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Sample records for primary blast type

  1. Management of primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Argyros, G J

    1997-07-25

    Blast waves are produced following the detonation of munitions, the firing of large caliber guns, or from any type of explosion. These blast waves can be powerful enough to injure the individuals exposed to them. This type of injury is called primary blast injury (PBI) and the organs most vulnerable to PBI are the gas-filled organs, namely the ear, the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The approach to the casualty with PBI is the same as it would be for any trauma victim, i.e. the initiation of life support measures. Attention should be directed to the common life-threatening manifestation of thoracic and abdominal PBI. Pulmonary manifestations would include hemorrhage, barotrauma and arterial air embolism, while abdominal manifestations would include hemorrhage and hollow organ rupture. Therapy is directed at the specific manifestations as well as avoiding additional iatrogenic injury. PMID:9217319

  2. The pathology of primary blast overpressure injury.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, M A

    1997-07-25

    Primary blast injury occurs in civilian and military detonations and from the firing of weapon systems. The pathology of primary blast injury has been reported for the last 70 years and has primarily been limited to descriptions of gross pathology and histology. Commonly accepted tenets have not been confirmed as blast overpressure experiments in enclosures and with multiple detonations have been conducted. Organ systems other than the ear and the lung are playing a greater role in injury definition and research importance. This paper is an overview and update of the current understanding of the pathology of primary blast injury.

  3. Primary blast injury causes cognitive impairments and hippocampal circuit alterations.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Matthew; Tummala, Shanti R; Gullotti, David; Kopil, Catherine; Gorka, Samuel; Ted Abel; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Morrison, Barclay; Cohen, Akiva S; Meaney, David F

    2016-09-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) and its long term consequences are a major health concern among veterans. Despite recent work enhancing our knowledge about bTBI, very little is known about the contribution of the blast wave alone to the observed sequelae. Herein, we isolated its contribution in a mouse model by constraining the animals' heads during exposure to a shockwave (primary blast). Our results show that exposure to primary blast alone results in changes in hippocampus-dependent behaviors that correspond with electrophysiological changes in area CA1 and are accompanied by reactive gliosis. Specifically, five days after exposure, behavior in an open field and performance in a spatial object recognition (SOR) task were significantly different from sham. Network electrophysiology, also performed five days after injury, demonstrated a significant decrease in excitability and increase in inhibitory tone. Immunohistochemistry for GFAP and Iba1 performed ten days after injury showed a significant increase in staining. Interestingly, a threefold increase in the impulse of the primary blast wave did not exacerbate these measures. However, we observed a significant reduction in the contribution of the NMDA receptors to the field EPSP at the highest blast exposure level. Our results emphasize the need to account for the effects of primary blast loading when studying the sequelae of bTBI.

  4. Simulations of Porcine Eye Exposure to Primary Blast Insult

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Richard; Gray, Walt; Sponsel, William E.; Lund, Brian J.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Groth, Sylvia L.; Reilly, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A computational model of the porcine eye was developed to simulate primary blast exposure. This model facilitates understanding of blast-induced injury mechanisms. Methods A computational model of the porcine eye was used to simulate the effects of primary blast loading for comparison with experimental findings from shock tube experiments. The eye model was exposed to overpressure-time histories measured during physical experiments. Deformations and mechanical stresses within various ocular tissues were then examined for correlation with pathological findings in the experiments. Results Stresses and strains experienced in the eye during a primary blast event increase as the severity of the blast exposure increases. Peak stresses in the model occurred in locations in which damage was most often observed in the physical experiments. Conclusions Blast injuries to the anterior chamber may be due to inertial displacement of the lens and ciliary body while posterior damage may arise due to contrecoup interactions of the vitreous and retina. Correlation of modeling predictions with physical experiments lends confidence that the model accurately represents the conditions found in the physical experiments. Translational Relevance This computational model offers insights into the mechanisms of ocular injuries arising due to primary blast and may be used to simulate the effects of new protective eyewear designs. PMID:26336633

  5. Primary blast injury causes cognitive impairments and hippocampal circuit alterations

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Matthew; Tummala, Shanti R.; Gullotti, David; Kopil, Kathryn; Gorka, Samuel; Abel, Ted; “Dale” Bass, Cameron R.; Morrison, Barclay; Cohen, Akiva S.; Meaney, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) and its long term consequences are a major health concern among veterans. Despite recent work enhancing our knowledge about bTBI, very little is known about the contribution of the blast wave alone to the observed sequelae. Herein, we isolated its contribution in a mouse model by constraining the animals' heads during exposure to a shockwave (primary blast). Our results show that exposure to primary blast alone results in changes in hippocampus-dependent behaviors that correspond with electro-physiological changes in area CA1 and are accompanied by reactive gliosis. Specifically, five days after exposure, behavior in an open field and performance in a spatial object recognition (SOR) task were significantly different from sham. Network electrophysiology, also performed five days after injury, demonstrated a significant decrease in excitability and increase in inhibitory tone. Immunohistochemistry for GFAP and Iba1 performed ten days after injury showed a significant increase in staining. Interestingly, a threefold increase in the impulse of the primary blast wave did not exacerbate these measures. However, we observed a significant reduction in the contribution of the NMDA receptors to the field EPSP at the highest blast exposure level. Our results emphasize the need to account for the effects of primary blast loading when studying the sequelae of bTBI. PMID:27246999

  6. Computational modeling of human head under blast in confined and open spaces: primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, A; Salimi Jazi, M; Karami, G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computational modeling for biomechanical analysis of primary blast injuries is presented. The responses of the brain in terms of mechanical parameters under different blast spaces including open, semi-confined, and confined environments are studied. In the study, the effect of direct and indirect blast waves from the neighboring walls in the confined environments will be taken into consideration. A 50th percentile finite element head model is exposed to blast waves of different intensities. In the open space, the head experiences a sudden intracranial pressure (ICP) change, which vanishes in a matter of a few milliseconds. The situation is similar in semi-confined space, but in the confined space, the reflections from the walls will create a number of subsequent peaks in ICP with a longer duration. The analysis procedure is based on a simultaneous interaction simulation of the deformable head and its components with the blast wave propagations. It is concluded that compared with the open and semi-confined space settings, the walls in the confined space scenario enhance the risk of primary blast injuries considerably because of indirect blast waves transferring a larger amount of damaging energy to the head. PMID:23996897

  7. The influence of personal blast protection on the distribution and severity of primary blast gut injury.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1996-03-01

    Primary blast injuries have been recognized since World War I when the most significant reported injury was to the lung. The prevalence of injury to tissues containing air was underlined by the frequency of gut blast injury in underwater explosions mostly reported during World War II. Gut injury is the most likely cause of mortality after the more immediate effects of pulmonary primary blast injury. Effective protection has been achieved for lungs exposed to short duration external blast waves by the placement of stress wave decouplers on to the thoracoabdominal wall in a pig model, thus modifying the energy coupled into the body. A combination of two densities of glass-reinforced plastic plate and Plastazote foam (GRP/PZ) effectively eliminated pulmonary injury in 17 protected animals, compared with the production of severe blast lung in nine unprotected animals (p < 0.001). Partial pulmonary protection was achieved using a plasticized lead and plastazote foam decoupling combination (PbPVC/PZ) in a further group of 10 animals. Peak incident overpressures were not significantly different in any group. Small bowel contusions were highly significantly reduced in the GRP/PZ groups when compared with unprotected animals and with PbPVC protected animals (both p < 0.001); no significant reduction was observed in the summed colonic contusion size in any protected group. Intestinal perforations were also highly significantly reduced in both GRP/PZ groups (p < 0.001). Primary pulmonary blast injury and probably small bowel injury are caused by the propagation of coupled stress waves within the body. Elimination of these injuries implies prevention of stress wave propagation. Because colonic injury was not prevented by the same protection, a different mechanism for the injury is suggested: transmission and propagation of shear waves. These findings have important implications for blast protection and the clinical management of primary blast casualties. PMID:8606411

  8. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves.

  9. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  10. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005–0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  11. In vitro studies of primary explosive blast loading on neurons.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Boggs, Mary E; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2015-09-01

    In a military setting, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently caused by blast waves that can trigger a series of neuronal biochemical changes. Although many animal models have been used to study the effects of primary blast waves, elucidating the mechanisms of damage in a whole-animal model is extremely complex. In vitro models of primary blast, which allow for the deconvolution of mechanisms, are relatively scarce. It is largely unknown how structural damage at the cellular level impacts the functional activity at variable time scales after the TBI event. A novel in vitro system was developed to probe the effects of explosive blast (ranging from ∼25 to 40 psi) on dissociated neurons. PC12 neurons were cultured on laminin-coated substrates, submerged underwater, and subjected to single and multiple blasts in a controlled environment. Changes in cell membrane permeability, viability, and cell morphology were evaluated. Significant increases in axonal beading were observed in the injured cells. In addition, although cell death was minimal after a single insult, cell viability decreased significantly following repeated blast exposure. PMID:25914380

  12. Low Level Primary Blast Injury in Rodent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela B. L.; Kan, Enci Mary; Salim, Agus; Li, Zhaohui; Ng, Kian Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M.; Ling, Eng-Ang; Tan, Mui Hong; Lu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure (BOP) exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi) or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histopathology of the brains showed that cortical neurons were “darkened” and shrunken with narrowed vasculature in the cerebral cortex day 1 after blast with signs of recovery at day 4 and day 7 after blast. TUNEL-positive cells were predominant in the white matter of the brain at day 1 after blast and double-labeling of brain tissue showed that these DNA-damaged cells were both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but were mainly not apoptotic due to the low caspase-3 immunopositivity. There was also an increase in amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive cells in the white matter which suggests acute axonal damage. In contrast, Iba-1 staining for macrophages or microglia was not different from control post-blast. Blast exposure altered the expression of over 5786 genes in the brain which occurred mostly at day 1 and day 4 post-blast. These genes were narrowed down to 10 overlapping genes after time-course evaluation and functional analyses. These genes pointed toward signs of repair at day 4 and day 7 post-blast. Our findings suggest that the BOP levels in the study resulted in mild cellular injury to the brain as evidenced by acute neuronal, cerebrovascular, and white matter perturbations that showed signs of resolution. It is unclear whether these perturbations exist at a milder level or normalize completely and will need more investigation. Specific changes in gene expression may be further evaluated to understand the mechanism of blast-induced neurotrauma. PMID

  13. Characterization of the response to primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, E; Watts, S

    2011-01-27

    Lung injuries, predominantly arising from blast exposure, are a clinical problem in a significant minority of current military casualties. This special feature consists of a series of articles on lung injury. This first article examines the mechanism of the response to blast lung (primary blast injury to the lung). Subsequent articles examine the incidence of blast lung, clinical consequences and current concepts of treatment, computer (in silico) modelling of lung injury and finally chemical injuries to the lungs. Blast lung is caused by a shock wave generated by an explosion causing widespread damage in the lungs, leading to intrapulmonary haemorrhage. This, and the ensuing inflammatory response in the lung, leads to a compromise in pulmonary gas exchange and hypoxia that can worsen over several hours. There is also a characteristic cardio-respiratory effect mediated via an autonomic reflex causing apnoea (or rapid shallow breathing), bradycardia and hypotension (the latter possibly also due to the release of nitric oxide). An understanding of this response, and the way it modifies other reflexes, can help the development of new treatment strategies for this condition and for the way it influences the patient's response to concomitant injuries. PMID:21149364

  14. A computational study on brain tissue under blast: primary and tertiary blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, A; Salimi Jazi, M; Karami, G; Ziejewski, M

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a biomechanical study of a human head model exposed to blast shock waves followed by a blunt impact with the surface of the enclosing walls of a confined space is carried out. Under blast, the head may experience primary blast injury (PBI) due to exposure to the shockwaves and tertiary blast injury (TeBI) due to a possible blunt impact. We examine the brain response data in a deformable finite element head model in terms of the inflicted stress/pressure, velocity, and acceleration on the brain for several blast scenarios with different intensities. The data will be compared for open space and confined spaces. Following the initial impact of the shock front in the confined space, one can see the fluctuations in biomechanical data due to wave reflections. Although the severity of the PBI and TeBI is dependent on the situation, for the cases studied here, PBI is considerably more pronounced than TeBI in confined spaces. PMID:24515869

  15. Low-Level Primary Blast Causes Acute Ocular Trauma in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kirstin; Choi, Jae-Hyek; Sponsel, William E; Gray, Walt; Groth, Sylvia L; Glickman, Randolph D; Lund, Brian J; Reilly, Matthew A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether clinically significant ocular trauma can be induced by a survivable isolated primary blast using a live animal model. Both eyes of 18 Dutch Belted rabbits were exposed to various survivable low-level blast overpressures in a large-scale shock tube simulating a primary blast similar to an improvised explosive device. Eyes of the blast-exposed rabbits (as well as five control rabbits) were thoroughly examined before and after blast to detect changes. Clinically significant changes in corneal thickness arose immediately after blast and were sustained through 48 h, suggesting possible disruption of endothelial function. Retinal thickness (RT) increased with increasing specific impulse immediately after exposure. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was inversely correlated with the specific impulse of the blast wave. These findings clearly indicate that survivable primary blast causes ocular injuries with likely visual functional sequelae of clinical and military relevance.

  16. Isolated Primary Blast Inhibits Long-Term Potentiation in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Edward W; Effgen, Gwen B; Patel, Tapan P; Meaney, David F; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Morrison, Barclay

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 13 years, traumatic brain injury (TBI) has affected over 230,000 U.S. service members through the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, mostly as a result of exposure to blast events. Blast-induced TBI (bTBI) is multi-phasic, with the penetrating and inertia-driven phases having been extensively studied. The effects of primary blast injury, caused by the shockwave interacting with the brain, remain unclear. Earlier in vivo studies in mice and rats have reported mixed results for primary blast effects on behavior and memory. Using a previously developed shock tube and in vitro sample receiver, we investigated the effect of isolated primary blast on the electrophysiological function of rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). We found that pure primary blast exposure inhibited long-term potentiation (LTP), the electrophysiological correlate of memory, with a threshold between 9 and 39 kPa·ms impulse. This deficit occurred well below a previously identified threshold for cell death (184 kPa·ms), supporting our previously published finding that primary blast can cause changes in brain function in the absence of cell death. Other functional measures such as spontaneous activity, network synchronization, stimulus-response curves, and paired-pulse ratios (PPRs) were less affected by primary blast exposure, as compared with LTP. This is the first study to identify a tissue-level tolerance threshold for electrophysiological changes in neuronal function to isolated primary blast.

  17. An objective index to estimate the survival rate of primary blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kihyuck; Yoon, Jungmin; Min, Kyeongran; Lee, Jungchang; Kang, Shinil; Hong, Sung Jun; Yoon, Sung Hoon; Lee, Jong-Shill; Nam, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seok Hyun; Park, Hoonki; Young, Kim In

    2014-01-01

    To supply proper treatments to the primary blast lung injury (PBLI) patients, it is important to estimate the severity of the primary blast lung injury in accordance with the blast conditions. In this study, a blast-induced mechanical parameter (first principal stress) of lung was calculated using a finite element thorax model and the correlation between the survival rate of the subjects with blast-induced lung damage and an objective index that was related to the first principal stress of the lung model. This study propose the objective index for the estimation of the degree of PBLI. The results have a potential clinical application to improve the efficacy of treatment for blast injury patients.

  18. The ultrastructure of rat lung following acute primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, R F; Cooper, G J; Maynard, R L

    1993-04-01

    While a number of workers have described the effects of blast waves upon the lung at both the macroscopic and light microscopic level, studies involving the use of the electron microscope have not been reported. In the experiments reported here the ultrastructural changes seen in lungs from rats exposed to a blast wave impacting on the right side of the chest are described. Considerable damage to the right lower lobe was observed which took the form of tearing of the inter-alveolar septa with capillary rupture and intra-alveolar haemorrhage. Changes to the alveolar epithelium and type II pneumocytes were also noted. Lesions were also identified in the left lung; these included intra-alveolar oedema with a minimal amount of interstitial oedema together with increased pinocytosis and isolated rupture of the alveolar epithelium. 'Ballooning' of the endothelium into the lumen of the capillary was also observed. There was an indication that lesions noted in the left lung at the electron microscopic level may be progressive in the first 24 hours following injury. PMID:8499315

  19. Primary blast traumatic brain injury in the rat: relating diffusion tensor imaging and behavior.

    PubMed

    Budde, Matthew D; Shah, Alok; McCrea, Michael; Cullinan, William E; Pintar, Frank A; Stemper, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among military personnel is at its highest point in U.S. history. Experimental animal models of blast have provided a wealth of insight into blast injury. The mechanisms of neurotrauma caused by blast, however, are still under debate. Specifically, it is unclear whether the blast shockwave in the absence of head motion is sufficient to induce brain trauma. In this study, the consequences of blast injury were investigated in a rat model of primary blast TBI. Animals were exposed to blast shockwaves with peak reflected overpressures of either 100 or 450 kPa (39 and 110 kPa incident pressure, respectively) and subsequently underwent a battery of behavioral tests. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a promising method to detect blast injury in humans, was performed on fixed brains to detect and visualize the spatial dependence of blast injury. Blast TBI caused significant deficits in memory function as evidenced by the Morris Water Maze, but limited emotional deficits as evidenced by the Open Field Test and Elevated Plus Maze. Fractional anisotropy, a metric derived from DTI, revealed significant brain abnormalities in blast-exposed animals. A significant relationship between memory deficits and brain microstructure was evident in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in memory function. The results provide fundamental insight into the neurological consequences of blast TBI, including the evolution of injury during the sub-acute phase and the spatially dependent pattern of injury. The relationship between memory dysfunction and microstructural brain abnormalities may provide insight into the persistent cognitive difficulties experienced by soldiers exposed to blast neurotrauma and may be important to guide therapeutic and rehabilitative efforts.

  20. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D; Miller, Mark C; Wood, Adam R; Vipperman, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts. PMID:25409326

  1. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D; Miller, Mark C; Wood, Adam R; Vipperman, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts.

  2. Computational Study of Human Head Response to Primary Blast Waves of Five Levels from Three Directions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D.; Miller, Mark C.; Wood, Adam R.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts. PMID:25409326

  3. Effects of repetitive low-pressure explosive blast on primary neurons and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury represents a considerable health concern, particularly for athletes and military personnel. For blast-induced brain injury, threshold shock-impulse levels required to induce such injuries and cumulative effects with single and/or multiple exposures are not well characterized. Currently, there is no established in vitro experimental model with blast pressure waves generated by live explosives. This study presents results of primary neurons and mixed cultures subjected to our unique in vitro indoor experimental platform that uses real military explosive charges to probe the effects of primary explosive blast at the cellular level. The effects of the blast on membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake of sodium ions, intracellular calcium, and release of glutamate were probed 2 and 24 hr postblast. Significant changes in membrane permeability and sodium uptake among the sham, single-blast-injured, and triple-blast-injured samples were observed. A significant increase in ROS and glutamate release was observed for the triple-blast-injured samples compared with the sham. Changes in intracellular calcium were not significant. These results suggest that blast exposure disrupts the integrity of the plasma membrane, leading to the upset of ion homeostasis, formation of ROS, and glutamate release. Published 2016. †This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Effects of repetitive low-pressure explosive blast on primary neurons and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury represents a considerable health concern, particularly for athletes and military personnel. For blast-induced brain injury, threshold shock-impulse levels required to induce such injuries and cumulative effects with single and/or multiple exposures are not well characterized. Currently, there is no established in vitro experimental model with blast pressure waves generated by live explosives. This study presents results of primary neurons and mixed cultures subjected to our unique in vitro indoor experimental platform that uses real military explosive charges to probe the effects of primary explosive blast at the cellular level. The effects of the blast on membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake of sodium ions, intracellular calcium, and release of glutamate were probed 2 and 24 hr postblast. Significant changes in membrane permeability and sodium uptake among the sham, single-blast-injured, and triple-blast-injured samples were observed. A significant increase in ROS and glutamate release was observed for the triple-blast-injured samples compared with the sham. Changes in intracellular calcium were not significant. These results suggest that blast exposure disrupts the integrity of the plasma membrane, leading to the upset of ion homeostasis, formation of ROS, and glutamate release. Published 2016. †This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:27317559

  5. Examining lethality risk for rodent studies of primary blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, William Brad; Hall, Christina; Siva Sai Suijith Sajja, Venkata; Lavik, Erink; VandeVord, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    While protective measures have been taken to mitigate injury to the thorax during a blast exposure, primary blast lung injury (PBLI) is still evident in mounted/in vehicle cases during military conflicts. Moreover, civilians, who are unprotected from blast exposure, can be severely harmed by terrorist attacks that use improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Since the lungs are the most susceptible organ due to their air-filled nature, PBLI is one of the most serious injuries seen in civilian blast cases. Determining lethality threshold for rodent studies is crucial to guide experimental designs centered on therapies for survival after PBLI or mechanistic understanding of the injury itself. Using an Advanced Blast Simulator, unprotected rats were exposed to a whole body blast to induce PBLI. The one-hour survival rate was assessed to determine operating conditions for a 50% lethality rate. Macroscopic and histological analysis of lung was conducted using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results demonstrated lethality risk trends based on static blast overpressure (BOP) for rodent models, which may help standardized animal studies and contribute to scaling to the human level. The need for a standardized method of producing PBLI is pressing and establishing standard curves, such as a lethality risk curve for lung blasts, is crucial for this condensing of BOP methods. PMID:25405409

  6. Primary blast injury-induced lesions in the retina of adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of primary blast exposure on the brain is widely reported but its effects on the eye remains unclear. Here, we aim to examine the effects of primary blast exposure on the retina. Methods Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to primary blast high and low injury and sacrificed at 24 h, 72 h, and 2 weeks post injury. The retina was subjected to western analysis for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), aquaporin-4 (AQP4), glutamine synthethase (GS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS), endothelial NOS, neuronal NOS and nestin expression; ELISA analysis for cytokines and chemokines; and immunofluorescence for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)/VEGF, GFAP/AQP4, GFAP/nestin, GS/AQP4, lectin/iNOS, and TUNEL. Results The retina showed a blast severity-dependent increase in VEGF, iNOS, eNOS, nNOS, and nestin expression with corresponding increases in inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. There was also increased AQP4 expression and retinal thickness after primary blast exposure that was severity-dependent. Finally, a significant increase in TUNEL+ and Caspase-3+ cells was observed. These changes were observed at 24 h post-injury and sustained up to 2 weeks post injury. Conclusions Primary blast resulted in severity-dependent pathological changes in the retina, manifested by the increased expression of a variety of proteins involved in inflammation, edema, and apoptosis. These changes were observed immediately after blast exposure and sustained up to 2 weeks suggesting acute and chronic injury mechanisms. These changes were most obvious in the astrocytes and Müller cells and suggest important roles for these cells in retina pathophysiology after blast. PMID:23819902

  7. Primary blast injury after a bomb explosion in a civilian bus.

    PubMed

    Katz, E; Ofek, B; Adler, J; Abramowitz, H B; Krausz, M M

    1989-04-01

    A 6-kg explosive charge detonated under a seat in the center of a crowded city bus in Jerusalem, killing three passengers immediately. Of the 55 survivors, all of whom were transferred to two major medical centers, 29 were hospitalized. Among those admitted, a high rate of primary blast injuries was found, including perforated ear drums (76%), blast lung (38%), and abdominal blast injuries (14%). Two of the latter patients suffered bowel perforations, which were diagnosed with considerable delay. Eight patients (31%) had sustained life-threatening trauma, consisting of a combination of primary, secondary, and tertiary blast injuries. The overall mortality rate was 10.3%. The large number of primary blast injuries, including the unexpected finding of bowel perforations, is explained by the high amplitude of the air pressure wave (3.8-5.2 atm) and its relatively long duration (2-3 msec) resulting from the detonation of the high-energy explosive charge in the small, enclosed space of the bus. Besides the usual wounds sustained by victims of an explosion that occurs in a confined space, the possibility of primary blast injury to the abdomen and to the lungs should be taken into account by the treating surgeon.

  8. Primary blast injury after a bomb explosion in a civilian bus.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, E; Ofek, B; Adler, J; Abramowitz, H B; Krausz, M M

    1989-01-01

    A 6-kg explosive charge detonated under a seat in the center of a crowded city bus in Jerusalem, killing three passengers immediately. Of the 55 survivors, all of whom were transferred to two major medical centers, 29 were hospitalized. Among those admitted, a high rate of primary blast injuries was found, including perforated ear drums (76%), blast lung (38%), and abdominal blast injuries (14%). Two of the latter patients suffered bowel perforations, which were diagnosed with considerable delay. Eight patients (31%) had sustained life-threatening trauma, consisting of a combination of primary, secondary, and tertiary blast injuries. The overall mortality rate was 10.3%. The large number of primary blast injuries, including the unexpected finding of bowel perforations, is explained by the high amplitude of the air pressure wave (3.8-5.2 atm) and its relatively long duration (2-3 msec) resulting from the detonation of the high-energy explosive charge in the small, enclosed space of the bus. Besides the usual wounds sustained by victims of an explosion that occurs in a confined space, the possibility of primary blast injury to the abdomen and to the lungs should be taken into account by the treating surgeon. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2930293

  9. Cerebellar white matter abnormalities following primary blast injury in US military personnel.

    PubMed

    Mac Donald, Christine; Johnson, Ann; Cooper, Dana; Malone, Thomas; Sorrell, James; Shimony, Joshua; Parsons, Matthew; Snyder, Abraham; Raichle, Marcus; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen; Russell, Michael; Brody, David L

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of blast exposure on the human brain in the absence of head impact. Clinical reports, experimental animal studies, and computational modeling of blast exposure have suggested effects on the cerebellum and brainstem. In US military personnel with isolated, primary blast-related 'mild' traumatic brain injury and no other known insult, we found diffusion tensor MRI abnormalities consistent with cerebellar white matter injury in 3 of 4 subjects. No abnormalities in other brain regions were detected. These findings add to the evidence supporting the hypothesis that primary blast exposure contributes to brain injury in the absence of head impact and that the cerebellum may be particularly vulnerable. However, the clinical effects of these abnormalities cannot be determined with certainty; none of the subjects had ataxia or other detected evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. The details of the blast events themselves cannot be disclosed at this time, thus additional animal and computational modeling will be required to dissect the mechanisms underlying primary blast-related traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, the effects of possible subconcussive impacts and other military-related exposures cannot be determined from the data presented. Thus many aspects of topic will require further investigation.

  10. Cerebellar White Matter Abnormalities following Primary Blast Injury in US Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Mac Donald, Christine; Johnson, Ann; Cooper, Dana; Malone, Thomas; Sorrell, James; Shimony, Joshua; Parsons, Matthew; Snyder, Abraham; Raichle, Marcus; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen; Russell, Michael; Brody, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of blast exposure on the human brain in the absence of head impact. Clinical reports, experimental animal studies, and computational modeling of blast exposure have suggested effects on the cerebellum and brainstem. In US military personnel with isolated, primary blast-related ‘mild’ traumatic brain injury and no other known insult, we found diffusion tensor MRI abnormalities consistent with cerebellar white matter injury in 3 of 4 subjects. No abnormalities in other brain regions were detected. These findings add to the evidence supporting the hypothesis that primary blast exposure contributes to brain injury in the absence of head impact and that the cerebellum may be particularly vulnerable. However, the clinical effects of these abnormalities cannot be determined with certainty; none of the subjects had ataxia or other detected evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. The details of the blast events themselves cannot be disclosed at this time, thus additional animal and computational modeling will be required to dissect the mechanisms underlying primary blast-related traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, the effects of possible subconcussive impacts and other military-related exposures cannot be determined from the data presented. Thus many aspects of topic will require further investigation. PMID:23409052

  11. Comprehensive evaluation of coagulation in swine subjected to isolated primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Prat, Nicolas J; Montgomery, Robbie; Cap, Andrew P; Dubick, Michael A; Sarron, Jean-Claude; Destombe, Casimir; May, Philippe; Magnan, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    Blast is one of the major causes of injury and death in recent armed conflicts. With increased use of improvised explosive devices in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 71% of combat casualties are caused by explosions. Blast injuries can range from primary (caused by shock wave) to quaternary injuries (e.g., burns), and such injuries can result in an acute coagulopathy denoted by a hypocoagulable state. It is not clear if this coagulopathy observed in victims of explosion is caused by local or general effect of the primary blast injury itself. In this study, 13 pigs were subjected to severe isolated open-field blast injury and we measured indices of coagulation impairment during the first hour after injury: ROTEM, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, coagulation factors, thrombin generation potential, platelet count, platelet activation, platelet function, and procoagulant microparticle formation. After 1 h, the mortality was 33%. No coagulation dysfunction was observed in the survivors in this period. This study presented a highly reproducible and consistent isolated blast injury in large mammals with comprehensive coagulation testing. The data suggest that isolated primary blast injury is not responsible for acute coagulopathy of trauma in victims of explosion but seems to lead to an early hypercoagulable state.

  12. Neuroinflammation in primary blast neurotrauma: Time course and prevention by torso shielding.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leyan; Schaefer, Michele L; Linville, Raleigh M; Aggarwal, Ayushi; Mbuguiro, Wangui; Wester, Brock A; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms of primary blast injury caused by overpressure are not fully understood. In particular, the presence and time course of neuroinflammation are unknown and so are the signatures of reactive inflammatory cells, especially the neuroprotective versus injurious roles of microglia. In general, chronic microglial activation in the injured brain suggests a pro-degenerative role for these reactive cells. In this study, we investigated the temporal dynamics of microglial activation in the brain of mice exposed to mild-moderate blast in a shock tube. Because, in our previous work, we had found that torso shielding with rigid Plexiglas attenuates traumatic axonal injury in the brain, we also evaluated neuroinflammatory microglial responses in animals with torso protection at 7 days post blast injury. Because of the prominent involvement of the visual system in blast TBI in rodents, activated microglial cells were counted in the optic tract at various time points post-injury with stereological methods. Cell counts (activated microglial cell densities) from subjects exposed to blast TBI were compared with counts from corresponding sham animals. We found that mild-moderate blast injury causes focal activation of microglia in certain white matter tracts, including the visual pathway. In the optic tract, the density of activated microglial profiles gradually intensified from 3 to 15 days post-injury and then became attenuated at 30 days. Torso protection significantly reduced microglial activation at 7 days. These findings shed light into mechanisms of primary blast neurotrauma and may suggest novel diagnostic and monitoring methods for patients. They leave open the question of whether microglial activation post blast is protective or detrimental, although response is time limited. Finally, our findings confirm the protective role of torso shielding and stress the importance of improved or optimized body gear for warfighters or other individuals at risk for blast exposure.

  13. Disaster preparedness, pediatric considerations in primary blast injury, chemical, and biological terrorism.

    PubMed

    Hamele, Mitchell; Poss, William Bradley; Sweney, Jill

    2014-02-01

    Both domestic and foreign terror incidents are an unfortunate outgrowth of our modern times from the Oklahoma City bombings, Sarin gas attacks in Japan, the Madrid train bombing, anthrax spores in the mail, to the World Trade Center on September 11(th), 2001. The modalities used to perpetrate these terrorist acts range from conventional weapons to high explosives, chemical weapons, and biological weapons all of which have been used in the recent past. While these weapons platforms can cause significant injury requiring critical care the mechanism of injury, pathophysiology and treatment of these injuries are unfamiliar to many critical care providers. Additionally the pediatric population is particularly vulnerable to these types of attacks. In the event of a mass casualty incident both adult and pediatric critical care practitioners will likely be called upon to care for children and adults alike. We will review the presentation, pathophysiology, and treatment of victims of blast injury, chemical weapons, and biological weapons. The focus will be on those injuries not commonly encountered in critical care practice, primary blast injuries, category A pathogens likely to be used in terrorist incidents, and chemical weapons including nerve agents, vesicants, pulmonary agents, cyanide, and riot control agents with special attention paid to pediatric specific considerations. PMID:24834398

  14. Disaster preparedness, pediatric considerations in primary blast injury, chemical, and biological terrorism

    PubMed Central

    Hamele, Mitchell; Poss, William Bradley; Sweney, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Both domestic and foreign terror incidents are an unfortunate outgrowth of our modern times from the Oklahoma City bombings, Sarin gas attacks in Japan, the Madrid train bombing, anthrax spores in the mail, to the World Trade Center on September 11th, 2001. The modalities used to perpetrate these terrorist acts range from conventional weapons to high explosives, chemical weapons, and biological weapons all of which have been used in the recent past. While these weapons platforms can cause significant injury requiring critical care the mechanism of injury, pathophysiology and treatment of these injuries are unfamiliar to many critical care providers. Additionally the pediatric population is particularly vulnerable to these types of attacks. In the event of a mass casualty incident both adult and pediatric critical care practitioners will likely be called upon to care for children and adults alike. We will review the presentation, pathophysiology, and treatment of victims of blast injury, chemical weapons, and biological weapons. The focus will be on those injuries not commonly encountered in critical care practice, primary blast injuries, category A pathogens likely to be used in terrorist incidents, and chemical weapons including nerve agents, vesicants, pulmonary agents, cyanide, and riot control agents with special attention paid to pediatric specific considerations. PMID:24834398

  15. High-Fidelity Simulation of Primary Blast: Direct Effects on the Head.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Thomas W; Wang, Yushan; Ritzel, David V; Josey, Tyson; Villanueva, Mercy; Shei, Yimin; Nelson, Peggy; Hennes, Grant; Weiss, Tracy; Vair, Cory; Fan, Changyang; Barnes, Julia

    2016-07-01

    The role of primary blast in blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is controversial in part due to the technical difficulties of generating free-field blast conditions in the laboratory. The use of traditional shock tubes often results in artifacts, particularly of dynamic pressure, whereas the forces affecting the head are dependent on where the animal is placed relative to the tube, whether the exposure is whole-body or head-only, and on how the head is actually exposed to the insult (restrained or not). An advanced blast simulator (ABS) has been developed that enables high-fidelity simulation of free-field blastwaves, including sharply defined static and dynamic overpressure rise times, underpressures, and secondary shockwaves. Rats were exposed in head-only fashion to single-pulse blastwaves of 15 to 30 psi static overpressure. Head restraints were configured so as to eliminate concussive and minimize whiplash forces exerted on the head, as shown by kinematic analysis. No overt signs of trauma were present in the animals post-exposure. However, significant changes in brain 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphohydrolase (CNPase) and neurofilament heavy chain levels were evident by 7 days. In contrast to most studies of primary blast-induced TBI (PbTBI), no elevation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels was noted when head movement was minimized. The ABS described in this article enables the generation of shockwaves highly representative of free-field blast. The use of this technology, in concert with head-only exposure, minimized head movement, and the kinematic analysis of the forces exerted on the head provide convincing evidence that primary blast directly causes changes in brain function and that GFAP may not be an appropriate biomarker of PbTBI.

  16. Primary blast injury: pathophysiology and implications for treatment. Part III: Injury to the central nervous system and the limbs.

    PubMed

    Guy, R J; Glover, M A; Cripps, N P

    2000-01-01

    There are some structures in which changes consistent with primary blast may be found despite secondary and tertiary blast being the most frequent sources of injury. The Central Nervous System for example, especially the brain, is well protected yet there are historical and experimental accounts of damage which cannot be attributed to secondary or tertiary blast or even air embolism resulting from pulmonary disruption. Similarly, analysis and experimental simulation of specific skeletal injuries has shown that primary blast alone can fracture bones and that it is likely to be responsible for limb avulsions in victims exposed to stress waves of sufficiently high intensity. PMID:10892035

  17. Catastrophic eruptions of the directed-blast type at Mount St. Helens, bezymianny and Shiveluch volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogoyavlenskaya, G.E.; Braitseva, O.A.; Melekestsev, I.V.; Kiriyanov, V. Yu; Dan, Miller C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes catastrophic eruptions of Mount St. Helens (1980), Bezymianny (1955-1956), and Shiveluch (1964) volcanoes. A detailed description of eruption stages and their products, as well as the quantitative characteristics of the eruptive process are given. The eruptions under study belong to the directed-blast type. This type is characterized by the catastrophic character of the climatic stage during which a directed blast, accompanied by edifice destruction, the profound ejection of juvenile pyroclastics and the formation of pyroclastic flows, occur. The climatic stage of all three eruptions has similar characteristics, such as duration, kinetic energy of blast (1017-1018 J), the initial velocity of debris ejection, morphology and size of newly-formed craters. But there are also certain differences. At Mount St. Helens the directed blast was preceeded by failure of the edifice and these events produced separable deposits, namely debris avalanche and directed blast deposits which are composed of different materials and have different volumes, thickness and distribution. At Bezymianny, failure did not precede the blast and the whole mass of debris of the old edifice was outburst only by blast. The resulting deposits, represented by the directed blast agglomerate and sand facies, have characteristics of both the debris avalanche and the blast deposit at Mount St. Helens. At Shiveluch directed-blast deposits are represented only by the directed-blast agglomerate; the directed-blast sand facies, or blast proper, seen at Mount St. Helens is absent. During the period of Plinian activity, the total volumes of juvenile material erupted at Mount St. Helens and at Besymianny were roughly comparable and exceeded the volume of juvenile material erupted at Shiveluch, However, the volume of pyroclastic-flow deposits erupted at Mount St. Helens was much less. The heat energy of all three eruptions is comparable: 1.3 ?? 1018, 3.8-4.8 ?? 1018 and 1 ?? 1017 J for

  18. Radiation resistance of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Uckun, F.M. Childrens Cancer Group, Arcadia, CA ); Aeppli, D.; Song, C.W. )

    1993-11-15

    Detailed comparative analyses of the radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were performed to achieve a better understanding of clinical radiation resistance in ALL. The radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from 74 children with newly diagnosed ALL was analyzed using leukemic progenitor cell (LPC) assays. Primary bone marrow blasts from all 74 patients were exposed to ionizing radiation and subsequently assayed for LPC-derived blast colony formation. Radiation survival curves of LPC were constructed for each of the newly diagnosed patients using computer programs for the single-hit multitarget as well as the linear quadratic models of cell survival. A marked interpatient variation in intrinsic radiation sensitivity was observed between LPC populations. The SF[sub 2] values ranged from 0.01 to 1.00. Patients were divided into groups according to their sex, age, WBC at diagnosis, cell cycle distribution of leukemic blasts, and immunophenotype. Only immunophenotype provided a significant correlation with the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of LPC. Patients with B-lineage ALL had higher SF[sub 2] and smaller [alpha] values than T-lineage ALL patients, consistent with greater intrinsic radiation resistance at the level of LPC. Notably, 43% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 27% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with SF[sub 2] [ge] 0.5. Similarly, 66% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 37% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with [alpha] values [le] 0.4 Gy[sup [minus]1]. Combining the two indicators of radiation resistance, they found that only 34% of the B-lineage ALL patients had none of the two parameters in the respective critical regions, while 63% of the T-lineage patients had none. In multivariate analyses, the immunophenotypic B-lineage affiliation was the only significant predictor of radiation resistance at the level of LPC. 42 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  20. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-06-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa•s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa.

  1. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0-450 kPa (0-800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146-220 kPa and 221-290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0-145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85-145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  2. Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury in rats leads to increased prion protein in plasma: a potential biomarker for blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the "signature injury" of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4-206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL ± 0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL ± 0.14 SE; two tailed test p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI.

  3. Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Leads to Increased Prion Protein in Plasma: A Potential Biomarker for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W.; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the “signature injury” of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4–206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL±0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL±0.14 SE; two tailed test p<0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI. PMID:25058115

  4. Primary repair or fecal diversion for colorectal injuries after blast: a medical review.

    PubMed

    Bortolin, Michelangelo; Baldari, Ludovica; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Roy, Nobhojit

    2014-06-01

    Blast injury is a frequent cause of injury during armed conflicts, and the force of a blast can cause closed colorectal injury and perforation.1 After identification of a blast-related colorectal injury, the surgical options are primary repair or fecal diversion with the option for secondary repair. This structured review was conducted to determine which patients could be treated with primary repair (PR) or with fecal diversion. The review method followed the Prisma Statement method for medical systematic review. All data from the relevant articles were collected in a single database. Articles took into account wars in Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan from January 1993 through November 2012. The review was limited due to lack of reported data, hence qualitative analysis was the main review method. The review showed that for patients who do not have associated intra-abdominal injuries (diaphragm, stomach, pancreas, spleen, or kidney) or hemodynamic instability, PR did not result in an increase of complications or mortality. PMID:24870213

  5. The Complexity of Biomechanics Causing Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration) is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs, which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs, which isolate a single injury mechanism.

  6. The Complexity of Biomechanics Causing Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration) is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs, which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs, which isolate a single injury mechanism. PMID:26539158

  7. Brain Response to Primary Blast Wave Using Validated Finite Element Models of Human Head and Advanced Combat Helmet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a “signature injury” in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27–0.66 MPa) from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP) in the head ranged from 0.68 to 1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10–35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44%) was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%). The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence “iso-damage” curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen

  8. Olefin unit primary fractionator on-line Petro-Blast Lancing

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.D.; Rutan, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    Today`s commodity chemicals market forces companies to find innovative ways to extend unit on line operation between turnarounds such that they will remain economically competitive. At the OxyChem Chocolate Bayou facility the Primary Fractionator, quench oil column, fouling defined the length of the run between Olefin Unit turnarounds. Polymer growth on the valve trays restricted vapor flow through the column. This increased the column pressure drop which resulted in severe flooding. The inability to cool the furnace effluent while separating the fuel oil and gasoline components would cause premature shutdowns. Fouling locations were defined using gamma scan techniques and pressure surveys. Nozzles were welded and hot tapped at strategic locations around the column. A high pressure Petro-Blast Lancing technique, inserted through the nozzles, was then used to clean the trays. The operation has extended the unit run length although the column may require additional Petro-Blast Lancing before the next scheduled plant turnaround. If this schedule holds, a two year extension in the unit run length will be realized.

  9. Marble-type glass based on blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, P.D.; Smirnov, V.G.; Trifonova, T.E.; Sergeev, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the recovery and use of blast furnace wastes as coloring agents in the manufacture of imitation marble glass. The slags consist of a series of metal oxides each of which is tested for the color it generates when reacted and annealed with the molten glass. Comparative tests were also run against non-waste coloring agents and it was found that the waste-derived colorants were equal or superior both in process behavior and in generating the appropriate optical properties in the finished glass.

  10. Novel method to dynamically load cells in 3D-gel culture for primary blast injury studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sory, David; Cepa-Areias, Anabela; Overby, Darryl; Proud, William; Institute of Shock Physics, Department of Bioengineering; Royal British Legion CentreBlast I Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    For at least a century explosive devices have been reported as one of the most important causes of injuries on battlefield in military conflicts as well as in terrorist attacks. Although significant experimental and modelling efforts have been focussed on blast injury at the organ or tissue level, few studies have investigated the mechanism of blast injury at the cellular level. This paper introduces an in vitro method compatible with living cells to examine the effects of high stress and short-duration pulses similar to those observed in blast waves. The experimental phase involved high strain rate axial compression of biological cylindrical specimens within a hermetically sealed sample holder made of a biocompatible polymer. Numerical simulations were performed in order to characterize the loading path within the sample and assess the loading conditions. A proof of concept is presented so as to establish a new window to address fundamental questions regarding primary blast injury at the cellular level. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the support of AWE, Aldermaston, UK and Imperial College London. The Centre for Blast Injury Studies acknowledges the support of the Royal British Legion and Imperial College London.

  11. 46 CFR 169.513 - Types of primary equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Types of primary equipment. 169.513 Section 169.513 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.513 Types of primary equipment....

  12. 46 CFR 169.513 - Types of primary equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of primary equipment. 169.513 Section 169.513 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.513 Types of primary equipment....

  13. Evidence of a blast shock in observations of type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, Victor; Zimovets, Ivan; Eselevich, Maxim; Sadykov, Viacheslav

    We have analysed a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on the Sun during solar flare of 16 February 2011. Observations made by the AIA/SDO, EUVI/STEREO, COR1/STEREO were used. Additionally, we have analysed radio observations made by the Nancay Radioheliograph as well as by some CALLISTO and RSTN spectrometers. It is found that sources of a decimetric-metric type II radio burst, which accompanied the event, propagated much faster than the CME. This gives an evidence that the radio burst was caused by a blast shock wave. The possible causes of this shock are discussed.

  14. Rat Injury Model under Controlled Field-Relevant Primary Blast Conditions: Acute Response to a Wide Range of Peak Overpressures

    PubMed Central

    Skotak, Maciej; Wang, Fang; Alai, Aaron; Holmberg, Aaron; Harris, Seth; Switzer, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the acute (up to 24 h) pathophysiological response to primary blast using a rat model and helium driven shock tube. The shock tube generates animal loadings with controlled pure primary blast parameters over a wide range and field-relevant conditions. We studied the biomechanical loading with a set of pressure gauges mounted on the surface of the nose, in the cranial space, and in the thoracic cavity of cadaver rats. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a single blast at precisely controlled five peak overpressures over a wide range (130, 190, 230, 250, and 290 kPa). We observed 0% mortality rates in 130 and 230 kPa groups, and 30%, 24%, and 100% mortality rates in 190, 250, and 290 kPa groups, respectively. The body weight loss was statistically significant in 190 and 250 kPa groups 24 h after exposure. The data analysis showed the magnitude of peak-to-peak amplitude of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations correlates well with mortality rates. The ICP oscillations recorded for 190, 250, and 290 kPa are characterized by higher frequency (10–20 kHz) than in other two groups (7–8 kHz). We noted acute bradycardia and lung hemorrhage in all groups of rats subjected to the blast. We established the onset of both corresponds to 110 kPa peak overpressure. The immunostaining against immunoglobulin G (IgG) of brain sections of rats sacrificed 24-h post-exposure indicated the diffuse blood-brain barrier breakdown in the brain parenchyma. At high blast intensities (peak overpressure of 190 kPa or more), the IgG uptake by neurons was evident, but there was no evidence of neurodegeneration after 24 h post-exposure, as indicated by cupric silver staining. We observed that the acute response as well as mortality is a non-linear function over the peak overpressure and impulse ranges explored in this work. PMID:23362798

  15. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Lee E; Fisher, Andrew M; Tagge, Chad A; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Goletiani, Cezar J; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D; Nowinski, Christopher J; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K; Wolozin, Benjamin L; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D; Budson, Andrew E; Kowall, Neil W; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F; Moss, William C; Cleveland, Robin O; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Stanton, Patric K; McKee, Ann C

    2012-05-16

    Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein-linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory.

  16. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Lee E; Fisher, Andrew M; Tagge, Chad A; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Goletiani, Cezar J; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D; Nowinski, Christopher J; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K; Wolozin, Benjamin L; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D; Budson, Andrew E; Kowall, Neil W; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F; Moss, William C; Cleveland, Robin O; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Stanton, Patric K; McKee, Ann C

    2012-05-16

    Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein-linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory. PMID:22593173

  17. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Blast-Exposed Military Veterans and a Blast Neurotrauma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Lee E.; Fisher, Andrew M.; Tagge, Chad A.; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A.; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W.; Goletiani, Cezar J.; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M.; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Cantu, Robert C.; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F.; Moss, William C.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Stanton, Patric K.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein–linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory. PMID:22593173

  18. Model primary content type for multipurpose internet mail extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.; Parks, C.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this memo is to propose an update to Internet RFC 2045 to include a new primary content-type to be known as `model`. RFC 2045 [1] describes mechanisms for specifying and describing the format of Internet Message Bodies via content-type/subtype pairs. We believe that `model` defines a fundamental type of content with unique presentational, hardware, and processing aspects. Various subtypes of this primary type are immediately anticipated but will be covered under separate documents.

  19. Dexamethasone potentiates in vitro blood-brain barrier recovery after primary blast injury by glucocorticoid receptor-mediated upregulation of ZO-1 tight junction protein.

    PubMed

    Hue, Christopher D; Cho, Frances S; Cao, Siqi; Dale Bass, Cameron R; Meaney, David F; Morrison, Barclay

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the frequent incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) in recent military conflicts, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapies for bTBI-related pathologies. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been reported to occur after primary blast exposure, making restoration of BBB function and integrity a promising therapeutic target. We tested the hypothesis that treatment with dexamethasone (DEX) after primary blast injury potentiates recovery of an in vitro BBB model consisting of mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3). DEX treatment resulted in complete recovery of transendothelial electrical resistance and hydraulic conductivity 1 day after injury, compared with 3 days for vehicle-treated injured cultures. Administration of RU486 (mifepristone) inhibited effects of DEX, confirming that barrier restoration was mediated by glucocorticoid receptor signaling. Potentiated recovery with DEX treatment was accompanied by stronger zonula occludens (ZO)-1 tight junction immunostaining and expression, suggesting that increased ZO-1 expression was a structural correlate to BBB recovery after blast. Interestingly, augmented ZO-1 protein expression was associated with specific upregulation of the α(+) isoform but not the α(-) isoform. This is the first study to provide a mechanistic basis for potentiated functional recovery of an in vitro BBB model because of glucocorticoid treatment after primary blast injury.

  20. Performance Optimization of Cold Rolled Type 316L Stainless Steel by Sand Blasting and Surface Linishing Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, B.; Heine, B.; Engelberg, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sand blasting followed by a surface linishing treatment was applied to optimize the near-surface microstructure of cold rolled type 316L stainless steel. The introduction of cold rolling led to the formation of α-martensite. Specimens with large thickness reductions (40, 53%) were more susceptible to localized corrosion. The application of sand blasting produced a near-surface deformation layer containing compressive residual stresses with significantly increased surface roughness, resulting in reduced corrosion resistance. The most resistant microstructure was obtained with the application of a final linishing treatment after sand blasting. This treatment produced microstructures with compressive near-surface residual stresses, reduced surface roughness, and increased resistance to localized corrosion.

  1. Hemoglobin levels and circulating blasts are two easily evaluable diagnostic parameters highly predictive of leukemic transformation in primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rago, Angela; Latagliata, Roberto; Montanaro, Marco; Montefusco, Enrico; Andriani, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Sabrina Leonetti; Mecarocci, Sergio; Spirito, Francesca; Spadea, Antonio; Recine, Umberto; Cicconi, Laura; Avvisati, Giuseppe; Cedrone, Michele; Breccia, Massimo; Porrini, Raffaele; Villivà, Nicoletta; De Gregoris, Cinzia; Alimena, Giuliana; D'Arcangelo, Enzo; Guglielmelli, Paola; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Cimino, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    To predict leukemic transformation (LT), we evaluated easily detectable diagnostic parameters in 338 patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) followed in the Latium region (Italy) between 1981 and 2010. Forty patients (11.8%) progressed to leukemia, with a resulting 10-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) rates of 72%. Hb (<10g/dL), and circulating blasts (≥1%) were the only two independent prognostic for LT at the multivariate analysis. Two hundred-fifty patients with both the two parameters available were grouped as follows: low risk (none or one factor)=216 patients; high risk (both factors)=31 patients. The median LFS times were 269 and 45 months for the low and high-risk groups, respectively (P<.0001). The LT predictive power of these two parameters was confirmed in an external series of 270 PMF patients from Tuscany, in whom the median LFS was not reached and 61 months for the low and high risk groups, respectively (P<.0001). These results establish anemia and circulating blasts, two easily and universally available parameters, as strong predictors of LT in PMF and may help to improve prognostic stratification of these patients particularly in countries with low resources where more sophisticated molecular testing is unavailable. PMID:25636356

  2. Mechanical and histological characterization of trachea tissue subjected to blast-type pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, B. J.; Bo, C.; Tucker, A. W.; Jardine, A. P.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    Injuries to the respiratory system can be a component of polytrauma in blast-loading injuries. Tissues located at air-liquid interfaces, including such tissues in the respiratory system, are particularly vulnerable to damage by blast overpressures. There is a lack of information about the mechanical and cellular responses that contribute to the damage of this class of tissues subjected to the high strain rates associated with blast loading. Here, we describe the results of dynamic blast-like pressure loading tests at high strain rates on freshly harvested ex vivo trachea tissue specimens.

  3. Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ahmed; Chauhan, Aneesha; Avinash, Sunita; Liew, Chee K; Eichhöfer, Jonas; Chauhan, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    This case illustrates the complexities of performing a primary percutaneous intervention in a patient with chronic Type A aortic aneurysm and dissection with contraindications for surgical management. We also discuss the significant risk that the patient had to overcome to survive an undiagnosed aortic dissection and an acute ST elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:27757405

  4. A Novel Preclinical Model of Moderate Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Divani, Afshin A; Murphy, Amanda J; Meints, Joyce; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Nordberg, Jessica; Monga, Manoj; Low, Walter C; Bhatia, Prerana M; Beilman, Greg J; SantaCruz, Karen S

    2015-07-15

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is the "signature" injury of the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Here, we present a novel method to induce bTBI using shock wave (SW) lithotripsy. Using a lithotripsy machine, Wistar rats (N = 70; 408.3 ± 93 g) received five SW pulses to the right side of the frontal cortex at 24 kV and a frequency of 60 Hz. Animals were then randomly divided into three study endpoints: 24 h (n = 25), 72 h (n = 19) and 168 h (n = 26). Neurological and behavioral assessments (Garcia's test, beam walking, Rotarod, and elevated plus maze) were performed at the baseline, and further assessments followed at 3, 6, 24, 72, and 168 h post-injury, if applicable. We performed digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to assess presence of cerebral vasospasm due to induced bTBI. Damage to brain tissue was assessed by an overall histological severity (OHS) score based on depth of injury, area of hemorrhage, and extent of axonal injury. Except for beam walking, OHS was significantly correlated with the other three outcome measures with at least one of their assessments during the first 6 h after the experiment. OHS manifested the highest absolute correlation coefficients with anxiety at the baseline and 6 h post-injury (r(baseline) = -0.75, r(6hrs) = 0.85; p<0.05). Median hemispheric differences for contrast peak values (obtained from DSA studies) for 24, 72, and 168 h endpoints were 3.45%, 3.05% and 0.2%, respectively, with statistically significant differences at 1 versus 7 d (p<0.05) and 3 versus 7 d (p<0.01). In this study, we successfully established a preclinical rat model of bTBI with characteristics similar to those observed in clinical cases. This new method may be useful for future investigations aimed at understanding bTBI pathophysiology. PMID:25585201

  5. Adaptive reconfigurable V-BLAST type equalizer for cognitive MIMO-OFDM radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozden, Mehmet Tahir

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive channel shortening equalizer design for multiple input multiple output-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) radio receivers is considered in this presentation. The proposed receiver has desirable features for cognitive and software defined radio implementations. It consists of two sections: MIMO decision feedback equalizer (MIMO-DFE) and adaptive multiple Viterbi detection. In MIMO-DFE section, a complete modified Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization of multichannel input data is accomplished using sequential processing multichannel Givens lattice stages, so that a Vertical Bell Laboratories Layered Space Time (V-BLAST) type MIMO-DFE is realized at the front-end section of the channel shortening equalizer. Matrix operations, a major bottleneck for receiver operations, are accordingly avoided, and only scalar operations are used. A highly modular and regular radio receiver architecture that has a suitable structure for digital signal processing (DSP) chip and field programable gate array (FPGA) implementations, which are important for software defined radio realizations, is achieved. The MIMO-DFE section of the proposed receiver can also be reconfigured for spectrum sensing and positioning functions, which are important tasks for cognitive radio applications. In connection with adaptive multiple Viterbi detection section, a systolic array implementation for each channel is performed so that a receiver architecture with high computational concurrency is attained. The total computational complexity is given in terms of equalizer and desired response filter lengths, alphabet size, and number of antennas. The performance of the proposed receiver is presented for two-channel case by means of mean squared error (MSE) and probability of error evaluations, which are conducted for time-invariant and time-variant channel conditions, orthogonal and nonorthogonal transmissions, and two different modulation schemes.

  6. Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes: integrative public health and primary care opportunities, challenges and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lawrence W; Brancati, Frederick L; Albright, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes imposes a large and growing burden on the public’s health. This burden, combined with the growing evidence for primary prevention from randomized controlled trials of structured lifestyle programs leads to recommendations to include caloric reduction, increased physical activity and specific assistance to patients in problem solving to achieve modest weight loss as well as pharmacotherapy. These recommendations demand exploration of new ways to implement such primary prevention strategies through more integrated community organization, medical practice and policy. The US experience with control of tobacco use and high blood pressure offers valuable lessons for policy, such as taxation on products, and for practice in a variety of settings, such as coordination of referrals for lifestyle supports. We acknowledge also some notable exceptions to their generalizability. This paper presents possible actions proposed by an expert panel, summarized in Table 1 as recommendations for immediate action, strategic action and research. The collaboration of primary care and public health systems will be required to make many of these recommendations a reality. This paper also provides information on the progress made in recent years by the Division of Diabetes Translation at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to implement or facilitate such integration of primary care and public health for primary prevention. PMID:22399542

  7. Operational results of shaft repair by installing stave type cooler at Kimitsu Nos. 3 and 4 blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Hiroshi; Amano, Shigeru; Sakamoto, Aiichiro; Anzai, Osamu; Nakagome, Michiru; Kuze, Toshisuke; Imuta, Akira

    1997-12-31

    Nos. 3 and 4 blast furnaces in Nippon Steel Corporation Kimitsu Works were both initially fitted with cooling plate systems. With the aging of each furnace, the damage to their respective inner-shaft profiles had become serious. Thus, in order to prevent operational change and prolong the furnace life, the inner-shaft profile of each furnace was repaired by replacing the former cooling plate system with the stave type cooler during the two-week-shutdowns. With this repair, stability of burden descent and gas flow near the wall part of the furnace have been achieved. Thus the prolongation of the furnace life is naturally expected.

  8. Blast injury research models

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, E.; Watts, S.; Cooper, G.

    2011-01-01

    Blast injuries are an increasing problem in both military and civilian practice. Primary blast injury to the lungs (blast lung) is found in a clinically significant proportion of casualties from explosions even in an open environment, and in a high proportion of severely injured casualties following explosions in confined spaces. Blast casualties also commonly suffer secondary and tertiary blast injuries resulting in significant blood loss. The presence of hypoxaemia owing to blast lung complicates the process of fluid resuscitation. Consequently, prolonged hypotensive resuscitation was found to be incompatible with survival after combined blast lung and haemorrhage. This article describes studies addressing new forward resuscitation strategies involving a hybrid blood pressure profile (initially hypotensive followed later by normotensive resuscitation) and the use of supplemental oxygen to increase survival and reduce physiological deterioration during prolonged resuscitation. Surprisingly, hypertonic saline dextran was found to be inferior to normal saline after combined blast injury and haemorrhage. New strategies have therefore been developed to address the needs of blast-injured casualties and are likely to be particularly useful under circumstances of enforced delayed evacuation to surgical care. PMID:21149352

  9. Kelly West Lecture. Primary prevention of type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stern, M P

    1991-05-01

    A useful paradigm for developing a public health strategy for combating chronic diseases consists of three phases: observational epidemiological studies, first cross-sectional and then prospective; intervention trials; and, finally, public health action. Although the field of cardiovascular epidemiology is well advanced into the third phase, i.e., public health action, the field of diabetes epidemiology is at least a generation behind and has only recently entered the phase of prospective observational studies. Part of the reason for this lag may be that, unlike cardiovascular disease, non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes has not been traditionally viewed as an epidemic, thereby detracting from a sense of urgency about the disease. Although this perspective may be appropriate for white populations, data from around the world make it increasingly apparent that type II diabetes has indeed reached epidemic proportions in non-white populations. Prospective studies are needed to firmly establish risk factors on which public health actions can be confidently based. Although anthropometric and metabolic risk factors such as obesity, body fat distribution, and circulating glucose and insulin concentrations are becoming well established as risk factors for type II diabetes, much less is known about behavioral risk factors. These latter risk factors are especially important because they are often amenable to public health action. There are preliminary data suggesting that decreased physical activity and increased fat consumption may be behavioral risk factors for diabetes. Decreased total energy intake, reflecting either low levels of physical activity or an intrinsically low metabolic rate, perhaps genetic in origin, may also be a diabetes risk factor. Unlike the field of cardiovascular epidemiology, in which there is already a critical mass of intervention trials on primary prevention, such trials are essentially nonexistent in the field of diabetes epidemiology; they

  10. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Montgomery, David W.; Merkle, Carrie J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ±2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ±1.1 %) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin coated 24 well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 micron pores. Additionally AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel® to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cell cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  11. Heart failure therapeutics on the basis of a biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor. Rationale and design of the BLAST-AHF study (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Butler, Javed; Collins, Sean P; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Levy, Phillip D; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Soergel, David G; Teerlink, John R; Violin, Jonathan D; Voors, Adriaan A; Pang, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    The BLAST-AHF (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure) study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of TRV027, a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor, in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). AHF remains a major public health problem, and no currently-available therapies have been shown to favorably affect outcomes. TRV027 is a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor that antagonizes angiotensin-stimulated G-protein activation while stimulating β-arrestin. In animal models, these effects reduce afterload while increasing cardiac performance and maintaining stroke volume. In initial human studies, TRV027 appears to be hemodynamically active primarily in patients with activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, a potentially attractive profile for an AHF therapeutic. BLAST-AHF is an international prospective, randomized, phase IIb, dose-ranging study that will randomize up to 500 AHF patients with systolic blood pressure ≥120 mm Hg and ≤200 mm Hg within 24 h of initial presentation to 1 of 3 doses of intravenous TRV027 (1, 5, or 25 mg/h) or matching placebo (1:1:1:1) for at least 48 h and up to 96 h. The primary endpoint is a composite of 5 clinical endpoints (dyspnea, worsening heart failure, length of hospital stay, 30-day rehospitalization, and 30-day mortality) combined using an average z-score. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of dyspnea and change in amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. The BLAST-AHF study will assess the efficacy and safety of a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor in AHF.

  12. Heart failure therapeutics on the basis of a biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor. Rationale and design of the BLAST-AHF study (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Butler, Javed; Collins, Sean P; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Levy, Phillip D; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Soergel, David G; Teerlink, John R; Violin, Jonathan D; Voors, Adriaan A; Pang, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    The BLAST-AHF (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure) study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of TRV027, a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor, in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). AHF remains a major public health problem, and no currently-available therapies have been shown to favorably affect outcomes. TRV027 is a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor that antagonizes angiotensin-stimulated G-protein activation while stimulating β-arrestin. In animal models, these effects reduce afterload while increasing cardiac performance and maintaining stroke volume. In initial human studies, TRV027 appears to be hemodynamically active primarily in patients with activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, a potentially attractive profile for an AHF therapeutic. BLAST-AHF is an international prospective, randomized, phase IIb, dose-ranging study that will randomize up to 500 AHF patients with systolic blood pressure ≥120 mm Hg and ≤200 mm Hg within 24 h of initial presentation to 1 of 3 doses of intravenous TRV027 (1, 5, or 25 mg/h) or matching placebo (1:1:1:1) for at least 48 h and up to 96 h. The primary endpoint is a composite of 5 clinical endpoints (dyspnea, worsening heart failure, length of hospital stay, 30-day rehospitalization, and 30-day mortality) combined using an average z-score. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of dyspnea and change in amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. The BLAST-AHF study will assess the efficacy and safety of a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor in AHF. PMID:25650371

  13. Concussive blast-type aural trauma, eardrum perforations, and their effects on hearing levels: an update on military experience in Izmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yetiser, S; Ustun, T

    1993-12-01

    Thirty-two military personnel, exposed to blast injury in the last 15 months, have been investigated according to type of eardrum perforation and hearing loss in this retrospective study. It has been concluded that tympanic membrane perforations and hearing loss due to blast effect have individual patterns. Hearing loss due to trauma is not because of pressure environment alone. Final outcomes have justified the previous recommendations about ear protection in military staff, particularly in those who are working with explosive materials. Ear muffs with ear phones are appropriate, providing ear protection as well as hearing gain.

  14. Mutations in DHDPSL are responsible for primary hyperoxaluria type III.

    PubMed

    Belostotsky, Ruth; Seboun, Eric; Idelson, Gregory H; Milliner, Dawn S; Becker-Cohen, Rachel; Rinat, Choni; Monico, Carla G; Feinstein, Sofia; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Magen, Daniella; Weissman, Irith; Charon, Celine; Frishberg, Yaacov

    2010-09-10

    Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of endogenous oxalate synthesis characterized by accumulation of calcium oxalate primarily in the kidney. Deficiencies of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) or glyoxylate reductase (GRHPR) are the two known causes of the disease (PH I and II, respectively). To determine the etiology of an as yet uncharacterized type of PH, we selected a cohort of 15 non-PH I/PH II patients from eight unrelated families with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis for high-density SNP microarray analysis. We determined that mutations in an uncharacterized gene, DHDPSL, on chromosome 10 cause a third type of PH (PH III). To overcome the difficulties in data analysis attributed to a state of compound heterozygosity, we developed a strategy of "heterozygosity mapping"-a search for long heterozygous patterns unique to all patients in a given family and overlapping between families, followed by reconstruction of haplotypes. This approach enabled us to determine an allelic fragment shared by all patients of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and bearing a 3 bp deletion in DHDPSL. Overall, six mutations were detected: four missense mutations, one in-frame deletion, and one splice-site mutation. Our assumption is that DHDPSL is the gene encoding 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate aldolase, catalyzing the final step in the metabolic pathway of hydroxyproline.

  15. 14 CFR 21.24 - Issuance of type certificate: primary category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Issuance of type certificate: primary... type certificate: primary category aircraft. (a) The applicant is entitled to a type certificate for an aircraft in the primary category if— (1) The aircraft— (i) Is unpowered; is an airplane powered by a...

  16. Environmental factors and primary prevention in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ilonen, Jorma; Vaarala, Outi; Åkerblom, Hans K.; Knip, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes has been increasing rapidly among children in most European countries over the last decades. Despite of the known strong genetic component in the disease only environmental factors can explain such a rapid change. The increase in incidence has been most conspicuous in the youngest age group, which emphasizes the importance of infancy and early environmental exposures. Nutritional and infectious factors affecting the young child or even the mother during pregnancy have been implicated to be important in the pathogenesis. The identification of single factors has been extremely difficult as reflected by many controversial reports on their importance. This difficulty may also be due to the heterogeneity of the disease mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms in different pathways may ultimately be responsible for beta-cell destruction. In most cases the disease is probably caused by a complex interplay between multiple factors including distinct genetic polymorphisms and environmental effects. Exploration of these pathways is needed for the development of effective preventive measures. The implementation of primary prevention trials will ultimately prove the value of various concepts generated for the disease pathogenesis. PMID:20455416

  17. Low temperature limits for mixing recycled oil, diesel fuel, and ammonium nitrate to make ANFO-type blasting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhe, T.C.; Bajpayee, T.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Bureau of Mines conducted research to determine the safe operating conditions for using recycled (used) lubricating oil from mining equipment as a partial replacement for diesel fuel to make ANFO-type blasting agents. The use of recycled oil (RO) saves energy, reduces oil imports, and reduces mining costs. Low ambient temperatures may cause these recycled oils to become too viscous for proper absorption by ammonium nitrate (AN) prills and result in poor blast performance, safety hazards, and environmental problems. To help quantify and resolve these issues, viscosity, mixing, and performance tests were conducted at various temperatures. Diesel fuels No. 1 and No. 2 were studied separately and in blends with 25, 50, and 75% RO. Good quality ANFO mixes (94-6) were produced with dry absorbent prills and blended fuel (No. 1 diesel plus RO) at temperatures as low as {minus}40 F ({minus}40 C) with 75% No. 1/25% RO, and at {minus}20 F ({minus}29 C) with 50/50. Diesel fuel No. 2 also made good mixes as low as {minus}30 F ({minus}34 C) with 75% No. 2/25% RO, and at 0 F ({minus}18 C) with 50/50. Reference detonation velocity tests were conducted in 1.4 in. (3.6 cm) diameter steel pipe at 70 F (21 C) on No. 1 diesel ANFO (94-6), giving an average value of 9,722 ft/s (2,964 m/s). Comparison tests showed good ANFO performance at low temperatures. Based on these results, a practical field method has been developed to help evaluate whether a specific oil blend will mix properly with AN at a low ambient temperature. This method will help to promote the safe and reliable use of RO ANFO at low temperatures, with adequate performance.

  18. Expanding the Range of Text Types Used in the Primary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strachan, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary-grade students' experiences with text should prepare them to critically read an extensive range of text types throughout their schooling and career, a primary goal of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). However, research demonstrates that narrative text overshadows other text types in the primary grades. The purpose of this…

  19. Effectiveness of eye armor during blast loading.

    PubMed

    Bailoor, Shantanu; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-11-01

    Ocular trauma is one of the most common types of combat injuries resulting from the interaction of military personnel with improvised explosive devices. Ocular blast injury mechanisms are complex, and trauma may occur through various injury mechanisms. However, primary blast injuries (PBI) are an important cause of ocular trauma that may go unnoticed and result in significant damage to internal ocular tissues and visual impairment. Further, the effectiveness of commonly employed eye armor, designed for ballistic and laser protection, in lessening the severity of adverse blast overpressures (BOP) is unknown. In this paper, we employed a three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction computational model for assessing effectiveness of the eye armor during blast loading on human eyes and validated results against free field blast measurements by Bentz and Grimm (2013). Numerical simulations show that the blast waves focused on the ocular region because of reflections from surrounding facial features and resulted in considerable increase in BOP. We evaluated the effectiveness of spectacles and goggles in mitigating the pressure loading using the computational model. Our results corroborate experimental measurements showing that the goggles were more effective than spectacles in mitigating BOP loading on the eye. Numerical results confirmed that the goggles significantly reduced blast wave penetration in the space between the armor and the eyes and provided larger clearance space for blast wave expansion after penetration than the spectacles. The spectacles as well as the goggles were more effective in reducing reflected BOP at higher charge mass because of the larger decrease in dynamic pressures after the impact. The goggles provided greater benefit of reducing the peak pressure than the spectacles for lower charge mass. However, the goggles resulted in moderate, sustained elevated pressure loading on the eye, that became 50-100% larger than the pressure loading

  20. Effectiveness of eye armor during blast loading.

    PubMed

    Bailoor, Shantanu; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-11-01

    Ocular trauma is one of the most common types of combat injuries resulting from the interaction of military personnel with improvised explosive devices. Ocular blast injury mechanisms are complex, and trauma may occur through various injury mechanisms. However, primary blast injuries (PBI) are an important cause of ocular trauma that may go unnoticed and result in significant damage to internal ocular tissues and visual impairment. Further, the effectiveness of commonly employed eye armor, designed for ballistic and laser protection, in lessening the severity of adverse blast overpressures (BOP) is unknown. In this paper, we employed a three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction computational model for assessing effectiveness of the eye armor during blast loading on human eyes and validated results against free field blast measurements by Bentz and Grimm (2013). Numerical simulations show that the blast waves focused on the ocular region because of reflections from surrounding facial features and resulted in considerable increase in BOP. We evaluated the effectiveness of spectacles and goggles in mitigating the pressure loading using the computational model. Our results corroborate experimental measurements showing that the goggles were more effective than spectacles in mitigating BOP loading on the eye. Numerical results confirmed that the goggles significantly reduced blast wave penetration in the space between the armor and the eyes and provided larger clearance space for blast wave expansion after penetration than the spectacles. The spectacles as well as the goggles were more effective in reducing reflected BOP at higher charge mass because of the larger decrease in dynamic pressures after the impact. The goggles provided greater benefit of reducing the peak pressure than the spectacles for lower charge mass. However, the goggles resulted in moderate, sustained elevated pressure loading on the eye, that became 50-100% larger than the pressure loading

  1. Types of Primary Insomnia: Is Hyperarousal Also Present during Napping?

    PubMed Central

    Pérusse, Alexandra D.; Turcotte, Isabelle; St-Jean, Geneviève; Ellis, Jason; Hudon, Carol; Bastien, Célyne H.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify if hyperarousal is a 24-hour phenomenon in insomnia by comparing sleep during napping between good sleepers (GS) and Insomnia sufferers (INS) (subdivided into paradoxical “PARA-I” and psychophysiological “PSY-I”) following a mentally challenging battery of cognitive tests. Design: Cross-sectional comparisons of GS, PSY-I, and PARA-I. Setting: Participants slept for 4 consecutive nights in the laboratory where PSG was recorded. Upon awakening on mornings 2 and 3, cognitive testing (lasting 90-120 min) was administered, followed by a 20-minute nap. Participants: Fourteen PSY-I, 12 PARA-I, and 23 GS completed the study, comprising home questionnaires, clinical interviews, night PSG recordings, cognitive testing, and nap PSG recordings. All participants were between 25 and 50 years of age and met inclusion criteria for PSY-I, PARA-I, or GS. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: On objective nap parameters, GS had a longer total sleep time (TST; p = 0.008) and better sleep efficiency (SE; p = 0.009), than PSY-I and PARA-I, and both groups of INS were awake significantly longer than GS (p = 0.003). Also, PARA-I took significantly more time than GS to fall asleep (p = 0.014). Subjectively reported sleepiness was comparable across the three groups. Positive relationships were observed between SE over the night and SE over the nap the following day. Conclusions: Results show that GS sleep better than INS during naps following prolonged cognitive testing, suggesting that, in INS, hyperarousal predominates over mental fatigue resulting from these tests. These results may parallel what is observed at night when INS experience increased cognitive load but are unable to fall asleep. Citation: Pérusse AD; Turcotte I; St-Jean G; Ellis J; Hudon C; Bastien CH. Types of primary insomnia: is hyperarousal also present during napping? J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(12):1273-1280. PMID:24340289

  2. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  3. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  4. Primary Pupils' Experiences of Different Types of Grouping in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Susan; Ireson, Judith; Davies, Jane

    2004-01-01

    There has been little research on pupils' experiences of ability grouping. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of primary-aged pupils regarding the purpose and practice of within and between class ability grouping; their experiences of those practices; and how their attitudes to school, self-perceptions and behaviour were affected. The…

  5. Effect of aviation fuel type and fuel injection conditions on the spray characteristics of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, Rick

    Feddema, Rick T. M.S.M.E., Purdue University, December 2013. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors. Major Professor: Dr. Paul E. Sojka, School of Mechanical Engineering Spray performance of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors are central to combustion stability, combustor heat management, and pollutant formation in aviation gas turbine engines. Next generation aviation gas turbine engines will optimize spray atomization characteristics of the fuel injector in order to achieve engine efficiency and emissions requirements. Fuel injector spray atomization performance is affected by the type of fuel injector, fuel liquid properties, fuel injection pressure, fuel injection temperature, and ambient pressure. Performance of pressure swirl atomizer and hybrid air blast nozzle type fuel injectors are compared in this study. Aviation jet fuels, JP-8, Jet A, JP-5, and JP-10 and their effect on fuel injector performance is investigated. Fuel injector set conditions involving fuel injector pressure, fuel temperature and ambient pressure are varied in order to compare each fuel type. One objective of this thesis is to contribute spray patternation measurements to the body of existing drop size data in the literature. Fuel droplet size tends to increase with decreasing fuel injection pressure, decreasing fuel injection temperature and increasing ambient injection pressure. The differences between fuel types at particular set conditions occur due to differences in liquid properties between fuels. Liquid viscosity and surface tension are identified to be fuel-specific properties that affect the drop size of the fuel. An open aspect of current research that this paper addresses is how much the type of aviation jet fuel affects spray atomization characteristics. Conventional aviation fuel specifications are becoming more important with new interest in alternative

  6. Multifocal primary cutaneous extranodal NK/T lymphoma nasal type*

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Pedro; Ferreira, Cristina; Soares-Almeida, Luís; Filipe, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma is a distinct entity according to the World Health Organization classification. Although 60% to 90% of patients with this disease present with a destructive mass in the midline facial tissues, it may also primarily or secondarily involve extranasal sites, like the skin. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient that came to our department with erythematous plaques of the right leg and eczematous lesions of the trunk. These lesions were biopsied and the patient was diagnosed with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. He was treated with multi-agent systemic chemotherapy but died 5 months after diagnosis. This case highlights the rarity and variability of cutaneous features of this disease and its aggressive course and poor prognosis. PMID:27192524

  7. Behavioral Outcomes Differ between Rotational Acceleration and Blast Mechanisms of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Shah, Alok S; Budde, Matthew D; Olsen, Christopher M; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra; Kurpad, Shekar N; McCrea, Michael; Pintar, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can result from a number of mechanisms, including blunt impact, head rotational acceleration, exposure to blast, and penetration of projectiles. Mechanism is likely to influence the type, severity, and chronicity of outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the severity and time course of behavioral outcomes following blast and rotational mTBI. The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Rotational Injury model and a shock tube model of primary blast injury were used to induce mTBI in rats and behavioral assessments were conducted within the first week, as well as 30 and 60 days following injury. Acute recovery time demonstrated similar increases over protocol-matched shams, indicating acute injury severity equivalence between the two mechanisms. Post-injury behavior in the elevated plus maze demonstrated differing trends, with rotationally injured rats acutely demonstrating greater activity, whereas blast-injured rats had decreased activity that developed at chronic time points. Similarly, blast-injured rats demonstrated trends associated with cognitive deficits that were not apparent following rotational injuries. These findings demonstrate that rotational and blast injury result in behavioral changes with different qualitative and temporal manifestations. Whereas rotational injury was characterized by a rapidly emerging phenotype consistent with behavioral disinhibition, blast injury was associated with emotional and cognitive differences that were not evident acutely, but developed later, with an anxiety-like phenotype still present in injured animals at our most chronic measurements.

  8. Behavioral Outcomes Differ between Rotational Acceleration and Blast Mechanisms of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stemper, Brian D.; Shah, Alok S.; Budde, Matthew D.; Olsen, Christopher M.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra; Kurpad, Shekar N.; McCrea, Michael; Pintar, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can result from a number of mechanisms, including blunt impact, head rotational acceleration, exposure to blast, and penetration of projectiles. Mechanism is likely to influence the type, severity, and chronicity of outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the severity and time course of behavioral outcomes following blast and rotational mTBI. The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Rotational Injury model and a shock tube model of primary blast injury were used to induce mTBI in rats and behavioral assessments were conducted within the first week, as well as 30 and 60 days following injury. Acute recovery time demonstrated similar increases over protocol-matched shams, indicating acute injury severity equivalence between the two mechanisms. Post-injury behavior in the elevated plus maze demonstrated differing trends, with rotationally injured rats acutely demonstrating greater activity, whereas blast-injured rats had decreased activity that developed at chronic time points. Similarly, blast-injured rats demonstrated trends associated with cognitive deficits that were not apparent following rotational injuries. These findings demonstrate that rotational and blast injury result in behavioral changes with different qualitative and temporal manifestations. Whereas rotational injury was characterized by a rapidly emerging phenotype consistent with behavioral disinhibition, blast injury was associated with emotional and cognitive differences that were not evident acutely, but developed later, with an anxiety-like phenotype still present in injured animals at our most chronic measurements. PMID:27014184

  9. Aquaporin 9, a promising predictor for the cytocidal effects of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia cell lines and primary blasts.

    PubMed

    Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Yuan, Bo; Yoshino, Yuta; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Horikoshi, Akira; Aizawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Jin; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2013-06-01

    A close correlation between the cytocidal effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) and aquaporin-9 (AQP9) expression levels has been proposed, yet detailed studies are still needed to confirm this association. Thus, in the present study, the correlation between the expression levels of AQP9 and sensitivity to ATO was investigated using two acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines, NB4 and HT93A, as well as primary APL cells from newly diagnosed and relapsed APL patients. A substantially higher sensitivity to ATO-mediated induction of apoptosis was observed in the NB4 cells when compared to that in the HT93A cells. In addition, markedly higher expression levels of AQP9, as assessed using flow cytometry, along with more intracellular arsenic accumulation, were observed in the NB4 cells. More importantly, similar to APL cell lines, the trend of expression levels of AQP9 correlated closely with the differential sensitivity to ATO-mediated induction of apoptosis in primary APL cells. In contrast, no correlation was observed between ATO sensitivity associated with AQP9 expression levels and the expression profiles of cell surface markers as well as chromosomal alterations. These results provide direct evidence that the expression levels of AQP9, rather than other biomarkers such as cell surface markers and chromosomal alterations, correlate closely with the sensitivity to ATO in both APL cell lines and primary blasts. These findings suggest that the AQP9 expression status of APL patients is a predictive marker for the successful outcome of ATO treatment, since AQP9 plays a pivotal role in various arsenite-mediated biological effects on normal and cancer cells. Moreover, flow cytometry may be a new convenient and valuable tool for analyzing the AQP9 status of APL patients compared to current methods such as western blotting.

  10. [Primary combined oral antidiabetic therapy in type-2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gábor; Baranyi, Eva

    2002-10-27

    New target values of the metabolic control and recent directions in the therapeutic strategies of type 2 diabetes mellitus are overviewed. Attention is called to the atherogenic effect of blood glucose elevations exceeding physiological level, even when only post-prandial and with short duration. The significance of early phase prandial insulin secretion in the metabolic state is underlined, and the related new therapeutic possibilities are discussed. Practical guidelines are given to the introduction of oral antidiabetic therapy, and the importance of the early, aggressive, combined treatment with a complex mechanism of action is emphasized.

  11. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Caused by Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium Produces Sustained Emotional Deficits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Scott A.; Elberger, Andrea J.; Deng, Yunping; Guley, Natalie H.; Del Mar, Nobel; Rogers, Joshua; Choi, Gy Won; Ferrell, Jessica; Rex, Tonia S.; Honig, Marcia G.; Reiner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month-old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25–40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50–60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2–8 weeks after blast, 50–60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, but did observe scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50 to 60 psi mice 3–8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50–60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to “diffuse” axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI. PMID:24478749

  12. A novel closed-head model of mild traumatic brain injury caused by primary overpressure blast to the cranium produces sustained emotional deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Heldt, Scott A; Elberger, Andrea J; Deng, Yunping; Guley, Natalie H; Del Mar, Nobel; Rogers, Joshua; Choi, Gy Won; Ferrell, Jessica; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month-old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25-40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50-60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2-8 weeks after blast, 50-60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, but did observe scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50 to 60 psi mice 3-8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50-60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to "diffuse" axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI. PMID:24478749

  13. A Gram-Negative Bacterial Secreted Protein Types Prediction Method Based on PSI-BLAST Profile

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of secreted protein types based solely on sequence data remains to be a challenging problem. In this study, we extract the long-range correlation information and linear correlation information from position-specific score matrix (PSSM). A total of 6800 features are extracted at 17 different gaps; then, 309 features are selected by a filter feature selection method based on the training set. To verify the performance of our method, jackknife and independent dataset tests are performed on the test set and the reported overall accuracies are 93.60% and 100%, respectively. Comparison of our results with the existing method shows that our method provides the favorable performance for secreted protein type prediction. PMID:27563663

  14. Gender of Primary Authors and Types of Research in Three Rehabilitation Counseling Journals: 1990-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Amy L.; Walker, Kristi

    2001-01-01

    The authors reviewed all articles published in three rehabilitation counseling journals from 1990 through 1999 to identify the gender of the primary author for each article and the type of article. It was found that men were more likely to be the primary authors of empirical and expository articles in each journal; however, this difference was not…

  15. Primary types of Chinese longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary types of Chinese (mainland China, Taiwan, and Tibet) longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution are catalogued and figured, current through 2012. Data on the original combination, current name, current tribal classification, and ...

  16. Primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) are catalogued and figured, current through 2012 (but also including some 2013 holotypes). Data on the original combination, current combina...

  17. The Relationship Between True Colors Temperament Types of Primary Caregivers and Literacy Development: An Exploratory Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calahan, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the relationship between the "True Colors" temperament type of the primary caregiver and the readiness to involve her child in the social context of extracurricular reading activities (a summer reading program) intended to promote literacy development. Finds that the "Gold" and "Blue" types involved their children in organized, structured…

  18. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Matthew; Skotak, Maciej; Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent. PMID:27603017

  19. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent. PMID:27603017

  20. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Matthew; Skotak, Maciej; Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent.

  1. Panencephalopathic type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: primary involvement of the cerebral white matter

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Toshio; Okumura, Atsushi; Oda, Masaya; Shiraki, Hirotsugu

    1981-01-01

    Eight necropsy cases of a “panencephalopathic” type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in the Japanese are reported. The reasons why this type should be discussed separately from other types of CJD are that there is primary involvement of the cerebral white matter as well as the cerebral cortex, and that the white matter lesion of one Japanese human brain with CJD similar to the present group has been successfully transmitted to experimental animals. Images PMID:7012278

  2. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guley, Natalie H; Rogers, Joshua T; Del Mar, Nobel A; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J; Marchetta, Jeffrey G; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2016-02-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25-40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50-60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits.

  3. Simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Ford, Corey C.

    2008-04-01

    U.S. soldiers are surviving blast and impacts due to effective body armor, trauma evacuation and care. Blast injuries are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military personnel returning from combat. Understanding of Primary Blast Injury may be needed to develop better means of blast mitigation strategies. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of blast direction and strength on the resulting mechanical stress and wave energy distributions generated in the brain.

  4. Initial manifestation of primary hyperoxaluria type I in adults-- recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, J J

    1996-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I may initially manifest as urolithiasis, renal insufficiency, or symptoms of systemic oxalosis. This hereditary disorder was fatal until effective therapies evolved during the past two decades. Difficulty in recognizing and diagnosing this disorder in adults is illustrated in a report of a patient eventually restored to good health by high-flux dialysis and combined renal and hepatic transplantation. I explore the molecular processes of the genetic defect and discuss clinical indicators of primary hyperoxaluria type I, manifestations of oxalosis, the pathogenesis of chronic oxalate nephropathy, and the diagnosis and management of this disease. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8779202

  5. Colonic-type adenocarcinoma arising in a primary retroperitoneal mature cystic teratoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wang L; Cao, Dengfeng

    2008-12-01

    A 47-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain was found to have a 20 cm cystic retroperitoneal mass. Pathology indicated a colonic-type adenocarcinoma arising in a primary retroperitoneal mature cystic teratoma. The adenocarcinoma was predominantly intracystic with focal superficial invasion into the cyst wall but not beyond the teratoma capsule. Immunohistochemistry showed that the adenocarcinoma cells were diffusely positive for cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and caudal-type homeobox transcription factor-2 (CDX2) but negative for CK7, confirming the colonic phenotype. In addition, the adenocarcinoma was seen adjacent to teratomatous colonic-type mucosa with adenomatous change (i.e. adenoma), suggesting that it was probably arising from a colonic-type adenoma within the teratoma. The carcinoma had a higher Ki-67 proliferation index and had a higher percentage of cells stained for p53 than the adjacent adenomatous lesion. To the authors' knowledge this is the first documented case in which a colonic-type adenocarcinoma was seen arising from a precursor lesion (i.e. a colonic-type adenoma in a primary retroperitoneal mature cystic teratoma) and is the second case of intestinal-type adenocarcinoma arising in a primary retroperitoneal mature cystic teratoma.

  6. Type I interferon regulation of natural killer cell function in primary and secondary infections.

    PubMed

    Stackaruk, Michele L; Lee, Amanda J; Ashkar, Ali A

    2013-08-01

    The priming of natural killer (NK) cells by type I interferon (IFN) is necessary for protection against primary and secondary viral infections. However, the pathway by which type I IFN activates NK cells to elicit antiviral responses is controversial. There is evidence to suggest that type I IFN priming of NK cells occurs through both direct and indirect pathways. As with many innate mechanisms, type I IFN and NK cells also orchestrate the adaptive immune response and thus aid in protection against secondary infections. Type I IFN can shape CD4(+) T cell, B cell and humoral memory formation. In addition, long-lived NK cells can perform specific and enhanced memory-like protection in secondary infections. This review outlines the different mechanisms underlying type I IFN regulation of NK cells and how type I IFN and NK cells can be used as a therapeutic target in vaccinations.

  7. Primary Pulmonary Salivary Gland-type Tumors: A Review and Update.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nadja; Weissferdt, Annikka; Kalhor, Neda; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary salivary gland-type tumors (SGT) comprise a very small proportion of primary lung neoplasms. The most common tumors among this group are mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. Contrary to the head and neck region, benign SGT such as pleomorphic adenomas are exceedingly rare in the pulmonary system. More recently, 2 additional SGT, namely hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma and salivary duct-like carcinoma were recognized as primary lung tumors expanding the spectrum of SGT that have been described to originate in the tracheobronchial system. Primary pulmonary SGT must be clinically excluded from metastatic salivary gland neoplasms as their morphology is indistinguishable from that of their salivary gland counterparts. Little is known about the clinical behavior and best treatment approach for these unusual tumors. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of primary pulmonary SGT with particular emphasis on morphologic characteristics and latest developments in terms of immunohistochemical and molecular techniques.

  8. [The characteristics of blast traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Hatano, Ben; Matsushita, Yoshitaro; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji

    2010-08-01

    With the increase in terrorist activity in recent times, the number of blast injuries has also increased in civilian and military settings. In a recent war, the number of patients who suffered blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) increased, so treatment of bTBI is currently a very important issue. Blast injury is complicated and can be divided into 4 categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary. Primary blast injury results from exposure to blast waves; secondary blast injury is trauma caused by fragments of explosive devices; tertiary blast injury is the result of collision with objects; and quaternary blast injury is the result of exposure to toxic and other substances. Blast waves mainly injure air-containing organs such as the lung, bowel, and ear. The brain may also be affected by blast waves. From the clinical perspective, hyperemia and severe cerebral edema occur frequently in patients who sustain significant bTBI. Penetrating or closed head injury caused by the explosion may be associated with vasospasm and pseudoaneurysm formation. Mild traumatic brain injury during war can be associated with posttraumatic stress disorder. To elucidate the mechanism of bTBI, many research works using animal models and computer analysis are underway. Such studies have so far shown that blast waves can cause damage to the brain tissue and cognitive deficits; however, detailed investigations on this topic are still required. Treatment of bTBI patients may require clinical knowledge and skills related to intensive care, neurology, and neurosurgery. Moreover, further research is required in this field. PMID:20697143

  9. Type of health insurance and the quality of primary care experience.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the association between type of health insurance coverage and quality of primary care as measured by its distinguishing attributes--first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. METHODS: The household component of the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was used for this study. The analysis primarily focused on subjects aged younger than 65 years who identified a usual source of care. Logistic regressions were used to examine the independent effects of insurance status on primary care attributes while individual sociodemographic characteristics were controlled for. RESULTS: The experience of primary care varies according to insurance status. The insured are able to obtain better primary care than the uninsured, and the privately insured are able to obtain better primary care than the publicly insured. Those insured through fee-for-service coverage experience better longitudinal care and less of a barrier to access than those insured through health maintenance organizations (HMOs). CONCLUSIONS: While expanding insurance coverage is important for establishing access to care, efforts are needed to enhance the quality of primary health care, particularly for the publicly insured. Policymakers should closely monitor the quality of primary care provided by HMOs. PMID:11111255

  10. The effect of explosive blast loading on human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Boggs, Mary

    2016-07-01

    Diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injury is challenging because brain tissue damage progresses slowly and is not readily detectable by conventional imaging techniques. We have developed a novel in vitro model to study primary blast loading on dissociated neurons using nitroamine explosives such as those used on the battlefield. Human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to single and triple 50-psi explosive blasts and single 100-psi blasts. Changes in membrane permeability and oxidative stress showed a significant increase for the single and triple 100-psi blast conditions compared with single 50-psi blast and controls.

  11. A Parametric Approach to Shape Field-Relevant Blast Wave Profiles in Compressed-Gas-Driven Shock Tube

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1–3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68–1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is

  12. A parametric approach to shape field-relevant blast wave profiles in compressed-gas-driven shock tube.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1-3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68-1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared

  13. Blast Injuries: From Improvised Explosive Device Blasts to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Ditkofsky, Noah G; York, John D; Abujudeh, Hani H; Avery, Laura A; Brunner, John F; Sodickson, Aaron D; Lev, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Although most trauma centers have experience with the imaging and management of gunshot wounds, in most regions blast wounds such as the ones encountered in terrorist attacks with the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are infrequently encountered outside the battlefield. As global terrorism becomes a greater concern, it is important that radiologists, particularly those working in urban trauma centers, be aware of the mechanisms of injury and the spectrum of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury patterns. Primary blast injuries are caused by barotrauma from the initial increased pressure of the explosive detonation and the rarefaction of the atmosphere immediately afterward. Secondary blast injuries are caused by debris carried by the blast wind and most often result in penetrating trauma from small shrapnel. Tertiary blast injuries are caused by the physical displacement of the victim and the wide variety of blunt or penetrating trauma sustained as a result of the patient impacting immovable objects such as surrounding cars, walls, or fences. Quaternary blast injuries include all other injuries, such as burns, crush injuries, and inhalational injuries. Radiography is considered the initial imaging modality for assessment of shrapnel and fractures. Computed tomography is the optimal test to assess penetrating chest, abdominal, and head trauma. The mechanism of blast injuries and the imaging experience of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing are detailed, as well as musculoskeletal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and pulmonary injury patterns from blast injuries.

  14. Blast Injuries: From Improvised Explosive Device Blasts to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Ditkofsky, Noah G; York, John D; Abujudeh, Hani H; Avery, Laura A; Brunner, John F; Sodickson, Aaron D; Lev, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Although most trauma centers have experience with the imaging and management of gunshot wounds, in most regions blast wounds such as the ones encountered in terrorist attacks with the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are infrequently encountered outside the battlefield. As global terrorism becomes a greater concern, it is important that radiologists, particularly those working in urban trauma centers, be aware of the mechanisms of injury and the spectrum of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury patterns. Primary blast injuries are caused by barotrauma from the initial increased pressure of the explosive detonation and the rarefaction of the atmosphere immediately afterward. Secondary blast injuries are caused by debris carried by the blast wind and most often result in penetrating trauma from small shrapnel. Tertiary blast injuries are caused by the physical displacement of the victim and the wide variety of blunt or penetrating trauma sustained as a result of the patient impacting immovable objects such as surrounding cars, walls, or fences. Quaternary blast injuries include all other injuries, such as burns, crush injuries, and inhalational injuries. Radiography is considered the initial imaging modality for assessment of shrapnel and fractures. Computed tomography is the optimal test to assess penetrating chest, abdominal, and head trauma. The mechanism of blast injuries and the imaging experience of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing are detailed, as well as musculoskeletal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and pulmonary injury patterns from blast injuries. PMID:26761543

  15. Application of Silver Sulfadiazine Cream With Early Surgical Intervention in Patients Suffering From Combined Burn-Blast Injury Facial Tattoos

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein

    2012-01-01

    Severe combined burn-blast injury is a great challenge to surgical teams due to its high mortality. It also results in unsightly traumatic tattoos. The aims of these case reports were to clarify the clinical characteristic of the dynamite explosion burn-blast facial injuries and discuss appropriate management of these patients. We report two patients suffering from facial burn-blast injury following dynamite explosion in which after primary stabilization, silver sulfadiazine cream was applied to the wounds and 12 hours later the wounds were cleaned under general anesthesia with vigorous saline solution irrigation and brushing. The foreign particles were meticulously removed from wounds and simultaneous repairing of defects was done with nylon 6-0 sutures. We conclude application of silver sulfadiazine cream on facial burn-blast injury tattoos several hours before surgical removal of particles is highly efficacious in facilitating particle removal and attaining a good result following surgical intervention, and primary repair. Treatment of combined burn-blast tattoos is different from other types of tattoos not associated with burns. Debridement and removal of foreign particles under general anesthesia from skin immediately and primary reconstruction of wounds is essential. We recommend application of the topical agent silver sulfadiazine to wounds about 12 hours before surgical intervention. PMID:24829894

  16. Application of silver sulfadiazine cream with early surgical intervention in patients suffering from combined burn-blast injury facial tattoos.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein

    2012-01-01

    Severe combined burn-blast injury is a great challenge to surgical teams due to its high mortality. It also results in unsightly traumatic tattoos. The aims of these case reports were to clarify the clinical characteristic of the dynamite explosion burn-blast facial injuries and discuss appropriate management of these patients. We report two patients suffering from facial burn-blast injury following dynamite explosion in which after primary stabilization, silver sulfadiazine cream was applied to the wounds and 12 hours later the wounds were cleaned under general anesthesia with vigorous saline solution irrigation and brushing. The foreign particles were meticulously removed from wounds and simultaneous repairing of defects was done with nylon 6-0 sutures. We conclude application of silver sulfadiazine cream on facial burn-blast injury tattoos several hours before surgical removal of particles is highly efficacious in facilitating particle removal and attaining a good result following surgical intervention, and primary repair. Treatment of combined burn-blast tattoos is different from other types of tattoos not associated with burns. Debridement and removal of foreign particles under general anesthesia from skin immediately and primary reconstruction of wounds is essential. We recommend application of the topical agent silver sulfadiazine to wounds about 12 hours before surgical intervention.

  17. In-vitro approaches for studying blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung Chia; Smith, Douglas H; Meaney, David F

    2009-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury caused by explosive or blast events is currently divided into four phases: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. These phases of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) are biomechanically distinct, and can be modeled in both in-vivo and in-vitro systems. The purpose of this review is to consider the mechanical phases of bTBI, how these phases are reproduced with in-vitro models, and to review findings from these models to assess how each phase of bTBI can be examined in more detail. Highlighted are some important gaps in the literature that may be addressed in the future to better identify the exact contributing mechanisms for bTBI. These in-vitro models, viewed in combination with in-vivo models and clinical studies, can be used to assess both the mechanisms and possible treatments for this type of trauma.

  18. In-Vitro Approaches for Studying Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung Chia; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury caused by explosive or blast events is currently divided into four phases: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. These phases of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) are biomechanically distinct, and can be modeled in both in-vivo and in-vitro systems. The purpose of this review is to consider the mechanical phases of bTBI, how these phases are reproduced with in-vitro models, and to review findings from these models to assess how each phase of bTBI can be examined in more detail. Highlighted are some important gaps in the literature that may be addressed in the future to better identify the exact contributing mechanisms for bTBI. These in-vitro models, viewed in combination with in-vivo models and clinical studies, can be used to assess both the mechanisms and possible treatments for this type of trauma. PMID:19397424

  19. Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and soluble factor urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, Hernán

    2013-11-01

    Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) may be due to genetic or acquired etiologies and is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome with high morbidity that often leads to end-stage renal failure. The different available therapeutic approaches are unsuccessful, in part due to partially deciphered heterogeneous and complex pathophysiological mechanisms. Moreover, the term FSGS, even in its primary form, comprises a histological description shared by a number of different causes with completely different molecular pathways of disease. This review focuses on the latest developments regarding the pathophysiology of primary acquired FSGS caused by soluble factor urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor, a circulating permeability factor involved in proteinuria and edema formation, and describes recent advances with potential success in therapy.

  20. Epithelial cell types of the primary ureter of Helix aspersa: Ultrastructural and cytochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Aguayo, I; Ballesteros, F; Hidalgo, J; López-Campos, J L

    1987-01-01

    The present study describes the morphological characteristics which determine the structural polarity of the principal and ciliated cells in the primary ureter epithelium of Helix aspersa. These characteristics are analysed on the basis of the function performed by both cell types. The presence of paniculate glycogen and the location of glycoconjugates associated with cell membranes of the epithelial cells is revealed by the method of Thiéry.

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coat Protein Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide in Primary Cortical Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Uhl, George R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1993-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coat protein, gp120, kills neurons in primary cortical cultures at low picomolar concentrations. The toxicity requires external glutamate and calcium and is blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to gp120 toxicity, since nitroarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, prevents toxicity as does deletion of arginine from the incubation medium and hemoglobin, which binds NO. Superoxide dismutase also attenuates toxicity, implying a role for superoxide anions.

  2. Enhanced proliferation of primary rat type II pneumocytes by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chassidy; Jahid, Sohail; Voelker, Dennis R.; Fan Hung

    2011-04-10

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer in sheep. The envelope protein (Env) is the oncogene, as it can transform cell lines in culture and induce tumors in animals, although the mechanisms for transformation are not yet clear because a system to perform transformation assays in differentiated type II pneumocytes does not exist. In this study we report culture of primary rat type II pneumocytes in conditions that favor prolonged expression of markers for type II pneumocytes. Env-expressing cultures formed more colonies that were larger in size and were viable for longer periods of time compared to vector control samples. The cells that remained in culture longer were confirmed to be derived from type II pneumocytes because they expressed surfactant protein C, cytokeratin, displayed alkaline phosphatase activity and were positive for Nile red. This system will be useful to study JSRV Env in the targets of transformation.

  3. Role of NSO compounds during primary cracking of a Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behar, F.; Lorant, F.; Lewan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to follow the generation of NSO compounds during the artificial maturation of an immature Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite in order to determine the different sources of the petroleum potential during primary cracking. Experiments were carried out in closed system pyrolysis in the temperature range from 225 to 350 ??C. Two types of NSOs were recovered: one is soluble in n-pentane and the second in dichloromethane. A kinetic scheme was optimised including both kerogen and NSO cracking. It was validated by complementary experiments carried out on isolated asphaltenes generated from the Type II kerogen and on the total n-pentane and DCM extracts generated from the Type III lignite. Results show that kerogen and lignite first decompose into DCM NSOs with minor generation of hydrocarbons. Then, the main source of petroleum potential originates from secondary cracking of both DCM and n-pentane NSOs through successive decomposition reactions. These results confirm the model proposed by Tissot [Tissot, B., 1969. Premie??res donne??es sur les me??canismes et la cine??tique de la formation du pe??trole dans les bassins se??dimentaires. Simulation d'un sche??ma re??actionnel sur ordinateur. Oil and Gas Science and Technology 24, 470-501] in which the main source of hydrocarbons is not the insoluble organic matter, but the NSO fraction. As secondary cracking of the NSOs largely overlaps that of the kerogen, it was demonstrated that bulk kinetics in open system is a result of both kerogen and NSO cracking. Thus, another kinetic scheme for primary cracking in open system was built as a combination of kerogen and NSO cracking. This new kinetic scheme accounts for both the rate and amounts of hydrocarbons generated in a closed pyrolysis system. Thus, the concept of successive steps for hydrocarbon generation is valid for the two types of pyrolysis system and, for the first time, a common kinetic scheme is available for extrapolating results to natural

  4. [Primary cardiorenal prevention in patients with type-2 diabetes. The Roadmap study].

    PubMed

    Halimi, S

    2005-10-22

    The incidence of type-2 diabetes is increasing throughout the world. By 2010, 350 million people will have this disease. Microalbuminuria is present in more than one third, for some at diabetes diagnosis. Rather than a complication, it is an indication of a vascular disorder that is part of the metabolic syndrome. 25% will develop end-stage kidney failure. Several studies have identified microalbuminuria or proteinuria as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Others have shown that antihypertensive treatments acting on the renin-angiotensin system (ACE inhibitors, ARBs agents) can reduce the progression of nephropathy in people with hypertension, type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. The "nephroprotective" effects of these drug classes, beyond their role in blood-pressure reduction, are suggested by modifications in renal structure and protein expression. But no study has so far examined their value in primary prevention in persons with type 2 diabetes without--but at risk of developing--microalbuminuria. The Roadmap study (Randomized Olmesartan And Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention Study) of primary prevention has as its objective measurement of the impact of ARBs (olmesartan 40 mg/d) treatment on renal outcome in 4400 patients with type 2 diabetes without microalbuminuria. Follow-up of this placebo-controlled study will last for 5 years. Conducted in 200 European centers, its results are expected for 2012. PMID:16269993

  5. The role of the primary care physician in caring for patients with type-1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Q L

    1998-02-01

    The management of type-1 diabetic patients is a challenge. Given the natural frequency of this medical problem, most primary care providers will have such patients in their office-based practice. The push for tighter control in order to lessen long-term complications is a sensible move, but it does not inherently require that you absent yourself from the loop. Most of the hoopla from the DCCT study has been used to justify the role of the endocrine sub-specialty team in the "primary care" management of all diabetic patients so that third-party payers will continue to fund such care as routine. While such team management has clear benefits, it should not preclude your active involvement in day-to-day management for fear that you do not have the proper credentials. Hopefully, this overview will give you the confidence to jump back in the ring. PMID:9533990

  6. A clinicopathological study of ocular involvement in primary hyperoxaluria type I.

    PubMed Central

    Small, K W; Scheinman, J; Klintworth, G K

    1992-01-01

    We performed a clinicopathological study on the eyes of a 3-year-old girl with primary hyperoxaluria type I. An examination one year before death disclosed a slightly diminished visual acuity in both eyes with black, geographic central macular, subretinal patches. Calcium oxalate was deposited predominantly in the retinal pigment epithelium of the posterior pole, where these cells were markedly hyperplastic and hypertrophied round foci of oxalate crystals. Oxalate crystals were exceedingly sparse in other ocular structures and when present were not associated with an apparent tissue reaction in these other locations. A collagenous layer was evident between parts of the retinal pigment epithelium and the neurosensory retina, which contained occasional perivascular clumps of melanin laden cells. The predominant deposition of oxalate in the retinal pigment epithelium, with the exuberant response of these cells around the crystals, gives a clue to the pathogenic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Images PMID:1739695

  7. Automated Blast Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, Isaiah R.; Yulfo, Alyce R.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic grit-blasting machine removes melted-layer residue from electrical-discharge-machined surfaces of turbine blades. Automatic control system of machine provides steady flow of grit and maintains blast nozzles at proper distance and in correct orientation perpendicular to surface being blasted, regardless of contour. Eliminates localized excessive blasting and consequent excessive removal of underlying material, blasting of adjacent surfaces, and missed areas.

  8. Membrane characteristics for biological blast overpressure testing using blast simulators.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Siva Sai Sujith Sajja, Venkata; Kemper, Andrew R; Rizel, Dave V; Duma, Stefan M; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Blast simulators often use passive-rupture membranes to generate shock waves similar to free-field blasts. The purpose of this study was to compare rupture patterns and pressure traces of three distinct membrane materials for biological and biomechanical blast studies. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) located at the Center for Injury Biomechanics at Virginia Tech was used to test membrane characteristics. Acetate, Mylar, and aluminum sheets with different thicknesses were used to obtain pressures between 70–210 kPa. Static pressure was measured inside the tube at the test section using piezoelectric pressure sensors. Peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse were calculated for each test. Rupture patterns and characteristic pressure traces were unique to each membrane type and thickness. Shock wave speed ranged between 1.2-1.8 Mach for static overpressures of 70–210 kPa. Acetate membranes fragmented sending pieces down the tube, but produced ideal (Friedlander) pressure traces. Mylar membranes bulged without fragmenting, but produced less-than-ideal pressure traces. Aluminum membranes did not fragment and produced ideal pressure traces. However, the cost of manufacturing and characterizing aluminum membranes should be considered during membrane selection. This study illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of using Mylar, acetate, and aluminum for passive rupture membranes for blast simulators. PMID:25405432

  9. Novel findings in patients with primary hyperoxaluria type III and implications for advanced molecular testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Beck, Bodo B; Baasner, Anne; Buescher, Anja; Habbig, Sandra; Reintjes, Nadine; Kemper, Markus J; Sikora, Przemyslaw; Mache, Christoph; Pohl, Martin; Stahl, Mirjam; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Pape, Lars; Fehrenbach, Henry; Jacob, Dorrit E; Grohe, Bernd; Wolf, Matthias T; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Yigit, Gökhan; Salido, Eduardo C; Hoppe, Bernd

    2013-02-01

    Identification of mutations in the HOGA1 gene as the cause of autosomal recessive primary hyperoxaluria (PH) type III has revitalized research in the field of PH and related stone disease. In contrast to the well-characterized entities of PH type I and type II, the pathophysiology and prevalence of type III is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed a large cohort of subjects previously tested negative for type I/II by complete HOGA1 sequencing. Seven distinct mutations, among them four novel, were found in 15 patients. In patients of non-consanguineous European descent the previously reported c.700+5G>T splice-site mutation was predominant and represents a potential founder mutation, while in consanguineous families private homozygous mutations were identified throughout the gene. Furthermore, we identified a family where a homozygous mutation in HOGA1 (p.P190L) segregated in two siblings with an additional AGXT mutation (p.D201E). The two girls exhibiting triallelic inheritance presented a more severe phenotype than their only mildly affected p.P190L homozygous father. In silico analysis of five mutations reveals that HOGA1 deficiency is causing type III, yet reduced HOGA1 expression or aberrant subcellular protein targeting is unlikely to be the responsible pathomechanism. Our results strongly suggest HOGA1 as a major cause of PH, indicate a greater genetic heterogeneity of hyperoxaluria, and point to a favorable outcome of type III in the context of PH despite incomplete or absent biochemical remission. Multiallelic inheritance could have implications for genetic testing strategies and might represent an unrecognized mechanism for phenotype variability in PH.

  10. Mutational analysis of AGXT in two Chinese families with primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease of glyoxylate metabolism caused by a defect in the liver-specific peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) that leads to hyperoxaluria, recurrent urolithiasis, and nephrocalcinosis. Methods Two unrelated patients with recurrent urolithiasis, along with members of their families, exhibited mutations in the AGXT gene by PCR direct sequencing. Results Two heterozygous mutations that predict truncated proteins, p.S81X and p.S275delinsRAfs, were identified in one patient. The p.S81X mutation is novel. Two heterozygous missense mutations, p.M1T and p.I202N, were detected in another patient but were not identified in her sibling. These four mutations were confirmed to be of paternal and maternal origin. Conclusions These are the first cases of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 to be diagnosed by clinical manifestations and AGXT gene mutations in mainland China. The novel p.S81X and p.I202N mutations detected in our study extend the spectrum of known AGXT gene mutations. PMID:24934730

  11. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Prognostic implication of human papillomavirus types and species in cervical cancer patients undergoing primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yat Ming; Cheung, Tak Hong; Yeo, Winnie; Mo, Frankie; Yu, Mei Yung; Lee, Kun Min; Ho, Wendy C S; Yeung, Apple C M; Law, Priscilla T Y; Chan, Paul K S

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types are associated with cervical cancer. It is well established that individual HPV types vary in oncogenicity, but current data on their prognostic implication remain controversial. We examined the association between HPV types/species and the survival of 236 Chinese women aged 26-87 (mean 54.4) years after receiving primary treatment for cervical cancer. Overall, 45.8% were of FIGO stage I, 41.9% stage II, and 12.3% stage III. The four most prevalent types found were HPV-16 (60.2%), HPV-18 (21.6%), HPV-52 (11.9%), and HPV-58 (9.3%). Overall, 19.5% of patients had multiple-type infections, 78.4% harboured one or more alpha-9 species, and 28.8% harboured one or more alpha-7 species. After a median follow-up of 8.0 years, 156 (66.1%) patients survived. The 3-year overall survival rate was 75.5%. Factors independently associated with a poorer 3-year overall survival were age >60 years, tumour size >4 cm, lymph node involvement and treatment with radiotherapy+/-chemotherapy. Univariate analysis showed HPV-16 single-type infection was associated with a marginally poorer disease-specific survival (71.6% vs. 87.0%, HR: 1.71, 95% CI = 1.01-2.90), whereas non-HPV-16 alpha-9 species was associated with a better disease-specific survival (90.0% vs. 76.2%, HR: 0.36, 95% CI = 0.16-0.79). However, on multivariate analysis, HPV infection status irrespective of different grouping methods, including individual types, species, single-type or co-infection, did not carry any significant prognostic significance. In conclusion, we did not observe any association between infection with a particular HPV type/species and survival. An HPV type-based stratification in treatment and follow-up plan could not be recommended.

  13. Shared decision making for patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-centered diabetes care requires shared decision making (SDM). Decision aids promote SDM, but their efficacy in nonacademic and rural primary care clinics is unclear. Methods We cluster-randomized 10 practices in a concealed fashion to implement either a decision aid (DA) about starting statins or one about choosing antihyperglycemic agents. Each practice served as a control group for another practice implementing the other type of DA. From April 2011 to July 2012, 103 (DA=53) patients with type 2 diabetes participated in the trial. We used patient and clinician surveys administered after the clinical encounter to collect decisional outcomes (patient knowledge and comfort with decision making, patient and clinician satisfaction). Medical records provided data on metabolic control. Pharmacy fill profiles provided data for estimating adherence to therapy. Results Compared to usual care, patients receiving the DA were more likely to report discussing medications (77% vs. 45%, p<.001), were more likely to answer knowledge questions correctly (risk reduction with statins 61% vs. 33%, p=.07; knowledge about options 57% vs. 33%, p=.002) and were more engaged by their clinicians in decision making (50. vs. 28, difference 21.4 (95% CI 6.4, 36.3), p=.01). We found no significant impact on patient satisfaction, medication starts, adherence or clinical outcomes, in part due to limited statistical power. Conclusion DAs improved decisional outcomes without significant effect on clinical outcomes. DAs designed for point-of-care use with type 2 diabetes patients promoted shared decision making in nonacademic and rural primary care practices. Trial Registration NCT01029288 PMID:23927490

  14. Porcine Head Response to Blast

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2 = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  15. Dry media blasting with wheat starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry

    1995-04-01

    The brand name TECHNOSTRIP covers several types of installations and facilities. These were developed mainly to meet the requirements of customers in the aeronautic field. The range of products includes: complete self-supporting and semi-automated system for aircraft stripping; large-size blasting booth for semi-automatic stripping; manual blasting booth; and sealed and portable manual stripping head. Wheat starch media was developed for particle blasting stripping and is used in TECHNOSTRIP. This paper reviews its origins and use as well as use of automated facilities, reliability, effects on materials, effects on environment, and utilization examples.

  16. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  17. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  18. Experimental Animal Models for Studies on the Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Risling, Mårten; Davidsson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    A blast injury is a complex type of physical trauma resulting from the detonation of explosive compounds and has become an important issue due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IED) in current military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major concern in contemporary military medicine and includes a variety of injuries that range from mild to lethal. Extreme forces and their complex propagation characterize BINT. Modern body protection and the development of armored military vehicles can be assumed to have changed the outcome of BINT. Primary blast injuries are caused by overpressure waves whereas secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries can have more varied origins such as the impact of fragments, abnormal movements, or heat. The characteristics of the blast wave can be assumed to be significantly different in open field detonations compared to explosions in a confined space, such an armored vehicle. Important parameters include peak pressure, duration, and shape of the pulse. Reflections from walls and armor can make the prediction of effects in individual cases very complex. Epidemiological data do not contain information of the comparative importance of the different blast mechanisms. It is therefore important to generate data in carefully designed animal models. Such models can be selective reproductions of a primary blast, penetrating injuries from fragments, acceleration movements, or combinations of such mechanisms. It is of crucial importance that the physical parameters of the employed models are well characterized so that the experiments can be reproduced in different laboratory settings. Ideally, pressure recordings should be calibrated by using the same equipment in several laboratories. With carefully designed models and thoroughly evaluated animal data it should be possible to achieve a translation of data between animal and clinical data. Imaging and computer simulation represent a possible link between experiments

  19. Experimental animal models for studies on the mechanisms of blast-induced neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Risling, Mårten; Davidsson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    A blast injury is a complex type of physical trauma resulting from the detonation of explosive compounds and has become an important issue due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IED) in current military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major concern in contemporary military medicine and includes a variety of injuries that range from mild to lethal. Extreme forces and their complex propagation characterize BINT. Modern body protection and the development of armored military vehicles can be assumed to have changed the outcome of BINT. Primary blast injuries are caused by overpressure waves whereas secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries can have more varied origins such as the impact of fragments, abnormal movements, or heat. The characteristics of the blast wave can be assumed to be significantly different in open field detonations compared to explosions in a confined space, such an armored vehicle. Important parameters include peak pressure, duration, and shape of the pulse. Reflections from walls and armor can make the prediction of effects in individual cases very complex. Epidemiological data do not contain information of the comparative importance of the different blast mechanisms. It is therefore important to generate data in carefully designed animal models. Such models can be selective reproductions of a primary blast, penetrating injuries from fragments, acceleration movements, or combinations of such mechanisms. It is of crucial importance that the physical parameters of the employed models are well characterized so that the experiments can be reproduced in different laboratory settings. Ideally, pressure recordings should be calibrated by using the same equipment in several laboratories. With carefully designed models and thoroughly evaluated animal data it should be possible to achieve a translation of data between animal and clinical data. Imaging and computer simulation represent a possible link between experiments

  20. HCMV Displays a Unique Transcriptome of Immunomodulatory Genes in Primary Monocyte-Derived Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Ellen; Thys, Kim; Tuefferd, Marianne; Van Hove, Carl; Aerssens, Jeroen; Van Loock, Marnix

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a betaherpesvirus which rarely presents problems in healthy individuals, yet may result in severe morbidity in immunocompromised patients and in immune-naïve neonates. HCMV has a large 235 kb genome with a coding capacity of at least 165 open reading frames (ORFs). This large genome allows complex gene regulation resulting in different sets of transcripts during lytic and latent infection. While latent virus mainly resides within monocytes and CD34+ progenitor cells, reactivation to lytic infection is driven by differentiation towards terminally differentiated myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages. Consequently, it has been suggested that macrophages and dendritic cells contribute to viral spread in vivo. Thus far only limited knowledge is available on the expression of HCMV genes in terminally differentiated myeloid primary cells and whether or not the virus exhibits a different set of lytic genes in primary cells compared with lytic infection in NHDF fibroblasts. To address these questions, we used Illumina next generation sequencing to determine the HCMV transcriptome in macrophages and dendritic cells during lytic infection and compared it to the transcriptome in NHDF fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate unique expression profiles in macrophages and dendritic cells which significantly differ from the transcriptome in fibroblasts mainly by modulating the expression of viral transcripts involved in immune modulation, cell tropism and viral spread. In a head to head comparison between macrophages and dendritic cells, we observed that factors involved in viral spread and virion composition are differentially regulated suggesting that the plasticity of the virion facilitates the infection of surrounding cells. Taken together, this study provides the full transcript expression analysis of lytic HCMV genes in monocyte-derived type 1 and type 2 macrophages as well as in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Thereby underlining the potential

  1. Anaemia and type 2 diabetes: implications from a retrospectively studied primary care case series.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Xr; Li, Y C; Chan, S L; Chan, K H

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. To identify the prevalence of anaemia in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients managed in a primary care setting and to explore its associations with cardiovascular complications and kidney disease. DESIGN. Retrospective case series study. SETTING. General Out-patient Clinic of Hospital Authority, Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Chinese type 2 diabetic patients who had annual assessments between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2011 were recruited. Their complete blood picture, serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (calculated by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease method), haemoglobin A1c, and urine albumin-creatinine ratio were retrieved. Anaemia was defined as a haemoglobin level of <130 g/L in men and <120 g/L in women (World Health Organization criteria). Student's t test and analysis of variance were used to analyse continuous variables and the Chi squared test for categorical data. Pearson's correlation coefficient and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine associations between haemoglobin level and different variables including age, gender, serum creatinine level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and urine albumin-creatinine ratio. All statistical tests were two-sided, and a P value of <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS. Among 6325 Chinese type 2 diabetic patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 1441 were found to have anaemia with a period prevalence of 22.8%. The prevalence of anaemia increased significantly with deterioration of renal function. Compared with diabetic patients with normal haemoglobin levels, anaemic diabetic patients had a higher co-morbidity rate for stroke, ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease (P<0.001). Independent predictors for haemoglobin level among diabetic patients were age, gender, serum creatinine level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, haemoglobin A1c, and urine albumin-creatinine ratio (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that male gender, old age

  2. Anti-diabetic medications and risk of primary liver cancer in persons with type II diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hagberg, K W; McGlynn, K A; Sahasrabuddhe, V V; Jick, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type II diabetes increases liver cancer risk but the risk may be mitigated by anti-diabetic medications. However, choice of medications is correlated with diabetes duration and severity, leading to confounding by indication. Methods: To address this association, we conducted a nested case–control study among persons with type II diabetes in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cases had primary liver cancer and controls were matched on age, sex, practice, calendar time, and number of years in the database. Exposure was classified by type and combination of anti-diabetic prescribed and compared to non-use. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results: In 305 cases of liver cancer and 1151 controls, there was no association between liver cancer and anti-diabetic medication use compared to non-use (OR=0.74 (95% CI=0.45–1.20) for metformin-only, 1.10 (95% CI=0.66–1.84) for other oral hypoglycaemic (OH)-only, 0.89 (95% CI=0.58–1.37) for metformin+other OH, 1.11 (95% CI=0.60–2.05) for metformin+insulin, 0.81 (95% CI=0.23–2.85) for other OH+insulin, and 0.72 (95% CI=0.18–2.84) for insulin-only). Stratification by duration of diabetes did not alter the results. Conclusions: Use of any anti-diabetic medications in patients with type II diabetes was not associated with liver cancer, though there was a suggestion of a small protective effect for metformin. PMID:25093492

  3. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A.; Vegge, Christina S.; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages. PMID:25585385

  4. Development and characterization of an open-ended shock tube for the study of blast mtbi.

    PubMed

    Shah Ms, Alok S; Stemper Phd, Brian D; Pintar Phd, Frank A

    2012-01-01

    Shock tubes can be used to study traumatic brain injuries due to blast waves in a laboratory setting without the use of explosives. A literature review shows that several shock tubes used in these type of studies are large in size and have a high cost of conducting tests and maintaining the device. The purpose of this study was to design and characterize small shock tubes to simulate open field blast waves, which can be used in a laboratory with limited space and has low cost of operation. In addition, the shock tube can be used to induce localized blast in a small region to study the injury mechanisms in the desired region. Furthermore, the animal is placed outside of the shock tube, which provides the ability to expose the animal to a pure primary blast wave. A helium-driven shock tube with driven length of 3.04 m and driver length of 0.30 m was used in the present study. Transducers were placed at multiple locations and distances to characterize the blast wave outside the shock tube. The versatile design of the shock tube can generate a wide range of peak overpressure, rise times and durations. The shock tube was able to generate peak overpressure ranging from 25 kPa to 508 kPa and positive durations ranging from 97 µs to 797 µs. The literature review also showed several studies where the data were collected and analyzed improperly. The under-sampling or improper filtering can significantly affect the data. Additionally, the orientation of the transducer with respect to the shock wave can also affect the recorded peak overpressure. This paper reports various peak overpressures, durations and rise-times that can be developed with a small open-ended shock tube and the methodology to properly collect and analyze blast wave data generated by the shock tube. PMID:22846311

  5. Relationship between orientation to a blast and pressure wave propagation inside the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Watanabe, Tomas; Adeeb, Saleena; Lankasky, Jason; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M

    2011-01-30

    Exposure to a blast wave generated during an explosion may result in brain damage and related neurological impairments. Several mechanisms by which the primary blast wave can damage the brain have been proposed, including: (1) a direct effect of the shock wave on the brain causing tissue damage by skull flexure and propagation of stress and shear forces; and (2) an indirect transfer of kinetic energy from the blast, through large blood vessels and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to the central nervous system. To address a basic question related to the mechanisms of blast brain injury, pressure was measured inside the brains of rats exposed to a low level of blast (~35kPa), while positioned in three different orientations with respect to the primary blast wave; head facing blast, right side exposed to blast and head facing away from blast. Data show different patterns and durations of the pressure traces inside the brain, depending on the rat orientation to blast. Frontal exposures (head facing blast) resulted in pressure traces of higher amplitude and longer duration, suggesting direct transmission and reflection of the pressure inside the brain (dynamic pressure transfer). The pattern of the pressure wave inside the brain in the head facing away from blast exposures assumes contribution of the static pressure, similar to hydrodynamic pressure to the pressure wave inside the brain. PMID:21129403

  6. Comparison of Some Blast Vibration Predictors for Blasting in Underground Drifts and Some Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, Vaibhab Pramod; Dey, Kaushik

    2016-04-01

    Drilling and blasting are the most economical excavation techniques in underground drifts driven through hard rock formation. Burn cut is the most popular drill pattern, used in this case, to achieve longer advance per blast round. The ground vibration generated due to the propagation of blast waves on the detonation of explosive during blasting is the principal cause for structural and rock damage. Thus, ground vibration is a point of concern for the blasting engineers. The ground vibration from a blast is measured using a seismograph placed at the blast monitoring station. The measured vibrations, in terms of peak particle velocity, are related to the maximum charge detonated at one instant and the distance of seismograph from the blast point. The ground vibrations from a number of blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances are monitored. A number of scaling factors of these dependencies (viz. Distance and maximum charge/delay) have been proposed by different researchers, namely, square root, cube root, CMRI, Langefors and Kihlstrom, Ghosh-Daemon, Indian standard etc. Scaling factors of desired type are computed for all the measured blast rounds. Regression analysis is carried out between the scaling factors and peak particle velocities to establish the coefficients of the vibration predictor equation. Then, the developed predictor equation is used for designing the blast henceforth. Director General of Mine Safety, India, specified that ground vibrations from eight to ten blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances should be monitored to develop a predictor equation; however, there is no guideline about the type of scaling factor to be used. Further to this, from the statistical point of view, a regression analysis on a small sample population cannot be accepted without the testing of hypothesis. To show the importance of the above, in this paper, seven scaling factors are considered for blast data set of a hard-rock underground drift using burn

  7. Cell-Type-Specific Cytokinin Distribution within the Arabidopsis Primary Root Apex[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Antoniadi, Ioanna; Plačková, Lenka; Simonovik, Biljana; Doležal, Karel; Turnbull, Colin; Ljung, Karin; Novák, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) play a crucial role in many physiological and developmental processes at the levels of individual plant components (cells, tissues, and organs) and by coordinating activities across these parts. High-resolution measurements of intracellular CKs in different plant tissues can therefore provide insights into their metabolism and mode of action. Here, we applied fluorescence-activated cell sorting of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked cell types, combined with solid-phase microextraction and an ultra-high-sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) method for analysis of CK biosynthesis and homeostasis at cellular resolution. This method was validated by series of control experiments, establishing that protoplast isolation and cell sorting procedures did not greatly alter endogenous CK levels. The MS-based method facilitated the quantification of all the well known CK isoprenoid metabolites in four different transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing GFP in specific cell populations within the primary root apex. Our results revealed the presence of a CK gradient within the Arabidopsis root tip, with a concentration maximum in the lateral root cap, columella, columella initials, and quiescent center cells. This distribution, when compared with previously published auxin gradients, implies that the well known antagonistic interactions between the two hormone groups are cell type specific. PMID:26152699

  8. The management of type 1 diabetes in primary school: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marks, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Crisp, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in childhood. The introduction of intensive insulin therapy and the rising prevalence of diabetes in younger children has increased the need for involvement of diabetes educators and school personnel in school diabetes care. School encompasses a significant proportion of a child's day, therefore diabetes treatment at school needs to be optimal or the child will have poor metabolic control. The aim of this literature review is to examine diabetes management in the early primary school setting. The main areas of diabetes management explored are: type, provision, and location of treatment, the impact on the child, and the role of the credentialed diabetes educator. The review identifies that the majority of children are not receiving intensive diabetes treatment at school. Younger children require more assistance with care and may be disadvantaged due to lack of appropriate school staff support. Most schools do not have nurses to assist with diabetes care, therefore teaching and administration staff are utilized. The use of insulin pump therapy may increase access to insulin at school, as children and teaching staff appear more confident with this method of delivery than injections. Treatment is frequently performed away from the classroom and can impact on class attendance, metabolic control, and emergencies. Diabetes educators need to work in collaboration with children, parents, and school personnel to ensure diabetes care is fully integrated into the school day. PMID:23597278

  9. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Primary Care Quality Among Type 2 Diabetes Patients, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruwei; Shi, Leiyu; Liang, Hailun; Haile, Geraldine Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Racial and ethnic disparities exist in diabetes prevalence, access to diabetes care, diabetes-related complications and mortality rates, and the quality of diabetes care among Americans. We explored racial and ethnic disparities in primary care quality among Americans with type 2 diabetes. Methods We analyzed data on adults with type 2 diabetes derived from the household component of the 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Multiple regression and multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine the association between race/ethnicity and primary care attributes related to first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination, and clusters of confounding factors were added sequentially. Results Preliminary findings indicated differences in primary care quality between racial/ethnic minorities and whites across measures of first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. After controlling for confounding factors, these differences were no longer apparent; all racial/ethnic categories showed similar rates of primary care quality according to the 4 primary care domains of interest in the study. Conclusion Results indicate equitable primary care quality for type 2 diabetes patients across 4 key domains of primary care after controlling for socioeconomic characteristics. Additional research is necessary to support these findings, particularly when considering smaller racial/ethnic groups and investigating outcomes related to diabetes. PMID:27490365

  10. Multifactorial control and treatment intensity of type-2 diabetes in primary care settings in Catalonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many studies on diabetes have demonstrated that an intensive control of glycaemia and the main associated risk factors (hypertension, dislipidaemia, obesity and smoking) reduce cardiovascular morbi-mortality. Different scientific societies have proposed a multifactorial approach to type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to identify the degree of control of glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and of cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients, using the GedapS 2004 guidelines, and to analyse the type and intensity of drug treatment. Methods This cross-sectional, multicentre, epidemiological study was conducted in a primary care setting in Vallès Occidental South, Catalonia. Data were collected of 393 patients aged 18 and above who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2. Biodemographic and clinical data, cardiovascular risk factors, associated cardiovascular disease, and treatment were assessed. Descriptive and multivariable analysis with logistic regression was realized. Results A total of 392 patients with a mean age of 66.8 years (SD = 10.6) (45.4% male patients) were analyzed. The duration of diabetes was 8.4 years (SD = 7.6). The degree of multifactorial control of risk factors was only 2.6%, although in more than 50% individual cardiovascular risk factor was controlled, except for LDL cholesterol (40.6%) and systolic blood pressure (29.6%). Furthermore, only 13.0% of subjects had an optimal BMI, 27.5% an optimal waist circumference. Treatment for diabetes was prescribed in 82.7% of patients, for hypertension 70.7%, for dyslipidaemia 47.2% and 40.1% were taking antiplatelets. Conclusion Over 50% of type 2 diabetic patients presented optimal control of the majority of individual cardiovascular risk factors, although the degree of multifactorial control of diabetes was insufficient (2.6%) and should be improved. Drug treatment can be intensified using a larger number of combinations, particularly in patients with target organ

  11. Serotyping of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates from diverse geographic locations by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zolla-Pazner, S; O'Leary, J; Burda, S; Gorny, M K; Kim, M; Mascola, J; McCutchan, F

    1995-01-01

    The immunologic relatedness of the various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clades was determined with 13 human anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to six immunogenic regions of the HIV-1 structural proteins. The immunoreactivity of the native, oligomeric viral envelope glycoproteins expressed on the surfaces of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected in vitro with primary isolates from clades A through E was determined by flow cytometry. Some epitopes in the immunodominant region of gp41 and the C terminus of gp120 appear to be HIV-1 group specific in that they are expressed on the surfaces of cells in cultures infected with the majority of viruses tested from clades A to E. Epitopes within the V3 region appear to be clade restricted. Surprisingly, one MAb to an epitope in the C terminus of gp120 was entirely clade B specific. Staining with anti-V2 and anti-CD4 binding domain (CD4bd) reagents was infrequently detected. Anti-CD4bd MAbs stained only CD4-negative T cells because the CD4bd of gp120 appeared to be complexed with membrane CD4. When present, the epitopes of V2 and the CD4bd appeared to be expressed on cells infected with various clades. Thus, the results suggest that MAbs to gp41, the C terminus, and the V3 loop of gp120 are most useful in serotyping primary isolates of HIV-1, providing group-specific, clade-restricted, and clade-specific reagents. The use of the immunofluorescent method with the reagents described herein distinguishes infection with clade B from that with all other HIV-1 clades. With additional MAbs, this technique will allow a broadly applicable, reproducible, and practical method for serotyping HIV-1. PMID:7745728

  12. Computer modeling of thoracic response to blast.

    PubMed

    Stuhmiller, J H; Chuong, C J; Phillips, Y Y; Dodd, K T

    1988-01-01

    Primary blast injury affects the gas-containing structures of the body. Damage to the lungs with resultant respiratory insufficiency and arterial embolization of air from alveolar pulmonary venous fistulae is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality following high-level blast exposure. In an effort to generate a widely applicable damage-risk criterion for thoracic injury from blast we are developing a complex computer finite element model (FEM) of the thorax. Taking an engineering approach, a horizontal cross-section of the thorax is divided into small discrete units (finite elements) of homogeneous structure. The necessary physical properties (density, bulk modulus, etc.) are then determined for each element. Specifying the material constants and geometry of the elements, the computer can load the surface of the structure with some force-time function (blast pressure-time history) and calculate the resultant physical events such as displacement, compression, stress, strain, etc. Computer predictions of pressure wave phenomena in the lung parenchyma are compared with trans-bronchially measured pressures in blast-exposed animals. The model should prove useful in assessing the risk of blast injury in diverse overpressure environments and may give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms and strategies for protection.

  13. Transient changes in neuronal cell membrane permeability after blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Wang, Ying; Long, Joseph B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2012-04-18

    The biochemical mechanisms of explosive blast-induced traumatic brain injury and the subsequent long-term neurobehavioral abnormalities are still not completely understood. We studied the biochemical mechanism of blast traumatic brain injury using our recently reported in-vitro model system with a shock tube. Primary blast exposure of in-vitro models leads to neurobiological changes in an overpressure dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Lactate dehydrogenase was released significantly into the extracellular medium without cell death after blast exposure, indicating compromised cell membrane integrity. We further explored the integrity of cell membrane after blast exposure by fluorescent dye uptake/release techniques in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Our data indicate that blast exposure leads to an overpressure-dependent transient increase in the release of preloaded calcein AM into the culture medium with proportional intracellular decrease. Uptake of an extracellular nucleic acid-binding dye TO-PRO-3 iodide was also increased significantly after blast exposure, indicating that the increased molecular transport is bidirectional and nuclear membrane integrity is also affected by blast exposure. These results suggest that blast exposure perturbs the integrity of the neuronal cell membrane, leading to increased bidirectional transport of molecules--a potential mechanism that can lead to traumatic brain injury.

  14. Rock blasting environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Agreda, C.

    1995-12-31

    The rock blasting environmental impacts such as: flyrock, ground vibrations, air-blast, and/or noise, dust and fumes are identified and mentioned. Some comments on the correction factors that might be taken into consideration to calculate the initial velocity and the maximum projection of the rock fragments are mentioned as well. The blast fumes causes, its alleviation and protective measures are identified, described and discussed. To mitigate, minimize and/or avoid blast fumes, the AN/FO, Al/AN/FO and S/AN/FO dry blasting agents optimum equations are developed, discussed and recommended.

  15. Modern BLAST Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Zhang, Louxin

    The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is arguably the most widely used program in bioinformatics. By sacrificing sensitivity for speed, it makes sequence comparison practical on huge sequence databases currently available. The original version of BLAST was developed in 1990. Since then it has spawned a variant of specialized programs. This chapter surveys the development of BLAST and BLAST-like programs for homology search, discusses alignment statistics that are used in assessment of reported matches in BLAST, and provides the reader with guidance to select appropriate programs and set proper parameters to match research requirements.

  16. A novel mutation in the AGXT gene causing primary hyperoxaluria type I: genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    M'Dimegh, Saoussen; Aquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; Omezzine, Asma; M'Barek, Ibtihel; Souche, Geneviéve; Zellama, Dorsaf; Abidi, Kamel; Achour, Abdelattif; Gargah, Tahar; Abroug, Saoussen; Bouslama, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by inherited mutations in the AGXT gene encoding liver peroxisomal alanine : glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which is deficient or mistargeted to mitochondria. PH1 shows considerable phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. The incidence and severity of PH1 varies in different geographic regions. DNA samples of the affected members from two unrelated Tunisian families were tested by amplifying and sequencing each of the AGXT exons and intron-exon junctions. We identified a novel frameshift mutation in the AGXT gene, the c.406_410dupACTGC resulting in a truncated protein (p.Gln137Hisfs*19). It is found in homozygous state in two nonconsanguineous unrelated families from Tunisia. These molecular findings provide genotype/phenotype correlations in the intrafamilial phenotypic and permit accurate carrier detection, and prenatal diagnosis. The novel p.Gln137Hisfs*19 mutation detected in our study extend the spectrum of known AGXT gene mutations in Tunisia. PMID:27659337

  17. The Effect of Sleep Quality on the Development of Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has important effects on physical and mental health, and sleep disorders are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between sleep duration or sleep quality and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The FACTS (FAmily CohorT Study in primary care) was established to investigate the relations between familial environment and health which was conducted at 22 family medicine outpatient clinics in general hospitals. Total 563 patients without diabetes who received ≥1 year follow-up examination were included in the analysis. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to determine sleep quality, and a score of ≥5 was considered to define poor sleep quality. Patients taking oral hypoglycemic agents, having a fasting glucose level of >126 mg/dL, or diagnosed with diabetes by physicians were classified as having diabetes. The median follow-up period was 2.5 years. Poor sleep quality was associated with a higher risk of diabetes after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, income, physical activity, and family history of diabetes (relative risk=2.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-6.78). As a risk factor for the development of diabetes, poor sleep quality may independently increase the incidence of diabetes. PMID:26839478

  18. Augmentation of virus secretion by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein is cell type independent and occurs in cultured human primary macrophages and lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, U; Clouse, K A; Strebel, K

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific Vpu protein is a small integral membrane phosphoprotein that induces degradation of the virus receptor CD4 in the endoplasmic reticulum and, independently, increases the release of progeny virions from infected cells. To address the importance of Vpu for virus replication in primary human cells such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), we used three different sets of monocyte-tropic molecular clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: a primary isolate, AD8+, and two chimeric variants of the T-cell-tropic isolate NL4-3 carrying the env determinants of either AD8+ or SF162 monocyte-tropic primary isolates. Isogenic variants of these chimeric viruses were constructed to express either wild-type Vpu or various mutants of Vpu. The effects of these mutations in the vpu gene on virus particle secretion from infected MDM or PBMC were assessed by determination of the release of virion-associated reverse transcriptase into culture supernatants, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of pelleted virions, and steady-state or pulse-chase metabolic labeling. Wild-type Vpu increased virus release four- to sixfold in MDM and two- to threefold in PBMC, while nonphosphorylated Vpu and a C-terminal truncation mutant of Vpu were partially active on virus release in primary cells. These results demonstrate that Vpu regulates virus release in primary lymphocyte and macrophage cultures in a similar manner and to a similar extent to those previously observed in HeLa cells or CD4+ T-cell lines. Thus, our findings provide evidence that Vpu functions in a variety of human cells, both primary cells and continuous cell lines, and mutations in Vpu affect its biological activity independent of the cell type and virus isolate used. PMID:7494279

  19. Modelling human eye under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Esposito, L; Clemente, C; Bonora, N; Rossi, T

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast injury (PBI) is the general term that refers to injuries resulting from the mere interaction of a blast wave with the body. Although few instances of primary ocular blast injury, without a concomitant secondary blast injury from debris, are documented, some experimental studies demonstrate its occurrence. In order to investigate PBI to the eye, a finite element model of the human eye using simple constitutive models was developed. The material parameters were calibrated by a multi-objective optimisation performed on available eye impact test data. The behaviour of the human eye and the dynamics of mechanisms occurring under PBI loading conditions were modelled. For the generation of the blast waves, different combinations of explosive (trinitrotoluene) mass charge and distance from the eye were analysed. An interpretation of the resulting pressure, based on the propagation and reflection of the waves inside the eye bulb and orbit, is proposed. The peculiar geometry of the bony orbit (similar to a frustum cone) can induce a resonance cavity effect and generate a pressure standing wave potentially hurtful for eye tissues.

  20. Modelling human eye under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Esposito, L; Clemente, C; Bonora, N; Rossi, T

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast injury (PBI) is the general term that refers to injuries resulting from the mere interaction of a blast wave with the body. Although few instances of primary ocular blast injury, without a concomitant secondary blast injury from debris, are documented, some experimental studies demonstrate its occurrence. In order to investigate PBI to the eye, a finite element model of the human eye using simple constitutive models was developed. The material parameters were calibrated by a multi-objective optimisation performed on available eye impact test data. The behaviour of the human eye and the dynamics of mechanisms occurring under PBI loading conditions were modelled. For the generation of the blast waves, different combinations of explosive (trinitrotoluene) mass charge and distance from the eye were analysed. An interpretation of the resulting pressure, based on the propagation and reflection of the waves inside the eye bulb and orbit, is proposed. The peculiar geometry of the bony orbit (similar to a frustum cone) can induce a resonance cavity effect and generate a pressure standing wave potentially hurtful for eye tissues. PMID:23521031

  1. An immunohistochemical and serum ELISA study of type I and III procollagen aminopropeptides in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B. H.; Madri, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    By means of ELISA methodology, the aminopropeptides of Type I and Type III procollagen were measured in the serum of a group of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The corresponding liver biopsies were graded blindly for degrees of fibrosis and inflammation. When available, paraffin-embedded liver specimens underwent immunoperoxidase staining for mature Type I and III collagen as well as the aminopropeptides of Type I and III procollagen. Regardless of the degree of fibrosis or inflammation, serum levels of the aminopropeptide of Type I remained within normal limits. In contrast, serum levels of the aminopropeptide of Type III procollagen were elevated uniformly. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the aminopropeptide of Type III procollagen persists extracellularly. This finding may explain the previously reported relationship between levels of inflammation and serum levels of the Type III aminopropeptide. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3303951

  2. Neuron Types in the Presumptive Primary Somatosensory Cortex of the Florida Manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Laura D; Stimpson, Cheryl D; Gupta, Kanika; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Hof, Patrick R; Reep, Roger L; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-01-01

    Within afrotherians, sirenians are unusual due to their aquatic lifestyle, large body size and relatively large lissencephalic brain. However, little is known about the neuron type distributions of the cerebral cortex in sirenians within the context of other afrotherians and aquatic mammals. The present study investigated two cortical regions, dorsolateral cortex area 1 (DL1) and cluster cortex area 2 (CL2), in the presumptive primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to characterize cyto- and chemoarchitecture. The mean neuron density for both cortical regions was 35,617 neurons/mm(3) and fell within the 95% prediction intervals relative to brain mass based on a reference group of afrotherians and xenarthrans. Densities of inhibitory interneuron subtypes labeled against calcium-binding proteins and neuropeptide Y were relatively low compared to afrotherians and xenarthrans and also formed a small percentage of the overall population of inhibitory interneurons as revealed by GAD67 immunoreactivity. Nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein-immunoreactive (NPNFP-ir) neurons comprised a mean of 60% of neurons in layer V across DL1 and CL2. DL1 contained a higher percentage of NPNFP-ir neurons than CL2, although CL2 had a higher variety of morphological types. The mean percentage of NPNFP-ir neurons in the two regions of the presumptive S1 were low compared to other afrotherians and xenarthrans but were within the 95% prediction intervals relative to brain mass, and their morphologies were comparable to those found in other afrotherians and xenarthrans. Although this specific pattern of neuron types and densities sets the manatee apart from other afrotherians and xenarthrans, the manatee isocortex does not appear to be explicitly adapted for an aquatic habitat. Many of the features that are shared between manatees and cetaceans are also shared with a diverse array of terrestrial mammals and likely represent highly conserved

  3. Neuron Types in the Presumptive Primary Somatosensory Cortex of the Florida Manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Laura D; Stimpson, Cheryl D; Gupta, Kanika; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Hof, Patrick R; Reep, Roger L; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-01-01

    Within afrotherians, sirenians are unusual due to their aquatic lifestyle, large body size and relatively large lissencephalic brain. However, little is known about the neuron type distributions of the cerebral cortex in sirenians within the context of other afrotherians and aquatic mammals. The present study investigated two cortical regions, dorsolateral cortex area 1 (DL1) and cluster cortex area 2 (CL2), in the presumptive primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to characterize cyto- and chemoarchitecture. The mean neuron density for both cortical regions was 35,617 neurons/mm(3) and fell within the 95% prediction intervals relative to brain mass based on a reference group of afrotherians and xenarthrans. Densities of inhibitory interneuron subtypes labeled against calcium-binding proteins and neuropeptide Y were relatively low compared to afrotherians and xenarthrans and also formed a small percentage of the overall population of inhibitory interneurons as revealed by GAD67 immunoreactivity. Nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein-immunoreactive (NPNFP-ir) neurons comprised a mean of 60% of neurons in layer V across DL1 and CL2. DL1 contained a higher percentage of NPNFP-ir neurons than CL2, although CL2 had a higher variety of morphological types. The mean percentage of NPNFP-ir neurons in the two regions of the presumptive S1 were low compared to other afrotherians and xenarthrans but were within the 95% prediction intervals relative to brain mass, and their morphologies were comparable to those found in other afrotherians and xenarthrans. Although this specific pattern of neuron types and densities sets the manatee apart from other afrotherians and xenarthrans, the manatee isocortex does not appear to be explicitly adapted for an aquatic habitat. Many of the features that are shared between manatees and cetaceans are also shared with a diverse array of terrestrial mammals and likely represent highly conserved

  4. Effects of variable blast pressures on blood flow and oxygen saturation in rat brain as evidenced using MRI.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia; Vandevord, Pamela; Shen, Yimin; Raza, Waqar; Haacke, E Mark

    2012-05-01

    It has been recognized that primary blast waves may result in neurotrauma in soldiers in theater. A new type of contrast used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), has been developed that is based on the different susceptibility levels in diverse tissues and can detect decreases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) using inferred oxygen saturation changes in tissue. In addition, a continuous arterial spin-labeled (ASL) MRI sequence was used as a direct measure of regional CBF within the brain tissue. Animals were subjected to whole-body blast exposures of various overpressures within a gas-driven shock tube. When exposed to low levels of overpressure, most rats demonstrated no obvious changes between pre- and postexposure in the conventional MR images. CBF changes measured by SWI and ASL were significantly higher for the overpressure exposed groups as compared to the sham group and tended to increase with pressure increases at the highest two pressures. In the hippocampus, all blast animals had a reduction in the CBF consistently in the range of 0-27%. In summary, low levels of primary blast pressure exposure demonstrated a significant physiologic effect to the brain up to 72 h postexposure. PMID:22285875

  5. Blast assessment and optimization for high quarry face-blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, F.; O`Meara, R.

    1996-12-01

    Where applicable, high production benches can improve efficiency in quarrying. Quality control, geological, cost or other considerations might result in the development of quarry benches higher than 30 m and sometimes up to 60 m. Production blasts on high quarry faces require a confident blast design with respect to safety, cost efficiency and minimized environmental effects. Careful pre-blast assessment of the design parameters, blast monitoring of the product performance and the environmental effects and post-blast assessment of the overall blast performance are essential for the successful implementation of the blast design. The blast geometry for high quarry faces and a blast design that often includes multiple explosive charges in a blasthole, make a reliable assessment of the blast parameters difficult. Assessment techniques, their applications and limitations are described and discussed. This will include such methods as blast surveying using laser profiling and borehole deviation measurements, blast monitoring using continuous velocity of detonation measurement systems, high speed photography and seismographs for blast performance and environmental effects. Observations of low frequency airblast and high standard deviations in ground vibration measurements are described and discussed against a background of timing assessment and frequency spectra analysis. Approaches where an optimized design was implemented based on the blast parameter assessment and modeling are presented. An improvement in blast efficiency lies in the combination of blast assessment and blast modeling, whilst adequate documentation supports the process of designing and implementing successful blasts.

  6. Type III interferons are expressed by Coxsackievirus-infected human primary hepatocytes and regulate hepatocyte permissiveness to infection

    PubMed Central

    Lind, K; Svedin, E; Utorova, R; Stone, V M; Flodström-Tullberg, M

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis is a common and potentially fatal manifestation of severe Coxsackievirus infections, particularly in newborn children. Little is known of the immune-mediated mechanisms regulating permissiveness to liver infection. It is well established that type I interferons (IFNs) play an important role in the host innate immune response to Coxsackievirus infections. Recent studies have highlighted a role for another IFN family, the type III IFNs (also called IFN-λ), in anti-viral defence. Whether type III IFNs are produced by hepatocytes during a Coxsackievirus infection remains unknown. Moreover, whether or not type III IFNs protects hepatocytes from a Coxsackievirus infection has not been addressed. In this study, we show that primary human hepatocytes respond to a Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection by up-regulating the expression of type III IFNs. We also demonstrate that type III IFNs induce an anti-viral state in hepatocytes characterized by the up-regulated expression of IFN-stimulated genes, including IFN-stimulated gene (ISG15), 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2), protein kinase regulated by dsRNA (PKR) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1). Furthermore, our study reveals that type III IFNs attenuate CVB3 replication both in hepatocyte cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. Our studies suggest that human hepatocytes express type III IFNs in response to a Coxsackievirus infection and highlight a novel role for type III IFNs in regulating hepatocyte permissiveness to this clinically relevant type of virus. PMID:24773058

  7. Dynamic Modelling of Fault Slip Induced by Stress Waves due to Stope Production Blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainoki, Atsushi; Mitri, Hani S.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic events can take place due to the interaction of stress waves induced by stope production blasts with faults located in close proximity to stopes. The occurrence of such seismic events needs to be controlled to ensure the safety of the mine operators and the underground mine workings. This paper presents the results of a dynamic numerical modelling study of fault slip induced by stress waves resulting from stope production blasts. First, the calibration of a numerical model having a single blast hole is performed using a charge weight scaling law to determine blast pressure and damping coefficient of the rockmass. Subsequently, a numerical model of a typical Canadian metal mine encompassing a fault parallel to a tabular ore deposit is constructed, and the simulation of stope extraction sequence is carried out with static analyses until the fault exhibits slip burst conditions. At that point, the dynamic analysis begins by applying the calibrated blast pressure to the stope wall in the form of velocities generated by the blast holes. It is shown from the results obtained from the dynamic analysis that the stress waves reflected on the fault create a drop of normal stresses acting on the fault, which produces a reduction in shear stresses while resulting in fault slip. The influence of blast sequences on the behaviour of the fault is also examined assuming several types of blast sequences. Comparison of the blast sequence simulation results indicates that performing simultaneous blasts symmetrically induces the same level of seismic events as separate blasts, although seismic energy is more rapidly released when blasts are performed symmetrically. On the other hand when nine blast holes are blasted simultaneously, a large seismic event is induced, compared to the other two blasts. It is concluded that the separate blasts might be employed under the adopted geological conditions. The developed methodology and procedure to arrive at an ideal blast sequence can

  8. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity in rats bearing human adenovirus type 12-induced primary retinoblastoma-like tumor in the eye.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Mukai, N; Solish, S P

    1981-01-01

    Using an animal model of retinoblastoma in inbred rats and cultured human adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells (RAO 188), complement-dependent cytotoxicity was determined by measuring release of 3H-uridine labelled RNA. Sera from rats in which tumors did not grow after adenovirus type 12 inoculation had higher cytotoxicity against RAO 188 cells than sera from rats bearing primary adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor. These results showed that the rat which could raise antibodies against adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells did not allow the tumor growth in the eye after virus inoculation.

  9. Divergence in Forest-Type Response to Climate and Weather: Evidence for Regional Links Between Forest-Type Evenness and Net Primary Productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradford, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change is altering long-term climatic conditions and increasing the magnitude of weather fluctuations. Assessing the consequences of these changes for terrestrial ecosystems requires understanding how different vegetation types respond to climate and weather. This study examined 20 years of regional-scale remotely sensed net primary productivity (NPP) in forests of the northern Lake States to identify how the relationship between NPP and climate or weather differ among forest types, and if NPP patterns are influenced by landscape-scale evenness of forest-type abundance. These results underscore the positive relationship between temperature and NPP. Importantly, these results indicate significant differences among broadly defined forest types in response to both climate and weather. Essentially all weather variables that were strongly related to annual NPP displayed significant differences among forest types, suggesting complementarity in response to environmental fluctuations. In addition, this study found that forest-type evenness (within 8 ?? 8 km2 areas) is positively related to long-term NPP mean and negatively related to NPP variability, suggesting that NPP in pixels with greater forest-type evenness is both higher and more stable through time. This is landscape- to subcontinental-scale evidence of a relationship between primary productivity and one measure of biological diversity. These results imply that anthropogenic or natural processes that influence the proportional abundance of forest types within landscapes may influence long-term productivity patterns. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA).

  10. SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

    2005-05-01

    The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

  11. 4-Hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate Aldolase Inactivity in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 3 and Glyoxylate Reductase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Travis J.; Knight, John; Murray, Michael S.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Holmes, Ross P.; Lowther, W. Todd

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding for 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate aldolase (HOGA) are associated with an excessive production of oxalate in Primary Hyperoxaluria type 3 (PH3). This enzyme is the final step of the hydroxyproline degradation pathway within the mitochondria and catalyzes the cleavage of 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate (HOG) to pyruvate and glyoxylate. No analyses have been performed to assess the consequences of the mutations identified, particularly for those variants that produce either full-length or nearly full-length proteins. In this study, the expression, stability, and activity of nine PH3 human HOGA variants were examined. Using recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli as well as transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, it was found that all nine PH3 variants are quite unstable, have a tendency to aggregate, and retain no measurable activity. A buildup of HOG was confirmed in the urine, sera and liver samples from PH3 patients. To determine how HOG is cleaved in the absence of HOGA activity, the ability of N-acetylneuraminate aldolase (NAL) to cleave HOG was evaluated. NAL showed minimal activity towards HOG. Whether the expected buildup of HOG in mitochondria could inhibit glyoxylate reductase (GR), the enzyme mutated in PH2, was also evaluated. GR was inhibited by HOG but not by 2-hydroxyglutarate or 2-oxoglutarate. Thus, one hypothetical component of the molecular basis for the excessive oxalate production in PH3 appears to be the inhibition of GR by HOG, resulting in a phenotype similar to PH2. PMID:22771891

  12. [What type of hypofractionated radiotherapy of primary tumours in palliative care?].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Charissoux, M; Boisselier, P; Ducteil, A; Azria, D

    2015-10-01

    Palliative radiation therapy is well-known in the setting of metastatic lesions (haemostatic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory aims, etc.). Palliative primary tumour radiotherapy is less studied. Here we propose a review of palliative indications of primary tumours, the most studied in the literature, and their radiotherapy modalities (target volumes and fractionation).

  13. Primary cilium - antenna-like structure on the surface of most mammalian cell types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, J.; Sitorova, V.; Hadzi Nikolov, D.; Mokry, J.; Richter, I.; Kasaova, L.; Filip, S.; Ryska, A.; Petera, J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary cilium is a sensory solitary non-motile microtubule-based organelle protruding in the quiescent phase of the cell cycle from the surface of the majority of human cells, including embryonic cells, stem cells and stromal cells of malignant tumors. The presence of a primary cilium on the surface of a cell is transient, limited to the quiescent G1(G0) phase and the beginning of the S phase of the cell cycle. The primary cilium is formed from the mother centriole. Primary cilia are key coordinators of signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis and, when deffective, they are a major cause of human diseases and developmental disorders, now commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Most cancer cells do not possess a primary cilium. The loss of the primary cilium is a regular feature of neoplastic transformation in the majority of solid tumors. The primary cilium could serve as a tumor suppressor organelle. The aim of this paper was to provide a review of the current knowledge of the primary cilium.

  14. Waveform analysis in mitigation of blast-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldas, G. G. U.; Ecevitoglu, B.

    2008-10-01

    To mitigate the blast-induced ground vibrations, we proposed a new methodology quite different from conventional methods which do not take into account the mechanics of seismic waves. Contrary to conventional methods, the proposed methodology does not consider any blast-parameters such as explosive types and amounts, blast-geometry, blast-hole design, hole-depth/diameter, etc., except time-delays. The methodology aims to employ the most suitable time-delays among blast-hole groupings to minimize destructive interference of the surface waves at the location of blast-induced vibrations. The crucial point of the proposed methodology is the use of a pilot-blast signal which takes account of the seismic properties of all complex geology between the blast and the target locations. Therefore, it does not require any geological model or assumption. The methodology has been implemented at a Turkish Coal Company's Lignite Mine. Blasting induced ground vibrations at this mine could be minimized to a ratio of 1/8.

  15. Differential expression of collagen types I and III in consequential and primary fibrosis in irradiated mouse colon

    SciTech Connect

    Followill, D.S.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    These studies were undertaken to understand further the pathogenesis of consequential and primary fibrosis in mouse colon after irradiation. The distal 2.5 cm of colon of C3Hf/Kam mice was irradiated with either a single dose of 27 Gy or a split dose of 2 x 14.75 Gy separated by 10 days to induce a consequential or primary fibrotic lesion, respectively. The amount of total collagen in the two lesions was quantified by hydroxyproline, and tensile strength, an assay of tissue rigidity, was measured as a function of dose and time after irradiation. The relative distribution of collagen types I, III and IV in the colon was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Collagen types I, III and IV were quantified by immunoblot techniques, and in situ hybridization was used to identify and score the cells producing procollagen mRNA types I and III as a function of time after irradiation. The hydroxyproline and tensile strength measurements demonstrated that both lesions contained significantly increased amounts of collagen compared to controls. However, the ulcerated lesion of consequential fibrosis contained three times as much collagen and required a three- to fourfold increase in the peak force to rupture the colon as did the non-ulcerative lesion of primary fibrosis. The fibrosis accompanying the consequential lesion contained elevated levels of both collagen types I and III, but primary fibrosis contained only elevated levels of type I collagen compared to controls. The in situ hybridization studies showed cells producing increased amounts of procollagen mRNA 8 and 25 weeks before the elevated levels of collagen were detected for consequential and primary fibrosis, respectively. The cells producing the excess collagen mRNA were identified as fibroblasts. No distinction between the two lesions could be made based on the cell types producing the collagen. 48 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Paint removal using wheat starch blast media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry; Oestreich, John

    1993-03-01

    A review of the Wheat Starch Blasting technology is presented. Laboratory evaluations covering Almen Arc testing on bare 2024-T3 aluminum and magnesium, as well as crack detection on 7075-T6 bare aluminum, are discussed. Comparisons with Type V plastic media show lower residual stresses are achieved on aluminum and magnesium with wheat starch media. Dry blasting effects on the detection of cracks confirms better crack visibility with wheat starch media versus Type V or Type II plastic media. Testing of wheat starch media in several composite test programs, including fiberglass, Kevlar, and graphite-epoxy composites, showed no fiber damage. Process developments and production experience at the first U.S. aircraft stripping facility are also reviewed. Corporate and regional aircraft are being stripped in this three nozzle dry blast hanger.

  17. Progression of bone lesions in a child with primary hyperoxaluria type 1: evaluation by roentgenology and MRI.

    PubMed

    Vichi, G F; Bongini, U; Seracini, D; Lavoratti, G C

    1995-11-01

    We report the radiological and MRI findings of bone oxalosis and their rapid and extensive progression in a child with primary hyperoxaluria (PH) type 1. We emphasize the spectrum of skeletal changes and their differences from renal osteodystrophy and the role played by imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of oxalosis. PMID:8577496

  18. Toxicology of blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M

    1997-07-25

    Blast overpressure (BOP) or high energy impulse noise, is the sharp instantaneous rise in ambient atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation or firing of weapons. Blasts that were once confined to military and to a lesser extent, occupational settings, are becoming more universal as the civilian population is now increasingly at risk of exposure to BOP from terrorist bombings that are occurring worldwide with greater frequency. Exposure to incident BOP waves can cause auditory and non-auditory damage. The primary targets for BOP damage are the hollow organs, ear, lung and gastrointestinal tract. In addition, solid organs such as heart, spleen and brain can also be injured upon exposure. However, the lung is more sensitive to damage and its injury can lead to death. The pathophysiological responses, and mortality have been extensively studied, but little attention, was given to the biochemical manifestations, and molecular mechanism(s) of injury. The injury from BOP has been, generally, attributed to its external physical impact on the body causing internal mechanical damage. However, a new hypothesis has been proposed based on experiments conducted in the Department of Respiratory Research, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and later in the Department of Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh. This hypothesis suggests that subtle biochemical changes namely, free radical-mediated oxidative stress occur and contribute to BOP-induced injury. Understanding the etiology of these changes may shed new light on the molecular mechanism(s) of injury, and can potentially offer new strategies for treatment. In this symposium. BOP research involving auditory, non-auditory, physiological, pathological, behavioral, and biochemical manifestations as well as predictive modeling and current treatment modalities of BOP-induced injury are discussed.

  19. Toxicology of blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M

    1997-07-25

    Blast overpressure (BOP) or high energy impulse noise, is the sharp instantaneous rise in ambient atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation or firing of weapons. Blasts that were once confined to military and to a lesser extent, occupational settings, are becoming more universal as the civilian population is now increasingly at risk of exposure to BOP from terrorist bombings that are occurring worldwide with greater frequency. Exposure to incident BOP waves can cause auditory and non-auditory damage. The primary targets for BOP damage are the hollow organs, ear, lung and gastrointestinal tract. In addition, solid organs such as heart, spleen and brain can also be injured upon exposure. However, the lung is more sensitive to damage and its injury can lead to death. The pathophysiological responses, and mortality have been extensively studied, but little attention, was given to the biochemical manifestations, and molecular mechanism(s) of injury. The injury from BOP has been, generally, attributed to its external physical impact on the body causing internal mechanical damage. However, a new hypothesis has been proposed based on experiments conducted in the Department of Respiratory Research, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and later in the Department of Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh. This hypothesis suggests that subtle biochemical changes namely, free radical-mediated oxidative stress occur and contribute to BOP-induced injury. Understanding the etiology of these changes may shed new light on the molecular mechanism(s) of injury, and can potentially offer new strategies for treatment. In this symposium. BOP research involving auditory, non-auditory, physiological, pathological, behavioral, and biochemical manifestations as well as predictive modeling and current treatment modalities of BOP-induced injury are discussed. PMID:9217311

  20. Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

  1. Experimental modeling of explosive blast-related traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Alley, Matthew D; Schimizze, Benjamin R; Son, Steven F

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to a conclusion that primary blast effects may potentially contribute significantly to the occurrence of military associated TBI. PMID:20580931

  2. Dry ice blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  3. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Martina; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit. PMID:25996248

  4. Blast furnace stove control

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Hansen, G.A.; Howse, J.W.; Cagliostro, D.J.; Chaubal, P.C.

    1998-12-31

    This paper outlines the process model and model-based control techniques implemented on the hot blast stoves for the No. 7 Blast Furnace at the Inland Steel facility in East Chicago, Indiana. A detailed heat transfer model of the stoves is developed. It is then used as part of a predictive control scheme to determine the minimum amount of fuel necessary to achieve the blast air requirements. The controller also considers maximum and minimum temperature constraints within the stove.

  5. Blast related neurotrauma: a review of cellular injury.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; VandeVord, Pamela J; Dal Cengio, Alessandra Leonardi; Bir, Cynthia; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2008-09-01

    Historically, blast overpressure is known to affect primarily gas-containing organs such as the lung and ear. More recent interests focus on its ability to cause damage to solid organs such as the brain, resulting in neurological disorders. Returning veterans exposed to blast but without external injuries are being diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury (Warden 2006) and with cortical dysfunction (Cernak et al 1999). Decades of studies have been conducted to elucidate the effects of primary blast wave on the central nervous system. These studies were mostly concerned with systemic effects (Saljo et al 2000-2003; Kaur et al 1995-1997, 1999; Cernak et al 1996, 2001). The molecular mechanism of blast-induced neurotrauma is still poorly understood. This paper reviews studies related to primary blast injury to the nervous system, particularly at the cellular level. It starts with a general discussion of primary blast injury and blast wave physics, followed by a review of the literature related to 1) the blast wave/body interaction, 2) injuries to the peripheral nervous system, 3) injuries to the central nervous system, and 4) injury criteria. Finally, some of our preliminary data on cellular injury from in vitro and in vivo studies are presented. Specifically, we report on the effects of overpressure on astrocytes. In the discussion, possible mechanisms of blast-related brain injury are discussed, as well as the concerns and limitations of the published studies. A clearer understanding of the injury mechanisms at both the molecular and macroscopic (organ) level will lead to the development of new treatment, diagnosis and preventive measures. PMID:18751525

  6. Persistence and Fitness of Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Acquired in Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Bluma G.; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Petrella, Marco; Moisi, Daniela; Oliveira, Maureen; Detorio, Mervi; Spira, Bonnie; Essabag, Vidal; Conway, Brian; Lalonde, Richard; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the persistence and fitness of multidrug-resistant (MDR) viruses acquired during primary human immunodeficiency virus infection (PHI). In four individuals, MDR infections persisted over the entire study period, ranging from 36 weeks to 5 years, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. In stark contrast, identified source partners in two cases showed expected outgrowth of wild-type (WT) virus within 12 weeks of treatment interruption. In the first PHI case, triple-class MDR resulted in low plasma viremia (1.6 to 3 log copies/ml) over time compared with mean values obtained for an untreated PHI group harboring WT infections (4.1 to 4.3 log copies/ml). Increasing viremia in PHI patient 1 at week 52 was associated with the de novo emergence of a protease inhibitor-resistant variant through a recombination event involving the original MDR virus. MDR infections in two other untreated PHI patients yielded viremia levels typical of the untreated WT group. A fourth patient's MDR infection yielded low viremia (<50 to 500 copies/ml) for 5 years despite his having phenotypic resistance to all antiretroviral drugs in his treatment regimen. In two of these PHI cases, a rebound to higher levels of plasma viremia only occurred when the M184V mutation in reverse transcriptase could no longer be detected and, in a third case, nondetection of M184V was associated with an inability to isolate virus. To further evaluate the fitness of MDR variants acquired in PHI, MDR and corresponding WT viruses were isolated from index and source partners, respectively. Although MDR viral infectivity (50% tissue culture infective dose) was comparable to that observed for WT viruses, MDR infections in each case demonstrated 2-fold and 13- to 23-fold reductions in p24 antigen and reverse transcriptase enzymatic activity, respectively. In dual-infection competition assays, MDR viruses consistently demonstrated a marked replicative disadvantage compared with WT virus. These results

  7. Surgical treatment of double primary liver cancer: An observational study for a rare type of tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Aijun; Ma, Senlin; Pawlik, Timothy; Wu, Bin; Yang, Xiaoyu; Cui, Longjiu; Wu, Mengchao

    2016-08-01

    Double primary liver cancer (DPLC) is a special type of clinical situation. As such, a detailed analysis of the surgical management and prognosis of patients with DPLC is lacking. The objective of the current study was to define the management and outcome of patients undergoing surgery for DPLC at a major hepatobiliary center.A total of 87 patients treated by surgical resection at the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital from January 1st, 2007 to October 31st, 2013 who had DPLC demonstrated by final pathological diagnosis were identified. Among these, 50 patients had complete clinical and prognostic data. Demographic and tumor characteristics as well as the prognosis were analyzed.The proportion of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (+) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) (+), HBsAg (+), and HBeAg (-) hepatocirrhosis in all patients was 21.84%, 67.82%, and 63.22%, respectively. Incidental findings accounted for 58.62% of patients; among those who had symptoms, the main symptom was abdominal pain (31.03%). Nonanatomic wedge resection was the main operative approach (62.07%). Postoperatively, the main complications included seroperitoneum (11.49%), hypoproteinemia (10.34%), and pleural effusion (8.05%). Factors associated with disease-free survival (DFS) included intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) tumor size (P = 0.002) and use of postoperative prophylactic transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) treatment (P = 0.015). Meanwhile, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) size (P = 0.045), ICC size (P < 0.001), and liver function (including aspartate aminotransferase [P = 0.001] and r-glutamyl transferase [P < 0.001]) were associated with overall survival (OS).Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatitis or cirrhosis is also an important factor in the pathogenesis of DPLC and surgical treatment is safe for it with low complication rates. In addition, it is effective to prolong DFS that DPLC patients undergo postoperative prophylactic TACE

  8. Laboratory Blast Testing Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needham, C.; Rule, G.

    Blast-induced injuries remain a critical problem facing US Forces during combat operations. As the nature of modern warfare has evolved, it is likely that the Improvised Explosive Device (IED) will remain a common battlefield threat for the foreseeable future. Thus, research devoted to improving protection, and characterizing the physiological response of people and equipment to blast exposure is and will remain a major thrust area for the DOD. Unfortunately, exact reproduction or simulation of the blast environment is technically challenging, while measuring and characterizing blast exposures is even more complex.

  9. A Multi-Mode Shock Tube for Investigation of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reneer, Dexter V.; Hisel, Richard D.; Hoffman, Joshua M.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Lusk, Braden T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave

  10. A multi-mode shock tube for investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reneer, Dexter V; Hisel, Richard D; Hoffman, Joshua M; Kryscio, Richard J; Lusk, Braden T; Geddes, James W

    2011-01-01

    Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave components

  11. Blasting response of the Eiffel Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlyck, Lachlan; Hayes, Kieran; Caetano, Ryan; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    A finite element model of the Eiffel Tower was constructed using Strand7 software. The model replicates the existing tower, with dimensions justified through the use of original design drawings. A static and dynamic analysis was conducted to determine the actions of the tower under permanent, imposed and wind loadings, as well as under blast pressure loads and earthquake loads due to an explosion. It was observed that the tower utilises the full axial capacity of individual members by acting as a `truss of trusses'. As such, permanent and imposed loads are efficiently transferred to the primary columns through compression, while wind loads induce tensile forces in the windward legs and compressive forces in the leeward. Under blast loading, the tower experienced both ground vibrations and blast pressures. Ground vibrations induced a negligibly small earthquake loading into the structure which was ignored in subsequent analyses. The blast pressure was significant, and a dynamic analysis of this revealed that further research is required into the damping qualities of the structure due to soil and mechanical properties. In the worst case scenario, the blast was assumed to completely destroy several members in the adjacent leg. Despite this weakened condition, it was observed that the tower would still be able to sustain static loads, at least for enough time for occupant evacuation. Further, an optimised design revealed the structure was structurally sound under a 46% reduction of the metal tower's mass.

  12. [Are the injuries caused by the "water bombs" dropped by the Canadair airplane blast injuries?].

    PubMed

    Savić, J

    1991-01-01

    During the forest fire extinguishing in summer using the fire-fighting amphibia (the Canadair) seven soldiers were injured by the "water bomb" dropped from the amphibia and two soldiers died. The way of injury occurrence as well as type and nature of injuries, imposed the question to the author: could it be a case of blast injuries, especially of primary blast injuries? Except for pure scientific reasons, a positive answer could have a practical importance both in regulation of work of persons engaged in fire combat on the ground during extinguishing of fire by the amphibia as well as for physician's work with those exposed to water impact from the plane and who could be eventually injured. Defining any mechanical injuries as transmission of the corresponding kinetic energy, the author considers that the mechanism of injury occurrence of the internal organs caused by the impact of the "water bomb" from the amphibia is the transmission of the energy impact wave into the body. The author has concluded that the impact of the "water bomb" dropped from the fire fighting amphibia can cause changes in the internal organs which are characteristic of primary blast injury. It is proposed that persons exposed to impact even in the absence of visible changes should be subjected to otorhinolaryngologic, and, in special cases, to pulmonary examinations.

  13. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-06-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit.Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in

  14. General view of blast furnace plant, with blast furnace "A" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of blast furnace plant, with blast furnace "A" (built in 1907) to the left; in the foreground is the turbo-blower and blast furnace gas-powered electric generating station (built in 1919), looking northwest - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Blast Furnace "A", Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  15. Rural-to-Urban Migrants' Experiences with Primary Care under Different Types of Medical Institutions in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jiazhi; Shi, Leiyu; Zou, Xia; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objectives China is facing the unprecedented challenge of rapidly increasing rural-to-urban migration. Migrants are in a vulnerable state when they attempt to access to primary care services. This study was designed to explore rural-to-urban migrants’ experiences in primary care, comparing their quality of primary care experiences under different types of medical institutions in Guangzhou, China. Methods The study employed a cross-sectional survey of 736 rural-to-urban migrants in Guangzhou, China in 2014. A validated Chinese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool—Adult Short Version (PCAT-AS), representing 10 primary care domains was used to collect information on migrants’ quality of primary care experiences. These domains include first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), ongoing care, coordination (referrals), coordination (information systems), comprehensiveness (services available), comprehensiveness (services provided), family-centeredness, community orientation and culturally competent. These measures were used to assess the quality of primary care performance as reported from patients’ perspective. Analysis of covariance was conducted for comparison on PCAT scores among migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals, municipal hospitals, community health centers/community health stations, and township health centers/rural health stations. Multiple linear regression models were used to explore factors associated with PCAT total scores. Results After adjustments were made, migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals (25.49) reported the highest PCAT total scores, followed by municipal hospitals (25.02), community health centers/community health stations (24.24), and township health centers/rural health stations (24.18). Tertiary hospital users reported significantly better performance in first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), coordination (information system), comprehensiveness (service

  16. Determining optimal surface roughness of TiO(2) blasted titanium implant material for attachment, proliferation and differentiation of cells derived from human mandibular alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, K; Wennerberg, A; Wroblewski, J; Hultenby, K; Lopez, B S; Arvidson, K

    2001-10-01

    In the complex process of bone formation at the implant-tissue interface, implant surface roughness is an important factor modulating osteoblastic function. In this study, primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells, derived from human mandibular bone, were used. The aim was to examine the effect of varying surface roughness of titanium implant material on cellular attachment, proliferation and differentiation. A recognized method of increasing surface roughness and enlarging the surface area of titanium implants is by blasting with titanium dioxide particles: the four specimen types in the study comprised surfaces which were machine-turned only, or blasted after turning, with 63-90 microm, 106-180 microm, or 180-300 microm TiO(2) particles, respectively. The specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning. The turned samples had the smoothest surfaces: average height deviation (S(a)) of 0.20 microm. The roughest were those blasted with 180-300 microm particles, S(a) value 1.38 microm. Blasting with intermediate particle sizes yielded S(a) values of 0.72 microm and 1.30 microm, respectively. Cell profile areas were measured using a semiautomatic interactive image analyzer. Figures were expressed as percentage of attachment. DNA synthesis was estimated by measuring the amount of [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into trichloroacetic acid (TCA) insoluble cell precipitates. The specific activity of alkaline phosphatase was assayed using p-nitrophenylphosphate as a substrate. The ability of the cells to synthesize osteocalcin was investigated in serum-free culture medium using the ELSA-OST-NAT immunoradiometric kit. After 3 h of culture, the percentage of cellular attachment did not differ significantly between specimens blasted with 180-300 micromparticles and the turned specimens. All blasted surfaces showed significantly higher [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation than the turned surfaces (P<0.05), with the highest on the surfaces blasted

  17. Primary bone natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type without EBV infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chen; Wang, Yafei; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2015-01-01

    Primary bone NK/T cell lymphoma is very rare. We report a case of 52-year-old man of primary bone NK/T cell lymphoma and then progressed to NK leukemia. The patient had low-grade fever for 4-month, and Ultrasonic B revealed a diffuse hepatosplenomegaly without lymphadenopathy. PET scanning showed increased FDG uptake in many bones of the whole body. The diagnosis was established by bone specimen. These neoplastic cells demonstrated a typical immunophenotype of CD56, CD3, CD2 and MPO positive, and CD5, CD20, CD30, PAX-5, CD4 and CD8 negative. Primary bone ENKTL is very rare; it should be made with the combination of clinical feature, PET-CT image, and pathological characteristics, and should be distinguished from other lymphomas or leukemia involved in bone. PMID:26823813

  18. Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia: a novel GNAS mutation in a Brazilian boy presenting with an early primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cresio; Sampaio, Silvana; Barbieri, Anna Maria; Mantovani, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia) is a rare disease characterized by an elevated parathyroid hormone due to the resistance to its action in target tissues. We report a new GNAS mutation causing PHP Ia and an atypical early-onset primary hypothyroidism. A 3-year-old boy was diagnosed with obesity, delayed pyschomotor development, and round face. The laboratory evaluation at the age of 1 year showed primary hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, elevated alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone. These data led to the diagnosis of PHP Ia. Molecular analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in GNAS exon 1 (TCG→CGC, Cys3→Arg) in both the child and his mother. Although previously reported cases described delayed subclinical hypothyroidism as the more common thyroid abnormality, we report a not previously described GNAS mutation associated with an atypical early-onset primary hypothyroidism. These observations broaden the clinical spectrum of PHP Ia and its associated mutations. PMID:23412865

  19. Syncytium induction in primary CD4+ T-cell lines from normal donors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates with non-syncytium-inducing genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, B J; Kedar, P; Pope, J H

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates classified as syncytium-inducing (SI) or non-SI (NSI) in the MT-2 T-cell line exhibit characteristic sequence differences in the V1-V2 and V3 regions of the env gene. Seven HIV-1 isolates were phenotyped as NSI or SI in the MT-2 cell line. Unexpectedly, all four NSI viruses induced large syncytia 4 to 8 days postinoculation in a panel of five primary CD4+ T-cell lines (including two clones) generated from the peripheral blood of normal donors by exposure to infectious HIV-1, inactivated HIV-1, or Epstein-Barr virus. The primary T-cell lines yielded neither HIV-1 provirus nor infectious HIV by PCR analysis or exhaustive coculture with phytohemagglutinin-treated blast cells. Three isolates (TC354, PK1, and PK2) were biologically cloned and retained their SI or NSI phenotypes in MT-2 and primary T-cell lines. The biologically cloned provirus DNA was also used to clone and sequence the relevant V2 and V3 regions of the env genes. The amino acid sequences of the V2 and V3 regions were characteristic of patterns already reported for the NSI, switch NSI, and SI phenotypes, respectively. This evidence precludes the possibility that these results were due to contamination of the NSI isolates with SI virus. The results unequivocally indicate that HIV-1 isolates with the NSI genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells may actively induce syncytia in cloned CD4+ T cells in vitro and support the view that direct cytopathic effects may contribute to the steady decline in CD4+ T cells in asymptomatic HIV-1-seropositive patients without detectable SI virus. PMID:7474129

  20. Foundational dendritic processing that is independent of the cell type-specific structure in model primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C J

    2015-11-16

    It has long been known that primary neurons in the brain and spinal cord exhibit very distinctive dendritic structures. However, it remains unclear whether dendritic processing for signal propagation and channel activation over dendrites is a function of the cell type-specific dendritic structure. By applying an extended analysis of signal attenuation for the physiological distributions of synaptic inputs and active channels on dendritic branches, we first demonstrate that regardless of their specific structure, all anatomically reconstructed models of primary neurons display a similar pattern of directional signal attenuation and locational channel activation over their dendrites. Then, using a novel modeling approach that allows direct comparison of the anatomically reconstructed primary neurons with their reduced models that exclusively retain anatomical dendritic signaling without being associated with structural specificity, we show that the reduced model can accurately predict dendritic excitability of the anatomical model in both passive and active mode. These results indicate that the directional signaling, locational excitability and their relationship are foundational features of dendritic processing that are independent of the cell type-specific structure across primary neurons. PMID:26463670

  1. Two or three primary dose regime for Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Thumburu, Kiran K.; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Jaiswal, Nishant; Agarwal, Amit; Kumar, Ajay; Kaur, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is an important cause of meningitis and pneumonia in children. Despite the availability of Hib conjugate vaccine, many countries are still to implement it in their immunization schedule. Before introducing the vaccine in routine immunization programs, it is important to know not only the cumulative efficacy but also the efficacy of each vaccine dose. The primary objective of this review is to find whether two primary dose schedule of Hib vaccine is equally efficacious as the standard three primary dose schedule. A highly sensitive online search was run using the terms ‘Haemophilus Vaccines’ or ‘Haemophilus influenzae type b’ and ‘conjugate vaccine’, and Medline (Ovid), PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL and Scopus were explored for prospective randomized controlled studies. Data were extracted in a predesigned proforma and analyzed using RevMan software. Nine randomized studies were included in the analysis. Pooled vaccine efficacy using a fixed effects model against confirmed invasive Hib disease following the 3, 2 and 1 primary dose schedule were 82% [95% confidence interval (CI) 73-87], 79% (95% CI 54–90) and 65% (95% CI 23–84), respectively, and the overall efficacy was 80% (95% CI 72–85). To conclude, we found that Hib conjugate vaccine is highly efficacious and that the two dose regime is as good as the three dose regime. [The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42013004490)]. PMID:25984342

  2. Foundational dendritic processing that is independent of the cell type-specific structure in model primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C J

    2015-11-16

    It has long been known that primary neurons in the brain and spinal cord exhibit very distinctive dendritic structures. However, it remains unclear whether dendritic processing for signal propagation and channel activation over dendrites is a function of the cell type-specific dendritic structure. By applying an extended analysis of signal attenuation for the physiological distributions of synaptic inputs and active channels on dendritic branches, we first demonstrate that regardless of their specific structure, all anatomically reconstructed models of primary neurons display a similar pattern of directional signal attenuation and locational channel activation over their dendrites. Then, using a novel modeling approach that allows direct comparison of the anatomically reconstructed primary neurons with their reduced models that exclusively retain anatomical dendritic signaling without being associated with structural specificity, we show that the reduced model can accurately predict dendritic excitability of the anatomical model in both passive and active mode. These results indicate that the directional signaling, locational excitability and their relationship are foundational features of dendritic processing that are independent of the cell type-specific structure across primary neurons.

  3. Topographic maps of brain electrical activity in primary degenerative dementia of the Alzheimer type and multiinfarct dementia.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, M; Gil, P; Jimenez, F; Exposito, F J; Miguel, F; Cacabelos, R; Rubia, F J

    1991-02-01

    The topography of the electroencephalographic (EEG) pattern of ten patients with primary degenerative dementia of the Alzheimer type, ten multiinfarct dementia patients, and ten age-matched controls was compared during three different behavioral conditions: resting condition with eyes open (EO), memorizing a list of words (M), and recalling the same list of words (R). Results indicate that the alpha frequency band does not show significant changes. On the other hand, the theta band could be considered an important factor in the differential diagnosis of the primary degenerative dementia of the Alzheimer type, showing a higher power over right posterior regions in this group of patients compared with the multiinfarct dementia patients under different behavioral conditions.

  4. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  5. Robotic Water Blast Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, M. H.; Roberts, M. L.; Hill, W. E.; Jackson, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Water blasting system under development removes hard, dense, extraneous material from surfaces. High pressure pump forces water at supersonic speed through nozzle manipulated by robot. Impact of water blasts away unwanted material from workpiece rotated on air bearing turntable. Designed for removing thermal-protection material, system is adaptable to such industrial processes as cleaning iron or steel castings.

  6. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples.

  7. Comparison of the microhardness of primary and permanent teeth after immersion in two types of carbonated beverages

    PubMed Central

    Haghgou, Hamid R.; Haghgoo, Roza; Asdollah, Fatemah Molla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The consumption of carbonated beverages is one of the etiological factors that cause dental erosion. The purpose of this research was to compare changes in the microhardness of permanent and primary teeth after immersion in two types of carbonated beverages. Materials and Methods: This investigation was done on 30 healthy permanent molars and 30 healthy primary canines. Each group of primary and permanent teeth was subdivided into three groups of 10 teeth. The teeth was immersed in 40 ml of each of the three beverages for 5 min. One subgroup was immersed in water (as a control). The next was immersed in Lemon Delster and the last subgroup was immersed in Coca-Cola. The microhardness of enamel was measured using the Vickers method before and after immersion. Finally, the data was analyzed by paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and t-test. Results: Microhardness reduction in the primary teeth was significant in both the Lemon Delster and Coca-Cola groups (P < 0.05). This reduction was also statistically significant in the permanent teeth (P < 0.05). A comparison of the enamel changes in the primary teeth with permanent teeth after immersion in both beverages showed a greater microhardness reduction in the primary teeth in both the experimental groups. Conclusions: Coca-Cola and Lemon Delster caused a significant reduction of microhardness in tooth enamel. This reduction was greater in primary teeth than in permanent teeth, and was also greater after immersion in Coca-Cola than after immersion in Lemon Delster. PMID:27583223

  8. Open pit blasting in India

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, D.A.; Garg, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    Open pit blasting in India uses two types of explosives. First there are bulk explosives for wet and dry holes, and there are packaged explosives. The Indian open pit coal mining is projected to use 190 thousand metric tons of explosives in 1995. This volume is projected to grow for the next ten years, whereas the underground coal mining will hold fairly constant. Bulk explosives started in about 1977 with watergels. In the late 1980s, bulk emulsions and heavy ANFOs were introduced. This system is still being expanded and is replacing packaged products in the larger mines. Packaged products are still popular where the annual consumption is less than 2,000 metric tons per year. Also, packaged products are used in small wet shots. Porous ammonium nitrate prill have recently become available but ANFO is not very common because of the high cost of the prill and the wet blasting conditions. As the market expands there will be a continuing demand for packaged products but an increasing demand for bulk waterproof products, particularly in the larger operations. Dynamites are produced at four plants in India. The annual production of about 45,000 metric tons per year is holding fairly constant, but is likely to decrease in the future. The future blasting in India will primarily use pumped emulsions and heavy ANFO on an increasing basis, but the packaged products will maintain their position.

  9. [Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of NK/T-cell nasal type and primary cerebral lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Boros, A; Michot, J-M; Hoang-Xuan, K; Mazeron, R

    2016-10-01

    The head and neck are common sites for extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of low-grade lymphomas, with curative or palliative intent. In the case of high-grade lymphomas, its combination with chemotherapy is debated. Its role is however undeniable in two specific entities: NK/T-cell lymphoma NK/T nasal type, and primary central nervous system lymphomas, which are the subject of this review. PMID:27614517

  10. Blast-induced neurotrauma in whales.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Siri K; Øen, Egil O

    2003-07-01

    A majority of investigations on primary blast injuries have focused on gas-containing organs, while the likelihood of blast-induced neurotrauma remains underrated. In Norway minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) are hunted using small fishing boats rigged with harpoon guns, which fire harpoons tipped with a grenade containing a charge of 30-g penthrite. The grenade detonates 60-70 cm inside the animal. The present study was undertaken to characterize the neuropathological changes caused by the penthrite blast and evaluate its role in the loss of consciousness and death in hunted whales. The study included 37 minke whales that were examined shipboard. The brains were later subjected to gross and light microscopy examination. The results showed that intra-body detonation of the grenade in near vicinity of the brain resulted in trauma similar to severe traumatic brain injury associated with a direct blow to the head. Detonation in more distant areas of the body resulted in injuries resembling acceleration-induced diffuse traumatic brain injury. The authors conclude that even if several vital organs were fatally injured in most whales, the neurotrauma induced by the blast-generated pressure waves were the primary cause for the immediate or very rapid loss of consciousness and death. PMID:12804799

  11. Blast wave energy diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Thomas E; Tierney, Heidi E; Idzorek, George C; Watt, Robert G; Peterson, Robert R; Peterson, Darrell L; Fryer, Christopher L; Lopez, Mike R; Jones, Michael C; Sinars, Daniel; Rochau, Gregory A; Bailey, James E

    2008-10-01

    The distance radiation waves that supersonically propagate in optically thick, diffusive media are energy sensitive. A blast wave can form in a material when the initially diffusive, supersonic radiation wave becomes transonic. Under specific conditions, the blast wave is visible with radiography as a density perturbation. [Peterson et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056901 (2006)] showed that the time-integrated drive energy can be measured using blast wave positions with uncertainties less than 10% at the Z Facility. In some cases, direct measurements of energy loss through diagnostic holes are not possible with bolometric and x-ray radiometric diagnostics. Thus, radiography of high compression blast waves can serve as a complementary technique that provides time-integrated energy loss through apertures. In this paper, we use blast waves to characterize the energy emerging through a 2.4 mm aperture and show experimental results in comparison to simulations. PMID:19044574

  12. Prognostic relevance of HER2/neu in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and induction of NK cell reactivity against primary ALL blasts by trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Schmied, Bastian J.; Dang, Truong-Minh; Mirza, Nora; Möhle, Robert; Kanz, Lothar; Vogel, Wichard; Salih, Helmut R.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor HER2/neu is expressed on various cancers and represents a negative prognostic marker, but is also a target for the therapeutic monoclonal antibody Trastuzumab. In about 30% of cases, HER2/neu is expressed on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells and was proposed to be associated with a deleterious prognosis. Here we evaluated clinical data from 65 ALL patients (HER2/neu+, n = 17; HER2/neu−, n = 48) with a median follow-up of 19.4 months (range 0.6-176.5 months) and observed no association of HER2/neu expression with response to chemotherapy, disease free or overall survival. In vitro, treatment of primary ALL cells (CD20+HER2/neu+, CD20+HER2/neu− and CD20−HER2/neu−) with Rituximab and Trastuzumab led to activation of NK cells in strict dependence of the expression of the respective antigen. NK reactivity was more pronounced with Rituximab as compared to Trastuzumab, and combined application could lead to additive effects in cases where both antigens were expressed. Besides providing evidence that HER2/neu expression is no risk factor in ALL patients, our data demonstrates that HER2/neu can be a promising target for Trastuzumab therapy in the subset of ALL patients with the potential to improve disease outcome. PMID:26887048

  13. Type-1 Collagen differentially alters β-catenin accumulation in primary Dupuytren's Disease cord and adjacent palmar fascia cells

    PubMed Central

    Vi, Linda; Njarlangattil, Anna; Wu, Yan; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David B

    2009-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's Disease (DD) is a debilitating contractile fibrosis of the palmar fascia characterised by excess collagen deposition, contractile myofibroblast development, increased Transforming Growth Factor-β levels and β-catenin accumulation. The aim of this study was to determine if a collagen-enriched environment, similar to in vivo conditions, altered β-catenin accumulation by primary DD cells in the presence or absence of Transforming Growth Factor-β. Methods Primary DD and patient matched, phenotypically normal palmar fascia (PF) cells were cultured in the presence or absence of type-1 collagen and Transforming Growth Factor-β1. β-catenin and α-smooth muscle actin levels were assessed by western immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results DD cells display a rapid depletion of cellular β-catenin not evident in patient-matched PF cells. This effect was not evident in either cell type when cultured in the absence of type-1 collagen. Exogenous addition of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 to DD cells in collagen culture negates the loss of β-catenin accumulation. Transforming Growth Factor-β1-induced α-smooth muscle actin, a marker of myofibroblast differentiation, is attenuated by the inclusion of type-1 collagen in cultures of DD and PF cells. Conclusion Our findings implicate type-1 collagen as a previously unrecognized regulator of β-catenin accumulation and a modifier of TGF-β1 signaling specifically in primary DD cells. These data have implications for current treatment modalities as well as the design of in vitro models for research into the molecular mechanisms of DD. PMID:19545383

  14. Blast trauma: the fourth weapon of mass destruction.

    PubMed

    Born, C T

    2005-01-01

    Injury from blast is becoming more common in the non-military population. This is primarily a result of an increase in politically motivated bombings within the civilian sector. Explosions unrelated to terrorism may also occur in the industrial setting. Civilian physicians and surgeons need to have an understanding of the pathomechanics and physiology of blast injury and to recognize the hallmarks of severity in order to increase survivorship. Because victims may be transported rapidly to the hospital, occult injury to gas and fluid containing organs (particularly the ears, bowel and lungs) may go unrecognized. Information surrounding the physical environment of the explosion (whether inside or outside, underwater, associated building collapse, etc) will prove useful. Most of the immediate deaths are caused by primary blast injury from the primary blast wave, but secondary blast injury from flying debris can also be lethal and involve a much wider radius. Liberal use of X-ray examination in areas of skin punctures will help to identify a need for exploration and/or foreign body removal. Biologic serum markers may have a role in identifying victims of primary blast injury and assist in monitoring their clinical progress. Tertiary blast injury results from the airborne propulsion of the victim by the shockwave and is a source of additional blunt head and torso trauma as well as fractures. Miscellaneous (quaternary) blast injury include thermal or dust inhalation exposure as well as crush and compartment syndromes from building collapse. Any explosion has the potential to be associated with nuclear, biologic or chemical contaminants, and this should remain a consideration for healthcare givers until proven otherwise.

  15. Study on the early warning mechanism for the security of blast furnace hearths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-bo; Huo, Shou-feng; Cheng, Shu-sen

    2013-04-01

    The campaign life of blast furnace (BF) hearths has become the limiting factor for safety and high efficiency production of modern BFs. However, the early warning mechanism of hearth security has not been clear. In this article, based on heat transfer calculations, heat flux and erosion monitoring, the features of heat flux and erosion were analyzed and compared among different types of hearths. The primary detecting elements, mathematical models, evaluating standards, and warning methods were discussed. A novel early warning mechanism with the three-level quantificational standards was proposed for BF hearth security.

  16. A "bicycle-handlebar" type of incision for primary and secondary abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, R; Moraes, M

    1995-01-01

    The authors register a revision of the literature regarding the types of low transversal pubic incisions used in abdominoplasty. Since 1987, the traditional open W-type incision changed to a new type called the bicycle handlebar. In this procedure, the pubic segment remains in a lower line at the level of the pubic hair, while the lateral limbs are in a high position. The anterior superior iliac spine is used as reference. Different types of procedures where the umbilical skin hole reaches the pubic incision are described and illustrated. This procedure is also used in secondary abdominoplasty. In all cases, the incision's new position should remain hidden under a bathing suit. PMID:7484469

  17. BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT TO PRIMARY DENTIN AFTER CUTTING WITH DIFFERENT BUR TYPES AND DENTIN CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Nicoló, Rebeca Di; Shintome, Luciana Keiko; Myaki, Silvio Issáo; Nagayassu, Marcos Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12). In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer – 3M/ESPE) prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5%) and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence. PMID:19089179

  18. Checklist of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) primary types of the Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a brief history of the collection.

    PubMed

    Monné, Miguel A; Monné, Marcela L

    2016-01-01

    A checklist of the Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) primary types deposited in the Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is given. There are 1,044 primary types. Lectotype designation for Megacyllene castroi (Prosen, 1947) is proposed. A brief history of the collection of Cerambycidae of the Museu Nacional is presented.

  19. Checklist of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) primary types of the Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a brief history of the collection.

    PubMed

    Monné, Miguel A; Monné, Marcela L

    2016-01-01

    A checklist of the Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) primary types deposited in the Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is given. There are 1,044 primary types. Lectotype designation for Megacyllene castroi (Prosen, 1947) is proposed. A brief history of the collection of Cerambycidae of the Museu Nacional is presented. PMID:27394892

  20. A new cell line-based neutralization assay for primary HIV type 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Albert, J; Francis, G; Holmes, H; Fenyö, E M

    2002-09-01

    Simple and standardized assays for detection and quantification of neutralizing antibodies to primary HIV-1 isolates are needed in research on HIV-1 vaccines and pathogenesis. Here we describe a new HIV-1 neutralization assay that is based on plaque formation in U87.CD4-CCR5 and U87.CD4-CXCR4 cells, which is an attractive alternative to peripheral blood mononuclear cell-based assays. Infected cells form syncytia, that is, plaques, that can be stained with hematoxylin and enumerated by light microscopy. Neutralization is determined by the ability of a serum to reduce the number of plaque-forming units (PFU) relative to controls exposed to medium or negative serum. The intraassay variation of the plaque-forming unit determinations was tested with 15 serum-virus combinations and showed good reproducibility. The differences ranged from -19 to +27% and had a standard deviation of +/- 9.1%. On the basis of these data the cutoff for neutralization (i.e., plaque reduction) was set to 30% (3.3 standard deviations). Virus titration experiments showed that neutralization results were dependent on virus dose and therefore the neutralization assays should be performed with a virus dose of 10-100 PFU/well. The reproducibility of the new neutralization assay was tested with 4 primary viruses and 9 sera for a total of 20 virus-serum combinations. The mean difference in neutralization (i.e. plaque reduction) determinations performed on different days was as small as 11%. None of 10 Swedish sera and 1 Ugandan plasma pool from HIV-1-uninfected subjects were positive for neutralization, indicating that the assay has high specificity. In summary, the new U87.CD4 cell line-based neutralization assay for primary HIV-1 isolates is a highly reproducible, sensitive, and high-throughput assay that is well suited for large-scale HIV-1 neutralization studies.

  1. Botulinum toxin type A in treatment of bilateral primary axillary hyperhidrosis: randomised, parallel group, double blind, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, M; Lowe, N J

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of bilateral primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Design Multicentre, randomised, parallel group, placebo controlled trial. Setting 17 dermatology and neurology clinics in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Participants Patients aged 18-75 years with bilateral primary axillary hyperhidrosis sufficient to interfere with daily living. 465 were screened, 320 randomised, and 307 completed the study. Interventions Patients received either botulinum toxin type A (Botox) 50 U per axilla or placebo by 10-15 intradermal injections evenly distributed within the hyperhidrotic area of each axilla, defined by Minor's iodine starch test. Main outcome measures Percentage of responders (patients with ⩾50% reduction from baseline of spontaneous axillary sweat production) at four weeks, patients' global assessment of treatment satisfaction score, and adverse events. Results At four weeks, 94% (227) of the botulinum toxin type A group had responded compared with 36% (28) of the placebo group. By week 16, response rates were 82% (198) and 21% (16), respectively. The results for all other measures of efficacy were significantly better in the botulinum toxin group than the placebo group. Significantly higher patient satisfaction was reported in the botulinum toxin type A group than the placebo group (3.3 v 0.8, P<0.001 at 4 weeks). Adverse events were reported by only 27 patients (11%) in the botulinum toxin group and four (5%) in the placebo group (P>0.05). Conclusion Botulinum toxin type A is a safe and effective treatment for primary axillary hyperhidrosis and produces high levels of patient satisfaction. What is already known on this topicPrimary hyperhidrosis is a chronic disorder that can affect any part of the body, especially the axillas, palms, feet, and faceCurrent treatments are often ineffective, short acting, or poorly toleratedWhat this study addsBotulinum toxin type

  2. Adjustment on the Type I Error Rate for a Clinical Trial Monitoring for both Intermediate and Primary Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In many clinical trials, a single endpoint is used to answer the primary question and forms the basis for monitoring the experimental therapy. Many trials are lengthy in duration and investigators are interested in using an intermediate endpoint for an accelerated approval, but will rely on the primary endpoint (such as, overall survival) for the full approval of the drug by the Food and Drug Administration. We have designed a clinical trial where both intermediate (progression-free survival, (PFS)) and primary endpoints (overall survival, (OS)) are used for monitoring the trial so the overall type I error rate is preserved at the pre-specified alpha level of 0.05. A two-stage procedure is used. In the first stage, the Bonferroni correction was used where the global type I error rate was allocated to each of the endpoints. In the next stage, the O’Brien-Fleming approach was used to design the boundary for the interim and final analysis for each endpoint. Data were generated assuming several parametric copulas with exponential marginals. Different degrees of dependence, as measured by Kendall’s τ, between OS and PFS were assumed: 0 (independence) 0.3, 0.5 and 0.70. This approach is applied to an example in a prostate cancer trial. PMID:24466469

  3. Effect of primary culture medium type for culture of canine fibroblasts on production of cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Jin; Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-09-01

    Fibroblasts are common source of donor cells for SCNT. It is suggested that donor cells' microenvironment, including the primary culture, affects development of reconstructed embryos. To prove this, canine embryos were cloned with fibroblasts that were cultured in two different primary media (RCMEp vs. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium [DMEM]) and in vivo developments were compared with relative amount of stemness, reprogramming, apoptosis gene transcripts, and telomerase activity. Donor cells cultured in RCMEp contained a significantly higher amount of SOX2, NANOG, DPPA2, REXO1, HDAC, DNMT1, MECP2 and telomerase activity than those cultured in DMEM (P < 0.05). In vivo developmental potential of cloned embryos with donor cells cultured in RCMEp had a higher birth rate than that of embryos derived from DMEM (P < 0.05). The culture medium can induce changes in gene expression of donor cells and telomerase activity, and these alterations can also affect in vivo developmental competence of the cloned embryos.

  4. Records and Distribution of New World Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Psychodidae, Diptera), With Special Emphasis on Primary Types and Species Diversity.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Leopoldo M; Foley, Desmond H; Pecor, David; Wolkoff, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This article includes the records and distribution of Phlebotomine sand flies (Psychodidae, Diptera) in the New World based on the specimen collections housed in 2 repositories, the US National Museum of Natural History and the Museum of Entomology, Florida State Collection of Arthropods. Approximately 128 species have primary types housed in the 2 repositories, including holotypes (47 species, 3 subspecies), "types" (7 species), allotypes (52 species, 6 subspecies), lectotypes (4 species), paratypes (93 species, 10 subspecies), and neoallotype (1 species), mounted on slides, with a total of 1,107 type slides. For species diversity, collection data from 24 countries in the sand fly database were analyzed according to the number of species present, specimen records, decade of collections, and countries where collections were conducted.

  5. The pathobiology of blast injuries and blast-induced neurotrauma as identified using a new experimental model of injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Cernak, Ibolja; Merkle, Andrew C; Koliatsos, Vassilis E; Bilik, Justin M; Luong, Quang T; Mahota, Theresa M; Xu, Leyan; Slack, Nicole; Windle, David; Ahmed, Farid A

    2011-02-01

    Current experimental models of blast injuries used to study blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) vary widely, which makes the comparison of the experimental results extremely challenging. Most of the blast injury models replicate the ideal Friedländer type of blast wave, without the capability to generate blast signatures with multiple shock fronts and refraction waves as seen in real-life conditions; this significantly reduces their clinical and military relevance. Here, we describe the pathophysiological consequences of graded blast injuries and BINT generated by a newly developed, highly controlled, and reproducible model using a modular, multi-chamber shock tube capable of tailoring pressure wave signatures and reproducing complex shock wave signatures seen in theater. While functional deficits due to blast exposure represent the principal health problem for today's warfighters, the majority of available blast models induces tissue destruction rather than mimic functional deficits. Thus, the main goal of our model is to reliably reproduce long-term neurological impairments caused by blast. Physiological parameters, functional (motor, cognitive, and behavioral) outcomes, and underlying molecular mechanisms involved in inflammation measured in the brain over the 30 day post-blast period showed this model is capable of reproducing major neurological changes of clinical BINT. PMID:21074615

  6. Parameters controlling the sand blasting of substrates for plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Mellali, M.; Grimaud, A.; Fauchais, P.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper was to examine how the grit blasting process influences the surface roughness of different substrates: aluminum alloy, cast iron and hard steel 100C6. Alumina grits of different mean diameters (2, 1.48, 1. 0.5 mm) were chosen. Grit blasting was performed using either a suction type machine or a pressure type machine which were equipped with straight nozzles made of B{sub 4}C (internal diameters of 8 mm) and the influence of the following parameters was studied: sand blasting distance (50 to 200 mm), blasting time (3 to 30 s), angle between nozzle and blasted surface (30, 60, 90{degree}), blasting pressure (from 0.2 to 0.6 MPa). The roughness of the substrates was characterized by using either a perthometer or image analysis. The influence of the grit erosion was studied. The results show that the most influential parameter for the roughness is the grit size. An increase of the pressure increased slightly the Ra but increased drastically the burst of the grit. A blasting time comprised between 3 and 6 s was quite sufficient to obtain the highest roughness and limit the grit burst.

  7. Bridging the Gap of Standardized Animals Models for Blast Neurotrauma: Methodology for Appropriate Experimental Testing.

    PubMed

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Ritzel, David

    2016-01-01

    Recent military combat has heightened awareness to the complexity of blast-related traumatic brain injuries (bTBI). Experiments using animal, cadaver, or biofidelic physical models remain the primary measures to investigate injury biomechanics as well as validate computational simulations, medical diagnostics and therapies, or protection technologies. However, blast injury research has seen a range of irregular and inconsistent experimental methods for simulating blast insults generating results which may be misleading, cannot be cross-correlated between laboratories, or referenced to any standard for exposure. Both the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and the National Institutes of Health have noted that there is a lack of standardized preclinical models of TBI. It is recommended that the blast injury research community converge on a consistent set of experimental procedures and reporting of blast test conditions. This chapter describes the blast conditions which can be recreated within a laboratory setting and methodology for testing in vivo models within the appropriate environment.

  8. M-type Phospholipase A2 Receptor Autoantibodies and Renal Function in Patients with Primary Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hoxha, Elion; Harendza, Sigrid; Pinnschmidt, Hans; Panzer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Loss of renal function in patients with primary membranous nephropathy cannot be reliably predicted by laboratory or clinical markers at the time of diagnosis. M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies have been shown to be associated with changes in proteinuria. Their eventual effect on renal function, however, is unclear. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this prospective, open, multicenter study, the potential role of M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels on the increase of serum creatinine in 118 consecutive patients with membranous nephropathy and positivity for serum M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies was analyzed. Patients were included in the study between April of 2010 and December of 2012 and observed until December of 2013. The clinical end point was defined as an increase of serum creatinine by ≥25% and serum creatinine reaching ≥1.3 mg/dl. Results Patients were divided into tertiles according to their M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibody levels at the time of inclusion in the study: tertile 1 levels=20–86 units/ml (low), tertile 2 levels=87–201 units/ml (medium), and tertile 3 levels ≥202 units/ml (high). The median follow-up time of all patients in the study was 27 months (interquartile range=18–33 months). The clinical end point was reached in 69% of patients with high M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels (tertile 3) but only 25% of patients with low M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels. The average time to reach the study end point was 17.7 months in patients with high M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels and 30.9 months in patients with low M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels—in addition to men and older age—are an independent predictor for progressive loss of renal

  9. Temporal association of cellular immune responses with the initial control of viremia in primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koup, R A; Safrit, J T; Cao, Y; Andrews, C A; McLeod, G; Borkowsky, W; Farthing, C; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    Virologic and immunologic studies were performed on five patients presenting with primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors specific for cells expressing antigens of HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Env were detected at or within 3 weeks of presentation in four of the five patients and were detected in all five patients by 3 to 6 months after presentation. The one patient with an absent initial CTL response had prolonged symptoms, persistent viremia, and low CD4+ T-cell count. Neutralizing antibody activity was absent at the time of presentation in all five patients. These findings suggest that cellular immunity is involved in the initial control of virus replication in primary HIV-1 infection and indicate a role for CTL in protective immunity to HIV-1 in vivo. PMID:8207839

  10. 14 CFR 21.24 - Issuance of type certificate: primary category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engineering analysis necessary to demonstrate compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements; the... necessary drawings and documents used to define the type design; and lists all the engineering reports on... paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section must be made by the civil airworthiness authority of the...

  11. 14 CFR 21.24 - Issuance of type certificate: primary category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engineering analysis necessary to demonstrate compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements; the... necessary drawings and documents used to define the type design; and lists all the engineering reports on... paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section must be made by the civil airworthiness authority of the...

  12. 14 CFR 21.24 - Issuance of type certificate: primary category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... completed the engineering analysis necessary to demonstrate compliance with the applicable airworthiness... all necessary drawings and documents used to define the type design; and lists all the engineering... statement required by paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section must be made by the civil airworthiness...

  13. Targeting A-type K(+) channels in primary sensory neurons for bone cancer pain in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai-Zheng; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Mei, Yan-Ai; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2012-03-01

    Cancer pain is one of the most severe types of chronic pain, and the most common cancer pain is bone cancer pain. The treatment of bone cancer pain remains a clinical challenge. Here, we report firstly that A-type K(+) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are involved in the neuropathy of rat bone cancer pain and are a new target for diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that can be used for therapy for this distinct pain. There are dynamically functional changes of the A-type K(+) channels in DRG neurons during bone cancer pain. The A-type K(+) currents that mainly express in isolectin B4-positive small DRG neurons are increased on post-tumor day 14 (PTD 14), then faded but still remained at a higher level on PTD 21. Correspondingly, the expression levels of A-type K(+) channel Kv1.4, Kv3.4, and Kv4.3 showed time-dependent changes during bone cancer pain. Diclofenac enhances A-type K(+) currents in the DRG neurons and attenuates bone cancer pain in a dose-dependent manner. The analgesic effect of diclofenac can be reversed or prevented by A-type K(+) channel blocker 4-AP or pandinotoxin-Kα, also by siRNA targeted against rat Kv1.4 or Kv4.3. Repeated diclofenac administration decreased soft tissue swelling adjacent to the tumor and attenuated bone destruction. These results indicate that peripheral A-type K(+) channels were involved in the neuropathy of rat bone cancer pain. Targeting A-type K(+) channels in primary sensory neurons may provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic strategy for bone cancer pain.

  14. Impact of chronic disease self-management programs on type 2 diabetes management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Forjuoh, Samuel N; Ory, Marcia G; Jiang, Luohua; Vuong, Ann M; Bolin, Jane N

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) on glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and selected self-reported measures. METHODS: We compared patients who received a diabetes self-care behavioral intervention, the CDSMP developed at the Stanford University, with controls who received usual care on their HbA1c and selected self-reported measures, including diabetes self-care activities, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), pain and fatigue. The subjects were a subset of participants enrolled in a randomized controlled trial that took place at seven regional clinics of a university-affiliated integrated healthcare system of a multi-specialty group practice between January 2009 and June 2011. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from randomization to 12 mo. Data were analyzed using multilevel statistical models and linear mixed models to provide unbiased estimates of intervention effects. RESULTS: Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics were generally comparable between the two groups. The average baseline HbA1c values in the CDSMP and control groups were 9.4% and 9.2%, respectively. Significant reductions in HbA1c were seen at 12 mo for the two groups, with adjusted changes around 0.6% (P < 0.0001), but the reductions did not differ significantly between the two groups (P = 0.885). Few significant differences were observed in participants’ diabetes self-care activities. No significant differences were observed in the participants’ HRQOL, pain, or fatigue measures. CONCLUSION: The CDSMP intervention may not lower HbA1c any better than good routine care in an integrated healthcare system. More research is needed to understand the benefits of self-management programs in primary care in different settings and populations. PMID:24936263

  15. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Arora, H.; Kelly, M.; Worley, A.; Del Linz, P.; Fergusson, A.; Hooper, P. A.; Dear, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene–acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson–Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg−1/3, 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411–413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494

  16. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials.

    PubMed

    Arora, H; Kelly, M; Worley, A; Del Linz, P; Fergusson, A; Hooper, P A; Dear, J P

    2014-05-13

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson-Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg(-1/3), 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411-413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast.

  17. Primary and secondary battery consumption trends in Sweden 1996-2013: method development and detailed accounting by battery type.

    PubMed

    Patrício, João; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Berg, Per E O; Rosado, Leonardo; Åberg, Helena

    2015-05-01

    In this article, a new method based on Material Flow Accounting is proposed to study detailed material flows in battery consumption that can be replicated for other countries. The method uses regularly available statistics on import, industrial production and export of batteries and battery-containing electric and electronic equipment (EEE). To promote method use by other scholars with no access to such data, several empirically results and their trends over time, for different types of batteries occurrence among the EEE types are provided. The information provided by the method can be used to: identify drivers of battery consumption; study the dynamic behavior of battery flows - due to technology development, policies, consumers behavior and infrastructures. The method is exemplified by the study of battery flows in Sweden for years 1996-2013. The batteries were accounted, both in units and weight, as primary and secondary batteries; loose and integrated; by electrochemical composition and share of battery use between different types of EEE. Results show that, despite a fivefold increase in the consumption of rechargeable batteries, they account for only about 14% of total use of portable batteries. Recent increase in digital convergence has resulted in a sharp decline in the consumption of primary batteries, which has now stabilized at a fairly low level. Conversely, the consumption of integrated batteries has increased sharply. In 2013, 61% of the total weight of batteries sold in Sweden was collected, and for the particular case of alkaline manganese dioxide batteries, the value achieved 74%. PMID:25782361

  18. Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Amber L; Zwickle, Adam; Namanya, Judith; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Mwita, Emiliana

    2016-02-01

    Many water-related illnesses show an increase during the wet season. This is often due to fecal contamination from runoff, yet, it is unknown whether seasonal changes in water availability may also play a role in increased illness via changes in the type of primary water source used by households. Very little is known about the dynamic aspects of access to water and changes in source type across seasons, particularly in semi-arid regions with annual water scarcity. The research questions in this study were: (1) To what degree do households in Uganda (UG) and Tanzania (TZ) change primary water source type between wet and dry seasons?; and (2) How might seasonal changes relate to water quality and health? Using spatial survey data from 92 households each in UG and TZ this study found that, from wet to dry season, 26% (UG) and 9% (TZ) of households switched from a source with higher risk of contamination to a source with lower risk. By comparison, only 20% (UG) and 0% (TZ) of households switched from a source with lower risk of contamination to a source with higher risk of contamination. This research suggests that one pathway through which water-related disease prevalence may differ across seasons is the use of water sources with higher risk contamination, and that households with access to sources with lower risks of contamination sometimes choose to use more contaminated sources. PMID:26828507

  19. Primary and secondary battery consumption trends in Sweden 1996-2013: method development and detailed accounting by battery type.

    PubMed

    Patrício, João; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Berg, Per E O; Rosado, Leonardo; Åberg, Helena

    2015-05-01

    In this article, a new method based on Material Flow Accounting is proposed to study detailed material flows in battery consumption that can be replicated for other countries. The method uses regularly available statistics on import, industrial production and export of batteries and battery-containing electric and electronic equipment (EEE). To promote method use by other scholars with no access to such data, several empirically results and their trends over time, for different types of batteries occurrence among the EEE types are provided. The information provided by the method can be used to: identify drivers of battery consumption; study the dynamic behavior of battery flows - due to technology development, policies, consumers behavior and infrastructures. The method is exemplified by the study of battery flows in Sweden for years 1996-2013. The batteries were accounted, both in units and weight, as primary and secondary batteries; loose and integrated; by electrochemical composition and share of battery use between different types of EEE. Results show that, despite a fivefold increase in the consumption of rechargeable batteries, they account for only about 14% of total use of portable batteries. Recent increase in digital convergence has resulted in a sharp decline in the consumption of primary batteries, which has now stabilized at a fairly low level. Conversely, the consumption of integrated batteries has increased sharply. In 2013, 61% of the total weight of batteries sold in Sweden was collected, and for the particular case of alkaline manganese dioxide batteries, the value achieved 74%.

  20. Evaluation of primary lung cancer with indium 111 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (type ZCE-025) monoclonal antibody scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Morris, J.F.; Antonovic, R.; Ahmed, A.; Galey, W.T.; Duncan, C.; Krishnamurthy, G.T. )

    1990-02-01

    A study was undertaken to test whether indium 111 (111In)-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (type ZCE 025) monoclonal intact antibody (MoAb) would concentrate in primary lung cancer enabling its detection and localization by scintigraphy. The scintigraphic results were correlated with chest radiograph, computed tomograph (CT), bronchoscopy, surgical resection, and tumor CEA analysis. Twenty adult male patients with clinical suspicion of primary lung cancer were studied. Each subject was infused with 4 to 5 mCi of 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb, and planar and tomographic scintiphotos were obtained on days 3 and 6 or 7 postinfusion. The scintigraphy was true-positive in 12 of 16 patients with primary lung cancer, eight of nine patients with squamous cell carcinoma, and four of seven with adenocarcinoma; it was true-negative in three of four patients with benign lung disease with an overall accuracy of 75%. In seven patients with confirmed primary lung cancer, but with negative bronchoscopic findings, the scintigraphy was true-positive in four. In 11 patients with definitely positive or suspicious malignancy by bronchoscopy the monoclonal scintigraphy was positive in eight. In true-positive cases, the location and size of the lesion by 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb imaging correlated well with CT findings and also tumor mass at surgery. Only one of 12 tumors stained positive for CEA had serum CEA levels greater than 10 ng/ml, indicating nonleakage of the tumor antigen into general circulation in early lung cancer. It is concluded that 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb planar and tomographic imaging shows potential to serve as a noninvasive diagnostic test in the evaluation of primary lung cancer. The lung lesion is likely to be malignant if it concentrates 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb and benign if it does not.

  1. Primary and secondary battery consumption trends in Sweden 1996–2013: Method development and detailed accounting by battery type

    SciTech Connect

    Patrício, João; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Berg, Per E.O.; Rosado, Leonardo; Åberg, Helena

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Developed MFA method was validated by the national statistics. • Exponential increase of EEE sales leads to increase in integrated battery consumption. • Digital convergence is likely to be a cause for primary batteries consumption decline. • Factors for estimation of integrated batteries in EE are provided. • Sweden reached the collection rates defined by European Union. - Abstract: In this article, a new method based on Material Flow Accounting is proposed to study detailed material flows in battery consumption that can be replicated for other countries. The method uses regularly available statistics on import, industrial production and export of batteries and battery-containing electric and electronic equipment (EEE). To promote method use by other scholars with no access to such data, several empirically results and their trends over time, for different types of batteries occurrence among the EEE types are provided. The information provided by the method can be used to: identify drivers of battery consumption; study the dynamic behavior of battery flows – due to technology development, policies, consumers behavior and infrastructures. The method is exemplified by the study of battery flows in Sweden for years 1996–2013. The batteries were accounted, both in units and weight, as primary and secondary batteries; loose and integrated; by electrochemical composition and share of battery use between different types of EEE. Results show that, despite a fivefold increase in the consumption of rechargeable batteries, they account for only about 14% of total use of portable batteries. Recent increase in digital convergence has resulted in a sharp decline in the consumption of primary batteries, which has now stabilized at a fairly low level. Conversely, the consumption of integrated batteries has increased sharply. In 2013, 61% of the total weight of batteries sold in Sweden was collected, and for the particular case of alkaline manganese

  2. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: evidence of primary and secondary central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Borlot, Felippe; Arantes, Paula Ricci; Quaio, Caio Robledo; Franco, José Francisco da Silva; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Gomy, Israel; Bertola, Debora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA is a rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase. Studies usually focus on skeletal abnormalities and their consequences. This study explores the neurological manifestations in a cohort of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA patients, with a detailed focus on brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. We performed a cross-sectional study involving nine patients with a biochemical confirmation of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA. The protocol consists of a comprehensive clinical examination and brain and spinal cord MRI analysis for all subjects. The mean age was 16.4 years (±5.7) and the mean onset of symptoms was 11.5 months (±6.3). Overall, cognition was spared in all but one patient and motor weakness was a constant finding in all patients. Deep sensation impairment was found in six patients. The brain MRIs showed non-specific white matter changes in two patients. Other abnormalities such as clival hypoplasia, basilar invagination, and arachnoid cists appeared in seven of the nine patients. Eight patients presented spinal cord compression, and in three of them, two spinal levels were compromised. Odontoid hypoplasia and degenerative features in the neuroaxis were present in all patients. Our experience with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA patients supports the evidence of central nervous system involvement. We emphasize the importance of regular clinical assessments with complete MRI studies, as an attempt to detect the early signs of spinal cord compression. This evaluation may be especially important before surgical interventions, as occult lesions may become symptomatic and promote postoperative unfavorable outcomes.

  3. Interfaces Between Coke, Slag, and Metal in the Tuyere Level of a Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejiang; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Zhengjian; Barati, Mansoor; Zhong, Jianbo; Wei, Mengfang; Wang, Guangwei; Jiao, Kexin; Yang, Tianjun

    2015-04-01

    An in-depth understanding about the reactions in the high-temperature zone of a blast furnace is significant to optimize both the current and future blast furnace process. The interfaces between coke, slag, and metal were observed using scanning electronic microscope with samples obtained from the tuyere level of a blast furnace. Two types of slag phases were identified, one originating from coke ash and the other from the bosh slag. Slag formed by coke ash was seen to cover the coke surface, which may hinder the reaction of coke with both gas and liquid iron. The reduction of FeO from the bosh slag (originated from the primary slag) occurs in the coke/slag interface with the reduced iron forming a metal layer surrounding the coke surface. The reduction of SiO2 occurs both in and outside the coke, and the reduced silicon reacts with iron to form iron silicide if the two species come into contact. Further study is proposed based on the results of this study.

  4. Evaluating spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China based on improved FORCCHN.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfang; Yan, Xiaodong; Guo, Jianping; Jia, Gensuo

    2012-01-01

    An improved individual-based forest ecosystem carbon budget model for China (FORCCHN) was applied to investigate the spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China. In this study, the forests of northeastern China were categorized into four ecological types according to their habitats and generic characteristics (evergreen broadleaf forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest). The results showed that distribution and change of forest NPP in northeastern China were related to the different forest types. From 1981 to 2002, among the forest types in northeastern China, per unit area NPP and total NPP of deciduous broadleaf forest were the highest, with the values of 729.4 gC/(m(2)•yr) and 106.0 TgC/yr, respectively, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest, deciduous needleleaf forest and evergreen needleleaf forest. From 1981 to 2002, per unit area NPP and total NPP of different forest types in northeastern China exhibited significant trends of interannual increase, and rapid increase was found between the 1980s and 1990s. The contribution of the different forest type's NPP to total NPP in northeastern China was clearly different. The greatest was deciduous broadleaf forest, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest. The smallest was evergreen needleleaf forest. Spatial difference in NPP between different forest types was remarkable. High NPP values of deciduous needleleaf forest, mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous broadleaf forest were found in the Daxing'anling region, the southeastern of Xiaoxing'anling and Jilin province, and the Changbai Mountain, respectively. However, no regional differences were found for evergreen needleleaf NPP. This study provided not only an estimation NPP of different forest types in northeastern China but also a useful methodology for estimating forest carbon storage at

  5. Characterization of primary human keratinocytes transformed by human papillomavirus type 18

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, P.; McDougall, J.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Primary human epithelial cells were cotransfected with pHPV-18 and pSV2neo, and cell strains were generated by selecting in G418. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of at least one intact, integrated viral genome in these cells. FE-A cells showed altered growth properties, characterized by a change in morphology, and clonal density. Differentiation markers analyzed by Western blotting (immunoblotting), such as cytokeratins and involucrin, indicated that the cells resembled a partially differentiated epithelial population. Increased expression of the 40-kilodalton cytokeratin was observed in FE-A cells, similar to that observed in simian virus 40-immortalized human keratinocytes. Calcium and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate treatment induced normal epithelial cells to differentiate, whereas the human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18)-containing keratinocytes were resistant to these signals, indicating their partially transformed nature. These cells were not able to induce tumors in nude mice over a period of up to 8 months. A second cell strain, FE-H18L, also generated by transfecting HPV-18, also exhibited an extended life span and similar alterations in morphology. Viral RNA transcribed from the early region of HPV-18 was detected in both cell strains by Northern (RNA) blot analysis. These cell strains should provide a useful model for determining the role of HPV in carcinogenesis.

  6. PhyloBLAST: facilitating phylogenetic analysis of BLAST results.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, F S; Wan, I; Hancock, R E; Rose, A M; Jones, S J

    2001-04-01

    PhyloBLAST is an internet-accessed application based on CGI/Perl programming that compares a users protein sequence to a SwissProt/TREMBL database using BLAST2 and then allows phylogenetic analyses to be performed on selected sequences from the BLAST output. Flexible features such as ability to input your own multiple sequence alignment and use PHYLIP program options provide additional web-based phylogenetic analysis functionality beyond the analysis of a BLAST result.

  7. Parathyroidectomy Ameliorates Glucose and Blood Pressure Control in a Patient with Primary Hyperparathyroidism, Type 2 Diabetes, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Singh, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Effect of parathyroidectomy on glucose control and hypertension is controversial. Here, we report a case of a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension in whom parathyroidectomy ameliorated both glucose control and blood pressure. Once high serum calcium levels were noticed, ultrasonography of neck confirmed a well-defined oval hypoechoic mass posterior to the right lobe of the thyroid, confirmed by scintiscan. Parathyroidectomy resulted in improvement of blood pressure and blood glucose. We could stop insulin and antihypertensive medications. We conclude that in patients with type 2 diabetes with vague complaints like fatigue, body ache, and refractory hypertension, as a part of the diagnostic workup, clinicians should also check serum calcium levels and parathyroid hormone to rule out hyperparathyroidism. Correction of hyperparathyroidism may result in improvement of hypertension and glucose control. PMID:26380561

  8. Solid-type primary intraosseous squamous-cell carcinoma in the mandible: Report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ohoud; Al-Zaher, Nabil; Alotaibi, Faiza; Khoja, Hatim; Qannam, Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) is a rare malignant neoplasm that has an exquisitely exclusive affection to the jawbone. It is defined as squamous cell carcinoma arising within the jaw and developing from residual odontogenic epithelium or from a preexisting odontogenic cyst or tumor. The solid-type of this tumor is a central jaw carcinoma arising de novo and has no initial connection with the oral mucosa. Herein, we report a case of solid-type PIOSCC involving the mandible in a 37-year-old male patient elucidating its histopathological and imaging findings. The patient underwent surgical resection followed by post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy. The close 2-year follow up of the patient revealed neither locoregional nor distant metastasis. PMID:26802621

  9. Biological properties of different type carbon particles in vitro study on primary culture of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Czerniak-Reczulska, M; Niedzielski, P; Balcerczyk, A; Bartosz, G; Karowicz-Bilińska, A; Mitura, K

    2010-02-01

    Carbon powders have extended surface of carbon layers, which is of significant biomedical importance since the powders are employed to cover implants material. Carbon Powder Particles are produced by different methods: by a detonation method, by RF PACVD (Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition) or MW/RF PCVD (Microwave/Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition) and others. Our previous data showed that Carbon Powder Particles may act as antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory factor. However the mechanism of such behavior has been not fully understood. The aim of the work was tested influence carbon powders manufactured by Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition RFPACVD method and detonation method on selected parameters of human endothelial cells, which play a crucial role in the regulation of the circulation and vascular wall homeostasis. Graphite powder was used as a control substance. Endothelial cells are actively involved in a wide variety of processes e.g., inflammatory responses to a different type of stimuli (ILs, TNF-alpha) or regulating vasomotor tone via production of vasorelaxants and vasocontrictors. Biological activation is dependent on the type and quantity of chemical bonds on the surface of the powders. The effect of powders on the proliferation of HUVECs (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells) was determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction assay. We found decreased cell proliferation after 72 h treatment with graphite as well as Carbon Powder Particles. PMID:20352757

  10. Misregulation of mitotic chromosome segregation in a new type of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Juan Alberto; Ghani, Mahdi; Schindler, Detlev; Gavvovidis, Ioannis; Winkler, Tina; Esquitino, Veronique; Sternberg, Nadine; Busche, Andreas; Krawitz, Peter; Hecht, Joachim; Robinson, Peter; Mundlos, Stephan; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Sperling, Karl; Trimborn, Marc; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2011-09-01

    Primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH) is a congenital disorder characterized by a pronounced reduction of brain size and mental retardation. We present here a consanguineous Turkish family clinically diagnosed with MCPH and without linkage to any of the known loci (MCPH1-MCPH7). Autozygosity mapping identified a homozygous region of 15.8 Mb on chromosome 10q11.23-21.3, most likely representing a new locus for MCPH. Although we were unable to identify the underlying genetic defect after extensive molecular screening, we could delineate a possible molecular function in chromosome segregation by the characterization of mitosis in the patients' cells. Analyses of chromosome nondisjunction in T-lymphocytes and fibroblasts revealed a significantly elevated rate of nondisjunction in the patients' cells as compared to controls. Mitotic progression was further explored by immunofluorescence analyses of several chromosome and spindle associated proteins. We detected a remarkable alteration in the anaphase distribution of Aurora B and INCENP, which are key regulators of chromosome segregation. In particular, a fraction of both proteins remained abnormally loaded on chromosomes during anaphase in MCPH patients' cells while in cells of normal control subjects both proteins are completely transferred to the spindle midzone. We did not observe any other alterations regarding cell cycle progression, chromosome structure, or response to DNA damage. Our observations point towards a molecular role of the underlying gene product in the regulation of anaphase/telophase progression possibly through interaction with chromosomal passenger proteins. In addition, our findings represent further evidence for the proposed role of MCPH genes in the regulation of mitotic progression.

  11. Explosive blast neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Ling, Geoffrey; Bandak, Faris; Armonda, Rocco; Grant, Gerald; Ecklund, James

    2009-06-01

    Explosive blast traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the more serious wounds suffered by United States service members injured in the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Some military medical treatments for blast TBI that have been introduced successfully in the war theater include decompressive craniectomy, cerebral angiography, transcranial Doppler, hypertonic resuscitation fluids, among others. Stateside neurosurgery, neuro-critical care, and rehabilitation for these patients have similarly progressed. With experience, military physicians have been able to clinically describe blast TBI across the entire severity spectrum. One important clinical finding is that a significant number of severe blast TBI victims develop pseudoaneurysms and vasospasm, which can lead to delayed decompensation. Another is that mild blast TBI shares clinical features with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Observations suggest that the mechanism by which explosive blast injures the central nervous system may be more complex than initially assumed. Rigorous study at the basic science and clinical levels, including detailed biomechanical analysis, is needed to improve understanding of this disease. A comprehensive epidemiological study is also warranted to determine the prevalence of this disease and the factors that contribute most to the risk of developing it. Sadly, this military-specific disease has significant potential to become a civilian one as well.

  12. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8-11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4-6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6). PMID:26136722

  13. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Hibah O.; Gonzalez, Larry P.; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000–30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8–11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4–6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5–6). PMID:26136722

  14. Evaluating Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Net Primary Productivity of Different Forest Types in Northeastern China Based on Improved FORCCHN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junfang; Yan, Xiaodong; Guo, Jianping; Jia, Gensuo

    2012-01-01

    An improved individual-based forest ecosystem carbon budget model for China (FORCCHN) was applied to investigate the spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China. In this study, the forests of northeastern China were categorized into four ecological types according to their habitats and generic characteristics (evergreen broadleaf forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest). The results showed that distribution and change of forest NPP in northeastern China were related to the different forest types. From 1981 to 2002, among the forest types in northeastern China, per unit area NPP and total NPP of deciduous broadleaf forest were the highest, with the values of 729.4 gC/(m2•yr) and 106.0 TgC/yr, respectively, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest, deciduous needleleaf forest and evergreen needleleaf forest. From 1981 to 2002, per unit area NPP and total NPP of different forest types in northeastern China exhibited significant trends of interannual increase, and rapid increase was found between the 1980s and 1990s. The contribution of the different forest type’s NPP to total NPP in northeastern China was clearly different. The greatest was deciduous broadleaf forest, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest. The smallest was evergreen needleleaf forest. Spatial difference in NPP between different forest types was remarkable. High NPP values of deciduous needleleaf forest, mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous broadleaf forest were found in the Daxing’anling region, the southeastern of Xiaoxing’anling and Jilin province, and the Changbai Mountain, respectively. However, no regional differences were found for evergreen needleleaf NPP. This study provided not only an estimation NPP of different forest types in northeastern China but also a useful methodology for estimating forest carbon storage

  15. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  16. Primary prevention of Type 2 diabetes in South Asians--challenges and the way forward.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, A; Ambady, R; Snehalatha, C; Samith Shetty, A; Nanditha, A

    2013-01-01

    Preventing diabetes is of enormous value, particularly for the South Asian countries, which have a huge healthcare burden from the onslaught of the disease. Type 2 diabetes has been proved to be preventable using lifestyle changes, even in South Asians despite their heightened risk profile. Strategies to improve awareness about diabetes and translation of preventive measures by innovative, culturally specific programmes have to be implemented at national levels. Integrated involvement of the government, community, media, healthcare and education services, and financial support from national and international organizations, are required. South Asian countries have initiated national programmes for diabetes prevention and management. It is also encouraging to note that joint ventures between developed countries such as the USA, UK and other European countries and centres of excellence in South Asia have been initiated to develop large-scale, community-oriented, pragmatic intervention strategies. PMID:22827704

  17. [Implications in primary health care of medical genetics and genomic in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio Alberto; Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos E; Huacuja-Ruiz, Luis; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Pérez-García, Guillermo; González-Rico, José Luis; López-Velázquez, Alma; Topete-González, Luz Rosalba; Rosales-Góme, Roberto Carlos; Candelario-Mejía, Gerardo; Villa-Ruano, Nemesio

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disease and a global health problem. Therefore, the first level of health care should handle the approaches of medical genetics and genomics to reduce its incidence. The aim is to present perspectives analyzed by our group in two areas of genetics and its clinical application. Emphasis is placed on the coexistence of several genetic forms clinically detectable in patients with diabetes, missing heritability associated with low penetrance, and epigenomics mechanism. It is discussed the effect of genetic variation associated with resistance to insulin, beta-cell dysfunction, shaft incretin, and other points of interest, such as thrifty genotype hypothesis, conformational disease, genetically unknown foods, phenocopies as clinically silent hypercortisolism, molecular phytopharmacology in the clinical management. Finally, the result was displayed in the Mexican population from genetic studies and new findings of clinical importance, such as involvement of melatonin and effect of variations in the number of copies in a genomic region.

  18. An algorithm for identification and classification of individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a large primary care database

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manuj; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin; Coton, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    Background Research into diabetes mellitus (DM) often requires a reproducible method for identifying and distinguishing individuals with type 1 DM (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM). Objectives To develop a method to identify individuals with T1DM and T2DM using UK primary care electronic health records. Methods Using data from The Health Improvement Network primary care database, we developed a two-step algorithm. The first algorithm step identified individuals with potential T1DM or T2DM based on diagnostic records, treatment, and clinical test results. We excluded individuals with records for rarer DM subtypes only. For individuals to be considered diabetic, they needed to have at least two records indicative of DM; one of which was required to be a diagnostic record. We then classified individuals with T1DM and T2DM using the second algorithm step. A combination of diagnostic codes, medication prescribed, age at diagnosis, and whether the case was incident or prevalent were used in this process. We internally validated this classification algorithm through comparison against an independent clinical examination of The Health Improvement Network electronic health records for a random sample of 500 DM individuals. Results Out of 9,161,866 individuals aged 0–99 years from 2000 to 2014, we classified 37,693 individuals with T1DM and 418,433 with T2DM, while 1,792 individuals remained unclassified. A small proportion were classified with some uncertainty (1,155 [3.1%] of all individuals with T1DM and 6,139 [1.5%] with T2DM) due to unclear health records. During validation, manual assignment of DM type based on clinical assessment of the entire electronic record and algorithmic assignment led to equivalent classification in all instances. Conclusion The majority of individuals with T1DM and T2DM can be readily identified from UK primary care electronic health records. Our approach can be adapted for use in other health care settings. PMID:27785102

  19. Reconstruction of improvised explosive device blast loading to personnel in the open

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiri, Suthee; Needham, Charles

    2016-05-01

    Significant advances in reconstructing attacks by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other blast events are reported. A high-fidelity three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics tool, called Second-order Hydrodynamic Automatic Mesh Refinement Code, was used for the analysis. Computer-aided design models for subjects or vehicles in the scene accurately represent geometries of objects in the blast field. A wide range of scenario types and blast exposure levels were reconstructed including free field blast, enclosed space of vehicle cabin, IED attack on a vehicle, buried charges, recoilless rifle operation, rocket-propelled grenade attack and missile attack with single subject or multiple subject exposure to pressure levels from ˜ 27.6 kPa (˜ 4 psi) to greater than 690 kPa (>100 psi). To create a full 3D pressure time-resolved reconstruction of a blast event for injury and blast exposure analysis, a combination of intelligence data and Blast Gauge data can be used to reconstruct an actual in-theatre blast event. The methodology to reconstruct an event and the "lessons learned" from multiple reconstructions in open space are presented. The analysis uses records of blast pressure at discrete points, and the output is a spatial and temporal blast load distribution for all personnel involved.

  20. [Level of knowledge of patients with type II diabetes mellitus in primary care].

    PubMed

    Piñeiro Chonsa, F; Lara Valdivielso, E; Muñoz Cacho, P; Herrera Plaza, T; Rodríguez Cordero, R; Mayo Alastrey, M A

    1991-01-01

    A personal interview to 148 patients was carried out with the aim of getting to know the level of information of type II diabetic patients at an Urban Health Center in Santander. A validated questionnaire made up of 14 questions on general aspects of diabetis, dietetic habits and capability to handle complications was used. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of questionnaire was 0.69. The correct answer average was 6.3 (IC = 5.9-6.5). Patients were best informed about general aspects and had much less information with regard to the handling of complications and to their diet. The differences among these three sections of questions were significative (p less than 0.001). The patients under diet treatment obtained worse results than those treated with oral hipoglucemiants and insulin. Our results are worse than those reported by other similar populations at a national level. Also, and due to the differences in knowledge within this group, we believe that the establishment of groups and subgroups when educating diabetic patients is possible and also highly recommended.

  1. Treatment of Primary Axillary Hyperhidrosis with Botulinum Toxin Type A: Our Experience in 50 Patients from 2007 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Scamoni, Stefano; Valdatta, Luigi; Frigo, Claudia; Maggiulli, Francesca; Cherubino, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background. Local injections of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) are an effective and safe solution for primary bilateral axillary hyperhidrosis. Traditional treatments are often ineffective and difficult to tolerate. This study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of Botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of these diseases and to evaluate the reliability of patient's subjective rating in the timing of repeat injections. Methods. From 2007 to 2008, we included in the study and treated a total of 50 patients, and we used the Minor's iodine test and the hyperhidrosis diseases severity scale as initial inclusion criteria and also for evaluating the followup, comparing to patient's subjective rating. We used also a specific questionnaire to evaluate the level of pain, the onset of the effect, any eventual adverse effect of the treatment, the onset of compensatory hyperhidrosis, and the global grade of satisfaction. The data were analyzed using standard statistical methods. Results. 88% of patients were totally satisfied and all patients repeated the treatment during all the study. The symptom-free interval was in median 6 months with an average improving of HDSS of 1.5 points. In 86%, there was a complete accordance between the subjective patient's demand of the repetition of the treatment and the positivity to Minor test and HDSS. No major side effects happened. Conclusion. Local injections of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) result in an effective and safe solution for bilateral axillary primary hyperhidrosis for the absence of significant morbidity, side effects, and lack of efficacy or duration. The only defects are the need of repetition of the treatment and relative costs. PMID:23119179

  2. Common glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type glycans on matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cells show different glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Yosuke; Kakoi, Naotaka; Yamada, Keita; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Recently, we reported comparative analysis of glycoproteins which express cancer-specific N-glycans on various cancer cells and identified 24 glycoproteins having polylactosamine (polyLacNAc)-type N-glycans that are abundantly present in malignant cells [ Mitsui et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2012 , 70 , 718 - 726 ]. In the present study, we applied the technique to comparative studies on common glycoproteins present in the matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Metastatic melanoma cells (WM266-4) contained a large amount of polyLacNAc-type N-glycans in comparison with primary melanoma cells (WM115). To identify the glycoproteins expressing these N-glycans, glycopeptides having polyLacNAc-type N-glycans were captured by a Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)-immobilized agarose column. The captured glycopeptides were analyzed by LC/MS after removing N-glycans, and some glycoproteins such as basigin, lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) were identified in both WM115 and WM266-4 cells. The expression level of polyLacNAc of CSPG4 in WM266-4 cells was significantly higher than that in WM115 cells. In addition, sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in CSPG4 showed dramatic changes between these cell lines. These data show that characteristic glycans attached to common proteins observed in different stages of cancer cells will be useful markers for determining degree of malignancies of tumor cells. PMID:24354860

  3. Aspirin Is Associated With Reduced Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes in a Primary Prevention Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Greg; Davis, Timothy M.E.; Davis, Wendy A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether regular aspirin use (≥75 mg/day) is independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in community-based patients with type 2 diabetes and no history of CVD. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Of the type 2 diabetic patients recruited to the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study, 651 (50.3%) with no prior CVD history at entry between 1993 and 1996 were followed until death or the end of June 2007, representing a total of 7,537 patient-years (mean ± SD 11.6 ± 2.9 years). Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine independent baseline predictors of CVD and all-cause mortality including regular aspirin use. RESULTS There were 160 deaths (24.6%) during follow-up, with 70 (43.8%) due to CVD. In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there was no difference in either CVD or all-cause mortality in aspirin users versus nonusers (P = 0.52 and 0.94, respectively, by log-rank test). After adjustment for significant variables in the most parsimonious Cox models, regular aspirin use at baseline independently predicted reduced CVD and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.30 [95% CI 0.09–0.95] and 0.53 [0.28–0.98[, respectively; P ≤ 0.044). In subgroup analyses, aspirin use was independently associated with reduced all-cause mortality in those aged ≥65 years and men. CONCLUSIONS Regular low-dose aspirin may reduce all-cause and CVD mortality in a primary prevention setting in type 2 diabetes. All-cause mortality reductions are greatest in men and in those aged ≥65 years. The present observational data support recommendations that aspirin should be used in primary CVD prevention in all but the lowest risk patients. PMID:19918016

  4. Costs Associated With the Primary Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the costs of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) interventions to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We describe the direct medical costs, direct nonmedical costs, and indirect costs of the placebo, metformin, and intensive lifestyle interventions over the 3-year study period of the DPP. Resource use and cost are summarized from the perspective of a large health system and society. Research costs are excluded. RESULTS The direct medical cost of laboratory tests to identify one subject with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) was $139. Over 3 years, the direct medical costs of the interventions were $79 per participant in the placebo group, $2,542 in the metformin group, and $2,780 in the lifestyle group. The direct medical costs of care outside the DPP were $272 less per participant in the metformin group and $432 less in the lifestyle group compared with the placebo group. Direct nonmedical costs were $9 less per participant in the metformin group and $1,445 greater in the lifestyle group compared with the placebo group. Indirect costs were $230 greater per participant in the metformin group and $174 less in the lifestyle group compared with the placebo group. From the perspective of a health system, the cost of the metformin intervention relative to the placebo intervention was $2,191 per participant and the cost of the lifestyle intervention was $2,269 per participant over 3 years. From the perspective of society, the cost of the metformin intervention relative to the placebo intervention was $2,412 per participant and the cost of the lifestyle intervention was $3,540 per participant over 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The metformin and lifestyle interventions are associated with modest incremental costs compared with the placebo intervention. The evaluation of costs relative to health benefits will determine the value of these interventions to health systems and society. PMID:12502656

  5. Primary defects in lipolysis and insulin action in skeletal muscle cells from type 2 diabetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Kase, Eili T; Feng, Yuan Z; Badin, Pierre-Marie; Bakke, Siril S; Laurens, Claire; Coue, Marine; Langin, Dominique; Gaster, Michael; Thoresen, G Hege; Rustan, Arild C; Moro, Cedric

    2015-09-01

    A decrease in skeletal muscle lipolysis and hormone sensitive-lipase (HSL) expression has been linked to insulin resistance in obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify potential intrinsic defects in lipid turnover and lipolysis in myotubes established from obese and type 2 diabetic subjects. Lipid trafficking and lipolysis were measured by pulse-chase assay with radiolabeled substrates in myotubes from non-obese/non-diabetic (lean), obese/non-diabetic (obese) and obese/diabetic (T2D) subjects. Lipolytic protein content and level of Akt phosphorylation were measured by Western blot. HSL was overexpressed by adenovirus-mediated gene delivery. Myotubes established from obese and T2D subjects had lower lipolysis (-30-40%) when compared to lean, using oleic acid as precursor. Similar observations were also seen for labelled glycerol. Incorporation of oleic acid into diacylglycerol (DAG) and free fatty acid (FFA) level was lower in T2D myotubes, and acetate incorporation into FFA and complex lipids was also lower in obese and/or T2D subjects. Both protein expression of HSL (but not ATGL) and changes in DAG during lipolysis were markedly lower in cells from obese and T2D when compared to lean subjects. Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis (-60%) and Akt phosphorylation (-90%) were lower in myotubes from T2D, however, overexpression of HSL in T2D myotubes did not rescue the diabetic phenotype. In conclusion, intrinsic defects in lipolysis and HSL expression co-exist with reduced insulin action in myotubes from obese T2D subjects. Despite reductions in intramyocellular lipolysis and HSL expression, overexpression of HSL did not rescue defects in insulin action in skeletal myotubes from obese T2D subjects.

  6. Relative abundances of chondrule primary textural types in ordinary chondrites and their bearing on conditions of chondrule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Keil, K.

    1981-03-01

    A petrographic survey of > 1600 chondrules in thin-sections of 12 different mildly to highly unequilibrated H-, L-, and Li-chondrites, as well as morphological and textural study of 141 whole chondrules separated from 11 of the same chondrites, was used to determine the relative abundances of definable chondrule primary textural types. Percentage abundances of various chondrule types are remarkably similar in all chondrites studied and are ˜47-52 porphyritic olivine-pyroxene (POP), 15-27 porphyritic olivine (P 0), 9-11 porphyritic pyroxene (PP), 34 barred olivine (BO), 7-9 radial pyroxene (RP), 2-5 granular olivine-pyroxene (GOP), 3-5 cryptocrystalline (C), and ≥ 1 metallic (M). Neither chondrule size nor shape is strongly correlated with textural type. Compound and cratered chondrules, which are interpreted as products of collisions between plastic chondrules, comprise ˜2-28% of non-porphyritic (RP, GOP, C) but only ˜2-9% of porphyritic (POP, PO, PP, BO) chondrules, leading to a model-dependent implication that non-porphyritic chondrules evolved at number densities (chondrules per unit volume of space) which were 102 to 104 times greater than those which prevailed during porphyritic chondrule formation (total range of ˜1 to ˜106 m-3. Distinctive "rims" of fine-grained sulfides and/or silicates occur on both porphyritic and non-porphyritic types and appear to post-date chondrule formation. Apparently, either the same process(es) contributed chondrules to all unequilibrated ordinary chondrites or, if genetically different, the various chondrule types were well mixed before incorporation into chondrites. Melting of pre-existing materials is the mechanism favored for chondrule formation.

  7. Interactions between Blast Waves and V-Shaped and Cone-Shaped Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Gogos, G.; Gazonas, G.

    2011-09-01

    A 2-D numerical model of interactions between a blast wave and a V-shaped or a cone-shaped structure is developed. The model simulates the blast wave reflection from a V-shaped or a cone-shaped structure, the movement of the structure due to the blast impact and the induced shock wave behind the structure. Elliptic grid generation and coordinate transformation are utilized to solve the flow fields in the irregular physical domain. Different types of blast wave reflections, such as normal reflection, oblique reflection and Mach stem reflection, are captured by the numerical model. It is found that the reflected pressure and impulse transmitted to the structure decrease with the increase of incident angle. On the other hand, with the increase of incident angle, the effects of fluid structure interactions (FSI) in reducing the blast loads decreases. The FSI coupled with oblique or Mach stem reflection improves the blast wave mitigation.

  8. The effect of a blast on the mandible and teeth: transverse fractures and their management.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2008-10-01

    Transverse mandibular fractures caused by blast waves have given us a better understanding of the physical and pathophysiological effects on this anatomical region. The external contour of the mandible, being rounded in parts (en face) and flat in others (lateral) will experience different effects of the blast. Impact of a spherical blast wave will inflict transverse lines of fractures on the mandibular body, and may be associated with transverse shearing of teeth at the cementoenamel junction. Fractures of the mandible caused by blast are different from those in the same region caused by any type of civilian trauma; these are the vertical to the longitudinal axis unlike comminuted fractures caused by shrapnel or bullet injuries. Fractures of the mandibular body by blasts are single or multiple parallel fractures in the lower border, between the apices of the roots and the mandibular lower border. Fractures are broken off by acceleration or deceleration of the blast wave. PMID:18440677

  9. Blast injury of the ear: an overview and guide to management.

    PubMed

    Garth, R J

    1995-07-01

    Blast injury is uncommon in many parts of the world but sporadic cases occur. The ear is particularly susceptible to damage and easily forgotten in patients with multiple injuries. The aim of this review article is to draw together the more important aspects of blast ear injury for those who are unfamiliar with it and to serve as a reminder of the problems to others. It covers the interactions of blast waves with the ear giving a summary of the mechanisms and types of injury. The management of blast-related injuries is discussed. PMID:7558254

  10. Blast TBI Models, Neuropathology, and Implications for Seizure Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, S. Krisztian; Leonessa, Fabio; Ling, Geoffrey S. F.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies. PMID:24782820

  11. Primary bladder lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell type: Case report and literature review of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Simpson, W Greg; Lopez, Armando; Babbar, Paurush; Payne, Lynnetta Faith

    2015-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the urinary bladder is exceedingly rare, representing 0.2% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flank pain that was found to have high grade DLBCL. Twenty-six other cases of both low and high grade primary bladder lymphomas were selected in order to provide a thorough comparison of different treatment modalities. Of the cases reviewed, bladder lymphoma was more common in females (2:1). The average age at diagnosis was 63.9 years old (low grade: 68.7 years old, high grade: 58.8 years old). The most common low-grade neoplasm was MALT lymphoma (85.7%). For the low-grade malignancies, the most successful treatments were simple therapies (2 transurethral resection of a bladder tumour [TURBT], 1 antibiotics), solitary chemotherapy, and combination TURBT/chemo; all 3 of which achieved 100% clinical remission (CR) in the cases reviewed. The most common high grade neoplasm was DLBCL (76.9%). The most successful therapies used to treat high grade lesions were solitary chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, duanorubacin, vincristine, prednisolone [CHOP] or ritoximab, CHOP [R-CHOP]) and combination therapies (2 radiation/CHOP, 2 surgery/CHOP). In the agreement with the current literature, this review has shown that simple therapies (TURBT) are equally as effective as aggressive treatments (chemotherapy, radiation) and should therefore be used as first line treatment in low grade tumors. For high grade malignancies, chemotherapy (R-CHOP or CHOP) alone or combination therapy (CHOP/surgery or CHOP/radiation) is recommended. PMID:25837971

  12. Fifteen years of continuous improvement of quality care of type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care in Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Cases, M; Roura-Olmeda, P; Berengué-Iglesias, M; Birulés-Pons, M; Mundet-Tuduri, X; Franch-Nadal, J; Benito-Badorrey, B; Cano-Pérez, J F

    2012-01-01

    Aims To assess the evolution of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) quality indicators in primary care centers (PCC) as part of the Group for the Study of Diabetes in Primary Care (GEDAPS) Continuous Quality Improvement (GCQI) programme in Catalonia. Methods Sequential cross-sectional studies were performed during 1993–2007. Process and outcome indicators in random samples of patients from each centre were collected. The results of each evaluation were returned to each centre to encourage the implementation of correcting interventions. Sixty-four different educational activities were performed during the study period with the participation of 2041 professionals. Results Clinical records of 23,501 patients were evaluated. A significant improvement was observed in the determination of some annual process indicators: HbA1c (51.7% vs. 88.9%); total cholesterol (75.9% vs. 90.9%); albuminuria screening (33.9% vs. 59.4%) and foot examination (48.9% vs. 64.2%). The intermediate outcome indicators also showed significant improvements: glycemic control [HbA1c ≤ 7% (< 57 mmol/mol); (41.5% vs. 64.2%)]; total cholesterol [≤ 200 mg/dl (5.17 mmol/l); (25.5% vs. 65.6%)]; blood pressure [≤ 140/90 mmHg; (45.4% vs. 66.1%)]. In addition, a significant improvement in some final outcome indicators such as prevalence of foot ulcers (7.6% vs. 2.6%); amputations (1.9% vs. 0.6%) and retinopathy (18.8% vs. 8.6%) was observed. Conclusions Although those changes should not be strictly attributed to the GCQI programme, significant improvements in some process indicators, parameters of control and complications were observed in a network of primary care centres in Catalonia. PMID:22340449

  13. Blasting-induced damage in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kabongo, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper is drawn from a project intended to explore a technique of prediction, control and optimization of fracture in coal induced by blasting. It evaluates the fines generated in coal submitted to dynamic loading stresses in an impact stamp mortar. The aim is to analyze a complex phenomenon of coal response to blast-generated stresses from a series of discrete simulations of shock and gas actions in controllable processes. It is learned that despite the nucleation of primary crushing and fractures to originate from the point of impact energy in coal, a secondary crushing appears to depart from within the burden progressing towards the free boundaries. The extension of the secondary crushing zone appears to be influenced by the magnitude of the breaking stresses generated and the coal burden distance. A strong dependence of fines on the coal`s innate discontinuities (strength) and the energy input is highlighted.

  14. Emulsified blasting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chironis, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    This article describes an improved blasting agent which is being tailor-blended with bulk ANFO to provide more explosive energy and better water resistance when the blasting conditions call for it. The proportions of the emulsion/ANFO mix are easily changed at the blasthole site because both materials can be selectively mixed in modified bulk-explosive trucks before loading the blasting agents into the holes. Such blends are helping speed stripping at a number of surface mines and are leading to cost savings in production, ranging from 10% to 30%, depending upon application, even though the actual cost of a blend will be higher than if bulk ANFO is used alone.

  15. Molecular Requirements for Peroxisomal Targeting of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase as an Essential Determinant in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Krisztián; Wolf, Janina; Erdmann, Ralf; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme, of which various missense mutations lead to irreversible kidney damage via primary hyperoxaluria type 1, in part caused by improper peroxisomal targeting. To unravel the molecular mechanism of its recognition by the peroxisomal receptor Pex5p, we have determined the crystal structure of the respective cargo–receptor complex. It shows an extensive protein/protein interface, with contributions from residues of the peroxisomal targeting signal 1 and additional loops of the C-terminal domain of the cargo. Sequence segments that are crucial for receptor recognition and hydrophobic core interactions within alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase are overlapping, explaining why receptor recognition highly depends on a properly folded protein. We subsequently characterized several enzyme variants in vitro and in vivo and show that even minor protein fold perturbations are sufficient to impair Pex5p receptor recognition. We discuss how the knowledge of the molecular parameters for alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase required for peroxisomal translocation could become useful for improved hyperoxaluria type 1 treatment. PMID:22529745

  16. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  17. Novel drug candidates for blast phase chronic myeloid leukemia from high-throughput drug sensitivity and resistance testing

    PubMed Central

    Pietarinen, P O; Pemovska, T; Kontro, M; Yadav, B; Mpindi, J P; Andersson, E I; Majumder, M M; Kuusanmäki, H; Koskenvesa, P; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C A; Mustjoki, S; Porkka, K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis (CML BC) remains a challenging disease to treat despite the introduction and advances in tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. In this study we set out to identify novel candidate drugs for CML BC by using an unbiased high-throughput drug testing platform. We used three CML cell lines representing different types of CML blast phases (K562, EM-2 and MOLM-1) and primary leukemic cells from three CML BC patients. Profiling of drug responses was performed with a drug sensitivity and resistance testing platform comprising 295 anticancer agents. Overall, drug sensitivity scores and the drug response profiles of cell line and primary cell samples correlated well and were distinct from other types of leukemia samples. The cell lines were highly sensitive to TKIs and the clinically TKI-resistant patient samples were also resistant ex vivo. Comparison of cell line and patient sample data identified new candidate drugs for CML BC, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors. Our results indicate that these drugs in particular warrant further evaluation by analyzing a larger set of primary patient samples. The results also pave way for designing rational combination therapies. PMID:25933373

  18. Impairment of Type I but Not Type III IFN Signaling by Hepatitis C Virus Infection Influences Antiviral Responses in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Friborg, Jacques; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Cao, Jian; Willard, Ryan; Lin, Baiqing; Eggers, Betsy; McPhee, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda), a type III interferon (IFN), acts through a unique receptor complex with limited cellular expression outside the liver which may result in a differentiated tolerability profile compared to peginterferon alfa (alfa). In Phase 2b clinical studies, Lambda administered in combination with ribavirin (RBV) was efficacious in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection representing genotypes 1 through 4, and was associated with more rapid declines in HCV RNA compared to alfa plus RBV. To gain insights into potential mechanisms for this finding, we investigated the effects of HCV replication on IFN signaling in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and in induced hepatocyte-like cells (iHLCs). HCV infection resulted in rapid down-regulation of the type I IFN-α receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1) transcript in hepatocytes while the transcriptional level of the unique IFN-λ receptor subunit IL28RA was transiently increased. In line with this observation, IFN signaling was selectively impaired in infected cells upon stimulation with alfa but not in response to Lambda. Importantly, in contrast to alfa, Lambda was able to induce IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in HCV-infected hepatocytes, reflecting the onset of innate responses. Moreover, global transcriptome analysis in hepatocytes indicated that Lambda stimulation prolonged the expression of various ISGs that are potentially beneficial to antiviral defense mechanisms. Collectively, these observed effects of HCV infection on IFN receptor expression and signaling within infected hepatocytes provide a possible explanation for the more pronounced early virologic responses observed in patients treated with Lambda compared to alfa. PMID:25826356

  19. Research Aimed at Improving Both Mood and Weight (RAINBOW) in Primary Care: A Type 1 hybrid design randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Yank, Veronica; Lv, Nan; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Lewis, Megan A.; Kramer, M. Kaye; Snowden, Mark B.; Rosas, Lisa G.; Xiao, Lan; Blonstein, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Effective interventions targeting comorbid obesity and depression are critical given the increasing prevalence and worsened outcomes for patients with both conditions. RAINBOW is a type 1 hybrid design randomized controlled trial. The objective is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness and implementation potential of an integrated, technology-enhanced, collaborative care model for treating comorbid obesity and depression in primary care. Obese and depressed adults (n=404) will be randomized to usual care enhanced with the provision of a pedometer and information about the health system’s services for mood or weight management (control) or with the Integrated Coaching for Better Mood and Weight (I-CARE) program (intervention). The 12-month I-CARE program synergistically integrates two proven behavioral interventions: problem-solving therapy with as-needed intensification of pharmacotherapy for depression (PEARLS) and standardized behavioral treatment for obesity (Group Lifestyle Balance™). It utilizes traditional (e.g., office visits and phone consults) and emerging care delivery modalities (e.g., patient web portal and mobile applications). Follow-up assessments will occur at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We hypothesize that compared with controls, I-CARE participants will have greater improvements in weight and depression severity measured by the 20-item Depression Symptom Checklist at 12 months, which will be sustained at 24 months. We will also assess I-CARE’s cost-effectiveness and use mixed methods to examine its potential for reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. This study offers the potential to change how obese and depressed adults are treated—through a new model of accessible and integrative lifestyle medicine and mental health expertise—in primary care. PMID:26096714

  20. Research aimed at improving both mood and weight (RAINBOW) in primary care: A type 1 hybrid design randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Yank, Veronica; Lv, Nan; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Lewis, Megan A; Kramer, M Kaye; Snowden, Mark B; Rosas, Lisa G; Xiao, Lan; Blonstein, Andrea C

    2015-07-01

    Effective interventions targeting comorbid obesity and depression are critical given the increasing prevalence and worsened outcomes for patients with both conditions. RAINBOW is a type 1 hybrid design randomized controlled trial. The objective is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness and implementation potential of an integrated, technology-enhanced, collaborative care model for treating comorbid obesity and depression in primary care. Obese and depressed adults (n = 404) will be randomized to usual care enhanced with the provision of a pedometer and information about the health system's services for mood or weight management (control) or with the Integrated Coaching for Better Mood and Weight (I-CARE) program (intervention). The 12-month I-CARE program synergistically integrates two proven behavioral interventions: problem-solving therapy with as-needed intensification of pharmacotherapy for depression (PEARLS) and standardized behavioral treatment for obesity (Group Lifestyle Balance(™)). It utilizes traditional (e.g., office visits and phone consults) and emerging care delivery modalities (e.g., patient web portal and mobile applications). Follow-up assessments will occur at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. We hypothesize that compared with controls, I-CARE participants will have greater improvements in weight and depression severity measured by the 20-item Depression Symptom Checklist at 12 months, which will be sustained at 24 months. We will also assess I-CARE's cost-effectiveness and use mixed methods to examine its potential for reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. This study offers the potential to change how obese and depressed adults are treated-through a new model of accessible and integrative lifestyle medicine and mental health expertise-in primary care.

  1. ERBB3-rs2292239 as primary type 1 diabetes association locus among non-HLA genes in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengjun; Wei, Haiyan; Chen, Xiuli; Zhao, Zhuhui; Du, Hongwei; Song, Wenhui; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Miaoying; Lu, Wei; Pei, Zhou; Xi, Li; Yan, Jian; Zhi, Dijing; Cheng, Ruoqian; Luo, Feihong

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that has strong contribution of genetic factors to its etiology. We aimed to assess the genetic association between non-HLA genes and T1D in a Chinese case-control cohort recruited from multiple centers consisting of 364 patients with T1D and 719 unrelated healthy children. We genotyped 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers located in 16 non-HLA genes (VTCN1, PTPN22, CTLA4, SUMO4, CD274, IL2RA, INS, DHCR7, ERBB3, VDR, CYP27B1, CD69, CD276, PTPN2, UBASH3A, and IL2RB) using SNaPshot multiple single-base extension methods. After multivariate analysis and correction for multiple comparisons, we identified the SNP rs2292239 in ERBB3 gene were significantly associated with T1D. The frequency of the major G allele was significantly decreased in patients with T1D (68.8% in T1D vs 77.3% in controls, OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.53-0.79, P = 0.02), and the minor allele T was associated with an increased risk of T1D (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.26-1.90, P = 0.02). Our haplotype analysis confirmed that rs2292239 was the primary T1D association locus in our current investigation. These results indicated that the ERBB3-rs2292239 was the primary T1D association locus among the investigated 55 SNPs in 16 non-HLA genes in Chinese Han population. PMID:27331016

  2. Application of AI techniques to blast furnace operations

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Osamu; Ushijima, Yuichi; Sawada, Toshiro

    1995-10-01

    It was during the first stages of application of artificial intelligence (AI) to industrial fields, that the ironmaking division of Mizushima works at Kawasaki Steel recognized its potential. Since that time, the division has sought applications for these techniques to solve various problems. AI techniques applied to control the No. 3 blast furnace operations at the Mizushima works include: Blast furnace control by a diagnostic type of expert system that gives guidance to the actions required for blast furnace operation as well as control of furnace heat by automatically setting blast temperature; Hot stove combustion control by a combination of fuzzy inference and a physical model to insure good thermal efficiency of the stove; and blast furnace burden control using neural networks makes it possible to connect the pattern of gas flow distribution with the condition of the furnace. Experience of AI to control the blast furnace and other ironmaking operations has proved its capability for achieving automation and increased operating efficiency. The benefits are very high. For these reasons, the applications of AI techniques will be extended in the future and new techniques studied to further improve the power of AI.

  3. Contacting dropouts from type 2 diabetes care in public primary health care: description of the patient population

    PubMed Central

    Kauppila, Timo; Laine, Merja K.; Honkasalo, Mikko; Raina, Marko; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize dropouts from type-2 diabetes (T2D) care in communal primary health care. Design An observational study. Setting In a Finnish city, patients with T2D who had not contacted the public primary health care system during the past 12 months were identified with a computer based search and contacted by a trained diabetes nurse. Subjects Dropouts from T2D treatment. Main outcome measures Demographic factors, laboratory parameters, examinations, medications, and comorbidities. Results Of the patients with T2D, 10% (n = 356) were dropouts and 60% of them were men. Median HbA1c was 6.5 (QR for 25% and 75%: 6.0, 7.7) %, (45 [42,61] mmol/mol). Of the dropouts, 14% had HbA1c ≥ 9.0% (75 mmol/mol), and these patients were younger than the other dropouts (mean age 54.4 [SD 10.8] years vs. 60.6 [9.4] years, p < 0.001). Median low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level was 2.8 (QR 2.1, 3.4) mmol/l. Median systolic blood pressure (BP) was 142 (QR 130, 160) mm Hg. Median diastolic BP was 86 (78, 94) mm Hg. Of the dropouts, 83% had comorbidities and 62% were prescribed metformin as a treatment. Conclusions Ten percent of T2D patients were dropouts of whom those with a poor glycaemic control were younger than the other dropouts. BP and LDL cholesterol concentrations were non-optimal among the majority of the dropouts. Metformin was prescribed less frequently to the dropouts than is usual for T2D patients. The comorbidities were equally common among the dropouts as among the other T2D patients. Key Points Which kinds of patients are dropouts from type-2 diabetes care is not known.• One-tenth of the patients with T2D were dropouts and they generally had good glycaemic control.• Blood pressure and LDL cholesterol concentrations were non-optimal among the majority of the dropouts.• Fourteen percent of these dropouts had HbA1c > 9% (75 mmol/mol) and they were more often younger than the other dropouts. PMID:27404014

  4. BLAST: THE REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Eales, Stephen; Dye, Simon; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Raymond, Gwenifer; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Rex, Marie; Semisch, Christopher; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P.; Patanchon, Guillaume; Siana, Brian

    2009-12-20

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has recently surveyed approx =8.7 deg{sup 2} centered on Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South at 250, 350, and 500 mum. In Dye et al., we presented the catalog of sources detected at 5sigma in at least one band in this field and the probable counterparts to these sources in other wavebands. In this paper, we present the results of a redshift survey in which we succeeded in measuring redshifts for 82 of these counterparts. The spectra show that the BLAST counterparts are mostly star-forming galaxies but not extreme ones when compared to those found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Roughly one quarter of the BLAST counterparts contain an active nucleus. We have used the spectroscopic redshifts to carry out a test of the ability of photometric redshift methods to estimate the redshifts of dusty galaxies, showing that the standard methods work well even when a galaxy contains a large amount of dust. We have also investigated the cases where there are two possible counterparts to the BLAST source, finding that in at least half of these there is evidence that the two galaxies are physically associated, either because they are interacting or because they are in the same large-scale structure. Finally, we have made the first direct measurements of the luminosity function in the three BLAST bands. We find strong evolution out to z = 1, in the sense that there is a large increase in the space density of the most luminous galaxies. We have also investigated the evolution of the dust-mass function, finding similar strong evolution in the space density of the galaxies with the largest dust masses, showing that the luminosity evolution seen in many wavebands is associated with an increase in the reservoir of interstellar matter in galaxies.

  5. Classification of Sasang constitutional body types using immunostimulatory activities of constitution-specific herbal extracts in human primary immune cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Ho; Chung, Mi Ja; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2012-09-01

    Sasang is a Korean traditional constitutional medicine in which individuals are classified into four constitutional types: Taeyangin, Soeumin, Taeumin, and Soyangin. However, the classification of each constitution is empirical and not scientific, and so it is difficult to consistently classify patients into these four constitutional types. Acanthopanacis cortex (AC; Taeyangin), Rehmanniae radix (RR; Soyangin), Ephedra herba (EH; Taeumin), and White ginseng (WG; Soeumin) are herbal medicines that are used to treat and prevent diseases associated with these four constitutions. Therefore, AC, RR, EH, and WG extracts (ACE, RRE, EHE, and WGE) were used as reference extracts to determine constitutional differences in the immunostimulatory activities of primary immune cells isolated from the blood of 15 volunteers. Cellular proliferation, nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) protein production, TNF-α and interleukin-6, and inducible NO synthase mRNA expression were measured as the immunostimulatory parameters. The increase in cell proliferation of V2, V3, V8, V11, and V12 was highest in EHE-treated lymphocytes among the ACE-, RRE-, EHE- or WGE-treated lymphocytes, and increase in cellular proliferation of V4, V7, V13, V14, and V15 in RRE-treated lymphocytes was significantly better than the other three medicines. The cell proliferation of V1, V5, V6, V9, and V10 responded best to WGE among the four extracts. Results of cell proliferation and other immunostimulatory parameters showed similar trends in regard to individual differences. These extracts may be useful as reference extracts in the development of a rapid and dependable individual lymphocyte- or macrophage-based assay that aids in the Sasang constitutional classification. PMID:22870991

  6. Primary care-public health linkages: Older primary care patients with prediabetes & type 2 diabetes encouraged to attend community-based senior centers.

    PubMed

    Noël, Polly H; Parchman, Michael L; Finley, Erin P; Wang, Chen-Pin; Bollinger, Mary; Espinoza, Sara E; Hazuda, Helen P

    2016-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) suggests that primary care-public health integration can improve health outcomes for vulnerable patients, but the extent to which formal linkages may enhance patients' use of community resources, or the factors that may influence providers to encourage their patients to use these resources, remain unclear. We conducted baseline assessments in 2014-2015 with 149 older adults with prediabetes or diabetes who had recently joined three senior centers linked to a network of primary care clinics in San Antonio, Texas. In addition to collecting sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, we asked members to identify their source of primary care and whether a health care provider had encouraged them to go to the senior center. We also asked members why they had joined the senior centers and which programs interested them the most. Members' source of primary care was not associated with being encouraged to attend the senior centers by a health care professional. Multivariable analysis indicated that participants with total annual household incomes of $20,000 or less [OR = 2.78; 95% CI = (1.05, 7.14)] and those reporting 12 years of education or less [OR = 3.57; 95% CI = (1.11, 11.11)] were significantly more likely to report being encouraged to attend the senior center by a health care provider. Providers who are aware of community-based resources to support patient self-management may be just as likely to encourage their socioeconomically vulnerable patients with prediabetes or diabetes to use them as providers who have a more formal partnership with the senior centers.

  7. Primary care-public health linkages: Older primary care patients with prediabetes & type 2 diabetes encouraged to attend community-based senior centers.

    PubMed

    Noël, Polly H; Parchman, Michael L; Finley, Erin P; Wang, Chen-Pin; Bollinger, Mary; Espinoza, Sara E; Hazuda, Helen P

    2016-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) suggests that primary care-public health integration can improve health outcomes for vulnerable patients, but the extent to which formal linkages may enhance patients' use of community resources, or the factors that may influence providers to encourage their patients to use these resources, remain unclear. We conducted baseline assessments in 2014-2015 with 149 older adults with prediabetes or diabetes who had recently joined three senior centers linked to a network of primary care clinics in San Antonio, Texas. In addition to collecting sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, we asked members to identify their source of primary care and whether a health care provider had encouraged them to go to the senior center. We also asked members why they had joined the senior centers and which programs interested them the most. Members' source of primary care was not associated with being encouraged to attend the senior centers by a health care professional. Multivariable analysis indicated that participants with total annual household incomes of $20,000 or less [OR = 2.78; 95% CI = (1.05, 7.14)] and those reporting 12 years of education or less [OR = 3.57; 95% CI = (1.11, 11.11)] were significantly more likely to report being encouraged to attend the senior center by a health care provider. Providers who are aware of community-based resources to support patient self-management may be just as likely to encourage their socioeconomically vulnerable patients with prediabetes or diabetes to use them as providers who have a more formal partnership with the senior centers. PMID:27462529

  8. Mechanisms of blast induced brain injuries, experimental studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Risling, M; Plantman, S; Angeria, M; Rostami, E; Bellander, B-M; Kirkegaard, M; Arborelius, U; Davidsson, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) potentially induced by blast waves from detonations result in significant diagnostic problems. It may be assumed that several mechanisms contribute to the injury. This study is an attempt to characterize the presumed components of the blast induced TBI. Our experimental models include a blast tube in which an anesthetized rat can be exposed to controlled detonations of explosives that result in a pressure wave with a magnitude between 130 and 260 kPa. In this model, the animal is fixed with a metal net to avoid head acceleration forces. The second model is a controlled penetration of a 2mm thick needle. In the third model the animal is subjected to a high-speed sagittal rotation angular acceleration. Immunohistochemical labeling for amyloid precursor protein revealed signs of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in the penetration and rotation models. Signs of punctuate inflammation were observed after focal and rotation injury. Exposure in the blast tube did not induce DAI or detectable cell death, but functional changes. Affymetrix Gene arrays showed changes in the expression in a large number of gene families including cell death, inflammation and neurotransmitters in the hippocampus after both acceleration and penetration injuries. Exposure to the primary blast wave induced limited shifts in gene expression in the hippocampus. The most interesting findings were a downregulation of genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic transmission. These experiments indicate that rotational acceleration may be a critical factor for DAI and other acute changes after blast TBI. The further exploration of the mechanisms of blast TBI will have to include a search for long-term effects. PMID:20493951

  9. A two-plasmid strategy for engineering a dengue virus type 3 infectious clone from primary Brazilian isolate.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jefferson J S; Cordeiro, Marli T; Bertani, Giovani R; Marques, Ernesto T A; Gil, Laura H V G

    2014-12-01

    Dengue infections represent one of the most prevalent arthropod-borne diseases worldwide, causing a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes. Engineered infectious clone is an important tool to study Dengue virus (DENV) biology. Functional full-length cDNA clones have been constructed for many positive-strand RNA viruses and have provided valuable tools for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in viral genome replication, virion assembly, virus pathogenesis and vaccine development. We report herein the successful development of an infectious clone from a primary Brazilian isolate of dengue virus 3 (DENV3) of the genotype III. Using a two-plasmid strategy, DENV3 genome was divided in two parts and cloned separately into a yeast-bacteria shuttle vector. All plasmids were assembled in yeast by homologous recombination technique and a full-length template for transcription was obtained by in vitro ligation of the two parts of the genome. Transcript-derived DENV3 is infectious upon transfection into BHK-21 cells and in vitro characterization confirmed its identity. Growth kinetics of transcript-derived DENV3 was indistinguishable from wild type DENV3. This system is a powerful tool that will help shed light on molecular features of DENV biology, as the relationship of specific mutations and DENV pathogenesis.

  10. Knowledge of diabetes among type 2 diabetes patients attending a primary health care clinic in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Perera, D P; De Silva, R E E; Perera, W L S P

    2013-07-01

    Patients' knowledge about their illness is considered important in controlling diabetes and preventing complications. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted among patients attending the diabetes clinic of a primary care level hospital in Moratuwa, Sri Lanka. During a 1-month period in 2009 all consenting patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who had been attending the clinic for more than 3 months were included in the study. Using an interviewer administered, structured questionnaire 150 patients (135 females, 15 males) answered 25 questions about diabetes knowledge (scored x4 to give score range 0-100). A majority of patients (70.0%) had a good score (> 65) on the knowledge test but critical gaps in knowledge were revealed, especially regarding knowledge about symptoms of poor control and importance of regular follow-up. Although patients with longer duration of diabetes had higher mean knowledge scores, they also had higher fasting blood glucose levels. Education programmes are needed to address critical gaps in patients' knowledge.

  11. Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase and the effects of mutations associated with Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I: An overview.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Cellini, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) (EC 2.6.1.44) catalyses the conversion of l-alanine and glyoxylate to pyruvate and glycine, a reaction that allows glyoxylate detoxification. Inherited mutations on the AGXT gene encoding AGT lead to Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1), a rare disorder characterized by the deposition of calcium oxalate crystals primarily in the urinary tract. Here we describe the results obtained on the biochemical features of AGT as well as on the molecular and cellular effects of polymorphic and pathogenic mutations. A complex scenario on the molecular pathogenesis of PH1 emerges in which the co-inheritance of polymorphic changes and the condition of homozygosis or compound heterozygosis are two important factors that determine the enzymatic phenotype of PH1 patients. All the reported data represent relevant steps toward the understanding of genotype/phenotype correlations, the prediction of the response of the patients to the available therapies, and the development of new therapeutic approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  12. Increased protein kinase A type Iα regulatory subunit expression in parathyroid gland adenomas of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yatsuka; Kambe, Fukushi; Imai, Tsuneo; Ogawa, Kimio; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Shibata, Masahiro; Kagawa, Chikara; Mizuno, Yutaka; Ito, Asako; Iwase, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) is a major regulatory subunit that functions as an inhibitor of PKA kinase activity. We have previously demonstrated that elevated RIα expression is associated with diffuse-to-nodular transformation of hyperplasia in parathyroid glands of renal hyperparathyroidism. The aim of the current study was to determine whether or not RIα expression is increased in adenomas of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), because monoclonal proliferation has been demonstrated in both adenomas and nodular hyperplasia. Surgical specimens comprising 22 adenomas and 11 normal glands, obtained from 22 patients with PHPT, were analyzed. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were employed to evaluate RIα expression. PKA activities were determined in several adenomas highly expressing RIα. RIα expression was also separately evaluated in chief and oxyphilic cells using the "Allred score" system. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a proliferation marker, was also immunohistochemically examined. Western blot analysis revealed that 5 out of 8 adenomas highly expressed RIα, compared with normal glands. PKA activity in adenomas was significantly less than in normal glands. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated high expression of RIα in 20 out of 22 adenomas. In adenomas, the greater RIα expression and more PCNA positive cells were observed in both chief and oxyphilic cells. The present study suggested that high RIα expression could contribute to monoclonal proliferation of parathyroid cells by impairing the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:23197043

  13. The global impact factors of net primary production in different land cover types from 2005 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Chen, Fang

    2016-01-01

    With the seriously polluted environment due to social development, the sustainability of net primary production (NPP), which is used to feed most lives on the earth, has become one of the biggest concerns that we have to consider for the sake of food shortage. There have been many researches analyzing one or two potential impact factors of NPP based on field observation data, which brings about many uncertainties for further calculation. Moreover, the frequently used process-based models heavily depend on the understandings of researchers about the NPP process. The premises of such models hinder the impact factor analysis from being objective and confident. To overcome such shortages, we collected 27 potential impact factors of global NPP in terms of eight land cover types. The feature variables include atmosphere, biosphere, anthroposphere and lithosphere parameters, which can be obtained from public available remote sensed products. The experiment shows that latitude, irradiance ultraviolet and normalized difference vegetation index are dominant factors impacting global NPP. Anthropogenic activities, precipitation and surface emissivity are influencing NPP calculation largely. However, some commonly used biosphere parameters in process-based models are actually not playing that important roles in NPP estimation. This work provides a new insight in analyzing NPP impact factors, being more objective and comprehensive compared with frequently used process-based models. PMID:27536518

  14. Propagation of adenovirus types 40 and 41 in the PLC/PRF/5 primary liver carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Grabow, W O; Puttergill, D L; Bosch, A

    1992-05-01

    The sensitivity of cell cultures to adenovirus types 40 and 41 (Ad40/41) was compared by means of cell culture infectious dose (ID50) assays using monolayer cultures in microtitre plates. The PLC/PRF/5 cell line derived from a primary human hepatocellular carcinoma was 100 times more sensitive to a laboratory strain of Ad41, and 10 times more sensitive to a laboratory strain of Ad40 and two Ad41 stool isolates, than Graham 293 and Chang conjunctival cells commonly used for the propagation of these viruses. In microtitre plate titration assays PLC/PRF/5 cells retained an optimal condition for longer and displayed cytopathogenic effects earlier and more clearly than the other cell lines. In contrast to previously used cells, PLC/PRF/5 cells also proved successful for the quantitation of Ad41, but not Ad40, by conventional plaque assays. The reason for the exceptional susceptibility of PLC/PRF/5 cells has not been elucidated, but the findings open attractive new doors for research on Ad40/41.

  15. Farming the planet: 2. Geographic distribution of crop areas, yields, physiological types, and net primary production in the year 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfreda, Chad; Ramankutty, Navin; Foley, Jonathan A.

    2008-03-01

    Croplands cover ~15 million km2 of the planet and provide the bulk of the food and fiber essential to human well-being. Most global land cover data sets from satellites group croplands into just a few categories, thereby excluding information that is critical for answering key questions ranging from biodiversity conservation to food security to biogeochemical cycling. Information about agricultural land use practices like crop selection, yield, and fertilizer use is even more limited. Here we present land use data sets created by combining national, state, and county level census statistics with a recently updated global data set of croplands on a 5 min by 5 min (~10 km by 10 km) latitude-longitude grid. The resulting land use data sets depict circa the year 2000 the area (harvested) and yield of 175 distinct crops of the world. We aggregate these individual crop maps to produce novel maps of 11 major crop groups, crop net primary production, and four physiologically based crop types: annuals/perennials, herbaceous/shrubs/trees, C3/C4, and leguminous/nonleguminous.

  16. The global impact factors of net primary production in different land cover types from 2005 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Chen, Fang

    2016-01-01

    With the seriously polluted environment due to social development, the sustainability of net primary production (NPP), which is used to feed most lives on the earth, has become one of the biggest concerns that we have to consider for the sake of food shortage. There have been many researches analyzing one or two potential impact factors of NPP based on field observation data, which brings about many uncertainties for further calculation. Moreover, the frequently used process-based models heavily depend on the understandings of researchers about the NPP process. The premises of such models hinder the impact factor analysis from being objective and confident. To overcome such shortages, we collected 27 potential impact factors of global NPP in terms of eight land cover types. The feature variables include atmosphere, biosphere, anthroposphere and lithosphere parameters, which can be obtained from public available remote sensed products. The experiment shows that latitude, irradiance ultraviolet and normalized difference vegetation index are dominant factors impacting global NPP. Anthropogenic activities, precipitation and surface emissivity are influencing NPP calculation largely. However, some commonly used biosphere parameters in process-based models are actually not playing that important roles in NPP estimation. This work provides a new insight in analyzing NPP impact factors, being more objective and comprehensive compared with frequently used process-based models.

  17. Two novel AGXT mutations identified in primary hyperoxaluria type-1 and distinct morphological and structural difference in kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Lu, Jingru; Lang, Yanhua; Liu, Ting; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Shao, Leping

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare genetic disease characterized by excessive oxalate accumulation in plasma and urine, resulting in various phenotypes because of allelic and clinical heterogeneity. This study aimed to detect disease-associated genetic mutations in three PH1 patients in a Chinese family. All AGXT exons and 3 common polymorphisms which might synergistically interact with mutations, including P11L, I340 M and IVSI+74 bp were analyzed by direct sequencing in all family members. It demonstrated that in each of three patients, a previously reported nonsense mutation p.R333(*) was in cis with a novel missense mutation p.M49L in the minor allele characterized by the polymorphism of 74-bp duplication in intron 1, while the other novel missense mutation p.N72I was in trans with both p.R333(*) and P.M49L in the major allele. Kidney stones from two sibling patients were also observed though stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. Distinct morphological and inner-structure differences in calculi were noticed, suggesting clinical heterozygosity of PH1 to a certain extent. In brief, two novel missense mutations were identified probably in association with PH1, a finding which should provide an accurate tool for prenatal diagnosis, genetic counseling and screening for potential presymptomatic individuals. PMID:27644547

  18. Primary infection with simian immunodeficiency virus: plasmacytoid dendritic cell homing to lymph nodes, type I interferon, and immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Malleret, Benoît; Manéglier, Benjamin; Karlsson, Ingrid; Lebon, Pierre; Nascimbeni, Michelina; Perié, Leïla; Brochard, Patricia; Delache, Benoît; Calvo, Julien; Andrieu, Thibault; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Hosmalin, Anne; Le Grand, Roger; Vaslin, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are antigen-presenting cells that develop into type-I interferon (IFN-I)-producing cells in response to pathogens. Their role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis needs to be understood. We analyzed their dynamics in relation to innate and adaptive immunity very early during the acute phase of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in 18 macaques. pDC counts decreased in blood and increased in peripheral lymph nodes, consistent with early recruitment in secondary lymphoid tissues. These changes correlated with the kinetic and intensity of viremia and were associated with a peak of plasma IFN-I. IFN-I and viremia were positively correlated with functional activity of the immune suppression associated enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and FoxP3(+)CD8(+) T cells, which both negatively correlated with SIV-specific T-cell proliferation and CD4(+) T-cell activation. These data suggest that pDCs and IFN-I play a key role in shaping innate and adaptive immunity toward suppressive pathways during the acute phase of SIV/HIV primary infection. PMID:18787223

  19. Comparison of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral loads in Kenyan women, men, and infants during primary and early infection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Barbra A; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Lavreys, Ludo; John-Stewart, Grace C; Nduati, Ruth; Panteleeff, Dana D; Emery, Sandra; Kreiss, Joan K; Overbaugh, Julie

    2003-06-01

    Steady-state levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in plasma reached at approximately 4 months postinfection are highly predictive of disease progression. Several studies have investigated viral levels in adults or infants during primary and early infection. However, no studies have directly compared these groups. We compared differences in peak and set point plasma HIV-1 RNA viral loads among antiretrovirus-naive Kenyan infants and adults for whom the timing of infection was well defined. Peak and set point viral loads were significantly higher in infants than in adults. We did not observe any gender-specific differences in viral set point in either adults or infants. However, infants who acquired HIV-1 in the first 2 months of life, either in utero, intrapartum, or through early breast milk transmission, had significantly higher set point HIV-1 RNA levels than infants who were infected after 2 months of age through late breast milk transmission or adults who were infected through heterosexual transmission.

  20. Two novel AGXT mutations identified in primary hyperoxaluria type-1 and distinct morphological and structural difference in kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cui; Lu, Jingru; Lang, Yanhua; Liu, Ting; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Shao, Leping

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare genetic disease characterized by excessive oxalate accumulation in plasma and urine, resulting in various phenotypes because of allelic and clinical heterogeneity. This study aimed to detect disease-associated genetic mutations in three PH1 patients in a Chinese family. All AGXT exons and 3 common polymorphisms which might synergistically interact with mutations, including P11L, I340 M and IVSI+74 bp were analyzed by direct sequencing in all family members. It demonstrated that in each of three patients, a previously reported nonsense mutation p.R333* was in cis with a novel missense mutation p.M49L in the minor allele characterized by the polymorphism of 74-bp duplication in intron 1, while the other novel missense mutation p.N72I was in trans with both p.R333* and P.M49L in the major allele. Kidney stones from two sibling patients were also observed though stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. Distinct morphological and inner-structure differences in calculi were noticed, suggesting clinical heterozygosity of PH1 to a certain extent. In brief, two novel missense mutations were identified probably in association with PH1, a finding which should provide an accurate tool for prenatal diagnosis, genetic counseling and screening for potential presymptomatic individuals. PMID:27644547

  1. Temperatures in the blast furnace refractory lining

    SciTech Connect

    Hebel, R.; Streuber, C.; Steiger, R.; Jeschar, R.

    1995-12-01

    The campaign life duration of a blast furnace is mainly determined by the condition of the refractory lining in heavy-duty zones such as the hearth, bosh, belly and lower stack. To achieve a desired lifetime, the temperature of the lining in these areas thereby proved to be the decisive controllable parameter. Low operating temperatures result in prolonged service life and are attained through high cooling efficiency. Besides the refractory grade chosen, the wear profile is mainly determined by the type of cooling system applied and the cooling intensity. Therefore, an appropriate compromise between long service life and energy losses has to be found in each case. In order to predict the service life of a lining it is important to know the wear condition at all times during the campaign. The paper describes the approaches the authors have made so far on European blast furnaces, on a theoretical and practical basis, on how to analyze the lining wear.

  2. Type D Personality and Essential Hypertension in Primary Care: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study Within a Cohort of Patients Visiting General Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Versino, Elisabetta; Gammino, Lorenzo; Colombi, Nicoletta; Ostacoli, Luca; Carletto, Sara; Furlan, Pier Maria; Picci, Rocco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the relationship between type D personality and essential hypertension among patients visiting their GPs for any health problem, 101 hypertensive and 138 nonhypertensive patients were consecutively recruited and assessed using the Type D Personality Scale (DS14). The predictive value of type D personality was determined using a logistic regression model, taking into account the differences in recognized confounders between groups. Type D personality in the hypertension group was twice as frequent as in the no hypertension group and hypertension was more frequent among type D than non-type D patients. Logistic regression showed a significant predictive value of type D personality for hypertension, adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, family history of hypertension, living condition, education, and employment. Therefore, type D personality was strongly related to hypertension and it was a noteworthy predictor of hypertension in a real-world cohort of primary care patients.

  3. Control of Glycemia and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Care in Catalonia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, Irene; Mata-Cases, Manel; Hermosilla, Eduard; Morros, Rosa; Fina, Francesc; Rosell, Magdalena; Castell, Conxa; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Bolíbar, Bonaventura; Mauricio, Didac

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and levels of glycemic and cardiovascular risk factor control in patients with type 2 diabetes that are in primary health care centers in Catalonia (Spain). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study of a total population of 3,755,038 individuals aged 31–90 years at the end of 2009. Clinical data were obtained retrospectively from electronic clinical records. RESULTS A total of 286,791 patients with type 2 diabetes were identified (7.6%). Fifty-four percent were men, mean (SD) age was 68.2 (11.4) years, and mean duration of disease was 6.5 (5.1) years. The mean (SD) A1C value was 7.15 (1.5)%, and 56% of the patients had A1C values ≤7%. The mean (SD) blood pressure (BP) values were 137.2 (13.8)/76.4 (8.3) mmHg, mean total cholesterol concentration was 192 (38.6) mg/dL, mean HDL cholesterol concentration was 49.3 (13.2) mg/dL, mean LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration was 112.5 (32.4) mg/dL, and mean BMI was 29.6 (5) kg/m2. Thirty-one percent of the patients had BP values ≤130/80 mmHg, 37.9% had LDL-C values ≤100 mg/dL, and 45.4% had BMI values ≤30 kg/m2. Twenty-two percent were managed exclusively with lifestyle changes. Regarding medicated diabetic patients, 46.9, 22.9, and 2.8% were prescribed one, two, or three antidiabetic drugs, respectively, and 23.4% received insulin therapy. CONCLUSIONS The results from this study indicate a similar or improved control of glycemia, lipids, and BP in patients with type 2 diabetes when compared with previous studies performed in Spain and elsewhere. PMID:22344609

  4. BLAST: The Balloon-Borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, Mark; Ade, Peter; Bock, Jamie; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matt; Gunderson, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    BLAST is the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope. It will fly from a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform from Antarctica. The telescope design incorporates a 2 m primary mirror with large-format bolometer arrays operating at 250, 350 and 500 microns. By providing the first sensitive large-area (10 sq. deg.) sub-mm surveys at these wavelengths, BLAST will address some of the most important galactic and cosmological questions regarding the formation and evolution of stars, galaxies and clusters. Galactic and extragalactic BLAST surveys will: (1) identify large numbers of high-redshift galaxies; (2) measure photometric redshifts, rest-frame FIR luminosities and star formation rates thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the galaxies that produce the FIR and sub-mm background; (3) measure cold pre-stellar sources associated with the earliest stages of star and planet formation; (4) make high-resolution maps of diffuse galactic emission over a wide range of galactic latitudes. In addition to achieving the above scientific goals, the exciting legacy of the BLAST LDB experiment will be a catalogue of 3000-5000 extragalactic sub-mm sources and a 100 sq. deg. sub-mm galactic plane survey. Multi-frequency follow-up observations from SIRTF, ASTRO-F, and Herschel, together with spectroscopic observations and sub-arcsecond imaging from ALMA are essential to understand the physical nature of the BLAST sources.

  5. Blast impact behaviour of concrete with different fibre reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdlová, Martina; Čechmánek, René; Řídký, Radek

    2015-09-01

    The paper summarizes the results of the development of special concrete intended for the explosion resistance applications, with the emphasis on minimal secondary fragments formation at the explosion. The fine-grained concrete matrix has been reinforced by various types of short dispersed fibers (metallic, mineral and polymer) of different sizes and by their combination and the effect of the fibre reinforcement on the physico-mechanical properties and blast resistance was observed. The concrete prism specimens have been subjected to the determination of mechanical parameters (compressive and flexural strength at quasi-static load). The blast tests were conducted on the slab specimens prepared from selected mixtures. The material characteristics and explosion test data have been used for numerical investigation, which defined the optimal wall composition and dimensions of the concrete element which should resist the explosion defined by type, size, weight and placement of the blast. In the next step the test elements resistance was verified by real explosion test.

  6. Co-blasting of titanium surfaces with an abrasive and hydroxyapatite to produce bioactive coatings: substrate and coating characterisation.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Conor F; Twomey, Barry; O'Neill, Liam; Stanton, Kenneth T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the influence of two blast media on the deposition of hydroxyapatite onto a titanium substrate using a novel ambient temperature coating technique named CoBlast. CoBlast was developed to address the problems with high temperature coating techniques. The blasting media used in this study were Al2O3 and a sintered apatite powder. The prepared and coated surfaces were compared to plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite on the same substrates using the same hydroxyapatite feedstock powder. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the coating crystallinity was the same as the original hydroxyapatite feedstock powder for the CoBlast samples while evidence of amorphous hydroxyapatite phases and β-TCP was observed in the plasma sprayed samples. The blast media type significantly influences the adhesive strength of the coating, surface roughness of both the substrate and coating and the microstructure of the substrate. The coating adhesion increased for the CoBlasted samples from 50 MPa to 60 MPa for sintered apatite powder and alumina, respectively, while plasma spray samples were significantly lower (5 MPa) when tested using a modified pull-test. In conclusion, the choice of blast medium is shown to be a key parameter in the CoBlast process. This study indicates that sintered apatite powder is the most suitable candidate for use as a blast medium in the coating of medical devices.

  7. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  8. 30 CFR 57.6803 - Blasting lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blasting lines. 57.6803 Section 57.6803 Mineral... and Underground § 57.6803 Blasting lines. Permanent blasting lines shall be properly supported. All blasting lines shall be insulated and kept in good repair. General Requirements—Surface and Underground...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6803 - Blasting lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blasting lines. 56.6803 Section 56.6803 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Blasting lines. Permanent blasting lines shall be properly supported. All blasting lines shall be...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nonsparking metal loading tube when tube is necessary. (d) No blast shall be fired while any vessel under way... within 1,500 feet shall be notified before a blast is fired. (e) No blast shall be fired while any... in progress, signals and arrangements shall be agreed upon to assure that no blast shall be...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nonsparking metal loading tube when tube is necessary. (d) No blast shall be fired while any vessel under way... within 1,500 feet shall be notified before a blast is fired. (e) No blast shall be fired while any... in progress, signals and arrangements shall be agreed upon to assure that no blast shall be...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nonsparking metal loading tube when tube is necessary. (d) No blast shall be fired while any vessel under way... within 1,500 feet shall be notified before a blast is fired. (e) No blast shall be fired while any... in progress, signals and arrangements shall be agreed upon to assure that no blast shall be...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nonsparking metal loading tube when tube is necessary. (d) No blast shall be fired while any vessel under way... within 1,500 feet shall be notified before a blast is fired. (e) No blast shall be fired while any... in progress, signals and arrangements shall be agreed upon to assure that no blast shall be...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting circuits. 75.1323 Section 75.1323... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blasting circuits. 75.1323 Section 75.1323... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blasting circuits. 75.1323 Section 75.1323... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underwater blasting. 1926.912 Section 1926.912 Labor... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... explosives aboard vessels used in underwater blasting operations shall be according to provisions...

  18. JC Polyomavirus Infection of Primary Human Renal Epithelial Cells Is Controlled by a Type I IFN-Induced Response

    PubMed Central

    Assetta, Benedetta; De Cecco, Marco; O’Hara, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The JC and BK human polyomaviruses (JCPyV and BKPyV, respectively) establish lifelong persistent infections in the kidney. In immunosuppressed individuals, JCPyV causes progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, and BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVN). In this study, we compared JCPyV and BKPyV infections in primary human renal proximal tubule epithelial (HRPTE) cells. JCPyV established a persistent infection, but BKPyV killed the cells in 15 days. To identify the cellular factors responsible for controlling JCPyV infection and promoting viral persistence, we profiled the transcriptomes of JCPyV- and BKPyV-infected cells at several time points postinfection. We found that infection with both viruses induced interferon production but that interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) were only activated in the JCPyV-infected cells. Phosphorylated STAT1 and IRF9, which are responsible for inducing ISGs, translocated to the nucleus of JCPyV-infected cells but did not in BKPyV-infected cells. In BKPyV-infected cells, two critical suppressors of cytokine signaling, SOCS3 and SOCS1, were induced. Infection with BKPyV but not JCPyV caused reorganization of PML bodies that are associated with inactivating antiviral responses. Blockade of the interferon receptor and neutralization of soluble interferon alpha (IFN-α) and IFN-β partially alleviated the block to JCPyV infection, leading to enhanced infectivity. Our results show that a type I IFN response contributes to the establishment of persistent infection by JCPyV in HRPTE cells. PMID:27381292

  19. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  20. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  1. Method of blast heating

    SciTech Connect

    Voges, B.

    1984-06-05

    A method of and a device for blast heating is described, employing separate indirect heat exchangers for combustion air and fuel gas fed to a regenerator and flue gases discharged from the regenerator. The indirect heat exchangers share heat-transfer liquid recirculating in a circuit in which an auxiliary heat exchanger is connected. In the latter exchanger, the temperature of transfer liquid is increased by combustion of partial streams of combustion air and fuel gas branched off downstream of the indirect heat exchangers. The temperature is increased to such a value which preheats the fuel gas to a temperature at which a substitution of fuel gas of a low calorific value, such as waste gas from a blast furnace, for fuel gas of high calorific value, is made possible.

  2. Performance of blasting caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Common blasting caps are made from an aluminum shell in the form of a tube which is closed at both ends. One end, which is called the output end, terminates in a principal side or face, and contains a detonating agent which communicates with a means for igniting the detonating agent. The improvement of the present invention is a flat, steel foil bonded to the face in a position which is aligned perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the tube.

  3. Computer assisted blast design and assessment tools

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, A.R.; Kleine, T.H.; Forsyth, W.W.

    1995-12-31

    In general the software required by a blast designer includes tools that graphically present blast designs (surface and underground), can analyze a design or predict its result, and can assess blasting results. As computers develop and computer literacy continues to rise the development of and use of such tools will spread. An example of the tools that are becoming available includes: Automatic blast pattern generation and underground ring design; blast design evaluation in terms of explosive distribution and detonation simulation; fragmentation prediction; blast vibration prediction and minimization; blast monitoring for assessment of dynamic performance; vibration measurement, display and signal processing; evaluation of blast results in terms of fragmentation; and risk and reliability based blast assessment. The authors have identified a set of criteria that are essential in choosing appropriate software blasting tools.

  4. A mouse model of blast injury to brain: initial pathological, neuropathological, and behavioral characterization.

    PubMed

    Koliatsos, Vassilis E; Cernak, Ibolja; Xu, Leyan; Song, Yeajin; Savonenko, Alena; Crain, Barbara J; Eberhart, Charles G; Frangakis, Constantine E; Melnikova, Tatiana; Kim, Hyunsu; Lee, Deidre

    2011-05-01

    The increased use of explosives in recent wars has increased the number of veterans with blast injuries. Of particular interest is blast injury to the brain, and a key question is whether the primary overpressure wave of the blast is injurious or whether brain injury from blast is mostly due to secondary and tertiary effects. Using a shock tube generating shock waves comparable to open-field blast waves, we explored the effects of blast on parenchymatous organs of mice with emphasis on the brain. The main injuries in nonbrain organs were hemorrhages in the lung interstitium and alveolar spaces and hemorrhagic infarcts in liver, spleen, and kidney. Neuropathological and behavioral outcomes of blast were studied at mild blast intensity, that is, 68 ± 8 kPag (9.9 ± 1.2 psig) static pressure, 103 kPag (14.9 psig) total pressure and 183 ± 14 kPag (26.5 ± 2.1 psig) membrane rupture pressure. Under these conditions, we observed multifocal axonal injury, primarily in the cerebellum/brainstem, the corticospinal system, and the optic tract. We also found prolonged behavioral and motor abnormalities, including deficits in social recognition and spatial memory and in motor coordination. Shielding of the torso ameliorated axonal injury and behavioral deficits. These findings indicate that long CNS axon tracts are particularly vulnerable to the effects of blast, even at mild intensities that match the exposure of most veterans in recent wars. Prevention of some of these neurological effects by torso shielding may generate new ideas as to how to protect military and civilian populations in blast scenarios. PMID:21487304

  5. Galveston Brain Injury Conference 2010: clinical and experimental aspects of blast injury.

    PubMed

    Masel, Brent E; Bell, Randy S; Brossart, Shawn; Grill, Raymond J; Hayes, Ronald L; Levin, Harvey S; Rasband, Matthew N; Ritzel, David V; Wade, Charles E; DeWitt, Douglas S

    2012-08-10

    Blast injury is the most prevalent source of mortality and morbidity among combatants in Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a common cause of mortality, and even mild BINT may be associated with chronic cognitive and emotional deficits. In addition to military personnel, the increasing use of explosives by terrorists has resulted in growing numbers of blast injuries in civilian populations. Since the medical and rehabilitative communities are likely to be faced with increasing numbers of patients suffering from blast injury, the 2010 Galveston Brain Injury Conference focused on topics related to the diagnosis, treatment, and mechanisms of BINT. Although past military actions have resulted in large numbers of blast casualties, BINT is considered the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The attention focused on BINT has led to increased financial support for research on blast effects, contributing to the development of better experimental models of blast injury and a clearer understanding of the mechanisms of BINT. This more thorough understanding of blast injury mechanisms will result in novel and more effective therapeutic and rehabilitative strategies designed to reduce injury and facilitate recovery, thereby improving long-term outcomes in patients suffering from the devastating and often lasting effects of BINT. The following is a summary of the 2010 Galveston Brain Injury Conference, that included presentations related to the diagnosis and treatment of acute BINT, the evaluation of the long-term neuropsychological effects of BINT, summaries of current experimental models of BINT, and a debate about the relative importance of primary blast effects on the acute and long-term consequences of blast exposure.

  6. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots.

  7. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots. PMID:26628518

  8. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots. PMID:26628518

  9. Blast-related fracture patterns: a forensic biomechanical approach

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Arul; Hill, Adam M.; Masouros, Spyros; Gibb, Iain; Bull, Anthony M. J.; Clasper, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    Improved protective measures and medical care has increased the survivability from battlefield injuries. In an attempt to reduce the debilitating consequences of blast injury, understanding and mitigating the effects of explosion on the extremities is key. In this study, forensic biomechanical analyses have been applied to determine mechanisms of injury after the traumatic event. The aims of this study were (i) to determine which effects of the explosion are responsible for combat casualty extremity bone injury in two distinct environments, namely open, free-field (open group), and in vehicle or in cover (enclosed group), and (ii) to determine whether patterns of combat casualty bone injury differed between environments. Medical records of casualties admitted to a military hospital in Afghanistan were reviewed over a six-month period. Explosive injuries have been sub-divided traditionally into primary, secondary and tertiary effects. All radiographs were independently reviewed by a military radiologist, a team of military orthopaedic surgeons and a team of academic biomechanists, in order to determine ‘zones of injury’ (ZoIs), and their related mechanisms. Sixty-two combat casualties with 115 ZoIs were identified. Thirty-four casualties in the open group sustained 56 ZoIs; 28 casualties in the enclosed group sustained 59 ZoIs. There was no statistical difference in mean ZoIs per casualty between groups (p = 0.54). There was a higher proportion of lower limb injuries in the enclosed group compared with the open group (p < 0.05). Of the casualties in the open group, 1 ZoI was owing to the primary effects of blast, 10 owing to a combination of primary and secondary blast effects, 23 owing to secondary blast effects and 24 owing to tertiary blast effects. In contrast, tertiary blast effects predominated in the enclosed group, accounting for 96 per cent of ZoIs. These data clearly demonstrate two distinct injury groups based upon the casualties' environment. The

  10. Blast furnace injection symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    These proceedings contain 14 papers related to blast furnace injection issues. Topics include coal quality, coal grinding, natural gas injection, stable operation of the blast furnace, oxygen enrichment, coal conveying, and performance at several steel companies. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. M.A. Ebadian

    2000-01-13

    The purpose of the project is to increase the productivity and economics of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCB's and lead-base paint and provides worker and environmental protection by continuously recycling the blast media and the full containment of the dust generated in the process.

  12. [Blast injuries of the ear].

    PubMed

    Haralampiev, K; Ristić, B

    1991-01-01

    Blast injury of the ear is the actual military medical problem. The ear, due to its anatomo-physiologic characteristics, is more sensitive to effects of blast waves than other organs and systems. The anatomic and functional ear damages, their symptoms, etiology and clinical course are described. The diagnosis and treatment have been pointed out. PMID:1807053

  13. MAGAZINE E30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE E-30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL LOOKING TO THE REAR OF THE MAGAZINE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. MAGAZINE E3. ENTRY WITH DOORS OPEN SHOWING FIRST BLAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE E-3-. ENTRY WITH DOORS OPEN SHOWING FIRST BLAST WALL WITH RANGE POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Cellular Mechanisms and Behavioral Outcomes in Blast-Induced Neurotrauma: Comparing Experimental Setups.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Hubbard, W Brad; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) has increased in incidence over the past decades and can result in cognitive issues that have debilitating consequences. The exact primary and secondary mechanisms of injury have not been elucidated and appearance of cellular injury can vary based on many factors, such as blast overpressure magnitude and duration. Many methodologies to study blast neurotrauma have been employed, ranging from open-field explosives to experimental shock tubes for producing free-field blast waves. While there are benefits to the various methods, certain specifications need to be accounted for in order to properly examine BINT. Primary cell injury mechanisms, occurring as a direct result of the blast wave, have been identified in several studies and include cerebral vascular damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, axonal injury, and cytoskeletal damage. Secondary cell injury mechanisms, triggered subsequent to the initial insult, result in the activation of several molecular cascades and can include, but are not limited to, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. The collective result of these secondary injuries can lead to functional deficits. Behavioral measures examining motor function, anxiety traits, and cognition/memory problems have been utilized to determine the level of injury severity. While cellular injury mechanisms have been identified following blast exposure, the various experimental models present both concurrent and conflicting results. Furthermore, the temporal response and progression of pathology after blast exposure have yet to be detailed and remain unclear due to limited resemblance of methodologies. This chapter summarizes the current state of blast neuropathology and emphasizes the need for a standardized preclinical model of blast neurotrauma.

  16. Cellular Mechanisms and Behavioral Outcomes in Blast-Induced Neurotrauma: Comparing Experimental Setups.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Hubbard, W Brad; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) has increased in incidence over the past decades and can result in cognitive issues that have debilitating consequences. The exact primary and secondary mechanisms of injury have not been elucidated and appearance of cellular injury can vary based on many factors, such as blast overpressure magnitude and duration. Many methodologies to study blast neurotrauma have been employed, ranging from open-field explosives to experimental shock tubes for producing free-field blast waves. While there are benefits to the various methods, certain specifications need to be accounted for in order to properly examine BINT. Primary cell injury mechanisms, occurring as a direct result of the blast wave, have been identified in several studies and include cerebral vascular damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, axonal injury, and cytoskeletal damage. Secondary cell injury mechanisms, triggered subsequent to the initial insult, result in the activation of several molecular cascades and can include, but are not limited to, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. The collective result of these secondary injuries can lead to functional deficits. Behavioral measures examining motor function, anxiety traits, and cognition/memory problems have been utilized to determine the level of injury severity. While cellular injury mechanisms have been identified following blast exposure, the various experimental models present both concurrent and conflicting results. Furthermore, the temporal response and progression of pathology after blast exposure have yet to be detailed and remain unclear due to limited resemblance of methodologies. This chapter summarizes the current state of blast neuropathology and emphasizes the need for a standardized preclinical model of blast neurotrauma. PMID:27604716

  17. Disability evaluation in acoustic blast trauma

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acoustic blast trauma is different from Noise induced hearing loss. Blast trauma can damage the tympanic membrane, ossicles and cochlea singly or in combination. It produces immediate severe hearing loss and may be associated with tinnitus and vestibular symptoms. Hearing loss recovers spontaneously in many cases but may be permanent in 30-55% cases. Thirteen patients working in an explosive manufacturing unit in Andhra Pradesh were exposed to blast trauma at work place. All these workers complained of immediate hearing loss and were subjected to audiological investigations. Methods: Initial evaluation showed a severe sensorineural type of hearing loss 10 of the 13 cases (77%). They were referred to our Medical board for disability evaluation after 2-3 years of initial injury. Pure tone audiometry indicated severe hearing loss in 12 of 13 cases (92%) that was not correlating clinically. Re-evaluation with Acoustic reflex and ABR (BERA) tests were done and permanent disability was evaluated with the results of these investigations. Observations: No significant hearing loss was found in most patients and these patients had minimal disability. Conclusion: Objective hearing tests should be carried out after one year or more before evaluation of permanent disability. PMID:26957811

  18. Developments in vapour cloud explosion blast modeling.

    PubMed

    Mercx, W P; van den Berg, A C; Hayhurst, C J; Robertson, N J; Moran, K C

    2000-01-01

    TNT Equivalency methods are widely used for vapour cloud explosion blast modeling. Presently, however, other types of models are available which do not have the fundamental objections TNT Equivalency models have. TNO Multi-Energy method is increasingly accepted as a more reasonable alternative to be used as a simple and practical method. Computer codes based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) like AutoReaGas, developed by TNO and Century Dynamics, could be used also in case a more rigorous analysis is required. Application of the Multi-Energy method requires knowledge of two parameters describing the explosion: a charge size and a charge strength. During the last years, research has led to an improved determination of the charge strength (i.e., the class number or source overpressure) to be chosen to apply the blast charts. A correlation has been derived relating the charge strength to a set of parameters describing the boundary conditions of the flammable cloud and the fuel in the cloud. A simple approach may not be satisfactory in all situations. The overpressure distribution inside a vapour cloud explosion is generally not homogeneous and the presence of obstructions causes directional blast propagation in the near field. A CFD approach, in which the actual situation is modeled, supplies case-specific results. An overview of the key aspects relevant to the application of the Multi-Energy method and CFD modeling is provided. Then the application of the two methods is demonstrated for an example problem involving the calculation of the explosion blast load on a structure at some distance from the explosion in an offshore platform complex.

  19. Alumina grit blasting parameters for surface preparation in the plasma spraying operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellali, M.; Grimaud, A.; Leger, A. C.; Fauchais, P.; Lu, J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper examines how the grit blasting process influences the surface roughness of different sub-strates, the grit residue, and the grit erosion. The influence of grit blasting conditions on induced sub-strate residual stresses is also discussed. Aluminum alloy, cast iron, and hard steel were blasted with white alumina grits of 0.5,1, and 1.4 mm mean diameters. Grit blasting was performed using either a suction-type or a pressure-type machine equipped with straight nozzles made of B4C. The influence of the follow-ing parameters was studied: grit blasting distance (56 to 200 mm), blasting time (3 to 30 s), angle between nozzle and blasted surface (30°, 60°, 90°), and blasting pressure (0.2 to 0.7 MPa). The roughness of the substrate was characterized either by using a perthometer or by image analysis. The grit residue remain-ing at the blasted surface was evaluated after cleaning by image analysis. The residual stresses induced by grit blasting were determined by using the incremental hole drilling method and by measuring the de-flection of grit-blasted beams. Grit size was determined to be the most important influence on roughness. The average values of Ra and Rt and the percentage of grit residue increased with grit size as well as the depth of the plastic zone under the substrate. An increase of the pressure slightly increased the values of Äa and Rt but also promoted grit breakdown and grit residue. A blasting time of 3 to 6 s was sufficient to obtain the highest roughness and limit the grit breakdown. The residual stresses generated under the blasted surface were compressive, and the depth of the affected zone depended on the grit diameter, the blasting pressure, and the Young’s modulus of the substrate. More-over, the maximum residual stress was reached at the limit of the plastic zone (i.e., several tenths of a mil-limeter below the substrate surface).

  20. X-RAY SCALING RELATION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DARK MATTER AS A PRIMARY FACTOR IN RETAINING HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    2013-10-20

    We have revisited the X-ray scaling relations of early-type galaxies (ETG) by investigating, for the first time, the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} relation in a sample of 14 ETGs. In contrast to the large scatter (a factor of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) in the L{sub X,Total}-L{sub B} relation, we found a tight correlation between these physically motivated quantities with an rms deviation of a factor of three in L{sub X,Gas} = 10{sup 38}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1} or M{sub Total} = a few × 10{sup 10} to a few × 10{sup 12} M{sub ☉}. More striking, this relation becomes even tighter with an rms deviation of a factor of 1.3 among the gas-rich galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} > 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}). In a simple power-law form, the new relation is (L{sub X,Gas}/10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}) = (M{sub Total}/3.2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}){sup 3}. This relation is also consistent with the steep relation between the gas luminosity and temperature, L{sub X,Gas} ∼ T{sub Gas} {sup 4.5}, identified by Boroson et al., if the gas is virialized. Our results indicate that the total mass of an ETG is the primary factor in regulating the amount of hot gas. Among the gas-poor galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} < a few × 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1}), the scatter in the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} (and L{sub X,Gas}-T{sub Gas}) relation increases, suggesting that secondary factors (e.g., rotation, flattening, star formation history, cold gas, environment, etc.) may become important.

  1. Primary Intestinal Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type: A Comprehensive Clinicopathological Analysis of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bao-Hua; Shui, Ruo-Hong; Sheng, Wei-Qi; Wang, Chao-Fu; Lu, Hong-Fen; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Xiong-Zeng; Li, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinicopathological features, survival and prognostic factors of primary intestinal extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (PI-ENKTCL). Methods Clinical and histological characteristics of PI-ENKTCL cases were retrospectively evaluated. Immunohistochemical phenotype and status of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement were examined. The overall survival and prognostic parameters were also analyzed. Results Fifty-five (2.7%) cases with PI-ENKTCL were identified out of 2017 archived ENKTCL cases, with a median age of 39 years and a male to female ratio of 2.1:1. The most common symptom was abdominal pain (90.9%), accompanied frequently with fever and less commonly with intestinal perforation or B symptoms. Small intestine (50.9%) was the most common site to be involved. 47.3% and 36.4% cases presented with stage I and II diseases, respectively. Histologically, most cases displayed characteristic morphologic changes of ENKTCL. Cytoplasmic CD3, TIA-1 and CD56 expression was found in 100%, 94.5% and 89.1% of cases, respectively. In situ hybridization detection for EBV demonstrated positive results in all cases. Monoclonal TCR gene rearrangement was found in 52.9% of tested cases. Chemotherapy with a DICE or L-asparaginase/peg-asparginase-containing regimen was most often employed. Both advanced tumor stage and B symptoms were independent inferior prognostic factors (p = 0.001 and p = 0.010). Noticeably, 6 cases demonstrated a CD4-positive phenotype. These cases featured a relatively older median age (58 years), predominance of small/medium-sized neoplastic cells, a higher rate of TCR rearrangement and slightly favorable outcome. Conclusion We reported by far the largest series of PI-ENKTCL, and demonstrated its heterogeneity, aggressive clinical behavior and unsatisfying response to the current therapeutic strategies. Those CD4-positive cases might represent a unique subtype of PI-ENKTCL or

  2. Factors influencing insulin acceptance among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a primary care clinic: a qualitative exploration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patients refuse insulin therapy even when they require this modality of treatment. However, some eventually accept insulin. This study aimed to explore the T2DM patients’ reasons for accepting insulin therapy and their initial barriers to use insulin. Methods This qualitative study interviewed twenty-one T2DM patients at a primary care clinic who had been on insulin for more than a year through three in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions. A semi structured interview protocol was used and the sessions were audio-recorded. Subsequently, thematic analysis was conducted to identify major themes. Results The participants’ acceptance of insulin was influenced by their concerns and beliefs about diabetes and insulin. Concerns about complications of poorly controlled diabetes and side effects of other treatment regime had resulted in insulin acceptance among the participants. They also had a strong belief in insulin benefits and effectiveness. These concerns and beliefs were the results of having good knowledge about the diabetes and insulin, experiential learning, as well as doctors’ practical and emotional support that helped them to accept insulin therapy and become efficient in self-care management. These factors also allayed their negative concerns and beliefs towards diabetes and insulin, which were their barriers for insulin acceptance as it caused fear to use insulin. These negative concerns were related to injection (self-injection, needle phobia, injection pain), and insulin use (inconvenience, embarrassment, lifestyle restriction, negative social stigma, and poor self-efficacy), whereas the negative beliefs were 'insulin could cause organ damage’, 'their diabetes was not serious enough’, 'insulin is for life-long’, and 'insulin is for more severe disease only’. Conclusions Exploring patients’ concerns and beliefs about diabetes and insulin is crucial to assist physicians in

  3. The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Miller, Danielle R.; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a common injury among returning troops due to the widespread use of improvised explosive devices in the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. As most of the TBIs sustained are in the mild range, brain changes may not be detected by standard clinical imaging techniques such as CT. Furthermore, the functional significance of these types of injuries is currently being debated. However, accumulating evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to subtle white matter abnormalities and may be especially useful in detecting mild TBI (mTBI). The primary aim of this study was to use DTI to characterize the nature of white matter abnormalities following blast-related mTBI, and in particular, examine the extent to which mTBI-related white matter abnormalities are region-specific or spatially heterogeneous. In addition, we examined whether mTBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) was associated with more extensive white matter abnormality than mTBI without LOC, as well as the potential moderating effect of number of blast exposures. A second aim was to examine the relationship between white matter integrity and neurocognitive function. Finally, a third aim was to examine the contribution of PTSD symptom severity to observed white matter alterations. One hundred fourteen OEF/OIF veterans underwent DTI and neuropsychological examination and were divided into three groups including a control group, blast-related mTBI without LOC (mTBI - LOC) group, and blast-related mTBI with LOC (mTBI + LOC) group. Hierarchical regression models were used to examine the extent to which mTBI and PTSD predicted white matter abnormalities using two approaches: 1) a region-specific analysis and 2) a measure of spatial heterogeneity. Neurocognitive composite scores were calculated for executive functions, attention, memory, and psychomotor speed. Results showed that blast-related mTBI + LOC was associated with greater odds of having

  4. The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jasmeet P; Miller, Danielle R; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a common injury among returning troops due to the widespread use of improvised explosive devices in the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. As most of the TBIs sustained are in the mild range, brain changes may not be detected by standard clinical imaging techniques such as CT. Furthermore, the functional significance of these types of injuries is currently being debated. However, accumulating evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to subtle white matter abnormalities and may be especially useful in detecting mild TBI (mTBI). The primary aim of this study was to use DTI to characterize the nature of white matter abnormalities following blast-related mTBI, and in particular, examine the extent to which mTBI-related white matter abnormalities are region-specific or spatially heterogeneous. In addition, we examined whether mTBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) was associated with more extensive white matter abnormality than mTBI without LOC, as well as the potential moderating effect of number of blast exposures. A second aim was to examine the relationship between white matter integrity and neurocognitive function. Finally, a third aim was to examine the contribution of PTSD symptom severity to observed white matter alterations. One hundred fourteen OEF/OIF veterans underwent DTI and neuropsychological examination and were divided into three groups including a control group, blast-related mTBI without LOC (mTBI - LOC) group, and blast-related mTBI with LOC (mTBI + LOC) group. Hierarchical regression models were used to examine the extent to which mTBI and PTSD predicted white matter abnormalities using two approaches: 1) a region-specific analysis and 2) a measure of spatial heterogeneity. Neurocognitive composite scores were calculated for executive functions, attention, memory, and psychomotor speed. Results showed that blast-related mTBI + LOC was associated with greater odds of having

  5. Antioxidant treatment reduces blast-induced cochlear damage and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Donald L; Lu, Jianzhong; Li, Wei; Du, Xiaoping; Floyd, Robert; Kopke, Richard

    2012-03-01

    Exposure to blast overpressure has become one of the hazards of both military and civilian life in many parts of the world due to war and terrorist activity. Auditory damage is one of the primary sequela of blast trauma, affecting immediate situational awareness and causing permanent hearing loss. Protecting against blast exposure is limited by the inability to anticipate the timing of these exposures, particularly those caused by terrorists. Therefore a therapeutic regimen is desirable that is able to ameliorate auditory damage when administered after a blast exposure has occurred. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of a combination of antioxidants 2,4-disulfonyl α-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) beginning 1 h after blast exposure could reduce both temporary and permanent hearing loss. To this end, a blast simulator was developed and the operational conditions established for exposing rats to blast overpressures comparable to those encountered in an open-field blast of 14 pounds per square inch (psi). This blast model produced reproducible blast overpressures that resulted in physiological and physical damage to the auditory system that was proportional to the number and amplitude of the blasts. After exposure to 3 consecutive 14 psi blasts 100% of anesthetized rats had permanent hearing loss as determined at 21 days post exposure by auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing. Animals treated with HPN-07 and NAC after blast exposure showed a significant reduction in ABR threshold shifts and DPOAE level shifts at 2-16 kHz with significant reduction in inner hair cell (IHC) and outer hair cell (OHC) loss across the 5-36 kHz region of the cochlea compared with control animals. The time course of changes in the auditory system was documented at 3 h, 24 h, 7 day and 21 day after blast exposure. At 3 h after blast exposure the auditory brainstem response (ABR

  6. Relationships between net primary productivity and stand age for several forest types and their influence on China's carbon balance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Jingming; Ju, Weimin; Feng, Xianfeng; Wu, Weixing

    2011-06-01

    Affected by natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as forest fires, insect-induced mortality and harvesting, forest stand age plays an important role in determining the distribution of carbon pools and fluxes in a variety of forest ecosystems. An improved understanding of the relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) and stand age (i.e., age-related increase and decline in forest productivity) is essential for the simulation and prediction of the global carbon cycle at annual, decadal, centurial, or even longer temporal scales. In this paper, we developed functions describing the relationship between national mean NPP and stand age using stand age information derived from forest inventory data and NPP simulated by the BEPS (Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator) model in 2001. Due to differences in ecobiophysical characteristics of different forest types, NPP-age equations were developed for five typical forest ecosystems in China (deciduous needleleaf forest (DNF), evergreen needleleaf forest in tropic and subtropical zones (ENF-S), deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF), evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF), and mixed broadleaf forest (MBF)). For DNF, ENF-S, EBF, and MBF, changes in NPP with age were well fitted with a common non-linear function, with R(2) values equal to 0.90, 0.75, 0.66, and 0.67, respectively. In contrast, a second order polynomial was best suitable for simulating the change of NPP for DBF, with an R(2) value of 0.79. The timing and magnitude of the maximum NPP varied with forest types. DNF, EBF, and MBF reached the peak NPP at the age of 54, 40, and 32 years, respectively, while the NPP of ENF-S maximizes at the age of 13 years. The highest NPP of DBF appeared at 122 years. NPP was generally lower in older stands with the exception of DBF, and this particular finding runs counter to the paradigm of age-related decline in forest growth. Evaluation based on measurements of NPP and stand age at the plot-level demonstrates the reliability

  7. Relationships between net primary productivity and stand age for several forest types and their influence on China's carbon balance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Jingming; Ju, Weimin; Feng, Xianfeng; Wu, Weixing

    2011-06-01

    Affected by natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as forest fires, insect-induced mortality and harvesting, forest stand age plays an important role in determining the distribution of carbon pools and fluxes in a variety of forest ecosystems. An improved understanding of the relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) and stand age (i.e., age-related increase and decline in forest productivity) is essential for the simulation and prediction of the global carbon cycle at annual, decadal, centurial, or even longer temporal scales. In this paper, we developed functions describing the relationship between national mean NPP and stand age using stand age information derived from forest inventory data and NPP simulated by the BEPS (Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator) model in 2001. Due to differences in ecobiophysical characteristics of different forest types, NPP-age equations were developed for five typical forest ecosystems in China (deciduous needleleaf forest (DNF), evergreen needleleaf forest in tropic and subtropical zones (ENF-S), deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF), evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF), and mixed broadleaf forest (MBF)). For DNF, ENF-S, EBF, and MBF, changes in NPP with age were well fitted with a common non-linear function, with R(2) values equal to 0.90, 0.75, 0.66, and 0.67, respectively. In contrast, a second order polynomial was best suitable for simulating the change of NPP for DBF, with an R(2) value of 0.79. The timing and magnitude of the maximum NPP varied with forest types. DNF, EBF, and MBF reached the peak NPP at the age of 54, 40, and 32 years, respectively, while the NPP of ENF-S maximizes at the age of 13 years. The highest NPP of DBF appeared at 122 years. NPP was generally lower in older stands with the exception of DBF, and this particular finding runs counter to the paradigm of age-related decline in forest growth. Evaluation based on measurements of NPP and stand age at the plot-level demonstrates the reliability

  8. Association between registered nurse staffing and management outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes within primary care: a cross-sectional linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Lukewich, Julia; Edge, Dana S.; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Williamson, Tyler; Tranmer, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background: As the organization of primary care continues to evolve toward more interdisciplinary team structures, demonstrating effectiveness of care delivery is becoming important, particularly for nonphysician providers. Nurses are the most common nonphysician provider within primary care. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between primary care delivery models that incorporate registered nurses and clinical outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Patient data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network were matched with survey data from 15 Family Health Team practices in southeastern Ontario. Included patients were adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had at least 1 primary care encounter at a Family Health Team practice that completed the organizational survey between Apr. 1, 2013, and Mar. 31, 2014. The clinical outcomes explored included hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and urine albumin:creatinine ratio. Results: Of the 15 practices, 13 (86.7%) had at least 1 registered nurse. The presence of 1 or more registered nurses in the practice was associated with increased odds of patients' having their hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values meet recommended targets. Practices with the lowest ratios of patients with diabetes to registered nurse had a significantly greater proportion of patients with hemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose values on target than did practices with the highest ratios of patients to registered nurse (p < 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Interpretation: The findings suggest that registered nurse staffing within primary care practice teams contributes to better diabetic care, as measured by diabetes management indicators. This study sets the groundwork for further exploration of nursing and organizational contributions to patient care in the primary care setting

  9. Surface assessment and modification of concrete using abrasive blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millman, Lauren R.

    Composite systems are applied to concrete substrates to strengthen and extend the service life. Successful restoration or rehabilitation requires surface preparation prior to the application of the overlay. Surface coatings, waterproofing systems, and other external surface applications also require surface preparation prior to application. Abrasive blast media is often used to clean and uniformly roughen the substrate. The appropriate surface roughness is necessary to facilitate a strong bond between the existing substrate and overlay. Thus, surface modification using abrasive blast media (sand and dry ice), their respective environmental effects, surface roughness characterization prior to and after blasting, and the adhesion between the substrate and overlay are the focus of this dissertation. This dissertation is comprised of an introduction, a literature review, and four chapters, the first of which addresses the environmental effects due to abrasive blasting using sand, water, and dry ice. The assessment considered four response variables: carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, fuel and energy consumption, and project duration. The results indicated that for sand blasting and water jetting, the primary factor contributing to environmental detriment was CO22 emissions from vehicular traffic near the construction site. The second chapter is an analysis of the International Concrete Repair Institute's (ICRI) concrete surface profiles (CSPs) using 3-D optical profilometry. The primary objective was to evaluate the suitability of approximating the 3-D surface (areal) parameters with those extracted from 2-D (linear) profiles. Four profile directions were considered: two diagonals, and lines parallel and transverse to the longitudinal direction of the mold. For any CSP mold, the estimation of the 3-D surface roughness using a 2-D linear profile resulted in underestimation and overestimation errors exceeding 50%, demonstrating the inadequacy of 2-D linear profiles to

  10. Synergy of seismic, acoustic, and video signals in blast analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Stump, B.W.; Weigand, J.

    1997-09-01

    The range of mining applications from hard rock quarrying to coal exposure to mineral recovery leads to a great variety of blasting practices. A common characteristic of many of the sources is that they are detonated at or near the earth`s surface and thus can be recorded by camera or video. Although the primary interest is in the seismic waveforms that these blasts generate, the visual observations of the blasts provide important constraints that can be applied to the physical interpretation of the seismic source function. In particular, high speed images can provide information on detonation times of individuals charges, the timing and amount of mass movement during the blasting process and, in some instances, evidence of wave propagation away from the source. All of these characteristics can be valuable in interpreting the equivalent seismic source function for a set of mine explosions and quantifying the relative importance of the different processes. This paper documents work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Southern Methodist University to take standard Hi-8 video of mine blasts, recover digital images from them, and combine them with ground motion records for interpretation. The steps in the data acquisition, processing, display, and interpretation are outlined. The authors conclude that the combination of video with seismic and acoustic signals can be a powerful diagnostic tool for the study of blasting techniques and seismology. A low cost system for generating similar diagnostics using consumer-grade video camera and direct-to-disk video hardware is proposed. Application is to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  11. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    William S. McPhee

    1999-05-31

    The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint and provides worker protection by continuously recycling the material and dust for the decontamination tasks. The proposed work would increase the cleaning rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites. This work focuses on redesigning and improving existing vacuum blasting technology including blast head nozzles, ergonomic handling of the blast head by reducing its weight; brush-ring design, vacuum level regulator, efficiency of the dust separator, and operational control sensors. The redesign is expected to enhance the productivity and economy of the vacuum blasting system by at least 50% over current vacuum blasting systems. There are three phases in the project. Phase I consists of developing and testing mathematical models. Phase II consists of pre-prototype design and fabrication and pre-prototype unit testing. Phase III consists of prototype design and field verification testing. In phase I, mathematical models are developed and analyzed for the nozzle, blast head, wind curtain, and dust separator, first as individual devices and then combined as an integrated model. This allows study of respective airflow and design parameters. The Contractor shall, based on the results of the mathematical modeling studies, design experimental models of the components and test these models. In addition, the Contractor shall develop sensors to detect the relationship of the blast head to the blast surfaces and controls to minimize the dependency on an operator's skill and judgment to obtain optimum positioning, as well as real-time characterization sensors to determine as the blast head is moving the depth to which coatings must be removed, thereby improving production and minimizing waste. In phase II, the Contractor shall design and

  12. Catalogue of the Primary Types of Cerylonidae, Endomychidae and Latridiidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidae) deposited in the National Museum of Natural History, with additional notes and clarification of the status of several types

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A checklist with critical data is provided for all primary types of the families Cerylonidae, Endomychidae and Latridiidae deposited in the National Museum of Natural History: 48 in all. Of those, there are 43 holotypes, 3 lectotypes, and 2 neotypes. This tally includes a newly designated lectotyp...

  13. Blast injury research: modeling injury effects of landmines, bullets, and bombs.

    PubMed

    Hayda, Roman; Harris, Robert M; Bass, Cameron Dale

    2004-05-01

    Terrorist blasts and landmine injuries have become more common in the past several decades generating thousands of casualties. Preventive and prognostic measures are limited by the lack of knowledge of these complex events. Previous blast research has focused on primary blast injuries that involve the lung, despite musculoskeletal injuries being the most common. Through the use of instrumented cadavers, Hybrid III test dummies, and other surrogates, unique models of these events have been created. The investigations studied the effectiveness of antimine footwear, forces and injury mechanisms in temporary shelters subjected to blast, modeling of blast-induced glass fragmentation, and helmet deformation and injury potential under ballistic load. Despite blasts being much higher rate events than those seen in automotive blunt trauma, we were able to measure forces and create injury models. We found that antimine footwear will require additional development to be effective. Guidelines for shelter placement have been altered, and tempered glass seems to offer no protection when compared with annealed glass. Although these models are in their nascent phase, the thorough understanding of the biomechanical nature of these blast injuries will assist in developing strategies to reduce injuries and in the creation of forecasting models.

  14. Surface preparation via grit-blasting for thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Lundberg, L.B.; Hartley, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    The major reason for grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents five statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the grit blasting process. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. A substantial range of grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated, including grit type, pressure, working distance, and exposure time. The substrates were characterized for surface characteristics using image analysis. These attributes are correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Optimized process parameters for the two machines used in this study as predicted by the SDE analysis are presented.

  15. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma. PMID:26259072

  16. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma.

  17. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals White Matter Injury in a Rat Model of Repetitive Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Evan; Du, Fu; Garman, Robert H.; Johnson, G. Allan; Riccio, Cory; Tong, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is one of the most common combat-related injuries seen in U.S. military personnel, yet relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms of injury. In particular, the effects of the primary blast pressure wave are poorly understood. Animal models have proven invaluable for the study of primary bTBI, because it rarely occurs in isolation in human subjects. Even less is known about the effects of repeated primary blast wave exposure, but existing data suggest cumulative increases in brain damage with a second blast. MRI and, in particular, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), have become important tools for assessing bTBI in both clinical and preclinical settings. Computational statistical methods such as voxelwise analysis have shown promise in localizing and quantifying bTBI throughout the brain. In this study, we use voxelwise analysis of DTI to quantify white matter injury in a rat model of repetitive primary blast exposure. Our results show a significant increase in microstructural damage with a second blast exposure, suggesting that primary bTBI may sensitize the brain to subsequent injury. PMID:24392843

  18. Studies on the Impact of Explosion on Blast Resistant Stiffened Door Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeredhi, Lakshmi Shireen Banu; Ramana Rao, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the extent of damage that is likely to be caused by a blast load on stiffened steel plate (door structure) designed to withstand blast load using computational methods. In this paper, panels with three types of reinforcements namely T, I and HAT shaped stiffeners are considered. The thickness of these stiffeners is varied to study the extent of increase in the resistance against the damage due to blast load. Special emphasis is given to evaluate mid-point displacements. The finite element package ABAQUS is employed for modeling the cover plate, with three different stiffeners separately having constant height and different thickness. The boundary conditions are assumed to be fixed on all sides and the computational domain is meshed using the S4R type shell element. For the response calculations, the weight of TNT (explosive) applied is varied from 100 to 500 kg with an increment of 100 kg. The blast response of stiffened doors with three different stiffeners subjected to constant blast load was examined systematically. The results of blast load analysis of stiffened door structure for stress, mid-point displacements for T, I and HAT stiffeners were compared against each other. It is found that the blast door structures with HAT stiffener performs better in this application.

  19. Astrophysical blast wave data

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Nathan; Geissel, Matthias; Lewis, Sean M; Porter, John L.

    2015-03-01

    The data described in this document consist of image files of shadowgraphs of astrophysically relevant laser driven blast waves. Supporting files include Mathematica notebooks containing design calculations, tabulated experimental data and notes, and relevant publications from the open research literature. The data was obtained on the Z-Beamlet laser from July to September 2014. Selected images and calculations will be published as part of a PhD dissertation and in associated publications in the open research literature, with Sandia credited as appropriate. The authors are not aware of any restrictions that could affect the release of the data.

  20. Noise and blast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. C.; Garinther, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Noise and blast environments are described, providing a definition of units and techniques of noise measurement and giving representative booster-launch and spacecraft noise data. The effects of noise on hearing sensitivity and performance are reviewed, and community response to noise exposure is discussed. Physiological, or nonauditory, effects of noise exposure are also treated, as are design criteria and methods for minimizing the noise effects of hearing sensitivity and communications. The low level sound detection and speech reception are included, along with subjective and behavioral responses to noise.

  1. Factors Affecting Internal Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.; Felts, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    Internal blast refers to explosion effects in confined spaces, which are dominated by the heat output of the explosive. Theoretical temperatures and pressures may not be reached due to heat losses and incomplete gas mixing. Gas mixing can have the largest effect, potentially reducing peak quasi-static pressure by a factor of two due to lack of thermal equilibrium between products and atmosphere in the space, separate from the effect of incomplete combustion of excess fuel when that atmosphere is air. Chamber and test geometry affect gas mixing, which has been inferred through temperature and pressure measurements and compared to calculations. Late-time combustion is observed for TNT compared to HMX.

  2. Palliative resection of a primary tumor in patients with unresectable colorectal cancer: could resection type improve survival?

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun Seok; Kim, Chang Hyun; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of extended resection of primary tumor on survival outcome in unresectable colorectal cancer (UCRC). Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted for 190 patients undergoing palliative surgery for UCRC between 1998 and 2007 at a single institution. Variables including demographics, histopathological characteristics of tumors, surgical procedures, and course of the disease were examined. Results Kaplan-Meier survival curve indicated a significant increase in survival times in patients undergoing extended resection of the primary tumor (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that extra-abdominal metastasis (P = 0.03), minimal resection of the primary tumor (P = 0.034), and the absence of multimodality adjuvant therapy (P < 0.001) were significantly associated poor survival outcome. The histological characteristics were significantly associated with survival times. Patients with well to moderate differentiation tumors that were extensively resected had significantly increased survival time (P < 0.001), while those with poor differentiation tumors that were extensively resected did not have increase survival time (P = 0.786). Conclusion Extended resection of primary tumors significantly improved overall survival compared to minimal resection, especially in well to moderately differentiated tumors (survival time: extended resection, 27.8 ± 2.80 months; minimal resection, 16.5 ± 2.19 months; P = 0.002). PMID:27757394

  3. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) 2005: Calibration and Targeted Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truch, Matthew; BLAST Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) operated successfully during a 100-hour flight from northern Sweden in June 2005 (BLAST05). As part of the calibration and pointing procedures, several compact sources were mapped, including solar system, Galactic, and extragalactic targets, specifically Pallas, CRL 2688, LDN 1014, IRAS 20126+4104, IRAS 21078+5211, IRAS 21307+5049, IRAS 22134+5834, IRAS 23011+6126, K3-50, W 75N, Mrk 231, NGC 4565, and Arp 220 (this last source being our primary calibrator). The BLAST observations of each compact source are described, flux densities and spectral energy distributions are reported, and these are compared with previous measurements at other wavelengths. BLAST was particularly useful for constraining the slope of the submillimeter continuum.

  4. NASA TEERM Project: Corn Based Blast Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    Coatings removal is a necessary part of the maintenance, repair, and overhaul activities at many NASA centers and contractor support sites. Sensitive substrates, such as composites and thin aluminum alloys require special handling such as the use of chemical stripping, pneumatic hand sanding, or softer blast media. Type V, acrylic based PMB is commonly used to de-coat, strip, or de-paint the delicate substrates of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) currently used in support of the Shuttle and slated to be used in support of CxP.

  5. Finite difference computation of blast diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, R.; Graham, J. M. R.

    1985-07-01

    This paper discusses the use of numerical finite difference methods for predicting flow fields in which a shock or blast wave is diffracted at a sharp edge. Three different types of method are studied: Donor Cell differencing with and without Flux Corrected Transport, a Finite Volume method with an explicit artificial viscosity and Runge-Kutta time stepping, and a second order upwind method based on the solution of a Riemann wave problem at cell interfaces. In the case of weak shock waves a comparison is made with the flow field predicted by acoustic theory including flow separation. Results for stronger shocks are also presented.

  6. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes. Methods Data were drawn from a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of randomly selected African American (n = 220), Native American (n = 181), and white (n = 297) Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 years old with diabetes in 2 rural counties in central North Carolina. Participants were asked about utilization of a primary care doctor and of specialists (nutritionist, diabetes specialist, eye doctor, bladder specialist, kidney specialist, heart specialist, foot specialist) in the past year. Findings Virtually all respondents (99.0%) reported having a primary care doctor and seeing that doctor in the past year. About 42% reported seeing a doctor for diabetes-related care. On average, participants reported seeing 2 specialists in the past year, and 54% reported seeing >1 specialist. Few reported seeing a diabetes specialist (5.7%), nutritionist (10.9%), or kidney specialist (17.5%). African Americans were more likely than others to report seeing a foot specialist (P<.01), while men were more likely than women to have seen a bladder specialist (P =.02), kidney specialist (P =.001), and heart specialist (P =.004), after adjusting for potential confounders. Predictors of the number of specialists seen include gender, education, poverty status, diabetes medication use, and self-rated health. Conclusions These data indicate low utilization of specialty diabetes care providers across ethnic groups and reflect the importance of primary care providers in diabetes care in rural areas. PMID:16092292

  7. A Survey Study of the Blast Furnace at Kuangshan Village Using 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Huang, Xing; Qian, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The blast furnace from the Northern Song Dynasty at Kuangshan Village is the tallest blast furnace that remains from ancient China. Previous studies have assumed that the furnace had a closed mouth. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) model of the blast furnace is constructed using 3D laser scanning technology, and accurate profile data are obtained using software. It is shown that the furnace throat is smaller than had been previously thought and that the furnace mouth is of the open type. This new furnace profile constitutes a discovery in the history of iron-smelting technology.

  8. A review on the response of blast loaded laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazancı, Zafer

    2016-02-01

    This review is conducted with emphasis on the analysis performed for laminated composite plates that are subjected to blast loads. A general discussion and classification of the different laminated plate theories is also given. Various types of time-dependent external blast pulse models that are widely used in the literature are summarized. Main aim is to categorize previous laminated plate theories in a general sense and give an overview on the development, characteristics and applications of numerical methods on the response of laminated composite plates subjected to blast loads. This review article contains 142 references.

  9. Mechanisms and pathophysiology of the low-level blast brain injury in animal models.

    PubMed

    Säljö, Annette; Mayorga, Maria; Bolouri, Hayde; Svensson, Berndt; Hamberger, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The symptoms of primary blast-induced mTBI, posttraumatic stress disorder and depression overlap. Evidence of an organic basis for these entities has been scarce and controversial. We present a review of animal studies demonstrating that low-level blast causes pathophysiological and functional changes in the brain. We monitor a time period from minutes to approximately 1 week after blast exposure from multiple modes (air, underwater, localized and whole body). The most salient findings observed were (1) the peak pressures (P(max)) in the brain, elicited from the blast from the firing of military weapons (P(max) 23-45 kPa), have a similar magnitude as that registered in air close to the head. Corresponding measurements during the detonation pulse from explosives under water show a P(max) in the brain, which is only 10% of that in water outside the head. (2) The rise time of the pressure curve is 10 times longer in the brain as compared with the blast in air outside the head during firing of military weapons. (3) The lower frequencies in the blast wave appear to be transmitted more readily to the brain than the higher frequencies. (4) When animals are exposed to low levels of blast, the blast wave appears mostly transmitted directly to the brain during air exposure, not via the thorax or abdomen. (5) Low levels of blast cause brain edema, as indicated by increased bioelectrical impedance, an increase in the intracranial pressure, small brain hemorrhages and impaired cognitive function. PMID:20580846

  10. The Effect of Charge Reactive Metal Cases on Air Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Wilson, William H.

    2009-12-01

    Experiments were conducted in a 23 m3 closed chamber using a charge encased in a cylindrical reactive metal case to study the effect on air blast from the case fragments. Parameters varied included case/charge mass ratio, charge diameter and charge type (i.e., detonation energy and pressure). The pressure histories measured on the chamber wall showed a double-shock front structure with an accelerating precursor shock followed by the primary shock, suggesting the early-time reaction of small case fragments. During the early reflections on the chamber wall, significant pressure rises versus the steel-cased and bare charges indicated combustion of a large amount of small case particles generated by secondary fragmentation. The analysis of explosion pressures and recovered fragments and solid products gave an expression for burnt casing mass as a function of Gurney velocity and charge diameter. The equivalent bare charge mass that yields the same explosion pressure as the cased charge increased with case/charge mass ratio and reached 2.5 times charge mass at the ratio of 1.75.

  11. Centrifugal shot blast system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.

  12. Traumatic amputation by explosive blast: pattern of injury in survivors.

    PubMed

    Hull, J B

    1992-12-01

    Explosive blast causes a pattern of injury including primary blast lung, secondary fragment injury and traumatic amputation of limbs. Major traumatic amputation is rare in survivors of bomb blast but common in those who die. The mechanism of such injury has not been previously determined, but must be established if protective measures are to be developed for members of the armed forces. The nature of 41 traumatic amputations in 29 servicemen who survived to reach medical care after blast injury was investigated to determine the anatomical level of amputation and the pattern of soft tissue damage. Joints were an infrequent site of amputation and the tibial tuberosity was a particularly frequent site of lower-limb severance. Comparison of the pattern of injury was made with that seen in ejecting fast-jet pilots, who frequently suffer major flailing injury; there appears to be a substantially different injury distribution. The accepted mechanism of traumatic amputation, avulsion by the dynamic overpressure, is challenged; it is suggested that the shockwave resulting from an explosion is capable of causing at least bone disruption in a limb.

  13. Injury biomechanics, neuropathology, and simplified physics of explosive blast and impact mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bandak, F A; Ling, G; Bandak, A; De Lanerolle, N C

    2015-01-01

    Explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact to the head are two types of loading shown to result in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). While mTBI from these two causes shares some common features behaviorally, there are distinct differences in the pathophysiology of the underlying injury mechanisms. Various elucidations have been offered in the literature to explain the organic damage associated with mTBI resulting from both types of loading. The current state of understanding in this field is somewhat limited by the degree of appreciation of the physics and biomechanics governing the effects of explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact on the head, which has resulted in the various approaches to the investigation of the operative brain injury "wounding mechanisms". In this chapter we provide a simplified description of terminology associated with forces on the head from explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact, to assist readers in the field in evaluating interpretations of brain injury "wounding" processes. Remarkably, mTBI from either loading is shown generally to result in only a small loss of neurons, with hippocampal neurons appearing to be particularly vulnerable to explosive blast shock waves. Explosive blast studies in large animal models show a unique pattern of periventricular injury, which is different from the classic diffuse axonal injury. Both astrocyte and microglial activation are also seen in explosive blast as well as impact trauma, but this may be a general secondary brain injury response, nonspecific to explosive blast or blunt trauma. Additionally, while moderate to severe impact closed head injuries sometimes result in petechial hemorrhages or hematomas, they do not appear to be associated with explosive blast mTBI even with repeated exposure to blasts.

  14. A Novel Blasted and Grooved Low Profile Pedicle Screw Able to Resist High Compression Bending Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sung; Choi, Hong-June; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Yoon, Young-Sul; Lee, Yoon-Chul; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Polyaxial pedicle screws are a safe, useful adjunct to transpedicular fixation. However, the large screw head size can cause soft tissue irritation, high rod positioning, and facet joint injury. However, the mechanical resistance provided by small and low profile pedicle screws is very limited. We therefore developed a novel, low profile pedicle screw using grooving and blasting treatment that is able to resist a high compression bending load. Methods We evaluated the compression bending force to displacement and yield loads for seven different screw head types that differed with regard to their groove intervals and whether or not they had been blasted. Results The rank order of screw types that had the greatest compression bending force to displacement was as follows: (1) universal polyaxial, (2) low polyaxial with 0.1mm grooves and blasting, (3) low polyaxial with blasting, (4) low polyaxial with 0.15mm grooves and blasting, (5) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves and blasting, (6) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves, (7) and low polyaxial. Low polyaxial screws with 0.1mm grooves and blasting had the maximum yield load and highest compression bending force to displacement of all seven polyaxial screw head systems evaluated. Conclusion Blasting and grooving treatment of pedicle screw heads resulted in screw heads with a high yield load and compression bending force relative to displacement because of increased friction. Low polyaxial pedicle screws with 0.1 mm grooves treated by blasting have mechanical characteristics similar to those of universal polyaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25983790

  15. Injury biomechanics, neuropathology, and simplified physics of explosive blast and impact mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bandak, F A; Ling, G; Bandak, A; De Lanerolle, N C

    2015-01-01

    Explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact to the head are two types of loading shown to result in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). While mTBI from these two causes shares some common features behaviorally, there are distinct differences in the pathophysiology of the underlying injury mechanisms. Various elucidations have been offered in the literature to explain the organic damage associated with mTBI resulting from both types of loading. The current state of understanding in this field is somewhat limited by the degree of appreciation of the physics and biomechanics governing the effects of explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact on the head, which has resulted in the various approaches to the investigation of the operative brain injury "wounding mechanisms". In this chapter we provide a simplified description of terminology associated with forces on the head from explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact, to assist readers in the field in evaluating interpretations of brain injury "wounding" processes. Remarkably, mTBI from either loading is shown generally to result in only a small loss of neurons, with hippocampal neurons appearing to be particularly vulnerable to explosive blast shock waves. Explosive blast studies in large animal models show a unique pattern of periventricular injury, which is different from the classic diffuse axonal injury. Both astrocyte and microglial activation are also seen in explosive blast as well as impact trauma, but this may be a general secondary brain injury response, nonspecific to explosive blast or blunt trauma. Additionally, while moderate to severe impact closed head injuries sometimes result in petechial hemorrhages or hematomas, they do not appear to be associated with explosive blast mTBI even with repeated exposure to blasts. PMID:25702211

  16. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  17. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  19. Determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape from the primary CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola A; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R; Wong, Mailee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nowak, Martin A; Shaw, George M; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-11-15

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication.

  20. Determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape from the primary CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola A; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R; Wong, Mailee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nowak, Martin A; Shaw, George M; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-11-15

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication. PMID:15545352

  1. Identification of key factors influencing primary productivity in two river-type reservoirs by using principal component regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonjung; Ha, Sun-Yong; Park, Hae-Kyung; Han, Myung-Soo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2015-04-01

    To understand the factors controlling algal production in two lakes located on the Han River in South Korea, Lake Cheongpyeong and Lake Paldang, a principal component regression model study was conducted using environmental monitoring and primary productivity data. Although the two lakes were geographically close and located along the same river system, the main factors controlling primary productivity in each lake were different: hydraulic retention time and light conditions predominantly influenced algal productivity in Lake Cheongpyeong, while hydraulic retention time, chlorophyll a-specific productivity, and zooplankton grazing rate were most important in Lake Paldang. This investigation confirmed the utility of principal component regression analysis using environmental monitoring data for predicting complex biological processes such as primary productivity; in addition, the study also increased the understanding of explicit interactions between environmental variables. The findings obtained in this research will be useful for the adaptive management of water reservoirs. The results will also aid in the development of management strategies for water resources, thereby improving total environmental conservation.

  2. Blast waves with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbutina, B.

    2015-04-01

    Blast waves appear in many astrophysical phenomena, such as supernovae. In this paper we discuss blast waves with cosmic rays, i.e., with a component with a power-law number density distribution function N( p) ∝ p -Γ that may be particulary important in describing the evolution of supernova remnants. We confirm some previous findings that a significant amount of cosmic ray energy is deposited towards the center of a remnant.

  3. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, R.G.

    1984-08-31

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  4. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, Ramkrishna G.

    1986-01-01

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  5. Modeling rock fracturing in bench-blasting problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuszmaul, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A computational model of rock blasting is being developed to examine the blasting problems associated with in situ oil shale processing. This model, however, will also be useful as a design tool for the traditional problems in rock blasting. The model includes fundamental treatment of both shock-wave propagation and the accumulation of brittle fracture in the rock. As a result, the model accurately predicts the degree and extent of fracturing as functions of design parameters. The model has proven useful for making parametric studies and for evaluation of alternate blast designs. This paper demonstrates the use of the numerical model to simulate the fracturing induced by the detonation of a vertical explosive column near a bench. The fracturing induced by three different explosives indicate that (in the chosen geometry) the most efficient breakage is done by a column of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixture (ANFO) used with a toe charge of aluminized ANFO. There was too much unfractured rock left when ANFO was used alone; aluminized ANFO used for the entire explosive column caused excessive fracturing. A final case involves ANFO used alone to fracture a different rock type. This case points out that in a different rock type, the ANFO will not leave excessive unfractured rock.

  6. Dyadic dynamics of HIV risk among transgender women and their primary male sexual partners: the role of sexual agreement types and motivations.

    PubMed

    Gamarel, Kristi E; Reisner, Sari L; Darbes, Lynae A; Hoff, Colleen C; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Nemoto, Toru; Operario, Don

    2016-01-01

    Transgender women - individuals assigned a male sex at birth who identify as women, female, or on the male-to-female trans feminine spectrum - are at high-risk of HIV worldwide. Prior research has suggested that transgender women more frequently engage in condomless sex with primary cisgender (i.e., non-transgender) male partners compared with casual or paying partners, and that condomless sex in this context might be motivated by relationship dynamics such as trust and intimacy. The current study examined sexual agreement types and motivations as factors that shape HIV risk behaviors in a community sample of 191 transgender women and their cisgender primary male partners who completed a cross-sectional survey. Overall, 40% of couples had monogamous, 15% open, and 45% discrepant sexual agreements (i.e., partners disagreed on their type of agreement). Actor-partner interdependence models were fit to examine the influence of sexual agreement type and motivations on extra-dyadic HIV risk (i.e., condomless sex with outside partners) and intra-dyadic HIV serodiscordant risk (i.e., condomless sex with serodiscordant primary partners). For male partners, extra-dyadic risk was associated with their own and their partners' sexual agreement motives, and male partners who engaged in extra-dyadic HIV risk had an increased odds of engaging in HIV serodiscordant intra-dyadic risk. Study findings support inclusion of the male partners of transgender women into HIV prevention efforts. Future research is warranted to explore the interpersonal and social contexts of sexual agreement types and motivations in relationships between transgender women and their male partners to develop interventions that meet their unique HIV prevention needs.

  7. Comparative proteomic phenotyping of cell lines and primary cells to assess preservation of cell type-specific functions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Cuiping; Kumar, Chanchal; Bohl, Sebastian; Klingmueller, Ursula; Mann, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Biological experiments are most often performed with immortalized cell lines because they are readily available and can be expanded without limitation. However, cell lines may differ from the in vivo situation in important aspects. Here we introduce a straightforward methodology to compare cell lines to their cognate primary cells and to derive a comparative functional phenotype. We used SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) for quantitative, mass spectrometry-based comparison of the hepatoma cell line Hepa1-6 with primary hepatocytes. The resulting quantitative proteome of 4,063 proteins had an asymmetric distribution, with many proteins down-regulated in the cell line. Bioinformatic analysis of the quantitative proteomics phenotypes revealed that Hepa1-6 cells were deficient in mitochondria, reflecting re-arrangement of metabolic pathways, drastically up-regulate cell cycle-associated functions and largely shut down drug metabolizing enzymes characteristic for the liver. This quantitative knowledge of changes provides an important basis to adapt cell lines to more closely resemble physiological conditions.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made by different manufacturers shall not be combined in the same blasting circuit. (c) Detonator leg wires shall be... used between the blasting cable and detonator circuitry shall— (1) Be undamaged; (2) Be well...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made by different manufacturers shall not be combined in the same blasting circuit. (c) Detonator leg wires shall be... used between the blasting cable and detonator circuitry shall— (1) Be undamaged; (2) Be well...

  10. Simulation of Blast Waves with Headwind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Lawrence, Scott W.; Klopfer, Goetz H.; Mathias, Dovan; Onufer, Jeff T.

    2005-01-01

    The blast wave resulting from an explosion was simulated to provide guidance for models estimating risks for human spacecraft flight. Simulations included effects of headwind on blast propagation, Blasts were modelled as an initial value problem with a uniform high energy sphere expanding into an ambient field. Both still air and cases with headwind were calculated.

  11. 30 CFR 56.6803 - Blasting lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Maintenance § 56.6803 Blasting lines. Permanent blasting lines shall be properly supported. All blasting lines shall be...

  12. Primary prevention of beta-cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes – The Global Platform for the Prevention of Autoimmune Diabetes (GPPAD) perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, A.G.; Danne, T.; Dunger, D.B.; Berner, R.; Puff, R.; Kiess, W.; Agiostratidou, G.; Todd, J.A.; Bonifacio, E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Type 1 diabetes can be identified by the presence of beta-cell autoantibodies that often arise in the first few years of life. The purpose of this perspective is to present the case for primary prevention of beta-cell autoimmunity and to provide a study design for its implementation in Europe. Methods We examined and summarized recruitment strategies, enrollment rates, and outcomes in published TRIGR, FINDIA and BABYDIET primary prevention trials, and the TEDDY intensive observational study. A proposal for a recruitment and implementation strategy to perform a phase II/III primary prevention randomized controlled trial in infants with genetic risk for developing beta-cell autoimmunity is outlined. Results Infants with a family history of type 1 diabetes (TRIGR, BABYDIET, TEDDY) and infants younger than age 3 months from the general population (FINDIA, TEDDY) were enrolled into these studies. All studies used HLA genotyping as part of their eligibility criteria. Predicted beta-cell autoimmunity risk in the eligible infants ranged from 3% (FINDIA, TEDDY general population) up to 12% (TRIGR, BABYDIET). Amongst eligible infants, participation was between 38% (TEDDY general population) and 97% (FINDIA). Outcomes, defined as multiple beta-cell autoantibodies, were consistent with predicted risks. We subsequently modeled recruitment into a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that could assess the efficacy of oral insulin treatment as adapted from the Pre-POINT pilot trial. The RCT would recruit infants with and without a first-degree family history of type 1 diabetes and be based on general population genetic risk testing. HLA genotyping and, for the general population, genotyping at additional type 1 diabetes susceptibility SNPs would be used to identify children with around 10% risk of beta-cell autoimmunity. The proposed RCT would have 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in multiple beta-cell autoantibodies by age 4 years at a two-tailed alpha of 0.05, and

  13. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication in Primary Macrophages by Using Tat- or CCR5-Specific Small Interfering RNAs Expressed from a Lentivirus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Ta M.; Coburn, Glen A.; McClure, Myra O.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2003-01-01

    Although several groups have demonstrated that RNA interference, induced by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes, can protect cells against a viral challenge in culture, this protection is transient. Here, we describe lentivirus expression vectors that can stably express siRNAs at levels sufficient to block virus replication. We have used these vectors to stably express siRNAs specific for the essential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat transcription factor or specific for a cellular coreceptor, CCR5, that is required for infection by the majority of primary HIV-1 isolates. These lentivirus vectors are shown to protect cells, including primary macrophages, against HIV-1 infection in culture by inducing selective degradation of their target mRNA species. These data suggest that it should be possible to block the expression of specific viral or cellular genes in vivo by using viral vectors to stably express the appropriate siRNAs. PMID:14581533

  14. Primary enteric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis masquerading as cystic renal cell carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chong; Teng, Xiao-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis is easily misdiagnosed and it was rarely reported in the literature. We describe in this study a case of 40-year-old male patient presented with right lumbar pain of one year duration and elevated level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). After a series of imaging examinations, the initial impression was a cystic renal cell carcinoma. Right radical nephrectomy was performed on the patient. The postoperative pathological examination indicated a primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of enteric type of the renal pelvis. After surgical removal of the tumor, an immunotherapy was administrated to prevent recurrence. The patient survives upon this report. A review of pertinent literature is also presented. PMID:27465836

  15. Biologic response to complex blast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, D.R.; Yelverton, J.T.; Fletcher, E.R.; Phillips, Y.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Small, bare charges were detonated inside an M59 armored personnel carrier (APC) in an attempt to simulate the complex blast waves generated by the jets from shaped-charge warheads penetrating into armored vehicles. Anesthetized sheep were placed inside the APC at 92- and 122-cm ranges from 57- or 113-g pentolite charges. Pressure-time was measured by pressure transducers either mounted on the animals or free standing at comparable ranges on the opposite side of the vehicle. In general, the waveforms were characterized by an initial shock wave of less than 1-msec duration followed by repeated reflections of decreasing magnitude. No deaths nor lung hemorrhages were observed, but all the animals sustained severe ear injury. Animals subjected to peak overpressures of 1.2 to 2.3 bar from the 113-g explosions also received slight non-auditory blast injuries to the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; those exposed to peak overpressures of just under 1 bar from the 57-g charges did not. The non-auditory blast injuries inside the APC were more severe than those sustained by sheep at comparable distances from 113-g charges in the open. The results suggested that the biological consequences of a complex wave of the type encountered in this study can be equated approximately to a Friedlander wave with a peak overpressure equal to that of the complex wave and with a total impulse equal to the impulse over the first 2 to 3 msec of the complex wave. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Prevalence of serum anti M-type phospholipase A2 receptor antibody in primary membranous nephropathy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, N.; Abeesh, P.; Dineshkumar, T.; Murugananth, S.; Sakthirajan, R.; Raman, G. Srinivasa; Dhanapriya, J.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, Md.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to assess utility of detection of antibodies to phospholipase A2receptor (PLA2R) in the serum of patients with membranous nephropathy. Seventy five patients with biopsy proven membranous nephropathy admitted between January 2011 and September 2014 were studied. Serum anti- PLA2R was tested by indirect immunofluorescence. The test was positive in 45 out of 60 patients with primary membranous nephropathy (PMN) and in none of the 15 patients with secondary membranous nephropathy, with a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 100% for PMN. Anti PLA2R positivity also showed a significant correlation with quantum of proteinuria and negative correlation with serum albumin. This study has validated detection of serum anti PLA2R in PMN as a non invasive diagnostic tool in Indian patients. PMID:27512297

  17. Prevalence of serum anti M-type phospholipase A2 receptor antibody in primary membranous nephropathy: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, N; Abeesh, P; Dineshkumar, T; Murugananth, S; Sakthirajan, R; Raman, G Srinivasa; Dhanapriya, J; Balasubramaniyan, T; Haris, Md

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to assess utility of detection of antibodies to phospholipase A2receptor (PLA2R) in the serum of patients with membranous nephropathy. Seventy five patients with biopsy proven membranous nephropathy admitted between January 2011 and September 2014 were studied. Serum anti- PLA2R was tested by indirect immunofluorescence. The test was positive in 45 out of 60 patients with primary membranous nephropathy (PMN) and in none of the 15 patients with secondary membranous nephropathy, with a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 100% for PMN. Anti PLA2R positivity also showed a significant correlation with quantum of proteinuria and negative correlation with serum albumin. This study has validated detection of serum anti PLA2R in PMN as a non invasive diagnostic tool in Indian patients.

  18. Blast-Induced Pressure Fields Beneath a Military Helmet for Non-Lethal Threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, David; Schwer, Douglas; Young, Theodore; Levine, Jeffrey; Dionne, Jean-Philippe; Makris, Aris; Hubler, Graham

    2008-11-01

    Coordinated experiments and numerical simulations investigated the pressure field surrounding a head with a helmet subjected to a blast wave typical of injurious but non-lethal threats. Experiments were conducted with C4 explosive charges ranging from 0.75 kg to 5 kg, and two anthropomorphic test mannequins (Hybrid III) located 3 m from the explosive. Experimental diagnostics included pressure sensors mounted at selected locations around each mannequin's head and in the free-field. Numerical modeling was done using a two-step approach. First, the blast and ground reflection were computed using a multi-component, reacting flow model. Second, the results were used to specify the boundary conditions for a three-dimensional unsteady simulation of the head-helmet complex subjected to a blast wave. The helmet was shown to provide protection against primary blast injury both in computations and experiments. The simulations indicate that pressure waves entering the gap between the helmet and head focus on the side of the head away from the blast and produce pressures comparable to that experienced on unprotected surfaces subjected to the blast.

  19. Development of a comprehensive Blast-Related Auditory Injury Database (BRAID).

    PubMed

    Joseph, Antony R; Horton, Jaime L; Clouser, Mary C; MacGregor, Andrew J; Louie, Michelle; Galarneau, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Defense Hearing Conservation Program provides specific guidance for service components to prevent occupational hearing loss; however, it does not specifically contend with the unique noise exposures observed in the theater of war, such as blasts and explosions. In order to examine the effects of blast injury on hearing sensitivity, we developed a large database composed of demographic, audiometric, point of injury, and medical outcome data, with the primary aim of developing a long-standing and integrated capability for the surveillance, assessment, and investigation of blast-related hearing outcomes. Methods used to develop the dataset are described. Encompassing more than 16,500 Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the Blast-Related Auditory Injury Database (BRAID) includes individuals with a blast-related injury and nonblast control subjects. Using baseline and postdeployment hearing threshold data, a retrospective analysis of the cohort revealed that the rate of hearing loss for the injured servicemembers was 39%. The BRAID will be useful for studies that assess hearing patterns following deployment-related injury, such as blast exposures, that facilitate exploration of health outcomes and whether they are predictive of audiometric disposition and that help establish hearing loss prevention strategies and program policies for affected military commands and servicemembers.

  20. Development of a comprehensive Blast-Related Auditory Injury Database (BRAID).

    PubMed

    Joseph, Antony R; Horton, Jaime L; Clouser, Mary C; MacGregor, Andrew J; Louie, Michelle; Galarneau, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Defense Hearing Conservation Program provides specific guidance for service components to prevent occupational hearing loss; however, it does not specifically contend with the unique noise exposures observed in the theater of war, such as blasts and explosions. In order to examine the effects of blast injury on hearing sensitivity, we developed a large database composed of demographic, audiometric, point of injury, and medical outcome data, with the primary aim of developing a long-standing and integrated capability for the surveillance, assessment, and investigation of blast-related hearing outcomes. Methods used to develop the dataset are described. Encompassing more than 16,500 Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the Blast-Related Auditory Injury Database (BRAID) includes individuals with a blast-related injury and nonblast control subjects. Using baseline and postdeployment hearing threshold data, a retrospective analysis of the cohort revealed that the rate of hearing loss for the injured servicemembers was 39%. The BRAID will be useful for studies that assess hearing patterns following deployment-related injury, such as blast exposures, that facilitate exploration of health outcomes and whether they are predictive of audiometric disposition and that help establish hearing loss prevention strategies and program policies for affected military commands and servicemembers. PMID:27273241

  1. Bridging the Gap of Standardized Animals Models for Blast Neurotrauma: Methodology for Appropriate Experimental Testing.

    PubMed

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Ritzel, David

    2016-01-01

    Recent military combat has heightened awareness to the complexity of blast-related traumatic brain injuries (bTBI). Experiments using animal, cadaver, or biofidelic physical models remain the primary measures to investigate injury biomechanics as well as validate computational simulations, medical diagnostics and therapies, or protection technologies. However, blast injury research has seen a range of irregular and inconsistent experimental methods for simulating blast insults generating results which may be misleading, cannot be cross-correlated between laboratories, or referenced to any standard for exposure. Both the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and the National Institutes of Health have noted that there is a lack of standardized preclinical models of TBI. It is recommended that the blast injury research community converge on a consistent set of experimental procedures and reporting of blast test conditions. This chapter describes the blast conditions which can be recreated within a laboratory setting and methodology for testing in vivo models within the appropriate environment. PMID:27604715

  2. Multifactorial lifestyle interventions in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus--a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Lucia; Melchart, Dieter; Linde, Klaus

    2010-08-01

    This systematic review aims to summarize the available randomized trials of multifactorial lifestyle interventions in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Randomized trials investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions including the elements of diet, physical activity, and stress management in people at increased risk for or with manifest coronary heart disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus were searched for in five electronic database and by citation tracking. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool. Exploratory effect size calculations were performed for a variety of laboratory and clinical outcome measures. Twenty-five trials including a total of 7,703 participants met the inclusion criteria. Fifteen trials were in patients with coronary heart disease, seven in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and three on primary prevention. The interventions varied greatly regarding concept, intensity, and providers. Compared to participants in "usual care" control groups, there were no consistent effects on lipid levels and blood pressure and small effects on body mass index and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Composite cardiac event rates were significantly less in the intervention groups of the few trials reporting these outcomes. Mortality was also lower in the intervention groups, but the difference was not statistically significant, and confidence intervals were wide. The evidence base for multifactorial lifestyle interventions is weak. Effects on surrogate measures seem minor, but there may be clinically relevant effects on major clinical endpoints. PMID:20652464

  3. Primary pulmonary low-grade marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type with prominent hyalinosis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Shigeo; Ban, Satoshi; Inagaki, Masaharu; Sugihara, Shiro; Yoshida, Katsue; Masawa, Nobuhide

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of primary pulmonary low-grade marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)-type with prominent sclerosis, which morphologically resembled pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) or inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the lung. The patient, a 66-year-old Japanese female with a history of Sjögren's syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis, presented with a lower left lobe mass 6.8 cm in diameter. Histologically, the lesion is characterized by dense bundles of collagen with scattered plasma cells, mature small lymphocytes, and histiocytes among the collagen bundles. Only the peripheral area of the nodule contained dense lymphoplasmacytoid and histiocytoid infiltrates. A few centrocyte-like cells were obscured by the numerous plasma cells and plasmacytoid cells. In addition, lymphoepithelial lesions and colonalized lymphoid follicles were identified by immunohistochemistry alone. Although PHG and IPT are unlikely to be confused with pulmonary MALT-type lymphomas, the present case suggests that MALT-type lymphoma should be added to the list of differential diagnoses for PHG and IPT. PMID:12498224

  4. The NS1 protein of a human influenza virus inhibits type I interferon production and the induction of antiviral responses in primary human dendritic and respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Haye, Kester; Burmakina, Svetlana; Moran, Thomas; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2009-07-01

    The NS1 protein of the influenza A virus is a potent virulence factor that inhibits type I interferon (IFN) synthesis, allowing the virus to overcome host defenses and replicate efficiently. However, limited studies have been conducted on NS1 function using human virus strains and primary human cells. We used NS1 truncated mutant influenza viruses derived from the human isolate influenza A/TX/91 (TX WT, where WT is wild type) to study the functions of NS1 in infected primary cells. Infection of primary differentiated human tracheo-bronchial epithelial cells with an NS1 truncated mutant demonstrated limited viral replication and enhanced type I IFN induction. Additionally, human dendritic cells (DCs) infected with human NS1 mutant viruses showed higher levels of activation and stimulated naïve T-cells better than TX WT virus-infected DCs. We also compared infections of DCs with TX WT and our previously characterized laboratory strain A/PR/8/34 (PR8) and its NS1 knockout strain, deltaNS1. TX WT-infected DCs displayed higher viral replication than PR8 but had decreased antiviral gene expression at late time points and reduced naïve T-cell stimulation compared to PR8 infections, suggesting an augmented inhibition of IFN production and human DC activation. Our findings show that human-derived influenza A viruses have a high capacity to inhibit the antiviral state in a human system, and here we have evaluated the possible mechanism of this inhibition. Lastly, C-terminal truncations in the NS1 protein of human influenza virus are sufficient to make the virus attenuated and more immunogenic, supporting its use as a live attenuated influenza vaccine in humans.

  5. Oncogenic Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax Suppression of Primary Innate Immune Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jinhee; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Toomey, Ngoc; Balachandran, Siddharth; Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus considered to be the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The viral transactivator Tax is regarded as the oncoprotein responsible for contributing toward the transformation process. Here, we demonstrate that Tax potently inhibits the activity of DEx(D/H) box helicases RIG-I and MDA5 as well as Toll-dependent TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), which function as cellular sensors or mediators of viral RNA and facilitate innate immune responses, including the production of type I IFN. Tax manifested this function by binding to the RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM) domains of TRIF and RIP1 to disrupt interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activity, a critical type I IFN transcription factor. These data provide further mechanistic insight into HTLV-1-mediated subversion of cellular host defense responses, which may help explain HTLV-1-related pathogenesis and oncogenesis. IMPORTANCE It is predicted that up to 15% of all human cancers may involve virus infection. For example, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been reported to infect up to 25 million people worldwide and is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). We show here that HTLV-1 may be able to successfully infect the T cells and remain latent due to the virally encoded product Tax inhibiting a key host defense pathway. Understanding the mechanisms by which Tax subverts the immune system may lead to the development of a therapeutic treatment for HTLV-1-mediated disease. PMID:25694597

  6. Self-management practices among type 2 diabetes patients attending primary health-care centres in Medina, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Johani, K A; Kendall, G E; Snider, P D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of self-management activities among people who have type 2 diabetes in Saudi Arabia. The Arabic version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities questionnaire was used to identify self-management practices among 210 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Only 15% of participants had a blood glucose level indicative of good glycaemic control (glycosylated haemoglobin ≤ 7 mmol/L). Most reported that they took their medication as prescribed, but many demonstrated low levels of compliance with other self-management practices (overall mean 3.7 days per week). Males and those with lower incomes were less likely to practise self-care activities. Most were given basic advice to undertake self-care activities, but only some were given more detailed information. There are opportunities to improve type 2 diabetes mellitus self-management practices in Saudi Arabia and increase the proportion of patients who achieve good glycaemic control. PMID:26450858

  7. Close-range blast exposure is associated with altered functional connectivity in Veterans independent of concussion symptoms at time of exposure.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Meghan E; Lindemer, Emily R; Fonda, Jennifer R; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2015-03-01

    Although there is emerging data on the effects of blast-related concussion (or mTBI) on cognition, the effects of blast exposure itself on the brain have only recently been explored. Toward this end, we examine functional connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex, a primary region within the default mode network (DMN), in a cohort of 134 Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans characterized for a range of common military-associated comorbidities. Exposure to a blast at close range (<10 meters) was associated with decreased connectivity of bilateral primary somatosensory and motor cortices, and these changes were not different from those seen in participants with blast-related mTBI. These results remained significant when clinical factors such as sleep quality, chronic pain, or post traumatic stress disorder were included in the statistical model. In contrast, differences in functional connectivity based on concussion history and blast exposures at greater distances were not apparent. Despite the limitations of a study of this nature (e.g., assessments long removed from injury, self-reported blast history), these data demonstrate that blast exposure per se, which is prevalent among those who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, may be an important consideration in Veterans' health. It further offers a clinical guideline for determining which blasts (namely, those within 10 meters) are likely to lead to long-term health concerns and may be more accurate than using concussion symptoms alone. PMID:25366378

  8. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salopiata, Florian; Depner, Sofia; Wäsch, Marvin; Böhm, Martin E.; Mücke, Oliver; Plass, Christoph; Lehmann, Wolf D.; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO). However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR) and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid) and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR). The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in erythroid

  9. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI).

  10. A review of the primary types of the Hawaiian stag beetle genus Apterocyclus Waterhouse (Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae), with the description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, M J; Hawks, David C

    2014-01-01

    The species of the Hawaiian stag beetle genus Apterocyclus Waterhouse (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) are reviewed following an examination of all primary types. Although the continued existence of the species is unknown and some possibly are extinct there are five recently extant species, including one species that is described here as new. The holotypes for all available names are pictured, and synonymies discussed and updated. Lectotypes are designated for Apterocyclus honoluluensis Waterhouse and A. munroi Sharp. A key to species and a revised catalog for the genus are provided.

  11. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI). PMID:26774395

  12. Blast wave parameters at diminished ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Relation between blast wave parameters resulted from a condensed high explosive (HE) charge detonation and a surrounding gas (air) pressure has been studied. Blast wave pressure and impulse differences at compression and rarefaction phases, which traditionally determine damage explosive effect, has been analyzed. An initial pressure effect on a post-explosion quasi-static component of the blast load has been investigated. The analysis is based on empirical relations between blast parameters and non-dimensional similarity criteria. The results can be directly applied to flying vehicle (aircraft or spacecraft) blast safety analysis.

  13. Effect of Grit Blasting on Substrate Roughness and Coating Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Varacalle; Donna Guillen; Doug Deason; William Rhodaberger; Elliott Sampson

    2006-09-01

    Statistically designed experiments were performed to compare the surface roughnesses produced by grit blasting A36/1020 steel with different abrasives. Grit blast media, blast pressure, and working distance were varied using a Box-type statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. The surface textures produced by four metal grits (HG16, HG18, HG25, and HG40) and three conventional grits (copper slag, coal slag, and chilled iron) were compared. Substrate roughness was measured using surface profilometry and correlated with operating parameters. The HG16 grit produced the highest surface roughness of all the grits tested. Aluminum and zinc-aluminum coatings were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates using a Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) process. Bond strength of the coatings was measured with a portable adhesion tester in accordance with ASTM standard D4541. The coatings on substrates roughened with steel grit exhibit superior bond strength to those on substrates prepared with conventional grit. For aluminum coatings sprayed onto surfaces prepared with the HG16 grit, the bond strength was most influenced by current, spray distance, and spray gun pressure (in that order). The highest bond strength for the zinc-aluminum coatings was attained on surfaces prepared using the metal grits.

  14. Effect of extracellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein 120 on primary human vascular endothelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Huang, M B; Hunter, M; Bond, V C

    1999-09-20

    During the course of an HIV-1 infection, free infectious and noninfectious virus particles, and free HIV-1 proteins, circulate within the host, exposing the host endothelium to these viral factors, even if the endothelium is not infected. This suggests that extracellular HIV-1 proteins could influence endothelial cell function, leading to pathogenesis. In light of this, we have used primary cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) to screen for effects of the HIV-1 protein gp120 on endothelial cell function. The results of this study show that short exposure of HUVEC cultures to this protein causes significant levels of cytotoxicity. Further, using several different assays, we have shown that this cytotoxic effect on HUVECs appears to be due to induction of an apoptotic program. The biphasic nature of gp120 titration curves suggests that multiple cellular factors are mediating these gp120-induced effects. Competition studies appear to confirm this by showing that the apoptotic effect is mediated through two cell surface receptors on HUVECs, CCR5 and CXCR4. Alternatively, competition studies examining CD4 receptors suggests that CD4 played no role in gp12O-induced effects on HUVECs.

  15. Vasopressin inhibits type-I collagen and albumin gene expression in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chojkier, M.; Brenner, D.A.; Leffert, H.L.

    1989-06-05

    The mechanisms that regulate collagen gene expression in hepatic cells are poorly understood. Accelerated Ca2+ fluxes are associated with inhibiting collagen synthesis selectively in human fibroblasts. In suspension cultures of isolated hepatocytes, the Ca2+ agonist vasopressin increases cytosolic levels of free Ca2+. However, whether vasopressin's interactions with plasma membrane V1 receptors attenuate hepatic collagen production is unknown. We investigated this problem by studying vasopressin's effects on collagen synthesis and Ca2+ efflux in long-term primary cultures of differentiated and proliferation-competent adult rat hepatocytes. Twelve-day-old quiescent cultures were exposed to test substances and labeled with (5-3H)proline. Determinations of radioactivity in collagenase-sensitive and collagenase-resistant proteins were used to calculate the relative levels of collagen production. Synthetic (8-arg)vasopressin stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux within 1 min and inhibited hepatocyte collagen production within 3 h by 50%; overall rates of protein synthesis were not affected significantly. In cultures labeled with (35S)methionine, vasopressin also decreased the levels of newly synthesized and secreted albumin, but not fibrinogen, detected in specific immunoprecipitates analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Northern blot analyses using specific (32P)cDNA probes revealed 70% decreases in hybridizable levels of collagen alpha 1(I) mRNA in hepatocyte cultures treated with either vasopressin or Ca2+ ionophore A23187; hybridizable levels of albumin mRNA also fell approximately 50% following vasopressin treatment.

  16. Expression of Alzheimer-Type Neurofibrillary Epitopes in Primary Rat Cortical Neurons Following Infection with Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Underly, Robert; Song, Mee-Sook; Dunbar, Gary L.; Weaver, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The neurofibrillary tau pathology and amyloid deposits seen in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also have been seen in bacteria-infected brains. However, few studies have examined the role of these bacteria in the generation of tau pathology. One suggested link between infection and AD is edentulism, the complete loss of teeth. Edentulism can result from chronic periodontal disease due to infection by Enterococcus faecalis. The current study assessed the ability to generate early Alzheimer-like neurofibrillary epitopes in primary rat cortical neurons through bacterial infection by E. faecalis. Seven-day old cultured neurons were infected with E. faecalis for 24 and 48 h. An upward molecular weight shift in tau by Western blotting (WB) and increased appearance of tau reactivity in cell bodies and degenerating neurites was found in the 48 h infection group for the antibody CP13 (phospho-Serine 202). A substantial increase in reactivity of Alz-50 was seen at 24 and 48 h after infection. Furthermore, extensive microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) reactivity also was seen at 24 and 48 h post-infection. Our preliminary findings suggest a potential link between E. faecalis infection and intracellular changes that may help facilitate early AD-like neurofibrillary pathology. HighlightsEnterococcus faecalis used in the generation of AD neurofibrillary epitopes in rat.Infection increases Alz-50, phospho-Serine 202 tau, and MAP2 expression.Infection by Enterococcus may play a role in early Alzheimer neurofibrillary changes. PMID:26834627

  17. Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type, with Primary Manifestation as an Upper Eyelid Swelling.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Akiko; Funasaka, Yoko; Nakamizo, Munenaga; Shima, Ayaka; Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Dan, Kazuo; Terasaki, Mika; Sugisaki, Yuichi; Fukuda, Yu; Kawana, Seiji; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENK/TCL) is most often in the nose or the nasopharynx but can present elsewhere. We report a rare case of ENK/TCL that presented as swelling of an upper eyelid without ocular involvement. A 76-year-old man visited our hospital with a swollen lesion of the left upper eyelid which had appeared 2 months earlier. A biopsy of the upper eyelid revealed slight perivascular and periadnexal infiltration of mononuclear cells with dermal edema. Treatment with oral prednisolone at a dosage of 20 mg/day decreased the eyelid swelling. However, 5 months later, exacerbation of the swelling and nasal congestion were observed. A second biopsy of the upper eyelid revealed a diffuse dermal infiltrate composed of mononuclear cells with an angiocentic growth pattern. Immunohistochemical studies and in situ hybridization showed natural killer-lineage antigens (CD56, granzyme B, and T-cell intracellular antigen 1) with expression of Epstein-Barr virus. These findings lead to the diagnosis of ENK/TCL. We treated the patient with radiation therapy (50 Gy) and 3 courses of a regimen including dexamethasone, carboplatin, etoposide, and ifosphamide. This case suggests that ENK/TCL can present with swelling of an upper eyelid as the primary sign of the skin lesion. Swelling of an upper eyelid should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ENK/TCL. PMID:27680487

  18. Physical surrogate leg to evaluate blast mine injury.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Duane S; Williams, Kevin; Salisbury, Christopher

    2011-12-01

    Antipersonnel blast landmines pose a significant threat in affected areas, with injuries to the lower extremity and amputation being common. Addressing a need for injury prediction and protection evaluation, a 50th percentile physical surrogate lower leg was developed incorporating the load transmission paths in the lower leg. Biofidelic and frangible materials were evaluated and selected based on high deformation rate properties compared to those for human tissues. The predicted leg injuries from experimental blast testing were in agreement with injury data for unprotected and protected legs. Post-test examination was found to be the only consistent and reliable evaluation method for predicting injury outcome, and an evaluation based on tissue damage was shown to be sensitive to changes in loading conditions, not possible with existing approaches. This study identified the severity of calcaneal fracture as the primary determinant of serious injury, which should be the focus of future protection development.

  19. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858–mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P.; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J.; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858–opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858–induced NK-cell–mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858–mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858–mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. PMID:27013443

  20. Strict specificity for high-mannose type N-glycans and primary structure of a red alga Eucheuma serra lectin.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kanji; Sato, Yuichiro; Ito, Kaori; Fujiwara, Yoshifumi; Iwamoto, Yasumasa; Makino, Hiroyuki; Kawakubo, Akihiro

    2007-05-01

    We have elucidated the carbohydrate-binding profile of a non-monosaccharide-binding lectin named Eucheuma serra lectin (ESA)-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra using a lectin-immobilized column and a centrifugal ultrafiltration-high performance liquid chromatography method with a variety of fluorescence-labeled oligosaccharides. In both methods, ESA-2 exclusively bound with high-mannose type (HM) N-glycans, but not with any of other N-glycans including complex type, hybrid type and core pentasaccharides, and oligosaccharides from glycolipids. These findings indicate that ESA-2 recognizes the branched oligomannosides of the N-glycans. However, ESA-2 did not bind with any of the free oligomannoses examined that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides implying that the portion of the core N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residue(s) of the N-glycans is also essential for binding. Thus, the algal lectin was strictly specific for HM N-glycans and recognized the extended carbohydrate structure with a minimum size of the pentasaccharide, Man(alpha1-3)Man(alpha1-6)Man(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-4) GlcNAc. Kinetic analysis of binding with a HM heptasaccharide (M5) showed that ESA-2 has four carbohydrate-binding sites per polypeptide with a high association constant of 1.6x10(8) M-1. Sequence analysis, by a combination of Edman degradation and mass analyses of the intact protein and of peptides produced by its enzymic digestions, showed that ESA-2 is composed of 268 amino acids (molecular weight 27950) with four tandemly repeated domains of 67 amino acids. The number of repeats coincided with the number of carbohydrate-binding sites in the monomeric molecule. Surprisingly, the marine algal lectin was homologous to hemagglutinin from the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:17259190

  1. Isolation and genetic characterization of human coronavirus NL63 in primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells obtained from a commercial supplier, and confirmation of its replication in two different types of human primary kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cryopreserved primary human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) were obtained from a commercial supplier for studies of Simian virus 40 (SV40). Within twelve hrs after cell cultures were initiated, cytoplasmic vacuoles appeared in many of the RPTEC. The RPTEC henceforth deteriorated rapidly. Since SV40 induces the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles, this batch of RPTEC was rejected for the SV40 study. Nevertheless, we sought the likely cause(s) of the deterioration of the RPTEC as part of our technology development efforts. Methods Adventitious viruses in the RPTEC were isolated and/or detected and identified by isolation in various indicator cell lines, observation of cytopathology, an immunoflurorescence assay, electron microscopy, PCR, and sequencing. Results Cytomegalovirus (CMV) was detected in some RPTEC by cytology, an immunofluorescence assay, and PCR. Human Herpesvirus 6B was detected by PCR of DNA extracted from the RPTEC, but was not isolated. Human coronavirus NL63 was isolated and identified by RT-PCR and sequencing, and its replication in a fresh batch of RPTEC and another type of primary human kidney cells was confirmed. Conclusions At least 3 different adventitious viruses were present in the batch of contaminated RPTEC. Whereas we are unable to determine whether the original RPTEC were pre-infected prior to their separation from other kidney cells, or had gotten contaminated with HCoV-NL63 from an ill laboratory worker during their preparation for commercial sale, our findings are a reminder that human-derived biologicals should always be considered as potential sources of infectious agents. Importantly, HCoV-NL63 replicates to high titers in some primary human kidney cells. PMID:23805916

  2. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  3. Lifestyle counseling for type 2 diabetes risk reduction in Dutch primary care: results of the APHRODITE study after 0.5 and 1.5 years.

    PubMed

    Vermunt, Paulina W A; Milder, Ivon E J; Wielaard, Frits; de Vries, Jeanne H M; van Oers, Hans A M; Westert, Gert P

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the overall effect of the Active Prevention in High-Risk Individuals of Diabetes Type 2 in and Around Eindhoven (APHRODITE) lifestyle intervention on type 2 diabetes risk reduction in Dutch primary care after 0.5 and 1.5 years and to evaluate the variability between general practices. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes (Finnish Diabetes Risk Score ≥13) were randomly assigned into an intervention group (n = 479) or a usual-care group (n = 446). Comparisons were made between study groups and between general practices regarding changes in clinical and lifestyle measures over 1.5 years. Participant, general practitioner, and nurse practitioner characteristics were compared between individuals who lost weight or maintained a stable weight and individuals who gained weight. RESULTS Both groups showed modest changes in glucose values, weight measures, physical activity, energy intake, and fiber intake. Differences between groups were significant only for total physical activity, saturated fat intake, and fiber intake. Differences between general practices were significant for BMI and 2-h glucose but not for energy intake and physical activity. In the intervention group, the nurse practitioners' mean years of work experience was significantly longer in individuals who were successful at losing weight or maintaining a stable weight compared with unsuccessful individuals. Furthermore, successful individuals more often had a partner. CONCLUSIONS Risk factors for type 2 diabetes could be significantly reduced by lifestyle counseling in Dutch primary care. The small differences in changes over time between the two study groups suggest that additional intervention effects are modest. In particular, the level of experience of the nurse practitioner and the availability of partner support seem to facilitate intervention success. PMID:21775759

  4. Patient reactions to a web-based cardiovascular risk calculator in type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Tom; Dack, Charlotte; Pal, Kingshuk; Ross, Jamie; Stevenson, Fiona A; Peacock, Richard; Pearson, Mike; Spiegelhalter, David; Sweeting, Michael; Murray, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of risk calculators for specific diseases is increasing, with an underlying assumption that they promote risk reduction as users become better informed and motivated to take preventive action. Empirical data to support this are, however, sparse and contradictory. Aim To explore user reactions to a cardiovascular risk calculator for people with type 2 diabetes. Objectives were to identify cognitive and emotional reactions to the presentation of risk, with a view to understanding whether and how such a calculator could help motivate users to adopt healthier behaviours and/or improve adherence to medication. Design and setting Qualitative study combining data from focus groups and individual user experience. Adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited through website advertisements and posters displayed at local GP practices and diabetes groups. Method Participants used a risk calculator that provided individualised estimates of cardiovascular risk. Estimates were based on UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) data, supplemented with data from trials and systematic reviews. Risk information was presented using natural frequencies, visual displays, and a range of formats. Data were recorded and transcribed, then analysed by a multidisciplinary group. Results Thirty-six participants contributed data. Users demonstrated a range of complex cognitive and emotional responses, which might explain the lack of change in health behaviours demonstrated in the literature. Conclusion Cardiovascular risk calculators for people with diabetes may best be used in conjunction with health professionals who can guide the user through the calculator and help them use the resulting risk information as a source of motivation and encouragement. PMID:25733436

  5. Fine-mapping chromosomal loss at 9p21: correlation with prognosis in primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type.

    PubMed

    Senff, Nancy J; Zoutman, Willem H; Vermeer, Maarten H; Assaf, Chalid; Berti, Emilio; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Espinet, Blanca; de Misa Cabrera, Ricardo Fernandez; Geerts, Marie-Louise; Kempf, Werner; Mitchell, Tracey J; Paulli, Marco; Petrella, Tony; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Santucci, Marco; Whittaker, Sean J; Willemze, Rein; Tensen, Cornelis P

    2009-05-01

    Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCLBCL, LT) is the most aggressive type of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. In a recent study on 12 patients it was found that inactivation of CDKN2A by either deletion of 9p21.3 or promoter hypermethylation is correlated with a worse prognosis. In the present EORTC multicenter study, skin biopsies of 64 PCLBCL, LT patients were analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to validate these previous results and to fine-map the losses in this region. Although no minimal common region of loss could be identified, most homozygous loss was observed in the CDKN2A gene (43 of 64; 67%) encoding p16 and p14ARF. Promoter hypermethylation of p16 and p14ARF was found in six and zero cases, respectively. Survival was markedly different between patients with versus without aberrations in the CDKN2A gene (5-year disease-specific survival 43 versus 70%; P=0.06). In conclusion, our results confirm that deletion of chromosome 9p21.3 is found in a considerable proportion of PCLBCL, LT patients and that inactivation of the CDKN2A gene is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In most patients the deletion involves a large area of at least several kilobase pairs instead of a small minimal common region.

  6. GEOGLAM best available crop masks and calendars for the four primary crop types (corn, wheat, soy and rice) within the main agricultural producing regions of the world.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, B.; McGaughey, K.; Humber, M. L.; Nordling, J.; Claverie, M.; Justice, C. O.; Deshayes, M.; Becker-Reshef, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative was developed by the Group on Earth Observations in order to produce and disseminate relevant, timely and accurate forecasts of agricultural production at national, regional and global scales through the use of earth observations, agro-meteorological data, field reports and national level expertise. As part of this goal GEOGLAM has developed the monthly GEOGLAM Crop Monitor, which provides coordinated global crop assessments on the four primary crop types (corn, wheat, soy and rice) within the main agricultural producing regions of the world. As a component of these assessments the GEOGLAM Crop Monitor has developed best available crop specific masks and seasonal specific calendars for each of the four primary crop types within these main producing regions of the world based on Crop Monitor partner products and inputs. These crop masks and calendars are due to be publically released in order to be of benefit to the greater agricultural research and monitoring communities. This talk will discuss the sources and development of these crop specific masks and calendars.

  7. 'Working with the team': an exploratory study of improved type 2 diabetes management in a new model of integrated primary/secondary care.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Julie; Askew, Deborah; Jackson, Claire; Russell, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore how a new model of integrated primary/secondary care for type 2 diabetes management, the Brisbane South Complex Diabetes Service (BSCDS), related to improved diabetes management in a selected group of patients. We used a qualitative research design to obtain detailed accounts from the BSCDS via semi-structured interviews with 10 patients. The interviews were fully transcribed and systematically coded using a form of thematic analysis. Participants' responses were grouped in relation to: (1) Patient-centred care; (2) Effective multiprofessional teamwork; and (3) Empowering patients. The key features of this integrated primary/secondary care model were accessibility and its delivery within a positive health care environment, clear and supportive interpersonal communication between patients and health care providers, and patients seeing themselves as being part of the team-based care. The BSCDS delivered patient-centred care and achieved patient engagement in ways that may have contributed to improved type 2 diabetes management in these participants.

  8. LIVER TYPE FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN (L-FABP) GENE ABLATION REDUCES NUCLEAR LIGAND DISTRIBUTION AND PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR ACTIVATED RECEPTOR-α ACTIVITY IN CULTURED PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES1

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Huang, Huan; Davis, Jason; Lyuksyutova, Olga I.; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2009-01-01

    The effect of liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene ablation on the uptake and distribution of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) to the nucleus by real-time laser scanning confocal imaging and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity was examined in cultured primary hepatocytes from livers wild-type L-FABP+/+ and gene ablated L-FABP−/− mice. Cultured primary hepatocytes from livers of L-FABP−/− mice exhibited: (i) reduced oxidation of palmitic acid, a common dietary long chain fatty acid (LCFA); (ii) reduced expression of fatty acid oxidative enzymes—proteins transcriptionally regulated by PPARα; (iii) reduced palmitic acid-induced PPARα coimmunoprecipitation with coactivator SRC1 concomitant with increased PPARα coimmunoprecipitation with coinhibitor N-CoR; (iv) reduced palmitic acid-induced PPARα. Diminished PPARα activation in L-FABP null hepatocytes was associated with lower uptake of common dietary LCFA (palmitic acid as well as its fluorescent derivative BODIPY FL C16), reduced level of total unesterified LCFA, and real-time redistribution of BODIPY FL C16 from the central nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these studies support the hypothesis that L-FABP may facilitate ligand (LCFA)-activated PPARα transcriptional activity at least in part by increasing total LCFA ligand available to PPARα for inducing PPARα-mediated transcription of proteins involved in LCFA metabolism. PMID:19285478

  9. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M.; Baker, Sandy T.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Wolfson, Marla R.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation—6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  10. Characterizing explosives and blasting emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.; Bacon, D.P.

    1995-12-31

    With the advance of science, rise of public interest in environmental matters, and continuing erosion of air quality, Federal and state regulators are demanding an increasing complex array of data concerning emissions produced by burning and detonating energetic materials. The US Department of Defense, one of the world`s largest consumers of energetic materials, now must characterize combustion products resulting from open burning/open detonation disposal operations. The catch-all phrase ``below detection limits`` no longer satisfies the regulators who now want testing to delve into the ppt level for volatile organic compounds and ppt level for semivolatile organic compounds. Regulators are also expanding their scope of interest and may soon be asking for emissions data on training operations such as artillery firing. Providing this type of information is no longer an impossibility. The Army, as the single manager of conventional munitions for the three military services, anticipated the tightening of data requirements and in the mid-1980s funded a study into technologies to characterize emissions produced by open-air destruction of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics. This study, conducted in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, has resulted in a unique testing system which gathers data from small detonations and burns and can accurately scale the data to allow characterizing combustion products of field open-burning/open-detonation disposal operations. The system and its technologies apply to other operations involving energetic materials. This paper describes the system (known as the BangBox Testing System), its component technologies, emerging results, and potential applications in the explosives and blasting industries.

  11. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation.

  12. Blast Exposure Causes Early and Persistent Aberrant Phospho- and Cleaved-Tau Expression in a Murine Model of Mild Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Bertrand R.; Meabon, James S.; Martin, Tobin J.; Mourad, Pierre D.; Bennett, Raymond; Kraemer, Brian C.; Cernak, Ibolja; Petrie, Eric C.; Emery, Michael J.; Swenson, Erik R.; Mayer, Cynthia; Mehic, Edin; Peskind, Elaine R.; Cook, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is considered the ‘signature injury’ of combat veterans that have served during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This prevalence of mTBI is due in part to the common exposure to high explosive blasts in combat zones. In addition to the threats of blunt impact trauma caused by flying objects and the head itself being propelled against objects, the primary blast overpressure (BOP) generated by high explosives is capable of injuring the brain. Compared to other means of causing TBI, the pathophysiology of mild-to-moderate BOP is less well understood. To study the consequences of BOP exposure in mice, we employed a well-established approach using a compressed gas-driven shock tube that recapitulates battlefield-relevant open-field BOP. We found that 24 hours post-blast a single mild BOP provoked elevation of multiple phosphor- and cleaved-tau species in neurons, as well as elevating manganese superoxide-dismutase (MnSOD or SOD2) levels, a cellular response to oxidative stress. In hippocampus, aberrant tau species persisted for at least 30 days post-exposure, while SOD2 levels returned to sham control levels. These findings suggest that elevated phospho- and cleaved-tau species may be among the initiating pathologic processes induced by mild blast exposure. These findings may have important implications for efforts to prevent blast-induced insults to the brain from progressing into long-term neurodegenerative disease processes. PMID:23948882

  13. Removal of TiO2 Nanoparticles During Primary Water Treatment: Role of Coagulant Type, Dose, and Nanoparticle Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Ryan J.; Keene, Valerie; Daniels, Louise; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nanomaterials from consumer products (i.e., paints, sunscreens, toothpastes, and food grade titanium dioxide [TiO2]) have the capacity to end up in groundwater and surface water, which is of concern because the effectiveness of removing them via traditional treatment is uncertain. Although aggregation and transport of nanomaterials have been investigated, studies on their removal from suspension are limited. Hence, this study involves the development of scaled-down jar tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the removal of a model metal oxide nanoparticle (NP), TiO2, in artificial groundwater (AGW), and artificial surface water (ASW) at the primary stages of treatment: coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation. Total removal was quantified at the end of each treatment stage by spectroscopy. Three different coagulants—iron chloride (FeCl3), iron sulfate (FeSO4), and alum [Al2(SO4)3]—destabilized the TiO2 NPs in both source waters. Overall, greater than one-log removal was seen in groundwater for all coagulants at a constant dose of 50 mg/L and across the range of particle concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 100 mg/L). In surface water, greater than 90% removal was seen with FeSO4 and Al2(SO4)3, but less than 60% when using FeCl3. Additionally, removal was most effective at higher NP concentrations (50 and 100 mg/L) in AGW when compared with ASW. Zeta potential was measured and compared between AGW and ASW with the presence of all three coagulants at the same treatment stage times as in the removal studies. These electrokinetic trends confirm that the greatest total removal of NPs occurred when the magnitude of charge was smallest (<10 mV) and conversely, higher zeta potential values (>35 mV) measured were under conditions with poor removal (<90%). These results are anticipated to be of considerable interest to practitioners for the assessment of traditional treatment processes' capacity to remove nanomaterials prior to subsequent

  14. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact...

  16. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact...

  17. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact...

  18. 9. LOOKING NORTH AT TRESTLE, HOIST HOUSE No. 1, BLAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING NORTH AT TRESTLE, HOIST HOUSE No. 1, BLAST FURNACE No. 1, AND HOT BLAST STOVES. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  19. Looking east at blast furnace no. 5 between the hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east at blast furnace no. 5 between the hot blast stoves (left) and the dustcatcher (right). - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  20. Looking southeast at blast furnaces no. 5 and no. 6 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking southeast at blast furnaces no. 5 and no. 6 with blast furnace trestle and Gondola Railroad cars in foreground. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  1. GENERAL VIEW OF TURBOBLOWER BUILDING (LEFT), BLAST FURNACE (CENTER), AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF TURBO-BLOWER BUILDING (LEFT), BLAST FURNACE (CENTER), AND HOT BLAST STOVES (RIGHT). - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Haselton Blast Furnaces, West of Center Street Viaduct, along Mahoning River, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  2. Looking southwest at blast furnaces no. 5 and no. 6 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking southwest at blast furnaces no. 5 and no. 6 with blast furnace trestle and Gondola Railroad cars in foreground. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  3. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, CAST HOUSE OF BLAST FURNACE NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, CAST HOUSE OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 1 AND BLAST FURNACE NO. 2. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 1 & No. 2, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  4. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact between... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall...

  5. Blast waves in rotating media.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossner, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The model investigated involves a cylindrically symmetric blast wave generated by an infinitely long line explosion in a cold and homogeneous gas rotating rigidly in its self-gravitational field. It is found that within the context of rotation in a gravitational field a blast wave will not adopt the one-zone form familiar from similarity solutions but, rather, a two-zone form. The inner compression zone arises as a response to the presence of the restoring force, which drives a rarefaction wave into the outer compression zone.

  6. Numerical study of rock blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation results on fracture of a concrete block due to dynamic explosive loads applied to the walls of a blast hole. Considered in the study is the influence of the pulse shape and rock properties on the pattern of irreversible deformation and cracking. It is found that a fractured zone bounded by a plastically deformed contour always arises around the explosion site. Comparison of elastoplastic deformation and fracture induced in the concrete block by explosion pulses of different durations and amplitudes shows that shorter pulses with higher amplitudes and steeper rise times provide a higher blasting efficiency.

  7. Community response to blast noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykaza, Edward T.; Pater, Larry L.; Fidell, Sanford; Schomer, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Although community response to impulsive noise from military operations is usually discussed for NEPA-related purposes in terms of the prevalence of annoyance, it is managed on a local, daily basis in terms of numbers of recent complaints. Reconciling blast noise complaint rates with the annoyance predicted by dosage-effect analysis would be of considerable benefit to the Army, since it would provide insight into the dynamics of community reaction to this distinctive form of noise exposure, and put its assessment and management on a common footing. This paper describes a systematic approach to the challenges of quantifying community reaction to blast noise. [Work supported by ERDC-CERL.

  8. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  9. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 serves as a primary cognate receptor for the Type IV pilus of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2016-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) utilizes the Type IV pilus (Tfp) to adhere to respiratory tract epithelial cells thus colonizing its human host; however, the host cell receptor to which this adhesive protein binds is unknown. From a panel of receptors engaged by Tfp expressed by other bacterial species, we showed that the majority subunit of NTHI Tfp, PilA, bound to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and that this interaction was both specific and of high affinity. Further, Tfp-expressing NTHI inoculated on to polarized respiratory tract epithelial cells that expressed ICAM1 were significantly more adherent compared to Tfp-deficient NTHI or NTHI inoculated on to epithelial cells to which ICAM1 gene expression was silenced. Moreover, pre-incubation of epithelial cells with recombinant soluble PilA (rsPilA) blocked adherence of NTHI, an outcome that was abrogated by admixing rsPilA with ICAM1 prior to application on to the target cells. Epithelial cells infected with adenovirus or respiratory syncytial virus showed increased expression of ICAM1; this outcome supported augmented adherence of Tfp-expressing NTHI. Collectively, these data revealed the cognate receptor for NTHI Tfp as ICAM1 and promote continued development of a Tfp-targeted vaccine for NTHI-induced diseases of the airway wherein upper respiratory tract viruses play a key predisposing role.

  10. Primary intestinal-type glandular lesions of the vagina: clinical, pathologic, and immunohistochemical features of 14 cases ranging from benign polyp to adenoma to adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Staats, Paul N; McCluggage, W Glenn; Clement, Philip B; Young, Robert H

    2014-05-01

    Primary intestinal-type glandular lesions of the vagina are rare. We report a series of 14 lesions, including 1 intestinal-type polyp without neoplastic features, 3 adenomas (2 with high-grade dysplasia), and 10 adenocarcinomas. Patients ranged in age from 20 to 86 years (mean 60 y) and presented with vaginal bleeding or a mass. No history of diethylstilbestrol exposure, adenosis, or endometriosis was elicited in any patient. The lesions were mostly polypoid, small (0.8 to 2.0 cm), and located in the posterior (6 cases) and lower (7 cases) vagina. One carcinoma metastasized to a para-aortic lymph node; the others were confined to the vagina. The neoplasms exhibited histologic features identical to those seen in primary large intestinal tumors, including variable numbers of goblet cells and in 1 case neuroendocrine cells. Five of the adenocarcinomas contained areas consistent with a precursor adenoma. In 3 cases, a benign urothelium-lined duct was adjacent to the lesion, and in 2 patients benign intestinal-type epithelium was present; no other potential benign precursor lesions were seen. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 6 cases; the tumors were positive for CDX-2 (6/6), CK20 (5/6), CEA (5/5), CK7 (4/6), and CA-125 (2/4) and were negative for ER (0/6) and p16 (0/2). Clinical outcome data were available in 3 patients with adenocarcinomas; 1 died of disease in <1 year, and 2 were alive with no evidence of disease at 2 and 7 years. The pertinent literature is reviewed, and the potential origin and differential diagnosis of these lesions are discussed. PMID:24722061

  11. Relationship between changes in the cochlear blood flow and disorder of hearing function induced by blast injury in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jichuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    The auditory system is the most susceptible to damages from blast waves. Blast injuries always lead to varying degrees of hearing impairment. Although a disorder of the cochlear blood flow (CoBF) has been considered to be related to many pathological processes of the auditory system and to contribute to various types of hearing loss, changes in the CoBF induced by blast waves and the relationship between such changes and hearing impairment are undefined. To observe the changes in the cochlear microcirculation after exposure to an explosion blast, investigate the relationship between changes in the CoBF and hearing impairment and subsequently explore the mechanism responsible for the changes in the CoBF, we detected the perfusion of the cochlear microcirculation and hearing threshold shift after exposure to an explosion blast. Then, an N-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor) solution and artificial perilymph were applied to the round window (RW) of the cochlea before the blast exposure, followed by an evaluation of the CoBF and hearing function. The results indicated that the changes in the CoBF were correlated to the strength of the blast wave. The cochlear blood flow significantly increased when the peak value of the blast overpressure was greater than approximately 45 kPa, and there was no significant change in the cochlear blood flow when the peak value of the blast overpressure was less than approximately 35 kPa. Following local administration of the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME, the increase in the CoBF induced by the blast was inhibited, and this reduction was significantly associated with the hearing threshold. PMID:23412965

  12. Relationship between changes in the cochlear blood flow and disorder of hearing function induced by blast injury in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jichuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    The auditory system is the most susceptible to damages from blast waves. Blast injuries always lead to varying degrees of hearing impairment. Although a disorder of the cochlear blood flow (CoBF) has been considered to be related to many pathological processes of the auditory system and to contribute to various types of hearing loss, changes in the CoBF induced by blast waves and the relationship between such changes and hearing impairment are undefined. To observe the changes in the cochlear microcirculation after exposure to an explosion blast, investigate the relationship between changes in the CoBF and hearing impairment and subsequently explore the mechanism responsible for the changes in the CoBF, we detected the perfusion of the cochlear microcirculation and hearing threshold shift after exposure to an explosion blast. Then, an N-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor) solution and artificial perilymph were applied to the round window (RW) of the cochlea before the blast exposure, followed by an evaluation of the CoBF and hearing function. The results indicated that the changes in the CoBF were correlated to the strength of the blast wave. The cochlear blood flow significantly increased when the peak value of the blast overpressure was greater than approximately 45 kPa, and there was no significant change in the cochlear blood flow when the peak value of the blast overpressure was less than approximately 35 kPa. Following local administration of the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME, the increase in the CoBF induced by the blast was inhibited, and this reduction was significantly associated with the hearing threshold. PMID:23412965

  13. Relationship between changes in the cochlear blood flow and disorder of hearing function induced by blast injury in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jichuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    The auditory system is the most susceptible to damages from blast waves. Blast injuries always lead to varying degrees of hearing impairment. Although a disorder of the cochlear blood flow (CoBF) has been considered to be related to many pathological processes of the auditory system and to contribute to various types of hearing loss, changes in the CoBF induced by blast waves and the relationship between such changes and hearing impairment are undefined. To observe the changes in the cochlear microcirculation after exposure to an explosion blast, investigate the relationship between changes in the CoBF and hearing impairment and subsequently explore the mechanism responsible for the changes in the CoBF, we detected the perfusion of the cochlear microcirculation and hearing threshold shift after exposure to an explosion blast. Then, an N-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor) solution and artificial perilymph were applied to the round window (RW) of the cochlea before the blast exposure, followed by an evaluation of the CoBF and hearing function. The results indicated that the changes in the CoBF were correlated to the strength of the blast wave. The cochlear blood flow significantly increased when the peak value of the blast overpressure was greater than approximately 45 kPa, and there was no significant change in the cochlear blood flow when the peak value of the blast overpressure was less than approximately 35 kPa. Following local administration of the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME, the increase in the CoBF induced by the blast was inhibited, and this reduction was significantly associated with the hearing threshold.

  14. Succinylacetone as primary marker to detect tyrosinemia type I in newborns and its measurement by newborn screening programs.

    PubMed

    De Jesús, Víctor R; Adam, Barbara W; Mandel, Daniel; Cuthbert, Carla D; Matern, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type I (TYR I) is caused by autosomal recessive fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and is characterized by development of severe liver disease in infancy and neurologic crises. If left untreated, most patients die of liver failure in the first years of life. Intervention with medication is effective when initiated during the first month of life. This improvement in the treatment of TYR I patients influenced the decision to include TYR I in the US Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Recommended Uniform Screening Panel. However, while tyrosine is routinely measured in newborn screening (NBS) by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), elevated tyrosine levels are not specific to TYR I. To improve the specificity of NBS for TYR I, several assays were developed to measure succinylacetone (SUAC) in dried blood spots (DBS). SUAC is a pathognomonic marker of TYR I, and its detection by NBS MS/MS is possible. This review of the current status of NBS for TYR I in the US is the result of discussions at the HHS Secretary's (Discretionary) Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children about the inconsistent implementation of effective NBS for TYR I in the US. We sought to understand the different TYR I screening practices in US NBS programs. Results indicate that 50 out of 51 NBS programs in the US screen for TYR I, and a successful SUAC performance evaluation scheme is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Programmatic and methodological barriers were identified that prevent widespread adoption of SUAC measurements in NBS laboratories. However, since SUAC detection is currently the best approach to NBS for TYR I, a further delay of the addition of SUAC measurement into NBS procedures is discouraged. SUAC measurement should improve both the false positive and false negative rate in NBS for TYR I thereby yielding the desired benefits for affected patients at no expense to the overall population

  15. Succinylacetone as Primary Marker to Detect Tyrosinemia Type I in Newborns and its Measurement by Newborn Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús, Víctor R.; Adam, Barbara W.; Mandel, Daniel; Cuthbert, Carla D.; Matern, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type I (TYR I) is caused by autosomal recessive fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and is characterized by development of severe liver disease in infancy and neurologic crises. If left untreated, most patients die of liver failure in the first years of life. Intervention with medication is effective when initiated during the first month of life. This improvement in the treatment of TYR I patients influenced the decision to include TYR I in the US Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Recommended Uniform Screening Panel. However, while tyrosine is routinely measured in newborn screening (NBS) by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), elevated tyrosine levels are not specific to TYR I. To improve the specificity of NBS for TYR I, several assays were developed to measure succinylacetone (SUAC) in dried blood spots (DBS). SUAC is a pathognomonic marker of TYR I, and its detection by NBS MS/MS is possible. This review of the current status of NBS for TYR I in the US is the result of discussions at the HHS Secretary’s (Discretionary) Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children about the inconsistent implementation of effective NBS for TYR I in the US. We sought to understand the different TYR I screening practices in US NBS programs. Results indicate that 50 out of 51 NBS programs in the US screen for TYR I, and a successful SUAC performance evaluation scheme is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Programmatic and methodological barriers were identified that prevent widespread adoption of SUAC measurements in NBS laboratories. However, since SUAC detection is currently the best approach to NBS for TYR I, a further delay of the addition of SUAC measurement into NBS procedures is discouraged. SUAC measurement should improve both the false positive and false negative rate in NBS for TYR I thereby yielding the desired benefits for affected patients at no expense to the overall

  16. Basophils as a primary inducer of the T helper type 2 immunity in ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wenwei; Su, Wen; Zhang, Yanjie; Liu, Qi; Wu, Jinhong; Di, Caixia; Zhang, Zili; Xia, Zhenwei

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-induced allergic airway inflammation is mediated by T helper type 2 (Th2) cells and their cytokines, but the mechanism that initiates the Th2 immunity is not fully understood. Recent studies show that basophils play important roles in initiating Th2 immunity in some inflammatory models. Here we explored the role of basophils in ovalbumin (OVA) -induced airway allergic inflammation in BALB/c mice. We found that OVA sensitization and challenge resulted in a significant increase in the amount of basophils in blood and lung, along with the up-regulation of activation marker of CD200R. However, depletion of basophils with MAR-1 or Ba103 antibody attenuated airway inflammation, represented by the significantly decreased amount of the Th2 subset in spleen and draining lymph nodes, interlukin-4 level in lung and OVA-special immunoglobulin E (sIgE) levels in serum. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of basophils from OVA-challenged lung tissue to naive BALB/c mice provoked the Th2 immune response. In addition, pulmonary basophils from OVA-challenged mice were able to uptake DQ-OVA and express MHC class II molecules and CD40 in vivo, as well as to release interleukin-4 following stimulation by IgE–antigen complexes and promote Th2 polarization in vitro. These findings demonstrate that basophils may participate in Th2 immune responses in antigen-induced allergic airway inflammation and that they do so through facilitating antigen presentation and providing interleukin-4. PMID:24383680

  17. Primary production of phytoplankton in the estuaries of different types (by the example of the Curonian and Vistula Lagoons of the Baltic Sea and the Volga delta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Sergei; Gorbunova, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to analyze the long-term change of the primary production in large estuaries of different types (Volga delta, Curonian and Vistula Lagoons) under the impact of environmental factors (e.g. climate changes, algal blooms, invasion mollusk). The researches (primary production, chlorophyll, nutrients and others) were carried out monthly from March-April to November in the Vistula and Curonian Lagoons since 1991 to 2015, and in the Lower part of the Volga Delta and fore-delta since 1996 to 2007. The Volga River is the largest river in Europe that flows into the Caspian Sea and it forms a great delta. According to the analysis of long-term data (from the 1960s), the maximum eutrophication and primary production (85-100 gCṡm-2ṡyear-1) in the Volga Delta was observed in the 1980s. In the 1990s, fertilizers use and the input of nutrients into the Volga Delta decreased significantly. Due of the high-flow exchange in the delta, especially during high-water years, observed in the 1980s - early 2000s, this led to a significant decrease in the concentration of nutrients in the water in the Volga Delta. As a result, in the 1990-2000s, the primary production has decreased to the level of 1960s-1970s (40-60 gCṡm-2ṡyear-1) and the process of eutrophication was replaced by de-eutrophication. At present, the trophic status of the Volga delta assessed as mesotrophic. The future trend of phytoplankton primary production of the Volga delta will greatly depend on the scenario of nutrients loading and river runoff. The Curonian Lagoon and Vistula Lagoon are the largest coastal lagoons of the Baltic Sea, relating to the most highly productive water bodies of Europe. The Curonian Lagoon is choke mostly freshwater lagoon, while the Vistula Lagoon is restricted brackish water lagoon. In the last decades the nutrients loading changes, warming trend and biological invasions are observed. The Curonian Lagoon may be characterized as hypertrophic water body. The local climate

  18. Primary production of phytoplankton in the estuaries of different types (by the example of the Curonian and Vistula Lagoons of the Baltic Sea and the Volga delta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Sergei; Gorbunova, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to analyze the long-term change of the primary production in large estuaries of different types (Volga delta, Curonian and Vistula Lagoons) under the impact of environmental factors (e.g. climate changes, algal blooms, invasion mollusk). The researches (primary production, chlorophyll, nutrients and others) were carried out monthly from March-April to November in the Vistula and Curonian Lagoons since 1991 to 2015, and in the Lower part of the Volga Delta and fore-delta since 1996 to 2007. The Volga River is the largest river in Europe that flows into the Caspian Sea and it forms a great delta. According to the analysis of long-term data (from the 1960s), the maximum eutrophication and primary production (85-100 gCṡm‑2ṡyear-1) in the Volga Delta was observed in the 1980s. In the 1990s, fertilizers use and the input of nutrients into the Volga Delta decreased significantly. Due of the high-flow exchange in the delta, especially during high-water years, observed in the 1980s - early 2000s, this led to a significant decrease in the concentration of nutrients in the water in the Volga Delta. As a result, in the 1990-2000s, the primary production has decreased to the level of 1960s-1970s (40-60 gCṡm‑2ṡyear-1) and the process of eutrophication was replaced by de-eutrophication. At present, the trophic status of the Volga delta assessed as mesotrophic. The future trend of phytoplankton primary production of the Volga delta will greatly depend on the scenario of nutrients loading and river runoff. The Curonian Lagoon and Vistula Lagoon are the largest coastal lagoons of the Baltic Sea, relating to the most highly productive water bodies of Europe. The Curonian Lagoon is choke mostly freshwater lagoon, while the Vistula Lagoon is restricted brackish water lagoon. In the last decades the nutrients loading changes, warming trend and biological invasions are observed. The Curonian Lagoon may be characterized as hypertrophic water body. The local climate

  19. New findings on the impact of an explosive VOD on blast results

    SciTech Connect

    Chiappetta, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    An explosive`s velocity of detonation (VOD), can be used to indicate a number of important characteristics regarding the product`s performance under specific field and test conditions. A number of new characteristic and transient VOD curves have been identified in the field, which can be used to evaluate explosive performance, control ground vibration amplitudes and frequencies, select the correct amount and type of stemming for use at the collar and in stem decks, eliminate explosive desensitization, evaluate primer performance, design air deck based blasts, evaluate contaminated explosives and to overcome post blast noxious fumes. Tests were conducted over a six year period in single and multi-hole blasts using laboratory and full scale blast environments. Explosives tested ranged from pure Emulsion to Anfo and various grades of Emulsion/Anfo blends. Field test parameters were; borehole diameter (1 1/2--30 inches), hole depths (10--120 feet), primer size (0.5--6.4 pounds) and the blast environment varied from soft, jelly-like tar sands to some of the hardest iron ore formations. Most tests were instrumented with an array of blast monitoring instrumentation systems consisting of continuous velocity of detonation recorders, high-speed 16 mm cameras, laser-surveying instrumentation and seismographs which were placed in the near and far fields.

  20. Prognostic value of physicians' assessment of compliance regarding all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes: primary care follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Rüter, Gernot; Brenner, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    Background Whether the primary care physician's assessment of patient compliance is a valuable prognostic marker to identify patients who are at increased risk of death, or merely reflects measurement of various treatment parameters such as HbA1C or other laboratory markers is unclear. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the prognostic value of the physicians' assessment of patient compliance and other factors with respect to all-cause mortality during a one year follow-up period. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among 1014 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 40 and over (mean age 69 years, SD 10.4, 45% male) who were under medical treatment in 11 participating practices of family physicians and internists working in primary care in a defined region in South Germany between April and June 2000. Baseline data were gathered from patients and physicians by standardized questionnaire. The physician's assessment of patient compliance was assessed by means of a 4-point Likert scale (very good, rather good, rather bad, very bad). In addition, we carried out a survey among physicians by means of a questionnaire to find out which aspects for the assessment of patient compliance were of importance to make this assessment. Active follow-up of patients was conducted after one year to determine mortality. Results During the one year follow-up 48 (4.7%) of the 1014 patients died. Among other factors such as patient type (patients presenting at office, nursing home or visited patients), gender, age and a history of macrovascular disease, the physician's assessment of patient compliance was an important predictor of all-cause mortality. Patients whose compliance was assessed by the physician as "very bad" (6%) were significantly more likely to die during follow-up (OR = 2.67, 95% CI 1.02–6.97) after multivariable adjustment compared to patients whose compliance was assessed as "rather good" (45%) or "very good" (18%). The HbA1C

  1. Morphophysiology of synaptic transmission between type I hair cells and vestibular primary afferents. An intracellular study employing horseradish peroxidase in the lizard, Calotes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Schessel, D A; Ginzberg, R; Highstein, S M

    1991-03-22

    Intracellular records with glass microelectrodes filled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were taken from primary afferents of the horizontal semicircular canal in the lizard, Calotes versicolor. A coefficient of variation (CV) of the interspike intervals of spontaneous action potentials (APs) was calculated and correlated with the terminal morphologies of afferents within the canal crista. Irregular fibers with CV greater than 0.4 always correlated with a nerve chalice or calyx afferent terminal expansion surrounding one or more type I hair cells; more regular fibers with CV less than 0.4 always correlated with a dimorphic or bouton only terminal expansion of afferents. Afferents with a CV greater than 0.4 demonstrated miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSPs) that summated to initiate APs. APs were blocked by tetrodotoxin and mEPSP frequency was modulated by caloric stimulation. Cobalt application reversibly blocked mEPSPs. Electron microscopic examination of physiologically studied afferents with CV greater than 0.4 revealed synaptic profiles consisting of typical synaptic bodies and synaptic vesicles in the type I hair cell presynaptic to the nerve chalice. Examples of the interspike baseline in regular and irregular afferents suggest differential modes of impulse initiation in these two fiber types.

  2. [Impaired insulin secretion in isolated islets of Goto-Kakizaki rats, an animal model of non obese type 2 diabetes, is a primary event].

    PubMed

    Seiça, Raquel M; Suzuki, K I; Santos, Rosa M; Do Rosário, Luis M

    2004-01-01

    The development of type 2 diabetes is associated with the impairment of insulin secretion. To evaluate the evolution of the secretory response, a chronological study comparing normal Wistar (W) vs Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of non obese type 2 diabetes, was done. Glucose and arginine were tested in collagenase isolated islets of Langerhans with perfusion and ELISA immunoassay techniques. Fasting glycaemia and insulinemia and glucose tolerance were also evaluated. We have seen, in W rats, a mild glucose intolerance in the first two weeks of age. GK rats were always glucose intolerant with hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia at fasten after one month old. Wistar islets had a characteristic biphasic response to glucose after the first two weeks of age. GK islets were always glucose irresponsive. Arginine induced an increase in insulin secretion in both animal models, independent of age, although GK rats had always a smaller response when compared to W rats. We concluded that 1) in W rats, a biphasic insulin secretion in response to glucose is observed after the first two weeks of age, simultaneously with glycaemia stabilization 2) in GK rats, both first and second phases of glucose-induced insulin release are significantly reduced and a smaller reduction in response to arginine is observed. This beta-cell disfunction is a primary event in this model of type 2 diabetes, preceding fasting hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  3. Mixing Effect in Internal Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.

    2009-12-01

    Detonation product gases are usually assumed to be completely mixed with an existing atmosphere by the time a peak quasi-static pressure (Pqs) is reached within an enclosed internal blast environment. With incomplete mixing, however, comes a loss in pressure from unburned fuel as well as a previously unrecognized source of error: heat capacity of the gas increases substantially with temperature, providing an energy sink in regions of unmixed hot gas. Our objective was to look at the extent of mixing by measuring gas temperature at several locations within a blast chamber at the time of peak Pqs. We recorded ranges of up to 400° C depending on charge location within the chamber, which is presumed to affect turbulence and mixing. Losses in peak Pqs of up to 13% may be attributed to this mixing effect for 1-kg Pentolite charges in a 62-m3 chamber in the simple geometries tested. A reasonably accurate Pqs may be extracted from blast wave reverberations in a chamber, allowing a closer look at effects such as gas mixing and consistency among multiple gages. These results point to an explanation for missing energy and a better understanding of heat flow in internal blast.

  4. Food and Drug Administration Approval for Use of Hiberix as a 3-Dose Primary Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccination Series.

    PubMed

    Briere, Elizabeth C

    2016-04-29

    On January 14, 2016, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina) received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expand use of Hiberix (Haemophilus b Conjugate Vaccine [Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate]) for a 3-dose infant primary vaccination series at ages 2, 4, and 6 months. Hiberix was first licensed in the United States in August 2009 for use as a booster dose in children aged 15 months through 4 years under the Accelerated Approval Regulations, in response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine shortage that lasted from December 2007 to July 2009 (1). Expanding the age indication to include infants provides another vaccine option in addition to other currently licensed monovalent or combination Hib vaccines recommended for the primary vaccination series.* Hiberix contains 10 μg purified capsular polyribosyl ribitolphosphate (PRP) conjugated to 25 μg tetanus toxoid (PRP-T) and is supplied as a single-dose vial of lyophilized vaccine to be reconstituted with saline diluent. For the 3-dose primary series, a single (0.5 mL) dose should be given by intramuscular injection at ages 2, 4, and 6 months; the first dose may be given as early as age 6 weeks. The recommended catch-up schedule for PRP-T vaccines (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/child-adolescent.html) should be followed. As previously recommended, a single booster dose should be administered to children aged 15 months through 18 months; to facilitate timely booster vaccination, Hiberix can be administered as early as age 12 months, in accordance with Hib vaccination schedules for routine and catch-up immunization (1-3).

  5. Ecosystem carbon partitioning: aboveground net primary productivity correlates with the root carbon input in different land use types of Southern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodeghiero, Mirco; Martinez, Cristina; Gianelle, Damiano; Camin, Federica; Zanotelli, Damiano; Magnani, Federico

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial plant carbon partitioning to above- and below-ground compartments can be better understood by integrating studies on biomass allocation and estimates of root carbon input based on the use of stable isotopes. These experiments are essential to model ecosystem's metabolism and predict the effects of global change on carbon cycling. Using in-growth soil cores in conjunction with the 13C natural abundance method we quantified net plant-derived root carbon input into the soil, which has been pointed out as the main unaccounted NPP (net primary productivity) component. Four land use types located in the Trentino Region (northern Italy) and representing a range of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) values (155-868 gC m-2 y-1) were investigated: conifer forest, apple orchard, vineyard and grassland. Cores, filled with soil of a known C4 isotopic signature were inserted at 18 sampling points for each site and left in place for twelve months. After extraction, cores were analysed for %C and d13C, which were used to calculate the proportion of new plant-derived root C input by applying a mass balance equation. The GPP (gross primary productivity) of each ecosystem was determined by the eddy covariance technique whereas ANPP was quantified with a repeated inventory approach. We found a strong and significant relationship (R2 = 0.93; p=0.03) between ANPP and the fraction of GPP transferred to the soil as root C input across the investigated sites. This percentage varied between 10 and 25% of GPP with the grassland having the lowest value and the apple orchard the highest. Mechanistic ecosystem carbon balance models could benefit from this general relationship since ANPP is routinely and easily measured at many sites. This result also suggests that by quantifying site-specific ANPP, root carbon input can be reliably estimated, as opposed to using arbitrary root/shoot ratios which may under- or over-estimate C partitioning.

  6. Food and Drug Administration Approval for Use of Hiberix as a 3-Dose Primary Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccination Series.

    PubMed

    Briere, Elizabeth C

    2016-01-01

    On January 14, 2016, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina) received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expand use of Hiberix (Haemophilus b Conjugate Vaccine [Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate]) for a 3-dose infant primary vaccination series at ages 2, 4, and 6 months. Hiberix was first licensed in the United States in August 2009 for use as a booster dose in children aged 15 months through 4 years under the Accelerated Approval Regulations, in response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine shortage that lasted from December 2007 to July 2009 (1). Expanding the age indication to include infants provides another vaccine option in addition to other currently licensed monovalent or combination Hib vaccines recommended for the primary vaccination series.* Hiberix contains 10 μg purified capsular polyribosyl ribitolphosphate (PRP) conjugated to 25 μg tetanus toxoid (PRP-T) and is supplied as a single-dose vial of lyophilized vaccine to be reconstituted with saline diluent. For the 3-dose primary series, a single (0.5 mL) dose should be given by intramuscular injection at ages 2, 4, and 6 months; the first dose may be given as early as age 6 weeks. The recommended catch-up schedule for PRP-T vaccines (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/child-adolescent.html) should be followed. As previously recommended, a single booster dose should be administered to children aged 15 months through 18 months; to facilitate timely booster vaccination, Hiberix can be administered as early as age 12 months, in accordance with Hib vaccination schedules for routine and catch-up immunization (1-3). PMID:27124887

  7. Uptake and Effects of the e-Vita Personal Health Record with Self-Management Support and Coaching, for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Treated in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, M; de Wit, M; Sieverink, F; Roelofsen, Y; Hendriks, S H; Bilo, H J G; Snoek, F J

    2016-01-01

    We studied the use, uptake, and effects of e-Vita, a personal health record, with self-management support and personalized asynchronized coaching, for type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care. Patients were invited by their practice nurse to join the study aimed at testing use and effects of a personal health record. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Uptake and usage were monitored using log data. Outcomes were self-reported diabetes self-care, diabetes-related distress, and emotional wellbeing. Patients' health status was collected from their medical chart. 132 patients agreed to participate in the study of which less than half (46.1%) did not return to the personal health record after 1st login. Only 5 patients used the self-management support program within the personal health record, 3 of whom asked a coach for feedback. Low use of the personal health record was registered. No statistical significant differences on any of the outcome measures were found between baseline and 6 month follow-up. This study showed minimal impact of implementing a personal health record including self-management support in primary diabetes care. Successful adoption of web-based platforms, as ongoing patient centered care, is hard to achieve without additional strategies aimed at enhancing patient motivation and engaging professionals.

  8. Uptake and Effects of the e-Vita Personal Health Record with Self-Management Support and Coaching, for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Treated in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, M.; de Wit, M.; Sieverink, F.; Roelofsen, Y.; Hendriks, S. H.; Bilo, H. J. G.; Snoek, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the use, uptake, and effects of e-Vita, a personal health record, with self-management support and personalized asynchronized coaching, for type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care. Patients were invited by their practice nurse to join the study aimed at testing use and effects of a personal health record. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Uptake and usage were monitored using log data. Outcomes were self-reported diabetes self-care, diabetes-related distress, and emotional wellbeing. Patients' health status was collected from their medical chart. 132 patients agreed to participate in the study of which less than half (46.1%) did not return to the personal health record after 1st login. Only 5 patients used the self-management support program within the personal health record, 3 of whom asked a coach for feedback. Low use of the personal health record was registered. No statistical significant differences on any of the outcome measures were found between baseline and 6 month follow-up. This study showed minimal impact of implementing a personal health record including self-management support in primary diabetes care. Successful adoption of web-based platforms, as ongoing patient centered care, is hard to achieve without additional strategies aimed at enhancing patient motivation and engaging professionals. PMID:26955640

  9. Enhanced expression of the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor in glomeruli correlates with serum receptor antibodies in primary membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hoxha, Elion; Kneißler, Ursula; Stege, Gesa; Zahner, Gunther; Thiele, Ina; Panzer, Ulf; Harendza, Sigrid; Helmchen, Udo M; Stahl, Rolf A K

    2012-10-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) is the major target antigen in idiopathic membranous nephropathy with detectable autoantibodies in the serum of up to 70% of patients. In retrospective studies, the PLA2R-autoantibody titer in the serum was sometimes negative indicating their measurement alone may be inconclusive. In order to better differentiate between primary and secondary membranous nephropathy, we conducted a prospective study that included 88 patients with a histologic diagnosis of membranous nephropathy. Immunohistochemical analysis for PLA2R was faintly positive in kidneys from normal individuals and patients with various other glomerular injuries. In 61 of the 88 patients, PLA2R expression was strongly positive in glomeruli, and in 60 of these patients PLA2R autoantibodies were also detected in the serum. The 27 patients negative for serum PLA2R autoantibodies were faintly positive for PLA2R staining in glomeruli and in 15 of these patients a secondary cause was found. The remaining 12 patients have a yet undetected secondary cause of membranous nephropathy or have different glomerular antigens other than PLA2R. Thus, increased staining for PLA2R in glomeruli of renal biopsies tightly correlates with the presence of PLA2R autoantibodies in the serum and this may help discriminate between primary and secondary membranous nephropathy.

  10. Recurrent truncating mutations in alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase gene in two South Indian families with primary hyperoxaluria type 1 causing later onset end-stage kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, A. K.; Paulose, B. K.; Danda, S.; Alexander, S.; Tamilarasi, V.; Omprakash, S.

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism due to liver-specific peroxisomal enzyme alanine-glyoxylate transaminase deficiency. Here, we describe two unrelated patients who were diagnosed to have primary hyperoxaluria. Homozygous c.445_452delGTGCTGCT (p.L151Nfs*14) (Transcript ID: ENST00000307503; human genome assembly GRCh38.p2) (HGMD ID CD073567) mutation was detected in both the patients and the parents were found to be heterozygous carriers. Our patients developed end-stage renal disease at 23 years and 35 years of age. However, in the largest series published from OxalEurope cohort, the median age of end-stage renal disease for null mutations carriers was 9.9 years, which is much earlier than our cases. Our patients had slower progressions as compared to three unrelated patients from North India and Pakistan, who had homozygous c.302T>C (p.L101P) (HGMD ID CM093792) mutation in exon 2. Further, patients need to be studied to find out if c.445_452delGTGCTGCT mutation represents a founder mutation in Southern India. PMID:27512303

  11. Quality of life and social isolation in Greek adolescents with primary focal hyperhidrosis treated with botulinum toxin type A: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kouris, Anargyros; Armyra, Kalliopi; Stefanaki, Christina; Christodoulou, Christos; Karimali, Polixeni; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis, although extensively documented in adults, typically has onset that dates back to early childhood. It is an unpleasant and socially disabling problem for the affected child, but little attention has been paid to the disease in adolescents. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) in adolescents with primary palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis and to determine its effect on quality of life and social isolation. Thirty-five individuals (17 girls, 18 boys) with moderate to severe palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis were treated with BTXA (onabotulinum). Patients were examined at baseline and 6 months after treatment. The Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) was used to evaluate disease severity and the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) was used to assess quality of life. The University of California at Los Angeles loneliness scale (UCLA version 3) was used to assess personal perception of loneliness and social isolation. The median age of the participants was 14 years, and 48.6% were female. Twenty-one had palmar hyperhidrosis, and 14 had axillary hyperhidrosis. Total CDLQI and social isolation scores decreased significantly after treatment with BTXA (both p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment levels of severity of hyperhidrosis. No statistically significant difference was documented for CDLQI and UCLA scores between boys and girls. Treatment of hyperhidrosis with BTXA resulted in improvement in quality of life, social skills, and activities.

  12. Blast Quantification Using Hopkinson Pressure Bars.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Samuel D; Fay, Stephen D; Rigby, Samuel E; Tyas, Andrew; Warren, James A; Reay, Jonathan J; Fuller, Benjamin J; Gant, Matthew T A; Elgy, Ian D

    2016-07-05

    Near-field blast load measurement presents an issue to many sensor types as they must endure very aggressive environments and be able to measure pressures up to many hundreds of megapascals. In this respect the simplicity of the Hopkinson pressure bar has a major advantage in that while the measurement end of the Hopkinson bar can endure and be exposed to harsh conditions, the strain gauge mounted to the bar can be affixed some distance away. This allows protective housings to be utilized which protect the strain gauge but do not interfere with the measurement acquisition. The use of an array of pressure bars allows the pressure-time histories at discrete known points to be measured. This article also describes the interpolation routine used to derive pressure-time histories at un-instrumented locations on the plane of interest. Currently the technique has been used to measure loading from high explosives in free air and buried shallowly in various soils.

  13. A Novel Mutation in the type Iα Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase A (PRKAR1A) in a Cushing's Syndrome Patient with Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Ryohei; Tamba, Sachiko; Yamada, Yuya; Okita, Tomonori; Kawachi, Yusuke; Mori, Reiko; Kyo, Mitsuaki; Saisho, Kenji; Kuroda, Yohei; Yamamoto, Koji; Furuya, Akiko; Mukai, Tokuo; Maekawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with Cushing's syndrome due to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with multiple nodules. Computed tomography scan results were atypical demonstrating an enlargement of the bilateral adrenal glands harboring multiple small nodules, but the lesion was clinically diagnosed to be primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) based on both endocrinological test results and his family history. We performed bilateral adrenalectomy and confirmed the diagnosis histologically. An analysis of the patient and his mother's genomic DNA identified a novel mutation in the type Iα regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) gene; p.E17X (c.49G>T). This confirmed the diagnosis of PPNAD which is associated with Carney Complex. PMID:27580546

  14. Cross-sectional study of older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in two rural public primary healthcare facilities in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ooi, C P; Loke, S C; Zaiton, A; Tengku-Aizan, H; Zaitun, Y

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge of the characteristics of older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is indispensible for improvement of their care. A cross-sectional study in two rural public primary healthcare centres in Malaysia identified 170 actively engaged older patients with T2DM, with suboptimal glycaemic control and frequent hypoglycaemia. The prevalence of multiple co-morbidities, complications of T2DM, high cardiovascular risk, neurological, musculoskeletal and visual deficits suggested high risk of disabilities and dependency but not yet disabled. This short window for interventions presents as an opportunity for development of a more comprehensive approach extending beyond glycaemia control to risk management, preventing functional loss and continuity of social participation.

  15. Primary sacral non-germinal center type diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with MYC translocation: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Asami; Sugimoto, Kei-Ji; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Imai, Hidenori; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Ota, Yasunori; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    An 85-year-old man presented with pain and numbness in the left buttock, and physical examination revealed an approximately 7 cm mass extending from the first to the third sacral vertebrae; biopsy of the mass led to the diagnosis of CD10-negative, BCL6-weakly positive, MUM1-positive, non-germinal center (non-GC) type diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Furthermore, serological testing showed negative results for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed a MYC translocation. Radiographs showed no remarkable osteolytic bone destruction, and the patient was staged with Stage IAE. After 8 cycles of rituximab therapy and 6 cycles of CHOP therapy, complete remission has been maintained until now, approximately 1 year after the treatment. Primary sacral lymphoma is very rare, with only 6 reported cases, including the present one. A review of the reported cases revealed that the disease predominantly affects elderly men, is usually non-GC-type DLBCL and stage IAE, measures approximately 2-7 cm in diameter in general, and does not show early recurrence after chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. There is no report in the literature yet of primary sacral DLBCL with MYC translocation, and this is the first case report. On the other hand, 35 cases of CD10-negative DLBCL with MYC translocation, including the present one, have been reported, and a review of the reported cases showed that the disease predominantly affects Asians, middle-aged or elderly men, shows positivity for either BCL6 or MUM1 and negativity for EBV, and has a high international prognostic index and poor prognosis.

  16. Macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes from two multiply exposed, uninfected individuals resist infection with primary non-syncytium-inducing isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, R I; Paxton, W A; Sheridan, K E; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    Despite multiple, high-risk sexual exposures, some individuals remain uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CD4+ lymphocytes from these individuals are less susceptible to infection in vitro with some strains of HIV-1, suggesting that the phenotype of the virus may influence its ability to interact with certain CD4+ cells. In the present study, we examined the susceptibility of CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from two exposed uninfected individuals (EU2 and EU3) to infection with a panel of biologically cloned isolates of HIV-1 having either a non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or a syncytium-inducing (SI) phenotype. Our results indicate that CD4+ T lymphocytes from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with NSI isolates of HIV-1 but are susceptible to infection with primary SI isolates. In addition, we found that macrophages from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with both NSI and SI isolates. The latter finding was confirmed by using several uncloned NSI and SI isolates obtained from patients during acute HIV-1 infection. In further experiments, env clones encoding glycoproteins characteristic of NSI or SI viruses were used in single-cycle infectivity assays to evaluate infection of CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages from EU2 and EU3. Consistent with our previous results, we found that macrophages from these individuals are resistant to infection with NSI and SI env-pseudotyped viruses, while CD4+ T lymphocytes are resistant to NSI, but not SI, pseudotyped viruses. Overall, our results demonstrate that CD4+ cells from two exposed uninfected individuals resist infection in vitro with primary, macrophage-tropic, NSI isolates of HIV-1, which is the predominant viral phenotype found following HIV-1 transmission. Furthermore, infection with NSI isolates was blocked in both CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from these individuals, suggesting that there may be a common mechanism for resistance in both cell types. PMID:8971004

  17. Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

    1998-11-23

    A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

  18. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts.

    PubMed

    Lance, Rachel M; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study.

  19. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts

    PubMed Central

    Lance, Rachel M.; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study. PMID:26606655

  20. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts.

    PubMed

    Lance, Rachel M; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study. PMID:26606655

  1. Job strain and supervisor support in primary care health centres and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Koponen, Anne; Vahtera, Jussi; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Virtanen, Marianna; Pentti, Jaana; Simonsen-Rehn, Nina; Kivimäki, Mika; Suominen, Sakari

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates associations between healthcare personnel's perceived job strain, supervisor support and the outcome of care in terms of glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes. Design A cross-sectional study from 2006. Setting 18 primary care health centres (HCs) from five municipalities in Finland. Participants Aggregated survey data on perceived job strain and supervisor support from healthcare personnel (doctors, n=122, mean age 45.5 years, nurses, n=300, mean age 47.1 years) were combined with registered data (Electronic Medical Records) from 8975 patients (51% men, mean age 67 years) with type 2 diabetes. Outcome measure Poor glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥7%). Results The mean HbA1c level among patients with type 2 diabetes was 7.1 (SD 1.2, range 4.5–19.1), and 43% had poor glycaemic control (HbA1c ≥7%). Multilevel logistic regression analyses, adjusted for patient's age and sex, and HC and HC service area-level characteristics, showed that patients’ HbA1c-levels were less optimal in high-strain HCs than in low-strain HCs (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.86). Supervisor support in HCs was not associated with the outcome of care. Conclusions The level of job strain among healthcare personnel may play a role in achieving good glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23645912

  2. Changes in the NS1 gene of avian influenza viruses isolated in Thailand affect expression of type I interferon in primary chicken embryonic fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Thepmalee, Chutamas; Sanguansermsri, Phanchana; Suwanankhon, Naratchala; Chamnanpood, Chanpen; Chamnanpood, Pornchai; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Niumsap, Pannika R; Surangkul, Damratsamon; Sanguansermsri, Donruedee

    2013-12-01

    The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of avian influenza virus was defined as one of the virulent factors. To understand the effect of NS1 protein of influenza virus H5N1 isolated in Thailand on type I (α/β) interferon (IFN) synthesis, five reverse genetic viruses were constructed and used as models. The viruses were generated using NS genomic segment from A/Peurto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) and four avian influenza viruses isolated from the first outbreak in Thailand. All the viruses have the rest of the genome from A/Peurto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1). The constructed viruses were named (1) NS1 PR8/34, (2) NS1 wild type, (3) NS1 L15FD53G, (4) NS1 N171I and (5) NS1 E71K, respectively. The type I (α/β) IFN gene expression in control and infected primary chicken embryonic fibroblast cells were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results show that the inhibition of IFN-β gene expression by NS1 wild type infected cells is stronger than NS1 N171I, NS1 E71K, NS1 PR8/34 and NS1 L15FD53G, respectively. The data suggest that the difference of amino acid sequence of NS1 protein contributes to the IFN-β antagonist. In contrast, the difference of the NS1 protein does not influence in the IFN-α antagonistic activity.

  3. Evolution of the mating type locus: insights gained from the dimorphic primary fungal pathogens Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii.

    PubMed

    Fraser, James A; Stajich, Jason E; Tarcha, Eric J; Cole, Garry T; Inglis, Diane O; Sil, Anita; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-04-01

    Sexual reproduction of fungi is governed by the mating type (MAT) locus, a specialized region of the genome encoding key transcriptional regulators that direct regulatory networks to specify cell identity and fate. Knowledge of MAT locus structure and evolution has been considerably advanced in recent years as a result of genomic analyses that enable the definition of MAT locus sequences in many species as well as provide an understanding of the evolutionary plasticity of this unique region of the genome. Here, we extend this analysis to define the mating type locus of three dimorphic primary human fungal pathogens, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii, using genomic analysis, direct sequencing, and bioinformatics. These studies provide evidence that all three species possess heterothallic bipolar mating type systems, with isolates encoding either a high-mobility-group (HMG) domain or an alpha-box transcriptional regulator. These genes are intact in all loci examined and have not been subject to loss or decay, providing evidence that the loss of fertility upon passage in H. capsulatum is not attributable to mutations at the MAT locus. These findings also suggest that an extant sexual cycle remains to be defined in both Coccidioides species, in accord with population genetic evidence. Based on these MAT sequences, a facile PCR test was developed that allows the mating type to be rapidly ascertained. Finally, these studies highlight the evolutionary forces shaping the MAT locus, revealing examples in which flanking genes have been inverted or subsumed and incorporated into an expanding MAT locus, allowing us to propose an expanded model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the phylum Ascomycota. PMID:17337636

  4. Experimental Investigation on the Basic Law of Hydraulic Fracturing After Water Pressure Control Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bingxiang; Li, Pengfeng; Ma, Jian; Chen, Shuliang

    2014-07-01

    Because of the advantages of integrating water pressure blasting and hydraulic fracturing, the use of hydraulic fracturing after water pressure control blasting is a method that is used to fully transform the structure of a coal-rock mass by increasing the number and range of hydraulic cracks. An experiment to study hydraulic fracturing after water pressure blasting on cement mortar samples (300 × 300 × 300 mm3) was conducted using a large-sized true triaxial hydraulic fracturing experimental system. A traditional hydraulic fracturing experiment was also performed for comparison. The experimental results show that water pressure blasting