astrocytes was proportional to the concentration of AgNP applied and significantly lowered by about 30% in the presence of the endocytosis inhibitors chloroquine or amiloride. Incubation at 4 °C reduced the accumulation of AgNP by 80% compared to the values obtained for cells that had been exposed to AgNP at 37 °C. These data demonstrate that viable cultured brain astrocytes efficiently accumulate PVP-coated AgNP in a temperature-dependent process that most likely involves endocytotic pathways.

  6. Accumulation of silver nanoparticles by cultured primary brain astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Eva M.; Koehler, Yvonne; Diendorf, Joerg; Epple, Matthias; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are components of various food industry products and are frequently used for medical equipment and materials. Although such particles enter the vertebrate brain, little is known on their biocompatibility for brain cells. To study the consequences of an AgNP exposure of brain cells we have treated astrocyte-rich primary cultures with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgNP. The incubation of cultured astrocytes with micromolar concentrations of AgNP for up to 24 h resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of silver, but did not compromise the cell viability nor lower the cellular glutathione content. In contrast, the incubation of astrocytes for 4 h with identical amounts of silver as AgNO3 already severely compromised the cell viability and completely deprived the cells of glutathione. The accumulation of AgNP by astrocytes was proportional to the concentration of AgNP applied and significantly lowered by about 30% in the presence of the endocytosis inhibitors chloroquine or amiloride. Incubation at 4 °C reduced the accumulation of AgNP by 80% compared to the values obtained for cells that had been exposed to AgNP at 37 °C. These data demonstrate that viable cultured brain astrocytes efficiently accumulate PVP-coated AgNP in a temperature-dependent process that most likely involves endocytotic pathways.

  7. Acute death of astrocytes in blast-exposed rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) affects civilians, soldiers, and veterans worldwide and presents significant health concerns. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration following bTBI remain elusive and current therapies are largely ineffective. It is important to better characterize blast-evoked cellular changes and underlying mechanisms in order to develop more effective therapies. In the present study, our group utilized rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) as an in vitro system to model bTBI. OHCs were exposed to either 138 ± 22 kPa (low) or 273 ± 23 kPa (high) overpressures using an open-ended helium-driven shock tube, or were assigned to sham control group. At 2 hours (h) following injury, we have characterized the astrocytic response to a blast overpressure. Immunostaining against the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed acute shearing and morphological changes in astrocytes, including clasmatodendrosis. Moreover, overlap of GFAP immunostaining and propidium iodide (PI) indicated astrocytic death. Quantification of the number of dead astrocytes per counting area in the hippocampal cornu Ammonis 1 region (CA1), demonstrated a significant increase in dead astrocytes in the low- and high-blast, compared to sham control OHCs. However only a small number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes were co-labeled with the apoptotic marker Annexin V, suggesting necrosis as the primary type of cell death in the acute phase following blast exposure. Moreover, western blot analyses revealed calpain mediated breakdown of GFAP. The dextran exclusion additionally indicated membrane disruption as a potential mechanism of acute astrocytic death. Furthermore, although blast exposure did not evoke significant changes in glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression, loss of GLT-1-expressing astrocytes suggests dysregulation of glutamate uptake following injury. Our data illustrate the profound effect of blast overpressure on astrocytes in OHCs at 2 h

  8. Acute death of astrocytes in blast-exposed rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna P; Shah, Alok S; Aperi, Brandy V; Kurpad, Shekar N; Stemper, Brian D; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) affects civilians, soldiers, and veterans worldwide and presents significant health concerns. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration following bTBI remain elusive and current therapies are largely ineffective. It is important to better characterize blast-evoked cellular changes and underlying mechanisms in order to develop more effective therapies. In the present study, our group utilized rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) as an in vitro system to model bTBI. OHCs were exposed to either 138 ± 22 kPa (low) or 273 ± 23 kPa (high) overpressures using an open-ended helium-driven shock tube, or were assigned to sham control group. At 2 hours (h) following injury, we have characterized the astrocytic response to a blast overpressure. Immunostaining against the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed acute shearing and morphological changes in astrocytes, including clasmatodendrosis. Moreover, overlap of GFAP immunostaining and propidium iodide (PI) indicated astrocytic death. Quantification of the number of dead astrocytes per counting area in the hippocampal cornu Ammonis 1 region (CA1), demonstrated a significant increase in dead astrocytes in the low- and high-blast, compared to sham control OHCs. However only a small number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes were co-labeled with the apoptotic marker Annexin V, suggesting necrosis as the primary type of cell death in the acute phase following blast exposure. Moreover, western blot analyses revealed calpain mediated breakdown of GFAP. The dextran exclusion additionally indicated membrane disruption as a potential mechanism of acute astrocytic death. Furthermore, although blast exposure did not evoke significant changes in glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression, loss of GLT-1-expressing astrocytes suggests dysregulation of glutamate uptake following injury. Our data illustrate the profound effect of blast overpressure on astrocytes in OHCs at 2 h

  9. Mitochondrial-dependent manganese neurotoxicity in rat primary astrocyte cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaoobao; Aschner, Judy L.; Santos, Ana Paula dos; Aschner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Chronic exposure to excessive levels of Mn results in a movement disorder termed manganism, which resembles Parkinson’s disease (PD). The pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder are not fully understood. Several lines of evidence implicate astrocytes as an early target of Mn neurotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Mn on mitochondrial function. Primary astrocyte cultures were prepared from cerebral cortices of one-day-old Sprague–Dawley rats. We have examined the cellular toxicity of Mn and its effects on the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activation of the precursor protein of caspase-3. The potentiometric dye, tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE), was used to assess the effect of Mn on astrocytic mitochondrial inner membrane potential (ΔΨm). Our studies show that, in a concentration-dependent manner, Mn induces significant (p<0.05) activation of astrocyte caspase-3 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK). Mn treatment (1 and 6 hrs) also significantly (p<0.01) dissipates the ΔΨm in astrocytes as evidenced by a decrease in mitochondrial TMRE fluorescence. These results suggest that activations of astrocytic caspase-3 and ERK are involved in Mn-induced neurotoxicity via mitochondrial-dependent pathways. PMID:18313649

  10. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  11. Carnosine modulates glutamine synthetase expression in senescent astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/recovery.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaojie; Wang, Bingyu; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Jingjing; Huang, Yuyan; Cao, Pei; Shen, Yao; Lyu, Jianxin

    2017-01-20

    Carnosine is believed to be neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia. However, few reports concern its function on senescent astrocytes during cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carnosine on cell damage and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in D-galactose-induced senescent astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/recovery (OGD/R). The results showed that OGD/R caused massive cell damage and a significant decrease in GS expression both in the young and senescent astrocytes. The GS expression level was partly recovered whereas it continued to decline in the recovery stage in the young and senescent astrocytes, respectively. Decreased GS expression significantly inhibited glutamate uptake and glutamine production and release. Carnosine prevented the cell damage, rescued the expression of GS and reversed the glutamate uptake activity and glutamine production in the senescent astrocytes exposed to OGD/R. The modulatory effect of carnosine on GS expression was partly antagonized by pyrilamine, a selective histamine H1 receptors antagonist, but not bestatin. Bisindolylmaleimide II, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of PKC could also reverse the action of carnosine on GS expression. Thus, histamine H1 receptors and PKC pathway may be involved in the modulatory action of carnosine in GS expression in the senescent astrocytes exposed to OGD/R.

  12. Effects of Ranolazine on Astrocytes and Neurons in Primary Culture.

    PubMed

    Aldasoro, Martin; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Mauricio, M Dolores; Vila, Jose M; Marchio, Patricia; Iradi, Antonio; Aldasoro, Constanza; Jorda, Adrian; Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L

    2016-01-01

    Ranolazine (Rn) is an antianginal agent used for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris when angina is not adequately controlled by other drugs. Rn also acts in the central nervous system and it has been proposed for the treatment of pain and epileptic disorders. Under the hypothesis that ranolazine could act as a neuroprotective drug, we studied its effects on astrocytes and neurons in primary culture. We incubated rat astrocytes and neurons in primary cultures for 24 hours with Rn (10-7, 10-6 and 10-5 M). Cell viability and proliferation were measured using trypan blue exclusion assay, MTT conversion assay and LDH release assay. Apoptosis was determined by Caspase 3 activity assay. The effects of Rn on pro-inflammatory mediators IL-β and TNF-α was determined by ELISA technique, and protein expression levels of Smac/Diablo, PPAR-γ, Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD by western blot technique. In cultured astrocytes, Rn significantly increased cell viability and proliferation at any concentration tested, and decreased LDH leakage, Smac/Diablo expression and Caspase 3 activity indicating less cell death. Rn also increased anti-inflammatory PPAR-γ protein expression and reduced pro-inflammatory proteins IL-1 β and TNFα levels. Furthermore, antioxidant proteins Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD significantly increased after Rn addition in cultured astrocytes. Conversely, Rn did not exert any effect on cultured neurons. In conclusion, Rn could act as a neuroprotective drug in the central nervous system by promoting astrocyte viability, preventing necrosis and apoptosis, inhibiting inflammatory phenomena and inducing anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents.

  13. Effects of Ranolazine on Astrocytes and Neurons in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, Martin; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Mauricio, Mª Dolores; Vila, Jose Mª; Marchio, Patricia; Iradi, Antonio; Aldasoro, Constanza; Jorda, Adrian; Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.

    2016-01-01

    Ranolazine (Rn) is an antianginal agent used for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris when angina is not adequately controlled by other drugs. Rn also acts in the central nervous system and it has been proposed for the treatment of pain and epileptic disorders. Under the hypothesis that ranolazine could act as a neuroprotective drug, we studied its effects on astrocytes and neurons in primary culture. We incubated rat astrocytes and neurons in primary cultures for 24 hours with Rn (10−7, 10−6 and 10−5 M). Cell viability and proliferation were measured using trypan blue exclusion assay, MTT conversion assay and LDH release assay. Apoptosis was determined by Caspase 3 activity assay. The effects of Rn on pro-inflammatory mediators IL-β and TNF-α was determined by ELISA technique, and protein expression levels of Smac/Diablo, PPAR-γ, Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD by western blot technique. In cultured astrocytes, Rn significantly increased cell viability and proliferation at any concentration tested, and decreased LDH leakage, Smac/Diablo expression and Caspase 3 activity indicating less cell death. Rn also increased anti-inflammatory PPAR-γ protein expression and reduced pro-inflammatory proteins IL-1 β and TNFα levels. Furthermore, antioxidant proteins Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD significantly increased after Rn addition in cultured astrocytes. Conversely, Rn did not exert any effect on cultured neurons. In conclusion, Rn could act as a neuroprotective drug in the central nervous system by promoting astrocyte viability, preventing necrosis and apoptosis, inhibiting inflammatory phenomena and inducing anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents. PMID:26950436

  14. Is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis a primary astrocytic disease?

    PubMed

    Sica, Roberto E

    2012-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is thought to be due to primary involvement of motor neurons. Pathogenic mechanisms underlying its appearance are relatively well known and include inflammation, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, protein damage, genetic abnormalities and type of neuronal death. Although these processes have been investigated in detail in the past two decades none of them appear to be the cause of the illness. In addition several possible environmental agents have been investigated but the results, in every case, were conflicting and therefore inconclusive. However, since the motor neurons display the features of apoptosis in this illness, the possibility remains that the motor neurons die because of a hostile environment, one that is unable to sustain their health, rather than being directly targeted themselves. The above considerations lead to an examination of astrocytes, for these cells play a key role in controlling the environment of neurons. It is known that astrocytes are exquisitely plastic, adapting their metabolism and behaviour to the needs of the neurons they contact. Each population of astrocytes is therefore unique and, were one to be adversely affected at the start of a disease process, the consequences would extend to the neurons that it normally chaperoned. The disturbed relationship might involve inappropriate production and secretion of astrocytic neurotransmitters, defective transport of glutamate and impaired trophic and metabolic support of the motor neurons. In order to explain the spread of weakness and pyramidal signs in ALS patients, which is very often from one group of muscles to a neighbouring one, it is postulated that, within the spinal cord, the brainstem and the motor cortex, the disease-causing process is also spreading-in this case, from one group of astrocytes to its neighbours. A misfolded protein, possibly a prion-like protein, would be a candidate for this type of transmission.

  15. Astrocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the astrocytes' function as equal partners with neurons in both the normal and the abnormal brain. Discusses the developmental scaffolds, inert scar tissue, Huntington's disease, psychiatric disorders, and the identification of these brain cells. (RT)

  16. Astrocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the astrocytes' function as equal partners with neurons in both the normal and the abnormal brain. Discusses the developmental scaffolds, inert scar tissue, Huntington's disease, psychiatric disorders, and the identification of these brain cells. (RT)

  17. Activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway attenuates lanthanum chloride induced injuries in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijin; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; Jin, Cuihong; Lu, Xiaobo; Hu, Xiaoyu; Sun, Yaling; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Yuan

    2017-08-16

    Lanthanum (La) exposure can lead to learning and memory disorder in animals; however, the underlying mechanism of La induced neurotoxicity is still unknown. It has been demonstrated that Nrf2 activation by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) results in neuroprotection against brain injuries. However, little study has been done with respect to its effect on La induced neurotoxicity. Herein, experiments are undertaken to determine if there is a correlation between La damaged astrocytes and the Nrf2/ARE signalling pathway. Primary rat astrocytes are exposed to 0 mmol L(-1), 0.125 mmol L(-1), 0.25 mmol L(-1) and 0.5 mmol L(-1) lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) for 24 hours. The results reveal that LaCl3 increases the apoptosis/necrosis rate of astrocytes, decreases the glutathione (GSH) content, increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and significantly down-regulates Nrf2 as well as the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2-regulated genes, including NADP(H): dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO1), hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GSH-Px1), glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and γ-glutamine cysteine synthase (γ-GCS) in astrocytes. In addition, it is found that tBHQ displays an antagonistic effect on astrocytes damaged by LaCl3. Therefore, La damaged astrocytes are possibly related to the down-regulated Nrf2/ARE pathway, and treatment with tBHQ clearly activates the Nrf2/ARE signalling pathway, which exerts protection against oxidative stress.

  18. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures.

    PubMed

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-06-13

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes.

  19. 3-bromopyruvate inhibits glycolysis, depletes cellular glutathione, and compromises the viability of cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ehrke, Eric; Arend, Christian; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an electrophilic alkylator that is considered a promising anticancer drug because it has been shown to kill cancer cells efficiently while having little toxic effect on nontumor cells. To test for potential adverse effects of 3-BP on brain cells, we exposed cultured primary rat astrocytes to 3-BP and investigated the effects of this compound on cell viability, glucose metabolism, and glutathione (GSH) content. The presence of 3-BP severely compromised cell viability and slowed cellular glucose consumption and lactate production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 100 µM 3-BP after 4 hr of incubation. The cellular hexokinase activity was not affected in 3-BP-treated astrocytes, whereas within 30 min after application of 3-BP the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was inhibited, and cellular GSH content was depleted in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 30 µM 3-BP. The depletion of cellular GSH after exposure to 100 µM 3-BP was not prevented by the presence of 10 mM of the monocarboxylates lactate or pyruvate, suggesting that 3-BP is not taken up into astrocytes predominantly by monocarboxylate transporters. The data suggest that inhibition of glycolysis by inactivation of GAPDH and GSH depletion contributes to the toxicity that was observed for 3-BP-treated cultured astrocytes.

  20. Toxicity of organotin compounds in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Röhl, C; Gülden, M; Seibert, H

    2001-01-01

    The neurotoxic organotin compounds trimethyl (TMT) and triethyltin (TET) are known to induce astrogliosis in vivo, which is indicated by an increased synthesis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in astrocytes. In contrast, tributyltin (TBT) does not induce astrogliosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether trialkyltin derivatives can induce an increased GFAP synthesis in astrocyte cultures in the absence of neurons and whether differences between the action of TMT, TET, and TBT can be detected. Primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes from 2-day-old rats were grown in 96-well plates until confluency and then exposed to various concentrations of TMT, TET, and TBT for 40 h. Effects on basal cell functions were measured by colorimetric determination of cell protein contents and by assessment of viability by means of the MTT assay. An indirect sandwich ELISA for 96-well plates was used for quantitative measurements of the GFAP content of the cells. All three compounds induced a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity indicated by parallel decreases of protein contents and MTT reduction. Half-maximum cytotoxic concentrations were 3 micromol/L (TBT), 30 micromol/L (TET), and 800 micromol/L (TMT). Cellular GFAP contents were reduced in parallel to cytotoxic action but no increase in GFAP expression at subcytotoxic concentrations could be observed. Thus, the astrocytes were not able to respond to TMT or TET exposure by an increased synthesis of GFAP in the absence of neuronal signals.

  1. Exposure to Cell Phone Radiation Up-Regulates Apoptosis Genes in Primary Cultures of Neurons and Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tian-Yong; Zou, Shi-Ping; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2007-01-01

    The health effects of cell phone radiation exposure are a growing public concern. This study investigated whether expression of genes related to cell death pathways are dysregulated in primary cultured neurons and astrocytes by exposure to a working GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) cell phone rated at a frequency of 1900 MHz. Primary cultures were exposed to cell phone emissions for 2 hrs. We used array analysis and real-time RT-PCR to show up-regulation of caspase-2, caspase-6 and Asc (apoptosis associated speck-like protein containing a card) gene expression in neurons and astrocytes. Upregulation occurred in both “on” and “stand-by” modes in neurons, but only in “on” mode in astrocytes. Additionally, astrocytes showed up-regulation of the Bax gene. The effects are specific since up-regulation was not seen for other genes associated with apoptosis, such as caspase-9 in either neurons and astrocytes, or Bax in neurons. The results show that even relatively short-term exposure to cell phone radiofrequency emissions can up-regulate elements of apoptotic pathways in cells derived from the brain, and that neurons appear to be more sensitive to this effect than astrocytes. PMID:17187929

  2. Exposure to cell phone radiation up-regulates apoptosis genes in primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tian-Yong; Zou, Shi-Ping; Knapp, Pamela E

    2007-01-22

    The health effects of cell phone radiation exposure are a growing public concern. This study investigated whether expression of genes related to cell death pathways are dysregulated in primary cultured neurons and astrocytes by exposure to a working Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) cell phone rated at a frequency of 1900MHz. Primary cultures were exposed to cell phone emissions for 2h. We used array analysis and real-time RT-PCR to show up-regulation of caspase-2, caspase-6 and Asc (apoptosis associated speck-like protein containing a card) gene expression in neurons and astrocytes. Up-regulation occurred in both "on" and "stand-by" modes in neurons, but only in "on" mode in astrocytes. Additionally, astrocytes showed up-regulation of the Bax gene. The effects are specific since up-regulation was not seen for other genes associated with apoptosis, such as caspase-9 in either neurons or astrocytes, or Bax in neurons. The results show that even relatively short-term exposure to cell phone radiofrequency emissions can up-regulate elements of apoptotic pathways in cells derived from the brain, and that neurons appear to be more sensitive to this effect than astrocytes.

  3. The expression and activity of KV3.4 channel subunits are precociously upregulated in astrocytes exposed to Aβ oligomers and in astrocytes of Alzheimer's disease Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Francesca; Pannaccione, Anna; Ciccone, Roselia; Casamassa, Antonella; Franco, Cristina; Piccialli, Ilaria; de Rosa, Valeria; Vinciguerra, Antonio; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Annunziato, Lucio

    2017-06-01

    Astrocyte dysfunction emerges early in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may contribute to its pathology and progression. Recently, the voltage gated potassium channel KV3.4 subunit, which underlies the fast-inactivating K(+) currents, has been recognized to be relevant for AD pathogenesis and is emerging as a new target candidate for AD. In the present study, we investigated both in in vitro and in vivo models of AD the expression and functional activity of KV3.4 potassium channel subunits in astrocytes. In primary astrocytes our biochemical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological studies demonstrated a time-dependent upregulation of KV3.4 expression and functional activity after exposure to amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers. Consistently, astrocytic KV3.4 expression was upregulated in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of 6-month-old Tg2576 mice. Further, confocal triple labeling studies revealed that in 6-month-old Tg2576 mice, KV3.4 was intensely coexpressed with Aβ in nonplaque associated astrocytes. Interestingly, in the cortical and hippocampal regions of 12-month-old Tg2576 mice, plaque-associated astrocytes much more intensely expressed KV3.4 subunits, but not Aβ. More important, we evidenced that the selective knockdown of KV3.4 expression significantly downregulated both glial fibrillary acidic protein levels and Aβ trimers in the brain of 6-month-old Tg2576 mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the expression and function of KV3.4 channel subunits are precociously upregulated in cultured astrocytes exposed to Aβ oligomers and in reactive astrocytes of AD Tg2576 mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Protective Effect of Edaravone against Carbon Monoxide Induced Apoptosis in Rat Primary Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Ke; Tu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To observe the protective effect of edaravone (Eda) on astrocytes after prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) and further to investigate the potential mechanisms of Eda against CO-induced apoptosis. Methods. The rat primary cultured astrocytes were cultured in vitro and exposed to 1% CO for 24 h after being cultured with different concentrations of Eda. MTT assay was used to detect the cytotoxicity of CO. Flow cytometry was used to detect the apoptosis rate, membrane potential of mitochondria, and ROS level. The mRNA and protein expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting analysis, respectively. Results. Eda can significantly suppress cytotoxicity of CO, and it can significantly increase membrane potential of mitochondria and Bcl-2 expressions and significantly suppress the apoptosis rate, ROS level, Bax, and caspase-3 expressions. Conclusion. Eda protects against CO-induced apoptosis in rat primary cultured astrocytes through decreasing ROS production and subsequently inhibiting mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:28261501

  5. ATP stimulates calcium influx in primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, J.T.; van Breemen, C.; Forster, E.; Norenberg, L.O.; Norenberg, M.D.

    1988-12-30

    The effect of ATP and other purines on /sup 45/Ca uptake was studied in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Treatment of the cells with ATP for 1 to 30 min brought about an increase in cellular /sup 45/Ca. Stimulation of calcium influx by ATP was investigated using a 90 sec exposure to /sup 45/Ca and over a concentration range of 0.1 nM to 3 mM; a biphasic dose-response curve was obtained with EC50 values of 0.3 nM and 9 uM, indicating the presence of low and high affinity purinergic binding sites. Similar levels of /sup 45/Ca influx at 90 sec were observed with ATP, ADP and adenosine (all at 100 uM). Prior treatment of the cultures with LaCl3 blocked the purine-induced /sup 45/Ca influx. These findings indicate that one pathway for calcium entry in astrocytes involves purinergic receptor-operated, calcium channels.

  6. Primary cerebral and cerebellar astrocytes display differential sensitivity to extracellular sodium with significant effects on apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomohiko; Makinodan, Manabu; Fukami, Shin-ichi; Toritsuka, Michihiro; Ikawa, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasunori; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis is one of the idiopathic or iatrogenic brain dysfunction, and the most common cause is excessively rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. While myelin disruption is the main pathology, as the diagnostic name indicates, a previous study has reported that astrocyte death precedes the destruction of the myelin sheath after the rapid correction of chronic low Na(+) levels, and interestingly, certain brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, etc.) are specifically damaged but not cerebellum. Here, using primary astrocyte cultures derived from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum, we examined how extracellular Na(+) alterations affect astrocyte death and whether the response is different between the two populations of astrocytes. Twice the amount of extracellular [Na(+) ] and voltage-gated Na(+) channel opening induced substantial apoptosis in both populations of astrocytes, while, in contrast, one half [Na(+) ] prevented apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes, in which the Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger, NCX2, was highly expressed but not in cerebral astrocytes. Strikingly, the rapid correction of chronic one half [Na(+) ] exposure significantly increased apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes but not in cerebral astrocytes. These results indicate that extracellular [Na(+) ] affects astrocyte apoptosis, and the response to alterations in [Na(+) ] is dependent on the brain region from which the astrocyte is derived.

  7. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial-neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, a most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. PMID:24342266

  8. Molecular and functional characterisation of glutamate transporters in rat cortical astrocytes exposed to a defined combination of growth factors during in vitro differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Céline; Najimi, Mustapha; Maloteaux, Jean-Marie; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    In vitro culture of astroglial progenitors can be obtained from early post-natal brain tissues and several methods have been reported for promoting their maturation into differentiated astrocytes. Hence, a combination of several nutriments/growth factors -- the G5 supplement (insulin, transferrin, selenite, biotin, hydrocortisone, fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor) -- is widely used as a culture additive favouring the growth, differentiation and maturation of primary cultured astrocytes. Considering the key role played by glial cells in the clearance of glutamate in the synapses, cultured astrocytes are frequently used as a model for the study of glutamate transporters. Indeed, it has been shown that when tested separately, growth factors influence the expression and activity of the GLAST and GLT-1. The present study aimed at characterising the functional expression of these transporters during the time course of differentiation of cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to the supplement G5. After a few days, the vast majority of cells exposed to this supplement adopted a typical stellate morphology (fibrous or type II astrocytes) and showed intense expression of the glial fibrillary acidic protein. Both RT-PCR and immunoblotting studies revealed that the expression of both GLAST and GLT-1 rapidly increased in these cells. While this was correlated with a significant increase in specific uptake of radiolabelled aspartate, fluorescence monitoring of the Na+ influx associated with glutamate transporters activity revealed that the exposure to the G5 supplement considerably increased the percentage of cells participating in the uptake. Biochemical and pharmacological studies revealed that this activity did not involve GLT-1 but most likely reflected an increase in GLAST-mediated uptake. Together, these data indicate that the addition of this classical combination of growth factors and nutriments drives the rapid differentiation toward a homogenous

  9. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide Induced MCP-1 Expression in Primary Astrocyte.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Davis, Jacques R J; Wu, Zhi-Lin; Faez Abdelgawad, Amro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neuroinflammation which presents as a possible mechanism of delirium is associated with MCP-1, an important proinflammatory factor which is expressed on astrocytes. It is known that dexmedetomidine (DEX) possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of DEX on the production of MCP-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. Materials and Methods. Astrocytes were treated with LPS (10 ng/ml, 50 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1000 ng/ml), DEX (500 ng/mL), LPS (100 ng/ml), and DEX (10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for a duration of three hours; expression levels of MCP-1 were measured by real-time PCR. The double immunofluorescence staining protocol was utilized to determine the expression of α2-adrenoceptors (α2AR) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on astrocytes. Results. Expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in astrocytes were induced dose-dependently by LPS. Administration of DEX significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 mRNA (P < 0.001). Double immunofluorescence assay showed that α2AR colocalize with GFAP, which indicates the expression of α2-adrenoceptors in astrocytes. Conclusions. DEX is a potent suppressor of MCP-1 in astrocytes induced with lipopolysaccharide through α2A-adrenergic receptors, which potentially explains its beneficial effects in the treatment of delirium by attenuating neuroinflammation.

  10. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide Induced MCP-1 Expression in Primary Astrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Faez Abdelgawad, Amro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neuroinflammation which presents as a possible mechanism of delirium is associated with MCP-1, an important proinflammatory factor which is expressed on astrocytes. It is known that dexmedetomidine (DEX) possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of DEX on the production of MCP-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. Materials and Methods. Astrocytes were treated with LPS (10 ng/ml, 50 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1000 ng/ml), DEX (500 ng/mL), LPS (100 ng/ml), and DEX (10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for a duration of three hours; expression levels of MCP-1 were measured by real-time PCR. The double immunofluorescence staining protocol was utilized to determine the expression of α2-adrenoceptors (α2AR) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on astrocytes. Results. Expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in astrocytes were induced dose-dependently by LPS. Administration of DEX significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 mRNA (P < 0.001). Double immunofluorescence assay showed that α2AR colocalize with GFAP, which indicates the expression of α2-adrenoceptors in astrocytes. Conclusions. DEX is a potent suppressor of MCP-1 in astrocytes induced with lipopolysaccharide through α2A-adrenergic receptors, which potentially explains its beneficial effects in the treatment of delirium by attenuating neuroinflammation. PMID:28286770

  11. Furin mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor upregulation in cultured rat astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Junjian; Deng, Min

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and the role of furin in BDNF maturation in reactive astrocytes from rats exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Furin, a proprotein convertase, is upregulated and cleaves certain substrates during hypoxia in cancer cells. In addition, during hypoxia in the central nervous system, astrocytes become reactive and release BDNF to protect neurons. Maturation of BDNF in astrocytes requires furin-mediated endoproteolytic processing of the precursor protein pro-BDNF to BDNF. To expand our knowledge about the role of furin in BDNF maturation in astrocytes, these cells were exposed to OGD, and expression of furin and BDNF was detected by Western blot analysis. Changes in BDNF expression were observed when furin activity was inhibited by furin prosegment. We found that protein expression of BDNF and furin was upregulated, and this upregulation correlated with OGD stimulation. Furin inhibition reduced BDNF maturation and secretion. These results indicate that furin mediates the upregulation of BDNF in reactive astrocytes exposed to OGD and that furin may impact the biological effect of reactive astrocytes.

  12. Inhibitory effect of the antidepressant imipramine on NF-κB-dependent CXCL1 expression in TNFα-exposed astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Han; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Yeni; Lim, Yoongho; Ha, Kyooseob; Shin, Soon Young

    2012-04-01

    Neuroinflammation is associated with the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases. Emerging evidence indicates that imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant commonly used in depressive disorders, exhibits neuroprotective activity partly through anti-inflammatory effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying imipramine-mediated anti-inflammatory response are poorly understood. In this study, rat primary cultured astrocytes were used to elucidate the effect of the imipramine on TNFα-induced inflammatory responses. The results clearly demonstrated that imipramine reduced TNFα-induced CXCL1 expression through suppression of NF-κB-dependent CXCL1 promoter activity in primary astrocytes. In addition, we found that imipramine suppressed TNFα-induced phosphorylation of inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) and p65/RelA nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), as well as the nuclear translocation of p65/RelA in primary cultured astrocytes. Chemotaxis assay demonstrated that astrocyte-derived CXCL1 contributed to migration of BV2 microglial cells toward astrocytes. This response was significantly blocked by treatment of astrocytes with imipramine or NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. This study indicates that the antidepressant imipramine inhibits TNFα-induced CXCL1 expression via down-regulation of NF-κB signaling pathway in astrocytes and suggests that imipramine has a potential as an anti-inflammatory drug.

  13. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  14. Astrocytes As the Main Players in Primary Degenerative Disorders of the Human Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Capani, Francisco; Quarracino, Cecilia; Caccuri, Roberto; Sica, Roberto E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Along the last years it has been demonstrated that non-neural cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the primary degenerative disorders (PDDs) of the human central nervous system. Among them, astrocytes coordinate and participate in many different and complex metabolic processes, in close interaction with neurons. Moreover, increasing experimental evidence hints an early astrocytic dysfunction in these diseases. In this mini review we summarize the astrocytic behavior in PDDs, with special consideration to the experimental observations where astrocytic pathology precedes the development of neuronal dysfunction. We also suggest a different approach that could be consider in human investigations in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. We believe that the study of PDDs with human brain samples may hold the key of a paradigmatic physiopathological process in which astrocytes might be the main players. PMID:26973519

  15. Astrocytes As the Main Players in Primary Degenerative Disorders of the Human Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Capani, Francisco; Quarracino, Cecilia; Caccuri, Roberto; Sica, Roberto E P

    2016-01-01

    Along the last years it has been demonstrated that non-neural cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the primary degenerative disorders (PDDs) of the human central nervous system. Among them, astrocytes coordinate and participate in many different and complex metabolic processes, in close interaction with neurons. Moreover, increasing experimental evidence hints an early astrocytic dysfunction in these diseases. In this mini review we summarize the astrocytic behavior in PDDs, with special consideration to the experimental observations where astrocytic pathology precedes the development of neuronal dysfunction. We also suggest a different approach that could be consider in human investigations in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. We believe that the study of PDDs with human brain samples may hold the key of a paradigmatic physiopathological process in which astrocytes might be the main players.

  16. Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell damage and inflammation by suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Liu, Yi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Ben; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-11-01

    Astrocyte inflammation plays important roles both in physiological and pathological processes in the central nervous system (CNS). Ischemic injury in the CNS causes damage to astrocytes and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6. This current study investigates whether mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) inhibits oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced cell damage and inflammatory cytokine secretion by suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat primary astrocytes. We found that MANF alleviated OGD-induced astrocyte damage and rescued the cell viability, and the upregulation of GRP78 (endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker) and NF-κB p65 (one of the central mediators of proinflammatory pathways) induced by OGD were significantly reduced by preincubation of MANF. In addition, the increases of secretion and mRNA expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in astrocytes induced by OGD were significantly suppressed by MANF. These findings demonstrate that MANF shows the potential to alleviate cell damage and inflammation in rat primary astrocytes by suppressing ER stress, indicating that MANF plays an important role in astrocyte inflammation and functioning and may suggest a promising strategy for neuroprotection in the CNS.

  17. Higher Vulnerability of Menadione-Exposed Cortical Astrocytes of Glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficient Mice to Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Cell Death: Implications for the Neurodegeneration in Glutaric Aciduria Type I.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Seminotti, Bianca; Zanatta, Ângela; de Mello Gonçalves, Aline; Bellaver, Bruna; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Quincozes-Santos, André; Goodman, Stephen Irwin; Woontner, Michael; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Wajner, Moacir

    2017-08-01

    Patients affected by glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I) show progressive cortical leukoencephalopathy whose pathogenesis is poorly known. In the present work, we exposed cortical astrocytes of wild-type (Gcdh (+/+) ) and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase knockout (Gcdh (-/-) ) mice to the oxidative stress inducer menadione and measured mitochondrial bioenergetics, redox homeostasis, and cell viability. Mitochondrial function (MTT and JC1-mitochondrial membrane potential assays), redox homeostasis (DCFH oxidation, nitrate and nitrite production, GSH concentrations and activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and GPx), and cell death (propidium iodide incorporation) were evaluated in primary cortical astrocyte cultures of Gcdh (+/+) and Gcdh (-/-) mice unstimulated and stimulated by menadione. We also measured the pro-inflammatory response (TNFα levels, IL1-β and NF-ƙB) in unstimulated astrocytes obtained from these mice. Gcdh (-/-) mice astrocytes were more vulnerable to menadione-induced oxidative stress (decreased GSH concentrations and altered activities of the antioxidant enzymes), mitochondrial dysfunction (decrease of MTT reduction and JC1 values), and cell death as compared with Gcdh (+/+) astrocytes. A higher inflammatory response (TNFα, IL1-β and NF-ƙB) was also observed in Gcdh (-/-) mice astrocytes. These data indicate a higher susceptibility of Gcdh (-/-) cortical astrocytes to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, probably leading to cell death. It is presumed that these pathomechanisms may contribute to the cortical leukodystrophy observed in GA-I patients.

  18. Evaluation of PFOS-mediated neurotoxicity in rat primary neurons and astrocytes cultured separately or in co-culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenwei; Liu, Qi; Liu, Chang; Li, Chunna; Li, Yachen; Li, Shuangyue; Liu, Xiaohui; Shao, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a potential neurotoxicant reported by epidemiological investigations and experimental studies, while the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes not only support for the construction of neurons, but also conduct neuronal functions through glutamate-glutamine cycle in astrocyte-neuron crosstalk. In the present study, the effect of PFOS exposure on rat primary hippocampal neurons or cortex astrocytes was evaluated. Then the role of the astrocytes in PFOS-induced toxic effect on neurons was explored with astrocyte-neuron co-culture system. Exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons to PFOS has led to oxidation-antioxidation imbalance, increased apoptosis and abnormal autophagy. The adverse effect of PFOS on rat primary cortex astrocytes manifested in the form of altered extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, decreased glutamine synthase activity, as well as decreased gene expression of glutamine synthase, glutamate transporters and glutamine transporters in the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Especially, the alleviation of PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in neurons could be observed in astrocyte-neuron co-culture system, though the ability of astrocytes in fostering neurite outgrowth was affected by PFOS. These results indicated that both astrocytes and neurons might be the targets of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity, and astrocytes could protect against PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in primary cultured neurons. Our research might render some information in explaining the mechanisms of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity.

  19. HIV-1 increases TLR responses in human primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Serramía, M Jesús; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Álvarez, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the major glial cell within the central nervous system and have a number of important physiological properties related to brain homeostasis. They provide trophic support to neurons and are immune cells with key roles during states-of-inflammation. The potential for production of proinflammatory cytokines and its consequences has been studied in the context of HIV-1 infection of normal human astrocytes (NHA). NHA express TLR3, TLR4, and TLR5. TLR3 ligation induced the strongest proinflammatory polarizing response, characterized by generation of high levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8. HIV-1 increased the transient production of key inflammatory mediators, and exposure to LPS of HIV-1-infected cells increased significantly the cytokine secretion. We confirmed that it is necessary viral gene expression from the moment of pretreatment with antiretrovirals inhibited totally HIV-1-induced TLR response. The higher response to LPS from HIV-1-infected cells did not correlate with TLR4 or MyD88 increased expression. LPS responsiveness of infected cells parallels MHC class II expression, but not CD14. HIV-1-infected NHA present increased sensitivity to the proinflammatory effects of LPS. If this phenomenon occurs in vivo, it will contribute to the immunopathogenesis of this disease and may ultimately offer novel targets for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:26671458

  20. Differential response to acrylonitrile toxicity in rat primary astrocytes and microglia

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubber and acrylamide. While acute high level exposures to ACN are known to be lethal, chronic low dose exposures causes glial cell tumors in rats. Recently, these glial tumors have been characterized as microglial in origin. While effects of ACN on astrocytes, the more numerous glial cell, have been investigated, the effects on microglia are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the responses of astrocytes and microglia to ACN treatment in vitro to address differential sensitivities and adaptive responses to this toxic chemical. Cell viability, ACN uptake, lipid peroxidation byproducts (F2-isoprostanes), glutathione (GSH) levels and expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were evaluated in primary rat microglia and astrocytes following ACN treatment. Results indicate that microglia are more sensitive to ACN than astrocytes, accumulating less ACN while demonstrating higher F2-isoprostane levels. GSH levels were up-regulated in both cell types, as a protective mechanism against ACN-induced oxidative stress, while Nrf2 levels were only induced in microglia. Our data suggest that microglia and astrocytes exhibit different sensitivities and responses to ACN, which are linked to the intracellular thiol status inherent to each of these cell types. PMID:23628792

  1. Differential response to acrylonitrile toxicity in rat primary astrocytes and microglia.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubber and acrylamide. While acute high level exposures to ACN are known to be lethal, chronic low dose exposures causes glial cell tumors in rats. Recently, these glial tumors have been characterized as microglial in origin. While effects of ACN on astrocytes, the more numerous glial cell, have been investigated, the effects on microglia are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the responses of astrocytes and microglia to ACN treatment in vitro to address differential sensitivities and adaptive responses to this toxic chemical. Cell viability, ACN uptake, lipid peroxidation byproducts (F2-isoprostanes), glutathione (GSH) levels and expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were evaluated in primary rat microglia and astrocytes following ACN treatment. Results indicate that microglia are more sensitive to ACN than astrocytes, accumulating less ACN while demonstrating higher F2-isoprostane levels. GSH levels were up-regulated in both cell types, as a protective mechanism against ACN-induced oxidative stress, while Nrf2 levels were only induced in microglia. Our data suggest that microglia and astrocytes exhibit different sensitivities and responses to ACN, which are linked to the intracellular thiol status inherent to each of these cell types.

  2. Differential inflammatory response to acrylonitrile in rat primary astrocytes and microglia.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel W; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is extensively used in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles and other commercial products. Chronic low dose exposures to ACN cause glial cell tumors in rats, primarily microglial in origin. Recently it has been determined that astrocytes and microglia respond to ACN-induced oxidative stress differently, which may influence cell-specific activation of inflammatory and carcinogenic pathways. This study was conducted to compare the inflammatory responses of astrocytes and microglia following ACN treatment in vitro to further characterize differential sensitivities and adaptive responses in these cell types. Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and p53 levels were measured along with levels of 12 different cytokines and chemokines in primary rat microglia and astrocytes. Additionally levels of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were measured to evaluate the cells' ability to metabolize ACN. Results indicate that while both cells upregulate p53 and NF-κB, the cytokines and chemokines produced differ between the cell types. Astrocytes, but not microglia, upregulated CYP2E1 in response to ACN, which may be due to the astrocytes accumulating more ACN than the microglia. Altogether our data implicate the inflammatory response as an important event in ACN-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Assessment of mitochondrial electron transport chain function in a primary astrocyte cell model of hyperhomocystinaemia.

    PubMed

    Turkes, Fiona; Murphy, Elaine; Land, John; Demiray, Berna; Duberley, Kate; Briddon, Antony; Hargreaves, Iain

    2013-07-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) has been detected in patients with various neurodegenerative conditions. Studies on neurones and cerebral tissue have revealed that hyperhomocystinaemia may inhibit mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enzyme activity resulting in neuronal morbidity. As astrocytes convey a protective and supportive role towards neurones, we postulated that Hcy-induced astrocytic ETC inhibition may contribute to neurological dysfunction. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we established a cellular model of hyperhomocystinaemia using primary rat astrocytes. Which were incubated were incubated with 200 µM, 500 µM Hcy and the Hcy metabolite, thiolactone (10 µM). Following 96 h of incubation with 200 µM and 500 µM Hcy, an approximate two-fold (1.11 nmol/mg) and three-fold (1.45 nmol/mg) increase in mitochondrial levels of Hcy, respectively, were detected compared to control levels (0.54 nmol/mg). However, on exposure to Hcy (200 or 500 µM) and Hcy-thiolactone (10 µM), the activities of astrocytic ETC complex I, II-III and IV were found to be comparable to control levels. In addition, the extracellular lactate:pyruvate ratio and the intracellular glutathione status of primary rat astrocytes were not significantly different between Hcy (200 or 500 µM) treated and controls. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that Hcy induced impairment of astrocytic ETC function may not contribute to the pathophysiology of hyperhomocystinaemia.

  4. Ginsenosides attenuate methylglyoxal-induced impairment of insulin signaling and subsequent apoptosis in primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chu, John M T; Lee, Dicky K M; Wong, Daniella P K; Wong, Ricky N S; Yung, Ken K L; Cheng, Christopher H K; Yue, Kevin K M

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), which is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, is known to increase the risk of neurodegeneration. In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia could cause insulin resistance and neurodegeneration in various cells including neurons and astrocytes. Hyperglycemia is also known to result in the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) Methylglyoxal (MG) is one of the most reactive AGE precursors in which its abnormal accumulation is usually found in diabetic patients and induces neuronal cell death in central nervous system. Ginseng is a herb that has been widely used to treat various diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. Ginsenosides, the pharmacologically active component isolated from ginseng, have been shown to have cryoprotective effects in different neural cells. In the present study we investigated the effects of MG in disturbing insulin signaling and leading to further cellular apoptosis in rat primary astrocytes. Furthermore, the protective effects of different subtypes of ginsenosides were studied. From the results, impairment of insulin signaling was found in astrocytes under MG treatment. Moreover, cleavage of caspase and Poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) was observed in line with insulin signaling disruption, showing the neurotoxic effects of MG towards astrocytes. The effects of ginsenosides in MG treated astrocytes were also investigated. After treatment, ginsenosides Rd and R-Rh2 were shown to ameliorate the cell viability of MG-treated astrocytes. In addition, Rd and R-Rh2 could improve insulin signaling and inhibit apoptosis, indicating that Rd, R-Rh2 and related compounds may have therapeutic potential in treating diabetes-induced neurodegeneration.

  5. African and Asian Zika virus strains differentially induce early antiviral responses in primary human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Ferraris, Pauline; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Diop, Fodé; Talignani, Loïc; Pompon, Julien; Garcia, Déborah; Liégeois, Florian; Sall, Amadou A; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2017-04-01

    ZIKA virus (ZIKV) is a newly emerging arbovirus. Since its discovery 60years ago in Uganda, it has spread throughout the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, emphasizing the capacity of ZIKV to spread to non-endemic regions worldwide. Although infection with ZIKV often leads to mild disease, its recent emergence in the Americas has coincided with an increase in adults developing Guillain-Barré syndrome and neurological complications in new-borns, such as congenital microcephaly. Many questions remain unanswered regarding the complications caused by different primary isolates of ZIKV. Here, we report the permissiveness of primary human astrocytes for two clinically relevant, Asian and African ZIKV strains and show that both isolates strongly induce antiviral immune responses in these cells albeit with markedly different kinetics. This study describes for the first time the specific antiviral gene expression in infected primary human astrocytes, the major glial cells within the central nervous system.

  6. Manganese accumulation in membrane fractions of primary astrocytes is associated with decreased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake, and is exacerbated by oleic acid and palmitate.

    PubMed

    Fordahl, Steve C; Erikson, Keith M

    2014-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) exposure interferes with GABA uptake; however, the effects of Mn on GABA transport proteins (GATs) have not been identified. We sought to characterize how Mn impairs GAT function in primary rat astrocytes. Astrocytes exposed to Mn (500 μM) had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake despite no change in membrane or cytosolic GAT3 protein levels. Co-treatment with 100 μM oleic or palmitic acids (both known to be elevated in Mn neurotoxicity), exacerbated the Mn-induced decline in (3)H-GABA uptake. Mn accumulation in the membrane fraction of astrocytes was enhanced with fatty acid administration, and was negatively correlated with (3)H-GABA uptake. Furthermore, control cells exposed to Mn only during the experimental uptake had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake, and the addition of GABA (50 μM) blunted cytosolic Mn accumulation. These data indicate that reduced GAT function in astrocytes is influenced by Mn and fatty acids accumulating at or interacting with the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Olfactory ensheathing cell-conditioned medium protects astrocytes exposed to hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Jinbo, Liu; Zhiyuan, Liu; Zhijian, Zhang; WenGe, Ding

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of olfactory ensheathing cell conditioned medium (OECCM) on damaged astrocytes after exposure to H2O2 in vitro. OECCM was used to treat astrocytes after injury, which was induced by exposure to 500 μmol/L H2O2 for 20 min. The cell morphology was then observed under a light microscope, cell viability assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell ultrastructure observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and apoptosis assessed by Annexin V staining followed by cytometry and Western blot. H2O2 induced severe damage to astrocytes as evidenced by decreased cell number, pathological changes in cell morphology, and significantly elevated cell apoptosis. Cells incubated with OECCM displayed significantly improved cell viability and decreased cell apoptotic rate. Under TEM, H2O2-treated cells showed partially broken plasma membranes, swollen rough endoplasmic reticula, visible vacuoles, and swollen or deformed mitochondria with ruptured cristae. Incubation with OECCM significantly ameliorated these pathological changes in astrocytes. These results suggest that OECCM may protect astrocytes from oxidative damage by promoting cell survival while reducing apoptosis of the damaged cells.

  8. Measurement of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in mouse primary neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sofia M; Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Danial, Nika N

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of microplate-based assays that measure extracellular fluxes in intact, living cells has revolutionized the field of cellular bioenergetics. Here, we describe a method for real time assessment of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in primary mouse cortical neurons and astrocytes. This method requires the Extracellular Flux Analyzer Instrument (XF24, Seahorse Biosciences), which uses fluorescent oxygen sensors in a microplate assay format.

  9. Effects of cholesterol transport inhibitor U18666A on APP metabolism in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Kar, Satyabrata

    2017-11-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) play an important role in the degeneration of neurons and development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Current evidence indicates that high levels of cholesterol-which increase the risk of developing AD-can influence Aβ production in neurons. However, it remains unclear how altered level/subcellular distribution of cholesterol in astrocytes can influence APP metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of cholesterol transport inhibitor U18666A-a class II amphiphile that triggers redistribution of cholesterol within the endosomal-lysosomal (EL) system-on APP levels and metabolism in rat primary cultured astrocytes. Our results revealed that U18666A increased the levels of the APP holoprotein and its cleaved products (α-/β-/η-CTFs) in cultured astrocytes, without altering the total levels of cholesterol or cell viability. The cellular levels of Aβ1-40 were also found to be markedly increased, while secretory levels of Aβ1-40 were decreased in U18666A-treated astrocytes. We further report a corresponding increase in the activity of the enzymes regulating APP processing, such as α-secretase, β-secretase, and γ-secretase as a consequence of U18666A treatment. Additionally, APP-cleaved products are partly accumulated in the lysosomes following cholesterol sequestration within EL system possibly due to decreased clearance. Interestingly, serum delipidation attenuated enhanced levels of APP and its cleaved products following U18666A treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that cholesterol sequestration within the EL system in astrocytes can influence APP metabolism and the accumulation of APP-cleaved products including Aβ peptides, which can contribute to the development of AD pathology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Furosemide- and bumetanide-sensitive ion transport and volume control in primary astrocyte cultures from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kimelberg, H K; Frangakis, M V

    1985-12-30

    K+ and Cl- transport using 42K+ and 36Cl- was studied in primary astrocyte cultures prepared from neonatal rat brains. A component of 42K+ uptake was sensitive to both furosemide and bumetanide with maximum inhibition being obtained at 1 and 0.01 mM concentrations of the inhibitors, respectively. Furosemide and bumetanide also markedly inhibited uptake of 36Cl-. 42K+ uptake in the presence of ouabain was also sensitive to the omission of medium Na+ and Cl-. These results suggest the existence of a K+ + Na+ + Cl- cotransport system in astrocyte cultures which in many cells has been shown to be involved in volume regulation. We studied volume changes using uptake of [14C]3-O- methyl-D-glucose ([14C]3-OMG), and also ion transport, in attached cells in response to exposure to hyper- or hypotonic medium. Exposure to medium made hypertonic with mannitol resulted in shrinkage of the [14C]3-OMG space of the cells, but did not affect 36Cl- content, expressed as nmol/mg protein. Exposure to hypotonic medium led to a marked increase in the [14C]3-OMG space, rapidly followed by a decrease towards control values. After the cells were then exposed to isotonic medium there was an immediate decrease followed by a slower increase in the [14C]3-OMG space. The increase in the [14C]3-OMG space was partially inhibited by 1 mM furosemide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Dexamethasone differentially regulates functional membrane properties in glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hinkerohe, Daniel; Wolfkühler, Dörte; Haghikia, Aiden; Meier, Carola; Faustmann, Pedro M; Schlegel, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    Similar to astrocytes, glioma cells form a well-coupled syncytium via gap junctions. This can be influenced, for example, by activated microglia, the main inflammatory cell population within the central nervous system (CNS). Under pathological conditions such as neoplastic cell growth, microglia number and activation state are enhanced. The aim of the present study is to analyze the influence of dexamethasone (DEX) on cellular and molecular properties in glial coculture models consisting of astroglia and microglia and human and rat glioma cell lines. Primary rat glial cocultures of astrocytes containing 5% (M5, representing "physiological" conditions) or 30% (M30, representing "pathological" conditions) microglia as well as rat and human glioma cell lines (F98, C6, U87) were incubated with DEX for 24 h. DEX-treated M30 cocultures showed significant increased gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). DEX treatment of glioma cells resulted in depolarization of the membrane resting potential (MRP) and a significant reduction of GJIC. Furthermore, DEX reduced the amount of activated microglia in M30 cocultures. DEX had no significant effects on the tested variables in the M5 coculture. DEX differentially regulates functional membrane properties of glioma cells and astrocytes in primary glial cocultures, which might resemble steroid effects in glioma cells and adjacent glial components in vivo.

  12. The Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Stimulates Glycolytic Lactate Production in Cultured Primary Rat Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Westhaus, Adrian; Blumrich, Eva Maria; Dringen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Metformin is the most frequently used drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in humans. However, only little is known about effects of metformin on brain metabolism. To investigate potential metabolic consequences of an exposure of brain cells to metformin, we incubated rat astrocyte-rich primary cultures with this compound. Metformin in concentrations of up to 30 mM did not acutely compromise the viability of astrocytes, but caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in cellular glucose consumption and lactate production. For acute incubations in the hour range, the presence of 10 mM metformin doubled the glycolytic flux, while already 1 mM metformin doubled glycolytic flux during incubation for 24 h. In addition to metformin, also other guanidino compounds increased astrocytic lactate production. After 4 h of incubation, half-maximal stimulation of glycolysis was observed for metformin, guanidine and phenformin at concentrations of around 3 mM, 3 mM and 30 µM, respectively. The acute stimulation of glycolytic lactate production by metformin was persistent after removal of extracellular metformin and was also observed, if glucose was absent from the incubation medium or replaced by other hexoses. The metformin-induced stimulation of glycolytic flux was not prevented by compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-dependent protein kinase, nor was it additive to the stimulation of glycolytic flux caused by respiratory chain inhibitors. These data demonstrate that the antidiabetic drug metformin has the potential to strongly activate glycolytic lactate production in brain astrocytes.

  13. Electrophoretic pattern and distribution of cytoskeletal proteins in flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski-Treska, J; Ulrich, G; Mensch, C; Aunis, D

    1984-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis patterns and distribution of major cytoskeletal proteins were studied in primary astrocytes with either flat-epitheloid or stellate appearance. No major differences in the electrophoretic patterns of actin, tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin were detected between flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes produced by the exposure of cultures to dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dBcAMP). However the morphological changes of astrocytes were accompanied by marked changes in the quantitative distribution of cytoskeletal proteins. The most prominent change was a large and specific decrease in the amount of actin, detected by [(35)S]methionine incorporation, densitometric scanning of one-dimensional gels and DNase inhibition assay. In stellate astrocytes produced by a 4 day treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP, the amount of actin decreased by 50%. This decrease was not apparently related to the depolymerization of actin.

  14. Reactive oxygen species levels and DNA fragmentation on astrocytes in primary culture after acute exposure to low intensity microwave electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Agata; Gulino, Marisa; Acquaviva, Rosaria; Bellia, Paolo; Raciti, Giuseppina; Grasso, Rosaria; Musumeci, Francesco; Vanella, Angelo; Triglia, Antonio

    2010-03-31

    The exposure of primary rat neocortical astroglial cell cultures to acute electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the microwave range was studied. Differentiated astroglial cell cultures at 14 days in vitro were exposed for 5, 10, or 20min to either 900MHz continuous waves or 900MHz waves modulated in amplitude at 50Hz using a sinusoidal waveform and 100% modulation index. The strength of the electric field (rms value) at the sample position was 10V/m. No change in cellular viability evaluated by MTT test and lactate dehydrogenase release was observed. A significant increase in ROS levels and DNA fragmentation was found only after exposure of the astrocytes to modulated EMF for 20min. No evident effects were detected when shorter time intervals or continuous waves were used. The irradiation conditions allowed the exclusion of any possible thermal effect. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that even acute exposure to low intensity EMF induces ROS production and DNA fragmentation in astrocytes in primary cultures, which also represent the principal target of modulated EMF. Our findings also suggest the hypothesis that the effects could be due to hyperstimulation of the glutamate receptors, which play a crucial role in acute and chronic brain damage. Furthermore, the results show the importance of the amplitude modulation in the interaction between EMF and neocortical astrocytes.

  15. Arctigenin Increases Hemeoxygenase-1 Gene Expression by Modulating PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in Rat Primary Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon-Hui; Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we found that the natural compound arctigenin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in rat primary astrocytes. Since hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a critical role as an antioxidant defense factor in the brain, we examined the effect of arctigenin on HO-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes. We found that arctigenin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also increases the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2/c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE) on HO-1 promoter. In addition, arctigenin increased ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in rat primary astrocytes. Further mechanistic studies revealed that arctigenin increased the phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream substrate of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Treatment of cells with a PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed the HO-1 expression, Nrf2 DNA binding and ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in arctigenin-treated astrocyte cells. The results collectively suggest that PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is at least partly involved in HO-1 expression by arctigenin via modulation of Nrf2/ARE axis in rat primary astrocytes.

  16. Arctigenin Increases Hemeoxygenase-1 Gene Expression by Modulating PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in Rat Primary Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeon-Hui; Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we found that the natural compound arctigenin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in rat primary astrocytes. Since hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a critical role as an antioxidant defense factor in the brain, we examined the effect of arctigenin on HO-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes. We found that arctigenin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also increases the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2/c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE) on HO-1 promoter. In addition, arctigenin increased ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in rat primary astrocytes. Further mechanistic studies revealed that arctigenin increased the phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream substrate of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Treatment of cells with a PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed the HO-1 expression, Nrf2 DNA binding and ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in arctigenin-treated astrocyte cells. The results collectively suggest that PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is at least partly involved in HO-1 expression by arctigenin via modulation of Nrf2/ARE axis in rat primary astrocytes. PMID:25489416

  17. Anisotonic media and glutamate-induced ion transport and volume responses in primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Kimelberg, H K

    1987-01-01

    1. The responses of primary monolayer astrocyte cultures prepared from neonatal rat brains to hyper- and hypotonic media and to the addition of L-glutamic acid were examined as part of a systematic approach to use these cultures to obtain information on the mechanisms of the volume changes seen in astroglial cells in situ. 2. Addition of 200 mM mannitol to the medium to make it hypertonic caused cell shrinkage as measured with [14C]3-O-methyl-D-glucose, and also activated K+ and Cl- uptake measured with 86Rb+ and 36Cl- respectively. The increased ion uptake was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM bumetanide, showing that the Na+ + K+ + 2 Cl- co-transport system was being activated by cell shrinkage. 3. Studies of 86Rb+ uptake as a function of external K+ and hypertonic media showed a complex pattern. Increased bumetanide-sensitive, hypertonic-stimulated uptake of 86Rb+ was seen up to 20 mM K+0, with maximum stimulation being first reached at around 2 to 5 mM K+. At concentrations greater than 20 mM K+0 there was a further increase in bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, but there was no stimulation of this uptake by hypertonicity. There were also increases in bumetanide-insensitive 86Rb+ fluxes at [K+]0 higher than 20 mM that may have been due to opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels; this increased 86Rb+ flux was decreased in hypertonic medium. 4. When primary astrocyte cultures were swollen in hypotonic medium there was a rapid increase in volume as measured with [14C] 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, which then decreased in the continued presence of hypotonic medium. Thus, these cells exhibit volume regulatory decrease or RVD, as described for other cells. The possible ionic bases of this phenomenon have not yet been fully examined but the initial RVD did not appear to stimulate a furosemide-sensitive cotransport system. 5. Glutamate has been implicated as a possible endogenous effector of volume change in astrocytes. In the presence of ouabain, L-glutamate led to swelling of

  18. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko; Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G.; Zorec, Robert

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  19. A Refined Bead-Free Method to Identify Astrocytic Exosomes in Primary Glial Cultures and Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Cory M.; Ménoret, Antoine; Jellison, Evan R.; Nicaise, Alexandra M.; Vella, Anthony T.; Crocker, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant glial cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and are known to fulfill critical homeostatic functions. Dysfunction of activated astrocytes is also known to participate in the development of several neurological diseases. Astrocytes can be uniquely identified by expression of the intermediate filament protein glial acidic fibrillary protein (GFAP). Herein, we report on the development of a rigorous and sensitive methodology to identify GFAP+ exosomes in primary culture using flow cytometry. We then demonstrate that activated astrocytes release increased amounts of exosomes in response to treatment with interleukin-1β. Using this methodology, we report the identification of GFAP+ exosomes in blood and then use a mouse model of inflammatory demyelination, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), to examine whether the abundance of GFAP+ exosomes in blood circulation changes during clinical illness. We find a detectable increase in the presence of GFAP+ exosomes in EAE mice when compared with non-EAE, control mice. Our data provide a novel perspective on the presence of GFAP in blood as it identifies exosomes as potential astrocyte-derived signals within blood. These data are complementary to previous clinical studies that reported elevated GFAP protein in blood samples from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during a clinical relapse. These data also reveal the existence of a potential systemic role for astrocyte-derived exosomes in CNS conditions involving inflammation such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:28663721

  20. GPR30 regulates glutamate transporter GLT-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wêgrzynowicz, Marta; Wang, Ning; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Lee, Kyuwon; Aschner, Michael

    2012-08-03

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30 contributes to the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2); however, the mechanisms associated with this protection have yet to be elucidated. Given that E2 increases astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which would prevent excitotoxic-induced neuronal death, we proposed that GPR30 mediates E2 action on GLT-1 expression. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the effects of G1, a selective agonist of GPR30, and GPR30 siRNA on astrocytic GLT-1 expression, as well as glutamate uptake in rat primary astrocytes, and explored potential signaling pathways linking GPR30 to GLT-1. G1 increased GLT-1 protein and mRNA levels, subject to regulation by both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Inhibition of TGF-α receptor suppressed the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Silencing GPR30 reduced the expression of both GLT-1 and TGF-α and abrogated the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Moreover, the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 protein expression was abolished by a protein kinase A inhibitor and an NF-κB inhibitor. G1 also enhanced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as both NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65 binding to the GLT-1 promoter. Finally, to model dysfunction of glutamate transporters, manganese was used, and G1 was found to attenuate manganese-induced impairment in GLT-1 protein expression and glutamate uptake. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that activation of GPR30 increases GLT-1 expression via multiple pathways, suggesting that GPR30 is worthwhile as a potential target to be explored for developing therapeutics of excitotoxic neuronal injury.

  1. GPR30 Regulates Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Expression in Rat Primary Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wêgrzynowicz, Marta; Wang, Ning; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Lee, Kyuwon; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30 contributes to the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2); however, the mechanisms associated with this protection have yet to be elucidated. Given that E2 increases astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which would prevent excitotoxic-induced neuronal death, we proposed that GPR30 mediates E2 action on GLT-1 expression. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the effects of G1, a selective agonist of GPR30, and GPR30 siRNA on astrocytic GLT-1 expression, as well as glutamate uptake in rat primary astrocytes, and explored potential signaling pathways linking GPR30 to GLT-1. G1 increased GLT-1 protein and mRNA levels, subject to regulation by both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Inhibition of TGF-α receptor suppressed the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Silencing GPR30 reduced the expression of both GLT-1 and TGF-α and abrogated the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Moreover, the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 protein expression was abolished by a protein kinase A inhibitor and an NF-κB inhibitor. G1 also enhanced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as both NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65 binding to the GLT-1 promoter. Finally, to model dysfunction of glutamate transporters, manganese was used, and G1 was found to attenuate manganese-induced impairment in GLT-1 protein expression and glutamate uptake. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that activation of GPR30 increases GLT-1 expression via multiple pathways, suggesting that GPR30 is worthwhile as a potential target to be explored for developing therapeutics of excitotoxic neuronal injury. PMID:22645130

  2. Na+ dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3) in primary astrocyte cultures: effect of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Miralles, V J; Martínez-López, I; Zaragozá, R; Borrás, E; García, C; Pallardó, F V; Viña, J R

    2001-12-13

    The Na+ -dependent L-glutamate transporters EAAT1(GLAST), EAAT2 (GLT-1) and EAAT3 (EAAC1) are expressed in primary astrocyte cultures, showing that the EAAT3 transporter is not neuron-specific. The presence of these three transporters was evaluated by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunocytochemical techniques, and transport activity. When primary astrocyte cultures were incubated with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a selective inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, the GSH concentration was significantly lower than in control cultures, but the expression and amount of protein of EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 and transport of L-glutamate was unchanged. Oxidative stress was created by adding H(2)O(2) or tert.-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bOOH) to the primary astrocyte cultures and cell damage was evaluated by measuring activity of lactate dehydrogenase. Under oxidative stress, GSH levels were significantly lower than in control astrocytes; but the expression and the amount of protein of the three transporters remained unchanged. However, L-glutamate uptake was significantly lower in astrocytes under oxidative conditions when compared to controls. L-Glutamate uptake was not changed in the presence of ascorbate, but was partially recovered in the presence of DTT and GSH ethyl ester. This report emphasizes that oxidative stress and not GSH depletion alters transporter activity without changing transporter expression.

  3. Effect of FK506 and cyclosporine A on the expression of BDNF, tyrosine kinase B and p75 neurotrophin receptors in astrocytes exposed to simulated ischemia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gabryel, Bozena; Bernacki, Jacek

    2009-07-01

    We investigated whether the immunosuppressive drugs, FK506 and cyclosporine A, increase BDNF protein and/or mRNA expression in ischemic astrocytes and if an increase could be related to changes in the nuclear expression of p-CREB, p-Erk1/2 and p-Akt. The influence of these immunosuppressants on protein and mRNA levels of TrkB and p75(NTR) receptors was also examined. On day 21, cultures of rat astrocytes were subjected to ischemic conditions simulated in vitro (combined oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD) for 8h and exposed to FK506 (10-1000nM) and cyclosporine A (0.25-10microM). FK506 and cyclosporine A (at 1000nM and 0.25microM, respectively) stimulated the expression and release of BDNF in cultured rat cerebral cortical astrocytes exposed to OGD. The immunosuppressants at these doses simultaneously increased p-CREB and p-Erk1/2 expression in the nuclear fraction of astrocytes. The results RT-PCR and Western blot analysis provided further evidence of a modulating influence of the drugs on the expression of trkB and p75(NTR) genes and their protein products in ischemic astrocytes.

  4. In vitro evaluation of the effects of electrospun PCL nanofiber mats containing the microalgae Spirulina (Arthrospira) extract on primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Shin, Chungwhan; Min, Seul Ki; Jung, Sang-Myung; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2012-02-01

    The blue-green microalgae, Spirulina, a harmless food and pharmaceutical additive, has several bioactive compounds that have therapeutic functions. Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer that has widely been used for tissue engineering. The electrospun PCL nanofiber containing Spirulina (PCL-Spirulina) was fabricated and tested as a potential extracellular matrix material for a culture of primary astrocytes, which play important roles in CNS injured systems. Spirulina extract was observed to increase growth and metabolic activity of rat primary astrocytes without any harm once added to the culture media. However, PCL-Spirulina nanofiber was proven to alleviate astrocyte activity. Through this research and to the best of our knowledge, we first suggest a novel composite nanomaterial, an electrospun PCL-Spirulina nanofiber that could be used to treat CNS injured systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity in a primary astrocytes/microglial co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengyao; Wang, Fu Sheng Lewis; Hu, Xiao Song; Chen, Fang; Chan, Hing Man

    2017-03-01

    Acrylamide (AA), is a common food contaminant generated by heat processing. Astrocytes and microglia are the two major glial cell types in the brain that play pivotal but different roles in maintaining optimal brain function. The objective of this study is to investigate the neurotoxicity of AA, using a primary astrocytes/microglia co-culture model. Co-cultural cells obtained from Balb/c mice were cultured and treated with 0-1.0mM AA for 24-96h. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, oxidative end produces formation and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured. The expression of nuclear-E2-related factor 2(Nrf2), and nuclear factor kappa-beta (NF-κB) and selected down-stream genes were measured. Results showed that AA treatment led toa dose-dependent toxicity. Oxidative stress was induced as indicated by an increase of ROS, a decrease of GSH levels, and an increase in the formation of 4-hydroxynonenal-adduct and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine-adduct. Both Nrf2 and NF-κB pathway contributed to the initiation of oxidative stress but the timing of two factors was different. Nrf2 and its related downstream genes were activated earlier than that in NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, AA-induced neurotoxicity attribute to oxidative stress via Nrf2 and NF-κB pathway. Moreover, the co-culture cell model was proven to be a viable model to study AA neurotoxicity.

  6. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  7. Could astrocytes be the primary target of an offending agent causing the primary degenerative diseases of the human central nervous system? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sica, Roberto E

    2015-05-01

    Most of the named primary degenerative diseases of the human central nervous system have been attributed to a direct, primary damage of some particular population of neurons. Within the spectrum of these illnesses there are disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fronto-temporal dementia, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's dementia and cerebellar ataxias affecting exclusively the human species. In the last years it has been shown that non-neural cells, mainly astrocytes, have a crucial role in the starting and development of these diseases. We suggest that the causative agent of these illnesses gets home first within the astrocytes, rather than the neurons, making them sick by modifying the structure of some proteins; from these cells the abnormal process would start a trip to other astrocytes having the same genetic, metabolic, structural and functional profiles that the originally affected astrocytes have, going through the gap junctions which connect that particular population devoted to a particular set of neurons. This appears to be a likely hypothesis because the astrocytes related to a defined population of neurons have their own, private properties and characteristics needed to support one particular set of neurons performing a defined function, making them a different and unique population, a fact which would limit the spreading of the disease to those astrocytes, sparing other astrocyte populations which do not share those characteristics. If this were the mechanism underlying these illnesses, the neurons, which their health depends on those astrocytes, would be deprived of their patronage and would start all the changes that characterizes a programmed cell death, and the clinical manifestations of a defined pathology would consequently appear.

  8. Transcriptional response to mitochondrial protease IMMP2L knockdown in human primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gokoolparsadh, Akira; Fang, Zhiming; Braidy, Nady; Lin, Peijie; Pardy, Christopher J; Eapen, Valsamma; Clarke, Raymond; Voineagu, Irina

    2017-01-22

    IMMP2L encodes the inner membrane peptidase subunit 2, a mitochondrial protease involved in cleaving the space-sorting signals of mitochondrial membrane proteins. IMMP2L has been implicated in Tourette syndrome, but how its dysfunction contributes to the neurodevelopmental phenotype remains unclear. Here we show that IMMP2L transcription requires Topoisomerase I in human primary astrocytes, and characterize the downstream effects of IMMP2L knockdown on gene expression. We demonstrate that IMMP2L knockdown leads to dysregulation of genes involved in central nervous system development. We also find that the transcriptional response to IMMP2L knockdown partially overlaps the one induced by mitochondrial complex III inhibition. Overall, these data bring further insight into the molecular consequences of IMMP2L dysfunction in the brain. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The antidiabetic drug metformin decreases mitochondrial respiration and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Dringen, Ralf

    2017-03-19

    Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that is used daily by millions of patients worldwide. Metformin is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and has recently been shown to increase glucose consumption and lactate release in cultured astrocytes. However, potential effects of metformin on mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism in astrocytes are unknown. We investigated this by mapping (13) C labeling in TCA cycle intermediates and corresponding amino acids after incubation of primary rat astrocytes with [U-(13) C]glucose. The presence of metformin did not compromise the viability of cultured astrocytes during 4 hr of incubation, but almost doubled cellular glucose consumption and lactate release. Compared with control cells, the presence of metformin dramatically lowered the molecular (13) C carbon labeling (MCL) of the cellular TCA cycle intermediates citrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, and malate, as well as the MCL of the TCA cycle intermediate-derived amino acids glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate. In addition to the total molecular (13) C labeling, analysis of the individual isotopomers of TCA cycle intermediates confirmed a severe decline in labeling and a significant lowering in TCA cycling ratio in metformin-treated astrocytes. Finally, the oxygen consumption of mitochondria isolated from metformin-treated astrocytes was drastically reduced in the presence of complex I substrates, but not of complex II substrates. These data demonstrate that exposure to metformin strongly impairs complex I-mediated mitochondrial respiration in astrocytes, which is likely to cause the observed decrease in labeling of mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates and the stimulation of glycolytic lactate production. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cytotoxicity Study on Luminescent Nanocrystals Containing Phospholipid Micelles in Primary Cultures of Rat Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Gianpiero; Fanizza, Elisabetta; Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Fasano, Anna; Striccoli, Marinella; Colella, Matilde; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, M. Lucia; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are emerging as a new tool in neuroscience field, representing superior optical probes for cellular imaging and medical diagnosis of neurological disorders with respect to organic fluorophores. However, only a limited number of studies have, so far, explored NC applications in primary neurons, glia and related cells. Indeed astrocytes, as resident cells in the central nervous system (CNS), play an important pathogenic role in several neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, therefore enhanced imaging tools for their thorough investigation are strongly amenable. Here, a comprehensive and systematic study on the in vitro toxicological effect of core-shell type luminescent CdSe@ZnS NCs incorporated in polyethylene glycol (PEG) terminated phospholipid micelles on primary cultures of rat astrocytes was carried out. Cytotoxicity response of empty micelles based on PEG modified phospholipids was compared to that of their NC containing counterpart, in order to investigate the effect on cell viability of both inorganic NCs and micelles protecting NC surface. Furthermore, since the surface charge and chemistry influence cell interaction and toxicity, effect of two different functional groups terminating PEG-modified phospholipid micelles, namely amine and carboxyl group, respectively, was evaluated against bare micelles, showing that carboxyl group was less toxic. The ability of PEG-lipid micelles to be internalized into the cells was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) assay. The results of the experiments clearly demonstrate that, once incorporated into the micelles, a low, not toxic, concentration of NCs is sufficient to be distinctly detected within cells. The overall study provides essential indications to define the optimal experimental conditions to effectively and profitably use the proposed luminescent colloidal NCs as optical probe for future in vivo

  11. Excitatory amino acid-stimulated uptake of /sup 22/Na+ in primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kimelberg, H.K.; Pang, S.; Treble, D.H.

    1989-04-01

    In this study we have found that L-glutamic acid, as well as being taken up by a Na+-dependent mechanism, will stimulate the uptake of 22Na+ by primary astrocyte cultures from rat brain in the presence of ouabain. By simultaneously measuring the uptake of 22Na+ and L-3H-glutamate a stoichiometry of 2-3 Na+ per glutamate was measured, implying electrogenic uptake. Increasing the medium K+ concentration to depolarize the cells inhibited L-3H-glutamate uptake, while calculations of the energetics of the observed L-3H-glutamate accumulation also supported an electrogenic mechanism of at least 2 Na+:1 glutamate. In contrast, kinetic analysis of the Na+ dependence of L-3H-glutamate uptake indicated a stoichiometry of Na+ to glutamate of 1:1, but further analysis showed that the stoichiometry cannot be resolved by purely kinetic studies. Studies with glutamate analogs, however, showed that kainic acid was a very effective stimulant of 22Na+ uptake, but 3H-kainic acid showed no Na+ -dependent uptake. Furthermore, while L-3H-glutamate uptake was very sensitive to lowered temperatures, glutamate-stimulated 22Na+ uptake was relatively insensitive. These results indicate that glutamate-stimulated uptake of 22Na+ in primary astrocytes cultures cannot be explained solely by cotransport of Na+ with glutamate, and they suggest that direct kainic acid-type receptor induced stimulation of Na+ uptake also occurs. Since both receptor and uptake effects involve transport of Na+, accurate measurements of the Na+ :glutamate stoichiometry for uptake can only be done using completely specific inhibitors of these 2 systems.

  12. Cytotoxicity Study on Luminescent Nanocrystals Containing Phospholipid Micelles in Primary Cultures of Rat Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Tiziana; Depalo, Nicoletta; Valente, Gianpiero; Fanizza, Elisabetta; Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Fasano, Anna; Striccoli, Marinella; Colella, Matilde; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, M Lucia; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are emerging as a new tool in neuroscience field, representing superior optical probes for cellular imaging and medical diagnosis of neurological disorders with respect to organic fluorophores. However, only a limited number of studies have, so far, explored NC applications in primary neurons, glia and related cells. Indeed astrocytes, as resident cells in the central nervous system (CNS), play an important pathogenic role in several neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, therefore enhanced imaging tools for their thorough investigation are strongly amenable. Here, a comprehensive and systematic study on the in vitro toxicological effect of core-shell type luminescent CdSe@ZnS NCs incorporated in polyethylene glycol (PEG) terminated phospholipid micelles on primary cultures of rat astrocytes was carried out. Cytotoxicity response of empty micelles based on PEG modified phospholipids was compared to that of their NC containing counterpart, in order to investigate the effect on cell viability of both inorganic NCs and micelles protecting NC surface. Furthermore, since the surface charge and chemistry influence cell interaction and toxicity, effect of two different functional groups terminating PEG-modified phospholipid micelles, namely amine and carboxyl group, respectively, was evaluated against bare micelles, showing that carboxyl group was less toxic. The ability of PEG-lipid micelles to be internalized into the cells was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) assay. The results of the experiments clearly demonstrate that, once incorporated into the micelles, a low, not toxic, concentration of NCs is sufficient to be distinctly detected within cells. The overall study provides essential indications to define the optimal experimental conditions to effectively and profitably use the proposed luminescent colloidal NCs as optical probe for future in vivo

  13. Comparison of primary and secondary rat astrocyte cultures regarding glucose and glutathione metabolism and the accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Petters, Charlotte; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte-rich primary cultures (APCs) are frequently used as a model system for the investigation of properties of brain astrocytes. However, as APCs contain a substantial number of microglial and oligodendroglial cells, biochemical parameters determined for such cultures may at least in part reflect also the presence of the contaminating cell types. To lower the potential contributions of microglial and oligodendroglial cells on properties of the astrocytes in APCs we prepared rat astrocyte-rich secondary cultures (ASCs) by subculturing of APCs and compared these ASCs with APCs regarding basal metabolic parameters, specific enzyme activities and the accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles. Immunocytochemical characterization revealed that ASCs contained only minute amounts of microglial and oligodendroglial cells. ASCs and APCs did not significantly differ in their specific glucose consumption and lactate production rates, in their specific iron and glutathione contents, in their specific activities of various enzymes involved in glucose and glutathione metabolism nor in their accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles. Thus, the absence or presence of some contaminating microglial and oligodendroglial cells appears not to substantially modulate the investigated metabolic parameters of astrocyte cultures.

  14. Aluminum uptake and effects on transferrin mediated iron uptake in primary cultures of rat neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Golub, M S; Han, B; Keen, C L

    1999-12-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is known primarily for its role in the transport and cellular uptake of iron (Fe). Tf is also the major serum binding protein for Al. In this study, primary rat oligodendrocyte, neuron and astrocyte cultures were found to differ in Tf mediated Fe and Al uptake and in the effect of Al-Tf on Fe-Tf uptake during 4 h incubation periods. When incubated with Al-Tf (1.25 microM), oligodendrocytes displayed a 3- to 4-fold increase (p=.0002) in Al, neurons demonstrated a much smaller (p=.06) increase, and no increase was seen for astrocytes. When incubated with equimolar Al citrate or Al chloride, no increase in cellular Al was seen in any of the three cell types. Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and neurons all demonstrated greater 59Fe uptake from Fe-Tf than Fe chloride. This uptake could be inhibited by excess Fe-Tf in oligodendrocytes and neurons, but not astrocytes. A small but significant inhibition of 59Fe uptake from Fe-Tf was seen after addition of Al-Tf to the incubation medium of oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes. Oligodendrocytes may be particularly vulnerable to the accumulation of excess intracellular Al, and to interference of Al with Fe uptake. Such effects could contribute to Al-induced neurotoxicity if they result in altered myelin formation or maintenance.

  15. Phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of Aquaporin-4 is required for Golgi transition in primary cultured astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kadohira, Ikuko; Abe, Yoichiro Nuriya, Mutsuo; Sano, Kazumi; Tsuji, Shoji; Arimitsu, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Yasui, Masato

    2008-12-12

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is expressed in the perivascular and subpial astrocytes end-feet in mammalian brain, and plays a critical component of an integrated water and potassium homeostasis. Here we examine whether AQP4 is phosphorylated in primary cultured mouse astrocytes. Astrocytes were metabolically labeled with [{sup 32}P]phosphoric acid, then AQP4 was immunoprecipitated with anti-AQP4 antibody. We observed that AQP4 was constitutively phosphorylated, which is reduced by treatment with protein kinase CK2 inhibitors. To elucidate the phosphorylation of AQP4 by CK2, myc-tagged wild-type or mutant AQP4 was transiently transfected in primary cultured astrocytes. Substitution of Ala residues for four putative CK2 phosphorylation sites in the C terminus abolished the phosphorylation of AQP4. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that the quadruple mutant was localized in the Golgi apparatus. These observations indicate that the C-terminal domain of AQP4 is constitutively phosphorylated at least in part by protein kinase CK2 and it is required for Golgi transition.

  16. Transforming growth factor-α mediates estrogen-induced upregulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Węgrzynowicz, Marta; Yin, Zhaobao; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) plays a central role in preventing excitotoxicity by removing excess glutamate from the synaptic clefts. 17β-estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), afford neuroprotection in a range of experimental models. However, the mechanisms that mediate E2 and TX neuroprotection have yet to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that E2 and TX enhance GLT-1 function by increasing transforming growth factor (TGF)-α expression and thus, attenuate manganese (Mn)-induced impairment in astrocytic GLT-1 expression and glutamate uptake in rat neonatal primary astrocytes. The results showed that E2 (10 nM) and TX (1 μM) increased GLT-1 expression and reversed the Mn-induced reduction in GLT-1, both at the mRNA and protein levels. E2/TX also concomitantly reversed the Mn-induced inhibition of astrocytic glutamate uptake. E2/TX activated the GLT-1 promoter and attenuated the Mn-induced repression of the GLT-1 promoter in astrocytes. TGF-α knock-down (siRNA) abolished the E2/TX effect on GLT-1 expression, and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (TGF-α receptor) suppressed the effect of E2/TX on GLT-1 expression and GLT-1 promoter activity. E2/TX also increased TGF-α mRNA and protein levels with a concomitant increase in astrocytic glutamate uptake. All estrogen receptors (ERs: ER-α ER-β and GPR30) were involved in mediating E2 effects on the regulation of TGF-α, GLT-1, and glutamate uptake. These results indicate that E2/TX increase GLT-1 expression in astrocytes via TGF-α signaling, thus offering an important putative target for the development of novel therapeutics for neurological disorders. PMID:22488924

  17. Transforming growth factor-α mediates estrogen-induced upregulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Yin, Zhaobao; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) plays a central role in preventing excitotoxicity by removing excess glutamate from the synaptic clefts. 17β-Estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator, afford neuroprotection in a range of experimental models. However, the mechanisms that mediate E2 and TX neuroprotection have yet to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that E2 and TX enhance GLT-1 function by increasing transforming growth factor (TGF)-α expression and, thus, attenuate manganese (Mn)-induced impairment in astrocytic GLT-1 expression and glutamate uptake in rat neonatal primary astrocytes. The results showed that E2 (10 nM) and TX (1 μM) increased GLT-1 expression and reversed the Mn-induced reduction in GLT-1, both at the mRNA and protein levels. E2/TX also concomitantly reversed the Mn-induced inhibition of astrocytic glutamate uptake. E2/TX activated the GLT-1 promoter and attenuated the Mn-induced repression of the GLT-1 promoter in astrocytes. TGF-α knockdown (siRNA) abolished the E2/TX effect on GLT-1 expression, and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (TGF-α receptor) suppressed the effect of E2/TX on GLT-1 expression and GLT-1 promoter activity. E2/TX also increased TGF-α mRNA and protein levels with a concomitant increase in astrocytic glutamate uptake. All ERs (ER-α, ER-β, and G protein-coupled receptor 30) were involved in mediating E2 effects on the regulation of TGF-α, GLT-1, and glutamate uptake. These results indicate that E2/TX increases GLT-1 expression in astrocytes via TGF-α signaling, thus offering an important putative target for the development of novel therapeutics for neurological disorders.

  18. Lovastatin and phenylacetate inhibit the induction of nitric oxide synthase and cytokines in rat primary astrocytes, microglia, and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pahan, K; Sheikh, F G; Namboodiri, A M; Singh, I

    1997-12-01

    This study explores the role of mevalonate inhibitors in the activation of NF-kbeta and the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6) in rat primary astrocytes, microglia, and macrophages. Lovastatin and sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) were found to inhibit LPS- and cytokine-mediated production of NO and expression of iNOS in rat primary astrocytes; this inhibition was not due to depletion of end products of mevalonate pathway (e.g., cholesterol and ubiquinone). Reversal of the inhibitory effect of lovastatin on LPS-induced iNOS expression by mevalonate and farnesyl pyrophosphate and reversal of the inhibitory effect of NaPA on LPS-induced iNOS expression by farnesyl pyrophosphate, however, suggests a role of farnesylation in the LPS-mediated induction of iNOS. The inhibition of LPS-mediated induction of iNOS by FPT inhibitor II, an inhibitor of Ras farnesyl protein transferase, suggests that farnesylation of p21(ras) or other proteins regulates the induction of iNOS. Inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of NF-kbeta by lovastatin, NaPA, and FPT inhibitor II in astrocytes indicates that the observed inhibition of iNOS expression is mediated via inhibition of NF-kbeta activation. In addition to iNOS, lovastatin and NaPA also inhibited LPS-induced expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 in rat primary astrocytes, microglia, and macrophages. This study delineates a novel role of the mevalonate pathway in controlling the expression of iNOS and different cytokines in rat astrocytes, microglia, and macrophages that may be important in developing therapeutics against cytokine- and NO-mediated neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC50 > 10 microM). The presence of 0.5 microM dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake blocker, had no effect on the potency of adenosine. 3. The response to 10 microM NECA was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists, xanthine amine congener (apparent KD = 12 nM), PD 115,199 (apparent KD = 134 nM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (apparent KD = 126 nM). However, the A1-receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, had no significant effect on the responses to NECA or 2-chloroadenosine at concentrations up to 1 microM. 4. Stimulation of A1-receptors with the selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, did not alter the basal accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP but inhibited a forskolin-mediated elevation of [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation by a maximal value of 42%. This inhibition was fully reversed in the presence of 0.1 microM, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. 5. The time course for NECA-mediated [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation was investigated. The results suggest that there is a substantial efflux of cyclic AMP from the cells in addition to the rapid and sustained elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (5 fold over basal) which was also observed. 6. These data indicate that rat astrocytes in primary culture express an A2B-adenosine receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, the presence of A1-receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase appears to have no significant effect on the A2B

  20. Actin is not required for nanotubular protrusions of primary astrocytes grown on metal nano-lawn.

    PubMed

    Gimsa, Ulrike; Iglic, Ales; Fiedler, Stefan; Zwanzig, Michael; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Jonas, Ludwig; Gimsa, Jan

    2007-01-01

    We used sub-micron metal rod decorated surfaces, 'nano-lawn' structures, as a substrate to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions of primary murine astrocytes. These cells form thin membranous tubes with diameters of less than 100 nm and a length of several microns, which make contact to neighboring cells and the substrate during differentiation. While membrane protrusions grow on top of the nano-lawn pillars, nuclei sink to the bottom of the substrate. We observed gondola-like structures along those tubes, suggestive of their function as transport vehicles. Elements of the cytoskeleton such as actin fibers are commonly believed to be essential for triggering the onset and growth of tubular membrane protrusions. A rope-pulling mechanism along actin fibers has recently been proposed to account for the transport or exchange of cellular material between cells. We present evidence for a complementary mechanism that promotes growth and stabilization of the observed tubular protrusions of cell membranes. This mechanism does not require active involvement of actin fibers as the formation of membrane protrusions could not be prevented by suppressing polymerization of actin by latrunculin B. Also theoretically, actin fibers are not essential for the growing and stability of nanotubes since curvature-driven self-assembly of interacting anisotropic raft elements is sufficient for the spontaneous formation of thin nano-tubular membrane protrusions.

  1. TNF-alpha down-regulates CXCR4 expression in primary murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Wang, J; He, T; Ransohoff, R M

    2001-01-05

    CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of AIDS-associated neurologic disorders and brain tumors. The physiological roles of CXCR4 in developmental patterning of the nervous and hematopoietic system; gastrointestinal angiogenesis; and cardiac organogenesis were established by studies in gene-targeted mice. Studies on CXCR4 expression and regulation in neuroepithelial cells are fundamental for understanding its physiopathologic roles in the central nervous system (CNS). We show here that CXCR4 expression by primary mouse astrocytes is suppressed by exposure to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). TNF-alpha caused a pronounced down-regulation of CXCR4 mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TNF-alpha-mediated decrease of CXCR4 mRNA accumulation resulted in decreased CXCR4 protein expression. As a result, the ability of stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) to induce activation of MAP kinases, Erk1/2 was impaired. The half life of CXCR4 mRNA in the presence and absence of TNF-alpha stimulation was comparable, suggesting that TNF-alpha down-regulated CXCR4 mRNA at the transcriptional level. These results suggest that TNF-alpha could modulate HIV and brain tumor pathogenesis and immune-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) by regulation of CXCR4 expression.

  2. Fumonisin B1 induces necrotic cell death in BV-2 cells and murine cultured astrocytes and is antiproliferative in BV-2 cells while N2A cells and primary cortical neurons are resistant.

    PubMed

    Osuchowski, Marcin F; Sharma, Raghubir P

    2005-12-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides, causes equine leukoencephalomalacia, impairs myelination, and inhibits neuronal growth in vitro. Intact mice do not show brain damage after systemic administration of FB1. We recently reported that intracerebroventricular administration of FB1 in mice caused neurodegeneration in the cortex and activation of astrocytes in the hippocampal area; results suggested that the neuronal damage may be secondary to activation of immunocompetent non-neuronal cells. Current study investigated effects of FB1 upon murine microglial (BV-2) and neuroblastoma (N2A) cell lines, and primary astrocytes and cortical neurons. BV-2 and N2A cultures and cells prepared from neonatal and postnatal brains of BALB/c mice were exposed to various concentrations of FB1 for 4 (BV-2 and N2A) or 4 and 8 (astrocytes and cortical neurons) days. FB1 at 25 microM decreased viability in BV-2 cells, whereas at 50 microM caused necrotic but not apoptotic cell death in both BV-2 and primary astrocytes (at day 8 only), assessed by lactic dehydrogenase release, and pripidium iodide and annexin V staining. Thymidine incorporation indicated that 2.5 microM FB1 decreased proliferation in BV-2 cells. DNA analysis by flow cytometry showed that the inhibition was not caused by cell cycle arrest. The mitochondrial activity decreased dose-dependently in BV-2 cells and was significantly elevated at 25 microM FB1, but not at 50 microM at days 4 or 8 in astrocytes. In BV-2 cells and primary astrocytes, the expression of TNFalpha and IL-1beta analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction was downregulated at 6 or 24 h. In all cell types tested the FB1 treatment caused accumulation of free sphinganine and decrease in free sphingosine levels at selected time points. Results indicated that primary and established murine brain immunocompetent cells are vulnerable to the FB1-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro whereas neuronal cells are not. The toxic effects

  3. Kinetics and autoradiography of high affinity uptake of serotonin by primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, D.M.; Kimelberg, H.K.

    1985-07-01

    Primary astrocyte cultures prepared from the cerebral cortices of neonatal rats showed significant accumulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; (/sup 3/H)-5-HT). At concentrations in the range of 0.01 to 0.7 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT, this uptake was 50 to 85% Na+ dependent and gave a Km of 0.40 +/- 0.11 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT and a Vmax of 6.42 +/- 0.85 (+/- SEM) pmol of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT/mg of protein/4 min for the Na+-dependent component. In the absence of Na+ the uptake was nonsaturable. Omission of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline markedly reduced the Na+-dependent component of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake but had a negligible effect on the Na+-independent component. This suggest significant oxidative deamination of serotonin after it has been taken up by the high affinity system, followed by release of its metabolite. The authors estimated that this system enabled the cells to concentrate (/sup 3/H)-5-HT up to 44-fold at an external (/sup 3/H)-5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake by a number of clinically effective antidepressants was also consistent with a specific high affinity uptake mechanism for 5-HT, the order of effectiveness of inhibition being chlorimipramine greater than fluoxetine greater than imipramine = amitriptyline greater than desmethylimipramine greater than iprindole greater than mianserin. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT was dependent on the presence of Cl- as well as Na+ in the medium, and the effect of omission of both ions was nonadditive. Varying the concentration of K+ in the media from 1 to 50 mM had a limited effect on (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake.

  4. Identification of gene products suppressed by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection or gp120 exposure of primary human astrocytes by rapid subtraction hybridization.

    PubMed

    Su, Zao-Zhong; Kang, Dong-Chul; Chen, Yinming; Pekarskaya, Olga; Chao, Wei; Volsky, David J; Fisher, Paul B

    2003-06-01

    Neurodegeneration and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) are the major disease manifestations of HIV-1 colonization of the central nervous system (CNS). In the brain, HIV-1 replicates in microglial cells and infiltrating macrophages and it persists in a low-productive, noncytolytic state in astrocytes. Astrocytes play critical roles in the maintenance of the brain microenvironment, responses to injury, and in neuronal signal transmission, and disruption of these functions by HIV-1 could contribute to HAD. To better understand the potential effects of HIV-1 on astrocyte biology, the authors investigated changes in gene expression using an efficient and sensitive rapid subtraction hybridization approach, RaSH. Primary human astrocytes were isolated from abortus brain tissue, low-passage cells were infected with HIV-1 or mock infected, and total cellular RNAs were isolated at multiple time points over a period of 1 week. This approach is designed to identify gene products modulated early and late after HIV-1 infection and limits the cloning of genes displaying normal cell-cycle fluctuations in astrocytes. By subtracting temporal cDNAs derived from HIV-1-infected astrocytes from temporal cDNAs made from uninfected cells, 10 genes displaying reduced expression in infected cells, termed astrocyte suppressed genes (ASGs), were identified and their suppression was confirmed by Northern blot hybridization. Both known and novel ASGs, not reported in current DNA databases, that are down-regulated by HIV-1 infection are described. Northern blotting confirms suppression of the same panel of ASGs by treatment of astrocytes with recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120. These results extend our previous analysis of astrocyte genes induced or enhanced by HIV-1 infection and together they suggest that HIV-1 and viral proteins have profound effects on astrocyte physiology, which may influence their function in the CNS.

  5. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes is coupled to increased arginine transport by upregulated y(+)LAT2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Milewski, Krzysztof; Skowrońska, Marta; Gajos, Anna; Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Beręsewicz, Andrzej; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-12-01

    One of the aspects of ammonia toxicity to brain cells is increased production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthases (NOSs). Previously we showed that ammonia increases arginine (Arg) uptake in cultured rat cortical astrocytes specifically via y(+)L amino acid transport system, by activation of its member, a heteromeric y(+)LAT2 transporter. Here, we tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 underlies ammonia-dependent increase of NO production via inducible NOS (iNOS) induction, and protein nitration. Treatment of rat cortical astrocytes for 48 with 5 mM ammonium chloride ('ammonia') (i) increased the y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake, (ii) raised the expression of iNOS and endothelial NOS (eNOS), (iii) stimulated NO production, as manifested by increased nitrite+nitrate (Griess) and/or nitrite alone (chemiluminescence), and consequently, (iv) evoked nitration of tyrosine residues of proteins in astrocytes. Except for the increase of eNOS, all the above described effects of ammonia were abrogated by pre-treatment of astrocytes with either siRNA silencing of the Slc7a6 gene coding for y(+)LAT2 protein, or antibody to y(+)LAT2, indicating their strict coupling to y(+)LAT2 activity. Moreover, induction of y(+)LAT2 expression by ammonia was sensitive to Nf-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085, linking y(+)LAT2 upregulation to the Nf-κB activation in this experimental setting as reported earlier and here confirmed. Importantly, ammonia did not affect y(+)LAT2 expression nor y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake activity in the cultured cerebellar neurons, suggesting astroglia-specificity of the above described mechanism. The described coupling of up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 transporter with iNOS in ammonia-exposed astrocytes may be considered as a mechanism to ensure NO supply for protein nitration. Ammonia (NH4(+)) increases the expression and activity of the L-arginine (Arg) transporter (Arg/neutral amino acids [NAA] exchanger) y(+)LAT2 in cultured rat cortical astrocytes by a mechanism

  6. TREK-1 mediates isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiyun; Peng, Zhengwu; Yang, Liu; Liu, Xue; Xie, Yaning; Cai, Yanhui; Xiong, Lize; Zeng, Yi

    2017-09-05

    There are growing concerns that anaesthetic exposure can cause extensive apoptotic degeneration of neurons and the impairment of normal synaptic development and remodelling. However, little attention has been paid to exploring the possible cytotoxicity of inhalation anaesthetics, such as isoflurane, in astrocytes. In this research, we determined that prolonged exposure to an inhalation anaesthetic caused cytotoxicity in astrocytes, and we identified the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for this process. Astrocytes were exposed to isoflurane, and astrocytic survival was then measured via LDH release assays, MTT assays, and TUNEL staining. TWIK-related potassium (K(+)) channel-1 (TREK-1) over-expression and knockdown models were also created using lentiviruses. The levels of TREK-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured via Western blot and qRT-PCR. Prolonged exposure to isoflurane decreased primary astrocytic viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, with prolonged exposure to isoflurane, the TREK-1 level increased, and the BDNF level was reduced. TREK-1 knockdown promoted the survival of astrocytes and increased BDNF expression following isoflurane exposure. Overdoses of and prolonged exposure to isoflurane induce cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes. TREK-1 plays an important role in isoflurane-induced cultured astrocytic cytotoxicity by down-regulating the expression of BDNF.

  7. Role of autophagy in methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuntao, Fang; Chenjia, Guo; Panpan, Zhang; Wenjun, Zhao; Suhua, Wang; Guangwei, Xing; Haifeng, Shi; Jian, Lu; Wanxin, Peng; Yun, Feng; Cai, Jiyang; Aschner, Michael; Rongzhu, Lu

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are degraded and recycled for reuse. There are numerous reports on the role of autophagy in cell growth and death; however, the role of autophagy in methylmercury (MeHg)-induced neurotoxicity has yet to be identified. We studied the role of autophagy in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity in astrocytes. MeHg reduced astrocytic viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and induced apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or chloroquine, as well as the silencing of the autophagy-related protein 5, increased MeHg-induced cytotoxicity and the ratio of apoptotic astrocytes. Conversely, rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, along with as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a precursor of reduced glutathione, decreased MeHg-induced toxicity and the ratio of apoptotic astrocytes. These results indicated that MeHg-induced neurotoxicity was reduced, at least in part, through the activation of autophagy. Accordingly, modulation of autophagy may offer a new avenue for attenuating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Ceramide in primary astrocytes from cerebellum: metabolism and role in cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Riboni, Laura; Tettamanti, Guido; Viani, Paola

    2002-04-01

    Cerebellar astrocytes are equipped with an efficient molecular machinery able to control the levels, and possibly the subcellular location, of ceramide. The major metabolic routes that contribute to the maintenance and variation of the cellular ceramide include ceramide biosynthesis, by de novo pathway or sphingosine recycling, ceramide formation from complex sphingolipids degradation and ceramide catabolism. In cerebellar astrocytes from rat cerebellum a peculiar metabolism of sphingomyelin occurs. This includes the preponderance of acidic sphingomyelinase, paralleled by a deficiency of the neutral Mg2+-dependent enzyme, as well as the presence of an extra-Golgi form of sphingomyelin synthase, which shares many characteristics with PC-PLC. Moreover these cells are characterized by a high efficiency in converting sphingosine to ceramide, possibly functional to the role played by astrocytes in the prevention of neuronal damage by high sphingosine concentration. Recent evidence demonstrates that a change of ceramide level is one of the key steps in the chain of reactions elicited by mitogenic stimuli. In fact, low cellular levels of ceramide characterize, and appear to be required for, the proliferation of cerebellar astrocytes. In particular mitogenic stimuli, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), rapidly down regulate the cellular levels of ceramide by stimulating sphingomyelin synthase. Ceramide acts as an intracellular physiological inhibitor of cell growth, being able to counteract the effect of bFGF by inhibiting the MAP kinase pathway. Although many questions remain in this field, the present knowledge strongly supports that ceramide represents a crucial member within lipid mediators, involved in the signaling pathways underlying cell proliferation in cerebellar astrocytes.

  9. Sex differences and effects of estrogenic compounds on the expression of inflammatory molecules by astrocytes exposed to the insecticide dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Astiz, Mariana; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2014-04-01

    A low dose of the organophosphorus insecticide dimethoate (DMT) produces oxidation of lipids and proteins and impairs mitochondrial function in the brain of male rats, together with a reduction of gonadal hormones in plasma. Here, we have assessed whether DMT affected the expression of inflammatory molecules, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of steroidogenic proteins and estrogen receptors in cortical astrocyte-enriched cultures obtained separately from male and female CD1 mice pups. Furthermore, we have analyzed whether estradiol may counteract the effects of DMT. A dose of DMT (2 μg/mL) did not affect cell viability, increased interleukin (IL) 6, IL1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP10), ERβ, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and aromatase mRNA levels and ERα protein levels in male but not in female cultures. Estradiol decreased the mRNA levels of IL6, IP10, TNFα, and IL1β in male but not in female cultures treated with DMT. The effect of estradiol was prevented by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780, fully imitated by an ERβ agonist and partially imitated by an ERα agonist. Furthermore, DMT increased the production of ROS in male astrocytes while estradiol reduced ROS production to control levels. These findings indicate that a sublethal dose of DMT alters astrocyte function. The selective action of estradiol on male astrocytes and the sexually dimorphic action of DMT suggest that the pesticide may have different neurological outcomes in males and females.

  10. White matter compromise in veterans exposed to primary blast forces.

    PubMed

    Taber, Katherine H; Hurley, Robin A; Haswell, Courtney C; Rowland, Jared A; Hurt, Susan D; Lamar, Cory D; Morey, Rajendra A

    2015-01-01

    Use diffusion tensor imaging to investigate white matter alterations associated with blast exposure with or without acute symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty-five veterans of the recent military conflicts included 23 exposed to primary blast without TBI symptoms, 6 having primary blast with mild TBI, and 16 unexposed to blast. Cross-sectional case-control study. Neuropsychological testing and diffusion tensor imaging metrics that quantified the number of voxel clusters with altered fractional anisotropy (FA) radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity, regardless of their spatial location. Significantly lower FA and higher radial diffusivity were observed in veterans exposed to primary blast with and without mild TBI relative to blast-unexposed veterans. Voxel clusters of lower FA were spatially dispersed and heterogeneous across affected individuals. These results suggest that lack of clear TBI symptoms following primary blast exposure may not accurately reflect the extent of brain injury. If confirmed, our findings would argue for supplementing the established approach of making diagnoses based purely on clinical history and observable acute symptoms with novel neuroimaging-based diagnostic criteria that "look below the surface" for pathology.

  11. Time-dependent homeostasis between glucose uptake and consumption in astrocytes exposed to CoCl₂ treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Kan, Quancheng; Chen, Suyan; Gao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia has been implicated in the pathology of the central nervous system during stroke. It also has a significant effect on the regulation of glucose transporters (GLUTs), and homeostasis between glucose uptake and consumption. CoCl2 is a hypoxia‑mimetic agent, and thus stabilizes the hypoxia‑inducible factor 1α (HIF‑1α) subunit and regulates GLUT genes. GLUT‑1 and GLUT‑3 are the most common isoforms of the GLUT family present in the brain, with the former primarily expressed in astrocytes and the latter in neurons under physiological conditions. However, it remains controversial whether GLUT‑3 is expressed in astrocytes. Additionally, it is unclear whether the regulation of GLUT‑1 and GLUT‑3, and glucose homeostasis, are affected by CoCl2 treatment in a time‑dependent manner. In the present study, mRNA and protein levels of GLUT‑1, GLUT‑3 and HIF‑1α in astrocytes were examined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The intracellular glucose concentration, glycogen storage, ATP content, pyruvate concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release activity and cell viability in astrocytes were also investigated. The observations of the current study confirmed that both protein and mRNA levels of GLUT‑1 and GLUT‑3 were elevated in a time‑dependent manner induced by CoCl2 treatment, followed by accumulation of HIF‑1α. Furthermore, in the early period of CoCl2 treatment (≤8 h at 100 µM), LDH release, ATP content, glycogen storage and cell viability remained unchanged, whereas intracellular pyruvate concentration increased and glucose concentration was reduced. However, in the later period of CoCl2 treatment (>8 h at 100 µM), LDH release and intracellular pyruvate concentration increased, while intracellular glucose concentration, ATP content and glycogen storage were reduced. This may be due to disruption of homeostasis and reduced cell viability. In conclusion

  12. Multiple Oxygen Tension Environments Reveal Diverse Patterns of Transcriptional Regulation in Primary Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Liyun; Park, Sung-Soo; Martin, Bronwen; Wang, Rui; Becker, Kevin G.; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Peers, Chris; Maudsley, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system normally functions at O2 levels which would be regarded as hypoxic by most other tissues. However, most in vitro studies of neurons and astrocytes are conducted under hyperoxic conditions without consideration of O2-dependent cellular adaptation. We analyzed the reactivity of astrocytes to 1, 4 and 9% O2 tensions compared to the cell culture standard of 20% O2, to investigate their ability to sense and translate this O2 information to transcriptional activity. Variance of ambient O2 tension for rat astrocytes resulted in profound changes in ribosomal activity, cytoskeletal and energy-regulatory mechanisms and cytokine-related signaling. Clustering of transcriptional regulation patterns revealed four distinct response pattern groups that directionally pivoted around the 4% O2 tension, or demonstrated coherent ascending/decreasing gene expression patterns in response to diverse oxygen tensions. Immune response and cell cycle/cancer-related signaling pathway transcriptomic subsets were significantly activated with increasing hypoxia, whilst hemostatic and cardiovascular signaling mechanisms were attenuated with increasing hypoxia. Our data indicate that variant O2 tensions induce specific and physiologically-focused transcript regulation patterns that may underpin important physiological mechanisms that connect higher neurological activity to astrocytic function and ambient oxygen environments. These strongly defined patterns demonstrate a strong bias for physiological transcript programs to pivot around the 4% O2 tension, while uni-modal programs that do not, appear more related to pathological actions. The functional interaction of these transcriptional ‘programs’ may serve to regulate the dynamic vascular responsivity of the central nervous system during periods of stress or heightened activity. PMID:21738745

  13. Different Apoptotic Pathways Activated by Oxaliplatin in Primary Astrocytes vs. Colo-Rectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanardelli, Matteo; Micheli, Laura; Nicolai, Raffaella; Failli, Paola; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy improves the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Its most significant and dose-limiting side effect is the development of a neuropathic syndrome. The mechanism of the neurotoxicity is unclear. The limited knowledge about differences existing between neurotoxic and antitumor effects hinders the discovery of effective and safe adjuvant therapies. In vitro, we suggested cell-specific activation apoptotic pathways in normal nervous cells (astrocytes) vs. colon-cancer cells (HT-29). In the present research we compared the apoptotic signals evoked by oxaliplatin in astrocytes and HT-29 analyzing the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. In astrocytes, oxaliplatin induced a mitochondrial derangement measured as cytosolic release of cytochrome C, increase in superoxide anion levels and decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Caspase-8, a main initiator of the extrinsic process remained unaltered. On the contrary, in HT-29 oxaliplatin increased caspase-8 activity and Bid expression, thus activating the extrinsic apoptosis, while the Bcl-2 increased expression blocked the mitochondrial damage. Data suggest the preferred activation of the intrinsic apoptosis as oxaliplatin damage signaling in normal nervous cells. The extrinsic pathway prevails in tumor cells indicating a possible strategy for planning new molecules to treat oxaliplatin-dependent neurotoxicity without negatively influence chemotherapy. PMID:25761243

  14. Effects of Cerebrolysin on in vitro primary microglial and astrocyte rat cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, V R; Windisch, M; García, M; Cacabelos, R

    1999-06-01

    In recent years the potential use of neurotrophic factors in the prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases has received much attention. To determine whether Cerebrolysin, a porcine brain-derived peptide preparation, was able to modulate in vitro lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and to test the direct effect of Cerebrolysin on astrocyte morphology, survival and proliferation, rat glial and astrocyte cell culture experiments were carried out. The morphology of microglia, ameboid/activated and flat/resting, was examined under contrast microscopy and cell counts obtained. In addition, the release of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was measured from cell culture supernatant using an enzyme-linked-immunoassay (ELISA). The results obtained in this study clearly suggest a protective effect of Cerebrolysin as revealed by downregulation of microglial activation after LPS treatment as well as by the control of IL-1 beta expression. No significant differences were observed on astrocyte morphology, survival or the production and/or release of BDNF. In conclusion, these in vitro studies indicate that Cerebrolysin might exert a neuroimmunotrophic function which can in turn reduce the extent of inflammation and accelerate neuronal death under pathological conditions such as human neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Impact of Heat Shock Protein A 12B Overexpression on Spinal Astrocyte Survival Against Oxygen-Glucose-Serum Deprivation/Restoration in Primary Cultured Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xun; Ma, Yuan; Yang, Li-Bin; Cheng, Jing-Ming; Yang, Tao; Fan, Ke-Xia; Li, Yun-Ming; Liu, En-Yu; Cheng, Lin; Huang, Hai-Dong; Gu, Jian-Wen; Kuang, Yong-Qin

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock protein A 12B (HSPA12B) is a newly discovered member of the heat shock protein 70 family. Preclinical evidence indicates that HSPA12B helps protect the brain from ischemic injury, although its specific function remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HSPA12B overexpression can protect astrocytes from oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration (OGD/R) injury. We analyzed the effects of HSPA12B overexpression on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury and spinal astrocyte survival. After ischemia-reperfusion injury, we found that HSPA12B overexpression decreased spinal cord water content and infarct volume. MTT assay showed that HSPA12B overexpression increased astrocyte survival after OGD/R treatment. Flow cytometry results showed a marked inhibition of OGD/R-induced astrocyte apoptosis. Western blot assay showed that HSPA12B overexpression significantly increased regulatory protein B-cell lymphocyte 2 (Bcl-2) levels, whereas it decreased expression of the Bax protein, which forms a heterodimer with Bcl-2. Measurements of the level of activation of caspase-3 by Caspase-Glo®3/7 Assay kit showed that HSPA12B overexpression markedly inhibited caspase-3 activation. Notably, we demonstrated that the effects of HSPA12B on spinal astrocyte survival depended on activation of the PI3K/Akt signal pathway. These findings indicate that HSPA12B protects against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury and may represent a potential treatment target.

  16. Inhibition of highly productive HIV-1 infection in T cells, primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes by Sargassum fusiforme

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Li, Wen; Cotter, Robin; Klein, Michael T; Roberge, Emily; Yu, Er K; Clark, Bruce; Veille, Jean-Claude; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Y-W; Canki, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Background The high rate of HIV-1 mutation and increasing resistance to currently available antiretroviral (ART) therapies highlight the need for new antiviral agents. Products derived from natural sources have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication during various stages of the virus life cycle, and therefore represent a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. To expand our arsenal of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection, we investigated aqueous extract from Sargassum fusiforme (S. fusiforme) for ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in the periphery, in T cells and human macrophages, and for ability to inhibit in the central nervous system (CNS), in microglia and astrocytes. Results S. fusiforme extract blocked HIV-1 infection and replication by over 90% in T cells, human macrophages and microglia, and it also inhibited pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) infection in human astrocytes by over 70%. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5)-tropic HIV-1, was dose dependant and long lasting, did not inhibit cell growth or viability, was not toxic to cells, and was comparable to inhibition by the nucleoside analogue 2', 3'-didoxycytidine (ddC). S. fusiforme treatment blocked direct cell-to-cell infection spread. To investigate at which point of the virus life cycle this inhibition occurs, we infected T cells and CD4-negative primary human astrocytes with HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which bypasses the HIV receptor requirements. Infection by pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) was also inhibited in a dose dependant manner, although up to 57% less, as compared to inhibition of native NL4-3, indicating post-entry interferences. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating S. fusiforme to be a potent inhibitor of highly productive HIV-1 infection and replication in T cells, in primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes. Results with VSV/NL4-3 infection, suggest inhibition of both entry and

  17. Inhibition of highly productive HIV-1 infection in T cells, primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes by Sargassum fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Li, Wen; Cotter, Robin; Klein, Michael T; Roberge, Emily; Yu, Er K; Clark, Bruce; Veille, Jean-Claude; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Y-W; Canki, Mario

    2006-05-25

    The high rate of HIV-1 mutation and increasing resistance to currently available antiretroviral (ART) therapies highlight the need for new antiviral agents. Products derived from natural sources have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication during various stages of the virus life cycle, and therefore represent a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. To expand our arsenal of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection, we investigated aqueous extract from Sargassum fusiforme (S. fusiforme) for ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in the periphery, in T cells and human macrophages, and for ability to inhibit in the central nervous system (CNS), in microglia and astrocytes. S. fusiforme extract blocked HIV-1 infection and replication by over 90% in T cells, human macrophages and microglia, and it also inhibited pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) infection in human astrocytes by over 70%. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5)-tropic HIV-1, was dose dependant and long lasting, did not inhibit cell growth or viability, was not toxic to cells, and was comparable to inhibition by the nucleoside analogue 2', 3'-didoxycytidine (ddC). S. fusiforme treatment blocked direct cell-to-cell infection spread. To investigate at which point of the virus life cycle this inhibition occurs, we infected T cells and CD4-negative primary human astrocytes with HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which bypasses the HIV receptor requirements. Infection by pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) was also inhibited in a dose dependant manner, although up to 57% less, as compared to inhibition of native NL4-3, indicating post-entry interferences. This is the first report demonstrating S. fusiforme to be a potent inhibitor of highly productive HIV-1 infection and replication in T cells, in primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes. Results with VSV/NL4-3 infection, suggest inhibition of both entry and post-entry events of the virus

  18. Estrogen and Tamoxifen Protect against Mn-Induced Toxicity in Rat Cortical Primary Cultures of Neurons and Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Sook Y.; Yin, Zhaobao; Milatovic, Dejan; Jiang, Haiyan; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) leads to a neurological disorder, manganism, which shares multiple common features with idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD). 17β-Estradiol (E2) and some selective estrogen receptor modulators, including tamoxifen (TX), afford neuroprotection in various experimental models of neurodegeneration. However, the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of E2/TX in Mn-induced toxicity have yet to be documented. Herein, we studied the ability of E2/TX to protect rat cortical primary neuronal and astroglial cultures from Mn-induced toxicity. Cell viability, Western blot, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Results established that both E2 (10nM) and TX (1μM) attenuated Mn-induced toxicity. The protective effects of E2/TX were more pronounced in astrocytes versus neurons. The E2-mediated attenuation of Mn-induced ROS generation in astrocytes at 6-h treatment (where no cell death was detected) was mediated by a classical estrogen receptor (ER) pathway and the TX-mediated effect on Mn-induced ROS generation was not mediated via classical ER-dependent mechanisms and likely by its antioxidant properties. The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway was involved in both E2- and TX-induced attenuation of Mn-induced ROS formation (6 h) in astrocytes. Treatments with Mn for a longer duration (24 h) led to significant cell death, and the protective effects of E2 and TX were (1) not mediated by a classical ER pathway and (2) associated with activation of both mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Taken together, the results suggest that both E2 and TX offer effective therapeutic means for neuroprotection against Mn-induced toxicity. PMID:19383943

  19. Estrogen and tamoxifen protect against Mn-induced toxicity in rat cortical primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Sook Y; Yin, Zhaobao; Milatovic, Dejan; Jiang, Haiyan; Aschner, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) leads to a neurological disorder, manganism, which shares multiple common features with idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD). 17beta-Estradiol (E2) and some selective estrogen receptor modulators, including tamoxifen (TX), afford neuroprotection in various experimental models of neurodegeneration. However, the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of E2/TX in Mn-induced toxicity have yet to be documented. Herein, we studied the ability of E2/TX to protect rat cortical primary neuronal and astroglial cultures from Mn-induced toxicity. Cell viability, Western blot, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Results established that both E2 (10nM) and TX (1 microM) attenuated Mn-induced toxicity. The protective effects of E2/TX were more pronounced in astrocytes versus neurons. The E2-mediated attenuation of Mn-induced ROS generation in astrocytes at 6-h treatment (where no cell death was detected) was mediated by a classical estrogen receptor (ER) pathway and the TX-mediated effect on Mn-induced ROS generation was not mediated via classical ER-dependent mechanisms and likely by its antioxidant properties. The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway was involved in both E2- and TX-induced attenuation of Mn-induced ROS formation (6 h) in astrocytes. Treatments with Mn for a longer duration (24 h) led to significant cell death, and the protective effects of E2 and TX were (1) not mediated by a classical ER pathway and (2) associated with activation of both mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Taken together, the results suggest that both E2 and TX offer effective therapeutic means for neuroprotection against Mn-induced toxicity.

  20. Restricted replication of mouse hepatitis virus A59 in primary mouse brain astrocytes correlates with reduced pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, M F; Wolswijk, G; Calafat, J; Koolen, M J; Horzinek, M C; van der Zeijst, B A

    1986-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of mouse hepatitis virus A59 (MHV-A59) are drastically attenuated in their pathogenic properties. Intracerebral inoculation of mice with 10(5) PFU of mutant ts342 results in prolonged infection of the central nervous system, whereas 100 PFU of wild-type virus are lethal (M. J. M. Koolen, A. D. M. E. Osterhaus, G. van Steenis, M. C. Horzinek, and B. A. M. van der Zeijst, Virology 125:393-402, 1983). In the Sac(-) cell line ts342 grows as well at 37 degrees C (the body temperature of mice) as at 31 degrees C (the permissive temperature). There is, however, a difference in primary cultures of mouse brain astrocytes. After infection with ts342, astrocytes produced low levels of infectious virus (5.2 +/- 3.7%) compared with virus yields after infection with wild-type virus. The fraction of wild-type virus- and ts342-infected cells was similar. Electron microscopy showed in wild-type virus-infected cells abundant virions in smooth vesicles usually closely associated with a well-developed Golgi apparatus. In mutant-infected cells no mature ts342 virus particles were found. There was no difference between ts342 and wild-type virus regarding the intracellular virus-specific RNAs. In ts342-infected cells the viral glycoproteins E2 and E1 were not detectable or were barely detectable. Either the mRNAs for the glycoproteins are not translated or the proteins are rapidly broken down. Revertants of ts342 were isolated. They grew as well as wild-type virus in astrocytes, indicating that they apparently produced sufficient amounts of E2 and E1, the ts defect itself rather than a second site mutation is responsible for the defect in replication, and the ts defect acts in unison with host-cell factors. The revertants also regained the lethal properties of wild-type virus. Images PMID:3009857

  1. Enhancing NAD+ Salvage Pathway Reverts the Toxicity of Primary Astrocytes Expressing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1).

    PubMed

    Harlan, Benjamin A; Pehar, Mariana; Sharma, Deep R; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-05-13

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) participates in redox reactions and NAD(+)-dependent signaling pathways. Although the redox reactions are critical for efficient mitochondrial metabolism, they are not accompanied by any net consumption of the nucleotide. On the contrary, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes lead to its degradation. Three distinct families of enzymes consume NAD(+) as substrate: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, ADP-ribosyl cyclases (CD38 and CD157), and sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Because all of the above enzymes generate nicotinamide as a byproduct, mammalian cells have evolved an NAD(+) salvage pathway capable of resynthesizing NAD(+) from nicotinamide. Overexpression of the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, increases total and mitochondrial NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Moreover, targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase to the mitochondria also enhances NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes. Supplementation with the NAD(+) precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside also increases NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations account for up to 20% of familial ALS and 1-2% of apparently sporadic ALS cases. Primary astrocytes isolated from mutant human superoxide dismutase 1-overexpressing mice as well as human post-mortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Increasing total and mitochondrial NAD(+) content in ALS astrocytes increases oxidative stress resistance and reverts their toxicity toward co-cultured motor neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancing the NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent astrocyte-mediated motor neuron death in ALS.

  2. [ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution for cerebrospinal surgery: pharmacological assessment using human astrocytes exposed to test solutions].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masuhiro; Doi, Kazuhisa; Enomoto, Riyo; Lee, Eibai; Naito, Shinsaku; Yamauchi, Aiko

    2009-09-01

    ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution (Artcereb) is a preparation intended for the irrigation and perfusion of the cerebral ventricles, and it is therefore important to evaluate the effects of Artcereb on brain cells. In vitro assessment of the effects of Artcereb in cell cultures of human fetal astrocytes was conducted in comparison with normal saline and lactated Ringer's solution. The effects of exposure to Artcereb were evaluated based on microscopic images of the mitochondria stained with rhodamine 123. The effects of exposure to Artcereb on cell function were also evaluated by quantitative analysis of mitochondrial activity based on rhodamine 123 and (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Morphological changes in nuclear structure were also evaluated. The results of the present study showed that cell function in cell cultures of human astrocytes was relatively unaffected by exposure to Artcereb as compared with normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution, suggesting that Artcereb has less effect on brain cells than normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution when used for the irrigation or perfusion of the cerebral ventricles.

  3. Effects of Korean Red Ginseng extract on tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in cultured rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun Myung; Joo, So Hyun; Kim, Pitna; Park, Jin Hee; Kim, Hee Jin; Bahn, Geon Ho; Kim, Hahn Young; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol-Heui; Shin, Chan Young; Park, Seung Hwa

    2013-10-01

    Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is an oriental herbal preparation obtained from Panax ginseng Meyer (Araliaceae). To expand our understanding of the action of KRG on central nervous system (CNS) function, we examined the effects of KRG on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in rat primary astrocytes. KRG extract was treated in cultured rat primary astrocytes and neuron in a concentration range of 0.1 to 1.0 mg/mL and the expression of functional tPA/PAI-1 was examined by casein zymography, Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. KRG extracts increased PAI-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes in a concentration dependent manner (0.1 to 1.0 mg/mL) without affecting the expression of tPA itself. Treatment of 1.0 mg/mL KRG increased PAI-1 protein expression in rat primary astrocytes to 319.3±65.9% as compared with control. The increased PAI-1 expression mediated the overall decrease in tPA activity in rat primary astrocytes. Due to the lack of PAI-1 expression in neuron, KRG did not affect tPA activity in neuron. KRG treatment induced a concentration dependent activation of PI3K, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK in rat primary astrocytes and treatment of PI3K or MAPK inhibitors such as LY294002, U0126, SB203580, and SP600125 (10 μM each), significantly inhibited 1.0 mg/mL KRG-induced expression of PAI- 1 and down-regulation of tPA activity in rat primary astrocytes. Furthermore, compound K but not other ginsenosides such as Rb1 and Rg1 induced PAI-1 expression. KRG-induced up-regulation of PAI-1 in astrocytes may play important role in the regulation of overall tPA activity in brain, which might underlie some of the beneficial effects of KRG on CNS such as neuroprotection in ischemia and brain damaging condition as well as prevention or recovery from addiction.

  4. MicroRNA and mRNA Transcriptome Profiling in Primary Human Astrocytes Infected with Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Danielle; Blake, Emily; Jokinen, Bradley; Abbas, Ata; Nechaev, Sergei; Watt, John A.; Dhasarathy, Archana; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by infection with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), which is transmitted to humans by deer ticks. The infection manifests usually as a rash and minor systemic symptoms; however, the bacteria can spread to other tissues, causing joint pain, carditis, and neurological symptoms. Lyme neuroborreliosis presents itself in several ways, such as Bell’s palsy, meningitis, and encephalitis. The molecular basis for neuroborreliosis is poorly understood. Analysis of the changes in the expression levels of messenger RNAs and non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, following Bb infection could therefore provide vital information on the pathogenesis and clinical symptoms of neuroborreliosis. To this end, we used cultured primary human astrocytes, key responders to CNS infection and important components of the blood-brain barrier, as a model system to study RNA and microRNA changes in the CNS caused by Bb. Using whole transcriptome RNA-seq, we found significant changes in 38 microRNAs and 275 mRNAs at 24 and 48 hours following Bb infection. Several of the RNA changes affect pathways involved in immune response, development, chromatin assembly (including histones) and cell adhesion. Further, several of the microRNA predicted target mRNAs were also differentially regulated. Overall, our results indicate that exposure to Bb causes significant changes to the transcriptome and microRNA profile of astrocytes, which has implications in the pathogenesis, and hence potential treatment strategies to combat this disease. PMID:28135303

  5. Pyruvate decarboxylation in astrocytes and in neurons in primary cultures in the presence and the absence of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Murthy, C R; Hertz, L

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative decarboxylation of [1-14C]pyruvate was studied in primary cultures of neurons and of astrocytes. The rate of this process, which is a measure of carbon flow into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and which is inhibited by its end product, acetyl CoA, was determined under conditions which would either elevate or reduce the components of the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS). Addition of aspartate (1 mM) was found to stimulate pyruvate decarboxylation in astrocytes whereas addition of glutamate (or glutamine) had no effect. Since aspartate is a precursor for extramitochondrial malate, and thus intramitochondrial oxaloacetate, whereas glutamate and glutamine are not, this suggests that an increase in oxaloacetate level stimulates TCA cycle activity. Conversely, a reduction of the glutamate content by 3 mM ammonia, which might reduce exchange between glutamate and aspartate across the mitochondrial membrane, suppressed pyruvate decarboxylation. This effect was abolished by addition of glutamate or glutamine or exposure to methionine sulfoximine (MSO). These findings suggest that impairment of MAS activity by removal of MAS constituents decreases TCA cycle activity whereas replenishment of these compounds restores the activity of the TCA cycle. No corresponding effects were observed in neurons.

  6. Isolating single primary rat hippocampal neurons & astrocytes on ultra-thin patterned parylene-C/silicon dioxide substrates.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Charles P; Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Gillespie, Trudi; Murray, Alan F

    2011-04-01

    We report here the patterning of primary rat neurons and astrocytes from the postnatal hippocampus on ultra-thin parylene-C deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate, following observations of neuronal, astrocytic and nuclear coverage on strips of different lengths, widths and thicknesses. Neuronal and glial growth was characterized 'on', 'adjacent to' and 'away from' the parylene strips. In addition, the article reports how the same material combination can be used to isolate single cells along thin tracks of parylene-C. This is demonstrated with a series of high magnification images of the experimental observations for varying parylene strip widths and thicknesses. Thus, the findings demonstrate the possibility to culture cells on ultra-thin layers of parylene-C and localize single cells on thin strips. Such work is of interest and significance to the Neuroengineering and Multi-Electrode Array (MEA) communities, as it provides an alternative insulating material in the fabrication of embedded micro-electrodes, which can be used to facilitate single cell stimulation and recording in capacitive coupling mode. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MicroRNA and mRNA Transcriptome Profiling in Primary Human Astrocytes Infected with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Casselli, Timothy; Qureshi, Humaira; Peterson, Elizabeth; Perley, Danielle; Blake, Emily; Jokinen, Bradley; Abbas, Ata; Nechaev, Sergei; Watt, John A; Dhasarathy, Archana; Brissette, Catherine A

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by infection with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), which is transmitted to humans by deer ticks. The infection manifests usually as a rash and minor systemic symptoms; however, the bacteria can spread to other tissues, causing joint pain, carditis, and neurological symptoms. Lyme neuroborreliosis presents itself in several ways, such as Bell's palsy, meningitis, and encephalitis. The molecular basis for neuroborreliosis is poorly understood. Analysis of the changes in the expression levels of messenger RNAs and non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, following Bb infection could therefore provide vital information on the pathogenesis and clinical symptoms of neuroborreliosis. To this end, we used cultured primary human astrocytes, key responders to CNS infection and important components of the blood-brain barrier, as a model system to study RNA and microRNA changes in the CNS caused by Bb. Using whole transcriptome RNA-seq, we found significant changes in 38 microRNAs and 275 mRNAs at 24 and 48 hours following Bb infection. Several of the RNA changes affect pathways involved in immune response, development, chromatin assembly (including histones) and cell adhesion. Further, several of the microRNA predicted target mRNAs were also differentially regulated. Overall, our results indicate that exposure to Bb causes significant changes to the transcriptome and microRNA profile of astrocytes, which has implications in the pathogenesis, and hence potential treatment strategies to combat this disease.

  8. Estrogen attenuates manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao B T; Aschner, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17β-Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. in J Neurochem 80:807-814, 2002; Pawlak et al. in Brain Res Mol Brain Res 138:1-7, 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuro SERMs) (Zhao et al. in Neuroscience 132:299-311, 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamate uptake. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis.

  9. Estrogen attenuates Manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao BT; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17 -Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. 2002; Pawlak et al. 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuroSERMs) (Zhao et al. 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamatergic neurotransmission. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen (TX) may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis. PMID:22878846

  10. Changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by calcium or rotenone in primary astrocytes occur predominantly through ros-mediated remodeling.

    PubMed

    Deheshi, Samineh; Dabiri, Bahram; Fan, Susu; Tsang, Michelle; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2015-06-01

    Morphological changes in mitochondria have been primarily attributed to fission and fusion, while the more pliable transformations of mitochondria (remodeling, rounding, or stretching) have been largely overlooked. In this study, we quantify the contributions of fission and remodeling to changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by the Ca(2+) ionophore 4Br-A23187 and the metabolic toxin rotenone. We also examine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the regulation of mitochondrial remodeling. In agreement with our previous studies, mitochondrial remodeling, not fission, is the primary contributor to Ca(2+) -mediated changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by 4Br-A23187 in rat cortical astrocytes. Treatment with rotenone produced similar results. In both paradigms, remodeling was selectively blocked by antioxidants whereas fission was not, suggesting a ROS-mediated mechanism for mitochondrial remodeling. In support of this hypothesis, inhibition of endogenous ROS by overnight incubation in antioxidants resulted in elongated reticular networks of mitochondria. Examination of inner and outer mitochondrial membranes revealed that they largely acted in concert during the remodeling process. While mitochondrial morphology is traditionally ascribed to a net output of fission and fusion processes, in this study we provide evidence that the acute pliability of mitochondria can be a dominant factor in determining their morphology. More importantly, our results suggest that the remodeling process is independently regulated through a ROS-signaling mechanism. Mitochondrial morphology is traditionally ascribed to a balance of fission and fusion processes. We have shown that mitochondria can undergo more pliable transformations; remodeling, rounding, or stretching. We demonstrate that remodeling, not fission, is the primary contributor to calcium mediated changes in mitochondrial morphology in primary astrocytes. Others have shown fission is mediated by calcineurin

  11. Activation of MAPK and FoxO by manganese (Mn) in rat neonatal primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Exil, Vernat; Ping, Li; Yu, Yingchun; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Caito, Samuel W; Wells, K Sam; Karki, Pratap; Lee, Eunsook; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) leads to a neurodegenerative disease that has shared clinical characteristics with Parkinson's disease (PD). Mn-induced neurotoxicity is time- and dose-dependent, due in part to oxidative stress. We ascertained the molecular targets involved in Mn-induced neurodegeneration using astrocyte culture as: (1) Astrocytes are vital for information processing within the brain, (2) their redox potential is essential in mitigating reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and (3) they are targeted early in the course of Mn toxicity. We first tested protein levels of Mn superoxide dismutase -2 (SOD-2) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) as surrogates of astrocytic oxidative stress response. We assessed levels of the forkhead winged-helix transcription factor O (FoxO) in response to Mn exposure. FoxO is highly regulated by the insulin-signaling pathway. FoxO mediates cellular responses to toxic stress and modulates adaptive responses. We hypothesized that FoxO is fundamental in mediating oxidative stress response upon Mn treatment, and may be a biomarker of Mn-induced neurodegeneration. Our results indicate that 100 or 500 µM of MnCl2 led to increased levels of FoxO (dephosphorylated and phosphorylated) compared with control cells (P<0.01). p-FoxO disappeared from the cytosol upon Mn exposure. Pre-treatment of cultured cells with (R)-(-)-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), a cysteine analog rescued the cytosolic FoxO. At these concentrations, MAPK phosphorylation, in particular p38 and ERK, and PPAR gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) levels were increased, while AKT phosphorylation remained unchanged. FoxO phosphorylation level was markedly reduced with the use of SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) and PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor). We conclude that FoxO phosphorylation after Mn exposure occurs in parallel with, and independent of the insulin-signaling pathway. FoxO levels and its translocation into the nucleus are part of early events

  12. Activation of MAPK and FoxO by Manganese (Mn) in Rat Neonatal Primary Astrocyte Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Exil, Vernat; Ping, Li; Yu, Yingchun; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Caito, Samuel W.; Wells, K. Sam; Karki, Pratap; Lee, Eunsook; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) leads to a neurodegenerative disease that has shared clinical characteristics with Parkinson's disease (PD). Mn-induced neurotoxicity is time- and dose-dependent, due in part to oxidative stress. We ascertained the molecular targets involved in Mn-induced neurodegeneration using astrocyte culture as: (1) Astrocytes are vital for information processing within the brain, (2) their redox potential is essential in mitigating reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and (3) they are targeted early in the course of Mn toxicity. We first tested protein levels of Mn superoxide dismutase -2 (SOD-2) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) as surrogates of astrocytic oxidative stress response. We assessed levels of the forkhead winged-helix transcription factor O (FoxO) in response to Mn exposure. FoxO is highly regulated by the insulin-signaling pathway. FoxO mediates cellular responses to toxic stress and modulates adaptive responses. We hypothesized that FoxO is fundamental in mediating oxidative stress response upon Mn treatment, and may be a biomarker of Mn-induced neurodegeneration. Our results indicate that 100 or 500 µM of MnCl2 led to increased levels of FoxO (dephosphorylated and phosphorylated) compared with control cells (P<0.01). p-FoxO disappeared from the cytosol upon Mn exposure. Pre-treatment of cultured cells with (R)-(−)-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), a cysteine analog rescued the cytosolic FoxO. At these concentrations, MAPK phosphorylation, in particular p38 and ERK, and PPAR gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) levels were increased, while AKT phosphorylation remained unchanged. FoxO phosphorylation level was markedly reduced with the use of SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) and PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor). We conclude that FoxO phosphorylation after Mn exposure occurs in parallel with, and independent of the insulin-signaling pathway. FoxO levels and its translocation into the nucleus are part of early events

  13. The Epigenetic Reader BRD2 as a Specific Modulator of PAI-1 Expression in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Mouse Primary Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Soon; Hong, Seong Hwi; Sim, Seobo; Cho, Kyu Suk; Kim, Ji-Woon; Yang, Sung Min; Jeon, Se Jin; You, Jueng Soo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-11-01

    The post translational modification of lysine acetylation is a key mechanism that regulates chromatin structure. Epigenetic readers, such as the BET domains, are responsible for reading histone lysine acetylation which is a hallmark of open chromatin structure, further providing a scaffold that can be accessed by RNA polymerases as well as transcription factors. Recently, several reports have assessed and highlighted the roles of epigenetic readers in various cellular contexts. However, little is known about their role in the regulation of inflammatory genes, which is critical in exquisitely tuning inflammatory responses to a variety of immune stimuli. In this study, we investigated the role of epigenetic readers BRD2 and BRD4 in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses in mouse primary astrocytes. Inflammatory stimulation by LPS showed that the levels of Brd2 mRNA and protein were increased, while Brd4 mRNA levels did not change. Knocking down of Brd2 mRNA using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in cultured mouse primary astrocytes inhibited LPS-induced mRNA expression and secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, no other pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as Il-6, Il-1β and Tnf-α, were affected. Indeed, treatment with bromodomain-containing protein inhibitor, JQ1, blocked Pai-1 mRNA expression through the inhibition of direct BRD2 protein-binding and active histone modification on Pai-1 promoter. Taken together, our data suggest that BRD2 is involved in the modulation of neuroinflammatory responses through PAI-1 and via the regulation of epigenetic reader BET protein, further providing a potential novel therapeutic strategy in neuroinflammatory diseases.

  14. ZnO nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress triggers apoptosis by activating JNK signaling pathway in cultured primary astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieting; Deng, Xiaobei; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Deliang; Ding, Wenjun

    2014-03-01

    It has been documented in in vitro studies that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are capable of inducing oxidative stress, which plays a crucial role in ZnO NP-mediated apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of apoptosis in neurocytes induced by ZnO NP exposure was not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential mechanisms of apoptosis provoked by ZnO NPs in cultured primary astrocytes by exploring the molecular signaling pathways triggered after ZnO NP exposure. ZnO NP exposure was found to reduce cell viability in MTT assays, increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, stimulate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and elicit caspase-3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis occurred after ZnO NP exposure as evidenced by nuclear condensation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) cleavage. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) with a concomitant increase in the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio suggested that the mitochondria also mediated the pathway involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis. In addition, exposure of the cultured cells to ZnO NPs led to phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Moreover, JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly reduced ZnO NP-induced cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression, but not ERK inhibitor (U0126) or p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), indicating that JNK signaling pathway is involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis in primary astrocytes.

  15. Sevenfold-reduced osmotic water permeability in primary astrocyte cultures from AQP-4-deficient mice, measured by a fluorescence quenching method.

    PubMed

    Solenov, Eugen; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Manley, Geoffrey T; Verkman, A S

    2004-02-01

    A calcein fluorescence quenching method was applied to measure osmotic water permeability in highly differentiated primary cultures of brain astrocytes from wild-type and aquaporin-4 (AQP-4)-deficient mice. Cells grown on coverglasses were loaded with calcein for measurement of volume changes after osmotic challenge. Hypotonic shock producing twofold cell swelling resulted in a reversible approximately 12% increase in calcein fluorescence, which was independent of cytosolic calcein concentration at levels well below where calcein self-quenching occurs. Calcein fluorescence was quenched in <200 ms in response to addition of cytosol in vitro, indicating that the fluorescence signal arises from changes in cytosol concentration. In astrocytes from wild-type CD1 mice, calcein fluorescence increased reversibly in response to hypotonic challenge with a half-time of 0.92 +/- 0.05 s at 23 degrees C, corresponding to an osmotic water permeability (Pf) of approximately 0.05 cm/s. Pf was reduced 7.1-fold in astrocytes from AQP-4-deficient mice. Temperature dependence studies indicated an increased Arrhenius activation energy for water transport in AQP-4-deficient astrocytes (11.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 5.5 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol). Our studies establish a calcein quenching method for measurement of cell membrane water permeability and indicate that AQP-4 provides the principal route for water transport in astrocytes.

  16. Cortical Astrocytes Acutely Exposed to the Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMA(III)) Show Increased Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Gene Expression that is Consistent with APP and BACE-1: Over-expression.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Lourdes, C; Uresti-Rivera, E E; Oliva-González, C; Torres-Ramos, M A; Aguirre-Bañuelos, P; Gandolfi, A J

    2016-10-01

    Long-term exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water has been associated with cognitive impairment in children and adults; however, the related pathogenic mechanisms have not been completely described. Increased or chronic inflammation in the brain is linked to impaired cognition and neurodegeneration; iAs induces strong inflammatory responses in several cells, but this effect has been poorly evaluated in central nervous system (CNS) cells. Because astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS and play a critical role in brain homeostasis, including regulation of the inflammatory response, any functional impairment in them can be deleterious for the brain. We propose that iAs could induce cognitive impairment through inflammatory response activation in astrocytes. In the present work, rat cortical astrocytes were acutely exposed in vitro to the monomethylated metabolite of iAs (MMA(III)), which accumulates in glial cells without compromising cell viability. MMA(III) LD50 in astrocytes was 10.52 μM, however, exposure to sub-toxic MMA(III) concentrations (50-1000 nM) significantly increased IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, and MIF-1 gene expression. These effects were consistent with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase (BACE-1) increased gene expression, mainly for those MMA(III) concentrations that also induced TNF-α over-expression. Other effects of MMA(III) on cortical astrocytes included increased proliferative and metabolic activity. All tested MMA(III) concentrations led to an inhibition of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Results suggest that MMA(III) induces important metabolic and functional changes in astrocytes that may affect brain homeostasis and that inflammation may play a major role in cognitive impairment-related pathogenicity in As-exposed populations.

  17. WIN 55,212-2, agonist of cannabinoid receptors, prevents amyloid β1-42 effects on astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Mauricio, Maria D; Vila, Jose M; Marchio, Patricia; Valles, Soraya L

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative illness involving synaptic dysfunction with extracellular accumulation of Aβ1-42 toxic peptide, glial activation, inflammatory response and oxidative stress, can lead to neuronal death. Endogenous cannabinoid system is implicated in physiological and physiopathological events in central nervous system (CNS), and changes in this system are related to many human diseases, including AD. However, studies on the effects of cannabinoids on astrocytes functions are scarce. In primary cultured astrocytes we studied cellular viability using MTT assay. Inflammatory and oxidative stress mediators were determined by ELISA and Western-blot techniques both in the presence and absence of Aβ1-42 peptide. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a synthetic cannabinoid) on cell viability, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress were also determined. Aβ1-42 diminished astrocytes viability, increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels and p-65, COX-2 and iNOS protein expression while decreased PPAR-γ and antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn SOD. WIN 55,212-2 pretreatment prevents all effects elicited by Aβ1-42. Furthermore, cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 also increased cell viability and PPAR-γ expression in control astrocytes. In conclusion cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 increases cell viability and anti-inflammatory response in cultured astrocytes. Moreover, WIN 55,212-2 increases expression of anti-oxidant Cu/Zn SOD and is able to prevent inflammation induced by Aβ1-42 in cultured astrocytes. Further studies would be needed to assess the possible beneficial effects of cannabinoids in Alzheimer's disease patients.

  18. WIN 55,212-2, Agonist of Cannabinoid Receptors, Prevents Amyloid β1-42 Effects on Astrocytes in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Mauricio, Maria D.; Vila, Jose Mª; Marchio, Patricia; Valles, Soraya L.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative illness involving synaptic dysfunction with extracellular accumulation of Aβ1-42 toxic peptide, glial activation, inflammatory response and oxidative stress, can lead to neuronal death. Endogenous cannabinoid system is implicated in physiological and physiopathological events in central nervous system (CNS), and changes in this system are related to many human diseases, including AD. However, studies on the effects of cannabinoids on astrocytes functions are scarce. In primary cultured astrocytes we studied cellular viability using MTT assay. Inflammatory and oxidative stress mediators were determined by ELISA and Western-blot techniques both in the presence and absence of Aβ1-42 peptide. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a synthetic cannabinoid) on cell viability, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress were also determined. Aβ1-42 diminished astrocytes viability, increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels and p-65, COX-2 and iNOS protein expression while decreased PPAR-γ and antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn SOD. WIN 55,212-2 pretreatment prevents all effects elicited by Aβ1-42. Furthermore, cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 also increased cell viability and PPAR-γ expression in control astrocytes. In conclusion cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 increases cell viability and anti-inflammatory response in cultured astrocytes. Moreover, WIN 55,212-2 increases expression of anti-oxidant Cu/Zn SOD and is able to prevent inflammation induced by Aβ1-42 in cultured astrocytes. Further studies would be needed to assess the possible beneficial effects of cannabinoids in Alzheimer's disease patients. PMID:25874692

  19. Astrocytic expression of HIV-1 Nef impairs spatial and recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Chompre, Gladys; Cruz, Emmanuel; Maldonado, Lucianette; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa; Porter, James T.; Noel, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy that effectively limits viral replication, memory impairment remains a dilemma for HIV infected people. In the CNS, HIV infection of astrocytes leads to the production of the HIV-1 Nef protein without viral replication. Post mortem studies have found Nef expression in hippocampal astrocytes of people with HIV associated dementia suggesting that astrocytic Nef may contribute to HIV associated cognitive impairment even when viral replication is suppressed. To test whether astrocytic expression of Nef is sufficient to induce cognitive deficits, we examined the effect of implanting primary rat astrocytes expressing Nef into the hippocampus on spatial and recognition memory. Rats implanted unilaterally with astrocytes expressing Nef showed impaired novel location and novel object recognition in comparison with controls implanted with astrocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). This impairment was correlated with an increase in chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) expression and the infiltration of peripheral macrophages into the hippocampus at the site of injection. Furthermore, the Nef exposed rats exhibited a bilateral loss of CA3 neurons. These results suggest that Nef protein expressed by the implanted astrocytes activates the immune system leading to neuronal damage and spatial and recognition memory deficits. Therefore, the continued expression of Nef by astrocytes in the absence of viral replication has the potential to contribute to HIV associated cognitive impairment. PMID:22926191

  20. Microarray analysis of changes in cellular gene expression induced by productive infection of primary human astrocytes: implications for HAD.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Young; Li, Jinliang; Bentsman, Galina; Brooks, Andrew I; Volsky, David J

    2004-12-01

    The role of astrocytes in HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is not well understood. HIV-1 binds efficiently to astrocytes but infects only a small fraction of the cells in vitro and in vivo. To gain insight into the biology of HIV-1-expressing astrocytes, we productively infected human fetal astrocytes with pseudotyped HIV-1 and employed Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to determine global changes in cellular gene expression at the peak of virus production. With a twofold change as a cutoff, HIV-1 increased transcription of 266 genes in astrocytes and suppressed expression of 468. The functions of highly expressed genes included interferon-mediated antiviral responses (OAS1, IFIT1), intercellular contacts (SH3, glia-derived nexin), cell homing/adhesion (matrix metalloproteinases), and cell-cell signaling (neuropilin 1 and 2). Surprisingly, genes involved in innate immune responses of astrocytes were largely unaffected. The single most significant effect of HIV-1, however, was down-modulation of at least 55 genes involved in control of cell cycle, DNA replication, and cell proliferation, which were overrepresented in these categories with probability scores of 10(-10)-10(-26). Our data suggest that HIV-1 expression in astrocytes profoundly alters host cell biology, with potential consequences for the physiological function of astrocytes during HIV-1 infection in the brain.

  1. Astrocytes produce interferon that enhances the expression of H-2 antigens on a subpopulation of brain cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Using primary culture methods, we show that purified astrocytes from embryonic mouse or rat central nervous system (CNS) can be induced to produce interferon (IFN) activity when pretreated with a standard IFN- superinducing regimen of polyribonucleotide, cycloheximide, and actinomycin D, whereas IFN activity was not inducible in neuronal cultures derived from mouse CNS. Astrocyte IFN displays inductive, kinetic, physicochemical, and antigenic properties similar to those of IFN-alpha/beta, but is dissimilar to lymphocyte IFN (IFN-gamma). Treatment of pure astrocytic cultures or astrocytes cultured with neurons with astrocyte IFN or IFN-alpha/beta induced a dramatic increase in the expression of H-2 antigens on a subpopulation of astrocytes. Neither neurons nor oligodendroglia expressed detectable levels of H-2 antigens when exposed to astrocyte IFN, IFN-alpha/beta, or to IFN-beta. Injection of astrocyte IFN or IFN-alpha/beta directly into brains of newborn mice indicated that H-2 antigens were also induced in vivo. None of the IFNs (astrocyte, alpha/beta, or beta) tested induced Ia antigens on CNS cells in vitro or in vivo. Since H-2 antigens have a critical role in immune responses, astrocyte IFN may initiate and participate in immune reactions that contribute to immunoprotective and immunopathological responses in the CNS. PMID:2423537

  2. Comparative effects on rat primary astrocytes and C6 rat glioma cells cultures after 24-h exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-García, Samuel; Silva-Ramírez, Ana Sonia; Ramirez-Lee, Manuel A.; Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Rangel-López, Edgar; Castillo, Claudia G.; Santamaría, Abel; Martinez-Castañon, Gabriel A.; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the effects of 24-h exposure of rat primary astrocytes and C6 rat glioma cells to 7.8 nm AgNPs. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and current treatments lead to diverse side-effects; for this reason, it is imperative to investigate new approaches, including those alternatives provided by nanotechnology, like nanomaterials (NMs) such as silver nanoparticles. Herein, we found that C6 rat glioma cells, but no primary astrocytes, decreased cell viability after AgNPs treatment; however, both cell types diminished their proliferation. The decrease of glioma C6 cells proliferation was related with necrosis, while in primary astrocytes, the decreased proliferation was associated with the induction of apoptosis. The ionic control (AgNO3) exerted a different profile than AgNPs; the bulk form did not modify the basal effect in each determination, whereas cisplatin, a well-known antitumoral drug used as a comparative control, promoted cytotoxicity in both cell types at specific concentrations. Our findings prompt the need to determine the fine molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the differential biological responses to AgNPs in order to develop new tools or alternatives based on nanotechnology that may contribute to the understanding, impact and use of NMs in specific targets, like glioblastoma cells.

  3. Hypothermia increases aquaporin 4 (AQP4) plasma membrane abundance in human primary cortical astrocytes via a calcium/ transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4)- and calmodulin-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Salman, Mootaz M; Kitchen, Philip; Woodroofe, M Nicola; Brown, James E; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Alex C; Conner, Matthew T

    2017-09-19

    Human aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is the primary water channel protein in brain astrocytes. Hypothermia is known to cause astrocyte swelling in culture, but the precise role of AQP4 in this process is unknown. Primary human cortical astrocytes were cultured under hypothermic (32°C) or normothermic (37°C) conditions. AQP4 transcript, total protein and surface localized protein were quantified using RT-qPCR, sandwich ELISA with whole cell lysates, or cell-surface biotinylation followed by ELISA analysis of the surface-localized protein, respectively. Four-hour mild hypothermic treatment increased the surface localization of AQP4 in human astrocytes to 155 ± 4% of normothermic controls, despite no change in total protein expression levels. The hypothermia-mediated increase in AQP4 surface abundance on human astrocytes was blocked using either calmodulin antagonist (trifluoperazine; TFP); TRPV4 antagonist, HC-067047 or calcium chelation using EGTA-AM. The TRPV4 agonist (GSK1016790A) mimicked the effect of hypothermia compared with untreated normothermic astrocytes. Hypothermia led to an increase in surface localization of AQP4 in human astrocytes through a mechanism likely dependent on the TRPV4 calcium channel and calmodulin activation. Understanding the effects of hypothermia on astrocytic AQP4 cell-surface expression may help develop new treatments for brain swelling based on an in-depth mechanistic understanding of AQP4 translocation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced GLT-1 mediated glutamate uptake and migration of primary astrocytes directed by fibronectin-coated electrospun poly-L-lactic acid fibers.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, Jonathan M; Hyzinski-García, María C; Van Vlasselaer, Kristien; Zaccor, Nicholas W; Plopper, George E; Mongin, Alexander A; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2014-02-01

    Bioengineered fiber substrates are increasingly studied as a means to promote regeneration and remodeling in the injured central nervous system (CNS). Previous reports largely focused on the ability of oriented scaffolds to bridge injured regions and direct outgrowth of axonal projections. In the present work, we explored the effects of electrospun microfibers on the migration and physiological properties of brain astroglial cells. Primary rat astrocytes were cultured on either fibronectin-coated poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) films, fibronectin-coated randomly oriented PLLA electrospun fibers, or fibronectin-coated aligned PLLA electrospun fibers. Aligned PLLA fibers strongly altered astrocytic morphology, orienting cell processes, actin microfilaments, and microtubules along the length of the fibers. On aligned fibers, astrocytes also significantly increased their migration rates in the direction of fiber orientation. We further investigated if fiber topography modifies astrocytic neuroprotective properties, namely glutamate and glutamine transport and metabolism. This was done by quantifying changes in mRNA expression (qRT-PCR) and protein levels (Western blotting) for a battery of relevant biomolecules. Interestingly, we found that cells grown on random and/or aligned fibers increased the expression levels of two glutamate transporters, GLAST and GLT-1, and an important metabolic enzyme, glutamine synthetase, as compared to the fibronectin-coated films. Functional assays revealed increases in glutamate transport rates due to GLT-1 mediated uptake, which was largely determined by the dihydrokainate-sensitive GLT-1. Overall, this study suggests that aligned PLLA fibers can promote directed astrocytic migration, and, of most importance, our in vitro results indicate for the first time that electrospun PLLA fibers can positively modify neuroprotective properties of glial cells by increasing rates of glutamate uptake.

  5. Profiling the iron, copper and zinc content in primary neuron and astrocyte cultures by rapid online quantitative size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; Grubman, Alexandra; Ryan, Timothy M; Lothian, Amber; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Grimm, Rudolf; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Doble, Philip A; Cherny, Robert A; Bush, Ashley I; White, Anthony R; Masters, Colin L; Roberts, Blaine R

    2013-12-01

    Metals often determine the chemical reactivity of the proteins to which they are bound. Each cell in the body tightly maintains a unique metalloproteomic profile, mostly dependent on function. This paper describes an analytical online flow injection quantitative size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) method, which was applied to profiling the metal-binding proteins found in primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes. This method can be conducted using similar amounts of sample to those used for Western blotting (20-150 μg protein), and has a turnaround time of <15 minutes. Metalloprotein standards for Fe (as ferritin), Cu and Zn (as superoxide dismutase-1) were used to construct multi-point calibration curves for online quantification of metalloproteins by SEC-ICP-MS. Homogenates of primary neuron and astrocyte cultures were analysed by SEC-ICP-MS. Online quantification by external calibration with metalloprotein standards determined the mass of metal eluting from the column relative to time (as pg s(-1)). Total on-column Fe, Cu and Zn detection limits ranged from 0.825 ± 0.005 ng to 13.6 ± 0.7 pg. Neurons and astrocytes exhibited distinct metalloprotein profiles, featuring both ubiquitous and unique metalloprotein species. Separation and detection by SEC-ICP-MS allows appraisal of these metalloproteins in their native state, and online quantification was achieved using this relatively simple external calibration process.

  6. Toxic effects of cobalt in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. Similarities with hypoxia and role of HIF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Karovic, Olga; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Rebola, Nelson; Edström, Erik; Lövdahl, Cecilia; Fredholm, Bertil B; Daré, Elisabetta

    2007-03-01

    Cobalt is suspected to cause memory deficit in humans and was reported to induce neurotoxicity in animal models. We have studied the effects of cobalt in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. CoCl(2) (0.2-0.8mM) caused dose-dependent ATP depletion, apoptosis (cell shrinkage, phosphatidylserine externalization and chromatin rearrangements) and secondary necrosis. The mitochondria appeared to be a main target of cobalt toxicity, as shown by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) and release from the mitochondria of apoptogenic factors, e.g. apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). Pre-treatment with bongkrekic acid reduced ATP depletion, implicating the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Cobalt increased the generation of oxygen radicals, but antioxidants did not prevent toxicity. There was also an impaired response to ATP stimulation, evaluated as a lower raise in intracellular calcium. Similarly to hypoxia and dymethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG), cobalt triggered stabilization of the alpha-subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1 (HIF-1alpha). This early event was followed by an increased expression of HIF-1 regulated genes, e.g. stress protein HO-1, pro-apoptotic factor Nip3 and iNOS. Although all of the three stimuli activated the HIF-1alpha pathway and decreased ATP levels, the downstream effects were different. DMOG only inhibited cell proliferation, whereas the other two conditions caused cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. This points to cobalt and hypoxia not only inducing HIF-1alpha regulated genes but also affecting similarly other cellular functions, including metabolism.

  7. The MicroRNA and MessengerRNA Profile of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex in Human Primary Astrocyte and Astrocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Joanna J.; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2010-01-01

    Background GW/P bodies are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein-rich foci involved in microRNA (miRNA)-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) silencing and degradation. The mRNA regulatory functions within GW/P bodies are mediated by GW182 and its binding partner hAgo2 that bind miRNA in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). To date there are no published reports of the profile of miRNA and mRNA targeted to the RISC or a comparison of the RISC-specific miRNA/mRNA profile differences in malignant and non-malignant cells. Methodology/Principal Findings RISC mRNA and miRNA components were profiled by microarray analysis of malignant human U-87 astrocytoma cells and its non-malignant counterpart, primary human astrocytes. Total cell RNA as well as RNA from immunoprecipitated RISC was analyzed. The novel findings were fourfold: (1) miRNAs were highly enriched in astrocyte RISC compared to U-87 astrocytoma RISC, (2) astrocytoma and primary astrocyte cells each contained unique RISC miRNA profiles as compared to their respective cellular miRNA profiles, (3) miR-195, 10b, 29b, 19b, 34a and 455-3p levels were increased and the miR-181b level was decreased in U-87 astrocytoma RISC as compared to astrocyte RISC, and (4) the RISC contained decreased levels of mRNAs in primary astrocyte and U-87 astrocytoma cells. Conclusions/Significance The observation that miR-34a and miR-195 levels were increased in the RISC of U-87 astrocytoma cells suggests an oncogenic role for these miRNAs. Differential regulation of mRNAs by specific miRNAs is evidenced by the observation that three miR34a-targeted mRNAs and two miR-195-targeted mRNAs were downregulated while one miR-195-targeted mRNA was upregulated. Biological pathway analysis of RISC mRNA components suggests that the RISC plays a pivotal role in malignancy and other conditions. This study points to the importance of the RISC and ultimately GW/P body composition and function in miRNA and mRNA deregulation in astrocytoma cells and possibly in

  8. Short-chain C2 ceramide induces heme oxygenase-1 expression by upregulating AMPK and MAPK signaling pathways in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Sun; Choi, Min-Ji; Ko, Hyun-Myung; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2016-03-01

    Ceramide belongs to the group of sphingolipid metabolites that are produced in the brain and peripheral systems and act as intracellular second messengers. Although some physiological roles of ceramide have been reported in the brain, the role of ceramide in astrocytes has not been clearly demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated the antioxidant effects of the cell-permeable short-chain C2 ceramide in rat brain astrocytes. C2 ceramide inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent cell death in rat primary astrocytes. C2 ceramide increased the expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) that are under the control of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. Detailed mechanistic studies revealed that C2 ceramide increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE), and increased ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. Moreover, C2 ceramide increased the interaction between Nrf2 and c-Jun as shown by antibody co-immunoprecipitation assay. Further analysis of signaling pathways revealed that AMPK and MAP kinases are involved in HO-1 expression by modulating ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. Therefore, the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes by C2 ceramide may be a potential therapeutic modality for neurodegenerative diseases that are accompanied by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Primary stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Horemans, Nele; Wannijn, Jean; Nauts, Robin; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2014-03-01

    As the environment is inevitably exposed to ionizing radiation from natural and anthropogenic sources, it is important to evaluate gamma radiation induced stress responses in plants. The objective of this research is therefore to investigate radiation effects in Arabidopsis thaliana on individual and subcellular level by exposing 2-weeks-old seedlings for 7 days to total doses of 3.9 Gy, 6.7 Gy, 14.8 Gy and 58.8 Gy and evaluating growth, photosynthesis, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid concentrations and antioxidative enzyme capacities. While the capacity of photosystem II (PSII measured as Fv/Fm) remained intact, plants started optimizing their photosynthetic process at the lower radiation doses by increasing the PSII efficiency (φPSII) and the maximal electron transport rate (ETRmax) and by decreasing the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). At the highest radiation dose, photosynthetic parameters resembled those of control conditions. On subcellular level, roots showed increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) capacities under gamma irradiation but catalase (CAT), syringaldazine peroxidase (SPX) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities, on the other hand, decreased. In the leaves no alterations were observed in SOD, CAT and SPX capacities, but GPX was highly affected. Based on these results it seems that roots are more sensitive for oxidative stress under gamma radiation exposure than leaves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Palmitoylethanolamide stimulation induces allopregnanolone synthesis in C6 Cells and primary astrocytes: involvement of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-α.

    PubMed

    Raso, G Mattace; Esposito, E; Vitiello, S; Iacono, A; Santoro, A; D'Agostino, G; Sasso, O; Russo, R; Piazza, P V; Calignano, A; Meli, R

    2011-07-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) regulates many pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system, including pain perception, convulsions and neurotoxicity, and increasing evidence points to its neuroprotective action. In the present study, we report that PEA, acting as a ligand of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, might regulate neurosteroidogenesis in astrocytes, which, similar to other glial cells and neurones, have the enzymatic machinery for neurosteroid de novo synthesis. Accordingly, we used the C6 glioma cell line and primary murine astrocytes. In the mitochondrial fraction from cells stimulated with PEA, we demonstrated an increase in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 enzyme (P450scc) expression, both comprising proteins considered to be involved in crucial steps of neurosteroid formation. The effects of PEA were completely blunted by GW6471, a selective PPAR-α antagonist, or by PPAR-α silencing by RNA interference. Accordingly, allopregnanolone (ALLO) levels were increased in supernatant of PEA-treated astrocytes, as revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and this effect was inhibited by GW6471. Moreover, PEA showed a protective effect, reducing malondialdehyde formation in cells treated with l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a glutathione depletor and, interestingly, the effect of PEA was partially inhibited by finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor. A similar profile of activity was demonstrated by ALLO and the lack of an additive effect with PEA suggests that the reduction of oxidative stress by PEA is mediated through ALLO synthesis. The present study provides evidence indicating the involvement of the saturated acylethanolamide PEA in ALLO synthesis through PPAR-α in astrocytes and explores the antioxidative activity of this molecule, confirming its homeostatic and protective role both under physiological and pathological conditions.

  11. Anthocyanin-rich açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) extract attenuates manganese-induced oxidative stress in rat primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    da Silva Santos, Vivian; Bisen-Hersh, Emily; Yu, Yingchun; Cabral, Ingridy Simone Ribeiro; Nardini, Viviani; Culbreth, Megan; Teixeira da Rocha, João Batista; Barbosa, Fernando; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for human health. However, at high concentrations Mn may be neurotoxic. Mn accumulates in astrocytes, affecting their redox status. In view of the high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the exotic Brazilian fruit açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.), its methanolic extract was obtained by solid-phase extraction (SPE). This açaí extract showed considerable anthocyanins content and direct antioxidant capacity. The açaí extract scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH•) with an EC₅₀ of 19.1 ppm, showing higher antioxidant activity compared to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), but lower than ascorbic acid and quercetin. This obtained açaí extract also attenuated Mn-induced oxidative stress in primary cultured astrocytes. Specifically, the açaí extract at an optimal and nutritionally relevant concentration of 0.1 μg/ml prevented Mn-induced oxidative stress by (1) restoring GSH/GSSG ratio and net glutamate uptake, (2) protecting astrocytic membranes from lipid peroxidation, and (3) decreasing Mn-induced expression of erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) protein. A larger quantity of açaí extract exacerbated the effects of Mn on these parameters except with respect to lipid peroxidation assessed by means of F₂-isoprostanes. These studies indicate that at nutritionally relevant concentration, anthocyanins obtained from açaí protect astrocytes against Mn neurotoxicity, but at high concentrations, the "pro-oxidant" effects of its constituents likely prevail. Future studies may be profitably directed at potential protective effects of açaí anthocyanins in nutraceutical formulations.

  12. Relaxin Protects Astrocytes from Hypoxia In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, Jordan M.; Summerlee, Alastair J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide relaxin has recently been shown to protect brain tissues from the detrimental effects of ischemia. To date, the mechanisms for this remain unclear. In order to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms by which relaxin may protect the brain, we investigated the possibility that relaxin protects astrocytes from hypoxia or oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultured astrocytes were pre-treated with either relaxin-2 or relaxin-3 and exposed to OGD for 24 or 48 hours. Following OGD exposure, viability assays showed that relaxin-treated cells exhibited a higher viability when compared to astrocytes that experienced OGD-alone. Next, to test whether relaxin reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) astrocytes were exposed to the same conditions as the previous experiment and a commercially available ROS detection kit was used to detect ROS production. Astrocytes that were treated with relaxin-2 and relaxin-3 showed a marked decrease in ROS production when compared to control astrocytes that were exposed only to OGD. Finally, experiments were performed to determine whether or not the mitochondrial membrane potential was affected by relaxin treatment during 24 hour OGD. Mitochondrial membrane potential was higher in astrocytes that were treated with relaxin-2 and relaxin-3 compared to untreated OGD-alone astrocytes. Taken together, these data present novel findings that show relaxin protects astrocytes from ischemic conditions through the reduction of ROS production and the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:24598861

  13. Regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression by Nrf2 and c-Jun in tertiary butylhydroquinone-stimulated rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in rat primary astrocytes. • tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an ARE-dependent manner. • tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. • Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. • Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction. - Abstract: Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a phase II antioxidant enzyme that is primarily involved in detoxification and cytoprotection in a variety of tissues. However, the mechanism underlying HO-1 gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of HO-1 expression in primary cultured astrocytes by using the natural antioxidant compound tertiary butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). We found that tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis revealed that tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent manner. In addition, tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments demonstrated that Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. Thus, Nrf2 knockdown reduced the basal level of HO-1 expression but did not affect the fold induction by tBHQ. On the other hand, knockdown of c-Jun diminished tBHQ-mediated induction of HO-1 without affecting basal expression. The data suggest that Nrf2 generally modulates the basal expression of HO-1, while c-Jun mediates HO-1 induction in response to tBHQ. The results of co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a physical interaction between Nrf2 and c-Jun in tBHQ-treated astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction in tBHQ-treated rat primary astrocytes.

  14. Regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression by Nrf2 and c-Jun in tertiary butylhydroquinone-stimulated rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-05-16

    Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a phase II antioxidant enzyme that is primarily involved in detoxification and cytoprotection in a variety of tissues. However, the mechanism underlying HO-1 gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of HO-1 expression in primary cultured astrocytes by using the natural antioxidant compound tertiary butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). We found that tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis revealed that tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent manner. In addition, tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments demonstrated that Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. Thus, Nrf2 knockdown reduced the basal level of HO-1 expression but did not affect the fold induction by tBHQ. On the other hand, knockdown of c-Jun diminished tBHQ-mediated induction of HO-1 without affecting basal expression. The data suggest that Nrf2 generally modulates the basal expression of HO-1, while c-Jun mediates HO-1 induction in response to tBHQ. The results of co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a physical interaction between Nrf2 and c-Jun in tBHQ-treated astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction in tBHQ-treated rat primary astrocytes.

  15. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Antagonist NPS 2143 Restores Amyloid Precursor Protein Physiological Non-Amyloidogenic Processing in Aβ-Exposed Adult Human Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Liu, Daisong; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2017-04-28

    Physiological non-amyloidogenic processing (NAP) of amyloid precursor holoprotein (hAPP) by α-secretases (e.g., ADAM10) extracellularly sheds neurotrophic/neuroprotective soluble (s)APPα and precludes amyloid-β peptides (Aβs) production via β-secretase amyloidogenic processing (AP). Evidence exists that Aβs interact with calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) in human astrocytes and neurons, driving the overrelease of toxic Aβ42/Aβ42-os (oligomers), which is completely blocked by CaSR antagonist (calcilytic) NPS 2143. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying NPS 2143 beneficial effects in human astrocytes. Moreover, because Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves neuroinflammation, we examined whether NPS 2143 remained beneficial when both fibrillary (f)Aβ25-35 and a microglial cytokine mixture (CMT) were present. Thus, hAPP NAP prevailed over AP in untreated astrocytes, which extracellularly shed all synthesized sAPPα while secreting basal Aβ40/42 amounts. Conversely, fAβ25-35 alone dramatically reduced sAPPα extracellular shedding while driving Aβ42/Aβ42-os oversecretion that CMT accelerated but not increased, despite a concurring hAPP overexpression. NPS 2143 promoted hAPP and ADAM10 translocation to the plasma membrane, thereby restoring sAPPα extracellular shedding and fully suppressing any Aβ42/Aβ42-os oversecretion, but left hAPP expression unaffected. Therefore, as anti-AD therapeutics calcilytics support neuronal viability by safeguarding astrocytes neurotrophic/neuroprotective sAPPα shedding, suppressing neurons and astrocytes Aβ42/Aβ42-os build-up/secretion, and remaining effective even under AD-typical neuroinflammatory conditions.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of fermented papaya preparation by activation of Nrf2 pathway in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinki; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2016-11-14

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) in astrocyte plays important roles in brain homeostasis. Fermented papaya preparation (FPP) has anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of FPP on activation of Nrf2 and release of Nrf2-regulated neuroprotective antioxidants and detoxifying molecules. Primary cultured astrocytes from rat embryos were treated with FPP for 6 or 24 hours. The expression levels of nuclear Nrf2 and cytoplasmic Nrf2-regulated molecules were determined by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Glutathione levels were measured in cells and medium. Dopaminergic neurons were exposed 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) with/without pre-treatment with FPP astrocytes. Mice were treated orally with FPP for 2 weeks. FPP increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in striatal astrocytes, induced up-regulation of NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S transferase and hemeoxygenase-1, and increased glutathione level and the percentage of metallothionein-expressing astrocytes. Moreover, FPP suppressed 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss in not only neuron-astrocyte mixed culture, but also neuron-rich cultures pre-treated with glial conditioned medium. Two-week oral treatment of mice with FPP resulted in Nrf2 activation and increase in glutathione level in striatum. The results indicated that FPP enhances the anti-oxidative capacity through activation of Nrf2 in astrocytes, suggesting it may provide neuroprotection in oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Astrocytes Prevent Ethanol Induced Apoptosis of Nrf2 Depleted Neurons by Maintaining GSH Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Rathinam, Marylatha; Patel, Dhyanesh; Henderson, George; Mahimainathan, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH), a major cellular antioxidant protects cells against oxidative stress injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2/Nrf2) is a redox sensitive master regulator of battery of antioxidant enzymes including those involved in GSH antioxidant machinery. Earlier we reported that ethanol (ETOH) elicits apoptotic death of primary cortical neurons (PCNs) which in partly due to depletion of intracellular GSH levels. Further a recent report from our laboratory illustrated that ETOH exacerbated the dysregulation of GSH and caspase mediated cell death of cortical neurons that are compromised in Nrf2 machinery (Narasimhan et al., 2011). In various experimental models of neurodegeneration, neuronal antioxidant defenses mainly GSH has been shown to be supported by astrocytes. We therefore sought to determine whether astrocytes can render protection to neurons against ETOH toxicity, particularly when the function of Nrf2 is compromised in neurons. The experimental model consisted of co-culturing primary cortical astrocytes (PCA) with Nrf2 downregulated PCNs that were exposed with 4 mg/mL ETOH for 24 h. Monochlorobimane (MCB) staining followed by FACS analysis showed that astrocytes blocked ETOH induced GSH decrement in Nrf2-silenced neurons as opposed to exaggerated GSH depletion in Nrf2 downregulated PCNs alone. Similarly, the heightened activation of caspase 3/7 observed in Nrf2-compromised neurons was attenuated when co-cultured with astrocytes as measured by luminescence based caspase Glo assay. Furthermore, annexin-V-FITC staining followed by FACS analysis revealed that Nrf2 depleted neurons showed resistance to ETOH induced neuronal apoptosis when co-cultured with astrocytes. Thus, the current study identifies ETOH induced dysregulation of GSH and associated apoptotic events observed in Nrf2-depleted neurons can be blocked by astrocytes. Further our results suggest that this neuroprotective effect of astrocyte despite dysfunctional Nrf2 system

  18. Astrocytes Prevent Ethanol Induced Apoptosis of Nrf2 Depleted Neurons by Maintaining GSH Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Rathinam, Marylatha; Patel, Dhyanesh; Henderson, George; Mahimainathan, Lenin

    2012-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH), a major cellular antioxidant protects cells against oxidative stress injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2/Nrf2) is a redox sensitive master regulator of battery of antioxidant enzymes including those involved in GSH antioxidant machinery. Earlier we reported that ethanol (ETOH) elicits apoptotic death of primary cortical neurons (PCNs) which in partly due to depletion of intracellular GSH levels. Further a recent report from our laboratory illustrated that ETOH exacerbated the dysregulation of GSH and caspase mediated cell death of cortical neurons that are compromised in Nrf2 machinery (Narasimhan et al., 2011). In various experimental models of neurodegeneration, neuronal antioxidant defenses mainly GSH has been shown to be supported by astrocytes. We therefore sought to determine whether astrocytes can render protection to neurons against ETOH toxicity, particularly when the function of Nrf2 is compromised in neurons. The experimental model consisted of co-culturing primary cortical astrocytes (PCA) with Nrf2 downregulated PCNs that were exposed with 4 mg/mL ETOH for 24 h. Monochlorobimane (MCB) staining followed by FACS analysis showed that astrocytes blocked ETOH induced GSH decrement in Nrf2-silenced neurons as opposed to exaggerated GSH depletion in Nrf2 downregulated PCNs alone. Similarly, the heightened activation of caspase 3/7 observed in Nrf2-compromised neurons was attenuated when co-cultured with astrocytes as measured by luminescence based caspase Glo assay. Furthermore, annexin-V-FITC staining followed by FACS analysis revealed that Nrf2 depleted neurons showed resistance to ETOH induced neuronal apoptosis when co-cultured with astrocytes. Thus, the current study identifies ETOH induced dysregulation of GSH and associated apoptotic events observed in Nrf2-depleted neurons can be blocked by astrocytes. Further our results suggest that this neuroprotective effect of astrocyte despite dysfunctional Nrf2 system

  19. 2-Chloroethanol Induced Upregulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 in Primary Cultured Rat Astrocytes Via MAPK Signal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Liao, Yingjun; Wang, Tong; Tang, Hongge; Wang, Gaoyang; Zhao, Fenghong; Jin, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    This study was to explore the mechanisms underlying 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCE) induced brain edema by focusing on alteration of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in rat astrocytes induced by 2-chloroethanol (2-CE), an intermediate metabolite of 1,2-DCE in vivo. Protein and mRNA levels of MMP-2, and the phosphorylated protein levels of p38 MAPK (p-p38), extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (p-ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK1/2) in astrocytes were examined by immunostaining, western blot or real-time RT-PCR analysis. Findings from this study disclosed that protein levels of MMP-2 were upregulated by 2-CE in astrocytes. Meanwhile, protein levels of p-p38, p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 were also increased apparently in the cells treated with 2-CE. Moreover, pretreatment of astrocytes with SB202190 (inhibitor of p38 MAPK), U0126 (inhibitor of ERK1/2) or SP600125 (inhibitor of JNK1/2) could suppress the upregulated expression of p-p38, p-ERK1/2, and p-JNK1/2. In response to suppressed protein levels of p-p38 and p-JNK1/2, the protein levels of MMP-2 also decreased significantly, indicating that activation of MAPK signal pathways were involved in the mechanisms underlying 2-CE-induced upregulation of MMP-2 expression. PMID:28101000

  20. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated changes in basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular calcium in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine A1 receptor stimulation on basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been investigated in primary astrocyte cultures derived from neonatal rat forebrains. 2. Histamine (0.1 microM-1 mM) caused rapid, concentration-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i over basal levels in single type-2 astrocytes in the presence of extracellular calcium. A maximum mean increase of 1,468 +/- 94 nM over basal levels was recorded in 90% of type-2 cells treated with 1 mM histamine (n = 49). The percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to histamine appeared to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the application of 1 mM histamine to type-1 astrocytes had less effect, eliciting a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 805 +/- 197 nM over basal levels in only 30% of the cells observed (n = 24). 3. In the presence of extracellular calcium, the A1 receptor-selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10 microM), caused a maximum mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 1,110 +/- 181 nM over basal levels in 30% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 53). The size of this response was concentration-dependent; however, the percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to CPA did not appear to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. A mean calcium increase of 605 +/- 89 nM over basal levels was also recorded in 23% of type-1 astrocytes treated with 10 microM CPA (n = 30). 4. In the absence of extracellular calcium, in medium containing 0.1 mM EGTA, a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 504 +/- 67 nM over basal levels was recorded in 41% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 41) after stimulation with 1 microM CPA. However, in the presence of extracellular calcium, pretreatment with the A1 receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, for 5-10 min before stimulation with 1 microM CPA, completely antagonized the response in 100% of the cells observed. 5. In type-2

  1. Overexpression of serum response factor in astrocytes improves neuronal plasticity in a model of early alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Paul, A P; Medina, A E

    2012-09-27

    Neuronal plasticity deficits underlie many of the cognitive problems seen in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). We have developed a ferret model showing that early alcohol exposure leads to a persistent disruption in ocular dominance (OD) plasticity. Recently, we showed that this deficit could be reversed by overexpression of serum response factor (SRF) in the primary visual cortex during the period of monocular deprivation (MD). Surprisingly, this restoration was observed throughout the extent of visual cortex and most of the cells transfected by the virus were positive for the astrocytic marker GFAP rather than the neuronal marker NeuN. Here we test whether overexpression of SRF exclusively in astrocytes is sufficient to restore OD plasticity in alcohol-exposed ferrets. To accomplish that, first we exposed cultured astrocytes to Sindbis viruses carrying either a constitutively active form of SRF (SRF+), a dominant negative (SRF-) or control Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). After 24h, these astrocytes were implanted in the visual cortex of alcohol-exposed animals or saline controls one day before MD. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals showed that alcohol-exposed animals that were implanted with astrocytes expressing SRF, but not SRF- or GFP, showed robust restoration of OD plasticity in all visual cortex. These findings suggest that overexpression of SRF exclusively in astrocytes can improve neuronal plasticity in FASD. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Uniquely hominid features of adult human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oberheim, Nancy Ann; Takano, Takahiro; Han, Xiaoning; He, Wei; Lin, Jane H C; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wyatt, Jeffrey D; Pilcher, Webster; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Ransom, Bruce R; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2009-03-11

    Defining the microanatomic differences between the human brain and that of other mammals is key to understanding its unique computational power. Although much effort has been devoted to comparative studies of neurons, astrocytes have received far less attention. We report here that protoplasmic astrocytes in human neocortex are 2.6-fold larger in diameter and extend 10-fold more GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive primary processes than their rodent counterparts. In cortical slices prepared from acutely resected surgical tissue, protoplasmic astrocytes propagate Ca(2+) waves with a speed of 36 microm/s, approximately fourfold faster than rodent. Human astrocytes also transiently increase cystosolic Ca(2+) in response to glutamatergic and purinergic receptor agonists. The human neocortex also harbors several anatomically defined subclasses of astrocytes not represented in rodents. These include a population of astrocytes that reside in layers 5-6 and extend long fibers characterized by regularly spaced varicosities. Another specialized type of astrocyte, the interlaminar astrocyte, abundantly populates the superficial cortical layers and extends long processes without varicosities to cortical layers 3 and 4. Human fibrous astrocytes resemble their rodent counterpart but are larger in diameter. Thus, human cortical astrocytes are both larger, and structurally both more complex and more diverse, than those of rodents. On this basis, we posit that this astrocytic complexity has permitted the increased functional competence of the adult human brain.

  3. Infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus directly induces proinflammatory cytokines in primary astrocytes via NF-kappaB activation: potential role for the initiation of demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Palma, JoAnn P; Kwon, Daeho; Clipstone, Neil A; Kim, Byung S

    2003-06-01

    Theiler's virus infection in the central nervous system (CNS) induces a demyelinating disease very similar to human multiple sclerosis. We have assessed cytokine gene activation upon Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection and potential mechanisms in order to delineate the early events in viral infection that lead to immune-mediated demyelinating disease. Infection of SJL/J primary astrocyte cultures induces selective proinflammatory cytokine genes (interleukin-12p40 [IL-12p40], IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and beta interferon [IFN-beta]) important in the innate immune response to infection. We find that TMEV-induced cytokine gene expression is mediated by the NF-kappaB pathway based on the early nuclear NF-kappaB translocation and suppression of cytokine activation in the presence of specific inhibitors of the NF-kappaB pathway. Further studies show this to be partly independent of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and IFN-alpha/beta pathways. Altogether, these results demonstrate that infection of astrocytes and other CNS-resident cells by TMEV provides the early NF-kappaB-mediated signals that directly activate various proinflammatory cytokine genes involved in the initiation and amplification of inflammatory responses in the CNS known to be critical for the development of immune-mediated demyelination.

  4. The Rac activator Tiam1 is required for polarized protrusional outgrowth of primary astrocytes by affecting the organization of the microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Iden, Sandra; Collard, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Polarized cell migration is a crucial process in the development and repair of tissues, as well as in pathological conditions, including cancer. Recent studies have elucidated important roles for Rho GTPases in the establishment and maintenance of polarity prior to and during cell migration. Here, we show that Tiam1, a specific activator of the small GTPase Rac, is required for the polarized outgrowth of protrusions in primary astrocytes during the initial phase of cell polarization after scratch-wounding monolayers of cells. Tiam1 deficiency delays closure of wounds in confluent monolayers. Lack of Tiam1 impairs adoption of an asymmetrical cell shape as well as microtubule organization within protrusions. Positioning of the centrosome and Golgi apparatus, however, are independent of Tiam1-Rac signaling. We speculate that the function of Tiam1 in polarized outgrowth of astrocyte protrusions involves regulation of microtubule organization, possibly by stabilizing the microtubule cytoskeleton. Our results add Tiam1 as a player to the growing list of proteins involved in polarized outgrowth of protrusions and further elucidate the signaling pathways leading to cell polarization. PMID:22710731

  5. The Rac activator Tiam1 is required for polarized protrusional outgrowth of primary astrocytes by affecting the organization of the microtubule network.

    PubMed

    Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Iden, Sandra; Collard, John G

    2012-01-01

    Polarized cell migration is a crucial process in the development and repair of tissues, as well as in pathological conditions, including cancer. Recent studies have elucidated important roles for Rho GTPases in the establishment and maintenance of polarity prior to and during cell migration. Here, we show that Tiam1, a specific activator of the small GTPase Rac, is required for the polarized outgrowth of protrusions in primary astrocytes during the initial phase of cell polarization after scratch-wounding monolayers of cells. Tiam1 deficiency delays closure of wounds in confluent monolayers. Lack of Tiam1 impairs adoption of an asymmetrical cell shape as well as microtubule organization within protrusions. Positioning of the centrosome and Golgi apparatus, however, are independent of Tiam1-Rac signaling. We speculate that the function of Tiam1 in polarized outgrowth of astrocyte protrusions involves regulation of microtubule organization, possibly by stabilizing the microtubule cytoskeleton. Our results add Tiam1 as a player to the growing list of proteins involved in polarized outgrowth of protrusions and further elucidate the signaling pathways leading to cell polarization.

  6. Extracellular matrix composition determines astrocyte responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kasey M; Milner, Richard; Crocker, Stephen J

    2015-07-23

    Astrocytes perform critical homeostatic physiological functions in the central nervous system (CNS) and are robustly responsive to injury, inflammation, or infection. We hypothesized that the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which are known to vary during development and in response to disease, determine astrocytic responses to injury and inflammation. We examined the response of primary astrocyte cultures grown on different ECM proteins to a mechanical wound (i.e., scratch). ECM substrates selected were laminin (Ln), vitronectin (Vn), fibronectin (Fn) or Tenascin C (TnC). We found that regrowth of the scratch wound was ECM dependent: recovery was arrested on fibronectin (Fn), almost complete on either Vn, Ln, or TnC. To determine whether ECM responses were also influenced by inflammation, we treated ECM plated cultures with interleukin-1β (IL-1β). We found that IL-1β arrested astrocyte growth on Ln, accelerated astrocyte growth on Fn and had no significant effect on astrocyte growth on TnC or Vn. We also determined that blocking β1integrins, the major class of receptors for all ECM proteins tested, prevented the robust response of astrocytes exposed to TnC, Ln and Vn, and also inhibited the robust effect of IL-1β to stimulate astrocyte growth on Fn. In addition, we evaluated downstream targets of integrin signaling, specifically the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and determined that activation of this pathway contributed to the response of astrocytes grown on TnC, but not on Ln, Vn or Fn. These findings provide new insights into the role of ECM as a source of heterogeneity of glial responses that may have important implications for neuropathological sequelae.

  7. Dopamine Burden Triggers Neurodegeneration via Production and Release of TNF-α from Astrocytes in Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Saidan; Wang, Weikan; Wang, Xuebao; Liang, Yong; Liu, Leping; Ye, Yiru; Yang, Jianjing; Gao, Hongchang; Zhuge, Qichuan

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA)-induced learning and memory impairment is well documented in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), but the contribution of DA to neurodegeneration and the involved underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of DA on neuronal apoptosis was initially detected. The results showed that MHE/DA (10 μg)-treated rats displayed neuronal apoptosis. However, we found that DA (10 μM) treatment did not induce evident apoptosis in primary cultured neurons (PCNs) but did produce TNF-α in primary cultured astrocytes (PCAs). Furthermore, co-cultures between PCAs and PCNs exposed to DA exhibited increased astrocytic TNF-α levels and neuronal apoptosis compared with co-cultures exposed to the vehicle, indicating the attribution of the neuronal apoptosis to astrocytic TNF-α. We also demonstrated that DA enhanced TNF-α production from astrocytes by activation of the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway, and secreted astrocytic TNF-α-potentiated neuronal apoptosis through inactivation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Overall, the findings from this study suggest that DA stimulates substantial production and secretion of astrocytic TNF-α, consequently and indirectly triggering progressive neurodegeneration, resulting in cognitive decline and memory loss in MHE.

  8. Amyloid-β induced astrocytosis and astrocyte death: Implication of FoxO3a-Bim-caspase3 death signaling.

    PubMed

    Saha, Pampa; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes, the main element of the homeostatic system in the brain, are affected in various neurological conditions including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A common astrocytic reaction in pathological state is known as astrocytosis which is characterized by a specific change in astrocyte shape due to cytoskeletal remodeling, cytokine secretion and cellular proliferation. Astrocytes also undergo apoptosis in various neurological conditions or in response to toxic insults. AD is pathologically characterized by progressive deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in senile plaques, intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, synaptic dysfunction and neuron death. Astrocytosis and astrocyte death have been reported in AD brain as well as in response to Aβ in vitro. However, how astrocytes undergo both proliferation and death in response to Aβ remains elusive. In this study, we used primary cultures of cortical astrocytes and exposed them to various doses of oligomeric Aβ. We found that cultured astrocytes proliferate and manifest all signs of astrocytosis at a low dose of Aβ. However, at high dose of Aβ the activated astrocytes undergo apoptosis. Astrocytosis was also noticed in vivo in response to Aβ in the rat brain. Next, we investigated the mechanism of astrocyte apoptosis in response to a high dose of Aβ. We found that death of astrocyte induced by Aβ requires a set of molecules that are instrumental for neuron death in response to Aβ. It involves activation of Forkhead transcription factor Foxo3a, induction of its pro-apoptotic target Bim and activation of its downstream molecule, caspase3. Hence, this study demonstrates that the concentration of Aβ decides whether astrocytes do proliferate or undergo apoptosis via a mechanism that is required for neuron death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. White matter astrocytes in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Lundgaard, I; Osório, M J; Kress, B T; Sanggaard, S; Nedergaard, M

    2014-09-12

    Myelination by oligodendrocytes is a highly specialized process that relies on intimate interactions between the axon and the oligodendrocytes. Astrocytes have an important part in facilitating myelination in the CNS, however, comparatively less is known about how they affect myelination. This review therefore summarizes the literature and explores lingering questions surrounding differences between white matter and gray matter astrocytes, how astrocytes support myelination, how their dysfunction in pathological states contributes to myelin pathologies and how astrocytes may facilitate remyelination. We discuss how astrocytes in the white matter are specialized to promote myelination and myelin maintenance by clearance of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters and by secretion of pro-myelinating factors. Additionally, astrocyte-oligodendrocyte coupling via gap junctions is crucial for both myelin formation and maintenance, due to K(+) buffering and possibly metabolic support for oligodendrocytes via the panglial syncytium. Dysfunctional astrocytes aberrantly affect oligodendrocytes, as exemplified by a number of leukodystrophies in which astrocytic pathology is known as the direct cause of myelin pathology. Conversely, in primary demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, astrocytes may facilitate remyelination. We suggest that specific manipulation of astrocytes could help prevent myelin pathologies and successfully restore myelin sheaths after demyelination.

  10. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and MSC conditioned medium in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)--in vitro evidence from primary motor neuron cultures, NSC-34 cells, astrocytes and microglia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Bénardais, Karelle; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Thau-Habermann, Nadine; Hensel, Niko; Huang, Dongya; Claus, Peter; Dengler, Reinhard; Stangel, Martin; Petri, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) improves functional outcome in the SOD1G93A mouse model of the degenerative motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as well as in models of other neurological disorders. We have now investigated the effect of the interaction between MSC and motor neurons (derived from both non-transgenic and mutant SOD1G93A transgenic mice), NSC-34 cells and glial cells (astrocytes, microglia) (derived again from both non-transgenic and mutant SOD1G93A ALS transgenic mice) in vitro. In primary motor neurons, NSC-34 cells and astrocytes, MSC conditioned medium (MSC CM) attenuated staurosporine (STS) - induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Studying MSC CM-induced expression of neurotrophic factors in astrocytes and NSC-34 cells, we found that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene expression in astrocytes were significantly enhanced by MSC CM, with differential responses of non-transgenic and mutant astrocytes. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in NSC-34 cells was significantly upregulated upon MSC CM-treatment. MSC CM significantly reduced the expression of the cytokines TNFα and IL-6 and iNOS both in transgenic and non-transgenic astrocytes. Gene expression of the neuroprotective chemokine Fractalkine (CX3CL1) was also upregulated in mutant SOD1G93A transgenic astrocytes by MSC CM treatment. Correspondingly, MSC CM increased the respective receptor, CX3CR1, in mutant SOD1G93A transgenic microglia. Our data demonstrate that MSC modulate motor neuronal and glial response to apoptosis and inflammation. MSC therefore represent an interesting candidate for further preclinical and clinical evaluation in ALS.

  11. Amitriptyline induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression through ERK-dependent modulation of multiple BDNF mRNA variants in primary cultured rat cortical astrocytes and microglia.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Kajitani, Naoto; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shigetou, Takahiro; Kasai, Miho; Matsumoto, Chie; Yokoe, Toshiki; Azuma, Honami; Takebayashi, Minoru; Morioka, Norimitsu; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    A significant role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been previously implicated in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. To ascertain the contribution of specific cell types in the brain that produce BDNF following antidepressant treatment, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline on rat primary neuronal, astrocytic and microglial cortical cultures were examined. Amitriptyline increased the expression of BDNF mRNA in astrocytic and microglial cultures but not neuronal cultures. Antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, such as clomipramine, duloxetine and fluvoxamine, also increased BDNF mRNA expression in astrocytic and microglial cultures. There are multiple BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IIA, IV and VI) expressed in astrocytes and microglia and the variant induced by antidepressants has yet to be elaborated. Treatment with antidepressants increased the expression of exon I, IV and VI in astrocyte and microglia. Clomipramine alone significantly upregulated expression of exon IIA. The amitriptyline-induced expression of both total and individual BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IV and VI) were blocked by MEK inhibitor U0126, indicating MEK/ERK signaling is required in the expression of BDNF. These findings indicate that non-neural cells are a significant target of antidepressants and further support the contention that glial production of BDNF is crucial role in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. The current data suggest that targeting of glial function could lead to the development of antidepressants with a truly novel mechanism of action.

  12. Adaptive Response in Mice Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Primary DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Zhang, Jie; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of adaptive response (AR) in animal and human cells exposed to ionizing radiation is well documented in scientific literature. We have examined whether such AR could be induced in mice exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) used for wireless communications. Mice were pre-exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 µW/cm2 power density for 4 hours/day for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days and then subjected to an acute dose of 3 Gy γ-radiation. The primary DNA damage in the form of alkali labile base damage and single strand breaks in the DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The results indicated that the extent of damage in mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 1 day and then subjected to γ-radiation was similar and not significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. However, mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 3, 5, 7 and 14 days showed progressively decreased damage and was significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. Thus, the data indicated that RF pre-exposure is capable of inducing AR and suggested that the pre-exposure for more than 4 hours for 1 day is necessary to elicit such AR. PMID:22389679

  13. Experimental Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Decreases Astrocyte Density and Changes Astrocytic Polarity in the CA1 Hippocampus of Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Saur, Lisiani; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Neves, Laura Tartari; de Oliveira, Raquel Mattos; Vaz, Sabrina Pereira; Ferreira, Kelly; Machado, Susane Alves; Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2016-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric condition resulting from exposure to a traumatic event. It is characterized by several debilitating symptoms including re-experiencing the past trauma, avoidance behavior, increased fear, and hyperarousal. Key roles in the neuropathology of PTSD and its symptomatology have been attributed to the hippocampus and amygdala. These regions are involved in explicit memory processes and context encoding during fear conditioning. The aim of our study was to investigate whether PTSD is capable of altering the morphology, density and expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in astrocytes from the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the medial amygdala and correlate the data obtained with the orientation index of the polarity of astrocytes. Thirty male rats were divided in two groups: control (n = 15) and PTSD (n = 15). The inescapable shock protocol, in which the animals are exposed to a single episode of footshock, was used to induce PTSD. Our results show that, in the hippocampus, PTSD is capable of decreasing the density of GFAP+ astrocytes as well as altering astrocytic morphology, as shown by the reductions observed in the total number of primary processes, in the number of primary processes in the lateral quadrants, and the degree of branching in the lateral quadrants. The analysis of the orientation index indicates that PTSD alters the polarity of hippocampal astrocytes. No alterations were observed in the amygdala astrocytes. Therefore, this study demonstrates notable changes in hippocampal astrocytes, supporting the concept that these cells play an important role in PTSD symptomatology.

  14. Amyloid β-Exposed Human Astrocytes Overproduce Phospho-Tau and Overrelease It within Exosomes, Effects Suppressed by Calcilytic NPS 2143—Further Implications for Alzheimer's Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Gardenal, Emanuela; Gui, Li; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    The two main drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) oligomers, cooperatively accelerate AD progression, but a hot debate is still ongoing about which of the two appears first. Here we present preliminary evidence showing that Tau and p-Tau are expressed by untransformed cortical adult human astrocytes in culture and that exposure of such cells to an Aβ42 proxy, Aβ25−35, which binds the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and activates its signaling, significantly increases intracellular p-Tau levels, an effect CaSR antagonist (calcilytic) NPS 2143 wholly hinders. The astrocytes also release both Tau and p-Tau by means of exosomes into the extracellular medium, an activity that could mediate p-Tau diffusion within the brain. Preliminary data also indicate that exosomal levels of p-Tau increase after Aβ25−35 exposure, but remain unchanged in cells pre-treated for 30-min with NPS 2143 before adding Aβ25−35. Thus, our previous and present findings raise the unifying prospect that Aβ•CaSR signaling plays a crucial role in AD development and progression by simultaneously activating (i) the amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor holoprotein, whose upshot is a surplus production and secretion of Aβ42 oligomers, and (ii) the GSK-3β-mediated increased production of p-Tau oligomers which are next released extracellularly inside exosomes. Therefore, as calcilytics suppress both effects on Aβ42 and p-Tau metabolic handling, these highly selective antagonists of pathological Aβ•CaSR signaling would effectively halt AD's progressive spread preserving patients' cognition and life quality. PMID:28473749

  15. Amyloid β-Exposed Human Astrocytes Overproduce Phospho-Tau and Overrelease It within Exosomes, Effects Suppressed by Calcilytic NPS 2143-Further Implications for Alzheimer's Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Gardenal, Emanuela; Gui, Li; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    The two main drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) oligomers, cooperatively accelerate AD progression, but a hot debate is still ongoing about which of the two appears first. Here we present preliminary evidence showing that Tau and p-Tau are expressed by untransformed cortical adult human astrocytes in culture and that exposure of such cells to an Aβ42 proxy, Aβ25-35, which binds the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and activates its signaling, significantly increases intracellular p-Tau levels, an effect CaSR antagonist (calcilytic) NPS 2143 wholly hinders. The astrocytes also release both Tau and p-Tau by means of exosomes into the extracellular medium, an activity that could mediate p-Tau diffusion within the brain. Preliminary data also indicate that exosomal levels of p-Tau increase after Aβ25-35 exposure, but remain unchanged in cells pre-treated for 30-min with NPS 2143 before adding Aβ25-35. Thus, our previous and present findings raise the unifying prospect that Aβ•CaSR signaling plays a crucial role in AD development and progression by simultaneously activating (i) the amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor holoprotein, whose upshot is a surplus production and secretion of Aβ42 oligomers, and (ii) the GSK-3β-mediated increased production of p-Tau oligomers which are next released extracellularly inside exosomes. Therefore, as calcilytics suppress both effects on Aβ42 and p-Tau metabolic handling, these highly selective antagonists of pathological Aβ•CaSR signaling would effectively halt AD's progressive spread preserving patients' cognition and life quality.

  16. Ceftriaxone Protects Astrocytes from MPP(+) via Suppression of NF-κB/JNK/c-Jun Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Xiuping; Qu, Shaogang

    2015-08-01

    Ceftriaxone has been shown to attenuate the dopaminergic neuron death and alleviate behavioral disorders in Parkinson's disease models via upregulation of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and decreases in extracellular glutamate. However, details of how this neuroprotection occurs are uncertain. We hypothesized that cytoprotection by ceftriaxone in astrocytes exposed to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) involves suppression of the NF-κB/JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. Here, we observed a protective effect of ceftriaxone in primary astrocytes exposed to MPP(+). Ceftriaxone enhanced glutamate uptake and promoted primary astrocyte viability after MPP(+) exposure. Ceftriaxone enhances glutamate uptake via upregulation of GLT-1 in the plasma membrane, and alleviates MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity via suppression of NF-κB/JNK/c-Jun signaling. Collectively, our data offer evidence that increased expression and function of GLT-1 are involved in the protective mechanism of ceftriaxone in astrocytes exposed to MPP(+) in vitro, and we offer insight into the potential therapeutic role of ceftriaxone in treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  17. Valproate and Amitriptyline Exert Common and Divergent Influences on Global and Gene Promoter-Specific Chromatin Modifications in Rat Primary Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Perisic, Tatjana; Zimmermann, Nicole; Kirmeier, Thomas; Asmus, Maria; Tuorto, Francesca; Uhr, Manfred; Holsboer, Florian; Rein, Theo; Zschocke, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant biochemical processes in the brain frequently go along with subtle shifts of the cellular epigenetic profile that might support the pathogenic progression of psychiatric disorders. Although recent reports have implied the ability of certain antidepressants and mood stabilizers to modulate epigenetic parameters, studies comparing the actions of these compounds under the same conditions are lacking. In this study, we screened amitriptyline (AMI), venlafaxine, citalopram, as well as valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine, and lamotrigine for their potential actions on global and local epigenetic modifications in rat primary astrocytes. Among all drugs, VPA exposure evoked the strongest global chromatin modifications, including histone H3/H4 hyperacetylation, 2MeH3K9 hypomethylation, and DNA demethylation, as determined by western blot and luminometric methylation analysis, respectively. CpG demethylation occurred independently of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) suppression. Strikingly, AMI also induced slight cytosine demethylation, paralleled by the reduction in DNMT enzymatic activity, without affecting the global histone acetylation status. Locally, VPA-induced chromatin modifications were reflected at the glutamate transporter (GLT-1) promoter as shown by bisulfite sequencing and acetylated histone H4 chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Distinct CpG sites in the distal part of the GLT-1 promoter were demethylated and enriched in acetylated histone H4 in response to VPA. For the first time, we could show that these changes were associated with an enhanced transcription of this astrocyte-specific gene. In contrast, AMI failed to stimulate GLT-1 transcription and to alter promoter methylation levels. In conclusion, VPA and AMI globally exerted chromatin-modulating activities using different mechanisms that divergently precipitated at an astroglial gene locus. PMID:19924110

  18. Growth factors and steroid mediated regulation of cytoskeletal protein expression in serum-deprived primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Vincenzo; Bronzi, Daniela; Tomassoni, Daniele; Costa, Antonino; Raciti, Giuseppina; Avitabile, Marcello; Amenta, Francesco; Avola, Roberto

    2008-12-01

    In this research we aimed to investigate the interactions between growth factors (GFs) and dexamethasone (DEX) on cytoskeletal proteins GFAP and vimentin (VIM) expression under different experimental conditions. Condition I: 24 h pretreatment with bFGF, subsequent 72 h switching in serum-free medium (SFM) and final addition of GFs, alone or by two in the last 24 h, after a prolonged (60 h) DEX treatment. Condition II: 36 h pretreatment with DEX (with bFGF in the last 24 h), followed by SFM for 60 h and final addition for 24 h with growth factors alone or two of them together. Western blot analysis data showed a marked GFAP expression in cultures submitted to Condition I comparing results to untreated or treated controls. VIM expression was instead significantly reduced after GFs addition in the last 24 h of 60 h DEX treatment, respect to control DEX-pretreated ones. Referring data to untreated controls, VIM expression was significantly enhanced after GFs addition. GFAP showed also a significant increase in astrocytes submitted to Condition II, respect to untreated or treated control cultures. VIM expression was up and down regulated under Condition II. Collectively, our findings evidence an interactive dialogue between GFs and DEX in astroglial cultures, co-pretreated with DEX and bFGF, regulating cytoskeletal network under stressful conditions.

  19. Congenital defect of maxillary primary central incisor associated with exposed pulp and gingival [fibrosis]: case report.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tomiko; Tomizawa, Mieko; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Tanabe, Yoshihiro; Noda, Tadashi

    2003-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of hypoplastic primary incisor in which the pulp was exposed at the crown portion and covered by the gingiva in a 1-year-11-month-old boy. The patient was referred to us due to swelling of his labial cervical gingiva of the maxillary right primary central incisor, and on examination, extended to the hypoplastic labial surface. Radiographically, there was a round radiolucent area on the crown including the edge. Surgical removal of the swollen gingiva revealed a large defect of the labial aspect of the incisor, showing pulpal tissue inside. The tooth was treated by vital pulpotomy. Histopathologically, the removed gingival tissue contained many pieces of dysplastic tooth elements in the lamina propria portion which should have been connected to the exposed pulp. The findings suggested that pulp exposure resulted from focal dental hypoplasia not from resorption of the tooth.

  20. Interleukin-1-mediated febrile responses in mice and interleukin-1 beta activation of NFkappaB in mouse primary astrocytes, involves the interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein.

    PubMed

    Zetterström, M; Lundkvist, J; Malinowsky, D; Eriksson, G; Bartfai, T

    1998-06-01

    The endogenous pyrogen interleukin-1 (IL-1) is considered as one of the key molecules in orchestrating the host response of injury and inflammation. IL-1 exerts its effects upon binding to the type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI). The IL-1-IL-1RI complex is further thought to associate with the IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP), which is suggested to be important for most IL-1 signal transduction pathways. With the aim of investigating the importance of the IL-1RAcP in IL-1 signalling, IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induced febrile responses and IL-1beta-mediated activation of NFkappaB in primary astrocyte cultures were examined using IL-1RAcP-deficient (IL-1RAcP KO) and wild type mice, respectively. It was shown that neither recombinant rat IL-1alpha (rrIL-1alpha, 25 microg/kg), recombinant rat IL-1beta (rrIL-1beta, 40 microg/kg) nor recombinant human IL-1beta (rhIL-1beta, 50 microg/kg) injected i.p. could elicit febrile responses in the IL-1RAcP-deficient mice, while the same doses of rrIL-1alpha/beta or rhIL-1beta injected into wild type mice caused normal fever responses. A febrile response could be induced in the IL-1RAcP-deficient mice by i.p. administration of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 microg/kg) and this response was similar to that obtained in wild type mice. Furthermore, it was shown that rhIL-1beta activated, in a concentration-dependent manner, nuclear translocation of the transcriptional nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in primary astrocyte cultures prepared from wild type mice, whereas no IL-1beta-induced translocation of NFkappaB could be detected in cultures prepared from IL-1RAcP-deficient mice, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The rhIL-1beta-induced NFkappaB complexes were shown to contain p50 but no, or very little, p65 and cRel immunoreactive proteins.

  1. Melanomas of unknown primary have a mutation profile consistent with cutaneous sun-exposed melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dutton-Regester, Ken; Kakavand, Hojabr; Aoude, Lauren G; Stark, Mitchell S; Gartside, Michael G; Johansson, Peter; O'Connor, Linda; Lanagan, Cathy; Tembe, Varsha; Pupo, Gulietta M; Haydu, Lauren E; Schmidt, Christopher W; Mann, Graham J; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2013-11-01

    Melanoma of unknown primary (MUP) is an uncommon phenomenon whereby patients present with metastatic disease without an evident primary site. To determine their likely site of origin, we combined exome sequencing from 33 MUPs to assess the total rate of somatic mutations and degree of UV mutagenesis. An independent cohort of 91 archival MUPs was also screened for 46 hot spot mutations highly prevalent in melanoma including BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11. Results showed that the majority of MUPs exhibited high somatic mutation rates, high ratios of C>T/G>A transitions, and a high rate of BRAF (45 of 101, 45%) and NRAS (32 of 101, 32%) mutations, collectively indicating a mutation profile consistent with cutaneous sun-exposed melanomas. These data suggest that a significant proportion of MUPs arise from regressed or unrecognized primary cutaneous melanomas or arise de novo in lymph nodes from nevus cells that have migrated from the skin.

  2. Human astrocytes in the diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Dossi, Elena; Vasile, Flora; Rouach, Nathalie

    2017-02-13

    Astrocytes are key active elements of the brain that contribute to information processing. They not only provide neurons with metabolic and structural support, but also regulate neurogenesis and brain wiring. Furthermore, astrocytes modulate synaptic activity and plasticity in part by controlling the extracellular space volume, as well as ion and neurotransmitter homeostasis. These findings, together with the discovery that human astrocytes display contrasting characteristics with their rodent counterparts, point to a role for astrocytes in higher cognitive functions. Dysfunction of astrocytes can thereby induce major alterations in neuronal functions, contributing to the pathogenesis of several brain disorders. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the structural and functional alterations occurring in astrocytes from the human brain in pathological conditions such as epilepsy, primary tumours, Alzheimer's disease, major depressive disorder and Down syndrome. Compelling evidence thus shows that dysregulations of astrocyte functions and interplay with neurons contribute to the development and progression of various neurological diseases. Targeting astrocytes is thus a promising alternative approach that could contribute to the development of novel and effective therapies to treat brain disorders.

  3. Astrocyte-conditioned medium protecting hippocampal neurons in primary cultures against corticosterone-induced damages via PI3-K/Akt signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ze-Hua; Yang, Ru; Fu, Xin; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wu, Gen-Cheng

    2006-10-09

    Prolonged or excessive exposure to corticosterone leads to neuronal damages in the brain regions, including hippocampus. We reported that astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) protected the neurons of the primary hippocampal cultures against the corticosterone-induced damages. Corticosterone added to the cultures resulted in a significant number of TUNEL-positive cells. However, corticosterone-induced TUNEL labeling was suppressed as for ACM-cultured neurons. To delineate the molecular basis underlying the neuroprotection of ACM, we assessed the activation of ERK1/2 and (PI3-K)/Akt signal pathways in response to corticosterone-induced neuronal damages. Western blot test revealed that corticosterone increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt in hippocampal neurons grown in Neurobasal medium supplemented with B27 and 500 microm L-glutamine (NBM+). Interestingly, the increase of phospho-ERK1/2 and Akt levels was much pronounced and the time course of phosphorylation was altered in ACM, suggesting that both signaling pathways might participate in ACM protection. Furthermore, the selective inhibitor of Akt, rather than ERK1/2, blocked the neuroprotective activity against corticosterone in ACM-cultured neurons. In summary, our data showed that ACM had a potent neuroprotective effect in cultured neurons. PI3-K/Akt signal pathway, but not ERK1/2, was involved in the protective activity against the corticosterone-induced damages.

  4. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gillett, N.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Seiler, F.A.; Boecker, B.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1988-11-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Initial deposition of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the /sup 238/Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after /sup 238/Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that /sup 238/Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of /sup 238/Pu.

  5. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, N. A.; Muggenburg, B. A.; Mewhinney, J. A.; Hahn, F. F.; Seiler, F. A.; Boecker, B. B.; McClellan, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of 238PuO2. Initial deposition of 238PuO2 in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the 238Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to 238PuO2, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after 238Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that 238Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of 238Pu. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3142267

  6. RNAseq profiling of primary microglia and astrocyte cultures in near-term ovine fetus: A glial in vivo-in vitro multi-hit paradigm in large mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Cortes, M; Cao, M; Liu, H L; Burns, P; Moore, C; Fecteau, G; Desrochers, A; Barreiro, L B; Antel, J P; Frasch, M G

    2017-01-30

    The chronically instrumented fetal sheep is a widely used animal model to study fetal brain development in health and disease, but no methods exist yet to interrogate dedicated brain cell populations to identify their molecular and genomic phenotype. For example, the molecular mechanisms whereby microglia or astrocytes contribute to inflammation in the brain remain incompletely understood. Here we present a protocol to derive primary pure microglial or astrocyte cultures from near-term fetal sheep brain, after the animals have been chronically instrumented and studied in vivo. Next, we present the implementation of whole transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq) pipeline to deeper elucidate the phenotype of such primary sheep brain glial cultures. We validate the new primary cultures method for cell purity and test the function of the glial cells on protein (IL-1β) and transcriptome (RNAseq) levels in response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in vitro. This method represents the first implementation of pure microglial or astrocytes cultures in fetal sheep brain. The presented approach opens new possibilities for testing not only supernatant protein levels in response to an in vitro challenge, but also to evaluate changes in the transcriptome of glial cells derived from a large mammalian brain bearing high resemblance to the human brain. Moreover, the presented approach lends itself to modeling the complex multi-hit paradigms of antenatal and perinatal cerebral insults in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. RNAseq profiling of primary microglia and astrocyte cultures in near-term ovine fetus: A glial in vivo-in vitro multi-hit paradigm in large mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, M.; Cao, M.; Liu, H.L.; Burns, P.; Moore, C.; Fecteau, G.; Desrochers, A.; Barreiro, L.B.; Antel, J.P.; Frasch, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Background The chronically instrumented fetal sheep is a widely used animal model to study fetal brain development in health and disease, but no methods exist yet to interrogate dedicated brain cell populations to identify their molecular and genomic phenotype. For example, the molecular mechanisms whereby microglia or astrocytes contribute to inflammation in the brain remain incompletely understood. New method Here we present a protocol to derive primary pure microglial or astrocyte cultures from near-term fetal sheep brain, after the animals have been chronically instrumented and studied in vivo. Next, we present the implementation of whole transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq) pipeline to deeper elucidate the phenotype of such primary sheep brain glial cultures. Results We validate the new primary cultures method for cell purity and test the function of the glial cells on protein (IL-1β) and transcriptome (RNAseq) levels in response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in vitro. Comparison with existing methods This method represents the first implementation of pure microglial or astrocytes cultures in fetal sheep brain. Conclusions The presented approach opens new possibilities for testing not only supernatant protein levels in response to an in vitro challenge, but also to evaluate changes in the transcriptome of glial cells derived from a large mammalian brain bearing high resemblance to the human brain. Moreover, the presented approach lends itself to modeling the complex multi-hit paradigms of antenatal and perinatal cerebral insults in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27856275

  8. Inhibition of high-affinity gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake in primary astrocyte cultures by phorbol esters and phospholipase C.

    PubMed Central

    Gomeza, J; Casado, M; Gimenez, C; Aragon, C

    1991-01-01

    The effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of protein kinase C (PKC), on high-affinity Na(+)-dependent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake were investigated in primary cultures of neurons and glial cells from rat brain cortex. Incubation of glial cells with PMA led to concentration- and time-dependent decreases in the GABA transport in glial cells. This effect could be completely suppressed by addition of the PKC inhibitor H7. The PMA effects could be mimicked by oleoylacetylglycerol, the diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 and exogenous phospholipase C. Treatment with PMA did not affect GABA transport in neuronal cells. PMID:1902665

  9. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air-liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×10(4) 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Ischemia-Derived Astrocytes (IDAs) with Ability to Transactivate Quiescent Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Alejandro; Rosciszewski, Gerardo; Murta, Veronica; Cadena, Vanesa; Usach, Vanina; Dodes-Traian, Martin M.; Setton-Avruj, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis H.; Ramos, Alberto J.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gliosis involving activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia, is a widespread but largely complex and graded glial response to brain injury. Astroglial population has a previously underestimated high heterogeneity with cells differing in their morphology, gene expression profile, and response to injury. Here, we identified a subset of reactive astrocytes isolated from brain focal ischemic lesions that show several atypical characteristics. Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDAs) were isolated from early ischemic penumbra and core. IDA did not originate from myeloid precursors, but rather from pre-existing local progenitors. Isolated IDA markedly differ from primary astrocytes, as they proliferate in vitro with high cell division rate, show increased migratory ability, have reduced replicative senescence and grow in the presence of macrophages within the limits imposed by the glial scar. Remarkably, IDA produce a conditioned medium that strongly induced activation on quiescent primary astrocytes and potentiated the neuronal death triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation. When re-implanted into normal rat brains, eGFP-IDA migrated around the injection site and induced focal reactive gliosis. Inhibition of gamma secretases or culture on quiescent primary astrocytes monolayers facilitated IDA differentiation to astrocytes. We propose that IDA represent an undifferentiated, pro-inflammatory, highly replicative and migratory astroglial subtype emerging from the ischemic microenvironment that may contribute to the expansion of reactive gliosis. Main Points: Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDA) were isolated from brain ischemic tissue IDA show reduced replicative senescence, increased cell division and spontaneous migration IDA potentiate death of oxygen-glucose deprived cortical neurons IDA propagate reactive gliosis on quiescent astrocytes in vitro and in vivo Inhibition of gamma secretases facilitates IDA differentiation to astrocytes PMID:27313509

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Ischemia-Derived Astrocytes (IDAs) with Ability to Transactivate Quiescent Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Alejandro; Rosciszewski, Gerardo; Murta, Veronica; Cadena, Vanesa; Usach, Vanina; Dodes-Traian, Martin M; Setton-Avruj, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis H; Ramos, Alberto J

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gliosis involving activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia, is a widespread but largely complex and graded glial response to brain injury. Astroglial population has a previously underestimated high heterogeneity with cells differing in their morphology, gene expression profile, and response to injury. Here, we identified a subset of reactive astrocytes isolated from brain focal ischemic lesions that show several atypical characteristics. Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDAs) were isolated from early ischemic penumbra and core. IDA did not originate from myeloid precursors, but rather from pre-existing local progenitors. Isolated IDA markedly differ from primary astrocytes, as they proliferate in vitro with high cell division rate, show increased migratory ability, have reduced replicative senescence and grow in the presence of macrophages within the limits imposed by the glial scar. Remarkably, IDA produce a conditioned medium that strongly induced activation on quiescent primary astrocytes and potentiated the neuronal death triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation. When re-implanted into normal rat brains, eGFP-IDA migrated around the injection site and induced focal reactive gliosis. Inhibition of gamma secretases or culture on quiescent primary astrocytes monolayers facilitated IDA differentiation to astrocytes. We propose that IDA represent an undifferentiated, pro-inflammatory, highly replicative and migratory astroglial subtype emerging from the ischemic microenvironment that may contribute to the expansion of reactive gliosis. Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDA) were isolated from brain ischemic tissue IDA show reduced replicative senescence, increased cell division and spontaneous migration IDA potentiate death of oxygen-glucose deprived cortical neurons IDA propagate reactive gliosis on quiescent astrocytes in vitro and in vivo Inhibition of gamma secretases facilitates IDA differentiation to astrocytes.

  12. Importance of Autophagy in Mediating Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Morphine-Induced Metabolic Dysfunction and Inflammation in Human Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Myosotys; Estrada-Bueno, Hary; Dever, Seth M.; Gewirtz, David A.; Kashanchi, Fatah; El-Hage, Nazira

    2017-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the function of astrocytes in providing brain metabolic support is compromised under pathophysiological conditions caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and opioids. Herein, we examined the role of autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway important for cellular homeostasis and survival, as a potential regulatory mechanism during pathophysiological conditions in primary human astrocytes. Blocking autophagy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting BECN1, but not the Autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) gene, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced intracellular calcium release. On the contrary, inducing autophagy pharmacologically with rapamycin further enhanced calcium release and significantly reverted HIV and morphine-decreased glutamate uptake. Furthermore, siBeclin1 caused an increase in HIV-induced nitric oxide (NO) release, while viral-induced NO in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin was decreased. HIV replication was significantly attenuated in astrocytes transfected with siRNA while significantly induced in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin. Silencing with siBeclin1, but not siATG5, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release, while secretion of IL-8 was significantly induced with rapamycin. Mechanistically, the effects of siBeclin1 in decreasing HIV-induced calcium release, viral replication, and viral-induced cytokine secretion were associated with a decrease in activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. PMID:28788100

  13. A cortical astrocyte subpopulation inhibits axon growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Gou, Lin; Xu, Hanpeng

    2015-08-01

    Astrocytes are the most heterogeneous and predominant glial cell type in the central nervous system. However, the functional significance of this heterogeneity remains to be elucidated. Following injury, damaged astrocytes inhibit axonal regeneration in vivo and in vitro. Cultured primary astrocytes are commonly considered good supportive substrates for neuron attachment and axon regeneration. However, it is not known whether different populations of cells in the heterogeneous astrocyte culture affect neuron behavior in the same way. In the present study, the effect of astrocyte heterogeneity on neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth was examined using an in vitro and in vivo coculture system. In vitro, neonatal cortical astrocytes were co-cultured with purified dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and astrocyte growth morphology, neuron attachment and neurite growth were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the heterogeneous astrocyte cells showed two different types of growth pattern, typical and atypical. Typical astrocytes were supportive to neuron attachment and neurite growth, which was consistent with previous studies, whereas atypical astrocytes inhibited neuron attachment and neurite growth. These inhibitory astrocytes exhibited a special growth pattern with various shapes and sizes, a high cell density, few oligodendrocytes on the top layer and occupied a smaller growth area compared with typical astrocytes. Neurites extended freely on typical supportive astrocyte populations, however, moved away when they reached atypical astrocyte growth pattern. Neurons growing on the atypical astrocyte pattern demonstrated minimal neurite outgrowth and these neurites had a dystrophic appearance, however, neuronal survival was unaffected. Immunocytochemistry studies demonstrated that these atypical inhibitory astrocytes were glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells. The existence of inhibitory astrocyte subpopulations in normal astrocytes reflects the

  14. Falcarindiol impairs the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase by abrogating the activation of IKK and JAK in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Young-Ji; Lin, Yun-Lian; Sun, Ya-Hui; Chi, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chieh-Fu; Wang, Chuen-Neu

    2004-01-01

    The effects of falcarindiol on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induced by lipopolysaccharide/interferon-γ (LPS/IFN-γ) in rat primary astrocytes were investigated. The molecular mechanisms underlying falcarindiol that confers its effect on iNOS expression were also elucidated. Falcarindiol abrogated the LPS/IFN-γ-mediated induction of iNOS by about 80%. Falcarindiol attenuated the induction of iNOS in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of falcarindiol on iNOS induction was attributable to decrease in the protein content and the mRNA level of iNOS. Treatment with 50 μM of falcarindiol for 30 min decreased LPS/IFN-γ-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation by 32%. Treatment with 50 μM of falcarindiol for 60 min diminished the LPS/IFN-γ-mediated activation of IκB kinase-α (IKK-α) and IKK-β by 28.2 and 29.7%, respectively. Falcarindiol modulated the nuclear translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1) in a time-dependent manner. Falcarindiol (50 μM) decreased the tyrosine phosphorylation of janus kinase 1 (JAK1) by 84.8% at 5 min. Falcarindiol also abrogated the tyrosine phoshorylation of JAK2 by 82.3% at 10 min. The present study demonstrates that falcarindiol attenuated the activation of IKK and JAK contributing to the blockade of activation of NF-κB and Stat1, thereby leading to the suppression of iNOS expression. PMID:15644867

  15. ASTROCYTES: EMERGING STARS IN LEUKODYSTROPHY PATHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Aloisi, Francesca; Ambrosini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant glial cell population in the central nervous system (CNS). Once considered only passive scaffolding elements, astrocytes are now recognised as cells playing essential roles in CNS development and function. They control extracellular water and ion homeostasis, provide substrates for energy metabolism, and regulate neurogenesis, myelination and synaptic transmission. Due to these multiple activities astrocytes have been implicated in almost all brain pathologies, contributing to various aspects of disease initiation, progression and resolution. Evidence is emerging that astrocyte dysfunction can be the direct cause of neurodegeneration, as shown in Alexander’s disease where myelin degeneration is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the astrocyte-specific cytoskeleton protein glial fibrillary acidic protein. Recent studies point to a primary role for astrocytes in the pathogenesis of other genetic leukodystrophies such as megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts and vanishing white matter disease. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiological role of astrocytes focusing on their contribution to the development of the above mentioned leukodystrophies and on new perspectives for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:24340223

  16. Comparison of the gene expression profiles of human fetal cortical astrocytes with pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells identifies human astrocyte markers and signaling pathways and transcription factors active in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nasir; Wang, Xiantao; Shah, Sonia; Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Yan, Bin; Heman-Ackah, Sabrina; Zhan, Ming; Rao, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and have a multitude of functions that include maintenance of CNS homeostasis, trophic support of neurons, detoxification, and immune surveillance. It has only recently been appreciated that astrocyte dysfunction is a primary cause of many neurological disorders. Despite their importance in disease very little is known about global gene expression for human astrocytes. We have performed a microarray expression analysis of human fetal astrocytes to identify genes and signaling pathways that are important for astrocyte development and maintenance. Our analysis confirmed that the fetal astrocytes express high levels of the core astrocyte marker GFAP and the transcription factors from the NFI family which have been shown to play important roles in astrocyte development. A group of novel markers were identified that distinguish fetal astrocytes from pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and NSC-derived neurons. As in murine astrocytes, the Notch signaling pathway appears to be particularly important for cell fate decisions between the astrocyte and neuronal lineages in human astrocytes. These findings unveil the repertoire of genes expressed in human astrocytes and serve as a basis for further studies to better understand astrocyte biology, especially as it relates to disease.

  17. Spatial and temporal single-cell volume estimation by a fluorescence imaging technique with application to astrocytes in primary culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi, Siamak; Allansson, Louise; Gustavsson, Tomas; Blomstrand, Fredrik; Hansson, Elisabeth; Olsson, Torsten

    1999-05-01

    Cell volume changes are often associated with important physiological and pathological processes in the cell. These changes may be the means by which the cell interacts with its surrounding. Astroglial cells change their volume and shape under several circumstances that affect the central nervous system. Following an incidence of brain damage, such as a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, one of the first events seen is swelling of the astroglial cells. In order to study this and other similar phenomena, it is desirable to develop technical instrumentation and analysis methods capable of detecting and characterizing dynamic cell shape changes in a quantitative and robust way. We have developed a technique to monitor and to quantify the spatial and temporal volume changes in a single cell in primary culture. The technique is based on two- and three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. The temporal information is obtained from a sequence of microscope images, which are analyzed in real time. The spatial data is collected in a sequence of images from the microscope, which is automatically focused up and down through the specimen. The analysis of spatial data is performed off-line and consists of photobleaching compensation, focus restoration, filtering, segmentation and spatial volume estimation.

  18. Receptor regulation of the glutamate, GABA and taurine high-affinity uptake into astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Hansson, E; Rönnbäck, L

    1991-05-10

    From experiments using dissociated primary astroglial cultures from newborn rat cerebral cortex, the stimulation of monoamine receptors (alpha, beta and 5HT) was shown to affect the high-affinity uptake kinetics of glutamate, GABA and taurine. In the presence of the alpha 1 agonist phenylephrine, there was an increased uptake (Vmax) of glutamate, while beta adrenoceptor activation slightly inhibited the glutamate uptake and stimulated the GABA and taurine uptakes. 5HT2 receptor stimulation caused a slight inhibition of the taurine uptake. The uptake rate of GABA was not affected by 5HT, alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists and the glutamate uptake was not affected by 5HT or alpha 2 receptor agonists. Nor was the taurine uptake affected by alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists. The active uptake of aspartate was unaffected by the presence of any of the monoamine receptor agonists used in this study. When the mechanisms behind these effects were studied, the GABA uptake seemed to be mediated via the G protein-adenylate cyclase complex in the receptor domain. Moreover, the K+ channels seemed to be involved. The taurine uptake, however, did not seem to be regulated by the same mechanism. It seems more probable that there is a direct interaction between the receptor and carrier of taurine at the membrane level. The mechanism underlying the receptor-regulated glutamate uptake is at present unclear, although it does not seem to involve protein kinase C.

  19. Rumination and PTSD symptoms among trauma-exposed Latinos in primary care: Is mindful attention helpful?

    PubMed

    Viana, Andres G; Paulus, Daniel J; Garza, Monica; Lemaire, Chad; Bakhshaie, Jafar; Cardoso, Jodi Berger; Ochoa-Perez, Melissa; Valdivieso, Jeanette; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2017-08-19

    The present investigation examined the moderating role of mindful attention in the relation between rumination and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, arousal, and total PTSD symptoms) among trauma-exposed Latinos in a primary care medical setting. It was hypothesized that mindful attention would moderate, or lessen, the relation between rumination and all facets of PTS, even after controlling for clinically relevant covariates. Participants included 182 trauma-exposed adult Latinos (89.0% female; Mage = 37.8, SD = 10.6% and 95.1% reported Spanish as their first language) attending a community-based integrated healthcare clinic in the Southwestern United States. Mindful attention was a significant moderator of relations between rumination and all PTS facets. Specifically, rumination and PTSD symptoms were significantly related yet only in the context of low (vs. high) levels of mindful attention. Mindfulness-based skills may offer incremental value to established treatment protocols for traumatic stress, especially when high levels of rumination are present. Rumination may also serve to identify those who are at greatest risk for developing PTSD after trauma exposure and, therefore, most likely to benefit from mindfulness-based strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An autopsy case of primary pericardial mesothelioma in arc cutter exposed to asbestos through talc pencils.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Kamimori, Takao; Morinaga, Kenji; Takeda, Yoshiki; Kohyama, Norihiko; Miki, Yoshihiro; Inai, Kouki; Yamamoto, Satoru

    2005-04-01

    An autopsy case of a primary pericardial mesothelioma in a 53-year-old arc cutter is reported. He had often had the chance to inhale dust generated by sharpening the slate pencils composed of talc. He was admitted for heart failure due to pericardial tumor, but later died. The tumor was mainly located on the pericardium with a thickness of about 2.5 cm. Small nodular disseminations were observed in the left parietal pleura. Microscopically, tumor cells were epithelial-like and rich in histochemical demonstrable hyaluronic acid. Findings of immunohistochemical markers revealed keratin (+), EMA (+), calretinin (+), and CEA (-), which were characteristics of mesothelioma of epithelial type. The number of asbestos bodies (AB) in the lung parenchyma was increased (2026 AB/gram dry lung tissue). Subsequent transmission electron microscopic examination equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer revealed that the fibers identified in the lungs were fibrous talc and actinolite. These findings suggested that this patient had been occupationally exposed to asbestos contaminated in the talc pencils, which induced the development of primary pericardial mesothelioma.

  1. Astrocytes optimize synaptic fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter; Levine, Herbert

    2007-03-01

    Most neuronal synapses in the central nervous system are enwrapped by an astrocytic process. This relation allows the astrocyte to listen to and feed back to the synapse and to regulate synaptic transmission. We combine a tested mathematical model for the Ca^2+ response of the synaptic astrocyte and presynaptic feedback with a detailed model for vesicle release of neurotransmitter at active zones. The predicted Ca^2+ dependence of the presynaptic synaptic vesicle release compares favorably for several types of synapses, including the Calyx of Held. We hypothesize that the feedback regulation of the astrocyte onto the presynaptic terminal optimizes the fidelity of the synapse in terms of information transmission.

  2. Astrocytic Clasmatodendrosis in Hippocampal Organ Culture

    PubMed Central

    HULSE, RAYMOND E.; WINTERFIELD, J.; KUNKLER, PHILLIP E.; KRAIG, RICHARD P.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms by which astrocytes are irreversibly injured from ischemic brain injury remain incompletely defined. More than 90 years ago Alzheimer showed that astrocytes lose their distal processes (i.e., undergo “clasmatodendrosis”) when irreversibly injured by a reduction in blood flow, a process shown by Friede and van Houten (1961) to be due to energy failure and acidosis. Such alterations in astrocytic morphology can relate directly to changes in cell function. However, astrocytic clasmatodendrosis has largely been lost to the modern literature, perhaps because of a inability to study it under controlled conditions. In the present study, novel four-dimensional (4D) and digital deblurring imaging of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining changes in hippocampal organ cultures (HOTCs) were used to establish an in vitro model of astrocytic clasmatodendrosis. Also, astrocytes in primary culture were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to show the occurrence of clasmatodendrosis via a parallel and separate means. In HOTCs, a significant reduction in astrocytic process length occurred 15 min (and remained for 60 min) after exposure to acidic Ringer’s and mitochondrial inhibition in the pyramidal cell body layer. Time-lapsed images of primary cultures showed thinning of cell processes within 15 min of exposure to acidic Ringer’s and mitochondrial inhibition. Distal processes subsequently broke away but retained their fluorescence for minutes before disintegrating along with their parent cell bodies. This report shows the spatiotemporal occurrence of clasmatodendrosis in astrocytes of HOTCs closely parallels that seen in vivo. Thus, HOTCs, where microenvironmental conditions can be controlled and single, identified cells can be followed in space and time, can be applied to study the interrelations between energy metabolism and pH that result in clasmatodendrosis. PMID:11180514

  3. Methylene Blue Protects Astrocytes against Glucose Oxygen Deprivation by Improving Cellular Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Roy Choudhury, Gourav; Winters, Ali; Rich, Ryan M.; Ryou, Myoung-Gwi; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Yuan, Fang; Yang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes outnumber neurons and serve many metabolic and trophic functions in the mammalian brain. Preserving astrocytes is critical for normal brain function as well as for protecting the brain against various insults. Our previous studies have indicated that methylene blue (MB) functions as an alternative electron carrier and enhances brain metabolism. In addition, MB has been shown to be protective against neurodegeneration and brain injury. In the current study, we investigated the protective role of MB in astrocytes. Cell viability assays showed that MB treatment significantly protected primary astrocytes from oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) & reoxygenation induced cell death. We also studied the effect of MB on cellular oxygen and glucose metabolism in primary astrocytes following OGD-reoxygenation injury. MB treatment significantly increased cellular oxygen consumption, glucose uptake and ATP production in primary astrocytes. In conclusion our study demonstrated that MB protects astrocytes against OGD-reoxygenation injury by improving astrocyte cellular respiration. PMID:25848957

  4. Methylene blue protects astrocytes against glucose oxygen deprivation by improving cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Gourav; Winters, Ali; Rich, Ryan M; Ryou, Myoung-Gwi; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Yuan, Fang; Yang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes outnumber neurons and serve many metabolic and trophic functions in the mammalian brain. Preserving astrocytes is critical for normal brain function as well as for protecting the brain against various insults. Our previous studies have indicated that methylene blue (MB) functions as an alternative electron carrier and enhances brain metabolism. In addition, MB has been shown to be protective against neurodegeneration and brain injury. In the current study, we investigated the protective role of MB in astrocytes. Cell viability assays showed that MB treatment significantly protected primary astrocytes from oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) & reoxygenation induced cell death. We also studied the effect of MB on cellular oxygen and glucose metabolism in primary astrocytes following OGD-reoxygenation injury. MB treatment significantly increased cellular oxygen consumption, glucose uptake and ATP production in primary astrocytes. In conclusion our study demonstrated that MB protects astrocytes against OGD-reoxygenation injury by improving astrocyte cellular respiration.

  5. Preventing Alcohol and Tobacco Exposed Pregnancies: CHOICES Plus in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Mary M; von Sternberg, Kirk L; Floyd, R Louise; Parrish, Danielle; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Stephens, Nanette S; Ostermeyer, Britta; Green, Charles; Seale, J Paul; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2017-07-01

    Alcohol and tobacco use are common among U.S. women, yet if used during pregnancy these substances present significant preventable risks to prenatal and perinatal health. Because use of alcohol and tobacco often continue into the first trimester and beyond, especially among women with unintended pregnancies, effective evidence-based approaches are needed to decrease these risk behaviors. This study was designed to test the efficacy of CHOICES Plus, a preconception intervention for reducing the risk of alcohol- and tobacco-exposed pregnancies (AEPs and TEPs). RCT with two intervention groups: CHOICES Plus (n=131) versus Brief Advice (n=130). Data collected April 2011 to October 2013. Data analysis finalized February 2016. Settings were 12 primary care clinics in a large Texas public healthcare system. Participants were women who were non-sterile, non-pregnant, aged 18-44 years, drinking more than three drinks per day or more than seven drinks per week, sexually active, and not using effective contraception (N=261). Forty-five percent were smokers. Interventions were two CHOICES Plus sessions and a contraceptive visit or Brief Advice and referral to community resources. Primary outcomes were reduced risk of AEP and TEP through 9-month follow-up. In intention-to-treat analyses across 9 months, the CHOICES Plus group was more likely than the Brief Advice group to reduce risk of AEP with an incidence rate ratio of 0.620 (95% CI=0.511, 0.757) and absolute risk reduction of -0.233 (95% CI=-0.239, -0.226). CHOICES Plus group members at risk for both exposures were more likely to reduce TEP risk (incidence rate ratio, 0.597; 95% CI=0.424, 0.840 and absolute risk reduction, -0.233; 95% CI=-0.019, -0.521). CHOICES Plus significantly reduced AEP and TEP risk. Addressing these commonly co-occurring risk factors in a single preconception program proved both feasible and efficacious in a low-income primary care population. Intervening with women before they become pregnant could

  6. Primary cultured astrocytes from old rats are capable to activate the Nrf2 response against MPP+ toxicity after tBHQ pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Aguilar, Adriana; Luna-López, Armando; Ventura-Gallegos, José L; Lazzarini, Roberto; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; González-Puertos, Viridiana Y; Morán, Julio; Santamaría, Abel; Königsberg, Mina

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes are key players for brain physiology, protecting neurons by releasing antioxidant enzymes; however, they are also susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) is a central regulator of the antioxidant response, and therefore, pharmacologic inducers are often used to activate this transcription factor to induce cellular protection. To date, it still remains unknown if cells from aged animals are capable of developing this response. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to determine if cortical astrocytes derived from old rats are able to respond to tertbuthyl-hydroquinene (tBHQ) pretreatment and stimulate the Nrf2-antioxidant response pathway to induce an antioxidant strategy against MPP+ toxicity, one of the most used molecules to model Parkinson's disease. Our results show that, although astrocytes from adult and old rats were more susceptible to MPP+ toxicity than astrocytes from newborn rats, when pretreated with tertbuthyl-hydroquinene, they were able to transactivate Nrf2, increasing antioxidant enzymes and developing cellular protection. These results are discussed in terms of the doses used to create protective responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Distinct repertoires of microRNAs present in mouse astrocytes compared to astrocyte-secreted exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gitler, Aaron D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and secrete various factors that regulate neuron development, function and connectivity. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs involved in posttranslational gene regulation. Recent findings showed that miRNAs are exchanged between cells via nanovesicles called exosomes. In this study, we sought to define which miRNAs are contained within exosomes secreted by astrocytes. We also explored whether astroglial miRNA secretion via exosomes is perturbed in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease where astrocytes play a crucial role in driving disease progression. Methodology/Principal findings By isolating and profiling the expression of miRNAs from primary mouse astrocytes and from the exosomes that astrocytes secrete, we compared miRNA expression in the cells and secreted vesicles. We established that miRNA expression profiles of astrocytes and their exosomes are vastly different. In addition, we determined that exosomal miRNA expression in astrocytes is not significantly perturbed in a mouse model of ALS. Conclusions Astrocytes secrete numerous miRNAs via exosomes and miRNA species contained in exosomes are considerably different from miRNAs detectable in astrocytes, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to select certain miRNAs for inclusion or exclusion from exosomes. The exosomal miRNA profiling dataset we have generated will provide a resource to aid in the investigation of this selection mechanism. Finally, the miRNA expression profile in astrocyte-secreted exosomes is not perturbed by expression of mutant SOD1-G93A. PMID:28152040

  8. Interindividual variation in gene expression responses and metabolite formation in acetaminophen-exposed primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Marlon J A; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Coonen, Maarten L J; Claessen, Sandra M; van Herwijnen, Marcel H M; Lommen, Arjen; van Delft, Joost H M; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a readily available over-the-counter drug and is one of the most commonly used analgesics/antipyretics worldwide. Large interindividual variation in susceptibility toward APAP-induced liver failure has been reported. However, the exact underlying factors causing this variability in susceptibility are still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to better understand this variability in response to APAP by evaluating interindividual differences in gene expression changes and APAP metabolite formation in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from several donors (n = 5) exposed in vitro to a non-toxic to toxic APAP dose range. To evaluate interindividual variation, gene expression data/levels of metabolites were plotted against APAP dose/donor. The correlation in APAP dose response between donors was calculated by comparing data points from one donor to the data points of all other donors using a Pearson-based correlation analysis. From that, a correlation score/donor for each gene/metabolite was defined, representing the similarity of the omics response to APAP in PHH of a particular donor to all other donors. The top 1 % highest variable genes were selected for further evaluation using gene set overrepresentation analysis. The biological processes in which the genes with high interindividual variation in expression were involved include liver regeneration, inflammatory responses, mitochondrial stress responses, hepatocarcinogenesis, cell cycle, and drug efficacy. Additionally, the interindividual variation in the expression of these genes could be associated with the variability in expression levels of hydroxyl/methoxy-APAP and C8H13O5N-APAP-glucuronide. The before-mentioned metabolites or their derivatives have also been reported in blood of humans exposed to therapeutic APAP doses. Possibly these findings can contribute to elucidating the causative factors of interindividual susceptibility toward APAP.

  9. Changes of primary and secondary metabolites in barley plants exposed to CdO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Večeřová, Kristýna; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Dočekal, Bohumil; Oravec, Michal; Pompeiano, Antonio; Tříska, Jan; Urban, Otmar

    2016-11-01

    The environmental fate of airborne nanoparticles and their toxicity to plants is not yet fully understood. Pot-grown barley plants with second leaves developed were therefore exposed to CdO nanoparticles (CdONPs) of ecologically relevant size (7-60 nm) and concentration (2.03 ± 0.45 × 10(5) particles cm(-3)) in air for 3 weeks. An experiment was designed to test the effects of different treatments when only leaves (T1); leaves and soil substrate (T2); and leaves, soil, and water supply were exposed to nanoparticles (T3). A fourth, control group of plants was left without treatment (T0). Although CdONPs were directly absorbed by leaves from the air, a part of leaf-allocated Cd was also transported from roots by transpiration flow. Chromatographic assays revealed that CdONPs had a significant effect on total content of primary metabolites (amino acids and saccharides) but no significant effect on total content of secondary metabolites (phenolic compounds, Krebs cycle acids, and fatty acids). In addition, the compositions of individual metabolite classes were affected by CdONP treatment. For example, tryptophan and phenylalanine were the most affected amino acids in both analysed organs, while ferulic acid and isovitexin constituted the polyphenols most affected in leaves. Even though CdONP treatment had no effect on total fatty acids content, there were significant changes in the composition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in both the roots and leaves of treated plants. Although the results indicate the most pronounced effect in T3 plants as compared to T1 and T2 plants, even just leaf exposure to CdONPs has the potential to induce changes in plant metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth of purified astrocytes in a chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.S.; De Vellis, J.

    1981-11-01

    Astrocytes purified from primary cultures of neonatal rat cerebrum can not be grown in a synthetic medium supplemented with putrescine, prostaglandin F/sub 2//sub ..cap alpha../, insulin, fibroblast growth factor, and hydrocortisone. These five supplements have a marked synergistic effect on growth when used in combination but have little effect when used individually. Astrocytes grown in the defined medium exhibit dramatic changes in morphological characteristics in comparison to cells grown in serum-free or serum-supplemented medium. In addition, these cells express the astrocyte-specific marker glial fibrillary acidic protein and are estimated by several criteria to be greater than 95% astrocytes.

  11. Defects in Motoneuron-Astrocyte Interactions in Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunyi; Feng, Zhihua; Ko, Chien-Ping

    2016-02-24

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motoneuron disease caused by loss or mutation in Survival of Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Recent studies have shown that selective restoration of SMN protein in astrocytes partially alleviates pathology in an SMA mouse model, suggesting important roles for astrocytes in SMA. Addressing these underlying mechanisms may provide new therapeutic avenues to fight SMA. Using primary cultures of pure motoneurons or astrocytes from SMNΔ7 (SMA) and wild-type (WT) mice, as well as their mixed and matched cocultures, we characterized the contributions of motoneurons, astrocytes, and their interactions to synapse loss in SMA. In pure motoneuron cultures, SMA motoneurons exhibited normal survival but intrinsic defects in synapse formation and synaptic transmission. In pure astrocyte cultures, SMA astrocytes exhibited defects in calcium homeostasis. In motoneuron-astrocyte contact cocultures, synapse formation and synaptic transmission were significantly reduced when either motoneurons, astrocytes or both were from SMA mice compared with those in WT motoneurons cocultured with WT astrocytes. The reduced synaptic activity is unlikely due to changes in motoneuron excitability. This disruption in synapse formation and synaptic transmission by SMN deficiency was not detected in motoneuron-astrocyte noncontact cocultures. Additionally, we observed a downregulation of Ephrin B2 in SMA astrocytes. These findings suggest that there are both cell autonomous and non-cell-autonomous defects in SMA motoneurons and astrocytes. Defects in contact interactions between SMA motoneurons and astrocytes impair synaptogenesis seen in SMA pathology, possibly due to the disruption of the Ephrin B2 pathway. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362543-11$15.00/0.

  12. Neuroprotective and axonal outgrowth-promoting effects of tetramethylpyrazine nitrone in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion rats and primary hippocampal neurons exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Gu, Jianbo; Wu, Liangmiao; Li, Ning; Sun, Yewei; Yu, Pei; Wang, Yuqiang; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Zhang, Zaijun

    2017-05-15

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is an important risk factor for vascular dementia and other brain dysfunctions, for which there are currently no effective medications available. We investigated the neuroprotective and axonal outgrowth promoting effects of tetramethylpyrazine nitrone (TBN) in a permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (2VO) rat model and in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). At 6th week after 2VO, TBN increased the time spent in novel arms in the Y-maze test and improved the discrimination ratio in object reorganization task. TBN attenuated axonal damage, and reduced oxidative DNA injury and lipid peroxidation in white matter. TBN also attenuated the neuronal apoptosis and ameliorated accumulation of astrocytes in parietal cortex and CA1 region of hippocampus. Western blot analyses indicated that TBN increased Bcl-2 expression, decreased Bax and Caspase 3 expressions, and upregulated the phosphorylation levels of high-molecular weight neurofilament (p-NFH), Akt (p-Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK3β) in hippocampus at 6th week after chronic hypoperfusion. In vitro, TBN rescued hippocampal neuronal viability and axonal elongation from OGD damage. The p-Akt and p-GSK3β upregulation by TBN was abolished by a specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, resulting in suppression of axonal outgrowth. Collectively, the results showed that TBN alleviated white matter lesion and impairment of cortex and hippocampus, attenuated oxidative damage and enhanced axonal outgrowth through the regulation of PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway, leading to improved cognitive deficit in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Astrocytes Potentiate Synaptic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita

    2005-03-01

    A recent experimental study shows that astrocytes, a subtype of glia, are able to influence the spontaneous activity in the brain via calcium dependent glutamate release. We model the coupling mechanism between an astrocyte and a neuron based on experimental data. This coupling is dynamic and bi-directional, such that the modulations in intracellular calcium concentrations in astrocytes affect neuronal excitability and vice versa via a glutamatergic pathway. We demonstrate through simple neural-glial circuits that increases in the intracellular calcium concentration in astrocytes nearby can enhance spontaneous activity in a neuron, a significant mechanism said to be involved in plasticity and learning. The pattern of this marked increase in spontaneous firing rate in our model quantitatively follows that observed in the experiment. Further, depending on the type of synaptic connections diverging from the neuron, it can either inhibit or excite the ensuing dynamics and potentiate synaptic transmission, thus reinstating the integral role played by astrocytes in normal neuronal dynamics.

  14. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals the effects of fluoxetine on lipid and amino acid metabolism in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shunjie; Zhou, Chanjuan; Cheng, Pengfei; Fu, Yuying; Fang, Liang; Huang, Wen; Yu, Jia; Shao, Weihua; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Meiling; Zhou, Jingjing; Xie, Peng

    2015-04-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a prescribed and effective antidepressant and generally used for the treatment of depression. Previous studies have revealed that the antidepressant mechanism of fluoxetine was related to astrocytes. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its mode of action in astrocytes remains largely unclear. In this study, primary astrocytes were exposed to 10 µM fluoxetine; 24 h post-treatment, a high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabolomic approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metabolic variations of intracellular metabolites. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) score plots of the spectra demonstrated that the fluoxetine-treated astrocytes were significantly distinguished from the untreated controls. In total, 17 differential metabolites were identified to discriminate the two groups. These key metabolites were mainly involved in lipids, lipid metabolism-related molecules and amino acids. This is the first study to indicate that fluoxetine may exert antidepressant action by regulating the astrocyte's lipid and amino acid metabolism. These findings should aid our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying fluoxetine therapy.

  15. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Induces Adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd2) Gene in Human X-ALD Fibroblasts and Inhibits the Proinflammatory Response in Abcd1/2 Silenced Mouse Primary Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene. Accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) that have been attributed to reduced peroxisomal VLCFA β-oxidation activity are the hallmark of the disease. Overexpression of ABCD2 gene, the closest homolog of ABCD1, has been shown to compensate for ABCD1, thus correcting the VLCFA derrangement. The accumulation of VLCFA leads to a neuroinflammatory disease process associated with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The present study underlines the importance of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in inducing the expression of ABCD2 (ALDRP), and normalizing the peroxisomal β-oxidation as well as the levels of saturated and monounsaturated VLCFAs in cultured human skin fibroblasts of X-ALD patients. The expression of ELOVL1, the single elongase catalyzing the synthesis of both saturated VLCFA (C26:0) and mono-unsaturated VLCFA (C26:1), was also reduced by CAPE treatment. Importantly, CAPE upregulated Abcd2 expression and peroxisomal β-oxidation and lowered the VLCFA levels in Abcd1-deficient U87 astrocytes and B12 oligodendrocytes. In addition, using Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes we examined the effects of CAPE in VLCFA-induced inflammatory response. CAPE treatment decreased the inflammatory response as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, inflammatory cytokine, and activation of NF-κB in Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes was reduced. The observations indicate that CAPE corrects both the metabolic disease of VLCFA as well as secondary inflammatory disease; therefore, it may be a potential drug candidate to be tested for X-ALD therapy in humans. PMID:23318275

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells Exposed to the Respiratory Toxicant Diacetyl.

    PubMed

    Foster, Matthew W; Gwinn, William M; Kelly, Francine L; Brass, David M; Valente, Ashlee M; Moseley, M Arthur; Thompson, J Will; Morgan, Daniel L; Palmer, Scott M

    2017-02-03

    Occupational exposures to the diketone flavoring agent, diacetyl, have been associated with bronchiolitis obliterans, a rare condition of airway fibrosis. Model studies in rodents have suggested that the airway epithelium is a major site of diacetyl toxicity, but the effects of diacetyl exposure upon the human airway epithelium are poorly characterized. Here we performed quantitative LC-MS/MS-based proteomics to study the effects of repeated diacetyl vapor exposures on 3D organotypic cultures of human primary tracheobronchial epithelial cells. Using a label-free approach, we quantified approximately 3400 proteins and 5700 phosphopeptides in cell lysates across four independent donors. Altered expression of proteins and phosphopeptides were suggestive of loss of cilia and increased squamous differentiation in diacetyl-exposed cells. These phenomena were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining of culture cross sections. Hyperphosphorylation and cross-linking of basal cell keratins were also observed in diacetyl-treated cells, and we used parallel reaction monitoring to confidently localize and quantify previously uncharacterized sites of phosphorylation in keratin 6. Collectively, these data identify numerous molecular changes in the epithelium that may be important to the pathogenesis of flavoring-induced bronchiolitis obliterans. More generally, this study highlights the utility of quantitative proteomics for the study of in vitro models of airway injury and disease.

  17. Primary acute histoplasmosis in guinea pigs exposed to aerosolized Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed Central

    Schlitzer, R L; Chandler, F W; Larsh, H W

    1981-01-01

    Guinea pigs were examined as a possible in vivo model for human histoplasmosis. Guinea pigs were exposed to an aerosol of viable microconidia and mycelial fragments of Histoplasma capsulatum generated in a Henderson apparatus. Colonization and infection of the lungs occurred, with subsequent involvement of the regional lymph nodes and reticuloendothelial organs. Cultural recovery of the fungus from the nasopharynx and bronchoalveoli was initially high, but decreased with time. The mean number of colonies recovered from the lungs gradually increased, reaching a peak at 2 weeks, with involvement of the regional lymph nodes. Extrathoracic dissemination to the liver and spleen occurred in only a few animals. After 4 weeks, all tissues except the cervical and tracheobronchial lymph nodes were culturally negative; all specimens were culturally negative after 8 weeks. Disappearance of H. capsulatum from tissues appeared to correlate inversely with the development of hypersensitivity as measured by skin test reactivity. Histopathological studies supported cultural results and were similar to those described for primary human and canine histoplasmosis. Images PMID:7275317

  18. The morphology and spatial arrangement of astrocytes in the optic nerve head of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Lye-Barthel, Ming; Masland, Richard H; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the shapes, numbers, and spatial distribution of astrocytes within the glial lamina, an astrocyte-rich region at the junction of the retina and optic nerve. A primary aim was to determine how the population of astrocytes, collectively, partitions the axonal space in this region. Astrocyte processes labeled with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) compartmentalize ganglion cell axons into bundles, forming "glial tubes," and giving the glial architecture of the optic nerve head in transverse section a honeycomb appearance. The shapes of individual astrocytes were studied by using transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein in isolated astrocytes (hGFAPpr-EGFP). Within the glial lamina the astrocytes were transverse in orientation, with thick, smooth primary processes emanating from a cytoplasmic expansion of the soma. Spaces between the processes of neighboring astrocytes were spatially aligned, to form the apertures through which the bundles of optic axons pass. The processes of individual astrocytes were far-reaching-they could span most of the width of the nerve-and overlapped the anatomical domains of other near and distant astrocytes. Thus, astrocytes in the glial lamina do not tile: each astrocyte participates in ensheathing approximately one-quarter of all of the axon bundles in the nerve, and each glial tube contains the processes of about nine astrocytes. This raises the mechanistic question of how, in glaucoma or other cases of nerve damage, the glial response can be confined to a circumscribed region where damage to axons has occurred.

  19. Heterogeneity of Notch signaling in astrocytes and the effects of GFAP and vimentin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lebkuechner, Isabell; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Möllerström, Elin; Pekna, Marcela; Pekny, Milos

    2015-10-01

    Astrocytes have multiple roles in the CNS including control of adult neurogenesis. We recently showed that astrocyte inhibition of neurogenesis through Notch signaling depends on the intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. Here, we used real-time quantitative PCR to analyze gene expression in individual mouse astrocytes in primary cultures and in GFAP(POS) or Aldh1L1(POS) astrocytes freshly isolated from uninjured, contralesional and lesioned hippocampus 4 days after entorhinal cortex lesion. To determine the Notch signaling competence of individual astrocytes, we measured the mRNA levels of Notch ligands and Notch1 receptor. We found that whereas most cultured and freshly isolated astrocytes were competent to receive Notch signals, only a minority of astrocytes were competent to send Notch signals. Injury increased the fraction of astrocyte subpopulation unable to send and receive Notch signals, thus resembling primary astrocytes in vitro. Astrocytes deficient of GFAP and vimentin showed decreased Notch signal sending competence and altered expression of Notch signaling pathway-related genes Dlk2, Notch1, and Sox2. Furthermore, we identified astrocyte subpopulations based on their mRNA and protein expression of nestin and HB-EGF. This study improves our understanding of astrocyte heterogeneity, and points to astrocyte cytoplasmic intermediate filaments as targets for neural cell replacement strategies.

  20. S100B Protein Regulates Astrocyte Shape and Migration via Interaction with Src Kinase: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROCYTE DEVELOPMENT, ACTIVATION, AND TUMOR GROWTH.

    PubMed

    Brozzi, Flora; Arcuri, Cataldo; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2009-03-27

    S100B is a Ca(2+)-binding protein of the EF-hand type that is abundantly expressed in astrocytes and has been implicated in the regulation of several intracellular activities, including proliferation and differentiation. We show here that reducing S100B levels in the astrocytoma cell line GL15 and the Müller cell line MIO-M1 by small interference RNA technique results in a rapid disassembly of stress fibers, collapse of F-actin onto the plasma membrane and reduced migration, and acquisition of a stellate shape. Also, S100B-silenced GL15 and MIO-M1 Müller cells show a higher abundance of glial fibrillary acidic protein filaments, which mark differentiated astrocytes, compared with control cells. These effects are dependent on reduced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) downstream effectors, Akt and RhoA, and consequently elevated activity of GSK3beta and Rac1 and decreased activity of the RhoA-associated kinase. Also, rat primary astrocytes transiently down-regulate S100B expression when exposed to the differentiating agent dibutyryl cyclic AMP and re-express S100B at later stages of dibutyryl cyclic AMP-induced differentiation. Moreover, reducing S100B levels results in a remarkably slow resumption of S100B expression, suggesting the S100B might regulate its own expression. Finally, we show that S100B interacts with Src kinase, thereby stimulating the PI3K/Akt and PI3K/RhoA pathways. These results suggest that S100B might contribute to reduce the differentiation potential of cells of the astrocytic lineage and participate in the astrocyte activation process in the case of brain insult and in invasive properties of glioma cells.

  1. Structural remodeling of fibrous astrocytes after axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Lye-Barthel, Ming; Masland, Richard H; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2010-10-20

    Reactive astrocytes are a pathological hallmark of many CNS injuries and neurodegenerations. They are characterized by hypertrophy of the soma and processes and an increase in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. Because the cells obscure each other in immunostaining, little is known about the behavior of a single reactive astrocyte, nor how single astrocytes combine to form the glial scar. We have investigated the reaction of fibrous astrocytes to axonal degeneration using a transgenic mouse strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in small subsets of astrocytes. Fibrous astrocytes in the optic nerve and corpus callosum initially react to injury by hypertrophy of the soma and processes. They retract their primary processes, simplifying their shape and dramatically reducing their spatial coverage. At 3 d after crush, quantitative analysis revealed nearly a twofold increase in the thickness of the primary processes, a halving of the number of primary processes leaving the soma and an eightfold reduction in the spatial coverage. In the subsequent week, they partially reextend long processes, returning to a near-normal morphology and an extensive spatial overlap. The resulting glial scar consists of an irregular array of astrocyte processes, contrasting with their original orderly arrangement. These changes are in distinct contrast to those reported for reactive protoplasmic astrocytes of the gray matter, in which the number of processes and branchings increase, but the cells continue to maintain nonoverlapping individual territories throughout their response to injury.

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) and Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-2 (TREM-2) Activation Balance Astrocyte Polarization into a Proinflammatory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rosciszewski, Gerardo; Cadena, Vanesa; Murta, Veronica; Lukin, Jeronimo; Villarreal, Alejandro; Roger, Thierry; Ramos, Alberto Javier

    2017-05-25

    Astrocytes react to brain injury with a generic response known as reactive gliosis, which involves activation of multiple intracellular pathways including several that may be beneficial for neuronal survival. However, by unknown mechanisms, reactive astrocytes can polarize into a proinflammatory phenotype that induces neurodegeneration. In order to study reactive gliosis and astroglial polarization into a proinflammatory phenotype, we used cortical devascularization-induced brain ischemia in Wistar rats and primary astroglial cell cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We analyzed the profile of TLR4 expression and the consequences of its activation by gain- and loss-of-function studies, and the effects produced by the activation of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2), a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling. Both OGD exposure on primary astroglial cell cultures and cortical devascularization brain ischemia in rats induced TLR4 expression in astrocytes. In vivo, astroglial TLR4 expression was specifically observed in the ischemic penumbra surrounding necrotic core. Functional studies showed that OGD increased the astroglial response to the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and conversely, TLR4 knockout primary astrocytes had impaired nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation when exposed to LPS. In gain-of-function studies, plasmid-mediated TLR4 over-expression exacerbated astroglial response to LPS as shown by sustained NF-κB activation and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα. TREM-2 expression, although present in naïve primary astrocytes, was induced by OGD, LPS, or high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB-1) exposure. TREM-2 activation by antibody cross-linking or the overexpression of TREM-2 intracellular adaptor, DAP12, partially suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation in purified astrocytic cultures. In vivo, TREM-2 expression was observed in macrophages and astrocytes located in the

  3. Understanding the role of dicer in astrocyte development.

    PubMed

    Howng, Shen-Yi Bruce; Huang, Yong; Ptáček, Louis; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The Dicer1 allele is used to show that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in astrocyte development and functions. While it is known that astrocytes that lack miRNAs are dysregulated, the in vivo phenotypes of these astrocytes are not well understood. In this study, we use Aldh1l1-EGFP transgene, a marker of astrocytes, to characterize mouse models with conditional Dicer1 ablation (via either human or mouse GFAP-Cre). This transgene revealed novel features of the defective astrocytes from the absence of miRNA. Although astrocyte miRNAs were depleted in both lines, we found histological and molecular differences in the Aldh1l1-EGFP cells between the two Cre lines. Aldh1l1-EGFP cells from hGFAP-Cre mutant lines displayed up-regulation of Aldh1l1-EGFP with increased proliferation and a genomic profile that acquired many features of wildtype primary astrocyte cultures. In the young mGFAP-Cre mutant lines we found that Aldh1l1-EGFP cells were disorganized and hyperproliferative in the developing cerebellum. Using the Aldh1l1-EGFP transgene, our work provides new insights into the roles of miRNAs in astrocyte development and the features of astrocytes in these two mouse models.

  4. Motor-Skill Learning Is Dependent on Astrocytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Padmashri, Ragunathan; Suresh, Anand; Boska, Michael D; Dunaevsky, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Motor-skill learning induces changes in synaptic structure and function in the primary motor cortex through the involvement of a long-term potentiation- (LTP-) like mechanism. Although there is evidence that calcium-dependent release of gliotransmitters by astrocytes plays an important role in synaptic transmission and plasticity, the role of astrocytes in motor-skill learning is not known. To test the hypothesis that astrocytic activity is necessary for motor-skill learning, we perturbed astrocytic function using pharmacological and genetic approaches. We find that perturbation of astrocytes either by selectively attenuating IP3R2 mediated astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling or using an astrocyte specific metabolic inhibitor fluorocitrate (FC) results in impaired motor-skill learning of a forelimb reaching-task in mice. Moreover, the learning impairment caused by blocking astrocytic activity using FC was rescued by administration of the gliotransmitter D-serine. The learning impairments are likely caused by impaired LTP as FC blocked LTP in slices and prevented motor-skill training-induced increases in synaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptor in vivo. These results support the conclusion that normal astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling during a reaching task is necessary for motor-skill learning.

  5. Quantification of a thermal damage threshold for astrocytes using infrared laser generated heat gradients.

    PubMed

    Liljemalm, Rickard; Nyberg, Tobias

    2014-04-01

    The response of cells and tissues to elevated temperatures is highly important in several research areas, especially in the area of infrared neural stimulation. So far, only the heat response of neurons has been considered. In this study, primary rat astrocytes were exposed to infrared laser pulses of various pulse lengths and the resulting cell morphology changes and cell migration was studied using light microscopy. By using a finite element model of the experimental setup the temperature distribution was simulated and the temperatures and times to induce morphological changes and migration were extracted. These threshold temperatures were used in the commonly used first-order reaction model according to Arrhenius to extract the kinetic parameters, i.e., the activation energy, E a, and the frequency factor, A c, for the system. A damage signal ratio threshold was defined and calculated to be 6% for the astrocytes to change morphology and start migrating.

  6. Astrocyte Cultures Mimicking Brain Astrocytes in Gene Expression, Signaling, Metabolism and K(+) Uptake and Showing Astrocytic Gene Expression Overlooked by Immunohistochemistry and In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye; Song, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Based on differences in gene expression between cultured astrocytes and freshly isolated brain astrocytes it has been claimed that cultured astrocytes poorly reflect the characteristics of their in vivo counterparts. This paper shows that this is not the case with the cultures of mouse astrocytes we have used since 1978. The culture is prepared following guidelines provided by Drs. Monique Sensenbrenner and John Booher, with the difference that dibutyryl cyclic AMP is added to the culture medium from the beginning of the third week. This addition has only minor effects on glucose and glutamate metabolism, but it is crucial for effects by elevated K(+) concentrations and for Ca(2+) homeostasis, important aspects of astrocyte function. Work by Liang Peng and her colleagues has shown identity between not only gene expression but also drug-induced gene upregulations and editings in astrocytes cultured by this method and astrocytes freshly isolated from brains of drug-treated animals. Dr. Norenberg's laboratory has demonstrated identical upregulation of the cotransporter NKCC1 in ammonia-exposed astrocytes and rats with liver failure. Similarity between cultured and freshly isolated astrocytes has also been shown in metabolism, K(+) uptake and several aspects of signaling. However, others have shown that the gene for the glutamate transporter GLT1 is not expressed, and rat cultures show some abnormalities in K(+) effects. Nevertheless, the overall reliability of the cultured cells is important because immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization poorly demonstrate many astrocytic genes, e.g., those of nucleoside transporters, and even microarray analysis of isolated cells can be misleading.

  7. Novel astrocyte targets

    PubMed Central

    Carmignoto, Giorgio; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years, it has been well established that a finely tuned, continuous crosstalk between neurons and astrocytes not only critically modulates physiological brain functions but also underlies many neurological diseases. In particular, this novel way of interpreting brain activity is markedly influencing our current knowledge of epilepsy, prompting a re-evaluation of old findings and guiding novel experimentation. Here, we review recent studies that have unraveled novel and unique contributions of astrocytes to the generation and spread of convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures and epileptiform activity. The emerging scenario advocates an overall framework in which a dynamic and reciprocal interplay among astrocytic and neuronal ensembles is fundamental for a fuller understanding of epilepsy. In turn, this offers novel astrocytic targets for the development of those really novel chemical entities for the control of convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures that have been acknowledged as a key priority in the management of epilepsy. PMID:24609207

  8. Primary and secondary metabolism in the sun-exposed peel and the shaded peel of apple fruit.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengmin; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2013-05-01

    The metabolism of carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids and phenolics was compared between the sun-exposed peel and the shaded peel of apple fruit. Contents of sorbitol and glucose were higher in the sun-exposed peel, whereas those of sucrose and fructose were almost the same in the two peel types. This was related to lower sorbitol dehydrogenase activity and higher activities of sorbitol oxidase, neutral invertase and acid invertase in the sun-exposed peel. The lower starch content in the sun-exposed peel was related to lower sucrose synthase activity early in fruit development. Dark respiratory metabolism in the sun-exposed peel was enhanced by the high peel temperature due to high light exposure. Activities of most enzymes in respiratory metabolism were higher in the sun-exposed peel, but the concentrations of most organic acids were relatively stable, except pyruvate and oxaloacetate. Due to the different availability of carbon skeletons from dark respiration in the two peel types, amino acids with higher C/N ratios are accumulated in the sun-exposed peel whereas those with lower C/N ratios are accumulated in the shaded peel. Contents of anthocyanins and flavonols and activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, UDP-galactose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase and several other enzymes were higher in the sun-exposed peel than in the shaded peel, indicating the entire phenylpropanoid pathway is upregulated in the sun-exposed peel. Comprehensive analyses of the metabolites and activities of enzymes involved in primary metabolism and secondary metabolism have allowed us to gain a full picture of the metabolic network in the two peel types under natural light exposure.

  9. Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: new hypothesis regarding its etiology and pathogenesis suggests that astrocytes might be the primary target hosting a still unknown external agent.

    PubMed

    Sica, Roberto E P; Nicola, Alejandro F De; González Deniselle, María C; Rodriguez, Gabriel; Monachelli, Gisella M Gargiulo; Peralta, Liliana Martinez; Bettini, Mariela

    2011-08-01

    This article briefly describes the already known clinical features and pathogenic mechanisms underlying sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, namely excitoxicity, oxidative stress, protein damage, inflammation, genetic abnormalities and neuronal death. Thereafter, it puts forward the hypothesis that astrocytes may be the cells which serve as targets for the harmful action of a still unknown environmental agent, while neuronal death may be a secondary event following the initial insult to glial cells. The article also suggests that an emergent virus or a misfolded infectious protein might be potential candidates to accomplish this task.

  10. Ultrastructural and biochemical alterations induced in human, rat and mouse hepatocytes in primary culture exposed to selected carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.H.

    1987-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB{sub 1}), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and actinomycin D are all potential human liver carcinogens. In order to investigate carcinogenic susceptibility of human liver to these agents, primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes were exposed to the four carcinogens. In the first series of experiments, human, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in primary culture were exposed to actinomycin D, AFB{sub 1}, and DMN for 24 h and examined for ultrastructural alterations. In an effort to relate the ultrastructural effects with total covalent binding of the carcinogen to DNA, human, rat and mouse hepatocytes were exposed to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M ({sup 3}H)AFB{sub 1} for 24 h. Hepatocytes from male rats had the highest degree of ({sup 3}H)AFB{sub 1}-DNA binding. Human hepatocytes contained the next highest binding level, while hepatocytes from female rats bound 38 pmoles/mg DNA. The AFB{sub 1}-DNA binding level in mouse hepatocytes was 1.4 pmoles/mg DNA. In similar experiments, human, and male and female rat hepatocytes in primary culture were exposed to the carcinogen 2-acetylamino (9-{sup 14}C)fluorene for 24 h. It was determined that male rat hepatocytes had the highest amount of radiolabeled 2-AAF bound to their DNA, female rats contained 0.57 nmoles/mg DNA, while human hepatocytes contained 0.29 nmoles/mg DNA.

  11. Heterogeneity of reactive astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Ao, Yan; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes respond to injury and disease in the central nervous system (CNS) with a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Recent progress demonstrates that reactive astrogliosis is not a simple all-or-none phenomenon, but is a finely gradated continuum of changes that range from reversible alterations in gene expression and cell hypertrophy, to scar formation with permanent tissue rearrangement. There is now compelling evidence that reactive astrocytes exhibit a substantial potential for heterogeneity at multiple levels, including gene expression, cell morphology, topography (distance from lesions), CNS regions, local (among neighboring cells), cell signaling and cell function. Structural and functional changes are regulated in reactive astrocytes by many different potential signaling events that occur in a context dependent manner. It is noteworthy that different stimuli of astrocyte reactivity can lead to similar degrees of GFAP upregulation while causing substantially different changes in transcriptome profiles and cell function. Thus, it is not possible to equate simple and uniform measures such as cell hypertrophy and upregulation of GFAP expression with a single, uniform concept of astrocyte reactivity. Instead, it is necessary to recognize the considerable potential for heterogeneity and determine the functional implications of astrocyte reactivity in a context specific manner as regulated by specific signaling events. PMID:24361547

  12. Hydrogen sulfide induces calcium waves in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yasuo; Tsugane, Mamiko; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Kimura, Hideo

    2004-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) modifies hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and functions as a neuromodulator. Here, we show that H2S increases intracellular Ca2+ and induces Ca2+ waves in primary cultures of astrocytes as well as hippocampal slices. H2S increases the influx of Ca2+ and to a lesser extent causes the release from intracellular Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ waves induced by neuronal excitation as well as responses to exogenously applied H2S are potently blocked by La3+ and Gd3+, inhibitors of Ca2+ channels. These observations suggest that H2S induces Ca2+ waves that propagate to neighboring astrocytes.

  13. Inhibition of Astrocytic Glutamine Synthetase by Lead is Associated with a Slowed Clearance of Hydrogen Peroxide by the Glutathione System.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stephen R; Lee, Alan; Bishop, Glenda M; Czerwinska, Hania; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Lead intoxication in humans is characterized by cognitive impairments, particularly in the domain of memory, where evidence indicates that glutamatergic neurotransmission may be impacted. Animal and cell culture studies have shown that lead decreases the expression and activity of glutamine synthetase (GS) in astrocytes, yet the basis of this effect is uncertain. To investigate the mechanism responsible, the present study exposed primary astrocyte cultures to a range of concentrations of lead acetate (0-330 μM) for up to 24 h. GS activity was significantly reduced in cells following 24 h incubation with 100 or 330 μM lead acetate. However, no reduction in GS activity was detected when astrocytic lysates were co-incubated with lead acetate, suggesting that the mechanism is not due to a direct interaction and involves intact cells. Since GS is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, the capacity of lead to inhibit the clearance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. It was found that exposure to lead significantly diminished the capacity of astrocytes to degrade H2O2, and that this was due to a reduction in the effectiveness of the glutathione system, rather than to catalase. These results suggest that the inhibition of GS activity in lead poisoning is a consequence of slowed H2O2 clearance, and supports the glutathione pathway as a primary therapeutic target.

  14. Inhibition of Astrocytic Glutamine Synthetase by Lead is Associated with a Slowed Clearance of Hydrogen Peroxide by the Glutathione System

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Stephen R.; Lee, Alan; Bishop, Glenda M.; Czerwinska, Hania; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Lead intoxication in humans is characterized by cognitive impairments, particularly in the domain of memory, where evidence indicates that glutamatergic neurotransmission may be impacted. Animal and cell culture studies have shown that lead decreases the expression and activity of glutamine synthetase (GS) in astrocytes, yet the basis of this effect is uncertain. To investigate the mechanism responsible, the present study exposed primary astrocyte cultures to a range of concentrations of lead acetate (0–330 μM) for up to 24 h. GS activity was significantly reduced in cells following 24 h incubation with 100 or 330 μM lead acetate. However, no reduction in GS activity was detected when astrocytic lysates were co-incubated with lead acetate, suggesting that the mechanism is not due to a direct interaction and involves intact cells. Since GS is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, the capacity of lead to inhibit the clearance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. It was found that exposure to lead significantly diminished the capacity of astrocytes to degrade H2O2, and that this was due to a reduction in the effectiveness of the glutathione system, rather than to catalase. These results suggest that the inhibition of GS activity in lead poisoning is a consequence of slowed H2O2 clearance, and supports the glutathione pathway as a primary therapeutic target. PMID:26696846

  15. Inducers of chemical hypoxia act in a gender- and brain region-specific manner on primary astrocyte viability and cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Roemgens, André; Singh, Shilpee; Beyer, Cordian; Arnold, Susanne

    2011-07-01

    Oxygen is the ultimate electron acceptor for mitochondrial respiration, a process catalyzed by cytochrome c oxidase (COX). In mammals, oxygen concentration regulates gene transcription of COX subunit IV isoforms. Here, we demonstrate that chemical hypoxia, i.e. inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by application of the COX inhibitors cobalt, cyanide, and azide, affects COX isoform IV-1 and IV-2 transcription in a gender- and brain region-specific way. After treatment with cyanide and cobalt, female cortical and mesencephalic astrocytes, respectively, revealed an up-regulation of COX IV-2 which was accompanied by increased ROS production and necrotic cell death. In male astrocytes, the ratio of COX IV-1/COX IV-2 was lowest after treatment with cobalt and paralleled by highest levels of ROS production and necrosis. These results support the view of a causal correlation of COX IV-2 transcription with cellular oxidative stress and cell death and highlight a gender specificity of these effects. By comparing three toxins, cobalt represented the most potent inducer of overall cell death and resembled most closely the previously observed effects of oxygen deprivation on decreasing the cox4i1/cox4i2 ratio. Overall, an increased sensitivity of male compared with female cell viability towards the toxins was detected. These regulatory responses might be causative for the known gender specificity of toxic and neurodegenerative processes in the brain.

  16. Extracellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat protein is associated with an increase in both NF-kappa B binding and protein kinase C activity in primary human astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Conant, K; Ma, M; Nath, A; Major, E O

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has been associated with an increase in the binding of the transcription factor NF-kappa B to its consensus sequence in the viral promoter. Using cultures of primary human fetal astrocytes, we show that exogenous HIV-1 Tat protein, which has been demonstrated to be released from infected cells, is associated with an increase in the binding of this transcription factor to an HIV-1 long terminal repeat kappa B sequence. This effect occurs rapidly and is independent of new protein synthesis. We also demonstrate that extracellular Tat protein is associated with an increase in protein kinase C activity. If Tat functions similarly in other cell types, such findings could relate to some of this protein's previously described physiological effects. These effects include Tat's ability to upregulate the synthesis of specific cytokines and to act as a growth factor. PMID:8627654

  17. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 and TDP43 trigger motoneuron death that is mediated via sodium channels and nitroxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Fabiola; Cortes, Nicole; Abarzua, Sebastian; Dyrda, Agnieszka; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motor neurons. Multiple disease-causing mutations, including in the genes for SOD1 and TDP-43, have been identified in ALS. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS: we have shown that media conditioned by astrocytes carrying mutant SOD1G93A contains toxic factor(s) that kill motoneurons by activating voltage-sensitive sodium (Nav) channels. In contrast, a recent study suggests that astrocytes expressing mutated TDP43 contribute to ALS pathology, but do so via cell-autonomous processes and lack non-cell-autonomous toxicity. Here we investigate whether astrocytes that express diverse ALS-causing mutations release toxic factor(s) that induce motoneuron death, and if so, whether they do so via a common pathogenic pathway. We exposed primary cultures of wild-type spinal cord cells to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes (ACM) that express SOD1 (ACM-SOD1G93A and ACM-SOD1G86R) or TDP43 (ACM-TDP43A315T) mutants; we show that such exposure rapidly (within 30–60 min) increases dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence (indicative of nitroxidative stress) and leads to extensive motoneuron-specific death within a few days. Co-application of the diverse ACMs with anti-oxidants Trolox or esculetin (but not with resveratrol) strongly improves motoneuron survival. We also find that co-incubation of the cultures in the ACMs with Nav channel blockers (including mexiletine, spermidine, or riluzole) prevents both intracellular nitroxidative stress and motoneuron death. Together, our data document that two completely unrelated ALS models lead to the death of motoneuron via non-cell-autonomous processes, and show that astrocytes expressing mutations in SOD1 and TDP43 trigger such cell death through a common pathogenic pathway that involves nitroxidative stress, induced at least in part by Nav channel activity. PMID:24570655

  18. Astrocytes are central in the pathomechanisms of vanishing white matter

    PubMed Central

    Dooves, Stephanie; Bugiani, Marianna; Postma, Nienke L.; Polder, Emiel; Land, Niels; Horan, Stephen T.; van Deijk, Anne-Lieke F.; van de Kreeke, Aleid; Jacobs, Gerbren; Vuong, Caroline; Klooster, Jan; Kamermans, Maarten; Wortel, Joke; Wisse, Lisanne E.; Scheper, Gert C.; Abbink, Truus E.M.; Heine, Vivi M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2016-01-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) is a fatal leukodystrophy that is caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). Disease onset and severity are codetermined by genotype. White matter astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are almost exclusively affected; however, the mechanisms of VWM development remain unclear. Here, we used VWM mouse models, patients’ tissue, and cell cultures to investigate whether astrocytes or oligodendrocytes are the primary affected cell type. We generated 2 mouse models with mutations (Eif2b5Arg191His/Arg191His and Eif2b4Arg484Trp/Arg484Trp) that cause severe VWM in humans and then crossed these strains to develop mice with various mutation combinations. Phenotypic severity was highly variable and dependent on genotype, reproducing the clinical spectrum of human VWM. In all mutant strains, impaired maturation of white matter astrocytes preceded onset and paralleled disease severity and progression. Bergmann glia and retinal Müller cells, nonforebrain astrocytes that have not been associated with VWM, were also affected, and involvement of these cells was confirmed in VWM patients. In coculture, VWM astrocytes secreted factors that inhibited oligodendrocyte maturation, whereas WT astrocytes allowed normal maturation of VWM oligodendrocytes. These studies demonstrate that astrocytes are central in VWM pathomechanisms and constitute potential therapeutic targets. Importantly, astrocytes should also be considered in the pathophysiology of other white matter disorders. PMID:26974157

  19. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  20. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  1. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: is the astrocyte the cell primarily involved?].

    PubMed

    Sica, Roberto E

    2013-01-01

    So far, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is thought as due to a primary insult of the motor neurons. None of its pathogenic processes proved to be the cause of the illness, nor can be blamed environmental agents. Motor neurons die by apoptosis, leaving the possibility that their death might be due to an unfriendly environment, unable to sustain their health, rather than being directly targeted themselves. These reasons justify an examination of the astrocytes, because they have the most important role controlling the neurons' environment. It is known that astrocytes are plastic, enslaving their functions to the requirements of the neurons to which they are related. Each population of astrocytes is unique, and if it were affected the consequences would reach the neurons that it normally sustains. In regard to the motor neurons, this situation would lead to a disturbed production and release of astrocytic neurotransmitters and transporters, impairing nutritional and trophic support as well. For explaining the spreading of muscle symptoms in ALS, correlated with the type of spreading observed at the cortical and spinal motor neurons pools, the present hypotheses suggests that the illness-causing process is spreading among astrocytes, through their gap junctions, depriving the motor neurons of their support. Also it is postulated that a normal astrocytic protein becomes misfolded and infectious, inducing the misfolding of its wild type, travelling from one protoplasmatic astrocyte to another and to the fibrous astrocytes encircling the pyramidal pathway which joints the upper and lower motoneurones.

  2. Effects of a low-voltage static electric field on energy metabolism in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.; Peng, L.; Hertz, L.

    1997-03-01

    Mouse astrocytes (glial cells) in primary cultures were exposed to a low-voltage static DC electric field with no current flow and thus with no generation of magnetic fields. The electric field altered the rate of glycolysis, measured by 2-deoxyglucose accumulation. The magnitude and direction of this effect depended on the polarization of the field and the applied voltage. The maximum effect was an increase of {approximately}30%, which occurred with field across the cells at an intensity that can be calculated to be 0.3 mV/cm or less. Reversal of the polarization converted the stimulation to a small but statistically significant inhibition.

  3. Astrocytes in Migration.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiang Shan; Gao, Kai; Chai, Rui Chao; Jia, Xi Hua; Luo, Dao Peng; Ge, Guo; Jiang, Yu Wu; Fung, Yin-Wan Wendy; Li, Lina; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental phenomenon that underlies tissue morphogenesis, wound healing, immune response, and cancer metastasis. Great progresses have been made in research methodologies, with cell migration identified as a highly orchestrated process. Brain is considered the most complex organ in the human body, containing many types of neural cells with astrocytes playing crucial roles in monitoring normal functions of the central nervous system. Astrocytes are mostly quiescent under normal physiological conditions in the adult brain but become migratory after injury. Under most known pathological conditions in the brain, spinal cord and retina, astrocytes are activated and become hypertrophic, hyperplastic, and up-regulating GFAP based on the grades of severity. These three observations are the hallmark in glia scar formation-astrogliosis. The reactivation process is initiated with structural changes involving cell process migration and ended with cell migration. Detailed mechanisms in astrocyte migration have not been studied extensively and remain largely unknown. Here, we therefore attempt to review the mechanisms in migration of astrocytes.

  4. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Awamleh, L; Pun, H; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2015-04-01

    Acute inflammatory dental pain is a prevalent condition often associated with limited jaw movements. Mustard oil (MO, a small-fiber excitant/inflammatory irritant) application to the rat molar tooth pulp induces increased excitability (i.e., central sensitization) of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons that can be modulated by MDH application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO). The objectives of the study were to determine whether MO application to the rat right maxillary first molar tooth pulp affects left face-M1 excitability manifested as altered intracortical microstimulation thresholds for evoking electromyographic activity in the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle), and whether MSO application to face-M1 can modulate this MO effect. Under Ketamine general anesthesia, Sprague-Dawley male rats had a microelectrode positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) face-M1 site. Then MO (n = 16) or control solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed tooth pulp, and RAD threshold was monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or saline (n = 8) was then applied to the face-M1, and RAD thresholds were monitored every 15 min for 120 min. ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni was used to analyze data (p < 0.05). Within 15 min of MO (but not control) pulp application, RAD thresholds increased significantly (p < 0.001) as compared to baseline. One hour following MSO (but not saline) application to the face-M1, RAD thresholds decreased significantly (p = 0.005) toward baseline. These novel findings suggest that acute inflammatory dental pain is associated with decreased face-M1 excitability that may be dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes and related to mechanisms underlying limited jaw movements in acute orofacial pain conditions.

  5. Acute treatment with 17beta-estradiol attenuates astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-neuron communication.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shilpa P; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2007-12-01

    Astrocytes are now recognized as dynamic signaling elements in the brain. Bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes involves integration of neuronal inputs by astrocytes and release of gliotransmitters that modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. The ovarian steroid hormone, 17beta-estradiol, in addition to its rapid actions on neuronal electrical activity can rapidly alter astrocyte intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) through a membrane-associated estrogen receptor. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques, we investigated the functional consequences of acute treatment with estradiol on astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-neuron communication in mixed hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of an astrocyte evoked a [Ca2+]i rise in the stimulated astrocyte, which propagated to the surrounding astrocytes as a [Ca2+]i wave. Following acute treatment with estradiol, the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i elevation in astrocytes around the stimulated astrocyte was attenuated. Further, estradiol inhibited the [Ca2+]i rise in individual astrocytes in response to the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, trans-(+/-)-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes induced [Ca2+]i elevations and electrophysiological responses in adjacent neurons. Estradiol rapidly attenuated the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-mediated [Ca2+]i rise and slow inward current in neurons. Also, the incidence of astrocyte-induced increase in spontaneous postsynaptic current frequency was reduced in the presence of estradiol. The effects of estradiol were stereo-specific and reversible following washout. These findings may indicate that the regulation of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission by astrocytes is sensitive to rapid estradiol-mediated hormonal control.

  6. A mental health intervention strategy for low-income, trauma-exposed Latina immigrants in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Kaltman, Stacey; de Mendoza, Alejandra Hurtado; Serrano, Adriana; Gonzales, Felisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Latinos in the United States face significant mental health disparities related to access to care, quality of care, and outcomes. Prior research suggests that Latinos prefer to receive care for common mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety disorders) in primary care settings, suggesting a need for evidence-based mental health services designed for delivery in these settings. This study sought to develop and preliminarily evaluate a mental health intervention for trauma-exposed Latina immigrants with depression and/or PTSD for primary care clinics that serve the uninsured. The intervention was designed to be simultaneously responsive to patients’ preferences for individual psychotherapy, to the needs of safety-net primary care clinics for efficient services, and to address the social isolation that is common to the Latina immigrant experience. Developed based on findings from the research team’s formative research, the resulting intervention incorporated individual and group sessions and combined evidence-based interventions to reduce depression and PTSD symptoms, increase group readiness, and improve perceived social support. Twenty-eight trauma-exposed low-income Latina immigrant women who screened positive for depression and/or PTSD participated in an open pilot trial of the intervention at a community primary care clinic. Results indicated that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and safe. A randomized controlled trial of the intervention is warranted. PMID:26913774

  7. Gangliosides induce autophagic cell death in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jaegyu; Lee, Shinrye; Lee, Jung Tae; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Deok Ryong; Kim, Ho; Park, Hae-Chul; Suk, Kyoungho

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gangliosides, sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, abundant in brain, are involved in neuronal function and disease, but the precise molecular mechanisms underlying their physiological or pathological activities are poorly understood. In this study, the pathological role of gangliosides in the extracellular milieu with respect to glial cell death and lipid raft/membrane disruption was investigated. Experimental approach: We determined the effect of gangliosides on astrocyte death or survival using primary astrocyte cultures and astrocytoma/glioma cell lines as a model. Signalling pathways of ganglioside-induced autophagic cell death of astrocytes were examined using pharmacological inhibitors and biochemical and genetic assays. Key results: Gangliosides induced autophagic cell death in based on the following observations. Incubation of the cells with a mixture of gangliosides increased a punctate distribution of fluorescently labelled microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3), the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I and LC3 flux. Gangliosides also increased the formation of autophagic vacuoles as revealed by monodansylcadaverine staining. Ganglioside-induced cell death was inhibited by either a knockdown of beclin-1/Atg-6 or Atg-7 gene expression or by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in ganglioside-induced autophagic cell death of astrocytes, because gangliosides induced ROS production and ROS scavengers decreased autophagic cell death. In addition, lipid rafts played an important role in ganglioside-induced astrocyte death. Conclusions and implications: Gangliosides released under pathological conditions may induce autophagic cell death of astrocytes, identifying a neuropathological role for gangliosides. PMID:20067473

  8. Edaravone protects against oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration-induced apoptosis in spinal cord astrocytes by inhibiting integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Yan, Ting; Shen, Yi-xing; Xu, You-jia; Shen, Hai-bin; Chen, Dong; Wang, Jin-rong; He, Shuang-hua; Dong, Qi-rong; Zhang, Ai-liang

    2017-01-01

    We previously found that oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration (OGSD/R) induces apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes, possibly via caspase-12 and the integrated stress response, which involves protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). We hypothesized that edaravone, a low molecular weight, lipophilic free radical scavenger, would reduce OGSD/R-induced apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes. To test this, we established primary cultures of rat astrocytes, and exposed them to 8 hours/6 hours of OGSD/R with or without edaravone (0.1, 1, 10, 100 μM) treatment. We found that 100 μM of edaravone significantly suppressed astrocyte apoptosis and inhibited the release of reactive oxygen species. It also inhibited the activation of caspase-12 and caspase-3, and reduced the expression of homologous CCAAT/enhancer binding protein, phosphorylated (p)-PERK, p-eIF2α, and ATF4. These results point to a new use of an established drug in the prevention of OGSD/R-mediated spinal cord astrocyte apoptosis via the integrated stress response. PMID:28400812

  9. Investigation of astrocyte - oligodendrocyte interactions in human cultures.

    PubMed

    John, Gareth R

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by CNS demyelination and oligodendrocyte depletion, axonal loss, and reactive astrogliosis. Myelin loss causes conduction block, while remyelination is associated with recovery of conduction and return of function. Reactive astrocytes are a prominent feature of MS plaques, and have been implicated as producing factors regulating oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation and myelin formation. Understanding their impact on these events may lead to new approaches for oligodendrocyte protection and/or remyelination in MS. Here, we outline protocols for the establishment and analysis of primary monocultures and cocultures of human astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. These approaches are designed to facilitate analysis of mechanisms underlying astrocytic regulation of progenitor survival and myelin repair.

  10. Astrocytes in the epileptic brain.

    PubMed

    Wetherington, Jonathon; Serrano, Geidy; Dingledine, Ray

    2008-04-24

    The roles that astrocytes play in the evolution of abnormal network excitability in chronic neurological disorders involving brain injury, such as acquired epilepsy, are receiving renewed attention due to improved understanding of the molecular events underpinning the physiological functions of astrocytes. In epileptic tissue, evidence is pointing to enhanced chemical signaling and disrupted linkage between water and potassium balance by reactive astrocytes, which together conspire to enhance local synchrony in hippocampal microcircuits. Reactive astrocytes in epileptic tissue both promote and oppose seizure development through a variety of specific mechanisms; the new findings suggest several novel astrocyte-related targets for drug development.

  11. Astrocytes in the Epileptic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wetherington, Jonathon; Serrano, Geidy; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The roles that astrocytes play in the evolution of abnormal network excitability in chronic neurological disorders involving brain injury, such as acquired epilepsy, are receiving renewed attention due to improved understanding of the molecular events underpinning the physiological functions of astrocytes. In epileptic tissue, evidence is pointing to enhanced chemical signaling and disrupted linkage between water and potassium balance by reactive astrocytes, which together conspire to enhance local synchrony in hippocampal microcircuits. Reactive astrocytes in epileptic tissue both promote and oppose seizure development through a variety of specific mechanisms; the new findings suggest several novel astrocyte-related targets for drug development. PMID:18439402

  12. Talking as a primary method of peer defusing for military personnel exposed to combat trauma.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Joël S; Clements, Paul T; Averill, Jennifer B; Vigil, Gloria J

    2002-08-01

    1. Humanitarian relief missions and military operations are unquestionably stressful and clearly have potential to affect the mental health of soldiers. 2. After being exposed to traumatic events, soldiers may develop acute stress reactions, a historically known phenomenon better recognized and understood today. 3. Although organized resources exist, they may not be accessible or appropriate. Soldiers are the most precious asset the military forces have and their peers may be the best and only resource available to them. 4. The need to ventilate and the relief that follows after talking about distressing events are evidence that defusing by talking should be encouraged after exposure to a traumatic event.

  13. Time-dependent activity of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 and homeostasis of intracellular pH in astrocytes exposed to CoCl2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Kan, Quancheng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Suyan

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxia causes injury to the central nervous system during stroke and has significant effects on pH homeostasis. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is important in the mechanisms of hypoxia and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. As a well-established hypoxia-mimetic agent, CoCl2 stabilizes and increases the expression of hypoxia inducible factor‑1α (HIF-1α), which regulates several genes involved in pH balance, including NHE1. However, it is not fully understood whether NHE1 is activated in astrocytes under CoCl2 treatment. In the current study, pHi and NHE activity were analyzed using the pHi‑sensitive dye BCECF‑AM. Using cariporide (an NHE1‑specific inhibitor) and EIPA (an NHE nonspecific inhibitor), the current study demonstrated that it was NHE1, not the other NHE isoforms, that was important in regulating pHi homeostasis in astrocytes during CoCl2 treatment. Additionally, the present study observed that, during the early period of CoCl2 treatment (the first 2 h), NHE1 activity and pHi dropped immediately, and NHE1 mRNA expression was reduced compared with control levels, whereas expression levels of the NHE1 protein had not yet changed. In the later period of CoCl2 treatment, NHE1 activity and pHi significantly increased compared with the control levels, as did the mRNA and protein expression levels of NHE1. Furthermore, the cell viability and injury of astrocytes was not changed during the initial 8 h of CoCl2 treatment; their deterioration was associated with the higher levels of pHi and NHE1 activity. The current study concluded that NHE1 activity and pHi homeostasis are regulated by CoCl2 treatment in a time-dependent manner in astrocytes, and may be responsible for the changes in cell viability and injury observed under hypoxia-mimetic conditions induced by CoCl2 treatment.

  14. Neutral glycolipid and ganglioside composition of type-1 and type-2 astrocytes from rat cerebral hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Asou, H; Adachi, T; Takagi, T; Kunimoto, M; Saito, H; Uyemura, K

    1999-02-01

    We reported previously that the major gangliosides in primary mixed-type astrocyte cultures are GM3 and GD3. To obtain more information regarding the exact distribution of glycosphingolipids in different types of astrocytes, we established a line of type-1 astrocytes that are characterized by a Ran-2 positive, broad flat morphology, and by the absence of binding to A2B5 antibodies. We also purified O-2A progenitor cells by immunopanning and cultured them in the presence of 10% newborn calf serum. They differentiated into type-2 astrocytes that were identified by immunostaining for each of GD3, A2B5, and GFAP. Using these cell cultures, we demonstrate that the major gangliosides were GM3 in type-1 astrocytes and GM3 and GD3 in type-2 astrocytes. In addition, a set of neutral glycolipids was identified based on the HP-TLC migration properties of CMH, CDH, CTH, and Glob, but the component distribution of these glycolipids is related to that of glycolipids of astrocytes. A marked increase in the expression of CTH and Glob was shown in type-2 astrocytes. The amount of neutral glycolipid-sugar was higher in the type-2 astrocytes than in the type-1 astrocytes. These results suggest that the increase in the total glycosphingolipid content and the change in the neutral glycolipid composition produced by type-2 astrocytes may be related to their biological functions and the cellular compositions.

  15. Cardiac arrhythmia is the primary response of embryonic Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) exposed to crude oil during weathering.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Carls, Mark G; Day, Heather L; Sloan, Catherine A; Bolton, Jennie L; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-01-01

    Teleost embryos develop a syndrome characterized by edema when exposed to water that weathers substrates contaminated with crude oil. Previous studies using zebrafish demonstrated that crude oil exposure causes cardiogenic edema, and that the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered crude oils (tricyclic fluorenes, dibenzothiophenes, and phenanthrenes) are cardiotoxic, causing arrhythmia through a pathway that does not require activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We demonstrate here for Pacific herring, a species impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, that the developing heart is the primary target of crude oil exposure. Herring embryos exposed to the effluent of oiled gravel columns developed dose-dependent edema and irregular cardiac arrhythmia soon afterthe heartbeat was established. At a dose that produced cardiac dysfunction in 100% of exposed embryos, tissue levels of tricyclic PAHs were below 1 micromol/kg, suggesting a specific, high affinity target in the heart. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanism of tricyclic PAH cardiotoxicity, the development of biomarkers for the effects of PAH exposure in fish, and understanding the long-term impacts of oil spills and other sources of PAH pollution in aquatic environments.

  16. A microbiological profile of unexposed and exposed pulp space of primary endodontic infections by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sassone, Luciana M; Fidel, Rivail A; Faveri, Marcelo; Figueiredo, Luciene; Fidel, Sandra R; Feres, Magda

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization, the composition of the microbiota of primary endodontic infections in cases associated with exposed (n = 30) and unexposed (n = 30) pulp space. Samples were collected by means of a #15 H-type file and 2 sterile paper points from 60 single-rooted teeth with necrotic pulp and periapical lesions. The presence, levels, and proportions of 40 bacterial species were determined by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. The species found in higher counts (×10(5)) in exposed pulp space cases were Eubacterium saburreum, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. vincentii, Tannerella forsythia, Enterococcus faecalis, Neisseria mucosa, Campylobacter gracilis, and Prevotella nigrescens, and in unexposed pulp space cases they were F. nucleatum ssp. vincentii, N. mucosa, E. faecalis, E. saburreum, C. gracilis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Counts of F. nucleatum ssp. vincentii, Campylobacter sputigena, Capnocytophaga showae, Treponema socrenskii, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga ochracea were significantly higher in unexposed pulp space cases (P < .05). The data of the present investigation suggested specific differences between the composition of the microbiota in cases with exposed and unexposed pulp space and an association between higher levels of some specific species and unexposed pulp space cases. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Th1 cells downregulate connexin 43 gap junctions in astrocytes via microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mitsuru; Masaki, Katsuhisa; Yamasaki, Ryo; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Matsushita, Takuya; Suzumura, Akio; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported early and extensive loss of astrocytic connexin 43 (Cx43) in acute demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Because it is widely accepted that autoimmune T cells initiate MS lesions, we hypothesized that infiltrating T cells affect Cx43 expression in astrocytes, which contributes to MS lesion formation. Primary mixed glial cell cultures were prepared from newborn mouse brains, and microglia were isolated by anti-CD11b antibody-conjugated magnetic beads. Next, we prepared astrocyte-rich cultures and astrocyte/microglia-mixed cultures. Treatment of primary mixed glial cell cultures with interferon (IFN) γ, interleukin (IL)-4, or IL-17 showed that only IFNγ or IL-17 at high concentrations reduced Cx43 protein levels. Upon treatment of astrocyte-rich cultures and astrocyte/microglia-mixed cultures with IFNγ, Cx43 mRNA/protein levels and the function of gap junctions were reduced only in astrocyte/microglia-mixed cultures. IFNγ-treated microglia-conditioned media and IL-1β, which was markedly increased in IFNγ-treated microglia-conditioned media, reduced Cx43 protein levels in astrocyte-rich cultures. Finally, we confirmed that Th1 cell-conditioned medium decreased Cx43 protein levels in mixed glial cell cultures. These findings suggest that Th1 cell-derived IFNγ activates microglia to release IL-1β that reduces Cx43 gap junctions in astrocytes. Thus, Th1-dominant inflammatory states disrupt astrocytic intercellular communication and may exacerbate MS. PMID:27929069

  18. AQP5 is differentially regulated in astrocytes during metabolic and traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Chai, Rui Chao; Jiang, Jiao Hua; Wong, Ann Yuen Kwan; Jiang, Feng; Gao, Kai; Vatcher, Greg; Hoi Yu, Albert Cheung

    2013-10-01

    Water movement plays vital roles in both physiological and pathological conditions in the brain. Astrocytes are responsible for regulating this water movement and are the major contributors to brain edema in pathological conditions. Aquaporins (AQPs) in astrocytes play critical roles in the regulation of water movement in the brain. AQP1, 3, 4, 5, 8, and 9 have been reported in the brain. Compared with AQP1, 4, and 9, AQP3, 5, and 8 are less studied. Among the lesser known AQPs, AQP5, which has multiple functions identified outside the central nervous system, is also indicated to be involved in hypoxia injury in astrocytes. In our study, AQP5 expression could be detected both in primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons, and AQP5 expression in astrocytes was confirmed in 1- to 4-week old primary cultures of astrocytes. AQP5 was localized on the cytoplasmic membrane and in the cytoplasm of astrocytes. AQP5 expression was downregulated during ischemia treatment and upregulated after scratch-wound injury, which was also confirmed in a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and a stab-wound injury model in vivo. The AQP5 increased after scratch injury was polarized to the migrating processes and cytoplasmic membrane of astrocytes in the leading edge of the scratch-wound, and AQP5 over-expression facilitated astrocyte process elongation after scratch injury. Taken together, these results indicate that AQP5 might be an important water channel in astrocytes that is differentially expressed during various brain injuries.

  19. Exposed human pulp caused by trauma and/or caries in primary dentition: a histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Nabih; Wetzel, Willi-Eckhard

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pulpal reactions after exposure due to trauma and/or caries and to suggest the appropriate treatment options for the management of pulp, in the light of the histological findings in the primary teeth. Fifteen primary maxillary incisors with pulpal exposure were examined with light microscope in a blind study. After the histological evaluation, teeth were divided into three groups for the etiological factors due to the exposure according to the patient's files: trauma group, caries group and caries and trauma group. The inflammatory infiltration was diminished from the pulp chamber towards the apical third of the root canal in all of the examined teeth. Teeth in the trauma group presented fewer inflammatory cells in the root canal in comparison with other groups. It was concluded that the teeth with traumatic pulp exposure were considered as more likely to respond positively to pulpotomy technique. Pulpectomy or extraction seemed to be indicated for the decayed or decayed and traumatically injured teeth.

  20. Assessment of neurotoxicity of monocrotaline, an alkaloid extracted from Crotalaria retusa in astrocyte/neuron co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Pitanga, Bruno P S; Silva, Victor Diógenes A; Souza, Cleide S; Junqueira, Huiara A; Fragomeni, Breno O N; Nascimento, Ravena P; Silva, Ana Rita; Costa, Maria de Fátima D; El-Bachá, Ramon S; Costa, Silvia L

    2011-12-01

    Studies have shown cases of poisoning with plants from the genus Crotalaria (Leguminosae) mainly in animals. They induce damages in the central nervous system (CNS), which has been attributed to toxic effects of the pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) monocrotaline (MCT). Previously we demonstrated that both MCT and dehydromonocrotaline (DHMC), its main active metabolite, induce changes in the levels and patterns of expression of the main protein from astrocyte cytoskeleton, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). In this study we investigated the effect of MCT on rat cortical astrocyte/neuron primary co-cultures. Primary cultures were exposed to 10 or 100 μM MCT. The MTT test and the measurement of LDH activity on the culture medium revealed that after 24h exposure MCT was not cytotoxic to neuron/astrocyte cells. However, the cell viability after 72 h treatment decreased in 10-20%, and the LDH levels in the culture medium increased at a rate of 12% and 23%, in cultures exposed to 10 or 100 μM MCT. Rosenfeld staining showed vacuolization and increase in cell body in astrocytes after MCT exposure. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses revealed changes on pattern of GFAP and βIII-tubulin expression and steady state levels after MCT treatment, with a dose and time dependent intense down regulation and depolarization of neuronal βIII-tubulin. Moreover, treatment with 100 μM MCT for 12h induced GSH depletion, which was not seen when cytochrome P450 enzyme system was inhibited indicating that it is involved in MCT induced cytotoxicity in CNS cells.

  1. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of medullary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pun, H; Awamleh, L; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that application of the small-fiber excitant and inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) to the rat molar tooth pulp can decrease face-M1 excitability, but increase the excitability of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons and that application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to the face-M1 or MDH can attenuate the MO-induced changes. The present study aimed to determine whether medullary MSO application could modulate the MO-induced decreased face-M1 excitability. Under ketamine general anesthesia, electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were implanted into the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle) of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. A microelectrode was positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) site in the left face-M1. Then MO (n = 16) or control-solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed molar tooth pulp, and intracortical microstimulation threshold intensities for evoking RAD EMG activities were monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, n = 8) was then applied to the MDH and RAD thresholds monitored every 15 min for 120 min. Statistics used ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni as appropriate (p < 0.05). As compared to baseline, RAD thresholds significantly increased (i.e., decreased excitability) within 1 min (26.3 ± 7.9%, p = 0.007) and peaked at 15 min following pulpal MO application (49.9 ± 5.7%, p < 0.001) but not following control-solution. Following MSO (but not PBS) application to the medulla, RAD thresholds significantly decreased within 15 min (26.5 ± 3.0%, p = 0.05) and at 60 min approached 6.3 ± 2.4%, of baseline values (p = 0.1). These novel findings suggest that clinically related motor disturbances arising from dental pain may involve decreased face-M1 excitability that is modulated by medullary astrocytes.

  2. Astrocytes Promote Oligodendrogenesis after White Matter Damage via Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Liang, Anna C.; Maeda, Mitsuyo; Egawa, Naohiro; Itoh, Kanako; Lo, Evan K.; Lok, Josephine; Ihara, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in the adult brain contribute to white matter homeostasis. After white matter damage, OPCs compensate for oligodendrocyte loss by differentiating into mature oligodendrocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Here, we test the hypothesis that, during endogenous recovery from white matter ischemic injury, astrocytes support the maturation of OPCs by secreting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). For in vitro experiments, cultured primary OPCs and astrocytes were prepared from postnatal day 2 rat cortex. When OPCs were subjected to chemical hypoxic stress by exposing them to sublethal CoCl2 for 7 d, in vitro OPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes was significantly suppressed. Conditioned medium from astrocytes (astro-medium) restored the process of OPC maturation even under the stressed conditions. When astro-medium was filtered with TrkB-Fc to remove BDNF, the BDNF-deficient astro-medium no longer supported OPC maturation. For in vivo experiments, we analyzed a transgenic mouse line (GFAPcre/BDNFwt/fl) in which BDNF expression is downregulated specifically in GFAP+ astrocytes. Both wild-type (GFAPwt/BDNFwt/fl mice) and transgenic mice were subjected to prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion by bilateral common carotid artery stenosis. As expected, compared with wild-type mice, the transgenic mice exhibited a lower number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and larger white matter damage. Together, these findings demonstrate that, during endogenous recovery from white matter damage, astrocytes may promote oligodendrogenesis by secreting BDNF. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The repair of white matter after brain injury and neurodegeneration remains a tremendous hurdle for a wide spectrum of CNS disorders. One potentially important opportunity may reside in the response of residual oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). OPCs may serve as a back-up for generating mature oligodendrocytes in damaged white

  3. Astrocytes Promote Oligodendrogenesis after White Matter Damage via Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Liang, Anna C; Maeda, Mitsuyo; Egawa, Naohiro; Itoh, Kanako; Lo, Evan K; Lok, Josephine; Ihara, Masafumi; Arai, Ken

    2015-10-14

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in the adult brain contribute to white matter homeostasis. After white matter damage, OPCs compensate for oligodendrocyte loss by differentiating into mature oligodendrocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Here, we test the hypothesis that, during endogenous recovery from white matter ischemic injury, astrocytes support the maturation of OPCs by secreting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). For in vitro experiments, cultured primary OPCs and astrocytes were prepared from postnatal day 2 rat cortex. When OPCs were subjected to chemical hypoxic stress by exposing them to sublethal CoCl2 for 7 d, in vitro OPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes was significantly suppressed. Conditioned medium from astrocytes (astro-medium) restored the process of OPC maturation even under the stressed conditions. When astro-medium was filtered with TrkB-Fc to remove BDNF, the BDNF-deficient astro-medium no longer supported OPC maturation. For in vivo experiments, we analyzed a transgenic mouse line (GFAP(cre)/BDNF(wt/fl)) in which BDNF expression is downregulated specifically in GFAP(+) astrocytes. Both wild-type (GFAP(wt)/BDNF(wt/fl) mice) and transgenic mice were subjected to prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion by bilateral common carotid artery stenosis. As expected, compared with wild-type mice, the transgenic mice exhibited a lower number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and larger white matter damage. Together, these findings demonstrate that, during endogenous recovery from white matter damage, astrocytes may promote oligodendrogenesis by secreting BDNF. The repair of white matter after brain injury and neurodegeneration remains a tremendous hurdle for a wide spectrum of CNS disorders. One potentially important opportunity may reside in the response of residual oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). OPCs may serve as a back-up for generating mature oligodendrocytes in damaged white matter. However

  4. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    PubMed

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Primary succession on slopes exposed to intense erosion: the case of Vesuvius Grand Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinca, Adriano; Battista Chirico, Giovanni; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2014-05-01

    Mt. Vesuvius (1281 m a.s.l.) is an active volcano dominating the central part of the Campania Region coastline, with a distinctive barren crater summit, known as Grand Cone, formed during the eruption of AD 79. Local environmental factors hindered the colonization of the Vesuvius Grand Cone by vascular plants after the last eruptions of 1906 and 1944. The Grand Cone exhibits very steep planar slopes (33-35 degrees), covered by unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, mainly formed by lapilli and gravels, characterized by an extremely low water holding capacity and very low organic matter and nitrogen contents, and exposed to intense water and wind erosion. In the last decade Genista aetnensis (Biv.) DC. (Fabaceae), has been expanding over the Grand Cone, facilitating the colonization by other species, especially herbaceous, with a dramatic change of the landscape appearance of the Vesuvius Grand Cone. G. aetnensis is a plant endemic of Mt. Etna and Eastern Sardinia and was firstly introduced at the base of Mt. Vesuvius within reforestation programs after the eruption of 1906. This plant is a nitrogen fixing species with a strong ability to colonize andosols, much more pronounced than the indigenous brooms (Cytisus scoparius and Spartium junceum). An intensive investigation has been conducted to explore the eco-hydrological processes driving the vegetation dynamics observed on the slopes of Grand Cone. Specific field surveys and laboratory experiments have been carried out to assess the effects of the G. aetnensis on soil physical and chemical properties, on the above- and below-ground microclimate, on the soil hydrological regime and on the distribution of coexisting species. The G. aetnensis triggers a pedogenetic process that contributes to a rapid increase of carbon and nitrogen stocks, available phosphorous, cation exchange capacity and a reduction of soil pH. The increase of carbon content also significantly improves the water retention properties in this coarse

  6. Transplantation of specific human astrocytes promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Stephen J A; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Noble, Mark; Mayer-Proschel, Margot; Davies, Jeannette E; Proschel, Christoph

    2011-03-02

    Repairing trauma to the central nervous system by replacement of glial support cells is an increasingly attractive therapeutic strategy. We have focused on the less-studied replacement of astrocytes, the major support cell in the central nervous system, by generating astrocytes from embryonic human glial precursor cells using two different astrocyte differentiation inducing factors. The resulting astrocytes differed in expression of multiple proteins thought to either promote or inhibit central nervous system homeostasis and regeneration. When transplanted into acute transection injuries of the adult rat spinal cord, astrocytes generated by exposing human glial precursor cells to bone morphogenetic protein promoted significant recovery of volitional foot placement, axonal growth and notably robust increases in neuronal survival in multiple spinal cord laminae. In marked contrast, human glial precursor cells and astrocytes generated from these cells by exposure to ciliary neurotrophic factor both failed to promote significant behavioral recovery or similarly robust neuronal survival and support of axon growth at sites of injury. Our studies thus demonstrate functional differences between human astrocyte populations and suggest that pre-differentiation of precursor cells into a specific astrocyte subtype is required to optimize astrocyte replacement therapies. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show functional differences in ability to promote repair of the injured adult central nervous system between two distinct subtypes of human astrocytes derived from a common fetal glial precursor population. These findings are consistent with our previous studies of transplanting specific subtypes of rodent glial precursor derived astrocytes into sites of spinal cord injury, and indicate a remarkable conservation from rat to human of functional differences between astrocyte subtypes. In addition, our studies provide a specific population of human astrocytes that

  7. DISC1, astrocytes and neuronal maturation: a possible mechanistic link with implications for mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Xia, Meng; Zhu, Shanshan; Shevelkin, Alexey; Ross, Christopher A; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a genetic risk factor implicated in major mental disorders that involve disrupted neurodevelopment and synaptic signaling. Glial cells such as astrocytes can regulate neuronal and synaptic maturation. Although astrocytes express DISC1, the role of astrocyte DISC1 in synaptic regulation remains unknown. We expressed a pathogenic, dominant-negative form of DISC1, mutant DISC1, in astrocytes to elucidate the roles of astrocytic DISC1 in maturation of dendrites and excitatory and inhibitory synapses using a co-culture model. We found that wild-type primary neurons exhibited less elaborated dendritic arborization when co-cultured with astrocytes that express mutant DISC1, compared to control astrocytes. We observed significantly decreased density of excitatory but not inhibitory synapses on wild-type primary neurons that were co-cultured with astrocytes that express mutant DISC1, compared to control astrocytes. Treatment of co-cultures with D-serine restored dendritic development and density of excitatory synapses. Our findings show for the first time that mutant DISC1 diminished the capacity of astrocytes to support dendritic and synaptic maturation in co-cultured neurons, and that D-serine can restore the dendritic and synaptic abnormalities. The results provide a new insight into the mechanisms whereby genetic risk factors within astrocytes could contribute the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Expression of mutant DISC1 (mDISC1) in astrocytes (A) decreases binding of endogenous DISC1 to serine racemase (SR) and production of D-serine (blue triangles) from L-serine (red triangles). As a result, neurons co-cultured with mutant DISC1 astrocytes exhibit diminished dendritic arborization (DIV10) and decreased linear density of VGLUT+(red)/PSD95 +  (green) excitatory synapses (DIV14). Filled circles with arrows denote membrane transporters for D-serine. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on doi: 10.1111/jnc.13699

  8. Calcium in the Mechanism of Ammonia-Induced Astrocyte Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A.R.; Rao, K.V. Rama; Tong, X.Y; Norenberg, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema, due largely to astrocyte swelling, is an important clinical problem in patients with acute liver failure. While mechanisms underlying astrocyte swelling in this condition are not fully understood, ammonia and associated oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS) appear to be involved. Mechanisms responsible for the increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) and their role in ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling, however, are poorly understood. Recent studies have demonstrated a transient increase in intracellular Ca2+ in cultured astrocytes exposed to ammonia. As Ca2+ is a known inducer of RONS, we investigated potential mechanisms by which Ca2+ may be responsible for the production of RONS and cell swelling in cultured astrocytes after treatment with ammonia. Exposure of cultured astrocytes to ammonia (5 mM) increased the formation of free radicals, including nitric oxide, and such increase was significantly diminished by treatment with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. We then examined the activity of Ca2+-dependent enzymes that are known to generate RONS and found that ammonia significantly increased the activities of NADPH oxidase (NOX), constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and such increases in activity were significantly diminished by BAPTA. Pretreatment of cultures with 7-nitroindazole, apocyanin and quinacrine, respective inhibitors of cNOS, NOX and PLA2, all significantly diminished RONS production. Additionally, treatment of cultures with BAPTA or with inhibitors of cNOS, NOX and PLA2 reduced ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. These studies suggest that the ammonia-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+ activates free radical producing enzymes that ultimately contribute to the mechanism of astrocyte swelling. PMID:19393035

  9. Inhibition or ablation of transglutaminase 2 impairs astrocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Alina; Ji, Changyi; Akbar, Abdullah; Keillor, Jeffrey W; Johnson, Gail V W

    2017-01-22

    Astrocytes play numerous complex roles that support and facilitate the function of neurons. Further, when there is an injury to the central nervous system (CNS) they can both facilitate or ameliorate functional recovery depending on the location and severity of the injury. When a CNS injury is relatively severe a glial scar is formed, which is primarily composed of astrocytes. The glial scar can be both beneficial, by limiting inflammation, and detrimental, by preventing neuronal projections, to functional recovery. Thus, understanding the processes and proteins that regulate astrocyte migration in response to injury is still of fundamental importance. One protein that is likely involved in astrocyte migration is transglutaminase 2 (TG2); a multifunctional protein expressed ubiquitously throughout the brain. Its functions include transamidation and GTPase activity, among others, and previous studies have implicated TG2 as a regulator of migration. Therefore, we examined the role of TG2 in primary astrocyte migration subsequent to injury. Using wild type or TG2(-/-) astrocytes, we manipulated the different functions and conformation of TG2 with novel irreversible inhibitors or mutant versions of the protein. Results showed that both inhibition and ablation of TG2 in primary astrocytes significantly inhibit migration. Additionally, we show that the deficiency in migration caused by deletion of TG2 can only be rescued with the native protein and not with mutants. Finally, the addition of TGFβ rescued the migration deficiency independent of TG2. Taken together, our study shows that transamidation and GTP/GDP-binding are necessary for inhibiting astrocyte migration and it is TGFβ independent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kyotorphin transport and metabolism in rat and mouse neonatal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianming; Jiang, Huidi; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E; Keep, Richard F

    2010-08-06

    Neuropeptide inactivation is generally thought to occur via peptidase-mediated degradation. However, a recent study found increased analgesia after L-kyotorphin (L-Tyr-L-Arg; L-KTP) administration in mice lacking an oligopeptide transporter, PEPT2. The current study examines the role of PEPT2 in L-KTP uptake by astrocytes and compares it to astrocytic L-KTP degradation. L-[(3)H]KTP uptake was measured in primary cultures of neonatal astrocytes from rats and from Pept2(+/+) and Pept2(-/-) mice. Uptake was further characterized using potential inhibitors. L-[(3)H]KTP degradation was examined in primary astrocyte cultures from Pept2(-/-) mice by following the formation of L-[(3)H]tyrosine. The uptake of L-[(3)H]KTP in both rat and Pept2(+/+) mouse neonatal astrocytes was inhibited by known PEPT2 inhibitors. L-[(3)H]KTP uptake was also reduced in Pept2(-/-) astrocytes as compared to those from Pept2(+/+) mice. Kinetic analysis indicated the presence of a high affinity (K(m) approximately 50 microM) transporter for L-[(3)H]KTP, identified as Pept2, and a low affinity transporter (K(m) approximately 3-4 mM), inhibited by amastatin, bestatin and tyrosine. Astrocytes also degraded L-KTP through a low affinity peptidase (K(m) approximately 2 mM). Astrocytic clearance of L-KTP occurs via both peptidase activity and transport. These processes occur at similar rates and may be linked. This supports the contention that oligopeptide transport may have an impact on the extracellular clearance (and potentially activity) of certain neuropeptides. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intermediate filaments are important for astrocyte response to oxidative stress induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    de Pablo, Yolanda; Nilsson, Michael; Pekna, Marcela; Pekny, Milos

    2013-07-01

    As a response to central nervous system injury, astrocytes become reactive. Two cellular hallmarks of reactive gliosis are hypertrophy of astrocyte processes and upregulation of intermediate filament (nanofilament) proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, nestin, and synemin. Astrocytes in mice devoid of GFAP and vimentin (GFAP (-/-) Vim (-/-)) do not form cytoplasmic intermediate filaments. GFAP (-/-) Vim (-/-) mice develop larger infarcts after ischemic stroke (Li et al. in J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 28(3):468-481, 2008). Here, we attempted to analyze the underlying mechanisms using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro ischemia model, examining a potential link between astrocyte intermediate filaments and reactive oxygen species (ROS). We observed a reorganization of the intermediate filament network in astrocytes exposed to OGD. ROS accumulation was higher in GFAP (-/-) Vim (-/-) than wild-type astrocytes when exposed to OGD followed by reperfusion or when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that the elimination of ROS is impaired in the absence of the intermediate filament system. Compared to wild-type astrocytes, GFAP (-/-) Vim (-/-) astrocytes exposed to OGD and reperfusion exhibited increased cell death and conferred lower degree of protection to cocultured neurons. We conclude that the astrocyte intermediate filament system is important for the cell response to oxidative stress induced by OGD followed by reperfusion.

  12. Relative Importance of Chemoautotrophy for Primary Production in a Light Exposed Marine Shallow Hydrothermal System.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Saez, Gonzalo V; Pop Ristova, Petra; Sievert, Stefan M; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Bühring, Solveig I

    2017-01-01

    The unique geochemistry of marine shallow-water hydrothermal systems promotes the establishment of diverse microbial communities with a range of metabolic pathways. In contrast to deep-sea vents, shallow-water vents not only support chemosynthesis, but also phototrophic primary production due to the availability of light. However, comprehensive studies targeting the predominant biogeochemical processes are rare, and consequently a holistic understanding of the functioning of these ecosystems is currently lacking. To this end, we combined stable isotope probing of lipid biomarkers with an analysis of the bacterial communities to investigate if chemoautotrophy, in parallel to photoautotrophy, plays an important role in autotrophic carbon fixation and to identify the key players. The study was carried out at a marine shallow-water hydrothermal system located at 5 m water depth off Dominica Island (Lesser Antilles), characterized by up to 55°C warm hydrothermal fluids that contain high amounts of dissolved Fe(2+). Analysis of the bacterial diversity revealed Anaerolineae of the Chloroflexi as the most abundant bacterial class. Furthermore, the presence of key players involved in iron cycling generally known from deep-sea hydrothermal vents (e.g., Zetaproteobacteria and Geothermobacter), supported the importance of iron-driven redox processes in this hydrothermal system. Uptake of (13)C-bicarbonate into bacterial fatty acids under light and dark conditions revealed active photo- and chemoautotrophic communities, with chemoautotrophy accounting for up to 65% of the observed autotrophic carbon fixation. Relatively increased (13)C-incorporation in the dark allowed the classification of aiC15:0, C15:0, and iC16:0 as potential lipid biomarkers for bacterial chemoautotrophy in this ecosystem. Highest total (13)C-incorporation into fatty acids took place at the sediment surface, but chemosynthesis was found to be active down to 8 cm sediment depth. In conclusion, this study

  13. Relative Importance of Chemoautotrophy for Primary Production in a Light Exposed Marine Shallow Hydrothermal System

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Saez, Gonzalo V.; Pop Ristova, Petra; Sievert, Stefan M.; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Bühring, Solveig I.

    2017-01-01

    The unique geochemistry of marine shallow-water hydrothermal systems promotes the establishment of diverse microbial communities with a range of metabolic pathways. In contrast to deep-sea vents, shallow-water vents not only support chemosynthesis, but also phototrophic primary production due to the availability of light. However, comprehensive studies targeting the predominant biogeochemical processes are rare, and consequently a holistic understanding of the functioning of these ecosystems is currently lacking. To this end, we combined stable isotope probing of lipid biomarkers with an analysis of the bacterial communities to investigate if chemoautotrophy, in parallel to photoautotrophy, plays an important role in autotrophic carbon fixation and to identify the key players. The study was carried out at a marine shallow-water hydrothermal system located at 5 m water depth off Dominica Island (Lesser Antilles), characterized by up to 55°C warm hydrothermal fluids that contain high amounts of dissolved Fe2+. Analysis of the bacterial diversity revealed Anaerolineae of the Chloroflexi as the most abundant bacterial class. Furthermore, the presence of key players involved in iron cycling generally known from deep-sea hydrothermal vents (e.g., Zetaproteobacteria and Geothermobacter), supported the importance of iron-driven redox processes in this hydrothermal system. Uptake of 13C-bicarbonate into bacterial fatty acids under light and dark conditions revealed active photo- and chemoautotrophic communities, with chemoautotrophy accounting for up to 65% of the observed autotrophic carbon fixation. Relatively increased 13C-incorporation in the dark allowed the classification of aiC15:0, C15:0, and iC16:0 as potential lipid biomarkers for bacterial chemoautotrophy in this ecosystem. Highest total 13C-incorporation into fatty acids took place at the sediment surface, but chemosynthesis was found to be active down to 8 cm sediment depth. In conclusion, this study

  14. Taurine Biosynthesis by Neurons and Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Garg, Sanjay K.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2011-01-01

    The physiological roles of taurine, a product of cysteine degradation and one of the most abundant amino acids in the body, remain elusive. Taurine deficiency leads to heart dysfunction, brain development abnormalities, retinal degradation, and other pathologies. The taurine synthetic pathway is proposed to be incomplete in astrocytes and neurons, and metabolic cooperation between these cell types is reportedly needed to complete the pathway. In this study, we analyzed taurine synthesis capability as reported by incorporation of radioactivity from [35S]cysteine into taurine, in primary murine astrocytes and neurons, and in several transformed cell lines (human (SH-SY5Y) and murine (N1E-115) neuroblastoma, human astrocytoma (U-87MG and 1321 N1), and rat glioma (C6)). Extensive incorporation of radioactivity from [35S]cysteine into taurine was observed in rat glioma cells as well as in primary mouse astrocytes and neurons, establishing the presence of an intact taurine synthesis pathway in these cells. Interestingly, exposure of cells to cysteine or cysteamine resulted in elevated intracellular hypotaurine without a corresponding increase in taurine levels, suggesting that oxidation of hypotaurine limits taurine synthesis in cells. Consistent with its role as an organic osmolyte, taurine synthesis was stimulated under hypertonic conditions in neurons. PMID:21778230

  15. Taurine biosynthesis by neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Garg, Sanjay K; Banerjee, Ruma

    2011-09-16

    The physiological roles of taurine, a product of cysteine degradation and one of the most abundant amino acids in the body, remain elusive. Taurine deficiency leads to heart dysfunction, brain development abnormalities, retinal degradation, and other pathologies. The taurine synthetic pathway is proposed to be incomplete in astrocytes and neurons, and metabolic cooperation between these cell types is reportedly needed to complete the pathway. In this study, we analyzed taurine synthesis capability as reported by incorporation of radioactivity from [(35)S]cysteine into taurine, in primary murine astrocytes and neurons, and in several transformed cell lines (human (SH-SY5Y) and murine (N1E-115) neuroblastoma, human astrocytoma (U-87 MG and 1321 N1), and rat glioma (C6)). Extensive incorporation of radioactivity from [(35)S]cysteine into taurine was observed in rat glioma cells as well as in primary mouse astrocytes and neurons, establishing the presence of an intact taurine synthesis pathway in these cells. Interestingly, exposure of cells to cysteine or cysteamine resulted in elevated intracellular hypotaurine without a corresponding increase in taurine levels, suggesting that oxidation of hypotaurine limits taurine synthesis in cells. Consistent with its role as an organic osmolyte, taurine synthesis was stimulated under hypertonic conditions in neurons.

  16. Marked potentiation of cell swelling by cytokines in ammonia-sensitized cultured astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brain edema leading to high intracranial pressure is a lethal complication of acute liver failure (ALF), which is believed to be cytotoxic due to swelling of astrocytes. In addition to the traditional view that elevated levels of blood and brain ammonia are involved in the mechanism of brain edema in ALF, emerging evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokines also contribute to this process. We earlier reported that treatment of astrocyte cultures with a pathophysiological concentration of ammonia (5 mM NH4Cl) resulted in the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and that inhibition of such activation diminished astrocyte swelling, suggesting a key role of NF-κB in the mechanism of ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. Since cytokines are also well-known to activate NF-κB, this study examined for additive/synergistic effects of ammonia and cytokines in the activation of NF-κB and their role in astrocyte swelling. Methods Primary cultures of astrocytes were treated with ammonia and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IFN-γ, each at 10 ng/ml), individually or in combination, and cell volume was determined by the [3H]-O-methylglucose equilibration method. The effect of ammonia and cytokines on the activation of NF-κB was determined by immunoblots. Results Cell swelling was increased by ammonia (43%) and by cytokines (37%) at 24 h. Simultaneous co-treatment with cytokines and ammonia showed no additional swelling. By contrast, cultures pretreated with ammonia for 24 h and then exposed to cytokines for an additional 24 h, showed a marked increase in astrocyte swelling (129%). Treatment of cultures with ammonia or cytokines alone also activated NF-κB (80-130%), while co-treatment had no additive effect. However, in cultures pre-treated with ammonia for 24 h, cytokines induced a marked activation of NF-κB (428%). BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB, completely blocked the astrocyte swelling in cultures pre-treated with ammonia and followed by the

  17. Astrocytes negatively regulate neurogenesis through the Jagged1-mediated Notch pathway.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Faiz, Maryam; de Pablo, Yolanda; Sjöqvist, Marika; Andersson, Daniel; Widestrand, Asa; Potokar, Maja; Stenovec, Matjaž; Smith, Peter L P; Shinjyo, Noriko; Pekny, Tulen; Zorec, Robert; Ståhlberg, Anders; Pekna, Marcela; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Pekny, Milos

    2012-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis is regulated by a number of cellular players within the neurogenic niche. Astrocytes participate actively in brain development, regulation of the mature central nervous system (CNS), and brain plasticity. They are important regulators of the local environment in adult neurogenic niches through the secretion of diffusible morphogenic factors, such as Wnts. Astrocytes control the neurogenic niche also through membrane-associated factors, however, the identity of these factors and the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine the mechanisms underlying our earlier finding of increased neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells when cocultured with astrocytes lacking glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin (GFAP(-/-) Vim(-/-) ). We used primary astrocyte and neurosphere cocultures to demonstrate that astrocytes inhibit neuronal differentiation through a cell-cell contact. GFAP(-/-) Vim(-/-) astrocytes showed reduced endocytosis of Notch ligand Jagged1, reduced Notch signaling, and increased neuronal differentiation of neurosphere cultures. This effect of GFAP(-/-) Vim(-/-) astrocytes was abrogated in the presence of immobilized Jagged1 in a manner dependent on the activity of γ-secretase. Finally, we used GFAP(-/-) Vim(-/-) mice to show that in the absence of GFAP and vimentin, hippocampal neurogenesis under basal conditions as well as after injury is increased. We conclude that astrocytes negatively regulate neurogenesis through the Notch pathway, and endocytosis of Notch ligand Jagged1 in astrocytes and Notch signaling from astrocytes to neural stem/progenitor cells depends on the intermediate filament proteins GFAP and vimentin. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Unperturbed Posttranscriptional Regulatory Rev Protein Function and HIV-1 Replication in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes protect neurons, but also evoke proinflammatory responses to injury and viral infections, including HIV. There is a prevailing notion that HIV-1 Rev protein function in astrocytes is perturbed, leading to restricted viral replication. In earlier studies, our finding of restricted viral entry into astrocytes led us to investigate whether there are any intracellular restrictions, including crippled Rev function, in astrocytes. Despite barely detectable levels of DDX3 (Rev-supporting RNA helicase) and TRBP (anti-PKR) in primary astrocytes compared to astrocytic cells, Rev function was unperturbed in wild-type, but not DDX3-ablated astrocytes. As in permissive cells, after HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes, viral-encoded Tat and Rev proteins had robust regulatory activities, leading to efficient viral replication. Productive HIV-1 infection in astrocytes persisted for several weeks. Our findings on HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes demonstrated that the intracellular environment is conducive to viral replication and that Tat and Rev functions are unperturbed. PMID:25188302

  19. TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced iNOS expression increased by prostaglandin E2 in rat primary astrocytes via EP2-evoked cAMP/PKA and intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Han-Yun; Mak, Oi-Tong; Yang, Chung-Shi; Liu, Yu-Peng; Fang, Kuan-Ming; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2007-01-15

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glia in the central nervous system (CNS), produce a large amount of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in response to proinflammatory mediators after CNS injury. However, it is unclear whether PGE(2) has a regulatory role in astrocytic activity under the inflamed condition. In the present work, we showed that PGE(2) increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma (T/I) in astrocytes. Pharmacological and RNA interference approaches further indicated the involvement of the receptor EP2 in PGE(2)-induced iNOS upregulation in T/I-treated astrocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and gel mobility shift assays also demonstrated that PGE(2) increased iNOS transcription through EP2-induced cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. Consistently, the effect of EP2 was significantly attenuated by the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 and partially suppressed by the inhibitor (SB203580) of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which serves as one of the downstream components of the PKA-dependent pathway. Interestingly, EP2-mediated PKA signaling appeared to increase intracellular Ca(2+) release through inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor activation, which might in turn stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation to promote iNOS production in T/I-primed astrocytes. By analyzing the expression of astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we found that PGE(2) alone only triggered the EP2-induced cAMP/PKA/p38MAPK signaling pathway in astrocytes. Collectively, PGE(2) may enhance T/I-induced astrocytic activation by augmenting iNOS/NO production through EP2-mediated cross-talk between cAMP/PKA and IP3/Ca(2+) signaling pathways.

  20. Modifications in astrocyte morphology and calcium signaling induced by a brain capillary endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth J

    2002-04-15

    Astrocytes extend specialized endfoot processes to perisynaptic and perivascular regions, and thus are positioned to mediate the bidirectional flow of metabolic, ionic, and other transmissive substances between neurons and the blood stream. While mutual structural and functional interactions between neurons and astrocytes have been documented, less is known about the interactions between astrocytes and cerebrovascular cells. For example, although the ability of astrocytes to induce structural and functional changes in endothelial cells is established, the reciprocity of brain endothelial cells to induce changes in astrocytes is undetermined. This issue is addressed in the present study. Changes in primary cultures of neonatal mouse cortical astrocytes were investigated following their coculture with mouse brain capillary endothelial (bEnd3) cells. The presence of bEnd3 cells altered the morphology of astrocytes by transforming them from confluent monolayers into networks of elongated multicellular columns. These columns did not occur when either bEnd3 cells or astrocytes were cocultured with other cell types, suggesting that astrocytes undergo specific morphological consequences when placed in close proximity to brain endothelial cells. In addition to these structural changes, the pharmacological profile of astrocytes was modified by coculture with bEnd3 cells. Astrocytes in the cocultures showed an increased Ca2+ responsiveness to bradykinin and glutamate, but no change in responsiveness to ATP, as compared to controls. Coculturing the astrocytes with a neuronal cell line resulted in increased responsiveness of the glial responses to glutamate but not to bradykinin. These studies indicate that brain endothelial cells induce changes in astrocyte morphology and pharmacology.

  1. Biopathology of astrocytes in human traumatic and complicated brain injuries. Review and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Castejón, Orlando José

    2015-01-01

    The biopathology of astrocyte cells in severe human brain traumatic injuries complicated with subdural and epidural haematoma and hygroma is reviewed. Clear and dense oedematous and hypertrophic reactive astrocytes are distinguished in severe primary traumatic vasogenic and secondary cytotoxic brain oedema. Swollen perineuronal astrocytes appear compressing and indenting clear and dark degenerated pyramidal and non-pyramidal nerve cells, degenerated myelinated axons and synaptic contacts. Hypertrophic astrocytes display dense cytoplasm and contain numerous rosettes of alpha, beta- and gamma-type glycogen granules, swollen mitochondria, dilated smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, oedematous Golgi apparatus, microtubules, gliofilaments, intermediate filaments, lysosomes and liposomes. The perisynaptic astrocyte ensheathment of synaptic contacts, containing beta type-glycogen granules, can be traced in the neuropil, surrounding swollen, bead-shaped dendritic profiles, and degenerated myelinated axons. This perisynaptic glial layer is absent in severe oedematous regions. The glycogen-rich and glycogendepleted perivascular astrocyte end-feet appear attached or dissociated from the capillary basement membrane. Phagocytic astrocytes can be seen engulfing degenerated synaptic contacts, necrotic membranes, degenerated myelinated axons, and myelin ovoids. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes are also observed. The interastrocytary gap junctions appear either widened, fused or fragmented. The key role of aquaporin in astrocyte swelling and brain oedema is emphasized. The findings are compared with those reported in experimental traumatic animal models, a large variety of pathogenetically related neuropathological conditions, and in vivo and in vitro experimental conditions. The contribution of pathological astrocytes to neurobehavioral disorders, such as loss of consciousness, neurological deficits and seizures is emphasized. Some hypotheses are postulated related to the

  2. Synergistic accumulation of iron and zinc by cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Glenda M; Scheiber, Ivo F; Dringen, Ralf; Robinson, Stephen R

    2010-07-01

    Iron and zinc are essential for normal brain function, yet the mechanisms used by astrocytes to scavenge non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) and zinc are not well understood. Ischaemic stroke, traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer's disease are associated with perturbations in the metabolism of NTBI and zinc, suggesting that these two metals may collectively contribute to pathology. The present study has investigated the accumulation of NTBI and zinc by rat primary astrocyte cultures. It was found that astrocytes express mRNA for both divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and Zip14, indicating the potential for these transporters to contribute to the accumulation of NTBI and zinc by these cells. Astrocytes were found to accumulate iron from ferric chloride in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the rate of accumulation was strongly stimulated by co-incubation with zinc acetate. In addition, cultured astrocytes rapidly accumulated zinc from zinc acetate, and this accumulation was stimulated by co-incubation with ferric chloride. Because a synergistic stimulation of iron and zinc accumulation is inconsistent with the known properties of DMT1 and Zip14, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms assist astrocytes to scavenge iron and zinc when they are present together in the extracellular compartment. These mechanisms may be involved in disorders that involve elevations in the extracellular concentrations of these metal ions.

  3. Connexin43 null mice reveal that astrocytes express multiple connexins.

    PubMed

    Dermietzel, R; Gao, Y; Scemes, E; Vieira, D; Urban, M; Kremer, M; Bennett, M V; Spray, D C

    2000-04-01

    The gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) is the primary component of intercellular channels in cardiac tissue and in astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells in the brain. Mice in which the gene for Cx43 is deleted by homologous recombination die at birth, due to profound hypertrophy of the ventricular outflow tract and stenosis of the pulmonary artery. Despite this significant cardiovascular abnormality, brains of connexin43 null [Cx43 (-/-)] animals are shown to be macroscopically normal and to display a pattern of cortical lamination that is not detectably different from wildtype siblings. Presence of Cx40 and Cx45 in brains and astrocytes cultured from both Cx43 (-/-) mice and wildtype littermates was confirmed by RT-PCR, Northern blot analyses and by immunostaining; Cx46 was detected by RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses. Presence of Cx26 in astrocyte cultures was indicated by RT-PCR and by Western blot analysis, although we were unable to resolve whether it was contributed by contaminating cells; Cx30 mRNA was detected by Northern blot in long term (2 weeks) but not fresh cultures of astrocytes. These studies thus reveal that astrocyte gap junctions may be formed of multiple connexins. Presumably, the metabolic and ionic coupling provided by these diverse gap junction types may functionally compensate for the absence of the major astrocyte gap junction protein in Cx43 (-/-) mice, providing whatever intercellular signaling is necessary for brain development and cortical lamination.

  4. Astrocytes as modulators of mercury-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Aschner, M

    1996-01-01

    The case for significant toxicity of methylmercury (MeHg) to the CNS is strongly supported by both in vivo and in vitro studies. MeHg perturbs a number of cellular processes which most certainly include astrocytic failure to maintain the composition of the extracellular fluid. Astrocytic predisposition to be damaged by MeHg offers a potential explanation for its neurotoxicity. Consistent with this concept is the ability of astrocytes to preferentially concentrate brain MeHg. The present commentary elaborates on the role of astrocytes in mediating MeHg-induced injuries, detailing their function in maintaining the extracellular concentrations of the excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate. It continues with a discussion on the effects of MeHg on astrocytic swelling and the ensuing regulatory volume decrease (RVD). Recent work demonstrating that primary astrocyte cultures constitutively express a cluster of sulfhydryl (-SH)-containing proteins, collectively referred to as metallothioneins (MTs), is also reviewed with particular reference to the role of MTs both as protectors and facilitators of MeHg intoxication.

  5. Cell-type-specific and differentiation-status-dependent variations in cytotoxicity of tributyltin in cultured rat cerebral neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Koshi; Tashiro, Tomoko; Negishi, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is an organotin used as an anti-fouling agent for fishing nets and ships and it is a widespread environmental contaminant at present. There is an increasing concern about imperceptible but serious adverse effect(s) of exposure to chemicals existing in the environment on various organs and their physiological functions, e.g. brain and mental function. Here, so as to contribute to improvement of and/or advances in in vitro cell-based assay systems for evaluating brain-targeted adverse effect of chemicals, we tried to evaluate cell-type-specific and differentiation-status-dependent variations in the cytotoxicity of TBT towards neurons and astrocytes using the four culture systems differing in the relative abundance of these two types of cells; primary neuron culture (> 95% neurons), primary neuron-astrocyte (2 : 1) mix culture, primary astrocyte culture (> 95% astrocytes), and passaged astrocyte culture (100% proliferative astrocytes). Cell viability was measured at 48 hr after exposure to TBT in serum-free medium. IC50's of TBT were 198 nM in primary neuron culture, 288 nM in primary neuron-astrocyte mix culture, 2001 nM in primary astrocyte culture, and 1989 nM in passaged astrocyte culture. Furthermore, in primary neuron-astrocyte mix culture, vulnerability of neurons cultured along with astrocytes to TBT toxicity was lower than that of neurons cultured purely in primary neuron culture. On the other hand, astrocytes in primary neuron-astrocyte mix culture were considered to be more vulnerable to TBT than those in primary or passaged astrocyte culture. The present study demonstrated variable cytotoxicity of TBT in neural cells depending on the culture condition.

  6. PUMA is invovled in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis of mouse cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tian, M; Jin, L; Jia, H; Jin, Y

    2015-01-22

    PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is required for p53-dependent and p53-independent forms of apoptosis. PUMA has been invovled in the onset and progress of several diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and ischemic brain disease. Although many studies have shown that ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) can induce the apoptosis of astrocytes, the role of PUMA in I/R-mediated apoptosis of cerebral astrocyte apoptosis remains unclear. To mimic in vivo I/R conditions, primary mouse cerebral astrocytes were incubated in a combinational cultural condition of oxygen, glucose, and serum deprivation (OSGD) for 1 h followed by reperfusion (OSGD/R). Cell death determination assays and cell viability assays indicated that OSGD and OSGD/R induce the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The expression of PUMA was significantly elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD/R. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of PUMA by siRNA transfection significantly decreased the OSGD/R-induced apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. We also found that OSGD and OSGD/R triggered the release of cytochrome c in astrocytes, indicating the dependence on a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was extremely generated during OSGD and OSGD/R, and the elimination of ROS by treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) remarkably inhibited the expression of PUMA and the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The activation of Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 was extremely elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD. In addition, we found that knockdown of PUMA led to the depressed expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 during OSGD/R. These results indicate that PUMA is invovled in the apoptosis of cerebral astrocytes upon I/R injury.

  7. Glucocorticoid treatment of astrocytes results in temporally dynamic transcriptome regulation and astrocyte-enriched mRNA changes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bradley S; Meng, Fan; Thompson, Robert C

    2012-12-18

    While general effects of glucocorticoids are well established, the specific cellular mechanisms by which these hormones exert tissue-dependent effects continue to be elaborated. Diseases that demonstrate altered glucocorticoid signaling have been associated with alterations in astrocytes, yet relatively little is known about the effects of glucocorticoids upon this cell type. We have analyzed mRNA expression patterns following glucocorticoid treatment of mouse primary astrocyte cultures. Microarray analysis of cortical astrocyte cultures treated with dexamethasone over an eight-point, 24 h time course identified 854 unique genes with ≥twofold change in mRNA expression at one or more time points. Clustering analysis associated subsets of these mRNA expression changes with gene ontology categories known to be impacted by glucocorticoids. Numerous mRNAs regulated by dexamethasone were also regulated by the natural ligand corticosterone; all of the mRNAs regulated ≥twofold by corticosterone were substantially attenuated by cotreatment with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486. Of the mRNAs demonstrating ≥twofold expression change in response to both glucocorticoids, 33 mRNAs were previously associated with glucocorticoid regulation, and 36 mRNAs were novel glucocorticoid targets. All genes tested by qPCR for glucocorticoid regulation in cortical astrocyte cultures were also regulated by glucocorticoids in hippocampal astrocyte cultures (18/18). Interestingly, a portion of glucocorticoid-regulated genes were astrocyte enriched; the percentage of astrocyte-enriched genes per total number of regulated genes was highest for the early time points and steadily decreased over the time course. These findings suggest that astrocytes in vitro may initially deploy cell type-specific patterns of mRNA regulatory responses to glucocorticoids and subsequently activate additional cell type-independent responses.

  8. Are astrocytes executive cells within the central nervous system?

    PubMed

    Sica, Roberto E; Caccuri, Roberto; Quarracino, Cecilia; Capani, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that astrocytes play a crucial role in the physiology of the central nervous system (CNS) by modulating synaptic activity and plasticity. Based on what is currently known we postulate that astrocytes are fundamental, along with neurons, for the information processing that takes place within the CNS. On the other hand, experimental findings and human observations signal that some of the primary degenerative diseases of the CNS, like frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, Huntington's dementia, primary cerebellar ataxias and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, all of which affect the human species exclusively, may be due to astroglial dysfunction. This hypothesis is supported by observations that demonstrated that the killing of neurons by non-neural cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of those diseases, at both their onset and their progression. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that astrocytes might be involved in the pathogenesis of some psychiatric disorders as well.

  9. A TRP among the astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Scimemi, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    TRP channels were first identified as membrane proteins mediating phototransduction in fruit flies. Astrocytes were initially referred to as the silent elements of the nervous system. At the time these discoveries were made, few would have suspected TRP channels and astrocytes could contribute significantly to our understanding of brain signalling. Recent findings, however, put TRP channels and astrocytes in the spotlight, describe their ability to modulate the activity of specific sets of synapses, and raise some interesting questions. What makes astrocytes capable of exerting cell-specific effects on interneuronal signals? How do different synapses respond to changes in astrocytic function and in the local micro-structure of the neuropil? Can astrocytes be considered good candidate targets for therapeutic intervention to treat neurological diseases? Here I discuss the recent developments on TRP channels and astrocytes that have made us aware of the many structural and functional features of synapses that still need to be discovered and that could lead a new avant-garde in decoding the cellular and molecular basis of brain (dys)function. PMID:23045334

  10. Astrocyte development: A Guide for the Perplexed.

    PubMed

    Molofsky, Anna Victoria; Deneen, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant cell type in the brain and perform key functions vital to CNS physiology, including blood brain barrier formation and maintenance, synaptogenesis, neurotransmission, and metabolic regulation. To fully understand the contributions of astrocytes to brain function, it will be important to bridge the existing gap between development and physiology. In this review, we provide an overview of Astrocyte development, including recent insights into molecular mechanisms of astrocyte specification, regional patterning and proliferation. This developmental perspective is complemented with recent findings that describe the functional maturation of astrocytes and their prospective diversity. Future progress in understanding Astrocyte development will depend on the development of astrocyte- stage specific markers and tools for manipulating astrocytes without affecting neuron production. Ultimately, a mechanistic approach to Astrocyte development will be crucial to developing new treatments for the many neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, neuroimmune, and neoplastic diseases involving astrocyte dysfunction.

  11. DT-diaphorase protects astrocytes from aminochrome-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Huenchuguala, Sandro; Muñoz, Patricia; Graumann, Rebecca; Paris, Irmgard; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes are exposed to aminochrome via the oxidation of dopamine that is taken up from the synaptic cleft after its release from dopaminergic neurons. Glutathione transferase M2-2 (GSTM2) has been shown to protect astrocytes from aminochrome-induced toxicity, but astrocytes also express DT-diaphorase, which has been shown to prevent aminochrome-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, the question is whether DT-diaphorase also protects astrocytes from aminochrome-induced toxicity. DT-diaphorase is constitutively expressed in U373MG cells, and its inhibition by dicoumarol induced a significant increase of aminochrome-induced cell death. However, the inhibition of DT-diaphorase in U373MGsiGST6 cells, which have 74% of GSTM2 gene expression silenced, resulted in a more than 2-fold increase in cell death, suggesting that DT-diaphorase plays an important role in preventing aminochrome-induced toxicity in astrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Actin cytoskeleton remodeling governs aquaporin-4 localization in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Rossi, Andrea; Mola, Maria Grazia; Procino, Giuseppe; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2008-12-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is constitutively concentrated in the plasma membrane of the perivascular glial processes, and its expression is altered in certain pathological conditions associated with brain edema or altered glial migration. When astrocytes are grown in culture, they lose their characteristic star-like shape and AQP4 continuous plasma membrane localization observed in vivo. In this study, we differentiated primary astrocyte cultures with cAMP and lovastatin, both able to induce glial stellation through a reorganization of F-actin cytoskeleton, and obtained AQP4 selectively localized on the cell plasma membrane associated with an increase in the plasma membrane water transport level, but only cAMP induced an increase in AQP4 total protein expression. Phosphorylation experiments indicated that AQP4 in astrocytes is neither phosphorylated nor a substrate of PKA. Depolymerization of F-actin cytoskeleton performed by cytochalasin-D suggested that F-actin cytoskeleton plays a primary role for AQP4 plasma membrane localization and during cell adhesion. Finally, AQP4 knockdown does not compromise the ability of astrocytes to stellate in the presence of cAMP, indicating that astrocyte stellation is independent of AQP4.

  13. Synergistic actions of microglia and astrocytes in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, David S; Murai, Keith K

    2015-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes are essential components of brain homeostasis. Interestingly, when the brain is exposed to adverse conditions, both astrocytes and microglia acquire specialized 'reactive' or 'activated' phenotypes that relate to the characteristics of the insult. In most cases they become important perpetrators of inflammation and potentially neuronal dysfunction. In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, the reciprocal interactions between microglia and astrocytes may be particularly important for the development of neuronal pathology and disease states. An important challenge is to understand how microglia and astrocytes inter-communicate at different stages of disease and the importance of this crosstalk on the physiology of surrounding neurons. In this review we focus on the potential roles that microglia and astrocytes fulfill in early to late stages of AD and how their synergistic actions may shape the progression of AD pathology to affect brain health.

  14. Sophorolipid Butyl Ester Diacetate Does Not Affect Macrophage Polarization but Enhances Astrocytic Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Expression at Micromolar Concentrations in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Alexis M; Gottipati, Manoj K; Totsingan, Filbert; Hanes, Cheryl M; Gross, Richard A; Lennartz, Michelle R; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2017-02-07

    Peritoneal macrophages (PMACs) and spinal cord astrocytes were exposed to varying concentrations of soluble sophorolipid butyl ester diacetate (SLBEDA) in vitro. Macrophages and astrocytes demonstrated no decrease in viability in response to SLBEDA. Studying pro- and anti-inflammatory genes, PMACs did not show a shift toward a pro-inflammatory phenotype. However, at higher concentrations (3 and 30 μM), astrocytes showed an increase in their expression of glial acidic fibrillary protein. This novel category of compounds poses low risk to PMAC and astrocyte viability; however, the effect on PMAC polarization and astrocyte reactivity requires more elucidation.

  15. Neuroprotective and Anti-Apoptotic Effects of CSP-1103 in Primary Cortical Neurons Exposed to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Porrini, Vanessa; Sarnico, Ilenia; Benarese, Marina; Branca, Caterina; Mota, Mariana; Lanzillotta, Annamaria; Bellucci, Arianna; Parrella, Edoardo; Faggi, Lara; Spano, Pierfranco; Imbimbo, Bruno Pietro; Pizzi, Marina

    2017-01-01

    CSP-1103 (formerly CHF5074) has been shown to reverse memory impairment and reduce amyloid plaque as well as inflammatory microglia activation in preclinical models of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, it was found to improve cognition and reduce brain inflammation in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Recent evidence suggests that CSP-1103 acts through a single molecular target, the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD), a transcriptional regulator implicated in inflammation and apoptosis. We here tested the possible anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective activity of CSP-1103 in a cell-based model of post-ischemic injury, wherein the primary mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). When added after OGD, CSP-1103 prevented the apoptosis cascade by reducing cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation and the secondary necrosis. Additionally, CSP-1103 limited earlier activation of p38 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways. These results demonstrate that CSP-1103 is neuroprotective in a model of post-ischemic brain injury and provide further mechanistic insights as regards its ability to reduce apoptosis and potential production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, these findings suggest a potential use of CSP-1103 for the treatment of brain ischemia. PMID:28106772

  16. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chendan; Ren, Jianbo; Guo, Xiangjie; Yun, Keming

    2016-10-24

    Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS). Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca(2+) release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca(2+) release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca(2+) overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca(2+) release and ER stress.

  17. Decreased expression of glutamate transporters in astrocytes after human traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    van Landeghem, Frank K H; Weiss, Thorsten; Oehmichen, Manfred; von Deimling, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    The primary mechanism for eliminating synaptically released glutamate is uptake by astrocytes. In the present study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the cellular expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2. Morphometrical immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a predominant expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2 in astrocytes of normal human neocortex (n = 10). Following traumatic injury of human brain (n = 55), the number of EAAT2-positive cells was decreased for a prolonged survival period within the traumatized neocortex and the pericontusional region. GFAP-positive astrocytes decreased in number within the first 24 h. Thereafter, the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes increased again, indicating formation of reactive gliosis. Double immunofluorescence examinations revealed a reduction in absolute numbers of GFAP-positive astrocytes coexpressing EAAT1 or EAAT2 at survival times up to 7 days. In addition, the relative fractions of astrocytes coexpressing glutamate transporters decreased following TBI. We conclude that the posttraumatic reduction in cellular EAAT 1 and EAAT2 expression is predominantly due to degeneration of astrocytes and to downregulation in surviving astrocytes. Our results support the view that reduced glutamate uptake by astrocytes contributes to posttraumatic elevation of extracellular glutamate in humans.

  18. Dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs in context of neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Maureen H.; Narasipura, Srinivas D.; Kim, Stephanie; Seaton, Melanie S.; Lutgen, Victoria; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2014-01-01

    HIV-mediated neuropathogenesis is a multifaceted process involving several players, including resident brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia) and infiltrating cells (peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)). We evaluated the dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs as it impacts HIV in the CNS. We demonstrate that human primary-derived astrocytes (PDAs) predominantly secrete Wnt 1, 2b, 3, 5b, and 10b. Wnts are small secreted glycoproteins that initiate either β-catenin-dependent or independent signal transduction. The Wnt pathway plays a vital role in the regulation of CNS activities including neurogenesis, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation. We show that HIV infection of PDAs altered astrocyte Wnt profile by elevating Wnts 2b and 10b. Astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) inhibited HIV replication in PBMCs by 50%. Removal of Wnts from ACM abrogated its ability to suppress HIV replication in PBMCs. Inversely, PBMCs supernatant activated PDAs, as demonstrated by a 10-fold increase in HLA-DR and a 5- fold increase in IFNγ expression, and enhanced astrocyte susceptibility to HIV by 2-fold, which was mediated by IFNγ in a Stat-3-dependent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrate a dynamic interaction between astrocytes and PBMCs, whereby astrocyte-secreted Wnts exert an anti-HIV effect on infected PBMCs and PBMCs, in turn, secrete IFNγ that enhance astrocyte susceptibility to productive HIV infection and mediate their activation. PMID:25331637

  19. Dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs in context of neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Richards, Maureen H; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Kim, Stephanie; Seaton, Melanie S; Lutgen, Victoria; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2015-03-01

    HIV-mediated neuropathogenesis is a multifaceted process involving several players, including resident brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia) and infiltrating cells [peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)]. We evaluated the dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs as it impacts HIV in the CNS. We demonstrate that human primary-derived astrocytes (PDAs) predominantly secrete Wnt 1, 2b, 3, 5b, and 10b. Wnts are small secreted glycoproteins that initiate either β-catenin-dependent or independent signal transduction. The Wnt pathway plays a vital role in the regulation of CNS activities including neurogenesis, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation. We show that HIV infection of PDAs altered astrocyte Wnt profile by elevating Wnts 2b and 10b. Astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) inhibited HIV replication in PBMCs by 50%. Removal of Wnts from ACM abrogated its ability to suppress HIV replication in PBMCs. Inversely, PBMCs supernatant activated PDAs, as demonstrated by a 10-fold increase in HLA-DR and a 5-fold increase in IFNγ expression, and enhanced astrocyte susceptibility to HIV by 2-fold, which was mediated by IFNγ in a Stat-3-dependent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrate a dynamic interaction between astrocytes and PBMCs, whereby astrocyte-secreted Wnts exert an anti-HIV effect on infected PBMCs and PBMCs, in turn, secrete IFNγ that enhance astrocyte susceptibility to productive HIV infection and mediate their activation.

  20. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-09-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astrocytes, also mediates intercellular signaling between astrocytes and neurons in hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes evoked Ca2+ waves mediated by the release of ATP and the activation of P2 receptors. Mechanically evoked Ca2+ waves led to decreased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission in an ATP-dependent manner. Exogenous application of ATP does not affect postsynaptic glutamatergic responses but decreased presynaptic exocytotic events. Finally, we show that astrocytes exhibit spontaneous Ca2+ waves mediated by extracellular ATP and that inhibition of these Ca2+ responses enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission. We therefore conclude that ATP released from astrocytes exerts tonic and activity-dependent down-regulation of synaptic transmission via presynaptic mechanisms.

  1. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-04-21

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP(+)- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP(+) or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD.

  2. Exposing primary rat retina cell cultures to γ-rays: An in vitro model for evaluating radiation responses.

    PubMed

    Gaddini, Lucia; Balduzzi, Maria; Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Patrono, Clarice; Matteucci, Andrea

    2017-09-25

    Retinal tissue can receive incidentalγ-rays exposure during radiotherapy either of tumors of the eye and optic nerve or of head-and-neck tumors, and during medical diagnostic procedures. Healthy retina is therefore at risk of suffering radiation-related side effects and the knowledge of pathophysiological response of retinal cells to ionizing radiations could be useful to design possible strategies of prevention and management of radiotoxicity. In this study, we have exploited an in vitro model (primary rat retinal cell culture) to study an array of biological effects induced on retinal neurons by γ-rays. Most of the different cell types present in retinal tissue - either of the neuronal or glial lineages - are preserved in primary rat retinal cultures. Similar to the retina in situ, neuronal cells undergo in vitro a maturational development shown by the formation of polarized neuritic trees and operating synapses. Since 2 Gy is the incidental dose received by the healthy retina per fraction when the standard treatment is delivered to the brain, retina cell cultures have been exposed to 1 or 2 Gy of γ-rays at different level of neuronal differentiation in vitro: days in vitro (DIV)2 or DIV8. At DIV9, retinal cultures were analysed in terms of viability, apoptosis and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify alterations in neuronal differentiation. After irradiation at DIV2, MTT assay revealed an evident loss of cell viability and βIII-tubulin immunostaining highlighted a marked neuritic damage, indicating that survived neurons showed an impaired differentiation. Differentiated cultures (DIV8) appeared to be more resistant with respect to undifferentiated, DIV2 cultures, both in terms of cell viability and differentiation. Apoptosis evaluated with TUNEL assay showed that irradiation at both DIV2 and DIV8 induced a significant increase in the apoptotic rate. To further investigate the effects of γ-rays on retinal neurons, we evaluated the expression of

  3. New frontiers for astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Nano, Rosanna; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Corti, Maurizio; Paolini, Alessandro; Pasi, Francesca; Corbella, Franco; DI Liberto, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common type of primary brain tumour, remains an unsolved clinical problem. A great deal of work has been done in an effort to understand the biology and genetics of glioblastoma multiforme, but clinically effective treatments remain elusive. It is well known that malignant gliomas develop resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. In this review we evaluated the literature data regarding therapeutic progress for the treatment of astrocytic tumours, focusing our attention on new frontiers for glioblastoma. The research studies performed in in vitro and in vivo models show that the application of hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles is safe and could be a promising tool in the treatment of glioblastoma patients. Our efforts are focused towards new fields of research, for example nanomedicine and the study of the uptake and cytotoxic effects of magnetic nanoparticles. The improvement of the quality of life of patients, by increasing their survival rate is the best result to be pursued, since these tumours are considered as ineradicable.

  4. Effect of 8-bromo-cAMP and dexamethasone on glutamate metabolism in rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zielke, H.R.; Tildon, J.T.; Landry, M.E.; Max, S.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in cultured rat astrocytes was measured in extracts and compared to the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact control astrocytes or astrocytes exposed to 1 mM 8-bromo-cAMP (8Br-cAMP) + 1 microM dexamethasone (DEX) for 4 days. GS activity in extracts of astrocytes treated with 8Br-cAMP + DEX was 7.5 times greater than the activity in extracts of control astrocytes. In contrast, the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact cells increased only 2-fold, suggesting that additional intracellular effectors regulate the expression of GS activity inside the intact cell. The rate of glutamine synthesis by astrocytes was 4.3 times greater in MEM than in HEPES buffered Hank's salts. Synthesis of glutamine by intact astrocytes cultured in MEM was independent of the external glutamine or ammonia concentrations but was increased by higher extracellular glutamate concentrations. In studies with intact astrocytes 80% of the original (U-{sup 14}C)glutamate was recovered in the medium as radioactive glutamine, 2-3% as aspartate, and 7% as glutamate after 2 hours for both control and treated astrocytes. The results suggest: (1) astrocytes are highly efficient in the conversion of glutamate to glutamine; (2) induction of GS activity increases the rate of glutamate conversion to glutamine by astrocytes and the rate of glutamine release into the medium; (3) endogenous intracellular regulators of GS activity control the flux of glutamate through this enzymatic reaction; and (4) the composition of the medium alters the rate of glutamine synthesis from external glutamate.

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes change morpho-functional and GABA characteristics of mouse cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Min, Joo-Ok; Kim, Seong Yeol; Shin, Ueon Sang; Yoon, Bo-Eun

    2015-12-18

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs) have been extensively explored for their possible beneficial use in the nervous system. CNTs have shown to modulate neuronal growth and electrical properties, but its effect that varying length of MW-CNTs on primary astrocyte roles have not been clearly demonstrated yet. We investigate here the effect of MW-CNTs on astrocytic morphology, cell-cell interaction and the distribution of intracellular GABA (gamma-amino butyric acid). Primary cultured cortical astrocytes on MW-CNT-coated glass coverslips grow rounder and make more cell-cell interactions, with many cell processes, compared to astrocytes on poly-D-lysine (PDL) coverslips. In addition, intracellular GABA spreads into the cell processes of astrocytes on MW-CNT coverslips. When this GABA spreads into cell processes from the cell body GABA can be released more easily and in larger quantities compared to astrocytes on PDL coverslips. Our result confirm that MW-CNTs modulate astrocytic morphology, the distribution of astrocytic GABA, cell-cell interactions and the extension of cell processes. CNTs look to be a promising material for use neuroprosthetics such as brain-machine interface technologies.

  6. High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening of Human Astrocytes to Identify Compounds That Protect Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir; Shah, Sonia; Zhao, Jean; Class, Bradley; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; McKew, John C.; Rao, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    -derived astrocytes and an optimized astrocyte differentiation protocol, it was possible to screen approximately 4,100 compounds in titration to identify 22 that are cytoprotective of astrocytes. This study is the largest-scale high-throughput screen conducted using human astrocytes, with a total of 17,536 data points collected in the primary screen. The results demonstrate the relevancy and utility of using astrocytes differentiated from human stem cells as a disease model for drug discovery and development. PMID:27034412

  7. INTEGRATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) MIXTURES RESEARCH: GENE EXPRESSION ALTERATIONS IN PRIMARY RAT HEPATOCYTE CULTURES EXPOSED TO DBP MIXTURES FORMED BY CHLORINATION AND OZONATION/POSTCHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the study?
    This study was designed to provide data on the in vitro toxicity of water concentrates containing complex mixtures of DBPs. Rat hepatocytes in primary culture were exposed for 24 hr to full strength, 1:10 or 1:20 dilutions of chlorination or ozonation/chl...

  8. INTEGRATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) MIXTURES RESEARCH: GENE EXPRESSION ALTERATIONS IN PRIMARY RAT HEPATOCYTE CULTURES EXPOSED TO DBP MIXTURES FORMED BY CHLORINATION AND OZONATION/POSTCHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the study?
    This study was designed to provide data on the in vitro toxicity of water concentrates containing complex mixtures of DBPs. Rat hepatocytes in primary culture were exposed for 24 hr to full strength, 1:10 or 1:20 dilutions of chlorination or ozonation/chl...

  9. Determine the yield of micronucleated cells in primary human fibroblasts exposed to focused soft X-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Prise

    2007-01-02

    This project was a small part of a larger collaborative study headed by Dr Aloke Chatterjee, (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) and including Drs Les Braby, John Ford (Texas A&M) and Kathy Held (MGH Boston), which was developing an integrated theoretical and experimental model of the radiation-induced bystander response. Our part of the study has been to determine the effectiveness of soft X-rays at inducing chromosomal damage under conditions of direct and bystander exposure. The aim was to compare this with the effectiveness of the low energy 60 kV electron microbeam available at Texas A&M. Previous studies have been performed with primary human fibroblasts measuring micronuclei formation to determine the relative yields of direct versus bystander mediated micronuclei formation after cells were individually irradiated utilizing our novel focused soft X-ray microprobe, which is capable of producing localized submicron beams of carbon-K (278 eV) X-rays. Only a brief overview is given here as the study has been published in several papers. Our original hypothesis was to study yields of bystander-induced micronucleated cells in both wild-type and mutant fibroblast from mouse embryo fibroblasts. Difficulties with the level of background micronuclei in the MEFs prevented systematic studies of bystander responses in the laboratories involved in the collaboration. We then performed these studies with AG1522 primary human fibroblast cells using a siRNA approach developed by John Ford at Texas A&M to knock down DNA PKcs in the first instance. Our soft X-ray source has been in routine use for carbon-K X-rays and is now available with Aluminium-K (1.49 keV) and titanium-K (4.5 keV), although the dose-rate from titanium is still too low at present for most experiments, where large numbers of cells need to be exposed. A separately funded project developed a new soft X-ray microprobe which will give much greater flexibility for changing energies and giving high dose

  10. Rat nucleus accumbens core astrocytes modulate reward and the motivation to self-administer ethanol after abstinence.

    PubMed

    Bull, Cecilia; Freitas, Kelen C C; Zou, Shiping; Poland, Ryan S; Syed, Wahab A; Urban, Daniel J; Minter, Sabrina C; Shelton, Keith L; Hauser, Kurt F; Negus, S Stevens; Knapp, Pamela E; Bowers, M Scott

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of the active role that astrocytes play in modulating neuronal function and behavior is rapidly expanding, but little is known about the role that astrocytes may play in drug-seeking behavior for commonly abused substances. Given that the nucleus accumbens is critically involved in substance abuse and motivation, we sought to determine whether nucleus accumbens astrocytes influence the motivation to self-administer ethanol following abstinence. We found that the packing density of astrocytes that were expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein increased in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) during abstinence from EtOH self-administration. No change was observed in the nucleus accumbens shell. This increased NAcore astrocyte density positively correlated with the motivation for ethanol. Astrocytes can communicate with one another and influence neuronal activity through gap-junction hemichannels. Because of this, the effect of blocking gap-junction hemichannels on the motivation for ethanol was examined. The motivation to self-administer ethanol after 3 weeks abstinence was increased following microinjection of gap-junction hemichannel blockers into the NAcore at doses that block both neuronal and astrocytic channels. In contrast, no effect was observed following microinjection of doses that are not thought to block astrocytic channels or following microinjection of either dose into the nucleus accumbens shell. Additionally, the motivation for sucrose after 3 weeks abstinence was unaffected by NAcore gap-junction hemichannel blockers. Next, Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) were selectively expressed in NAcore astrocytes to test the effect of astrocyte stimulation. DREADD activation increased cytosolic calcium in primary astrocytes, facilitated responding for rewarding brain stimulation, and reduced the motivation for ethanol after 3 weeks abstinence. This is the first work to modulate drug-seeking behavior with

  11. Parkinsonian toxin-induced oxidative stress inhibits basal autophagy in astrocytes via NQO2/quinone oxidoreductase 2: Implications for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Janda, Elzbieta; Lascala, Antonella; Carresi, Cristina; Parafati, Maddalena; Aprigliano, Serafina; Russo, Vanessa; Savoia, Claudia; Ziviani, Elena; Musolino, Vincenzo; Morani, Federica; Isidoro, Ciro; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) stimulates autophagy in different cellular systems, but it remains controversial if this rule can be generalized. We have analyzed the effect of chronic OS induced by the parkinsonian toxin paraquat (PQ) on autophagy in astrocytoma cells and primary astrocytes, which represent the first cellular target of neurotoxins in the brain. PQ decreased the basal levels of LC3-II and LC3-positive vesicles, and its colocalization with lysosomal markers, both in the absence and presence of chloroquine. This was paralleled by increased number and size of SQSTM1/p62 aggregates. Downregulation of autophagy was also observed in cells chronically exposed to hydrogen peroxide or nonlethal concentrations of PQ, and it was associated with a reduced astrocyte capability to protect dopaminergic cells from OS in co-cultures. Surprisingly, PQ treatment led to inhibition of MTOR, activation of MAPK8/JNK1 and MAPK1/ERK2-MAPK3/ERK1 and upregulation of BECN1/Beclin 1 expression, all signals typically correlating with induction of autophagy. Reduction of OS by NMDPEF, a specific NQO2 inhibitor, but not by N-acetylcysteine, abrogated the inhibitory effect of PQ and restored autophagic flux. Activation of NQO2 by PQ or menadione and genetic manipulation of its expression confirmed the role of this enzyme in the inhibitory action of PQ on autophagy. PQ did not induce NFE2L2/NRF2, but when it was co-administered with NMDPEF NFE2L2 activity was enhanced in a SQSTM1-independent fashion. Thus, a prolonged OS in astrocytes inhibits LC3 lipidation and impairs autophagosome formation and autophagic flux, in spite of concomitant activation of several pro-autophagic signals. These findings outline an unanticipated neuroprotective role of astrocyte autophagy and identify in NQO2 a novel pharmacological target for its positive modulation.

  12. Parkinsonian toxin-induced oxidative stress inhibits basal autophagy in astrocytes via NQO2/quinone oxidoreductase 2: Implications for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Elzbieta; Lascala, Antonella; Carresi, Cristina; Parafati, Maddalena; Aprigliano, Serafina; Russo, Vanessa; Savoia, Claudia; Ziviani, Elena; Musolino, Vincenzo; Morani, Federica; Isidoro, Ciro; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) stimulates autophagy in different cellular systems, but it remains controversial if this rule can be generalized. We have analyzed the effect of chronic OS induced by the parkinsonian toxin paraquat (PQ) on autophagy in astrocytoma cells and primary astrocytes, which represent the first cellular target of neurotoxins in the brain. PQ decreased the basal levels of LC3-II and LC3-positive vesicles, and its colocalization with lysosomal markers, both in the absence and presence of chloroquine. This was paralleled by increased number and size of SQSTM1/p62 aggregates. Downregulation of autophagy was also observed in cells chronically exposed to hydrogen peroxide or nonlethal concentrations of PQ, and it was associated with a reduced astrocyte capability to protect dopaminergic cells from OS in co-cultures. Surprisingly, PQ treatment led to inhibition of MTOR, activation of MAPK8/JNK1 and MAPK1/ERK2-MAPK3/ERK1 and upregulation of BECN1/Beclin 1 expression, all signals typically correlating with induction of autophagy. Reduction of OS by NMDPEF, a specific NQO2 inhibitor, but not by N-acetylcysteine, abrogated the inhibitory effect of PQ and restored autophagic flux. Activation of NQO2 by PQ or menadione and genetic manipulation of its expression confirmed the role of this enzyme in the inhibitory action of PQ on autophagy. PQ did not induce NFE2L2/NRF2, but when it was co-administered with NMDPEF NFE2L2 activity was enhanced in a SQSTM1-independent fashion. Thus, a prolonged OS in astrocytes inhibits LC3 lipidation and impairs autophagosome formation and autophagic flux, in spite of concomitant activation of several pro-autophagic signals. These findings outline an unanticipated neuroprotective role of astrocyte autophagy and identify in NQO2 a novel pharmacological target for its positive modulation. PMID:26046590

  13. Ceramide sensitizes astrocytes to oxidative stress: protective role of cannabinoids.

    PubMed Central

    Carracedo, Arkaitz; Geelen, Math J H; Diez, María; Hanada, Kentaro; Guzmán, Manuel; Velasco, Guillermo

    2004-01-01

    Cannabinoids induce apoptosis on glioma cells via stimulation of ceramide synthesis de novo, whereas they do not affect viability of primary astrocytes. In the present study, we show that incubation with Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol did not induce accumulation of ceramide on astrocytes, although incubation of these cells in a serum-free medium (with or without cannabinoids) led to stimulation of ceramide synthesis de novo and sensitization to oxidative stress. Thus treatment with H2O2 induced apoptosis of 5-day-serum-deprived astrocytes and this effect was abrogated by pharmacological blockade of ceramide synthesis de novo. The sensitizing effect of ceramide accumulation may depend on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation rather than on other ceramide targets. Finally, a protective role of cannabinoids on astrocytes is shown as a long-term incubation with cannabinoids prevented H2O2-induced loss of viability in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that whereas challenge of glioma cells with cannabinoids induces accumulation of de novo -synthesized ceramide and apoptosis, long-term treatment of astrocytes with these compounds does not stimulate this pathway and also abrogates the sensitizing effects of ceramide accumulation. PMID:14979873

  14. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-03-15

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes.

  15. Astrocytes Directly Influence Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Rarick, Kevin R.; Gershan, Jill; Dwinell, Michael B.; Harder, David R.; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a defining component of tumor pathophysiology, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well understood. Current dogma is that tumor cells stimulate and activate astrocytes, and this mutual relationship is critical for tumor cell sustenance in the brain. Here, we provide evidence that primary rat neonatal and adult astrocytes secrete factors that proactively induced human lung and breast tumor cell invasion and metastasis capabilities. Among which, tumor invasion factors namely matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 were partly responsible for the astrocyte media-induced tumor cell invasion. Inhibiting MMPs reduced the ability of tumor cell to migrate and invade in vitro. Further, injection of astrocyte media-conditioned breast cancer cells in mice showed increased invasive activity to the brain and other distant sites. More importantly, blocking the preconditioned tumor cells with broad spectrum MMP inhibitor decreased the invasion and metastasis of the tumor cells, in particular to the brain in vivo. Collectively, our data implicate astrocyte-derived MMP-2 and MMP-9 as critical players that facilitate tumor cell migration and invasion leading to brain metastasis. PMID:24324647

  16. Photostimulation of astrocytes with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xiuli; Lv, Xiaohua; Zhou, Wei; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2009-02-02

    The involvement of astrocytes in brain functions rather than support has been identified and widely concerned. However the lack of an effective stimulation of astrocytes hampers our understanding of their essential roles. Here, we employed 800-nm near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser to induce Ca2+ wave in astrocytes. It was demonstrated that photostimulation of astrocytes with femtosecond laser pulses is efficient with the advantages of non-contact, non-disruptiveness, reproducibility, and high spatiotemporal precision. Photostimulation of astrocytes would facilitate investigations on information processing in neuronal circuits by providing effective way to excite astrocytes.

  17. Pharmacological Activation Gi/o Protein Increases Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Production through Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway in Primary Cultured Rat Cortical Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Matsumoto, Chie; Azuma, Honami; Taki, Sayaka; Takebayashi, Minoru; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Morioka, Norimitsu

    2017-01-01

    A significant reduction of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been identified in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, clarification of the mechanism of GDNF production, and modulating brain GDNF levels could be a novel therapeutic approach. A previous study demonstrated that antidepressant amitriptyline-induced GDNF production was significantly inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), a Gi/o protein inhibitor in astrocytes, the main source of GDNF in the brain. However, it is not known whether direct activation of Gi/o protein might induce GDNF expression, and what mechanisms might be involved after Gi/o protein activation. The current study investigated Gi/o protein-initiated GDNF production in rat cortical astrocytes using activators that directly activate Gi/o protein, mastoparan and compound48/80. Treatment of astrocytes with either mastoparan or compound48/80 increased GDNF mRNA expression at 3 and 6 h, and GDNF protein release at 24 h. Treatment of astrocyte with either mastoparan or compound48/80 increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression as well as GDNF. Mastoparan and compound48/80-induced GDNF mRNA expression were significantly inhibited by not only PTX, but also fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor. In fact, both FGFR substrate2α (FRS2α) and ERK phosphorylation were increased by treatment with either mastoparan or compound48/80, and these were significantly blocked by PTX. Thus, direct, receptor-independent Gi/o protein activation increases GDNF production through FGFR/ERK signaling pathway. The current results indicate a critical role of Gi/o signaling in the regulation of GDNF expression in astrocytes.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 released from activated microglia enhances astrocyte proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dan; Hu Xiaoming; Qian Li; Wilson, Belinda; Lee, Christopher; Flood, Patrick; Langenbach, Robert; Hong, J.-S.

    2009-07-01

    Microglial activation has been implicated in many astrogliosis-related pathological conditions including astroglioma; however, the detailed mechanism is not clear. In this study, we used primary enriched microglia and astrocyte cultures to determine the role of microglial prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in the proliferation of astrocytes. The proliferation of astrocytes was measured by BrdU incorporation. The level of PGE{sub 2} was measured by ELISA method. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 in microglia were also applied in this study. We found that proliferation of astrocytes increased following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in the presence of microglia. Furthermore, increased proliferation of astrocytes was observed in the presence of conditioned media from LPS-treated microglia. The potential involvement of microglial PGE{sub 2} in enhanced astrocyte proliferation was suggested by the findings that PGE{sub 2} production and COX-2 expression in microglia were increased by LPS treatment. In addition, activated microglia-induced increases in astrocyte proliferation were blocked by the PGE{sub 2} antagonist AH6809, COX-2 selective inhibitor DuP-697 or by genetic knockout of microglial COX-2. These findings were further supported by the finding that addition of PGE{sub 2} to the media significantly induced astrocyte proliferation. These results indicate that microglial PGE{sub 2} plays an important role in astrocyte proliferation, identifying PGE{sub 2} as a key neuroinflammatory molecule that triggers the pathological response related to uncontrollable astrocyte proliferation. These findings are important in elucidating the role of activated microglia and PGE{sub 2} in astrocyte proliferation and in suggesting a potential avenue in the use of anti-inflammatory agents for the therapy of astroglioma.

  19. Activation of Egr-1 expression in astrocytes by HIV-1 Tat: new insights into astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Zou, Wei; Green, Linden A; Kim, Byung Oh; He, Johnny J

    2011-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis; the underlying mechanisms are still evolving. We have recently shown that HIV-1 Tat induces expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a characteristic of HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We have also shown that the Tat-induced GFAP expression in astrocytes is regulated by p300 and that deletion of the early growth response 1 (Egr-1) cis-transacting element within the p300 promoter abolishes Tat-induced GFAP expression. In this study, we further examined the relationship between Tat and Egr-1 in astrocytes. We found increased Egr-1 protein expression in Tat-expressing human astrocytoma cells and mouse primary astrocytes. Using the Egr-1 promoter-driven firefly luciferase reporter gene assay and the site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that Tat increased Egr-1 expression by transactivating the Egr-1 promoter and involving specific serum response elements within the promoter. Consistent with these data, we showed that Tat transactivation of the Egr-1 promoter was abrogated when astrocytes were cultured in serum-reduced media. Taken together, these results reveal that Tat directly transactivates Egr-1 expression and suggest that Tat interaction with Egr-1 is probably one of the very upstream molecular events that initiate Tat-induced astrocyte dysfunction and subsequent Tat neurotoxicity.

  20. Persistent oxygen-glucose deprivation induces astrocytic death through two different pathways and calpain-mediated proteolysis of cytoskeletal proteins during astrocytic oncosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Zou, Liangyu; Xiao, Haibing; Chu, Yinghao; Chu, Xiaofan

    2010-07-26

    Astrocytes are thought to play a role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the provision of metabolic substrates for neurons as well as the coupling of cerebral blood flow to neuronal activity. Accordingly, astrocytic death due to various types of injury can critically influence neuronal survival. The exact pathway of cell death after brain ischemia is under debate. In the present study, we used astrocytes from rat primary culture treated with persistent oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) as a model of ischemia to examine the pathway of cell death and the relevant mechanisms. We observed changes in the cellular morphology, the energy metabolism of astrocytes, and the percentage of apoptosis or oncosis of the astrocytes induced by OGD. Electron microscopy revealed the co-existence of ultrastructural features in both apoptosis and oncosis in individual cells. The cellular ATP content was gradually decreased and the percentages of apoptotic and oncotic cells were increased during OGD. After 4h of OGD, ATP depletion to less than 35% of the control was observed, and oncosis became the primary pathway for astrocytic death. Increased plasma membrane permeability due to oncosis was associated with increased calpain-mediated degradation of several cytoskeletal proteins, including paxillin, vinculin, vimentin and GFAP. Pre-treatment with the calpain inhibitor 3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-mercapto-(Z)-2-propenoic acid (PD150606) could delay the OGD-induced astrocytic oncosis. These results suggest that there is a narrow range of ATP that determines astrocytic oncotic death induced by persistent OGD and that calpain-mediated hydrolysis of the cytoskeletal-associated proteins may contribute to astrocytes oncosis.

  1. Characterization of mouse cell line IMA 2.1 as a potential model system to study astrocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Schildknecht, Stefan; Kirner, Susanne; Henn, Anja; Gasparic, Karlo; Pape, Regina; Efremova, Liudmila; Maier, Olaf; Fischer, Roman; Leist, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are activated in most chronic neurodegenerative diseases associated with inflammatory events such as Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease, but also in stroke. Due to an aging population worldwide, research efforts in these areas are likely to expand in the future. This will entail an increased demand for appropriate experimental models. We introduce here the new immortalized mouse astrocyte cell line IMA 2.1 as an alternative to currently used primary astrocyte cultures. IMA 2.1 were directly compared with primary mouse astrocytes with respect to their response to proinflammatory stimuli, expression of typical astrocyte markers, and to the cell line's capacity to metabolize the parkinsonian toxin MPTP to its toxic metabolite MPP+. Under inflammatory conditions, mimicked with the addition of a cytokine mix, IMA 2.1 responded similarly to primary astrocytes with mRNA upregulation, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and the release of various inflammatory mediators. Analysis of astrocytic markers indicated that IMA 2.1 represent a relatively early, GFAP-negative stage of astrocyte development. Moreover, conversion of MPTP by monoamine oxidase-B proceeded in IMA at least as quickly as in primary cells. For all endpoints investigated, the cell line IMA 2.1, derived from a single clone, delivered reproducible results over a period of several years and allowed upscaling of experiments due to its easy handling compared with primary cells.

  2. Hypoxia diminishes the protective function of white-matter astrocytes in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Agematsu, Kota; Korotcova, Ludmila; Morton, Paul D; Gallo, Vittorio; Jonas, Richard A; Ishibashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    White-matter injury after surgery is common in neonates with cerebral immaturity secondary to in utero hypoxia. Astrocytes play a central role in brain protection; however, the reaction of astrocytes to hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) remains unknown. We investigated the role of astrocytes in white-matter injury after HCA and determined the effects of preoperative hypoxia on this role, using a novel mouse model. Mice were exposed to hypoxia from days 3 to 11, which is equivalent to the third trimester in humans (prehypoxia, n = 49). Brain slices were transferred to a chamber perfused by cerebrospinal fluid. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was performed to simulate ischemia-reperfusion/reoxygenation resulting from circulatory arrest under hypothermia. Astrocyte reactions were compared with preoperative normoxia (prenormoxia; n = 45). We observed astrocyte activation after 25°C ischemia-reperfusion/reoxygenation in prenormoxia (P < .01). Astrocyte number after OGD correlated with caspase-3(+) cells (rho = .77, P = .001), confirming that astrogliosis is an important response after HCA. At 3 hours after OGD, astrocytes in prenormoxia had already proliferated and become activated (P < .05). Conversely, astrocytes that developed under hypoxia did not display these responses. At 20 hours after ischemia-reperfusion/reoxygenation, astrogliosis was not observed in prehypoxia, demonstrating that hypoxia altered the response of astrocytes to insult. In contrast to prenormoxia, caspase-3(+) cells in prehypoxia increased after ischemia reperfusion/reoxygenation, compared with control (P < .01). Caspase-3(+) cells were more common with prehypoxia than with prenormoxia (P < .001), suggesting that lack of astrogliosis permits increased white-matter injury. Preoperative hypoxia alters the neuroprotective function of astrocytes. Restoring this function before surgery may be a therapeutic option to reduce postoperative white-matter injury in the immature brain. Copyright

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Axonal Outgrowth Alone and Synergistically with Astrocytes via tPA

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jian-Yong; Chopp, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We reported that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhance neurological recovery from experimental stroke and increase tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) expression in astrocytes. Here, we investigate mechanisms by which tPA mediates MSC enhanced axonal outgrowth. Primary murine neurons and astrocytes were isolated from wild-type (WT) and tPA-knockout (KO) cortices of embryos. Mouse MSCs (WT) were purchased from Cognate Inc. Neurons (WT or KO) were seeded in soma side of Xona microfluidic chambers, and astrocytes (WT or KO) and/or MSCs in axon side. The chambers were cultured as usual (normoxia) or subjected to oxygen deprivation. Primary neurons (seeded in plates) were co-cultured with astrocytes and/or MSCs (in inserts) for Western blot. In chambers, WT axons grew significantly longer than KO axons and exogenous tPA enhanced axonal outgrowth. MSCs increased WT axonal outgrowth alone and synergistically with WT astrocytes at both normoxia and oxygen deprivation conditions. The synergistic effect was inhibited by U0126, an ERK inhibitor, and receptor associated protein (RAP), a low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) ligand antagonist. However, MSCs exerted neither individual nor synergistic effects on KO axonal outgrowth. Western blot showed that MSCs promoted astrocytic tPA expression and increased neuronal tPA alone and synergistically with astrocytes. Also, MSCs activated neuronal ERK alone and synergistically with astrocytes, which was inhibited by RAP. We conclude: (1) MSCs promote axonal outgrowth via neuronal tPA and synergistically with astrocytic tPA; (2) neuronal tPA is critical to observe the synergistic effect of MSC and astrocytes on axonal outgrowth; and (3) tPA mediates MSC treatment-induced axonal outgrowth through the LRP1 receptor and ERK. PMID:27959956

  4. The ISTSS/Rand guidelines on mental health training of primary healthcare providers for trauma-exposed populations in conflict-affected countries.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, David; Weine, Stevan; Green, Bonnie; de Jong, Joop; Rayburn, Nadine; Ventevogel, Peter; Keller, Allen; Agani, Ferid

    2006-02-01

    Mental health care for trauma-exposed populations in conflict-affected developing countries often is provided by primary healthcare providers (PHPs), including doctors, nurses, and lay health workers. The Task Force on International Trauma Training, through an initiative sponsored by the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies and the RAND Corporation, has developed evidence- and consensus-based guidelines for the mental health training of PHPs in conflict-affected developing countries. This article presents the Guidelines, which provide a conceptual framework and specific principles for improving the quality of mental health training for PHPs working with trauma-exposed populations.

  5. Phosphorylation Status of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Distinguishes Metabolic Phenotypes of Cultured Rat Brain Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    HALIM, NADER D.; McFATE, THOMAS; MOHYELDIN, AHMED; OKAGAKI, PETER; KOROTCHKINA, LIOUBOV G; PATEL, MULCHAND S; JEOUNG, NAM HO; HARRIS, ROBERT A.; SCHELL, MICHAEL J.; VERMA, AJAY

    2010-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in nervous tissue has been proposed to occur in a compartmentalized manner with astrocytes contributing largely to glycolysis and neurons being the primary site of glucose oxidation. However, mammalian astrocytes and neurons both contain mitochondria and it remains unclear why in culture neurons oxidize glucose, lactate, and pyruvate to a much larger extent than astrocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyruvate metabolism is differentially regulated in cultured neurons vs. astrocytes. Expression of all components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC), the rate-limiting step for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle, was determined in cultured astrocytes and neurons. In addition, regulation of PDC enzymatic activity in the two cell types via protein phosphorylation was examined. We show that all components of the PDC are expressed in both cell types in culture but that PDC activity is kept strongly inhibited in astrocytes through phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha subunit (PDHα). In contrast, neuronal PDC operates close to maximal levels with much lower levels of phosphorlyated PDHα. Dephosphorylation of astrocytic PDHα restores PDC activity and lowers lactate production. Our findings suggest that the glucose metabolism of astrocytes and neurons may be far more flexible than previously believed. PMID:20544852

  6. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  7. P2X7 receptors stimulate AKT phosphorylation in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Silva, Maria C; Rodnight, Richard; Lenz, Guido; Liao, Zhongji; Kong, Qiongman; Tran, Minh; Kang, Yuan; Gonzalez, Fernando A; Weisman, Gary A; Neary, Joseph T

    2004-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that nucleotide receptors are widely expressed in the nervous system. Here, we present evidence that P2Y and P2X receptors, particularly the P2X7 subtype, are coupled to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway in astrocytes. P2Y and P2X receptor agonists ATP, uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) and 2′,3′-O-(4-benzoyl)-benzoyl ATP (BzATP) stimulated Akt phosphorylation in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. BzATP induced Akt phosphorylation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, similar to the effect of BzATP on Akt phosphorylation in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably transfected with the rat P2X7 receptor. Activation was maximal at 5 – 10 min and was sustained for 60 min; the EC50 for BzATP was approximately 50 μM. In rat cortical astrocytes, the positive effect of BzATP on Akt phosphorylation was independent of glutamate release. The effect of BzATP on Akt phosphorylation in rat cortical astrocytes was significantly reduced by the P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G and the P2X receptor antagonist iso-pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid, but was unaffected by trinitrophenyl-ATP, oxidized ATP, suramin and reactive blue 2. Results with specific inhibitors of signal transduction pathways suggest that extracellular and intracellular calcium, PI3K and a Src family kinase are involved in the BzATP-induced Akt phosphorylation pathway. In conclusion, our data indicate that stimulation of astrocytic P2X7 receptors, as well as other P2 receptors, leads to Akt activation. Thus, signaling by nucleotide receptors in astrocytes may be important in several cellular downstream effects related to the Akt pathway, such as cell cycle and apoptosis regulation, protein synthesis, differentiation and glucose metabolism. PMID:15023862

  8. KSRP: A Checkpoint for Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    LI, XUELIN; LIN, WEI-JYE; CHEN, CHING-YI; SI, YING; ZHANG, XIAOWEN; LU, LIANG; SUSWAM, ESTHER; ZHENG, LEI; KING, PETER H.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) is a central feature of many neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. As an immunologically competent cell, the astrocyte plays an important role in CNS inflammation. It is capable of expressing a number of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) that promote inflammation directly and through the recruitment of immune cells. Checkpoints are therefore in place to keep tight control over cytokine production. Adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (ARE) in the 3′ untranslated region of cytokine mRNAs serve as a major checkpoint by regulating mRNA stability and translational efficiency. Here, we examined the impact of KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), an RNA binding protein which destabilizes mRNAs via the ARE, on cytokine expression and paracrine phenotypes of primary astrocytes. We identified a network of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α and IL-1β, whose expression increased 2 to 4-fold at the RNA level in astrocytes isolated from KSRP−/− mice compared to littermate controls. Upon activation, KSRP−/− astrocytes produced TNF-α and IL-1β at levels that exceeded control cells by 15-fold or more. Conditioned media from KSRP−/− astrocytes induced chemotaxis and neuronal cell death in vitro. Surprisingly, we observed a prolongation of half-life in only a subset of mRNA targets and only after selective astrocyte activation. Luciferase reporter studies indicated that KSRP regulates cytokine gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Our results outline a critical role for KSRP in regulating pro-inflammatory mediators and have implications for a wide range of CNS inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22847996

  9. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Plamena R.; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Ackland, Gareth L.; Funk, Gregory D.; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2. Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca2+]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to detect

  10. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  11. Midazolam provides cytoprotective effect during corticosterone-induced damages in rat astrocytes by stimulating steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Zhi; Miao, Yu-Liang; An, Li-Na; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Pan, Ning-Ling; Ma, Ya-Qun; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yun-Feng; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2013-06-28

    Midazolam is a benzodiazepine derivative drug that has powerful anxiolytic, amnestic, hypnotic, and sedative properties. The cytoprotective effect of midazolam on brain astrocytes is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the cytoprotective effect of midazolam on astrocytes exposed to corticosterone, a stress-produced glucocorticoid. We found that midazolam stimulated pregnenolone and progesterone secretion in astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Midazolam protected astrocytes from corticosterone-induced damages in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that progesterone reduced corticosterone-induced damages. Finally, we applied trilostane, an inhibitor of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, to inhibit pregnenolone metabolism and found that pretreatment with trilostane significantly inhibited the cytoprotective effect of midazolam on corticosterone-induced cytotoxicity in rat astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that midazolam has cytoprotective effect on astrocytes. This is, at least partially, derived from midazolam-induced steroidogenesis including progesterone and downstream products in astrocytes. Our data provide new insights into the cytoprotective effect of midazolam.

  12. Dual effects of carnosine on energy metabolism of cultured cortical astrocytes under normal and ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Yang, Jianbo; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carnosine on the bioenergetic profile of cultured cortical astrocytes under normal and ischemic conditions. The Seahorse Bioscience XF96 Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used to measure the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) and extracellular acidification rates (ECARs) of cultured cortical astrocytes treated with and without carnosine under normal and ischemic conditions. Under the normal growth condition, the basal OCRs and ECARs of astrocytes were 21.72±1.59 pmol/min/μg protein and 3.95±0.28 mpH/min/μg protein respectively. Mitochondrial respiration accounted for ~80% of the total cellular respiration and 85% of this coupled to ATP synthesis. Carnosine significantly reduced basal OCRs and ECARs and ATP-linked respiration, but it strikingly increased the spare respiratory capacity of astrocytes. The cellular ATP level in carnosine-treated astrocytes was reduced to ~42% of the control. However, under the ischemic condition, carnosine upregulated the mitochondrial respiratory and cellular ATP content of astrocytes exposed to 8h of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by 24 h of recovery under the normal growth condition. Carnosine may be an endogenous regulator of astrocyte energy metabolism and a clinically safe therapeutic agent for promoting brain energy metabolism recovery after ischemia/reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone.

  14. Modulation of interleukin-1beta mediated inflammatory response in human astrocytes by flavonoids: implications in neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Mishra, Mamata; Ghosh, Soumya; Tewari, Richa; Basu, Anirban; Seth, Pankaj; Sen, Ellora

    2007-06-15

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) contributes to inflammation and neuronal death in CNS injuries and neurodegenerative pathologies, and astrocytes have been implicated as the primary mediators of IL-1beta induced neuronal death. As astrocytes play an important role in supporting the survival and functions of neurons, we investigated the effect of plant flavonoids quercetin and luteolin, with known anti-inflammatory properties in modulating the response of human astrocytes to IL-1beta for therapeutic intervention. Flavonoids significantly decreased the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from astrocytes stimulated with IL-1beta. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) and thioredoxin (TRX1)-mediators associated with protection against oxidative stress. Flavonoids not only modulated the expression of astrocytes specific molecules such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), and ceruloplasmin (CP) both in the presence and absence of IL-1beta but also decreased the elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon-inducible protein (IP-10), monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and RANTES from IL-1beta activated astrocytes. Significant decrease in neuronal apoptosis was observed in neurons cultured in conditioned medium obtained from astrocytes treated with a combination of IL-1beta and flavonoids as compared to that treated with IL-1beta alone. Our result suggests that by (i) enhancing the potential of activated astrocytes to detoxify free radical, (ii) reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and (iii) modulating expression of mediators associated with enhanced physiological activity of astrocyte in response to injury, flavonoids confer (iv) protection against IL-1beta induced astrocyte mediated neuronal damage.

  15. Acute and Chronic Mu Opioids Differentially Regulate Thrombospondins 1 and 2 Isoforms in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic opioids induce synaptic plasticity, a major neuronal adaptation. Astrocyte activation in synaptogenesis may play a critical role in opioid tolerance, withdrawal, and dependence. Thrombospondins 1 and 2 (TSP1/2) are astrocyte-secreted matricellular glycoproteins that promote neurite outgrowth as well as dendritic spine and synapse formation, all of which are inhibited by chronic μ opioids. In prior studies, we discovered that the mechanism of TSP1 regulation by μ opioids in astrocytes involves crosstalk between three different classes of receptors, μ opioid receptor, EGFR and TGFβR. Moreover, TGFβ1 stimulated TSP1 expression via EGFR and ERK/MAPK activation, indicating that EGFR is a signaling hub for opioid and TGFβ1 actions. Using various selective antagonists, and inhibitors, here we compared the mechanisms of chronic opioid regulation of TSP1/2 isoform expression in vivo and in immortalized rat cortical astrocytes. TSP1/2 release from astrocytes was also monitored. Acute and chronic μ opioids, morphine, and the prototypic μ ligand, DAMGO, modulated TSP2 protein levels. TSP2 but not TSP1 protein content was up-regulated by acute (3 h) morphine or DAMGO by an ERK/MAPK dependent mechanism. Paradoxically, TSP2 protein levels were altered neither by TGFβ1 nor by astrocytic neurotrophic factors, EGF, CNTF, and BMP4. TSP1/2 immunofluorescence was increased in astrocytes subjected to scratch-wounding, suggesting TSPs may be useful markers for the “reactive” state of these cells and potentially for different types of injury. Previously, we determined that chronic morphine attenuated both neurite outgrowth and synapse formation in cocultures of primary astrocytes and neurons under similar temporal conditions that μ opioids reduced TSP1 protein levels in astrocytes. Here we found that, after the same 8 day treatment, morphine or DAMGO diminished TSP2 protein levels in astrocytes. Therefore, μ opioids may deter synaptogenesis via both TSP1/2 isoforms

  16. Acute and chronic mu opioids differentially regulate thrombospondins 1 and 2 isoforms in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Phamduong, Ellen; Rathore, Maanjot K; Crews, Nicholas R; D'Angelo, Alexander S; Leinweber, Andrew L; Kappera, Pranay; Krenning, Thomas M; Rendell, Victoria R; Belcheva, Mariana M; Coscia, Carmine J

    2014-02-19

    Chronic opioids induce synaptic plasticity, a major neuronal adaptation. Astrocyte activation in synaptogenesis may play a critical role in opioid tolerance, withdrawal, and dependence. Thrombospondins 1 and 2 (TSP1/2) are astrocyte-secreted matricellular glycoproteins that promote neurite outgrowth as well as dendritic spine and synapse formation, all of which are inhibited by chronic μ opioids. In prior studies, we discovered that the mechanism of TSP1 regulation by μ opioids in astrocytes involves crosstalk between three different classes of receptors, μ opioid receptor, EGFR and TGFβR. Moreover, TGFβ1 stimulated TSP1 expression via EGFR and ERK/MAPK activation, indicating that EGFR is a signaling hub for opioid and TGFβ1 actions. Using various selective antagonists, and inhibitors, here we compared the mechanisms of chronic opioid regulation of TSP1/2 isoform expression in vivo and in immortalized rat cortical astrocytes. TSP1/2 release from astrocytes was also monitored. Acute and chronic μ opioids, morphine, and the prototypic μ ligand, DAMGO, modulated TSP2 protein levels. TSP2 but not TSP1 protein content was up-regulated by acute (3 h) morphine or DAMGO by an ERK/MAPK dependent mechanism. Paradoxically, TSP2 protein levels were altered neither by TGFβ1 nor by astrocytic neurotrophic factors, EGF, CNTF, and BMP4. TSP1/2 immunofluorescence was increased in astrocytes subjected to scratch-wounding, suggesting TSPs may be useful markers for the "reactive" state of these cells and potentially for different types of injury. Previously, we determined that chronic morphine attenuated both neurite outgrowth and synapse formation in cocultures of primary astrocytes and neurons under similar temporal conditions that μ opioids reduced TSP1 protein levels in astrocytes. Here we found that, after the same 8 day treatment, morphine or DAMGO diminished TSP2 protein levels in astrocytes. Therefore, μ opioids may deter synaptogenesis via both TSP1/2 isoforms, but

  17. Cleavable ester linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to study the solvent exposed lysine residues of peptides/proteins, we previously reported disulfide linked N-hydrosuccinimide ester modified silica coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NHS-SS-SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs). The presence of a disulfide bond in the linker limits the use of disulfide r...

  18. Molecular mechanisms of astrocyte-induced synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Katherine T; Eroglu, Cagla

    2017-08-01

    Astrocytes are morphologically complex cells that perform a wide variety of critical functions in the brain. As a structurally and functionally integrated component of the synapse, astrocytes secrete proteins, lipids, and small molecules that bind neuronal receptors to promote synaptogenesis and regulate synaptic connectivity. Additionally, astrocytes are key players in circuit formation, instructing the formation of synapses between distinct classes of neurons. This review highlights recent publications on the topic of astrocyte-mediated synaptogenesis, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms through which astrocytes orchestrate the formation of synaptic circuits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tibolone Preserves Mitochondrial Functionality and Cell Morphology in Astrocytic Cells Treated with Palmitic Acid.

    PubMed

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E

    2017-06-30

    Obesity has been associated with increased chronic neuroinflammation and augmented risk of neurodegeneration. This is worsened during the normal aging process when the levels of endogenous gonadal hormones are reduced. In this study, we have assessed the protective actions of tibolone, a synthetic steroid with estrogenic actions, on T98G human astrocytic cells exposed to palmitic acid, a saturated fatty acid used to mimic obesity in vitro. Tibolone improved cell survival, and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in palmitic acid-treated astrocytic cells. Although we did not find significant actions of tibolone on free radical production, it modulated astrocytic morphology after treatment with palmitic acid. These data suggest that tibolone protects astrocytic cells by preserving both mitochondrial functionality and morphological complexity.

  20. Intracellular Polyamines Enhance Astrocytic Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Benedikt, Jan; Inyushin, Mikhail; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V.; Rivera, Yomarie; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y.; Nichols, Colin G.; Eaton, Misty J.; Skatchkov, Serguei N.

    2013-01-01

    Spermine (SPM) and spermidine (SPD), endogenous polyamines (PA) with the ability to modulate various ion channels and receptors in the brain, exert neuroprotective, antidepressant, antioxidant and other effects in vivo such as increasing longevity. These PA are preferably accumulated in astrocytes, and we hypothesized that SPM increases glial intercellular communication by interacting with glial gap junctions. Results obtained in situ, using Lucifer yellow propagation in the astrocytic syncitium of 21–25 day old rat CA1 hippocampal slices, showed reduced coupling when astrocytes were dialyzed with standard intracellular solutions (ICS) without SPM. However, there was a robust increase in the spreading of Lucifer yellow via gap junctions to neighboring astrocytes when the cells were patched with ICS containing 1 mM SPM; a physiological concentration in glia. Lucifer yellow propagation was inhibited by gap junction blockers. Our findings show that the glial syncitium propagates SPM via gap junctions and further suggest a new role of polyamines in the regulation of the astroglial network in both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23076119

  1. Intracellular polyamines enhance astrocytic coupling.

    PubMed

    Benedikt, Jan; Inyushin, Mikhail; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V; Rivera, Yomarie; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y; Nichols, Colin G; Eaton, Misty J; Skatchkov, Serguei N

    2012-12-05

    Spermine (SPM) and spermidine, endogenous polyamines with the ability to modulate various ion channels and receptors in the brain, exert neuroprotective, antidepressant, antioxidant, and other effects in vivo such as increasing longevity. These polyamines are preferably accumulated in astrocytes, and we hypothesized that SPM increases glial intercellular communication by interacting with glial gap junctions. The results obtained in situ, using Lucifer yellow propagation in the astrocytic syncitium of 21-25-day-old rat CA1 hippocampal slices, showed reduced coupling when astrocytes were dialyzed with standard intracellular solutions without SPM. However, there was a robust increase in the spreading of Lucifer yellow through gap junctions to neighboring astrocytes when the cells were patched with intracellular solutions containing 1 mM SPM, a physiological concentration in glia. Lucifer yellow propagation was inhibited by gap junction blockers. Our findings show that the glial syncitium propagates SPM through gap junctions and further indicate a new role of polyamines in the regulation of the astroglial network under both normal and pathological conditions.

  2. Astrocytic GABA transporter activity modulates excitatory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Boddum, Kim; Jensen, Thomas P.; Magloire, Vincent; Kristiansen, Uffe; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are ideally placed to detect and respond to network activity. They express ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, and can release gliotransmitters. Astrocytes also express transporters that regulate the extracellular concentration of neurotransmitters. Here we report a previously unrecognized role for the astrocytic GABA transporter, GAT-3. GAT-3 activity results in a rise in astrocytic Na+ concentrations and a consequent increase in astrocytic Ca2+ through Na+/Ca2+ exchange. This leads to the release of ATP/adenosine by astrocytes, which then diffusely inhibits neuronal glutamate release via activation of presynaptic adenosine receptors. Through this mechanism, increases in astrocytic GAT-3 activity due to GABA released from interneurons contribute to 'diffuse' heterosynaptic depression. This provides a mechanism for homeostatic regulation of excitatory transmission in the hippocampus. PMID:27886179

  3. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Hogberg, Helena T.; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hartung, Thomas; Coecke, Sandra; Bal-Price, Anna K.

    2009-03-15

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100{beta}) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABA{sub A} receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100{beta}) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity.

  4. CD38 positively regulates postnatal development of astrocytes cell-autonomously and oligodendrocytes non-cell-autonomously.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Kaji, Minoru; Ishii, Hiroshi; Jureepon, Roboon; Takarada-Iemata, Mika; Minh Ta, Hieu; Manh Le, Thuong; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Shiraishi, Yoshitake; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Haruhiro; Kitao, Yasuko; Hori, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    Glial development is critical for the function of the central nervous system. CD38 is a multifunctional molecule with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity. While critical roles of CD38 in the adult brain such as oxytocin release and social behavior have been reported, those in the developing brain remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that deletion of Cd38 leads to impaired development of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in mice. CD38 is highly expressed in the developing brains between postnatal day 14 (P14) and day 28 (P28). In situ hybridization and FACS analysis revealed that CD38 is expressed predominantly in astrocytes in these periods. Analyses of the cortex of Cd38 knockout (Cd38(-/-) ) mice revealed delayed development of astrocytes and subsequently delayed differentiation of oligodendrocytes (OLs) at postnatal stages. In vitro experiments using primary OL cultures, mixed glial cultures, and astrocytic conditioned medium showed that astrocytic CD38 regulates the development of astrocytes in a cell-autonomous manner and the differentiation of OLs in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Further experiments revealed that connexin43 (Cx43) in astrocytes plays a promotive role for CD38-mediated OL differentiation. Finally, increased levels of NAD(+) , caused by CD38 deficiency, are likely to be responsible for the suppression of astrocytic Cx43 expression and OL differentiation. Our data indicate that CD38 is a positive regulator of astrocyte and OL development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The use of Museum Based Science Centres to Expose Primary School Students in Developing Countries to Abstract and Complex Concepts of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Trust; Sigauke, Esther

    2017-10-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology, and it is regarded as the basis for the next industrial revolution. In developing countries, nanotechnology promises to solve everyday challenges, such as the provision of potable water, reliable energy sources and effective medication. However, there are several challenges in the exploitation of nanotechnology. One of the notable challenges is the lack of adequate knowledge about how materials behave at the nanoscale. As nanotechnology is relatively new, the current generation of scientists have not had the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of the technology at an early stage. Young students who are at the primary school level may follow the same trajectory if they are not exposed to the technology. There is a need to lay a strong foundation by introducing nanoscience and nanotechnology to students at the primary school level. It is during the early stages of child development that students master basic concepts for life long learning. Nevertheless, many primary school children, particularly those in developing countries are missing the chance of learning about nanoscience and nanotechnology because it is regarded as being abstract and complex. In this paper, we argue that despite the complexity of nanoscience and nanotechnology, science centres can be used as one of the platforms for exposing young students to the discipline. We use a case study of a museum-based science centre as an example to illustrate that young students can be exposed to nanoscience and nanotechnology using tactile and hands-on experience. The early engagement of primary school children with nanoscience and nanotechnology is important in raising the next generation of scientists who are firmly grounded in the discipline.

  6. The use of Museum Based Science Centres to Expose Primary School Students in Developing Countries to Abstract and Complex Concepts of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Trust; Sigauke, Esther

    2017-04-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology, and it is regarded as the basis for the next industrial revolution. In developing countries, nanotechnology promises to solve everyday challenges, such as the provision of potable water, reliable energy sources and effective medication. However, there are several challenges in the exploitation of nanotechnology. One of the notable challenges is the lack of adequate knowledge about how materials behave at the nanoscale. As nanotechnology is relatively new, the current generation of scientists have not had the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of the technology at an early stage. Young students who are at the primary school level may follow the same trajectory if they are not exposed to the technology. There is a need to lay a strong foundation by introducing nanoscience and nanotechnology to students at the primary school level. It is during the early stages of child development that students master basic concepts for life long learning. Nevertheless, many primary school children, particularly those in developing countries are missing the chance of learning about nanoscience and nanotechnology because it is regarded as being abstract and complex. In this paper, we argue that despite the complexity of nanoscience and nanotechnology, science centres can be used as one of the platforms for exposing young students to the discipline. We use a case study of a museum-based science centre as an example to illustrate that young students can be exposed to nanoscience and nanotechnology using tactile and hands-on experience. The early engagement of primary school children with nanoscience and nanotechnology is important in raising the next generation of scientists who are firmly grounded in the discipline.

  7. Homocysteine Induces Glial Reactivity in Adult Rat Astrocyte Cultures.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Aline; Bellaver, Bruna; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Santos, Camila Leite; Nonose, Yasmine; Kolling, Janaina; Dos Santos, Tiago M; de Assis, Adriano M; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wyse, Angela T S

    2017-03-02

    Astrocytes are dynamic glial cells associated to neurotransmitter systems, metabolic functions, antioxidant defense, and inflammatory response, maintaining the brain homeostasis. Elevated concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) are involved in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. In line with this, our hypothesis was that Hcy could promote glial reactivity in a model of cortical primary astrocyte cultures from adult Wistar rats. Thus, cortical astrocytes were incubated with different concentrations of Hcy (10, 30, and 100 μM) during 24 h. After the treatment, we analyzed cell viability, morphological parameters, antioxidant defenses, and inflammatory response. Hcy did not induce any alteration in cell viability; however, it was able to induce cytoskeleton rearrangement. The treatment with Hcy also promoted a significant decrease in the activities of Na(+), K(+) ATPase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), as well as in the glutathione (GSH) content. Additionally, Hcy induced an increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In an attempt to elucidate the putative mechanisms involved in the Hcy-induced glial reactivity, we measured the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) transcriptional activity and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression, which were activated and inhibited by Hcy, respectively. In summary, our findings provide important evidences that Hcy modulates critical astrocyte parameters from adult rats, which might be associated to the aging process.

  8. Arachidonic acid stimulates glucose uptake in cerebral cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, N; Martin, J L; Stella, N; Magistretti, P J

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) has recently been shown to influence various cellular functions in the central nervous system. Here we report that AA increases, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, 2-deoxy-D-[1-3H]glucose ([3H]2DG) uptake in primary cultures of astrocytes prepared from the cerebral cortex of neonatal mice. This effect is mimicked by an unsaturated fatty acid such as linolenic acid, while palmitic and arachidic acids, two saturated fatty acids, are inactive. Pharmacological agents that increase the endogenous levels of AA by stimulating AA release (melittin) or by inhibiting its reacylation (thimerosal) also promote [3H]2DG uptake by astrocytes. We also report that norepinephrine (NE) stimulates the release of [3H]AA from membrane phospholipids, with an EC50 of 3 microM; this effect is accompanied, with a temporal delay of approximately 4 min, by the stimulation of [3H]2DG uptake, for which the EC50 of NE is 1 microM. Since the cerebral cortex, the brain region from which astrocytes used in this study were prepared, receives a massive noradrenergic innervation, originating from the locus coeruleus, the effects of NE reported here further stress the notion that certain neurotransmitters may play a role in the regulation of energy metabolism in the cerebral cortex and point at astrocytes as the likely targets of such metabolic effects. PMID:8483920

  9. Resveratrol effects on astrocyte function: relevance to neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Wight, Randall D; Tull, Cameron A; Deel, Matthew W; Stroope, Brooke L; Eubanks, Amy G; Chavis, Janet A; Drew, Paul D; Hensley, Lori L

    2012-09-14

    Inflammatory molecules have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis. Resveratrol is an anti-fungal compound found in the skins of red grapes and other fruits and nuts. We examined the ability of resveratrol to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of inflammatory molecules from primary mouse astrocytes. Resveratrol inhibited LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO); the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), and IL-6; and the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), which play critical roles in innate immunity, by astrocytes. Resveratrol also suppressed astrocyte production of IL-12p40 and IL-23, which are known to alter the phenotype of T cells involved in adaptive immunity. Finally resveratrol inhibited astrocyte production of C-reactive protein (CRP), which plays a role in a variety of chronic inflammatory disorders. Collectively, these studies suggest that resveratrol may be an effective therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative diseases initiated or maintained by inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Astrocytic Expression of CTMP Following an Excitotoxic Lesion in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Nara; Yi, Min-Hee; Kim, Sena; Baek, Hyunjung; Triantafillu, Ursula L.

    2017-01-01

    Akt (also known as protein kinase B, PKB) has been seen to play a role in astrocyte activation of neuroprotection; however, the underlying mechanism on deregulation of Akt signaling in brain injuries is not fully understood. We investigated the role of carboxy-terminal modulator protein (CTMP), an endogenous Akt inhibitor, in brain injury following kainic acid (KA)-induced neurodegeneration of mouse hippocampus. In control mice, there was a weak signal for CTMP in the hippocampus, but CTMP was markedly increased in the astrocytes 3 days after KA treatment. To further investigate the effectiveness of Akt signaling, the phosphorylation of CTMP was examined. KA treatment induced an increased p-CTMP expression in the astrocytes of hippocampus at 1 day. LPS/IFN-γ-treatment on primary astrocytes promoted the p-CTMP was followed by phosphorylation of Akt and finally upregulation of CTMP and p-CREB. Time-dependent expression of p-CTMP, p-Akt, p-CREB, and CTMP indicate that LPS/IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of CTMP can activate Akt/CREB signaling, whereas lately emerging enhancement of CTMP can inhibit it. These results suggest that elevation of CTMP in the astrocytes may suppress Akt activity and ultimately negatively affect the outcome of astrocyte activation (astroglisiois). Early time point enhancers of phosphorylation of CTMP and/or late time inhibitors specifically targeting CTMP may be beneficial in astrocyte activation for neuroprotection within treatment in neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:28243164

  11. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K+ and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  12. Astrocyte morphology after ischemic and hemorrhagic experimental stroke has no influence on the different recovery patterns.

    PubMed

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Saur, Lisiani; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Vaz, Sabrina Pereira; Ferreira, Kelly; Machado, Susane Alves; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2015-02-01

    Stroke, broadly subdivided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes, is a serious health-care problem worldwide. Previous studies have suggested ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke could present different functional recovery patterns. However, little attention has been given to this neurobiological finding. Coincidently, astrocyte morphology could be related to improved sensorimotor recovery after skilled reaching training and modulated by physical exercise and environmental enrichment. Therefore, it is possible that astrocyte morphology might be linked to differential recovery patterns between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, we decided to compare long-term GFAP-positive astrocyte morphology after ischemic (IS, n=5), hemorrhagic (HS, n=5) and sham (S, n=5) stroke groups (induced by endothelin-1, collagenase type IV-S and salina, respectively). Our results showed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes induced similar long-term GFAP-positive astrocyte plasticity (P>0.05) for all evaluated measures (regional and cellular optical density; astrocytic primary processes ramification and length; density of GFAP positive astrocytes) in perilesional sensorimotor cortex and striatum. These interesting negative results discourage similar studies focused on long-term plasticity of GFAP-positive astrocyte morphology and recovery comparison of stroke subtypes.

  13. Improvement of neuronal cell survival by astrocyte-derived exosomes under hypoxic and ischemic conditions depends on prion protein.

    PubMed

    Guitart, Kathrin; Loers, Gabriele; Buck, Friedrich; Bork, Ute; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Prion protein (PrP) protects neural cells against oxidative stress, hypoxia, ischemia, and hypoglycemia. In the present study we confirm that cultured PrP-deficient neurons are more sensitive to oxidative stress than wild-type neurons and present the novel findings that wild-type, but not PrP-deficient astrocytes protect wild-type cerebellar neurons against oxidative stress and that exosomes released from stressed wild-type, but not from stressed PrP-deficient astrocytes reduce neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress. We show that neuroprotection by exosomes of stressed astrocytes depends on exosomal PrP but not on neuronal PrP and that astrocyte-derived exosomal PrP enters into neurons, suggesting neuronal uptake of astrocyte-derived exosomes. Upon exposure of wild-type astrocytes to hypoxic or ischemic conditions PrP levels in exosomes were increased. By mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis, we detected increased levels of 37/67 kDa laminin receptor, apolipoprotein E and the ribosomal proteins S3 and P0, and decreased levels of clusterin/apolipoprotein J in exosomes from wild-type astrocytes exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation relative to exosomes from astrocytes maintained under normoxic conditions. The levels of these proteins were not altered in exosomes from stressed PrP-deficient astrocytes relative to unstressed PrP-deficient astrocytes. These results indicate that PrP in astrocytes is a sensor for oxidative stress and mediates beneficial cellular responses, e.g. release of exosomes carrying PrP and other molecules, resulting in improved survival of neurons under hypoxic and ischemic conditions.

  14. Changes in ascorbic acid content in primary cultured rat hepatocytes exposed to 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride, a radical initiator.

    PubMed

    Sasakii, K; Kimura, K; Kitaguchi, Y; Onoue, T; Ogura, H; Aoyagi, Y

    2001-08-01

    Changes in ascorbate content in primary cultured rat hepatocytes exposed to oxidative stress derived from water soluble radical initiator 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) were examined. Cells were exposed to 0.05 and 5 mg/ml of AAPH as 'mild' and severe' oxidative stresses, respectively. Lipid peroxidation in hepatocytes was induced by 'severe' oxidative stress, but not by 'mild' oxidative stress. Ascorbate decreased at 6 hr after administration of both mild' and severe' oxidative stresses, and recovered to the control level after a further 6 hr. In cells treated with 'severe oxidative stress, however, total ascorbate (reduced form plus oxidized form) had increased 24 hr after administration. These results indicated that consumption alone did not account for the increase of ascorbate in hepatocytes under oxidative stress.

  15. Multifaceted roles for astrocytes in spreading depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Jessica L.; Escartin, Carole; Ayata, Cenk; Bonvento, Gilles; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SD) are coordinated waves of synchronous depolarization, involving large numbers of neurons and astrocytes as they spread slowly through brain tissue. The recent identification of SDs as likely contributors to pathophysiology in human subjects has led to a significant increase in interest in SD mechanisms, and possible approaches to limit the numbers of SDs or their deleterious consequences in injured brain. Astrocytes regulate many events associated with SD. SD initiation and propagation is dependent on extracellular accumulation of K+ and glutamate, both of which involve astrocytic clearance. SDs are extremely metabolically demanding events, and signaling through astrocyte networks is likely central to the dramatic increase in regional blood flow that accompanies SD in otherwise healthy tissues. Astrocytes may provide metabolic support to neurons following SD, and may provide a source of adenosine that inhibits neuronal activity following SD. It is also possible that astrocytes contribute to the pathophysiology of SD, as a consequence of excessive glutamate release, facilitation of NMDA receptor activation, brain edema due to astrocyte swelling, or disrupted coupling to appropriate vascular responses after SD. Direct or indirect evidence has accumulated implicating astrocytes in many of these responses, but much remains unknown about their specific contributions, especially in the context of injury. Conversion of astrocytes to a reactive phenotype is a prominent feature of injured brain, and recent work suggests that the different functional properties of reactive astrocytes could be targeted to limit SDs in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26301517

  16. Hypoxia in Astrocytic Tumors and Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cavazos, David A.; Brenner, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM, Grade IV astrocytoma) is the most common and most aggressive of the primary malignant brain tumors in adults. Hypoxia is a distinct feature in GBM and plays a significant role in tumor progression, resistance to treatment and poor outcomes. This review considers the effects of hypoxia on astrocytic tumors and the mechanisms that contribute to tumor progression and therapeutic resistance, with a focus on the vascular changes, chemotaxic signaling pathways and metabolic alterations involved. PMID:26094595

  17. Soluble cpg15 from Astrocytes Ameliorates Neurite Outgrowth Recovery of Hippocampal Neurons after Mouse Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Jing; Hu, Jie-Xian; Lu, De-Xin; Ji, Chun-Xia; Qi, Yao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Feng-Yan; Huang, Fang; Xu, Ping; Chen, Xian-Hua

    2017-02-08

    The present study focuses on the function of cpg15, a neurotrophic factor, in ischemic neuronal recovery using transient global cerebral ischemic (TGI) mouse model and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated primary cultured cells. The results showed that expression of cpg15 proteins in astrocytes, predominantly the soluble form, was significantly increased in mouse hippocampus after TGI and in the cultured astrocytes after OGD. Addition of the medium from the cpg15-overexpressed astrocytic culture into the OGD-treated hippocampal neuronal cultures reduces the neuronal injury, whereas the recovery of neurite outgrowths of OGD-injured neurons was prevented when cpg15 in the OGD-treated astrocytes was knocked down, or the OGD-treated-astrocytic medium was immunoadsorbed by cpg15 antibody. Furthermore, lentivirus-delivered knockdown of cpg15 expression in mouse hippocampal astrocytes diminishes the dendritic branches and exacerbates injury of neurons in CA1 region after TGI. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of MEK1/2, PI3K, and TrkA decreases, whereas overexpression of p-CREB, but not dp-CREB, increases the expression of cpg15 in U118 or primary cultured astrocytes. Also, it is observed that the Flag-tagged soluble cpg15 from the astrocytes transfected with Flag-tagged cpg15-expressing plasmids adheres to the surface of neuronal bodies and the neurites. In conclusion, our results suggest that the soluble cpg15 from astrocytes induced by ischemia could ameliorate the recovery of the ischemic-injured hippocampal neurons via adhering to the surface of neurons. The upregulated expression of cpg15 in astrocytes may be activated via MAPK and PI3K signal pathways, and regulation of CREB phosphorylation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal plasticity plays a crucial role in the amelioration of neurological recovery of ischemic injured brain, which remains a challenge for clinic treatment of cerebral ischemia. cpg15 as a synaptic plasticity-related factor may participate in

  18. Differential Pro-Inflammatory Responses of Astrocytes and Microglia Involve STAT3 Activation in Response to 1800 MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonghui; He, Mindi; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; He, Yue; Chen, Chunhai; Liu, Chuan; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes play important role in maintaining the homeostasis of central nervous system (CNS). Several CNS impacts have been postulated to be associated with radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields exposure. Given the important role of inflammation in neural physiopathologic processes, we investigated the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia and astrocytes and the involved mechanism in response to RF fields. Microglial N9 and astroglial C8-D1A cells were exposed to 1800 MHz RF for different time with or without pretreatment with STAT3 inhibitor. Microglia and astrocytes were activated by RF exposure indicated by up-regulated CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, RF exposure induced differential pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes and microglia, characterized by different expression and release profiles of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, PGE2, nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). Moreover, the RF exposure activated STAT3 in microglia but not in astrocytes. Furthermore, the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic ameliorated the RF-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in microglia but not in astrocytes. Our results demonstrated that RF exposure differentially induced pro-inflammatory responses in microglia and astrocytes, which involved differential activation of STAT3 in microglia and astrocytes. Our data provide novel insights into the potential mechanisms of the reported CNS impacts associated with mobile phone use and present STAT3 as a promising target to protect humans against increasing RF exposure. PMID:25275372

  19. Lithium Ameliorates LPS-Induced Astrocytes Activation Partly via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Susu; Sun, Jie; Qian, Yanning

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are critical for the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). In addition, astrocytes express toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) and build up responses to innate immune triggers by releasing pro-inflammatory molecules. The pathogenesis of neurological disorders often involves the activation of astrocytes and associated inflammatory processes. Lithium, a primary drug for the treatment of bipolar disorder, has recently been suggested to have a role in neuroprotection during neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether lithium can ameliorate LPS-induced astrocytes activation via inhibition of TLR4 expression. Primary astrocytes cells were pretreated with lithium and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cellular activation, cytokine production, and TLR4 expression, were assessed. Lithium significantly inhibited LPS-induced astrocytes activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, as well as LPS-induced TLR4 expression. Lithium can inhibit LPS-induced TLR4 expression and astrocytes activation. These results indicate that lithium plays an important role in astrocytes activation and neuroinflammation-related diseases, which may open new avenues for neuroscience and biomedical research, and also offers new insight into the treatment of POCD. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein-1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Petrini, Stefania; Caramia, Martino; Veroni, Caterina; Minnone, Gaetana; Bernardo, Antonietta; Franciolini, Fabio; Pessia, Mauro; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara Corinna; Ambrosini, Elena

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in the MLC1 gene, which encodes a protein expressed in brain astrocytes, are the leading cause of MLC, a rare leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, brain edema, subcortical cysts, myelin and astrocyte vacuolation. Although recent studies indicate that MLC1 protein is implicated in the regulation of cell volume changes, the exact role of MLC1 in brain physiology and in the pathogenesis of MLC disease remains to be clarified. In preliminary experiments, we observed that MLC1 was poorly expressed in highly proliferating astrocytoma cells when compared with primary astrocytes, and that modulation of MLC1 expression influenced astrocyte growth. Because volume changes are key events in cell proliferation and during brain development MLC1 expression is inversely correlated to astrocyte progenitor proliferation levels, we investigated the possible role for MLC1 in the control of astrocyte proliferation. We found that overexpression of wild type but not mutant MLC1 in human astrocytoma cells hampered cell growth by favoring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) degradation and by inhibiting EGF-induced Ca(+) entry, ERK1/2 and PLCγ1 activation, and calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channel function, all molecular pathways involved in astrocyte proliferation stimulation. Interestingly, MLC1 did not influence AKT, an EGFR-stimulated kinase involved in cell survival. Moreover, EGFR expression was higher in macrophages derived from MLC patients than from healthy individuals. Since reactive astrocytes proliferate and re-express EGFR in response to different pathological stimuli, the present findings provide new information on MLC pathogenesis and unravel an important role for MLC1 in other brain pathological conditions where astrocyte activation occurs.

  1. Characterization of Amino Acid Profile and Enzymatic Activity in Adult Rat Astrocyte Cultures.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Hansel, Gisele; Arús, Bernardo Assein; Bellaver, Gabriela; Longoni, Aline; Kolling, Janaina; Wyse, Angela T S; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes are multitasking players in brain complexity, possessing several receptors and mechanisms to detect, participate and modulate neuronal communication. The functionality of astrocytes has been mainly unraveled through the study of primary astrocyte cultures, and recently our research group characterized a model of astrocyte cultures derived from adult Wistar rats. We, herein, aim to characterize other basal functions of these cells to explore the potential of this model for studying the adult brain. To characterize the astrocytic phenotype, we determined the presence of GFAP, GLAST and GLT 1 proteins in cells by immunofluorescence. Next, we determined the concentrations of thirteen amino acids, ATP, ADP, adenosine and calcium in astrocyte cultures, as well as the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and acetylcholine esterase. Furthermore, we assessed the presence of the GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB 1) in the astrocytes. Cells demonstrated the presence of glutamine, consistent with their role in the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as glutamate and D-serine, amino acids classically known to act as gliotransmitters. ATP was produced and released by the cells and ADP was consumed. Calcium levels were in agreement with those reported in the literature, as were the enzymatic activities measured. The presence of GAT 1 was detected, but the presence of CB 1 was not, suggesting a decreased neuroprotective capacity in adult astrocytes under in vitro conditions. Taken together, our results show cellular functionality regarding the astrocytic role in gliotransmission and neurotransmitter management since they are able to produce and release gliotransmitters and to modulate the cholinergic and GABAergic systems.

  2. Methamphetamine inhibits the glucose uptake by human neurons and astrocytes: stabilization by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Abdul Muneer, P M; Alikunju, Saleena; Szlachetka, Adam M; Haorah, James

    2011-04-27

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psycho-stimulant drug exerts euphoric effects on users and abusers. It is also known to cause cognitive impairment and neurotoxicity. Here, we hypothesized that METH exposure impairs the glucose uptake and metabolism in human neurons and astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose is expected to cause neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration due to depletion of energy. We found that METH exposure inhibited the glucose uptake by neurons and astrocytes, in which neurons were more sensitive to METH than astrocytes in primary culture. Adaptability of these cells to fatty acid oxidation as an alternative source of energy during glucose limitation appeared to regulate this differential sensitivity. Decrease in neuronal glucose uptake by METH was associated with reduction of glucose transporter protein-3 (GLUT3). Surprisingly, METH exposure showed biphasic effects on astrocytic glucose uptake, in which 20 µM increased the uptake while 200 µM inhibited glucose uptake. Dual effects of METH on glucose uptake were paralleled to changes in the expression of astrocytic glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1). The adaptive nature of astrocyte to mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acid appeared to contribute the survival of astrocytes during METH-induced glucose deprivation. This differential adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes also governed the differential sensitivity to the toxicity of METH in these brain cells. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine for enhanced production of ATP from fatty oxidation in glucose-free culture condition validated the adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes. These findings suggest that deprivation of glucose-derived energy may contribute to neurotoxicity of METH abusers.

  3. NMO sera down-regulate AQP4 in human astrocyte and induce cytotoxicity independent of complement.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hiroyo; Sano, Yasuteru; Shimizu, Fumitaka; Omoto, Masatoshi; Tasaki, Ayako; Oishi, Mariko; Koga, Michiaki; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakada, Tsutomu; Kanda, Takashi

    2013-08-15

    Autoantibodies against astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are highly specific for neuromyelitis optica (NMO). However, the molecular mechanism of NMO still remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the possible humoral mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of astrocytic damage. Human primary astrocytes (AST) were immortalized by retroviral vectors harboring temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen gene and AQP4 cDNA (M23), designated as hAST-AQP4. The effects of NMO sera on the content and localization of AQP4, including cytotoxicity and astrocytic morphology, were evaluated. In addition, this study examined whether the amount and localization of AQP4 protein in astrocytes were influenced by direct contact with the immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, TY09. NMO sera alone induced cytotoxicity and addition of complement had a more harmful effect on hAST-AQP4. NMO sera also decreased AQP4 mRNA and protein. NMO sera alone up-regulated TNFα and IL-6 in astrocytes and co-incubation with anti-TNFα and anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibodies blocked both the cytotoxicity and reduction of AQP4 in astrocytes. In the experiment using the in vitro BBB models, AQP4 protein mainly localized at the astrocytic membrane after co-culture with TY09, in contact with TY09. The future elucidation of factors that up-regulate AQP4 in astrocytes presumably released by blood brain barrier forming endothelial cells and that block the production of inflammatory cytokines may therefore lead to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy.

  4. Picomolar Amyloid-β Peptides Enhance Spontaneous Astrocyte Calcium Transients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Kosuri, Pallav; Arancio, Ottavio

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are constitutively produced in the brain throughout life via mechanisms that can be regulated by synaptic activity. Although Aβ has been extensively studied as the pathological plaque-forming protein species in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), little is known about the normal physiological function(s) and signaling pathway(s). We previously discovered that physiologically-relevant, low picomolar amounts of Aβ can enhance synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent cognition in mice. In this study, we demonstrated that astrocytes are cellular candidates for participating in this type of Aβ signaling. Using calcium imaging of primary astrocyte cultures, we observed that picomolar amounts of Aβ peptides can enhance spontaneous intracellular calcium transient signaling. After application of 200 pM Aβ42 peptides, the frequency and amplitude averages of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients were significantly increased. These effects were dependent on α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs), as the enhancement effects were blocked by a pharmacological α7-nAChR inhibitor and in astrocytes from an α7 deficient mouse strain. We additionally examined evoked intercellular calcium wave signaling but did not detect significant picomolar Aβ-induced alterations in propagation parameters. Overall, these results indicate that at a physiologically-relevant low picomolar concentration, Aβ peptides can enhance spontaneous astrocyte calcium transient signaling via α7-nAChRs. Since astrocyte-mediated gliotransmission has been previously found to have neuromodulatory roles, Aβ peptides may have a normal physiological function in regulating neuron-glia signaling. Dysfunction of this signaling process may underlie glia-based aspects of AD pathogenesis. PMID:23948929

  5. Astrocytic mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization following extended oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Korenić, Andrej; Boltze, Johannes; Deten, Alexander; Peters, Myriam; Andjus, Pavle; Radenović, Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extended OGD exposure. Here, we subjected primary mouse astrocytes to glucose deprivation (GD), OGD and combinations of both conditions varying in duration and sequence. Changes in Δψ(m), visualized by change in the fluorescence of JC-1, were investigated within one hour after reconstitution of oxygen and glucose supply, intended to model in vivo reperfusion. In all experiments, astrocytes showed resilience to extended periods of OGD, which had little effect on Δψ(m) during reperfusion, whereas GD caused a robust Δψ(m) negativation. In case no Δψ(m) negativation was observed after OGD, subsequent chemical oxygen deprivation (OD) induced by sodium azide caused depolarization, which, however, was significantly delayed as compared to normoxic group. When GD preceded OD for 12 h, Δψ(m) hyperpolarization was induced by both GD and subsequent OD, but significant interaction between these conditions was not detected. However, when GD was extended to 48 h preceding OGD, hyperpolarization enhanced during reperfusion. This implicates synergistic effects of both conditions in that sequence. These findings provide novel information regarding the role of the two main substrates of electron transport chain (glucose and oxygen) and their hyperpolarizing effect on Δψ(m) during substrate deprivation, thus shedding new light on mechanisms of astrocyte resilience to prolonged ischemic injury.

  6. Astrocytic face of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zorec, Robert; Parpura, Vladimir; Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexej

    2017-03-30

    Ageing of the central nervous system (CNS) is the major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), a type of neurodegeneration that is associated with deficits in cognition and memory and clinically manifested as severe senile dementia. Numerous mental processes underline cognition, including attention, producing and understanding language, learning, reasoning, problem solving, decision making and memory formation. In the past, neurones or their parts have been considered to be the exclusive cellular sites of memory and cognitive processes. However, it has become evident that astrocytes, the major homeostatic glial cell of the CNS, provide an essential contribution to memory formation, and astroglial failure may promote cognitive decline in AD. In response to the network reset mechanisms mediated by the noradrenergic projections of neurones located in the locus coeruleus, astrocytes get excited and participate in the morphological remodelling associated with synaptic plasticity, otherwise thought to represent a cellular mechanism of learning and memory. Astroglial morphological plasticity is an energy-demanding process requiring mobilisation of glycogen, which, in the CNS, is almost exclusively stored in astrocytes. Astroglia exhibit cytoplasmic excitability that engages ions (such as Ca(2+) and Na(+)) and second messengers (such as cAMP). These ions/molecules contribute to the reception of extracellular signals and coordinate the secretion of glio-signalling molecules, including peptides such as apolipoporotein E, which participates in lipid transport between glia and neurones. In this setting, astrocytes are positioned as spatio-temporal integrators of neural network coordination, which disintegrates during progression of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic reactive astrocytes after focal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shinghua

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are specialized and most numerous glial cell type in the central nervous system and play important roles in physiology. Astrocytes are also critically involved in many neural disorders including focal ischemic stroke, a leading cause of brain injury and human death. One of the prominent pathological features of focal ischemic stroke is reactive astrogliosis and glial scar formation associated with morphological changes and proliferation. This review paper discusses the recent advances in spatial and temporal dynamics of morphology and proliferation of reactive astrocytes after ischemic stroke based on results from experimental animal studies. As reactive astrocytes exhibit stem cell-like properties, knowledge of dynamics of reactive astrocytes and glial scar formation will provide important insights for astrocyte-based cell therapy in stroke. PMID:25657720

  8. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function.

  9. Astrocytes Control Synapse Formation, Function, and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won-Suk; Allen, Nicola J.; Eroglu, Cagla

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, through their close associations with synapses, can monitor and alter synaptic function, thus actively controlling synaptic transmission in the adult brain. Besides their important role at adult synapses, in the last three decades a number of critical findings have highlighted the importance of astrocytes in the establishment of synaptic connectivity in the developing brain. In this article, we will review the key findings on astrocytic control of synapse formation, function, and elimination. First, we will summarize our current structural and functional understanding of astrocytes at the synapse. Then, we will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which developing and mature astrocytes instruct the formation, maturation, and refinement of synapses. Our aim is to provide an overview of astrocytes as important players in the establishment of a functional nervous system. PMID:25663667

  10. Zinc promotes the death of hypoxic astrocytes by upregulating hypoxia-induced hypoxiainducible factor-1alpha expression via Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rong; Chen, Chen; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Ke Jian

    2013-01-01

    Aim Pathological release of excess zinc ions has been implicated in ischemic brain cell death. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In stroke, ischemia-induced zinc release and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) accumulation concurrently occur in the ischemic tissue. The present study testes the hypothesis that the presence of high intracellular zinc concentration is a major cause of modifications to PARP-1 and HIF-1α during hypoxia, which significantly contributes to cell death during ischemia. Methods Primary cortical astrocytes and C8-D1A cells were exposed to different concentrations of zinc chloride. Cell death rate and protein expression of HIF-1 and Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 were examined after 3-hour hypoxic treatment. Results Although 3-hr hypoxia or 100 μM of zinc alone did not induce noticeable cytotoxicity, their combination led to a dramatic increase in astrocytic cell death in a zinc concentration dependent manner. Exposure of astrocytes to hypoxia for 3-hr remarkably increased the levels of intracellular zinc and HIF-1α protein, which was further augmented by added exogenous zinc. Notably HIF-1α knockdown blocked zinc-induced astrocyte death. Moreover, knockdown of PARP-1, another important protein in the response of hypoxia, attenuated the overexpression of HIF-1α and reduced the cell death rate. Conclusions Our studies show that zinc promotes hypoxic cell death through overexpression of the hypoxia response factor HIF-1α via the cell fate determine factor PARP-1 modification, which provides a novel mechanism for zinc-mediated ischemic brain injury. PMID:23582235

  11. Properties of astrocytes cultured from GFAP over-expressing and GFAP mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Woosung; Messing, Albee

    2009-04-15

    Alexander disease is a fatal leukoencephalopathy caused by dominantly-acting coding mutations in GFAP. Previous work has also implicated elevations in absolute levels of GFAP as central to the pathogenesis of the disease. However, identification of the critical astrocyte functions that are compromised by mis-expression of GFAP has not yet been possible. To provide new tools for investigating the nature of astrocyte dysfunction in Alexander disease, we have established primary astrocyte cultures from two mouse models of Alexander disease, a transgenic that over-expresses wild type human GFAP, and a knock-in at the endogenous mouse locus that mimics a common Alexander disease mutation. We find that mutant GFAP, as well as excess wild type GFAP, promotes formation of cytoplasmic inclusions, disrupts the cytoskeleton, decreases cell proliferation, increases cell death, reduces proteasomal function, and compromises astrocyte resistance to stress.

  12. Astrocytes: Everything but the glue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The current knowledge in neuroscience indicates that neural tissue has two major cell populations: neurons and glia (term derived from the Greek word for glue). Neuronal population is characterized by the capacity to produce action potentials, whereas glial cells are typically identified as the subordinate cell population of neurons. To date, this point of view has changed dramatically and growing evidence indicates that glial cells play a crucial role in normal mental functions and the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Classically, glial cells include four major populations clearly discernible in the adult brain: astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia cells and NG2 glia. Astrocytes, also referred as to astroglia, are by far the most abundant cell lineage in the adult brain. These cells are in close contact with several tissue components of the brain parenchyma including neurons, vasculature, extracellular matrix and other glial populations. Hence, the number and strategic position of astrocytes provide them with exceptional capacity for modulating multiple functions in the neural tissue. PMID:25938129

  13. Targeting astrocytes in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Li, Baoman; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are homeostatic cells of the central nervous system, which are critical for development and maintenance of synaptic transmission and hence of synaptically connected neuronal ensembles. Astrocytic densities are reduced in bipolar disorder, and therefore deficient astroglial function may contribute to overall disbalance in neurotransmission and to pathological evolution. Classical anti-bipolar drugs (lithium salts, valproic acid and carbamazepine) affect expression of astroglial genes and modify astroglial signalling and homeostatic cascades. Many effects of both antidepressant and anti-bipolar drugs are exerted through regulation of glutamate homeostasis and glutamatergic transmission, through K(+) buffering, through regulation of calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (that controls metabolism of arachidonic acid) or through Ca(2+) homeostatic and signalling pathways. Sometimes anti-depressant and anti-bipolar drugs exert opposite effects, and some effects on gene expression in drug treated animals are opposite in neurones vs. astrocytes. Changes in the intracellular pH induced by anti-bipolar drugs affect uptake of myo-inositol and thereby signalling via inositoltrisphosphate (InsP3), this being in accord with one of the main theories of mechanism of action for these drugs.

  14. Synaptopathy in the noise-exposed and aging cochlea: Primary neural degeneration in acquired sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Sharon G; Liberman, M Charles

    2015-12-01

    The classic view of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is that the "primary" targets are hair cells, and that cochlear-nerve loss is "secondary" to hair cell degeneration. Our recent work in mouse and guinea pig has challenged that view. In noise-induced hearing loss, exposures causing only reversible threshold shifts (and no hair cell loss) nevertheless cause permanent loss of >50% of cochlear-nerve/hair-cell synapses. Similarly, in age-related hearing loss, degeneration of cochlear synapses precedes both hair cell loss and threshold elevation. This primary neural degeneration has remained hidden for three reasons: 1) the spiral ganglion cells, the cochlear neural elements commonly assessed in studies of SNHL, survive for years despite loss of synaptic connection with hair cells, 2) the synaptic terminals of cochlear nerve fibers are unmyelinated and difficult to see in the light microscope, and 3) the degeneration is selective for cochlear-nerve fibers with high thresholds. Although not required for threshold detection in quiet (e.g. threshold audiometry or auditory brainstem response threshold), these high-threshold fibers are critical for hearing in noisy environments. Our research suggests that 1) primary neural degeneration is an important contributor to the perceptual handicap in SNHL, and 2) in cases where the hair cells survive, neurotrophin therapies can elicit neurite outgrowth from spiral ganglion neurons and re-establishment of their peripheral synapses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ferrous Iron Induces Nrf2 Expression in Mouse Brain Astrocytes to Prevent Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenwen; Zhong, Zhihong; Yang, Yong; Wang, Baofeng; Sun, Yuhao; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Bian, Liuguan

    2016-08-01

    Free radical damage caused by ferrous iron is involved in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a major phase II gene regulator that binds to antioxidant response element, represents an important cellular cytoprotective mechanism against oxidative damage. We hypothesized that Nrf2 might protect astrocytes from damage by Fe(2+) . Therefore, we examined cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes induced by iron overload and evaluated the effects of Fe(2+) on Nrf2 expression. The results demonstrated that 24-h Fe(2+) exposure exerted time- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in astrocytes. Furthermore, Fe(2+) exposure in astrocytes resulted in time- and concentration-dependent increases in Nrf2 expression, which preceded Fe(2+) toxicity. Nrf2-specific siRNA further knocked down Nrf2 levels, resulting in greater Fe(2+) -induced astrocyte cytotoxicity. These data indicate that induction of Nrf2 expression could serve as an adaptive self-defense mechanism, although it is insufficient to completely protect primary astrocytes from Fe(2+) -induced neurotoxicity.

  16. TCTP Expression After Rat Spinal Cord Injury: Implications for Astrocyte Proliferation and Migration.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianbing; Mao, Xingxing; Chen, Minghao; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Yang; Duan, Chengwei; Zhang, Haiyan; Sun, Chi; Wu, Weijie; Zhu, Xinjian; Ge, Jianbing; Tao, Weidong; Wang, Youhua; Lu, Hongjian

    2015-11-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved protein which plays a role in cell proliferation and growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. However, its expression and function in spinal cord injury (SCI) are still unknown. Here, we demonstrated that expression of TCTP was dynamic changed after acute spinal cord injury. Our results showed that TCTP gradually increased, reached a peak at 3 day, and then declined to basal levels at 14 days after spinal cord injury. Upregulation of TCTP was accompanied with an increase in the levels of proliferation proteins such as PCNA. Immunofluorescent labeling also showed that TCTP located in astrocytes and traumatic SCI induced TCTP colocalizated with PCNA. These results indicated that TCTP might play an important role in astrocyte proliferation. To further probe the role of TCTP, TCTP-specific siRNA-transfected astrocytes showed significant decrease of primary astrocyte proliferation. Surprisingly, TCTP knockdown also reduced primary astrocyte migration, as the reorganization of microtubules and F-actin was disturbed after siRNA transfection. All above indicated that TCTP might play a crucial role in astrocyte proliferation and migration. Collectively, our data suggested that TCTP might play important roles in CNS pathophysiology after SCI.

  17. Glutamate pays its own way in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C

    2013-12-16

    In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that glutamate can be oxidized for energy by brain astrocytes. The ability to harvest the energy from glutamate provides astrocytes with a mechanism to offset the high ATP cost of the uptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. This brief review focuses on oxidative metabolism of glutamate by astrocytes, the specific pathways involved in the complete oxidation of glutamate and the energy provided by each reaction.

  18. Different responses of astrocytes and neurons to nitric oxide: The role of glycolytically generated ATP in astrocyte protection

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Angeles; Almeida, Julia; Bolaños, Juan P.; Moncada, Salvador

    2001-01-01

    It was recently proposed that in Jurkat cells, after inhibition of respiration by NO, glycolytically generated ATP plays a critical role in preventing the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and thus apoptotic cell death. We have investigated this observation further in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons and astrocytes—cell types that differ greatly in their glycolytic capacity. Continuous and significant (≈85%) inhibition of respiration by NO (1.4 μM at 175 μM O2) generated by [(z)-1-[2-aminoethyl]-N-[2-ammonioethyl]amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2 diolate (DETA-NO) initially (10 min) depleted ATP concentrations by ≈25% in both cell types and increased the rate of glycolysis in astrocytes but not in neurons. Activation of glycolysis in astrocytes, as judged by lactate production, prevented further ATP depletion, whereas in neurons, which do not invoke this mechanism, there was a progressive decrease in ATP concentrations over the next 60 min. During this time, there was a persistent mitochondrial hyperpolarization and absence of apoptotic cell death in astrocytes, whereas in the neurons there was a progressive fall in Δψm and increased apoptosis. After glucose deprivation or treatment with inhibitors of the F1F0-ATPase and adenine nucleotide translocase, astrocytes responded to NO with a fall in Δψm and apoptotic cell death similar to the response in neurons. Finally, although treatment of astrocytes with NO partially prevented staurosporin-induced collapse in Δψm and cell death, NO and staurosporin synergized in decreasing Δψm and inducing apoptosis in neurons. These results demonstrate that although inhibition of cellular respiration by NO leads to neurotoxicity, it may also result in initial neuroprotection, depending on the glycolytic capacity of the particular cell. PMID:11742096

  19. Astrocytic Actions on Extrasynaptic Neuronal Currents

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, knowledge about astrocytic functions has significantly increased. It was demonstrated that astrocytes are not passive elements of the central nervous system (CNS), but active partners of neurons. There is a growing body of knowledge about the calcium excitability of astrocytes, the actions of different gliotransmitters and their release mechanisms, as well as the participation of astrocytes in the regulation of synaptic functions and their contribution to synaptic plasticity. However, astrocytic functions are even more complex than being a partner of the “tripartite synapse,” as they can influence extrasynaptic neuronal currents either by releasing substances or regulating ambient neurotransmitter levels. Several types of currents or changes of membrane potential with different kinetics and via different mechanisms can be elicited by astrocytic activity. Astrocyte-dependent phasic or tonic, inward or outward currents were described in several brain areas. Such currents, together with the synaptic actions of astrocytes, can contribute to neuromodulatory mechanisms, neurosensory and -secretory processes, cortical oscillatory activity, memory, and learning or overall neuronal excitability. This mini-review is an attempt to give a brief summary of astrocyte-dependent extrasynaptic neuronal currents and their possible functional significance. PMID:26696832

  20. Astrocyte scar formation aids CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Burda, Joshua E.; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S.; Deming, Timothy J.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system (CNS). Astrocyte scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or deleting chronic astrocyte scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. In striking contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocyte scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents CNS axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  1. Lateral regulation of synaptic transmission by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Covelo, A; Araque, A

    2016-05-26

    Fifteen years ago the concept of the "tripartite synapse" was proposed to conceptualize the functional view that astrocytes are integral elements of synapses. The signaling exchange between astrocytes and neurons within the tripartite synapse results in the synaptic regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity through an autocrine form of communication. However, recent evidence indicates that the astrocyte synaptic regulation is not restricted to the active tripartite synapse but can be manifested through astrocyte signaling at synapses relatively distant from active synapses, a process termed lateral astrocyte synaptic regulation. This phenomenon resembles the classical heterosynaptic modulation but is mechanistically different because it involves astrocytes and its properties critically depend on the morphological and functional features of astrocytes. Therefore, the functional concept of the tripartite synapse as a fundamental unit must be expanded to include the interaction between tripartite synapses. Through lateral synaptic regulation, astrocytes serve as an active processing bridge for synaptic interaction and crosstalk between synapses with no direct neuronal connectivity, supporting the idea that neural network function results from the coordinated activity of astrocytes and neurons.

  2. Hyperoxia causes reduced density of retinal astrocytes in the central avascular zone in the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Felicitas; Stahl, Andreas; Agostini, Hansjürgen T; Martin, Gottfried

    2013-09-01

    The mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) is commonly used to investigate various aspects of the pathogenesis of the retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) as well as angiogenesis in general. Retinal astrocytes were suggested to be involved in retinal angiogenesis. This study aimed to describe their localization and cell density during the course of physiological vascularization and pathological revascularization. Mice expressing H2B-GFP (green fluorescent protein fused to histone 2B) from the endogenous Pdgfra promoter were kept in 75% oxygen from P7 (post natal day 7) to P12 (mouse model of OIR). Retinal flatmounts or cryosections were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), glutamine synthetase (Glul), collagen IV (Col IV), desmin (Des), caspase 3 (Casp3), paired box 2 (Pax2), or Ki67. Astrocytic nuclei were counted with the ImageJ macro AuTOCellQuant. The hypoxic state of the retina was investigated by Hypoxyprobe. The GFP signal of the Pdgfra reporter mice co-localized with Pax2, a nuclear marker for retinal astrocytes. This bright label was much easier to quantify than Gfap or Pax2 staining. Quantification of the cell density of astrocytes during physiological development specified the spreading of astrocytes in a concentrical wave from the optic nerve head towards the periphery. Astrocyte density was reduced during the remodelling of the primary vascular plexus into a hierarchical vascular tree (maximal astrocyte density at P1: 2800 astrocytes/mm2, final astrocyte density: 800 astrocytes/mm2). In the OIR model, cell density of astrocytes was elevated in the peripheral vascularized zone. In contrast, astrocyte density dropped to a half (400 astrocytes/mm2) of the normal value in the central avascular zone during the hyperoxic phase between P8 and P10 by apoptosis and rose only after P17 as the retinal network normalized. An additional drop of astrocyte density was observed within the angles between the large vessels of the central

  3. Functional and phenotypic differences of pure populations of stem cell-derived astrocytes and neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kleiderman, Susanne; Sá, João V; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Gutbier, Simon; Evje, Lars G; Hadera, Mussie G; Glaab, Enrico; Henry, Margit; Sachinidis, Agapios; Alves, Paula M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation. Current protocols to prepare astrocyte cultures differ in their final content of immature precursor cells, preactivated cells or entirely different cell types. A new method taking care of all these issues would improve research on astrocyte functions. We found here that the exposure of a defined population of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSC) to BMP4 results in pure, nonproliferating astrocyte cultures within 24-48 h. These murine astrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (mAGES) expressed the positive markers GFAP, aquaporin 4 and GLT-1, supported neuronal function, and acquired innate immune functions such as the response to tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1. The protocol was applicable to several normal or disease-prone pluripotent cell lines, and the corresponding mAGES all exited the cell cycle and lost most of their nestin expression, in contrast to astrocytes generated by serum-addition or obtained as primary cultures. Comparative gene expression analysis of mAGES and NSC allowed quantification of differences between the two cell types and a definition of an improved marker set to define astrocytes. Inclusion of several published data sets in this transcriptome comparison revealed the similarity of mAGES with cortical astrocytes in vivo. Metabolic analysis of homogeneous NSC and astrocyte populations revealed distinct neurochemical features: both cell types synthesized glutamine and citrate, but only mature astrocytes released these metabolites. Thus, the homogeneous cultures allowed an improved definition of NSC and astrocyte features. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition reduce ammonia-induced cell swelling in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pichili V B; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V; Norenberg, Michael D

    2009-09-01

    Ammonia is the principal neurotoxin implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, and astrocytes are the neural cells predominantly affected in this condition. Astrocyte swelling (cytotoxic edema) represents a critical component of the brain edema in acute form of hepatic encephalopathy (acute liver failure, ALF). Although mechanisms of astrocyte swelling by ammonia are not completely understood, cultured astrocytes exposed to pathophysiological levels of ammonia develop the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT), a process that was shown to result in astrocyte swelling. Cyclosporin A (CsA), a traditional inhibitor of the mPT, was previously shown to completely block ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling in culture. However, the efficacy of CsA to protect cytotoxic brain edema in ALF is problematic because it poorly crosses the blood-brain barrier, which is relatively intact in ALF. We therefore examined the effect of agents that block the mPT but are also known to cross the blood-brain barrier, including pyruvate, magnesium, minocycline, and trifluoperazine on the ammonia-induced mPT, as well as cell swelling. Cultured astrocytes exposed to ammonia for 24 hr displayed the mPT as demonstrated by a CsA-sensitive dissipation of the mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Pyruvate, minocycline, magnesium, and trifluoperazine significantly blocked the ammonia-induced mPT. Ammonia resulted in a significant increase in cell volume, which was blocked by the above-mentioned agents to a variable degree. A regression analysis indicated a high correlation between the effectiveness of reducing the mPT and cell swelling. Our data suggest that all these agents have therapeutic potential in mitigating brain edema in ALF.

  5. Permanence of suppression of the primary immune response in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, sublethally exposed to tritiated water during embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, J.A.; Fujihara, M.P.; Poston, T.M.; Abernethy, C.S.

    1982-09-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that antibody synthesis in response to a challenge from the bacterium, Flexibacter columnaris, was significantly suppresssed in juvenile (5 months) rainbow trout following exposure to tritium at doses as low as 4.0 rad when administered during the first 20 days of embryogenesis. In continuing studies, a secondary challenge to columnaris cells delivered to yearling (17 months) trout was used to test the hypothesis that early embryonic exposure to tritium irradiation (0, 0.04, 0.4, 4.0, and 40.0 rad) resulted in permanent injury to the primary immune process.Results indicated that under the prescribed experimental conditions, suppression of the primary immune response was permanent; that is, the degree of injury in yearling fish (17 months) equaled or exceeded that found in juvenile fish (5 months). At levels in the range of the maximum permissible concentration, tritium produced measurable, dose-dependent, and irreversible suppression of immune capacity in affected fish. The threshold-free and exponential nature of the dose-response curve suggests extrapolation of effects to even lower exposures.

  6. The effect of resilience on posttraumatic stress disorder in trauma-exposed inner-city primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Glenda L; Wingo, Aliza P; Moore, Renee; Pelletier, Tiffany; Gutman, Alisa R; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J

    2011-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has previously been associated with increased risk for a variety of chronic medical conditions and it is often underdiagnosed in minority civilian populations. The current study examined the effects of resilience on the likelihood of having a diagnosis of PTSD in an inner-city sample of primary care patients (n=767). We measured resilience with the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, trauma with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and Trauma Events Inventory, and assessed for PTSD with the modified PTSD symptom scale. Multiple logistic regression model with presence/absence of PTSD as the outcome yielded 3 significant factors: childhood abuse, nonchild abuse trauma, and resilience. One type of childhood abuse in moderate to severe range (OR, 2.01; p = .0001), 2 or more types of childhood abuse in moderate to severe range (OR, 4.00; p < or = .0001), and 2 or more types of nonchildhood abuse trauma exposure (OR, 3.33; p < or = .0001), were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of PTSD, while resilience was robustly and significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of PTSD (OR, 0.93; p < or = .0001). By understanding the role of resilience in recovery from adverse experiences, improved treatment and interventional methods may be developed. Furthermore, these results suggest a role for assessing resilience in highly traumatized primary care populations as a way to better characterize risk for PTSD and direct screening/psychiatric referral efforts.

  7. Increased utilisation of primary healthcare in persons exposed to severe stress in prenatal life: a national population-based study in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiong; Yang, Hu; Guldin, Mai-Britt; Vedsted, Peter; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have suggested that stress in a pregnant mother may affect the future health of the unborn child negatively. An excellent proxy for health problems is the use of healthcare resources. Using nationwide data, we examined whether persons born to mothers who lost a close relative during pregnancy have more contacts to general practice. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants We included all children born in Denmark from 1973 to 2002 (N=2 032 528). Exposure of prenatal stress was defined as maternal bereavement by the death of a close relative during the antenatal period. The outcome of interest was contact with general practice between 2003 and 2009 when the participants were between 1 and 35 years of age. Poisson regression was used to assess the association between exposure and outcome. Outcome measures Contacts to general practitioner. Results Overall, persons exposed to prenatal stress had 2% more GP contacts than those not exposed, primarily due to increased utilisation of healthcare services during late adolescence and early adulthood. The exposed persons born to mothers who had lost a spouse had a higher risk (relative risk (RR) 1.12, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.14) and so did those born to mothers who had lost a close relative due to unexpected death (RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.06). Exposed persons had more contacts to general practice in daytime and more psychometric tests, talk therapies and C reactive protein tests than unexposed persons. Conclusions Prenatal stress following maternal bereavement was associated with a slightly increased utilisation of primary healthcare, mainly due to increased healthcare needs related to mental health and infections. Understanding how stress during pregnancy influences the future health of the child is an important aspect of prenatal care. PMID:25573520

  8. Microglia trigger astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection via purinergic gliotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Youichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2014-03-01

    Microglia are highly sensitive to even small changes in the brain environment, such as invasion of non-hazardous toxicants or the presymptomatic state of diseases. However, the physiological or pathophysiological consequences of their responses remain unknown. Here, we report that cultured microglia sense low concentrations of the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHglow) and provide neuroprotection against MeHg, for which astrocytes are also required. When exposed to MeHglow, microglia exocytosed ATP via p38 MAPK- and vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-dependent mechanisms. Astrocytes responded to the microglia-derived ATP via P2Y1 receptors and released interleukin-6 (IL-6), thereby protecting neurons against MeHglow. These neuroprotective actions were also observed in organotypic hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, but not in slices prepared from VNUT knockout or P2Y1 receptor knockout mice. These findings suggest that microglia sense and respond to even non-hazardous toxicants such as MeHglow and change their phenotype into a neuroprotective one, for which astrocytic support is required.

  9. Priming astrocytes with TNF enhances their susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and creates a self-sustaining inflammatory milieu.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andrea Alice; Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Gibaldi, Daniel; Mariante, Rafael Meyer; Dos Santos, Jessica Brandão; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2017-09-06

    In conditions of immunosuppression, the central nervous sty 5ystem (CNS) is the main target tissue for the reactivation of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. In experimental T. cruzi infection, interferon gamma (IFNγ)(+) microglial cells surround astrocytes harboring amastigote parasites. In vitro, IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi, and IFNγ-stimulated infected astrocytes are implicated as potential sources of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Pro-inflammatory cytokines trigger behavioral alterations. In T. cruzi-infected mice, administration of anti-TNF antibody hampers depressive-like behavior. Herein, we investigated the effects of TNF on astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi infection and the regulation of cytokine production. Primary astrocyte cultures of neonatal C57BL/6 and C3H/He mice and the human U-87 MG astrocyte lineage were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Cytokine production, particularly TNF, and TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1/p55) expression were analyzed. Recombinant cytokines (rIFNγ and rTNF), the anti-TNF antibody infliximab, and the TNFR1 modulator pentoxifylline were used to assess the in vitro effects of TNF on astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi infection. To investigate the role of TNF on CNS colonization by T. cruzi, infected mice were submitted to anti-TNF therapy. rTNF priming of mouse and human astrocytes enhanced parasite/astrocyte interaction (i.e., the percentage of astrocytes invaded by trypomastigote parasites and the number of intracellular parasite forms/astrocyte). Furthermore, T. cruzi infection drove astrocytes to a pro-inflammatory profile with TNF and interleukin-6 production, which was amplified by rTNF treatment. Adding rTNF prior to infection fueled parasite growth and trypomastigote egression, in parallel with increased TNFR1 expression. Importantly, pentoxifylline inhibited the TNF-induced increase in astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi invasion. In T. cruzi-infected mice

  10. Transport of 3-hydroxybutyrate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Stevenson, J.H.; Couto, R.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Studies by a number of investigators have shown that 3-hydroxybutyrate is a preferred energy substrate for brain during early development. Since recent studies by the authors group suggest that the utilization of oxidizable substrates by brain may be regulated in part by transport across the plasma membrane, the authors investigated the transport of ({sup 3}H) D- and L-3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxy-(3-{sup 14}C) butyrate by primary cultures of rat brain astrocytes. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that 3-hydroxybutyrate is taken up into cultured rat brain astrocytes by both diffusion and a carrier mediated transport system, and further support the concept that transport at the cellular level contributes to the regulation of substrate utilization by brain cells.

  11. Acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2006-10-01

    Chronic administration of acrylonitrile results in a dose-related increase in astrocytomas in rat brain, but the mechanism of acrylonitrile carcinogenicity is not fully understood. The potential of acrylonitrile or its metabolites to induce direct DNA damage as a mechanism for acrylonitrile carcinogenicity has been questioned, and recent studies indicate that the mechanism involves the induction of oxidative stress in rat brain. The present study examined the ability of acrylonitrile to induce DNA damage in the DI TNC1 rat astrocyte cell line using the alkaline Comet assay. Oxidized DNA damage also was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase treatment in the modified Comet assay. No increase in direct DNA damage was seen in astrocytes exposed to sublethal concentrations of acrylonitrile (0-1.0 mM) for 24 hr. However, acrylonitrile treatment resulted in a concentration-related increase in oxidative DNA damage after 24 hr. Antioxidant supplementation in the culture media (alpha-tocopherol, (-)-epigallocathechin-3 gallate, or trolox) reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage. Depletion of glutathione using 0.1 mM DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine increased acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (22-46%), while cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 2.5 mM L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, a precursor for glutathione biosynthesis, significantly reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (7-47%). Cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 0.5 mM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a suicidal inhibitor of cytochrome P450, prevented the oxidative DNA damage produced by acrylonitrile. Cyanide (0.1-0.5 mM) increased oxidative DNA damage (44-160%) in astrocytes. These studies demonstrate that while acrylonitrile does not directly damage astrocyte DNA, it does increase oxidative DNA damage. The oxidative DNA damage following acrylonitrile exposure appears to arise mainly through the P450 metabolic pathway; moreover, glutathione depletion may contribute to the

  12. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Lysosomal Exocytosis in Astrocytes and Contributes to Astrocyte-mediated Tat Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; He, Johnny J

    2016-10-21

    Tat interaction with astrocytes has been shown to be important for Tat neurotoxicity and HIV/neuroAIDS. We have recently shown that Tat expression leads to increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression and aggregation and activation of unfolded protein response/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes and causes neurotoxicity. However, the exact molecular mechanism of astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity is not defined. In this study, we showed that neurotoxic factors other than Tat protein itself were present in the supernatant of Tat-expressing astrocytes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed significantly elevated lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes and plasma membrane-associated proteins in the supernatant of Tat-expressing astrocytes. We confirmed that Tat expression and infection of pseudotyped HIV.GFP led to increased lysosomal exocytosis from mouse astrocytes and human astrocytes. We found that Tat-induced lysosomal exocytosis was tightly coupled to astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity. In addition, we demonstrated that Tat-induced lysosomal exocytosis was astrocyte-specific and required GFAP expression and was mediated by ER stress. Taken together, these results show for the first time that Tat promotes lysosomal exocytosis in astrocytes and causes neurotoxicity through GFAP activation and ER stress induction in astrocytes and suggest a common cascade through which aberrant astrocytosis/GFAP up-regulation potentiates neurotoxicity and contributes to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. DJ-1 knock-down in astrocytes impairs astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection against rotenone.

    PubMed

    Mullett, Steven J; Hinkle, David A

    2009-01-01

    Mutations that eliminate DJ-1 expression cause a familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD). In sporadic PD, and many other neurodegenerative diseases, reactive astrocytes over-express DJ-1 whereas neurons maintain its expression at non-disease levels. Since DJ-1 has neuroprotective properties, and since astrocytes are known to support and protect neurons, DJ-1 over-expression in reactive astrocytes may reflect an attempt by these cells to protect themselves and surrounding neurons against disease progression. We used neuron-astrocyte contact and non-contact co-cultures to show that DJ-1 knock-down in astrocytes impaired their neuroprotective capacity, relative to wild-type astrocytes, against the neurotoxin rotenone. Conversely, DJ-1 over-expression in astrocytes augmented their neuroprotective capacity. Experiments using astrocyte conditioned media on neuron-only cultures suggested that astrocyte-released, soluble factors were involved in the DJ-1-dependent, astrocyte-mediated neuroprotective mechanism. Our findings support the developing view that astrocytic dysfunction, in addition to neuronal dysfunction, may contribute to the progression of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. From in silico astrocyte cell models to neuron-astrocyte network models: A review.

    PubMed

    Oschmann, Franziska; Berry, Hugues; Obermayer, Klaus; Lenk, Kerstin

    2017-02-08

    The idea that astrocytes may be active partners in synaptic information processing has recently emerged from abundant experimental reports. Because of their spatial proximity to neurons and their bidirectional communication with them, astrocytes are now considered as an important third element of the synapse. Astrocytes integrate and process synaptic information and by doing so generate cytosolic calcium signals that are believed to reflect neuronal transmitter release. Moreover, they regulate neuronal information transmission by releasing gliotransmitters into the synaptic cleft affecting both pre- and postsynaptic receptors. Concurrent with the first experimental reports of the astrocytic impact on neural network dynamics, computational models describing astrocytic functions have been developed. In this review, we give an overview over the published computational models of astrocytic functions, from single-cell dynamics to the tripartite synapse level and network models of astrocytes and neurons.

  15. Astrocytes and Developmental White Matter Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Ellora; Levison, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the astrocytes in the immature periventricular white matter are vulnerable to ischemia and respond to inflammation. Here we provide a synopsis of the articles that have evaluated the causes and consequences of developmental brain injuries to white matter astrocytes as well as the consequences of several…

  16. Astrocytes and Developmental White Matter Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Ellora; Levison, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the astrocytes in the immature periventricular white matter are vulnerable to ischemia and respond to inflammation. Here we provide a synopsis of the articles that have evaluated the causes and consequences of developmental brain injuries to white matter astrocytes as well as the consequences of several…

  17. In vitro comparison of digital and conventional bitewing radiographs for the detection of approximal caries in primary teeth exposed and viewed by a new wireless handheld unit

    PubMed Central

    Ulusu, T; Bodur, H; Odabaş, M E

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic quality of a new wireless handheld unit (ADX4000; Dexcowin Co. Ltd, Korea) on conventional bitewings and its LCD screen for the detection of approximal caries in primary teeth. Methods In total, 108 approximal surfaces of primary teeth were examined in vitro by 3 observers. Conventional films were viewed under subdued lighting conditions on a conventional view box. Digital 3.5 inch images were displayed on the built-in monitor of the ADX4000 and digital 17 inch images were viewed on a 17 inch monitor. The true caries diagnosis was based on histological assessment of the approximal surfaces after sectioning the primary teeth. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (Az) analysis was used to assess the diagnostic quality of imaging modalities. Results The areas under the ROC curves ranged from 0.786 (digital 17 inch) to 0.813 (digital 3.5 inch). No statistically significant differences were found between the three modalities for detecting approximal caries. Conclusions It was concluded that the diagnostic quality of conventional film and digital images, which were exposed and viewed by a new wireless handheld unit, was comparable. PMID:20100920

  18. Lack of changes in cytosolic ionized calcium in primary cultures of rat kidney cortical cells exposed to cytotoxic concentrations of gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Swann, J D; Ulrich, R; Acosta, D

    1990-10-01

    Gentamicin nephrotoxicity in vivo has a delayed onset. Our assessment of gentamicin-induced cell death in vitro, by measuring the release of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), indicated a prolonged onset as well. A recent study, which showed that gentamicin caused an abrupt increase in the concentration of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in a trypsin-harvested kidney cell line, suggested that immediate changes in calcium homeostasis may initiate the pathogenesis of gentamicin nephrotoxicity. To study the immediate effect of gentamicin on [Ca2+]i, gentamicin was perfused for 1 hr over primary monolayer cultures of renal cortical epithelial cells, and suspensions of trypsin-harvested renal cells (from primary cultures and a cell line) were treated with gentamicin for 30 min. [Ca2+]i was determined using the fluorescent probe fura-2. Positive controls (ionomycin and mercury) reliably increased [Ca2+]i in each experimental model, but no increase in [Ca2+]i was observed with gentamicin. Because enzyme release data indicated that significant cytotoxicity did not occur until 48 hr of exposure to 2 mM gentamicin, primary cultures were exposed to gentamicin (1-2 mM) for 24-48 hr and [Ca2+]i was measured. No gentamicin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was observed in these longer exposures, whether or not significant LDH release occurred. These results do not support a role for elevated [Ca2+]i in the cytotoxicity of gentamicin in cultured kidney cells, either immediately after exposure or following prolonged exposures.

  19. STIM1 and Orai1 mediate thrombin-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Claudia; Sampieri, Alicia; Vivas, Oscar; Peña-Segura, Claudia; Vaca, Luis

    2012-12-01

    In astrocytes, thrombin leads to cytoplasmic Ca(2+) elevations modulating a variety of cytoprotective and cytotoxic responses. Astrocytes respond to thrombin stimulation with a biphasic Ca(2+) increase generated by an interplay between ER-Ca(2+) release and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). In many cell types, STIM1 and Orai1 have been demonstrated to be central components of SOCE. STIM1 senses the ER-Ca(2+) depletion and binds Orai1 to activate Ca(2+) influx. Here we used immunocytochemistry, overexpression and siRNA assays to investigate the role of STIM1 and Orai1 in the thrombin-induced Ca(2+) response in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. We found that STIM1 and Orai1 are endogenously expressed in cortical astrocytes and distribute accordingly with other mammalian cells. Importantly, native and overexpressed STIM1 reorganized in puncta under thrombin stimulation and this reorganization was reversible. In addition, the overexpression of STIM1 and Orai1 increased by twofold the Ca(2+) influx evoked by thrombin, while knockdown of endogenous STIM1 and Orai1 significantly decreased this Ca(2+) influx. These results indicate that STIM1 and Orai1 underlie an important fraction of the Ca(2+) response that astrocytes exhibit in the presence of thrombin. Thrombin stimulation in astrocytes leads to ER-Ca(2+) release which causes STIM1 reorganization allowing the activation of Orai1 and the subsequent Ca(2+) influx.

  20. Deimination level and peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 expression are elevated in astrocytes with increased incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Serra, Horacio M

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes respond to environmental cues, including changes in temperatures. Increased deimination, observed in many progressive neurological diseases, is thought to be contributed by astrocytes. We determined the level of deimination and expression of peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in isolated primary astrocytes in response to changes on either side (31°C and 41°C) of the optimal temperature (37°C). We investigated changes in the astrocytes by using a number of established markers and accounted for cell death with the CellTiter-Blue assay. We found increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, ALDH1L1, and J1-31, resulting from increased incubation temperature and increased expression of TSP1, S100β, and AQP4, resulting from decreased incubation temperature vs. optimal temperature, suggesting activation of different biochemical pathways in astrocytes associated with different incubation temperatures. Mass spectrometric analyses support such trends. The PAD2 level was increased only as a result of increased incubation temperature with a commensurate increased level of deimination. Actin cytoskeleton and iso[4]LGE, a lipid peroxidase modification, also showed an increase with higher incubation temperature. Altogether, these results suggest that temperature, as an environmental cue, activates astrocytes in a different manner on either side of the optimal temperature and that increase in deimination is associated only with the higher temperature side of the spectrum.

  1. Dimethyl sulfoxide damages mitochondrial integrity and membrane potential in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chan; Gao, Junying; Guo, Jichao; Bai, Lei; Marshall, Charles; Cai, Zhiyou; Wang, Linmei; Xiao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a polar organic solvent that is used to dissolve neuroprotective or neurotoxic agents in neuroscience research. However, DMSO itself also has pharmacological and pathological effects on the nervous system. Astrocytes play a central role in maintaining brain homeostasis, but the effect and mechanism of DMSO on astrocytes has not been studied. The present study showed that exposure of astrocyte cultures to 1% DMSO for 24 h did not significantly affect cell survival, but decreased cell viability and glial glutamate transporter expression, and caused mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential impairment and reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. DMSO at concentrations of 5% significantly inhibited cell variability and promoted apoptosis of astrocytes, accompanied with more severe mitochondrial damage. These results suggest that mitochondrial impairment is a primary event in DMSO-induced astrocyte toxicity. The potential cytotoxic effects on astrocytes need to be carefully considered during investigating neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects of hydrophobic agents dissolved by DMSO.

  2. Changes in Protein Expression and Lysine Acetylation Induced by Decreased Glutathione Levels in Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pehar, Mariana; Ball, Lauren E; Sharma, Deep R; Harlan, Benjamin A; Comte-Walters, Susana; Neely, Benjamin A; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes and neurons form a highly specialized functional unit, and the loss or gain of astrocytic functions can influence the initiation and progression of different neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons depend on the antioxidant protection provided by neighboring astrocytes. Glutathione (γ-l-glutamyl-l-cysteinyl-glycine) is a major component of the antioxidant system that defends cells against the toxic effects of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. A decline in glutathione levels has been observed in aging and neurodegenerative diseases, and it aggravates the pathology in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-mouse model. Using a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach, we analyzed changes in global protein expression and lysine acetylation in primary astrocyte cultures obtained from wild-type mice or those deficient in the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). GCLM knockout astrocytes display an ∼80% reduction in total glutathione levels. We identified potential molecular targets and novel sites of acetylation that are affected by the chronic decrease in glutathione levels and observed a response mediated by Nrf2 activation. In addition, sequence analysis of peptides displaying increased acetylation in GCLM knockout astrocytes revealed an enrichment of cysteine residues in the vicinity of the acetylation site, which suggests potential crosstalk between lysine-acetylation and cysteine modification. Regulation of several metabolic and antioxidant pathways was observed at the level of protein expression and lysine acetylation, revealing a coordinated response involving transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Selective cytotoxicity of microcystins LR, LW and LF in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulc Rozman, Klara; Jurič, Damijana Mojca; Šuput, Dušan

    2017-01-04

    Microcystins (MCs) comprise a group of cyanobacterial toxins with hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic and, possibly, neurotoxic activity in mammals. In order to understand the development of their neurotoxicity we investigated the toxic effects of MC variants, MC-LR, MC-LW and MC-LF, in astrocytes that play a central role in maintaining brain homeostasis. 24h exposure of cultured rat cortical astrocytes to MCs revealed dose-dependent toxicity of MC-LF and MC-LW, but not of MC-LR, observed by significant reduction in cell number, declined viability monitored by MTT test and an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, confirmed by Annexin-V labelling. The cultured astrocytes expressed organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatp) Oatp1a4, Oatp1c1 and Oatp1a5, but not Oatp1b2. Intracellular localisation of MC-LF and MC-LW, proven by anti-Adda primary antibody, demonstrated transport of tested MCs into cultured astrocytes. Acute MC-LW and MC-LF intoxication induced cytoskeletal disruption as seen by the degradation of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), actin and the tubulin network. In this in vitro study, MC-LF and MC-LW, but not MC-LR, are shown to cause the dysfunction of astrocytic homeostatic capabilities, already at low concentrations, suggesting that astrocyte atrophy, with loss of function, could be expected in the brain response to the toxic insult.

  4. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Damages Mitochondrial Integrity and Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chan; Gao, Junying; Guo, Jichao; Bai, Lei; Marshall, Charles; Cai, Zhiyou; Wang, Linmei; Xiao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a polar organic solvent that is used to dissolve neuroprotective or neurotoxic agents in neuroscience research. However, DMSO itself also has pharmacological and pathological effects on the nervous system. Astrocytes play a central role in maintaining brain homeostasis, but the effect and mechanism of DMSO on astrocytes has not been studied. The present study showed that exposure of astrocyte cultures to 1% DMSO for 24 h did not significantly affect cell survival, but decreased cell viability and glial glutamate transporter expression, and caused mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential impairment and reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. DMSO at concentrations of 5% significantly inhibited cell variability and promoted apoptosis of astrocytes, accompanied with more severe mitochondrial damage. These results suggest that mitochondrial impairment is a primary event in DMSO-induced astrocyte toxicity. The potential cytotoxic effects on astrocytes need to be carefully considered during investigating neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects of hydrophobic agents dissolved by DMSO. PMID:25238609

  5. Astrocyte Mediated Protection of Fetal Cerebral Cortical Neurons from Rotenone and Paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Rathinam, Mary Latha; Watts, Lora Talley; Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Riar, Amanjot Kaur; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Henderson, George.I.

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of fetal rat cortical neurons and astrocytes were used to test the hypothesis that astrocyte-mediated control of neuronal glutathione (GSH) is a potent factor in neuroprotection against rotenone and paraquat. In neurons, rotenone (0.025 to 1μM) for 4 and 24 h decreased viability as did paraquat (2 to 100μM). Rotenone (30nM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 24% and 30%, while ROS were increased by 56%. Paraquat (30μM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 36% and 70%, while ROS were increased by 23%. When neurons were co-cultured with astrocytes, their GSH increased 1.5 fold and 5 fold at 12 and 24 h. Co-culturing with astrocytes blocked neuronal death and damage by rotenone and paraquat. Astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection was dependent on the activity of components of the γ-glutamyl cycle. These studies illustrate the importance of astrocyte-mediated glutathione homeostasis for protection of neurons from rotenone and paraquat and the role of the γ-glutamyl cycle in this neuroprotection PMID:22301167

  6. Inhibition of astrocyte glutamate uptake by reactive oxygen species: role of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, O.; Horn, T. F.; Yu, N.; Gruol, D. L.; Bloom, F. E.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature suggests that free radicals and reactive oxygen species may account for many pathologies, including those of the nervous system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The influence of various reactive oxygen species on the rate of glutamate uptake by astrocytes was investigated on monolayers of primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes. RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite inhibited glutamate uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of copper ions and ascorbate increased the potency and the efficacy of the hydrogen peroxide effect, supporting the potential neurotoxicity of the hydroxyl radical. The free radical scavenger dimethylthiourea effectively eliminated the inhibitory potential of a mixture containing hydrogen peroxide, copper sulphate, and ascorbate on the rate of glutamate transport into astrocytes. The inhibitory effect of hydrogen peroxide on glutamate uptake was not altered by the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase, whereas the inhibition of catalase by sodium azide clearly potentiated this effect. Superoxide and nitric oxide had no effect by themselves on the rate of glutamate uptake by astrocytes. The absence of an effect of nitric oxide is not due to an inability of astrocytes to respond to this substance, since the same cultures did respond to nitric oxide with a sustained increase in cytoplasmic free calcium. CONCLUSION: These results confirm that reactive oxygen species have a potential neurotoxicity by means of impairing glutamate transport into astrocytes, and they suggest that preventing the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the extracellular space of the brain, especially during conditions that favor hydroxyl radical formation, could be therapeutic. PMID:9260155

  7. Slow degradation in phagocytic astrocytes can be enhanced by lysosomal acidification.

    PubMed

    Lööv, Camilla; Mitchell, Claire H; Simonsson, Martin; Erlandsson, Anna

    2015-06-12

    Inefficient lysosomal degradation is central in the development of various brain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms and the involvement of different cell types remains elusive. We have previously shown that astrocytes effectively engulf dead cells, but then store, rather than degrade the ingested material. In the present study we identify reasons for the slow digestion and ways to accelerate degradation in primary astrocytes. Our results show that actin-rings surround the phagosomes for long periods of time, which physically inhibit the phago-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, astrocytes express high levels of Rab27a, a protein known to reduce the acidity of lysosomes by Nox2 recruitment, in order to preserve antigens for presentation. We found that Nox2 colocalizes with the ingested material, indicating that it may influence antigen processing also in astrocytes, as they express MHC class II. By inducing long-time acidification of astrocytic lysosomes using acidic nanoparticles, we could increase the digestion of astrocyte-ingested, dead cells. The degradation was, however, normalized over time, indicating that inhibitory pathways are up-regulated in response to the enhanced acidification. GLIA 2015.

  8. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  9. Analysis of central regulatory pathways in p53-deficient primary cultures of malignant fibrous histiocytoma exposed to ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Schlott, Thilo; Taubert, Helge; Fayyazi, Afshin; Schweyer, Stefan; Bartel, Frank; Korabiowska, Monika; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas frequently carry p53 mutations reducing chemotherapeutical response. Especially malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) reveals a reduced ifosfamide (IF) chemosensitivity when compared to other sarcoma entities. This is the first study to analyze MFH cells for the effects of IF on the expression of the pathways P16-CDK4-Rb and P14ARF-MDM2-P73 regulating cell cycle. The aim was to identify candidate genes possibly involved in the anti-apoptotic response of p53-deficient MFH cells during chemotherapy. PCR, real-time RT-PCR and confocal laser scanning microscopy were applied on primary cultures of MFH cells containing defective p53 genes. The cultures were treated with different concentrations of IF. A non-treated MFH culture served as negative control. A threshold concentration of IF (100 microM) was determined sparing the majority of the cells (99%), whereas higher IF quantities caused complete apoptosis. Data collected over a period of 48 h showed that the MFH cells surviving 100 microM IF overexpressed the kinase gene CDK4 and oncogene MDM2 by a factor of 63. A similar strong increase was observed at the protein level for both proteins. In contrast, the other proteins analyzed were not detectable. Additionally, the MFH cells induced complex patterns of MDM2 mRNA splicing and an abnormal mRNA transcript carrying a novel MDM2 missense mutation. These effects were neither observed in the non-treated culture nor in cultures completely inducing spontaneous apoptosis. Therefore, we speculate that the induction of the gene CDK4, and especially of MDM2, is involved in anti-apoptotic mechanisms of p53-negative MFH cells tolerating IF in vitro. Further experiments are necessary to test whether the novel candidate genes favor development of chemoresistance and whether MDM2 mRNA splicing variants contribute to this process in vivo.

  10. Decreased Astrocytic Thrombospondin-1 Secretion After Chronic Ammonia Treatment Reduces the Level of Synaptic Proteins: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A. R.; Tong, X. Y.; Curtis, K. M.; Ruiz-Cordero, R.; Shamaladevi, N.; Abuzamel, M.; Johnstone, J.; Gaidosh, G.; Rama Rao, K.V.; Norenberg, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) is a major complication in patients with severe liver disease. Elevated blood and brain ammonia levels have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and astrocytes are the principal neural cells involved in this disorder. Since defective synthesis and release of astrocytic factors have been shown to impair synaptic integrity in other neurological conditions, we examined whether thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an astrocytic factor involved in the maintenance of synaptic integrity, is also altered in CHE. Cultured astrocytes were exposed to ammonia (NH4Cl, 0.5–2.5 mM) for 1–10 days, and TSP-1 content was measured in cell extracts and culture media. Astrocytes exposed to ammonia exhibited a reduction in intra- and extracellular TSP-1 levels. Exposure of cultured neurons to conditioned media (CM) from ammonia-treated astrocytes showed a decrease in synaptophysin, PSD95 and synaptotagmin levels. CM from TSP-1 overexpressing astrocytes that were treated with ammonia, when added to cultured neurons, reversed the decline in synaptic proteins. Recombinant TSP-1 similarly reversed the decrease in synaptic proteins. Metformin, an agent known to increase TSP-1 synthesis in other cell types also reversed the ammonia-induced TSP-1 reduction. Likewise, we found a significant decline in TSP-1 level in cortical astrocytes, as well as a reduction in synaptophysin content in vivo in a rat model of CHE. These findings suggest that TSP-1 may represent an important therapeutic target for CHE. PMID:25040426

  11. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nianzhen

    2002-01-01

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca2+ elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca2+ elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca2+ wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca2+ signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca2+-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca2+, possibly through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The NO-induced Ca2+ signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca2+ change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca2+ influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca2+ release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca2+ elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca2+ wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by

  12. Globular adiponectin induces a pro-inflammatory response in human astrocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Klegeris, Andis; Little, Jonathan P.

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Adiponectin receptors are expressed in human astrocytes. • Globular adiponectin induces secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 from cultured astrocytes. • Adiponectin may play a pro-inflammatory role in astrocytes. - Abstract: Neuroinflammation, mediated in part by activated brain astrocytes, plays a critical role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine secreted from adipose tissue and has been reported to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects in peripheral tissues; however, the effects of adiponectin on astrocytes remain unknown. Shifts in peripheral concentrations of adipokines, including adiponectin, could contribute to the observed link between midlife adiposity and increased AD risk. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of globular adiponectin (gAd) on pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and secretion in human U373 MG astrocytic cells and to explore the potential involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3 K) signaling pathways in these processes. We demonstrated expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) and adipoR2 in U373 MG cells and primary human astrocytes. gAd induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and gene expression of IL-6, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-8 in U373 MG cells. Using specific inhibitors, we found that NF-κB, p38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in gAd-induced induction of cytokines with ERK1/2 contributing the most. These findings provide evidence that gAd may induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human astrocytes.

  13. The NRTIs Lamivudine, Stavudine and Zidovudine Have Reduced HIV-1 Inhibitory Activity in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Tachedjian, Gilda; Ellett, Anne M.; Roche, Michael J.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Brew, Bruce J.; Turville, Stuart G.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 establishes infection in astrocytes and macroage-lineage cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Certain antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) can penetrate the CNS, and are therefore often used in neurologically active combined antiretroviral therapy (Neuro-cART) regimens, but their relative activity in the different susceptible CNS cell populations is unknown. Here, we determined the HIV-1 inhibitory activity of CNS-penetrating ARVs in astrocytes and macrophage-lineage cells. Primary human fetal astrocytes (PFA) and the SVG human astrocyte cell line were used as in vitro models for astrocyte infection, and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were used as an in vitro model for infection of macrophage-lineage cells. The CNS-penetrating ARVs tested were the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) abacavir (ABC), lamivudine (3TC), stavudine (d4T) and zidovudine (ZDV), the non-NRTIs efavirenz (EFV), etravirine (ETR) and nevirapine (NVP), and the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL). Drug inhibition assays were performed using single-round HIV-1 entry assays with luciferase viruses pseudotyped with HIV-1 YU-2 envelope or vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G). All the ARVs tested could effectively inhibit HIV-1 infection in macrophages, with EC90s below concentrations known to be achievable in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Most of the ARVs had similar potency in astrocytes, however the NRTIs 3TC, d4T and ZDV had insufficient HIV-1 inhibitory activity in astrocytes, with EC90s 12-, 187- and 110-fold greater than achievable CSF concentrations, respectively. Our data suggest that 3TC, d4T and ZDV may not adequately target astrocyte infection in vivo, which has potential implications for their inclusion in Neuro-cART regimens. PMID:23614033

  14. Impact of vegf on astrocytes: analysis of gap junctional intercellular communication, proliferation, and motility.

    PubMed

    Wuestefeld, Ricarda; Chen, Jingchen; Meller, Karl; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Theiss, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), cell proliferation, and cell dynamics in primary astrocytes. VEGF is known as a dimeric polypeptide that potentially binds to two receptors, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, however many effects are mediated by VEGFR-2, for example, actin polymerization, forced cell migration, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Recently it has been shown that in case of hypoxia, ischemia or injury VEGF is upregulated to stimulate angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Besides this, VEGF reveals a potent therapeutical target for averting tumor vascularization, emerging in bevacizumab, the first humanized anti-VEGF-A antibody for treating recurrent Glioblastoma multiforme. To expand our knowledge about VEGF effects in glial cells, we cultivated rat astrocytes in medium containing VEGF for 1 and 2 days. To investigate the effects of VEGF on GJIC, we microinjected neurobiotin into a single cell and monitored dye-spreading into adjacent cells. These experiments showed that VEGF significantly enhances astrocytic GJIC compared with controls. Cell proliferation measured by BrdU-labeling also revealed a significant increase of astrocytic mitose rates subsequent to 1 day of VEGF exposure, whereas longer VEGF treatment for 2 days did not have additive effects. To study cell-dynamics of astrocytes subsequent to VEGF treatment, we additionally transfected astrocytes with LifeAct-RFP. Live-cell imaging and quantitative analysis of these cells with aid of confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed higher process movement of VEGF-treated astrocytes. In conclusion, VEGF strongly affects cell proliferation, GJIC, and motility in astrocytes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Effects of Alpha Boswellic Acid on Reelin Expression and Tau Phosphorylation in Human Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Esmat; Katouli, Fatemeh Hedayati; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Shasaltaneh, Marzieh Dehghan; Parandavar, Elham; Bayati, Samaneh; Afrasiabi, Ali; Nazari, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Reelin is an extracellular glycoprotein which contributes to synaptic plasticity and function of memory in the adult brain. It has been indicated that the Reelin signaling cascade participates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Besides the neurons, glial cells such as astrocytes also express Reelin protein. While functional loss of astrocytes has been reported to be associated with AD, dysfunction of astrocytic Reelin signaling pathway has not received much attention. Therefore, we investigated the effects of α-boswellic acid (ABA) as one of the major component of Boswellia serrata resin on primary fetal human astrocytes under a stress paradigm as a possible model for AD through study on Reelin cascade. For this aim, we used streptozotocin (STZ), in which from an outlook generates Alzheimer's hallmarks in astrocytes, and assayed Reelin expression, Tau and Akt phosphorylation as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in the presences of ABA. Our results indicated that while STZ (100 µM) down-regulated the expression of Reelin, ABA (25 µM) up-regulated its expression (p < 0.01) for 24 h. ABA efficiently reduced hyperphosphorylated Tau (Ser404) in STZ-treated astrocytes (p < 0.01). Furthermore, STZ-induced apoptosis by increasing cleaved caspase three (p < 0.01) and ROS generation (p < 0.01), a further pathological hallmark of Tauopathy. On the other hand, ABA decreased ROS generation and promoted proliferation of astrocytes through elevating Survivin expression (p < 0.01). These results showed that ABA could be considered as a potent therapeutic agent for prevention and decreasing the progression of Alzheimer's hallmarks in astrocytes; however, more in vivo studies would be needed.

  16. Neuroinflammation leads to region-dependent alterations in astrocyte gap junction communication and hemichannel activity.

    PubMed

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Fritz, Teresa; Angle, Amanda; Kielian, Tammy

    2011-01-12

    Inflammation attenuates gap junction (GJ) communication in cultured astrocytes. Here we used a well-characterized model of experimental brain abscess as a tool to query effects of the CNS inflammatory milieu on astrocyte GJ communication and electrophysiological properties. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive astrocytes in acute brain slices from glial fibrillary acidic protein-GFP mice at 3 or 7 d after Staphylococcus aureus infection in the striatum. Astrocyte GJ communication was significantly attenuated in regions immediately surrounding the abscess margins and progressively increased to levels typical of uninfected brain with increasing distance from the abscess proper. Conversely, astrocytes bordering the abscess demonstrated hemichannel activity as evident by enhanced ethidium bromide (EtBr) uptake that could be blocked by several pharmacological inhibitors, including the connexin 43 (Cx43) mimetic peptide Gap26, carbenoxolone, the pannexin1 (Panx1) mimetic peptide (10)Panx1, and probenecid. However, hemichannel opening was transient with astrocytic EtBr uptake observed near the abscess at day 3 but not day 7 after infection. The region-dependent pattern of hemichannel activity at day 3 directly correlated with increases in Cx43, Cx30, Panx1, and glutamate transporter expression (glial L-glutamate transporter and L-glutamate/L-aspartate transporter) along the abscess margins. Changes in astrocyte resting membrane potential and input conductance correlated with the observed changes in GJ communication and hemichannel activity. Collectively, these findings indicate that astrocyte coupling and electrical properties are most dramatically affected near the primary inflammatory site and reveal an opposing relationship between the open states of GJ channels versus hemichannels during acute infection. This relationship may extend to other CNS diseases typified with an inflammatory component.

  17. Cdh1 inhibits reactive astrocyte proliferation after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jin; Zhang, Chuanhan; Lv, Youyou; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Chang; Wang, Xueren; Yao, Wenlong

    2013-08-01

    Anaphase-promoting complex (APC) and its co-activator Cdh1 are required for cell cycle regulation in proliferating cells. Recent studies have defined diverse functions of APC-Cdh1 in nervous system development and injury. Our previous studies have demonstrated the activity of APC-Cdh1 is down-regulated in hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia. But the detailed mechanisms of APC-Cdh1 in ischemic nervous injury are unclear. It is known that astrocyte proliferation is an important pathophysiological process following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of APC-Cdh1 in reactive astrocyte proliferation is not determined yet. In the present study, we cultured primary cerebral astrocytes and set up in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion model. Our results showed that the expression of Cdh1 was decreased while Skp2 (the downstream substrate of APC-Cdh1) was increased in astrocytes after 1h oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion. The down-regulation of APC-Cdh1 was coupled with reactive astrocyte proliferation. By constructing Cdh1 expressing lentivirus system, we also found exogenous Cdh1 can down-regulate Skp2 and inhibit reactive astrocyte proliferation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion. Moreover, Western blot showed that other downstream proteins of APC-Cdh1, PFK-1 and SnoN, were decreased in the inhibition of reactive astrocyte proliferation with Cdh1 expressing lentivirus treatment. These results suggest that Cdh1 plays an important role in the regulation of reactive astrocyte proliferation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

  18. Neuroinflammation leads to region-dependent alterations in astrocyte gap junction communication and hemichannel activity

    PubMed Central

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Fritz, Teresa; Angle, Amanda; Kielian, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation attenuates gap junction (GJ) communication in cultured astrocytes. Here we utilized a well-characterized model of experimental brain abscess as a tool to query effects of the CNS inflammatory milieu on astrocyte GJ communication and electrophysiological properties. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on GFP-positive astrocytes in acute brain slices from GFAP-GFP mice at 3 or 7 days following S. aureus infection in the striatum. Astrocyte GJ communication was significantly attenuated in regions immediately surrounding the abscess margins and progressively increased to levels typical of uninfected brain with increasing distance from the abscess proper. Conversely, astrocytes bordering the abscess demonstrated hemichannel activity as evident by enhanced EtBr uptake that could be blocked by several pharmacological inhibitors including the connexin 43 (Cx43) mimetic peptide Gap26, carbenoxolone, the pannexin1 (Panx1) mimetic peptide 10Panx1, and probenecid. However, hemichannel opening was transient with astrocytic EtBr uptake observed near the abscess at day 3 but not day 7 post-infection. The region-dependent pattern of hemichannel activity at day 3 directly correlated with increases in Cx43, Cx30, Panx1, and glutamate transporter expression (GLT and GLAST) along the abscess margins. Changes in astrocyte resting membrane potential and input conductance correlated with the observed changes in GJ communication and hemichannel activity. Collectively, these findings indicate that astrocyte coupling and electrical properties are most dramatically affected near the primary inflammatory site and reveal an opposing relationship between the open states of GJ channels versus hemichannels during acute infection. This relationship may extend to other CNS diseases typified with an inflammatory component. PMID:21228152

  19. αB-crystallin negative astrocytic inclusions.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Brad P; Bressler, Joseph; Chen, Terina; Hutchins, Grover M; Crain, Barbara J; Kaufmann, Walter E

    2011-04-01

    We report on an unusual pathological finding of astrocytes, observed in the brain of a 16-year-old African-American male with severe intellectual disability and spastic quadriplegia. The brain showed bilateral pericentral, perisylvian polymicrogyria and pachygyria, in conjunction with a large number of hypertrophic astrocytes with eosinophilic granular cytoplasmic inclusions. The astrocytic abnormality was more severe in the dysgenetic area but present throughout the cerebral cortex. Astrocytic inclusions stained with acid fuchsin, azocarmine and Holzer's stain, and were immunoreactive for GFAP, S-100, and ubiquitin, but not for αB-crystallin, filamin, vimentin, nestin, tau or α-synuclein. Based on the case and a review of the literature, the authors postulate that these astrocytic inclusions in the cerebral cortex reflect abnormalities in radial glial developmental processes, such as migration, differentiation, or glial-neuronal interaction function during neuronal migration.

  20. Role of astrocytes in manganese mediated neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are responsible for numerous aspects of metabolic support, nutrition, control of the ion and neurotransmitter environment in central nervous system (CNS). Failure by astrocytes to support essential neuronal metabolic requirements plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of brain injury and the ensuing neuronal death. Astrocyte-neuron interactions play a central role in brain homeostasis, in particular via neurotransmitter recycling functions. Disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu) -γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons contributes to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABA-ergic transmission, and is associated with several neuropathological conditions, including manganese (Mn) toxicity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in support of the important roles for astrocytes in normal as well as neuropathological conditions primarily those caused by exposure to Mn. PMID:23594835

  1. Exposure to high glutamate concentration activates aerobic glycolysis but inhibits ATP-linked respiration in cultured cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Shi, Xiaojie; Yang, Jianbo; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in removing the synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space and maintaining the glutamate below neurotoxic level in the brain. However, high concentration of glutamate leads to toxicity in astrocytes, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether energy metabolism disorder, especially impairment of mitochondrial respiration, is involved in the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. Exposure to 10-mM glutamate for 48 h stimulated glycolysis and respiration in astrocytes. However, the increased oxygen consumption was used for proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration, but not for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. When the exposure time extended to 72 h, glycolysis was still activated for ATP generation, but the mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration of astrocytes was reduced. The glutamate-induced astrocyte damage can be mimicked by the non-metabolized substrate d-aspartate but reversed by the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA. In addition, the glutamate toxicity can be partially reversed by vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that changes of bioenergetic profile occur in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to high concentration of glutamate and highlight the role of mitochondria respiration in glutamate-induced gliotoxicity in cortical astrocytes.

  2. Knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 affects ischaemia-induced astrocyte activation and glial scar formation.

    PubMed

    Cheon, So Yeong; Cho, Kyoung Joo; Song, Juhyun; Kim, Gyung Whan

    2016-04-01

    Reactive astrocytes play an essential role in determining the tissue response to ischaemia. Formation of a glial scar can block the neuronal outgrowth that is required for restoration of damaged tissue. Therefore, regulation of astrocyte activation is important; however, the mediator of this process has not been fully elucidated. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is an early responder to oxidative stress, and plays a pivotal role in the intracellular signalling pathway of apoptosis, inflammation, and differentiation. To confirm whether ASK1 mediates astrocyte activation and leads to glial scar formation after cerebral ischaemia, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and astrocyte cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation. After silencing of ASK1 , astrocyte-associated genes were downregulated, as seen with the use of microarrays. The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) level was decreased, and correlated with the reduction in the ASK1 level. In astrocytes, reduction in the ASK1 level decreased the activity of the p38 pathway, and the levels of transcription factors for GFAP and GFAP transcripts after hypoxia. In the chronic phase, ASK1 depletion reduced glial scar formation and conserved neuronal structure, which may lead to better functional recovery. These data suggest that ASK1 may be an important mediator of ischaemia-induced astrocyte activation and scar formation, and could provide a potential therapeutic target for treatment after ischaemic stroke.

  3. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 suppresses invasion and anchorage-independent growth of astrocytic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cockbill, Louisa M. R.; Murk, Kai; Love, Seth; Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors are the most common form of primary brain tumor. Astrocytic tumor cells infiltrate the surrounding CNS tissue, allowing them to evade removal upon surgical resection of the primary tumor. Dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton are crucial to cancer cell invasion, but the specific mechanisms that underlie the particularly invasive phenotype of astrocytic tumor cells are unclear. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) is a PDZ and BAR domain–containing protein that inhibits actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3)-dependent actin polymerization and is involved in regulating the trafficking of a number of cell-surface receptors. Here we report that, in contrast to other cancers, PICK1 expression is down-regulated in grade IV astrocytic tumor cell lines and also in clinical cases of the disease in which grade IV tumors have progressed from lower-grade tumors. Exogenous expression of PICK1 in the grade IV astrocytic cell line U251 reduces their capacity for anchorage-independent growth, two-dimensional migration, and invasion through a three-dimensional matrix, strongly suggesting that low PICK1 expression plays an important role in astrocytic tumorigenesis. We propose that PICK1 negatively regulates neoplastic infiltration of astrocytic tumors and that manipulation of PICK1 is an attractive possibility for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26466675

  4. Broadly Reactive Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Antibodies from Exposed Individuals Effectively Inhibit Infection of Primary Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cortjens, B; Yasuda, E; Yu, X; Wagner, K; Claassen, Y B; Bakker, A Q; van Woensel, J B M; Beaumont, T

    2017-05-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory disease in young children. Antibodies specific for the RSV prefusion F protein have guided RSV vaccine research, and in human serum, these antibodies contribute to >90% of the neutralization response; however, detailed insight into the composition of the human B cell repertoire against RSV is still largely unknown. In order to study the B cell repertoire of three healthy donors for specificity against RSV, CD27(+) memory B cells were isolated and immortalized using BCL6 and Bcl-xL. Of the circulating memory B cells, 0.35% recognized RSV-A2-infected cells, of which 59% were IgA-expressing cells and 41% were IgG-expressing cells. When we generated monoclonal B cells selected for high binding to RSV-infected cells, 44.5% of IgG-expressing B cells and 56% of IgA-expressing B cells reacted to the F protein, while, unexpectedly, 41.5% of IgG-expressing B cells and 44% of IgA expressing B cells reacted to the G protein. Analysis of the G-specific antibodies revealed that 4 different domains on the G protein were recognized. These epitopes predicted cross-reactivity between RSV strain A (RSV-A) and RSV-B and matched the potency of antibodies to neutralize RSV in HEp-2 cells and in primary epithelial cell cultures. G-specific antibodies were also able to induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of RSV-A2-infected cells. However, these processes did not seem to depend on a specific epitope. In conclusion, healthy adults harbor a diverse repertoire of RSV glycoprotein-specific antibodies with a broad range of effector functions that likely play an important role in antiviral immunity.IMPORTANCE Human RSV remains the most common cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease in premature babies, young infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients and plays an important role in asthma exacerbations. In developing countries, RSV lower respiratory tract disease

  5. Proteomics of human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) and to therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields (TAMMEF).

    PubMed

    Corallo, Claudio; Battisti, Emilio; Albanese, Antonietta; Vannoni, Daniela; Leoncini, Roberto; Landi, Giacomo; Gagliardi, Assunta; Landi, Claudia; Carta, Serafino; Nuti, Ranuccio; Giordano, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent joint disease, characterized by degradation of extracellular matrix and alterations in chondrocyte metabolism. Some authors reported that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can positively interfere with patients affected by OA, even though the nature of the interaction is still debated. Human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes isolated from the femoral heads of OA-patients undergoing to total hip replacement, were cultured in vitro and exposed 30 min/day for two weeks to extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) with fixed frequency (100 Hz) and to therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields (TAMMEF) with variable frequencies, intensities and waveforms. Sham-exposed (S.E.) cells served as control group. Cell viability was measured at days 2, 7 and 14. After two weeks, cell lysates were processed using a proteomic approach. Chondrocyte exposed to ELF and TAMMEF system demonstrated different viability compared to untreated chondrocytes (S.E.). Proteome analysis of 2D-Electrophoresis and protein identification by mass spectrometry showed different expression of proteins derived from nucleus, cytoplasm and organelles. Function analysis of the identified proteins showed changes in related-proteins metabolism (glyceraldeyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase), stress response (Mn-superoxide-dismutase, heat-shock proteins), cytoskeletal regulation (actin), proteinase inhibition (cystatin-B) and inflammation regulatory functions (S100-A10, S100-A11) among the experimental groups (ELF, TAMMEF and S.E.). In conclusion, EMFs do not cause damage to chondrocytes, besides stimulate safely OA-chondrocytes and are responsible of different protein expression among the three groups. Furthermore, protein analysis of OA-chondrocytes treated with ELF and the new TAMMEF systems could be useful to clarify the pathogenetic mechanisms of OA by identifying biomarkers of the disease.

  6. Acamprosate {monocalcium bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate)} reduces ethanol-drinking behavior in rats and glutamate-induced toxicity in ethanol-exposed primary rat cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Oka, Michiko; Hirouchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masaru; Sugahara, Seishi; Oyama, Tatsuya

    2013-10-15

    Acamprosate, the calcium salt of bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate), contributes to the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol-dependent patients, but its mechanism of action in the central nervous system is unclear. Here, we report the effect of acamprosate on ethanol-drinking behavior in standard laboratory Wistar rats, including voluntary ethanol consumption and the ethanol-deprivation effect. After forced ethanol consumption arranged by the provision of only one drinking bottle containing 10% ethanol, the rats were given a choice between two drinking bottles, one containing water and the other containing 10% ethanol. In rats selected for high ethanol preference, repeated oral administration of acamprosate diminished voluntary ethanol drinking. After three months of continuous access to two bottles, rats were deprived of ethanol for three days and then presented with two bottles again. After ethanol deprivation, ethanol preference was increased, and the increase was largely abolished by acamprosate. After exposure of primary neuronal cultures of rat cerebral cortex to ethanol for four days, neurotoxicity, as measured by the extracellular leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), was induced by incubation with glutamate for 1h followed by incubation in the absence of ethanol for 24h. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine, the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine and the voltage-gated calcium-channel blocker nifedipine all inhibited glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons. Acamprosate inhibited the glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons more strongly than that from intact neurons. In conclusion, acamprosate showed effective reduction of drinking behavior in rats and protected ethanol-exposed neurons by multiple blocking of glutamate signaling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Astrocytic LRP1 Mediates Brain Aβ Clearance and Impacts Amyloid Deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Jin; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jian; Wang, Na; Cirrito, John R; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Holtzman, David M; Bu, Guojun

    2017-04-12

    Accumulation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain represent an early and perhaps necessary step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ accumulation leads to the formation of Aβ aggregates, which may directly and indirectly lead to eventual neurodegeneration. While Aβ production is accelerated in many familial forms of early-onset AD, increasing evidence indicates that impaired clearance of Aβ is more evident in late-onset AD. To uncover the mechanisms underlying impaired Aβ clearance in AD, we examined the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in astrocytes. Although LRP1 has been shown to play critical roles in brain Aβ metabolism in neurons and vascular mural cells, its role in astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the brain responsible for maintaining neuronal homeostasis, remains unclear. Here, we show that astrocytic LRP1 plays a critical role in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 knockdown in primary astrocytes resulted in decreased cellular Aβ uptake and degradation. In addition, silencing of LRP1 in astrocytes led to downregulation of several major Aβ-degrading enzymes, including matrix metalloproteases MMP2, MMP9, and insulin-degrading enzyme. More important, conditional knock-out of the Lrp1 gene in astrocytes in the background of APP/PS1 mice impaired brain Aβ clearance, exacerbated Aβ accumulation, and accelerated amyloid plaque deposition without affecting its production. Together, our results demonstrate that astrocytic LRP1 plays an important role in Aβ metabolism and that restoring LRP1 expression and function in the brain could be an effective strategy to facilitate Aβ clearance and counter amyloid pathology in AD.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes represent a major cell type regulating brain homeostasis; however, their roles in brain clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ) and underlying mechanism are not clear. In this study, we used both cellular models and conditional knock-out mouse models to

  8. Decreased Motor Neuron Support by SMA Astrocytes due to Diminished MCP1 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jasmin E; Nguyen, TrangKimberly T; Grunseich, Christopher; Nofziger, Jonathan H; Lee, Philip R; Fields, Douglas; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Foran, Emily

    2017-05-24

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by severe, often fatal muscle weakness due to loss of motor neurons. SMA patients have deletions and other mutations of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, resulting in decreased SMN protein. Astrocytes are the primary support cells of the CNS and are responsible for glutamate clearance, metabolic support, response to injury, and regulation of signal transmission. Astrocytes have been implicated in SMA as in in other neurodegenerative disorders. Astrocyte-specific rescue of SMN protein levels has been shown to mitigate disease manifestations in mice. However, the mechanism by which SMN deficiency in astrocytes may contribute to SMA is unclear and what aspect of astrocyte activity is lacking is unknown. Therefore, it is worthwhile to identify defects in SMN-deficient astrocytes that compromise normal function. We show here that SMA astrocyte cultures derived from mouse spinal cord of both sexes are deficient in supporting both WT and SMN-deficient motor neurons derived from male, female, and mixed-sex sources and that this deficiency may be mitigated with secreted factors. In particular, SMN-deficient astrocytes have decreased levels of monocyte chemoactive protein 1 (MCP1) secretion compared with controls and MCP1 restoration stimulates outgrowth of neurites from cultured motor neurons. Correction of MCP1 deficiency may thus be a new therapeutic approach to SMA.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by the loss of motor neurons, but astrocyte dysfunction also contributes to the disease in mouse models. Monocyte chemoactive protein 1 (MCP1) has been shown to be neuroprotective and is released by astrocytes. Here, we report that MCP1 levels are decreased in SMA mice and that replacement of deficient MCP1 increases differentiation and neurite length of WT and SMN-deficient motor-neuron-like cells in cell culture. This study reveals a novel aspect of astrocyte

  9. Astrocytic αVβ3 Integrin Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth and Promotes Retraction of Neuronal Processes by Clustering Thy-1

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Frischknecht, Renato; Maldonado, Horacio; Seidenbecher, Constanze I.; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Hetz, Claudio; Aylwin, María de la Luz; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Thy-1 is a membrane glycoprotein suggested to stabilize or inhibit growth of neuronal processes. However, its precise function has remained obscure, because its endogenous ligand is unknown. We previously showed that Thy-1 binds directly to αVβ3 integrin in trans eliciting responses in astrocytes. Nonetheless, whether αVβ3 integrin might also serve as a Thy-1-ligand triggering a neuronal response has not been explored. Thus, utilizing primary neurons and a neuron-derived cell line CAD, Thy-1-mediated effects of αVβ3 integrin on growth and retraction of neuronal processes were tested. In astrocyte-neuron co-cultures, endogenous αVβ3 integrin restricted neurite outgrowth. Likewise, αVβ3-Fc was sufficient to suppress neurite extension in Thy-1(+), but not in Thy-1(−) CAD cells. In differentiating primary neurons exposed to αVβ3-Fc, fewer and shorter dendrites were detected. This effect was abolished by cleavage of Thy-1 from the neuronal surface using phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Moreover, αVβ3-Fc also induced retraction of already extended Thy-1(+)-axon-like neurites in differentiated CAD cells as well as of axonal terminals in differentiated primary neurons. Axonal retraction occurred when redistribution and clustering of Thy-1 molecules in the plasma membrane was induced by αVβ3 integrin. Binding of αVβ3-Fc was detected in Thy-1 clusters during axon retraction of primary neurons. Moreover, αVβ3-Fc-induced Thy-1 clustering correlated in time and space with redistribution and inactivation of Src kinase. Thus, our data indicates that αVβ3 integrin is a ligand for Thy-1 that upon binding not only restricts the growth of neurites, but also induces retraction of already existing processes by inducing Thy-1 clustering. We propose that these events participate in bi-directional astrocyte-neuron communication relevant to axonal repair after neuronal damage. PMID:22479590

  10. Substrate-dependent regulation of ascorbate transport in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.X.; Jaworski, E.M.; Kulaga, A.; Dixon, S.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na{sup +}-dependent L-ascorbate transporter in the plasma membrane. The present study examined the effects of ascorbate deprivation and supplementation on the activity of the transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-({sup 14}C)ascorbate for 1 minute at 37C. They observed that the maximal uptake rate, V{sub max}, rapidly (<3 hours) increased when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. There was no change in the apparent affinity (K{sub m}) of the transport system for ascorbate. V{sub max} returned to normal following addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The authors conclude that astrocytes adapt ascorbate transport rates to changes in substrate availability. Furthermore, the data suggest that the transport system located in the astroglial plasma membrane regulates intracellular ascorbate concentration, because changes in transport rate may compensate for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in extracellular ascorbate levels.

  11. The role of astrocytes in CNS tumors: pre-clinical models and novel imaging approaches

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emma R.; Howarth, Clare; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a significant clinical problem, yet the mechanisms governing tumor cell extravasation across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and CNS colonization are unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of brain metastasis but in vitro work suggests both tumoricidal and tumor-promoting roles for astrocyte-derived molecules. Also, the involvement of astrogliosis in primary brain tumor progression is under much investigation. However, translation of in vitro findings into in vivo and clinical settings has not been realized. Increasingly sophisticated resources, such as transgenic models and imaging technologies aimed at astrocyte-specific markers, will enable better characterization of astrocyte function in CNS tumors. Techniques such as bioluminescence and in vivo fluorescent cell labeling have potential for understanding the real-time responses of astrocytes to tumor burden. Transgenic models targeting signaling pathways involved in the astrocytic response also hold great promise, allowing translation of in vitro mechanistic findings into pre-clinical models. The challenging nature of in vivo CNS work has slowed progress in this area. Nonetheless, there has been a surge of interest in generating pre-clinical models, yielding insights into cell extravasation across the BBB, as well as immune cell recruitment to the parenchyma. While the function of astrocytes in the tumor microenvironment is still unknown, the relationship between astrogliosis and tumor growth is evident. Here, we review the role of astrogliosis in both primary and secondary brain tumors and outline the potential for the use of novel imaging modalities in research and clinical settings. These imaging approaches have the potential to enhance our understanding of the local host response to tumor progression in the brain, as well as providing new, more sensitive diagnostic imaging methods. PMID:23596394

  12. Tiagabine treatment and DNA damage in rat astrocytes: an in vitro study by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Cardile, V; Palumbo, M; Renis, M; Pavone, A; Maci, T; Perciavalle, V

    2001-06-22

    We studied in vitro the effects of Tiagabine on genomic DNA of cortical rat astrocytes. To evaluate DNA damage, we used a relatively simple technique called Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis or Comet assay. Tiagabine was dissolved in culture medium and added at concentration of 1, 10, 20 and 50 microg/ml on 12-day old cultured astrocytes. In presence of 1 and 10 microg/ml of Tiagabine, no DNA damage was observed after 48 h of treatment. A moderate DNA damage was instead observed for cells exposed to 20 microg/ml of antiepileptic drug. Finally, DNA fragmentation was more evident after treatment with 50 microg/ml of Tiagabine. We conclude that Tiagabine, at the usual recommended doses, does not appear to influence negatively the cortical rat astrocytes, inducing DNA fragmentation only at very high concentrations.

  13. Effects of L-carnitine, erythritol and betaine on pro-inflammatory markers in primary human corneal epithelial cells exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xia; Su, Zhitao; Deng, Ruzhi; Lin, Jing; Li, De-Quan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-07-01

    To explore the effects of osmoprotectants on pro-inflammatory mediator production in primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) exposed to hyperosmotic stress. HCECs cultured in iso-osmolar medium (312 mOsM) were switched to hyperosmotic media with or without prior incubation with 2-20 mM of l-carnitine, erythritol or betaine for different time periods. The mRNA expression and protein production of pro-inflammatory markers in HCECs were evaluated by RT-qPCR and ELISA. Hyperosmolar media significantly stimulated the mRNA and protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and chemokines, IL-8, CCL2 and CCL20 in HCECs in an osmolarity dependent manner. The stimulated expression of these pro-inflammatory mediators was significantly but differentially suppressed by l-carnitine, erythritol or betaine. l-Carnitine displayed the greatest inhibitory effects and down-regulated 54-77% of the stimulated mRNA levels of TNF-α (down from 12.3-5.7 fold), IL-1β (2.2-0.9 fold), IL-6 (7.3-2.9 fold), IL-8 (4.6-2.0 fold), CCL2 (15.3-3.5 fold) and CCL20 (4.1-1.5 fold) in HCECs exposed to 450 mOsM. The stimulated protein production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was also significantly suppressed by l-carnitine, erythritol and betaine. l-carnitine suppressed 49-79% of the stimulated protein levels of TNF-α (down from 81.3 to 17.4 pg/ml), IL-1β (56.9-29.2 pg/ml), IL-6 (12.8-4.6 ng/ml) and IL-8 (21.2-10.9 ng/ml) by HCECs exposed to 450 mOsM. Interestingly, hyperosmolarity stimulated increase in mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were significantly suppressed by a transient receptor potential vanilloid channel type 1 (TRPV1) activation inhibitor capsazepine. l-carnitine, erythritol and betaine function as osmoprotectants to suppress inflammatory responses via TRPV1 pathway in HCECs exposed to hyperosmotic stress. Osmoprotectants may have efficacy in reducing innate inflammation in dry eye disease.

  14. Effects of L-carnitine, Erythritol and Betaine on Pro-inflammatory Markers in Primary Human Corneal Epithelial Cells Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xia; Su, Zhitao; Deng, Ruzhi; Lin, Jing; Li, De-Quan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the effects of osmoprotectants on pro-inflammatory mediator production in primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) exposed to hyperosmotic stress. Methods HCECs cultured in iso-osmolar medium (312mOsM) were switched to hyperosmotic media with or without prior incubation with 2–20mM of L-carnitine, erythritol or betaine for different time periods. The mRNA expression and protein production of pro-inflammatory markers in HCECs were evaluated by RT-qPCR and ELISA. Results Hyperosmolar media significantly stimulated the mRNA and protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and chemokines, IL-8, CCL2 and CCL20 in HCECs in an osmolarity dependent manner. The stimulated expression of these pro-inflammatory mediators was significantly but differentially suppressed by L-carnitine, erythritol or betaine. L-carnitine displayed the greatest inhibitory effects and down-regulated 54–77% of the stimulated mRNA levels of TNF-α (down from 12.3 to 5.7 fold), IL-1β (2.2 to 0.9 fold), IL-6 (7.3 to 2.9 fold), IL-8 (4.6 to 2.0 fold), CCL2 (15.3 to 3.5 fold) and CCL20 (4.1 to 1.5 fold) in HCECs exposed to 450mOsM. The stimulated protein production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was also significantly suppressed by L-carnitine, erythritol and betaine. L-carnitine suppressed 49–79% of the stimulated protein levels of TNF-α (down from 81.3 to 17.4pg/ml), IL-1β (56.9 to 29.2pg/ml), IL-6 (12.8 to 4.6ng/ml), and IL-8 (21.2 to 10.9ng/ml) by HCECs exposed to 450mOsM. Interestingly, hyperosmolarity stimulated increase in mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were significantly suppressed by a TRPV1 activation inhibitor capsazepine. Conclusions L-carnitine, erythritol and betaine function as osmoprotectants to suppress inflammatory responses via TRPV1 pathway in HCECs exposed to hyperosmotic stress. Osmoprotectants may have efficacy in reducing innate inflammation in dry eye disease. PMID:25271595

  15. Artificial Astrocytes Improve Neural Network Performance

    PubMed Central

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B.; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function. PMID:21526157

  16. Astrocytes regulate cortical state switching in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poskanzer, Kira E.; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The role of astrocytes in neuronal function has received increasing recognition, but disagreement remains about their function at the circuit level. Here we use in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of neocortical astrocytes while monitoring the activity state of the local neuronal circuit electrophysiologically and optically. We find that astrocytic calcium activity precedes spontaneous circuit shifts to the slow-oscillation–dominated state, a neocortical rhythm characterized by synchronized neuronal firing and important for sleep and memory. Further, we show that optogenetic activation of astrocytes switches the local neuronal circuit to this slow-oscillation state. Finally, using two-photon imaging of extracellular glutamate, we find that astrocytic transients in glutamate co-occur with shifts to the synchronized state and that optogenetically activated astrocytes can generate these glutamate transients. We conclude that astrocytes can indeed trigger the low-frequency state of a cortical circuit by altering extracellular glutamate, and therefore play a causal role in the control of cortical synchronizations. PMID:27122314

  17. Artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance.

    PubMed

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-04-19

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astroc