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Sample records for primary care practices

  1. Primary care practice composition in 34 countries.

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, Peter; Heinemann, Stephanie; Greß, Stefan; Schäfer, Willemijn

    2015-12-01

    Health care needs in the population change through ageing and increasing multimorbidity. Primary health care might accommodate to this through the composition of practices in terms of the professionals working in them. The aim of this article is to describe the composition of primary care practices in 34 countries and to analyse its relationship to practice circumstances and the organization of the primary care system. The data were collected through a survey among samples of general practitioners (n=7183) in 34 countries. In some countries, primary care is mainly provided in single-handed practices. Other countries which have larger practices with multiple professional groups. There is no overall relationship between the professional groups in the practice and practice location. Practices that are located further from other primary care practices have more different professions. Practices with a more than average share of socially disadvantaged people and/or ethnic minorities have more different professions. In countries with a stronger pro-primary care workforce development and more comprehensive primary care delivery the number of different professions is higher. In conclusion, primary care practice composition varies strongly. The organizational scale of primary care is largely country dependent, but this is only partly explained by system characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Obesity care strategies in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Sawyer, Alexis; Batey, Sue; Maloney, Michelle; Wall, Tim; Hines, Valerie; Robles, Kattia; Sontag, Debbie; Haverkamp, Karen Susan; Lopez, Susan; Binns, Helen J

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated pediatric obesity clinics for internal referrals developed at 5 primary care offices. Clinics developed site-specific strategies: 1 group approach and 4 clinics providing individualized care only. Clinicians reported patient/family motivation as an important referral consideration and compliance as the greatest challenge and perceive clinics to have provided some help.

  3. Prolotherapy in primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Rabago, David; Slattengren, Andrew; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2010-03-01

    Prolotherapy is an injection-based complementary and alternative medical therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Prolotherapy techniques and injected solutions vary by condition, clinical severity, and practitioner preferences; over several treatment sessions, a fairly small volume of an irritant or sclerosing solution is injected at sites on painful ligament and tendon insertions and in adjacent joint space during several treatment sessions. Prolotherapy is becoming increasingly popular in the United States and internationally and is actively used in clinical practice. Prolotherapy has been assessed as a treatment for various painful chronic musculoskeletal conditions that are refractory to "standard of care" therapies. Although anecdotal clinical success guides the use of prolotherapy for many conditions, clinical trial literature supporting evidence-based decision-making for the use of prolotherapy exists for low back pain, several tendinopathies, and osteoarthritis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Primary Care Practice Transformation Is Hard Work

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; McDaniel, Reuben R.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Stewart, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Serious shortcomings remain in clinical care in the United States despite widespread use of improvement strategies for enhancing clinical performance based on knowledge transfer approaches. Recent calls to transform primary care practice to a patient-centered medical home present even greater challenges and require more effective approaches. Methods Our research team conducted a series of National Institutes of Health funded descriptive and intervention projects to understand organizational change in primary care practice settings, emphasizing a complexity science perspective. The result was a developmental research effort that enabled the identification of critical lessons relevant to enabling practice change. Results A summary of findings from a 15-year program of research highlights the limitations of viewing primary care practices in the mechanistic terms that underlie current or traditional approaches to quality improvement. A theoretical perspective that views primary care practices as dynamic complex adaptive systems with “agents” who have the capacity to learn, and the freedom to act in unpredictable ways provides a better framework for grounding quality improvement strategies. This framework strongly emphasizes that quality improvement interventions should not only use a complexity systems perspective, but also there is a need for continual reflection, careful tailoring of interventions, and ongoing attention to the quality of interactions among agents in the practice. Conclusions It is unlikely that current strategies for quality improvement will be successful in transforming current primary care practice to a patient-centered medical home without a stronger guiding theoretical foundation. Our work suggests that a theoretical framework guided by complexity science can help in the development of quality improvement strategies that will more effectively facilitate practice change. PMID:20856145

  5. Primary Care Physicians' Dementia Care Practices: Evidence of Geographic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Zlateva, Ianita; Delaney, Colleen; Kleppinger, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores primary care physicians' (PCPs) self-reported approaches and barriers to management of patients with dementia, with a focus on comparisons in dementia care practices between PCPs in 2 states. Design and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 600 randomly selected licensed PCPs in…

  6. Primary Care Physicians' Dementia Care Practices: Evidence of Geographic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Zlateva, Ianita; Delaney, Colleen; Kleppinger, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores primary care physicians' (PCPs) self-reported approaches and barriers to management of patients with dementia, with a focus on comparisons in dementia care practices between PCPs in 2 states. Design and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were mailed to 600 randomly selected licensed PCPs in…

  7. Diabetes care provision in UK primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Gillian; Hrisos, Susan; Stamp, Elaine; Elovainio, Marko; Francis, Jill J; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Hunter, Margaret; Johnston, Marie; Presseau, Justin; Steen, Nick; Eccles, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    Although most people with Type 2 diabetes receive their diabetes care in primary care, only a limited amount is known about the quality of diabetes care in this setting. We investigated the provision and receipt of diabetes care delivered in UK primary care. Postal surveys with all healthcare professionals and a random sample of 100 patients with Type 2 diabetes from 99 UK primary care practices. 326/361 (90.3%) doctors, 163/186 (87.6%) nurses and 3591 patients (41.8%) returned a questionnaire. Clinicians reported giving advice about lifestyle behaviours (e.g. 88% would routinely advise about calorie restriction; 99.6% about increasing exercise) more often than patients reported having received it (43% and 42%) and correlations between clinician and patient report were low. Patients' reported levels of confidence about managing their diabetes were moderately high; a median (range) of 21% (3% to 39%) of patients reporting being not confident about various areas of diabetes self-management. Primary care practices have organisational structures in place and are, as judged by routine quality indicators, delivering high quality care. There remain evidence-practice gaps in the care provided and in the self confidence that patients have for key aspects of self management and further research is needed to address these issues. Future research should use robust designs and appropriately designed studies to investigate how best to improve this situation.

  8. Diabetes Care Provision in UK Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Gillian; Hrisos, Susan; Stamp, Elaine; Elovainio, Marko; Francis, Jill J.; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Hunter, Margaret; Johnston, Marie; Presseau, Justin; Steen, Nick; Eccles, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although most people with Type 2 diabetes receive their diabetes care in primary care, only a limited amount is known about the quality of diabetes care in this setting. We investigated the provision and receipt of diabetes care delivered in UK primary care. Methods Postal surveys with all healthcare professionals and a random sample of 100 patients with Type 2 diabetes from 99 UK primary care practices. Results 326/361 (90.3%) doctors, 163/186 (87.6%) nurses and 3591 patients (41.8%) returned a questionnaire. Clinicians reported giving advice about lifestyle behaviours (e.g. 88% would routinely advise about calorie restriction; 99.6% about increasing exercise) more often than patients reported having received it (43% and 42%) and correlations between clinician and patient report were low. Patients’ reported levels of confidence about managing their diabetes were moderately high; a median (range) of 21% (3% to 39%) of patients reporting being not confident about various areas of diabetes self-management. Conclusions Primary care practices have organisational structures in place and are, as judged by routine quality indicators, delivering high quality care. There remain evidence-practice gaps in the care provided and in the self confidence that patients have for key aspects of self management and further research is needed to address these issues. Future research should use robust designs and appropriately designed studies to investigate how best to improve this situation. PMID:22859997

  9. Can health care teams improve primary care practice?

    PubMed

    Grumbach, Kevin; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2004-03-10

    In health care settings, individuals from different disciplines come together to care for patients. Although these groups of health care personnel are generally called teams, they need to earn true team status by demonstrating teamwork. Developing health care teams requires attention to 2 central questions: who is on the team and how do team members work together? This article chiefly focuses on the second question. Cohesive health care teams have 5 key characteristics: clear goals with measurable outcomes, clinical and administrative systems, division of labor, training of all team members, and effective communication. Two organizations are described that demonstrate these components: a private primary care practice in Bangor, Me, and Kaiser Permanente's Georgia region primary care sites. Research on patient care teams suggests that teams with greater cohesiveness are associated with better clinical outcome measures and higher patient satisfaction. In addition, medical settings in which physicians and nonphysician professionals work together as teams can demonstrate improved patient outcomes. A number of barriers to team formation exist, chiefly related to the challenges of human relationships and personalities. Taking small steps toward team development may improve the work environment in primary care practices.

  10. Organization of primary care practice for providing energy balance care.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Clauser, Steven B; Liu, Benmei; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Huang, Terry T-K; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2014-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) may not adequately counsel or monitor patients regarding diet, physical activity, and weight control (i.e., provide energy balance care). We assessed the organization of PCPs' practices for providing this care. The study design was a nationally representative survey conducted in 2008. The study setting was U.S. primary care practices. A total of 1740 PCPs completed two sequential questionnaires (response rate, 55.5%). The study measured PCPs' reports of practice resources, and the frequency of body mass index assessment, counseling, referral for further evaluation/management, and monitoring of patients for energy balance care. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression modeling were used. More than 80% of PCPs reported having information resources on diet, physical activity, or weight control available in waiting/exam rooms, but fewer billed (45%), used reminder systems (<30%), or received incentive payments (3%) for energy balance care. A total of 26% reported regularly assessing body mass index and always/often providing counseling as well as tracking patients for progress related to energy balance. In multivariate analyses, PCPs in practices with full electronic health records or those that bill for energy balance care provided this care more often and more comprehensively. There were strong specialty differences, with pediatricians more likely (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.51) and obstetrician/gynecologists less likely (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.44) than others to provide energy balance care. PCPs' practices are not well organized for providing energy balance care. Further research is needed to understand PCP care-related specialty differences.

  11. [Primary care practices in Germany: a model for the future].

    PubMed

    Beyer, Martin; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Erler, Antje

    2011-01-01

    In its 2009 report the Federal Advisory Council on the Assessment of Developments in the Health Care System developed a model of Primary Care Practices for future general practice-based primary care. This article presents the theoretical background of the model. Primary care practices are seen as developed organisations requiring changes at all system levels (interaction, organisation, and health system) to ensure sustainability of primary care functions in the future. Developments of the elements comprising the health care system may be compared to the developments and proposals observed in other countries. In Germany, however, the pace of these developments is relatively slow.

  12. Chemoprevention research: implications for primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Denicoff, A M; Padberg, R M

    2000-01-01

    The field of cancer prevention research is entering a time of growth and opportunity. This important research is identifying agents that are making a substantial difference by reducing cancer incidence in high-risk populations. Primary care providers are natural partners for this research because of their diversity, commitment to disease prevention, and long-term access to their patient population. Several national chemoprevention trials in breast and prostate cancer are open and seeking to affiliate with primary care providers. Information is provided on this research effort, the development of chemoprevention trials, and how to learn more.

  13. Staffing Patterns of Primary Care Practices in the Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Peikes, Deborah N.; Reid, Robert J.; Day, Timothy J.; Cornwell, Derekh D. F.; Dale, Stacy B.; Baron, Richard J.; Brown, Randall S.; Shapiro, Rachel J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite growing calls for team-based care, the current staff composition of primary care practices is unknown. We describe staffing patterns for primary care practices in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative. METHODS We undertook a descriptive analysis of CPC initiative practices’ baseline staffing using data from initial applications and a practice survey. CMS selected 502 primary care practices (from 987 applicants) in 7 regions based on their health information technology, number of patients covered by participating payers, and other factors; 496 practices were included in this analysis. RESULTS Consistent with the national distribution, most of the CPC initiative practices included in this study were small: 44% reported 2 or fewer full-time equivalent (FTE) physicians; 27% reported more than 4. Nearly all reported administrative staff (98%) and medical assistants (89%). Fifty-three percent reported having nurse practitioners or physician assistants; 47%, licensed practical or vocational nurses; 36%, registered nurses; and 24%, care managers/coordinators—all of these positions are more common in larger practices. Other clinical staff were reported infrequently regardless of practice size. Compared with other CPC initiative practices, designated patient-centered medical homes were more likely to have care managers/coordinators but otherwise had similar staff types. Larger practices had fewer FTE staff per physician. CONCLUSIONS At baseline, most CPC initiative practices used traditional staffing models and did not report having dedicated staff who may be integral to new primary care models, such as care coordinators, health educators, behavioral health specialists, and pharmacists. Without such staff and payment for their services, practices are unlikely to deliver comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible care to patients at a sustainable cost. PMID:24615310

  14. Naturopathy and the Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Sara A.; Gutknecht, Nancy C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Naturopathy is a distinct type of primary care medicine that blends age-old healing traditions with scientific advances and current research. It is guided by a unique set of principles that recognize the body's innate healing capacity, emphasize disease prevention, and encourage individual responsibility to obtain optimal health. Naturopathic treatment modalities include diet and clinical nutrition, behavioral change, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical medicine, pharmaceuticals, and minor surgery. Naturopathic physicians (NDs) are trained as primary care physicians in four-year, accredited doctoral-level naturopathic medical schools. Currently, there are 15 U.S. states, 2 U.S. territories, and a number of provinces in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand that recognize licensure for NDs. PMID:20189002

  15. Primary Care Practice Development: A Relationship-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William L.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Numerous primary care practice development efforts, many related to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), are emerging across the United States with few guides available to inform them. This article presents a relationship-centered practice development approach to understand practice and to aid in fostering practice development to advance key attributes of primary care that include access to first-contact care, comprehensive care, coordination of care, and a personal relationship over time. METHODS Informed by complexity theory and relational theories of organizational learning, we built on discoveries from the American Academy of Family Physicians’ National Demonstration Project (NDP) and 15 years of research to understand and improve primary care practice. RESULTS Primary care practices can fruitfully be understood as complex adaptive systems consisting of a core (a practice’s key resources, organizational structure, and functional processes), adaptive reserve (practice features that enhance resilience, such as relationships), and attentiveness to the local environment. The effectiveness of these attributes represents the practice’s internal capability. With adequate motivation, healthy, thriving practices advance along a pathway of slow, continuous developmental change with occasional rapid periods of transformation as they evolve better fits with their environment. Practice development is enhanced through systematically using strategies that involve setting direction and boundaries, implementing sensing systems, focusing on creative tensions, and fostering learning conversations. CONCLUSIONS Successful practice development begins with changes that strengthen practices’ core, build adaptive reserve, and expand attentiveness to the local environment. Development progresses toward transformation through enhancing primary care attributes. PMID:20530396

  16. Putting population health into practice through primary health care.

    PubMed

    Neuwelt, Pat; Matheson, Don; Arroll, Bruce; Dowell, Anthony; Winnard, Doone; Crampton, Peter; Sheridan, Nicolette Fay; Cumming, Jacqueline

    2009-02-27

    The introduction of the Primary Health Care Strategy has offered opportunities to take a population health approach to the planning and delivery of primary health care. The lack of a common understanding of population health between primary care and public health has been the prompt for a group of academics and practitioners to join forces and produce this statement on a population health approach to primary care, through primary health care. This paper takes the position that the features of a population health approach (such as a concern for equity, community participation, teamwork and attention to the determinants of health) enhance general practice care rather than undermine it. We conclude that the contribution of the health sector towards population health goals can be achieved through collaboration between GPs, nurses, other primary health care workers, and communities, together with health promotion and public health practitioners. Finding common language and understanding is an important step towards improving that collaboration.

  17. Primary care practice organization influences colorectal cancer screening performance.

    PubMed

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Soban, Lynn M; Parkerton, Patricia H; Etzioni, David A

    2007-06-01

    To identify primary care practice characteristics associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening performance, controlling for patient-level factors. Primary care director survey (1999-2000) of 155 VA primary care clinics linked with 38,818 eligible patients' sociodemographics, utilization, and CRC screening experience using centralized administrative and chart-review data (2001). Practices were characterized by degrees of centralization (e.g., authority over operations, staffing, outside-practice influence); resources (e.g., sufficiency of nonphysician staffing, space, clinical support arrangements); and complexity (e.g., facility size, academic status, managed care penetration), adjusting for patient-level covariates and contextual factors. Chart-based evidence of CRC screening through direct colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, or consecutive fecal occult blood tests, eliminating cases with documented histories of CRC, polyps, or inflammatory bowel disease. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health care utilization, patients were significantly more likely to be screened for CRC if their primary care practices had greater autonomy over the internal structure of care delivery (p<.04), more clinical support arrangements (p<.03), and smaller size (p<.001). Deficits in primary care clinical support arrangements and local autonomy over operational management and referral procedures are associated with significantly lower CRC screening performance. Competition with hospital resource demands may impinge on the degree of internal organization of their affiliated primary care practices.

  18. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  19. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  20. Primary care providers’ bereavement care practices: Recommendations for research directions

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela R.; Patel, Sapana R.; Kaplan, Daniel B.; Bruce, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bereaved patients are often seen in primary care settings. While most do not require formal support, physicians may be called upon to provide support to some bereaved, particularly those with bereavement-related mental health disorders like complicated grief and bereavement-related depression. Research evidence on physician bereavement care is scant. We make recommendations for future research in this area. Design Literature review, focusing on studies conducted between 1996 and 2013 in the United States. Searches of Medline and PsychInfo, along with hand searches of reference sections, was conducted. Results The limited existing research indicates substantial gaps in the research literature, especially in the areas of primary care physician skill and capacity, patient-level outcomes, and the quality of research methodology. No U.S. studies have focused specifically on care for bereavement-related mental health disorders. We provide recommendations about how to improve research about primary care bereavement care. Conclusions The primary care sector offers ample opportunities for research on bereavement care. With greater research efforts, there may be improvements to quality of bereavement care in primary care, in general, and also to the accurate detection and appropriate referral for bereavement-related mental health conditions. PMID:24955568

  1. The impact of primary care resources on prevention practices.

    PubMed

    Soban, Lynn M; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2005-01-01

    Organizational factors influence the quality of preventive care. Combining facility-level data from a national organizational survey and centrally available, externally abstracted chart review data on prevention performance, we assessed the relationship between structural features of primary care departments and the quality of preventive care delivered. Primary care practice resources were significantly and positively associated with the delivery of 6 of 9 preventive services. Adjusting for facility size and academic affiliation, these resource arrangements accounted for substantial variation in 8 of 9 services. Assuring high-quality prevention performance requires ongoing investment in primary care-based infrastructure.

  2. Revisiting Prostate Cancer Screening Practices Among Vermont Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Laura; Sternberg, Kevan M; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Plante, Mark K; Perrapato, Scott D

    2017-06-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the prostate cancer screening practices of Vermont primary care physicians and compare them with a prior study in 2001. An electronic survey was created and emailed to all currently practicing primary care physicians in Vermont. Data was stratified by practice length, practice location, university affiliation, and internal medicine versus family practice. Surveys were received from 123 (27.2%) primary care physicians. 27.7% of physicians in practice <10 years recommended prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, compared with 55.9% of those practicing ≥10 years (p = 0.006). Of those who modified their recommendations in the past 5 years, 96.1% reported that the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2012 statement influenced them. Respondents who continued to use PSA testing were less likely to stop screening after age 80 compared with those surveyed in 2001 (51% in 2014 vs. 74% in 2001; p <0.001). Primary care physicians in practice for 10 or more years were more likely to recommend PSA-based screening than those in practice for less time. The USPSTF statement discouraging PSA-based screening for prostate cancer has had significant penetrance among Vermont primary care physicians.

  3. Primary Care Practice Transformation and the Rise of Consumerism.

    PubMed

    Shrank, William H

    2017-02-27

    Americans are increasingly demanding the same level of service in healthcare that they receive in other services and products that they buy. This rise in consumerism poses challenges for primary care physicians as they attempt to transform their practices to succeed in a value-based reimbursement landscape, where they are rewarded for managing costs and improving the health of populations. In this paper, three examples of consumer-riven trends are described: retail healthcare, direct and concierge care, and home-based diagnostics and care. For each, the intersection of consumer-driven care and the goals of value-based primary care are explored. If the correct payment and connectivity enablers are in place, some examples of consumer-driven care are well-positioned to support primary care physicians in their mission to deliver high-quality, efficient care for the populations they serve. However, concerns about access and equity make other trends less consistent with that mission.

  4. The RCGP Quality Practice Award for primary care teams.

    PubMed

    Ring, Nicola

    2003-03-01

    Accreditation is a means of improving quality through the process of externally reviewing performance against written standards. Following the introduction of clinical governance, participation in quality accreditation schemes has been encouraged. The Royal College of General Practitioners' Quality Practice Award (QPA) is an example of a quality accreditation scheme for primary care practice teams. QPA applies to the wider primary care team and is directly relevant to nursing and midwifery staff employed by or attached to practice teams. QPA supports evidence-based and reflective practice, continuing professional development and team working, all of which are integral to current nursing and midwifery practice. Nurses and midwives working in primary care teams must be aware of QPA and, where necessary, actively and collaboratively participate in this process.

  5. Why do rural primary care physicians sell their practices?

    PubMed

    Stensland, Jeffrey; Brasure, Michelle; Moscovice, Ira

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluates why rural primary care physicians sell their practices. A random sample of rural primary care practices in California, Utah, Ohio, Texas, and Virginia were surveyed to investigate changes in ownership of the practices during the period 1995-1998. These five states were selected because they represent areas with different experiences with physician-hospital integration and varied rates of managed care penetration. A series of logistic regressions were conducted to examine the factors that led independent physicians to sell their practices to either nonlocal buyers, local hospitals, or local physicians. Findings suggest that sales to nonlocal buyers represent the majority of practice ownership changes. The motivations for ceding control to nonlocal buyers center on managed care concerns, recruitment concerns, and administrative burdens. Sellers were also concerned about their level of net income prior to being acquired. However, the preacquisition financial concerns of sellers were not significantly stronger than the financial concerns of practices that remained independent. The environmental conditions that motivate rural physicians to sell their practices are not expected to improve. Therefore, additional sales of rural primary care practices to nonlocal buyers are expected. Further research is necessary to determine whether this shift in control will lead to changes in the quality or accessibility of care.

  6. Primary Care Providers' HIV Prevention Practices Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tracy; Teaster, Pamela B.; Thornton, Alice; Watkins, John F.; Alexander, Linda; Zanjani, Faika

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore primary care providers' HIV prevention practices for older adults. Primary care providers' perceptions and awareness were explored to understand factors that affect their provision of HIV prevention materials and HIV screening for older adults. Design and Method Data were collected through 24 semistructured interviews with primary care providers (i.e., physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) who see patients older than 50 years. Results Results reveal facilitators and barriers of HIV prevention for older adults among primary care providers and understanding of providers' HIV prevention practices and behaviors. Individual, patient, institutional, and societal factors influenced HIV prevention practices among participants, for example, provider training and work experience, lack of time, discomfort in discussing HIV/AIDS with older adults, stigma, and ageism were contributing factors. Furthermore, factors specific to primary and secondary HIV prevention were identified, for instance, the presence of sexually transmitted infections influenced providers' secondary prevention practices. Implications HIV disease, while preventable, is increasing among older adults. These findings inform future research and interventions aimed at increasing HIV prevention practices in primary care settings for patients older than 50. PMID:25736425

  7. Variations in Patient Portal Adoption in Four Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    This case report reviews the patient portal adoption experiences of four primary care practices at Partners HealthCare during 2002 – 2009. Although each practice used the enterprise patient portal (Patient Gateway) and electronic health record, their patient enrollments varied substantially, as did their marketing approaches, new feature adoption, leadership approach, and staff involvement. Marketing limitations, leadership concerns, and limited staff engagement characterized the low-enrollment practices, but not the others. These factors, along with other practice characteristics such as location and patient demographics, should be explored in future research to identify best practices for successful adoption of a patient portal. PMID:21347096

  8. Community care in practice: social work in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lymbery, M; Millward, A

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the establishment of social work within primary health care settings in Great Britain, following the passage of the National Health Service and Community Care Act in 1990. Although the improvement of relationships between social workers and primary health care teams has been promoted for a number of years, the advent of formal policies for community care has made this a priority for both social services and health. This paper presents interim findings from the evaluation of three pilot projects in Nottinghamshire, Great Britain. These findings are analysed from three linked perspectives. The first is the extent to which structures and organisations have worked effectively together to promote the location of social workers within health care settings. The second is the impact of professional and cultural factors on the work of the social worker in these settings. The third is the effect of interpersonal relationships on the success of the project. The paper will conclude that there is significant learning from each of these perspectives which can be applied to the future location of social workers to primary health care.

  9. Team-based care: a critical element of primary care practice transformation.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Debora Goetz; Beeson, Tishra; Kuzel, Anton J; Love, Linda E; Carver, Mary C

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of how primary care practices in the United States are transforming their practice to deliver patient-centered care. The study used qualitative research methods to conduct case studies of small primary care practices in the state of Virginia. The research team collected data from practices using in-depth interviews, structured telephone questionnaires, observation, and document review. Team-based care stood out as the most critical method used to successfully transform practices to provide patient-centered care. This article presents 3 team-based care models that were utilized by the practices in this study.

  10. Risk Stratification Methods and Provision of Care Management Services in Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative Practices.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ashok; Sessums, Laura; Gupta, Reshma; Jin, Janel; Day, Tim; Finke, Bruce; Bitton, Asaf

    2017-09-01

    Risk-stratified care management is essential to improving population health in primary care settings, but evidence is limited on the type of risk stratification method and its association with care management services. We describe risk stratification patterns and association with care management services for primary care practices in the Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative. We undertook a qualitative approach to categorize risk stratification methods being used by CPC practices and tested whether these stratification methods were associated with delivery of care management services. CPC practices reported using 4 primary methods to stratify risk for their patient populations: a practice-developed algorithm (n = 215), the American Academy of Family Physicians' clinical algorithm (n = 155), payer claims and electronic health records (n = 62), and clinical intuition (n = 52). CPC practices using practice-developed algorithm identified the most number of high-risk patients per primary care physician (282 patients, P = .006). CPC practices using clinical intuition had the most high-risk patients in care management and a greater proportion of high-risk patients receiving care management per primary care physician (91 patients and 48%, P =.036 and P =.128, respectively). CPC practices used 4 primary methods to identify high-risk patients. Although practices that developed their own algorithm identified the greatest number of high-risk patients, practices that used clinical intuition connected the greatest proportion of patients to care management services. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  11. Guidelines for clinical practice: applications for primary care.

    PubMed

    Lohr, K N

    1994-03-01

    Practice guidelines can make considerable contributions to several areas of health care delivery. Perhaps their greatest promise lies in the area of assessing and improving the quality of health care and health outcomes; secondarily, they may help to rationalize the overall use of health services and thus be a partial means to controlling the use of services and costs of care. Work at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States has (a) suggested eight characteristics of good guidelines; (b) building on those, pointed the way to methods for developing and assessing guidelines; and (c) shown how sound and realistic guidelines can contribute to better ways to measure and improve the quality of primary medical care. This paper discusses four questions: (1) what are guidelines, and how might they relate to or be of benefit to primary care and family medicine? (2) What criteria or principles should be used to create good practice guidelines? (3) What problems or pitfalls need to be anticipated in developing and disseminating guidelines? (4) In what ways can guidelines help improve the quality of health care, especially through quality assurance and improvement and utilization and cost management? Practice guidelines will not be a quick or painless strategy for improving the quality and value of health care, but unprecedented opportunities lie ahead for physicians in primary care.

  12. Primary care quality improvement from a practice facilitator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Liddy, Clare E; Blazhko, Valeriya; Dingwall, Molly; Singh, Jatinderpreet; Hogg, William E

    2014-02-03

    Practice facilitation has proven to be effective at improving care delivery. Practice facilitators are healthcare professionals who work with and support other healthcare providers. To the best of our knowledge, very few studies have explored the perspective of facilitators. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the barriers that facilitators face during the facilitation process and to identify approaches used to overcome these barriers to help practices move towards positive change. We conducted semi-structured interviews with four practice facilitators who worked with 84 primary care practices in Eastern Ontario, Canada over a period of five years (2007-2012). The transcripts were analyzed independently by three members of the research team using an open coding technique. A qualitative data analysis using immersion/crystallization technique was applied to interpret the interview transcripts. Common barriers identified by the facilitators included accessibility to the practice (e.g., difficulty scheduling meetings, short meetings), organizational behaviour (team organization, team conflicts, etc.), challenges with practice engagement (e.g., lack of interest, lack of trust), resistance to change, and competing priorities. To help practices move towards positive change the facilitators had to tailor their approach, integrate themselves, be persistent with practices, and exhibit flexibility. The consensus on redesigning and transforming primary care in North America and around the world is rapidly growing. Practice facilitation has been pivotal in materializing the transformation in the way primary care practices deliver care. This study provides an exclusive insight into facilitator approaches which will assist the design and implementation of small- and large-scale facilitation interventions.

  13. EHRs in primary care practices: benefits, challenges, and successful strategies.

    PubMed

    Goetz Goldberg, Debora; Kuzel, Anton J; Feng, Lisa Bo; DeShazo, Jonathan P; Love, Linda E

    2012-02-01

    To understand the current use of electronic health records (EHRs) in small primary care practices and to explore experiences and perceptions of physicians and staff toward the benefits, challenges, and successful strategies for implementation and meaningful use of advanced EHR functions. Qualitative case study of 6 primary care practices in Virginia. We performed surveys and in-depth interviews with clinicians and administrative staff (N = 38) and observed interpersonal relations and use of EHR functions over a 16-month period. Practices with an established EHR were selected based on a maximum variation of quality activities, location, and ownership. Physicians and staff report increased efficiency in retrieving medical records, storing patient information, coordination of care, and office operations. Costs, lack of knowledge of EHR functions, and problems transforming office operations were barriers reported for meaningful use of EHRs. Major disruption to patient care during upgrades and difficulty utilizing performance tracking and quality functions were also reported. Facilitators for adopting and using advanced EHR functions include team-based care, adequate technical support, communication and training for employees and physicians, alternative strategies for patient care during transition, and development of new processes and work flow procedures. Small practices experience difficulty with implementation and utilization of advanced EHR functions. Federal and state policies should continue to support practices by providing technical assistance and financial incentives, grants, and/or loans. Small practices should consider using regional extension center services and reaching out to colleagues and other healthcare organizations with similar EHR systems for advice and guidance.

  14. Assessing spirituality in primary care practice: is there time?

    PubMed

    Brush, B L; Daly, P R

    2000-03-01

    Over the past decade, increased attention has centered on the connection between spirituality and health. While there is general agreement that a balance of mind, body, and soul is necessary for the maintenance of health, many providers express discomfort in spiritual assessment and caregiving, citing lack of time, education, and spiritual self-awareness as key reasons. In response to these identified barriers to spiritual caregiving, faculty at the Boston College School of Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner Program designed a faculty-student practice whose focus is to integrate spiritual care into primary care practice. This article discusses the practice model and the process of preparing nurse practitioner (NP) students to assess patient spirituality within the context of a shifting care environment. It encourages all NPs to include spiritual assessment and care in daily practice.

  15. Computer use in primary care practices in Canada.

    PubMed

    Anisimowicz, Yvonne; Bowes, Andrea E; Thompson, Ashley E; Miedema, Baukje; Hogg, William E; Wong, Sabrina T; Katz, Alan; Burge, Fred; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Yelland, Gregory S; Wodchis, Walter P

    2017-05-01

    To examine the use of computers in primary care practices. The international Quality and Cost of Primary Care study was conducted in Canada in 2013 and 2014 using a descriptive cross-sectional survey method to collect data from practices across Canada. Participating practices filled out several surveys, one of them being the Family Physician Survey, from which this study collected its data. All 10 Canadian provinces. A total of 788 family physicians. A computer use scale measured the extent to which family physicians integrated computers into their practices, with higher scores indicating a greater integration of computer use in practice. Analyses included t tests and (2) tests comparing new and traditional models of primary care on measures of computer use and electronic health record (EHR) use, as well as descriptive statistics. Nearly all (97.5%) physicians reported using a computer in their practices, with moderately high computer use scale scores (mean [SD] score of 5.97 [2.96] out of 9), and many (65.7%) reported using EHRs. Physicians with practices operating under new models of primary care reported incorporating computers into their practices to a greater extent (mean [SD] score of 6.55 [2.64]) than physicians operating under traditional models did (mean [SD] score of 5.33 [3.15]; t726.60 = 5.84; P < .001; Cohen d = 0.42, 95% CI 0.808 to 1.627) and were more likely to report using EHRs (73.8% vs 56.7%; [Formula: see text]; P < .001; odds ratio = 2.15). Overall, there was a statistically significant variability in computer use across provinces. Most family physicians in Canada have incorporated computers into their practices for administrative and scholarly activities; however, EHRs have not been adopted consistently across the country. Physicians with practices operating under the new, more collaborative models of primary care use computers more comprehensively and are more likely to use EHRs than those in practices operating under traditional models of

  16. Computer use in primary care practices in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Anisimowicz, Yvonne; Bowes, Andrea E.; Thompson, Ashley E.; Miedema, Baukje; Hogg, William E.; Wong, Sabrina T.; Katz, Alan; Burge, Fred; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Yelland, Gregory S.; Wodchis, Walter P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the use of computers in primary care practices. Design The international Quality and Cost of Primary Care study was conducted in Canada in 2013 and 2014 using a descriptive cross-sectional survey method to collect data from practices across Canada. Participating practices filled out several surveys, one of them being the Family Physician Survey, from which this study collected its data. Setting All 10 Canadian provinces. Participants A total of 788 family physicians. Main outcome measures A computer use scale measured the extent to which family physicians integrated computers into their practices, with higher scores indicating a greater integration of computer use in practice. Analyses included t tests and 2 tests comparing new and traditional models of primary care on measures of computer use and electronic health record (EHR) use, as well as descriptive statistics. Results Nearly all (97.5%) physicians reported using a computer in their practices, with moderately high computer use scale scores (mean [SD] score of 5.97 [2.96] out of 9), and many (65.7%) reported using EHRs. Physicians with practices operating under new models of primary care reported incorporating computers into their practices to a greater extent (mean [SD] score of 6.55 [2.64]) than physicians operating under traditional models did (mean [SD] score of 5.33 [3.15]; t726.60 = 5.84; P < .001; Cohen d = 0.42, 95% CI 0.808 to 1.627) and were more likely to report using EHRs (73.8% vs 56.7%; χ12=25.43; P < .001; odds ratio = 2.15). Overall, there was a statistically significant variability in computer use across provinces. Conclusion Most family physicians in Canada have incorporated computers into their practices for administrative and scholarly activities; however, EHRs have not been adopted consistently across the country. Physicians with practices operating under the new, more collaborative models of primary care use computers more comprehensively and are more likely

  17. Health Care Disparities and Diabetes Care: Practical Considerations for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard O.; Beech, Bettina M.; Miller, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    IN BRIEF Disparities in diabetes care are prevalent in the United States. This article provides an overview of these disparities and discusses both potential causes and efforts to address them to date. The authors focus the discussion on aspects relevant to the patient-provider dyad and provide practical considerations for the primary care provider’s role in helping to diminish and eliminate disparities in diabetes care. PMID:21289869

  18. Primary Care Physicians Practicing Preventive Medicine in the Outpatient Setting.

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Carter, Kimberly; Sundsted, Karna; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Preventive care is an important part of primary care medicine, yet much variation in its practice exists. The aim of this study is to assess physicians' perspectives of practicing preventive medicine and evaluate which topics are deemed most important. All primary care medicine providers at two separate academic medical centers (Mayo Clinic, MN and Mayo Clinic, FL) were surveyed via an E-mail questionnaire assessing physicians' perception of the role of preventive medicine during both acute/routine and yearly visits, physicians' perception of patients' response to preventive medicine topics, and which preventive medicine topics are commonly practiced. Of 445 providers meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 183 (41.1%) responded. Providers were more likely to engage patients in preventive medicine during yearly visits more so than acute visits (3.82 vs. 4.72, range 1-5 Likert Scale), yet providers were very likely to partake in such practices during both visits. Providers perceived that patients received the practice of preventive medicine very well (4.13 on 1-5 Likert Scale). No significant difference between provider practice and patient perception was noted between the two sites, although there was some variation based on clinical experience of the provider. Providers were found to most commonly practice topics recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Our study found a high predisposition to practicing preventive medicine. Providers seem to practice according to published evidence-based medicine recommendations.

  19. Primary Care Physicians Practicing Preventive Medicine in the Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Snipelisky, David; Carter, Kimberly; Sundsted, Karna; Burton, M. Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preventive care is an important part of primary care medicine, yet much variation in its practice exists. The aim of this study is to assess physicians’ perspectives of practicing preventive medicine and evaluate which topics are deemed most important. Methods: All primary care medicine providers at two separate academic medical centers (Mayo Clinic, MN and Mayo Clinic, FL) were surveyed via an E-mail questionnaire assessing physicians’ perception of the role of preventive medicine during both acute/routine and yearly visits, physicians’ perception of patients’ response to preventive medicine topics, and which preventive medicine topics are commonly practiced. Results: Of 445 providers meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 183 (41.1%) responded. Providers were more likely to engage patients in preventive medicine during yearly visits more so than acute visits (3.82 vs. 4.72, range 1–5 Likert Scale), yet providers were very likely to partake in such practices during both visits. Providers perceived that patients received the practice of preventive medicine very well (4.13 on 1–5 Likert Scale). No significant difference between provider practice and patient perception was noted between the two sites, although there was some variation based on clinical experience of the provider. Providers were found to most commonly practice topics recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Conclusions: Our study found a high predisposition to practicing preventive medicine. Providers seem to practice according to published evidence-based medicine recommendations. PMID:26941906

  20. Respiratory Care Training for Safety-Net Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Dingae, Meg B; Fending, Deborah; Liu, Andrew H; Make, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Programs designed to enhance the diagnosis and management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care settings have had variable success and have not been broadly implemented. The Respiratory Toolkit was created to bridge this gap. The 2-year program providing primary care training in both asthma and COPD was conducted in an urban federally qualified health center with 13 clinics and 87 staff. The program included interactive training with multidisciplinary teams, in-clinic follow-up trainings, electronic medical record (EMR) tools, and patient-centered educational resources. For asthma patients, use of spirometry increased from 7% of visits before to 43% after training, severity assessment from 13% to 29%, asthma action plans from 2% to 8%, and prescription of inhaled corticosteroids from 33% to 42%. For COPD patients, spirometry use increased from 21% to 35% of visits, and long-acting beta2-agonists from 19% to 26%. Among undiagnosed smokers, use of the COPD screener increased from 0 to 11% of visits, of spirometry from 4% to 36%, and of advice to quit from 74% to 79%. The Respiratory Toolkit produced significant changes in guideline-based care for patients with asthma or COPD; however, time constraints and other barriers prevented full adoption.

  1. Readiness of Primary Care Practices for Medical Home Certification

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Sarah J.; Sakshaug, Joseph W.; Chen, Lena M.; Hollingsworth, John M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of medical home infrastructure among primary care practices for children and identify practice characteristics associated with medical home infrastructure. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of restricted data files from 2007 and 2008 of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We mapped survey items to the 2011 National Committee on Quality Assurance’s Patient-Centered Medical home standards. Points were awarded for each “passed” element based on National Committee for Quality Assurance scoring, and we then calculated the percentage of the total possible points met for each practice. We used multivariate linear regression to assess associations between practice characteristics and the percentage of medical home infrastructure points attained. RESULTS: On average, pediatric practices attained 38% (95% confidence interval 34%–41%) of medical home infrastructure points, and family/general practices attained 36% (95% confidence interval 33%–38%). Practices scored higher on medical home elements related to direct patient care (eg, providing comprehensive health assessments) and lower in areas highly dependent on health information technology (eg, computerized prescriptions, test ordering, laboratory result viewing, or quality of care measurement and reporting). In multivariate analyses, smaller practice size was significantly associated with lower infrastructure scores. Practice ownership, urban versus rural location, and proportion of visits covered by public insurers were not consistently associated with a practice’s infrastructure score. CONCLUSIONS: Medical home programs need effective approaches to support practice transformation in the small practices that provide the vast majority of the primary care for children in the United States. PMID:23382438

  2. Primary care clinicians' recognition and management of depression: a model of depression care in real-world primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Baik, Seong-Yi; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Gonzales, Junius J

    2013-11-01

    Depression is prevalent in primary care (PC) practices and poses a considerable public health burden in the United States. Despite nearly four decades of efforts to improve depression care quality in PC practices, a gap remains between desired treatment outcomes and the reality of how depression care is delivered. This article presents a real-world PC practice model of depression care, elucidating the processes and their influencing conditions. Grounded theory methodology was used for the data collection and analysis to develop a depression care model. Data were collected from 70 individual interviews (60 to 70 min each), three focus group interviews (n = 24, 2 h each), two surveys per clinician, and investigators' field notes on practice environments. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for analysis. Surveys and field notes complemented interview data. Seventy primary care clinicians from 52 PC offices in the Midwest: 28 general internists, 28 family physicians, and 14 nurse practitioners. A depression care model was developed that illustrates how real-world conditions infuse complexity into each step of the depression care process. Depression care in PC settings is mediated through clinicians' interactions with patients, practice, and the local community. A clinician's interactional familiarity ("familiarity capital") was a powerful facilitator for depression care. For the recognition of depression, three previously reported processes and three conditions were confirmed. For the management of depression, 13 processes and 11 conditions were identified. Empowering the patient was a parallel process to the management of depression. The clinician's ability to develop and utilize interactional relationships and resources needed to recognize and treat a person with depression is key to depression care in primary care settings. The interactional context of depression care makes empowering the patient central to depression care delivery.

  3. Determinants of Health and Pediatric Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew F; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Cox, Joanne E; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Grace, Aimee M; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri E; Lobach, Katherine S; Ma, Christine T; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberly D; Sadof, Matthew D; Shah, Anita N; Fierman, Arthur H

    2016-03-01

    More than 20% of children nationally live in poverty. Pediatric primary care practices are critical points-of-contact for these patients and their families. Practices must consider risks that are rooted in poverty as they determine how to best deliver family-centered care and move toward action on the social determinants of health. The Practice-Level Care Delivery Subgroup of the Academic Pediatric Association's Task Force on Poverty has developed a roadmap for pediatric providers and practices to use as they adopt clinical practice redesign strategies aimed at mitigating poverty's negative impact on child health and well-being. The present article describes how care structures and processes can be altered in ways that align with the needs of families living in poverty. Attention is paid to both facilitators of and barriers to successful redesign strategies. We also illustrate how such a roadmap can be adapted by practices depending on the degree of patient need and the availability of practice resources devoted to intervening on the social determinants of health. In addition, ways in which practices can advocate for families in their communities and nationally are identified. Finally, given the relative dearth of evidence for many poverty-focused interventions in primary care, areas that would benefit from more in-depth study are considered. Such a focus is especially relevant as practices consider how they can best help families mitigate the impact of poverty-related risks in ways that promote long-term health and well-being for children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. [Clinical practice guidelines and primary care. SESPAS report 2012].

    PubMed

    Atienza, Gerardo; Bañeres, Joaquim; Gracia, Francisco Javier

    2012-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are intended to serve as a bridge between the decision levels and the sources of knowledge, giving decision makers the best synthesis of scientific evidence and an analysis of context, to provide elements of judgement and to transfer scientific knowledge into clinical practice. However, the actual impact on health care is variable and effectiveness in changing medical practice, moderate. Qualitative and quantitative studies show that most primary care physicians consider that the guides are a valuable source of advice and training and a kind of improving the quality of healthcare. However, they underline its rigidity, the difficulty to apply to individual patients and that their main goal is to reduce healthcare costs. In Spain, there are several experiences as GuíaSalud in developing clinical practice guidelines aimed specifically at primary care. However, the proper implementation of a clinical practice guideline includes not only the quality and thoroughness of the evidence, but the credibility of professionals and organizations and other contextual factors such as characteristics of patients, providers and organizations or systems. An important step in future research is to develop a better theoretical understanding of organizational change that is required for management and professionals to give appropriate guidance to the implementation of the clinical practice guidelines.

  5. Health information technology workforce needs of rural primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A; Patterson, Davis G; Fenton, Susan H; Ostergard, Stefanie J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed electronic health record (EHR) and health information technology (HIT) workforce resources needed by rural primary care practices, and their workforce-related barriers to implementing and using EHRs and HIT. Rural primary care practices (1,772) in 13 states (34.2% response) were surveyed in 2012 using mailed and Web-based questionnaires. EHRs or HIT were used by 70% of respondents. Among practices using or intending to use the technology, most did not plan to hire new employees to obtain EHR/HIT skills and even fewer planned to hire consultants or vendors to fill gaps. Many practices had staff with some basic/entry, intermediate and/or advanced-level skills, but nearly two-thirds (61.4%) needed more staff training. Affordable access to vendors/consultants who understand their needs and availability of community college and baccalaureate-level training were the workforce-related barriers cited by the highest percentages of respondents. Accessing the Web/Internet challenged nearly a quarter of practices in isolated rural areas, and nearly a fifth in small rural areas. Finding relevant vendors/consultants and qualified staff were greater barriers in small and isolated rural areas than in large rural areas. Rural primary care practices mainly will rely on existing staff for continued implementation and use of EHR/HIT systems. Infrastructure and workforce-related barriers remain and must be overcome before practices can fully manage patient populations and exchange patient information among care system partners. Efforts to monitor adoption of these skills and ongoing support for continuing education will likely benefit rural populations. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Defining a typology of primary care practices: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Senn, Nicolas; Cohidon, Christine; Zuchuat, Jean-Christophe

    2016-12-01

    To define a typology of primary care (PC) practices based on a mixed inductive/deductive approach that uses a large number of variables describing organizational and demographic characteristics of practices and a priori hierarchical structuring of the data. Secondary analysis of the Swiss part of the QUALICOPC study using a multiple factor analysis approach incorporating 74 variables hierarchically structured and including information on infrastructures, clinical care, workforces, accessibility and geographic location of PC practices. Switzerland. Two hundred randomly selected PC practices. Typology of PC practices based on axes identified through the multiple factorial approach. The factorial analysis extracted two uncorrelated axes summarizing 17% of the global variance. The first axis is mainly associated with two dimensions related to the comprehensiveness of services, namely 'clinical care provided' (Pearson's r = 0.73) and 'available infrastructures' (r = 0.78). The second axis is mainly associated with the workforce in the practice such as the number of general practitioners or other health workers (r = 0.69). Swiss PC practices were mapped using these two axes. This innovative approach allows defining a global typology of PC practices. Based upon Swiss data, two axes were identified to globally describe PC organization: comprehensiveness of services and workforces development. This exploratory study demonstrates a promising way, first to characterize globally one or several PC models that emerge from complex features, second to compare more accurately PC organization between countries and finally to assess how these models might be associated with patients' outcomes.

  7. Results of an initiative to charge for previously uncompensated care in an academic primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Daniel P; Marcelo, Karen; Baker, David W

    2013-01-01

    Increasing clinical workload with dwindling compensation has challenged primary care medical practices over the past decade. This has led to more physicians leaving and fewer medical trainees entering primary care. In an effort to make primary care practices viable, many groups routinely charge for providing care that was uncompensated in the past. We initiated a program in our practice that charged for certain after-hour and electronic communications, completion of forms outside of office visits, and failure to show for appointments. We assessed the effect on workload, patient adherence to appointments, and financial outcomes. This initiative decreased our physicians' workload, increased physicians' satisfaction, and produced a modest increase in revenues.

  8. Trust and Reflection in Primary Care Practice Redesign.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Holly Jordan; Palmer, Raymond F; Leykum, Luci K; McDaniel, Reuben R; Nutting, Paul A; Stange, Kurt C; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Miller, William L; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2016-08-01

    To test a conceptual model of relationships, reflection, sensemaking, and learning in primary care practices transitioning to patient-centered medical homes (PCMH). Primary data were collected as part of the American Academy of Family Physicians' National Demonstration Project of the PCMH. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of clinicians and staff from 36 family medicine practices across the United States. Surveys measured seven characteristics of practice relationships (trust, diversity, mindfulness, heedful interrelation, respectful interaction, social/task relatedness, and rich and lean communication) and three organizational attributes (reflection, sensemaking, and learning) of practices. We surveyed 396 clinicians and practice staff. We performed a multigroup path analysis of the data. Parameter estimates were calculated using a Bayesian estimation method. Trust and reflection were important in explaining the characteristics of practice relationships and their associations with sensemaking and learning. The strongest associations between relationships, sensemaking, and learning were found under conditions of high trust and reflection. The weakest associations were found under conditions of low trust and reflection. Trust and reflection appear to play a key role in moderating relationships, sensemaking, and learning in practices undergoing practice redesign. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  9. Association between licensure examination scores and practice in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tamblyn, Robyn; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Dauphinee, W Dale; Hanley, James A; Norcini, John; Girard, Nadyne; Grand'Maison, Paul; Brailovsky, Carlos

    2002-12-18

    Standards for licensure are designed to provide assurance to the public of a physician's competence to practice. However, there has been little assessment of the relationship between examination scores and subsequent practice performance. To determine if there is a sustained relationship between certification examination scores and practice performance and if licensing examinations taken at the end of medical school are predictive of future practice in primary care. A total of 912 family physicians, who passed the Québec family medicine certification examination (QLEX) between 1990 and 1993 and entered practice. Linked databases were used to assess physicians' practice performance for 3.4 million patients in the universal health care system in Québec, Canada. Patients were seen during the follow-up period for the first 4 years (1993 cohort of physicians) to 7 years (1990 cohort of physicians) of practice from July 1 of the certification examination to December 31, 1996. Mammography screening rate, continuity of care index, disease-specific and symptom-relief prescribing rate, contraindicated prescribing rate, and consultation rate. Physicians achieving higher scores on both examinations had higher rates (rate increase per SD increase in score per 1000 persons per year) of mammography screening (beta for QLEX, 16.8 [95% confidence interval [CI], 8.7-24.9]; beta for Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination [MCCQE], 17.4 [95% CI, 10.6-24.1]) and consultation (beta for QLEX, 4.9 [95% CI, 2.1-7.8]; beta for MCCQE, 2.9 [95% CI, 0.4-5.4]). Higher subscores in diagnosis were predictive of higher rates in the difference between disease-specific and symptom-relief prescribing (beta for QLEX, 3.9 [95% CI, 0.9-7.0]; beta for MCCQE, 3.8 [95% CI, 0.3-7.3]). Higher scores of drug knowledge were predictive of a lower rate (relative risk per SD increase in score) of contraindicated prescribing for MCCQE (relative risk, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.77-1.00). Relationships between

  10. Primary care physicians and elder abuse: current attitudes and practices.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Deborah B; Rosenbaum, Rachel; Page, Connie; Herman, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    while estimates suggest that between 1.4% and 5.4% of older adults experience abuse, only 1 of 14 cases of elder abuse or neglect is ever reported to authorities. It is critical for clinicians to be aware of elder abuse in order to improve primary care. to understand Michigan primary care physicians' knowledge of and reporting practices for elder abuse, including the type of elder abuse education they received, the nature of their clinical practice, and the barriers that prevent them from reporting elder abuse. a 17-item survey was mailed to 855 primary care physicians in Michigan in 2 waves between October 2007 and December 2007. Of the 855 surveys mailed, 222 were returned for a response rate of 26%. The majority of physicians (131 [67%] of 197 physicians) believed that their training about elder abuse was not very adequate or not adequate at all. Physicians with fewer than 10 hours of training were more likely to rate their training as not adequate when compared to those who had more than 10 hours of clinical training (χ(2)=64.340, P<.001). Whether abuse was reported was highly correlated with whether it was suspected (χ(2)=26.195, P<.001). Those physicians who reported receiving formal training on the topic of elder abuse in residency programs and those who reported participating in CME activities while in practice were less likely to identify not recognizing abuse at time of patient visits as a barrier to reporting. recognizing the subtle signs of elder abuse continues to be a barrier for physicians who treat older adult patients. However, education may improve primary care physicians' ability to detect and recognize elder abuse.

  11. Centralized care management support for "high utilizers" in primary care practices at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent C; Paik, Jamie L; Haley, Laura L; Grammatico, Gina M

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence of effectiveness is limited, care management based outside primary care practices or hospitals is receiving increased attention. The University of Michigan (UM) Complex Care Management Program (CCMP) provides care management for uninsured and underinsured, high-utilizing patients in multiple primary care practices. To inform development of optimal care management models, we describe the CCMP model and characteristics and health care utilization patterns of its patients. Of a consecutive series of 49 patients enrolled at CCMP in 2011, the mean (SD) age was 48 (+/- 14); 23 (47%) were women; and 29 (59%) were White. Twenty-eight (57%) had two or more chronic medical conditions, 39 (80%) had one or more psychiatric condition, 28 (57%) had a substance abuse disorder, and 11 (22%) were homeless. Through phone, e-mail, and face-to-face contact with patients and primary care providers (PCPs), care managers coordinated health and social services and facilitated access to medical and mental health care. Patients had a mean (SD) number of hospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits in 6 months prior to enrollment of2.2 (2.5) and 4.2 (4.3), respectively, with a nonstatistically significant decrease in hospitalizations, hospital days, and emergency room visits in 6 months following enrollment in CCMP. Centralized care management support for primary care practices engages high-utilizing patients with complex medical and behavioral conditions in care management that would be difficult to provide through individual practices and may decrease health care utilization by these patients.

  12. Nurses' clinical practice in primary care: a process under construction.

    PubMed

    Matumoto, Silvia; Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to present the re-signification process of the meanings of nurses' clinical practice in primary care from the perspective of extended clinic and permanent education. An intervention research was carried out with the approval of an ethics committee. Nine nurses participated in reflection groups from September to December 2008 in Ribeirão Preto-SP-Brazil. The redefinition process of the meanings proposed by the institutional analysis was mapped. The results point out that the nurses perceive differences in clinical work, by acknowledging the sense of user-centered clinical practice; daily limits and tensions and the need for support from managers and the team to deal with users' problems and situations. They identify the necessity to open space in the schedule to do that. It was concluded that nurses' clinical practice is being consolidated, and that collective analysis processes permit learning and the reconstruction of practices.

  13. Why Do Some Primary Care Practices Engage in Practice Improvement Efforts Whereas Others Do Not?

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Debora Goetz; Mick, Stephen S; Kuzel, Anton J; Feng, Lisa Bo; Love, Linda E

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand what motivates primary care practices to engage in practice improvement, identify external and internal facilitators and barriers, and refine a conceptual framework. Data Sources In-depth interviews and structured telephone surveys with clinicians and practice staff (n = 51), observations, and document reviews. Study Design Comparative case study of primary care practices (n = 8) to examine aspects of the practice and environment that influence engagement in improvement activities. Data Collection Methods Three on-site visits, telephone interviews, and two surveys. Principal Findings Pressures from multiple sources create conflicting forces on primary care practices' improvement efforts. Pressures include incentives and requirements, organizational relationships, and access to resources. Culture, leadership priorities, values set by the physician(s), and other factors influence whether primary care practices engage in improvement efforts. Conclusions Most primary care practices are caught in a cross fire between two groups of pressures: a set of forces that push practices to remain with the status quo, the “15-minute per patient” approach, and another set of forces that press for major transformations. Our study illuminates the elements involved in the decision to stay with the status quo or to engage in practice improvement efforts needed for transformation. PMID:23034072

  14. United States Chiropractic Practice Acts and Institute of Medicine defined primary care practice

    PubMed Central

    Duenas, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective This review was conducted to analyze the law for the practice of chiropractic throughout the United States, including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, to determine the legal ability of the Doctor of Chiropractic in each jurisdiction to provide primary care service as described by the 1996 Institute of Medicine Definition of Primary Care. Method The practice acts for each State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were reviewed for language that would permit the chiropractic doctor to meet the 9 criteria of primary care practice described by the Institute of Medicine. Forty-four practice acts were cross referenced with the results of a scope of practice survey of State Boards of Chiropractic in 1999. Results The review of the practice acts and the survey on chiropractic scope of practice revealed a varied degree of chiropractic scope of practice with 23 of 53 of the jurisdictions limiting the ability of the chiropractic doctor to fully provide IOM defined primary care. Conclusion The varied practice act definitions for chiropractic practice throughout the United States the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands reveal an inability of the chiropractic profession to respond to a call for a standard nationally-based primary-care policy that could be readily achieved by all chiropractic practitioners throughout the Union. This void of primary-care qualification in many State and Commonwealth practice acts will need to be addressed by the leaders of the profession if government entities and national third party organizations are to utilize chiropractic health care services to the standard of chiropractic education and clinical experience. The need for a broad range chiropractic scope of practice model practice act is suggested. PMID:19674578

  15. Supporting primary health care nurse practitioners’ transition to practice

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan-Bentz, Maureen; Humbert, Jennie; Cragg, Betty; Legault, Frances; Laflamme, Célyne; Bailey, P.H.; Doucette, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine role transition and support requirements for nurse practitioner (NP) graduates in their first year of practice from the perspectives of the NPs and coparticipants familiar with the NPs’ practices; and to make recommendations for practice, education, and policy. DESIGN Descriptive qualitative design informed by focused ethnography and narrative analysis using semistructured, in-depth, qualitative interviews. SETTING Primary health care (PHC) settings in Ontario in which NPs worked. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-three NPs who had graduated from the Ontario Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner program, and 21 coparticipants including family physicians, NPs, and managers who were familiar with the NPs’ practices. METHODS Anglophone and francophone NPs in their first year of practice in PHC settings were contacted by e-mail or letter. Participating NPs nominated colleagues in the workplace who could comment on their practice. Interviews were conducted within the first 3 months, at 6 months, and at 12 months of the NPs’ first year of practice and were transcribed verbatim and coded. Job descriptions and organizational charts demonstrating the NPs’ organization positions were also analyzed. The researchers collaboratively analyzed the interviews using a systematic data analysis protocol. MAIN FINDINGS Familiarity of colleagues and employers with the NP role and scope of practice was an important element in successful NP role transition. Lack of preparation for integrating NPs into clinical settings and lack of infrastructure, orientation, mentorship, and awareness of the NP role and needs made the transition difficult for many. One-third of the NPs had changed employment, identifying interprofessional conflict or problems with acceptance of their role in new practice environments as reasons for the change. CONCLUSION The transition of NP graduates in Ontario was complicated by the health care environment being ill-prepared to receive them owing to

  16. Registered Nurses’ Patient Education in Everyday Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Nurses’ patient education is important for building patients’ knowledge, understanding, and preparedness for self-management. The aim of this study was to explore the conditions for nurses’ patient education work by focusing on managers’ discourses about patient education provided by nurses. In 2012, data were derived from three focus group interviews with primary care managers. Critical discourse analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews. The discursive practice comprised a discourse order of economic, medical, organizational, and didactic discourses. The economic discourse was the predominant one to which the organization had to adjust. The medical discourse was self-evident and unquestioned. Managers reorganized patient education routines and structures, generally due to economic constraints. Nurses’ pedagogical competence development was unclear, and practice-based experiences of patient education were considered very important, whereas theoretical pedagogical knowledge was considered less important. Managers’ support for nurses’ practical- and theoretical-based pedagogical competence development needs to be strengthened. PMID:28462314

  17. Patient experiences at primary care practices using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Samantha F; Silfen, Sheryl L; Wang, Jason J; Kamara, Taafoi S; Wu, Winfred Y; Shih, Sarah C

    2012-01-01

    We assessed patient experiences before and one year after electronic health record (EHR) implementation among primary care practices in New York City. These practices represented an ethnically diverse population in lower-income, urban communities. Surveys, available in English, Spanish, and Chinese languages, were administered at 10 sites. Generally, patients reported positive responses during both periods. After EHR implementation, patients were more likely to want e-mail communication with their doctors' office. The 70% of patients with Internet access were generally more satisfied with their experience and more likely to recognize benefits of EHRs. However, older patients and those with lower education levels or chronic diseases were significantly less likely than their counterparts to use the Internet. Therefore, disparities in Internet access could potentially lead to unequal access and use of healthcare if not addressed. Practices should routinely record patient communication preferences within the EHR, to tailor communications and improve patient experiences.

  18. Enhancing the primary care team to provide redesigned care: the roles of practice facilitators and care managers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin Fries; Machta, Rachel M; Meyers, David S; Genevro, Janice; Peikes, Deborah N

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care require multiple supports. Two potential members of the primary care team-practice facilitator and care manager-can play important but distinct roles in redesigning and improving care delivery. Facilitators, also known as quality improvement coaches, assist practices with coordinating their quality improvement activities and help build capacity for those activities-reflecting a systems-level approach to improving quality, safety, and implementation of evidence-based practices. Care managers provide direct patient care by coordinating care and helping patients navigate the system, improving access for patients, and communicating across the care team. These complementary roles aim to help primary care practices deliver coordinated, accessible, comprehensive, and patient-centered care.

  19. Palliative care in the community: setting practice guidelines for primary care teams.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, L; Stacy, R

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Previous studies have demonstrated deficiencies in palliative care in the community. One method of translating the results of research into clinical practice, in order to produce more effective health care, is the development of clinical guidelines. Setting standards for such care has been performed by care teams in both hospital and hospice settings but not in primary care. AIM. This study set out to develop guidelines for primary care teams to follow in the provision of palliative care in the community using facilitated case discussions with the members of such teams, as a form of internal audit. METHOD. Five practices were randomly chosen from the family health services authority medical list. Meetings between the facilitators and primary care teams were held over a period of one year. The teams were asked to describe good aspects of care, areas of concern and suggestions to improve these, in recent cases of patient deaths. RESULTS. In total 56 cases were discussed. All practices felt that cohesive teamwork, coordinated management, early involvement of nursing staff and the identification of a key worker were essential for good terminal care. Concerns arose in clinical and administrative areas but the majority were linked to poor communication, either between patient and professionals within the primary care team or between primary and secondary care. All the positive aspects of care, concerns and suggestions were collated by the facilitators into guidelines for teams to refer to from the initial diagnosis of a terminal illness through to the patient's death and care of the relatives afterwards. CONCLUSION. Developing multidisciplinary as opposed to medical guidelines for palliative care allows primary health care teams to create standards that are acceptable to them and stimulates individuals within the teams to accept responsibility for initiating the change necessary for more effective care. The process of facilitating teams to discuss their work

  20. Managing obesity in primary care practice: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Raymond; Wadden, Thomas A; Tsai, Adam G; Peck, Katherine; Moran, Caroline H

    2013-01-01

    This narrative review examines randomized controlled trials of the management of obesity in primary care practice, in light of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ decision to support intensive behavioral weight loss counseling provided by physicians and related health professionals. Mean weight losses of 0.1–2.3 kg were observed with brief (10- to 15-min) behavioral counseling delivered by primary care providers (PCPs) at monthly to quarterly visits. Losses increased to 1.7–7.5 kg when brief PCP counseling was combined with weight loss medication. Collaborative treatment, in which medical assistants delivered brief monthly behavioral counseling in conjunction with PCPs, produced losses of 1.6–4.6 kg in periods up to two years. Remotely delivered, intensive (>monthly contact) behavioral counseling, as offered by telephone, yielded losses of 0.4–5.1 kg over the same period. Further study is needed of the frequency and duration of visits required to produce clinically meaningful weight loss (>5%) in primary care patients. In addition, trials are needed that examine the cost-effectiveness of PCP-delivered counseling, compared with that potentially provided by registered dietitians or well-studied commercial programs. PMID:23323827

  1. Creating collaborative learning environments for transforming primary care practices now.

    PubMed

    Miller, William L; Cohen-Katz, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The renewal of primary care waits just ahead. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement and a refreshing breeze of collaboration signal its arrival with demonstration projects and pilots appearing across the country. An early message from this work suggests that the development of collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams may be essential for the success of the PCMH. Our focus in this article is on training existing health care professionals toward being thriving members of this transformed clinical care team in a relationship-centered PCMH. Our description of the optimal conditions for collaborative training begins with delineating three types of teams and how they relate to levels of collaboration. We then describe how to create a supportive, safe learning environment for this type of training, using a different model of professional socialization, and tools for building culture. Critical skills related to practice development and the cross-disciplinary collaborative processes are also included. Despite significant obstacles in readying current clinicians to be members of thriving collaborative teams, a few next steps toward implementing collaborative training programs for existing professionals are possible using competency-based and adult learning approaches. Grasping the long awaited arrival of collaborative primary health care will also require delivery system and payment reform. Until that happens, there is an abundance of work to be done envisioning new collaborative training programs and initiating a nation-wide effort to motivate and reeducate our colleagues. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Improving asthma care in rural primary care practices: a performance improvement project.

    PubMed

    Cicutto, Lisa; Dingae, Meg B; Langmack, Esther L

    2014-01-01

    Rural areas are often underserviced health areas, lack specialty care services, and experience higher levels of asthma-related burden. A primary care, asthma-focused, performance improvement program was provided to a 6-county, rural-frontier region in Colorado to determine whether asthma care practices could be enhanced to become concordant with evidence-based asthma care guidelines. A pre-post, quasi-experimental design was used. A complex, multifaceted intervention was provided to multidisciplinary primary care teams in practices serving children and adults with asthma. Intervention elements included face-to-face trainings, clinical support tools, patient education materials, a website, and clinic visits. Performance improvement and behavior change indicators were collected through chart audits and surveys from the entire health care team. Participants included three health care organizations and their staff in 13 primary care practices. Overall, all team members reported statistically significant improvements in confidence levels for providing quality asthma care. Chart reviews of asthma patient encounters completed before and after the program demonstrated statistically significant improvements in asthma care practices for asthma control assessment (1% vs 20%), provision of asthma action plans (2% vs 29%), controller prescription (39% vs 71%), inhaler technique assessment (1% vs 18%), and arrangement of follow-up appointment (20% vs 37%). The asthma care-focused, multifaceted, complex, performance improvement intervention provided to rural primary health care teams lead to significant improvements in all indicators of quality asthma care provision to adults and children with asthma. However, significant barriers exist for rural practices to adopt evidence-based asthma care practices. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education

  3. Best practice in primary care pathology: review 3

    PubMed Central

    Smellie, W S A; Forth, J; Bareford, D; Twomey, P; Galloway, M J; Logan, E C M; Smart, S R S; Reynolds, T M; Waine, C

    2006-01-01

    This best practice review examines four series of common primary care questions in laboratory medicine: (i) “minor” blood platelet count and haemoglobin abnormalities; (ii) diagnosis and monitoring of anaemia caused by iron deficiency; (iii) secondary hyperlipidaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia; and (iv) glycated haemoglobin and microalbumin use in diabetes. The review is presented in question–answer format, referenced for each question series. The recommendations represent a précis of guidance found using a standardised literature search of national and international guidance notes, consensus statements, health policy documents and evidence‐based medicine reviews, supplemented by Medline Embase searches to identify relevant primary research documents. They are not standards, but form a guide to be set in the clinical context. Most of the recommendations are based on consensus rather than evidence. They will be updated periodically to take account of new information. PMID:16873560

  4. Best practice in primary care pathology: review 7

    PubMed Central

    Smellie, W S A; Forth, J; Smart, S R S; Galloway, M J; Irving, W; Bareford, D; Collinson, P O; Kerr, K G; Summerfield, G; Carey, P J; Minhas, Rubin

    2007-01-01

    This seventh best‐practice review examines four series of common primary care questions in laboratory medicine: (1) blood count abnormalities 2; (2) cardiac troponins; (3) high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol; and (4) viral diseases 2. The review is presented in a question–answer format, with authorship attributed for each question series. The recommendations are a précis of guidance found using a standardised literature search of national and international guidance notes, consensus statements, health policy documents and evidence‐based medicine reviews, supplemented by Medline Embase searches to identify relevant primary research documents. The recommendations are not standards, but form a guide to be set in the clinical context. Most are consensus based rather than evidence based. They will be updated periodically to take account of new information. PMID:17046843

  5. Best practice in primary care pathology: review 9

    PubMed Central

    Smellie, W S A; Shaw, N; Bowlees, R; Taylor, A; Howell‐Jones, R; McNulty, C A M

    2007-01-01

    This ninth best‐practice review examines two series of common primary care questions in laboratory medicine: (i) potassium abnormalities and (ii) venous leg ulcer microbiology. The review is presented in question‐and‐answer format, referenced for each question series. The recommendations represent a précis of guidance found using a standardised literature search of national and international guidance notes, consensus statements, health policy documents and evidence‐based medicine reviews, supplemented by MEDLINE EMBASE searches to identify relevant primary research documents. They are not standards but form a guide to be set in the clinical context. Most are consensus rather than evidence‐based. They will be updated periodically to take account of new information. PMID:17259298

  6. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  7. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Báez, María Valeria; Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population.

  8. Regional Primary Care Team to Deliver Best-Practice Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Leonie; Leach, Matthew J.; May, Esther; Turnbull, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Best-practice diabetes care can reduce the burden of diabetes and associated health care costs. But this requires access to a multidisciplinary team with the right skill mix. We applied a needs-driven evidence-based health workforce model to describe the primary care team required to support best-practice diabetes care, paying particular attention to diverse clinic populations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Care protocols, by number and duration of consultations, were derived for twenty distinct competencies based on clinical practice guidelines and structured input from a multidisciplinary clinical panel. This was combined with a previously estimated population profile of persons across 26 patient attributes (i.e., type of diabetes, complications, and threats to self-care) to estimate clinician contact hours by competency required to deliver best-practice care in the study region. RESULTS A primary care team of 22.1 full-time-equivalent (FTE) positions was needed to deliver best-practice primary care to a catchment of 1,000 persons with diabetes with the attributes of the Australian population. Competencies requiring greatest contact time were psychosocial issues and dietary advice at 3.5 and 3.3 FTE, respectively (1 FTE/∼300 persons); home (district) nursing at 3.2 FTE; and diabetes education at 2.8 FTE. The annual cost of delivering care was estimated at just over 2,000 Australian dollars (∼2,090 USD) (2012) per person with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS A needs-driven approach to primary care service planning identified a wider range of competencies in the diabetes primary and community care team than typically described. Access to psychosocial competences as well as medical management is required if clinical targets are to be met, especially in disadvantaged groups. PMID:23393210

  9. In search of joy in practice: a report of 23 high-functioning primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Sinsky, Christine A; Willard-Grace, Rachel; Schutzbank, Andrew M; Sinsky, Thomas A; Margolius, David; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We highlight primary care innovations gathered from high-functioning primary care practices, innovations we believe can facilitate joy in practice and mitigate physician burnout. To do so, we made site visits to 23 high-performing primary care practices and focused on how these practices distribute functions among the team, use technology to their advantage, improve outcomes with data, and make the job of primary care feasible and enjoyable as a life's vocation. Innovations identified include (1) proactive planned care, with previsit planning and previsit laboratory tests; (2) sharing clinical care among a team, with expanded rooming protocols, standing orders, and panel management; (3) sharing clerical tasks with collaborative documentation (scribing), nonphysician order entry, and streamlined prescription management; (4) improving communication by verbal messaging and in-box management; and (5) improving team functioning through co-location, team meetings, and work flow mapping. Our observations suggest that a shift from a physician-centric model of work distribution and responsibility to a shared-care model, with a higher level of clinical support staff per physician and frequent forums for communication, can result in high-functioning teams, improved professional satisfaction, and greater joy in practice.

  10. In Search of Joy in Practice: A Report of 23 High-Functioning Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Sinsky, Christine A.; Willard-Grace, Rachel; Schutzbank, Andrew M.; Sinsky, Thomas A.; Margolius, David; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We highlight primary care innovations gathered from high-functioning primary care practices, innovations we believe can facilitate joy in practice and mitigate physician burnout. To do so, we made site visits to 23 high-performing primary care practices and focused on how these practices distribute functions among the team, use technology to their advantage, improve outcomes with data, and make the job of primary care feasible and enjoyable as a life’s vocation. Innovations identified include (1) proactive planned care, with previsit planning and previsit laboratory tests; (2) sharing clinical care among a team, with expanded rooming protocols, standing orders, and panel management; (3) sharing clerical tasks with collaborative documentation (scribing), nonphysician order entry, and streamlined prescription management; (4) improving communication by verbal messaging and in-box management; and (5) improving team functioning through co-location, team meetings, and work flow mapping. Our observations suggest that a shift from a physician-centric model of work distribution and responsibility to a shared-care model, with a higher level of clinical support staff per physician and frequent forums for communication, can result in high-functioning teams, improved professional satisfaction, and greater joy in practice. PMID:23690328

  11. Formative evaluation of practice changes for managing depression within a Shared Care model in primary care.

    PubMed

    Beaulac, Julie; Edwards, Jeanette; Steele, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To investigate the implementation and initial impact of the Physician Integrated Network (PIN) mental health indicators, which are specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression, in three primary care practices with Shared Mental Health Care in Manitoba.

  12. Shared care requires a shared vision: communities of clinical practice in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Young, Jessica; Egan, Tony; Jaye, Chrystal; Williamson, Martyn; Askerud, Anna; Radue, Peter; Penese, Maree

    2017-09-01

    To understand how a vision of care is formed and shared by patients and the primary care professionals involved in their care. To achieve the best health outcomes, it is important for patients and those who care for them to have a mutual understanding about what is important to the patient in their everyday life and why, and what care is necessary to realise this vision. Shared or team care does not necessarily translate to a consistent and integrated approach to a patient's care. An individual patient's care network of clinical and lay participants can be conceptualised as the patient's own 'Community of Clinical Practice' of which they are the central member. Working alongside a long-term conditions nursing team, we conducted a focused ethnography of nine 'Communities of Clinical Practice' in one general practice setting. Participant observation, in-depth qualitative interviews with 24 participants including nine patients, and the patients' medical records. Data were analysed using a template organising style. Primary care professionals' insight into a patient's vision of care evolves through a deep knowing of the patient over time; this is shared between 'Community of Clinical Practice' members, frequently through informal communication and realised through respectful dialogue. These common values - respect, authenticity, autonomy, compassion, trust, care ethics, holism - underpin the development of a shared vision of care. A patient's vision of care, if shared, provides a focus around which 'Community of Clinical Practice' members cohere. Nurses play an important role in sharing the patient's vision of care with other participants. A shared vision of care is an aspirational concept which is difficult to articulate but with attentiveness, sustained authentic engagement and being driven by values, it should evolve amongst the core participants of a 'Community of Clinical Practice'. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Parents and family matter: strategies for developing family-centered adolescent care within primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Svetaz, María Verónica; Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Allen, Michele

    2014-09-01

    Healthy adolescent development and successful transition to adulthood begins in the family. Supporting families in their communities and cultures ultimately makes this support system stronger. Parenting adolescents is described as the most challenging life stage for parents. Primary care providers are in an ideal position to support families with teens. This article reviews stressors, recommends strength-based strategies, describes how health care delivery systems can be organized to address the needs of adolescents and their families, shares a case study of a family-oriented, youth-friendly primary care clinic, and provides practical strategies for developing family-centered adolescent care within primary care practices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary Care in the Baccalaureate Nursing Program. Pathways to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Patricia T.

    The work and findings of the Southern Regional Education Board's Nursing Curriculum Project (NCP) for baccalaureate programs, which included faculty development programs for primary nursing care and clinical electives, are discussed. The historical background of primary care in the baccalaureate nursing program is traced, and characteristics of…

  15. Clinician Staffing, Scheduling, and Engagement Strategies Among Primary Care Practices Delivering Integrated Care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melinda M; Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Cifuentes, Maribel; Hall, Jennifer; Gunn, Rose; Fernald, Douglas; Gilchrist, Emma; Miller, Benjamin F; DeGruy, Frank; Cohen, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    To examine the interrelationship among behavioral health clinician (BHC) staffing, scheduling, and a primary care practice's approach to delivering integrated care. Observational cross-case comparative analysis of 17 primary care practices in the United States focused on implementation of integrated care. Practices varied in size, ownership, geographic location, and integrated care experience. A multidisciplinary team analyzed documents, practice surveys, field notes from observation visits, implementation diaries, and semistructured interviews using a grounded theory approach. Across the 17 practices, staffing ratios ranged from 1 BHC covering 0.3 to 36.5 primary care clinicians (PCCs). BHC scheduling varied from 50-minute prescheduled appointments to open, flexible schedules slotted in 15-minute increments. However, staffing and scheduling patterns generally clustered in 2 ways and enabled BHCs to be engaged by referral or warm handoff. Five practices predominantly used warm handoffs to engage BHCs and had higher BHC-to-PCC staffing ratios; multiple BHCs on staff; and shorter, more flexible BHC appointment schedules. Staffing and scheduling structures that enabled warm handoffs supported BHC engagement with patients concurrent with the identification of behavioral health needs. Twelve practices primarily used referrals to engage BHCs and had lower BHC-to-PCC staffing ratios and BHC schedules prefilled with visits. This enabled some BHCs to bill for services, but also made them less accessible to PCCs in when patients presented with behavioral health needs during a clinical encounter. Three of these practices were experimenting with open scheduling and briefer BHC visits to enable real-time access while managing resources. Practices' approaches to PCC-BHC staffing, scheduling, and delivery of integrated care mutually influenced each other and were shaped by the local context. Practice leaders, educators, clinicians, funders, researchers, and policy makers must

  16. The emerging primary care workforce: preliminary observations from the primary care team: learning from effective ambulatory practices project.

    PubMed

    Ladden, Maryjoan D; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Fishman, Nancy W; Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Parchman, Michael; Wagner, Edward H

    2013-12-01

    Many primary care practices are changing the roles played by the members of their health care teams. The purpose of this article is to describe some of these new roles, using the authors' preliminary observations from 25 site visits to high-performing primary care practices across the United States in 2012-2013. These sites visits, to practices using their workforce creatively, were part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded initiative, The Primary Care Team: Learning From Effective Ambulatory Practices.Examples of these new roles that the authors observed on their site visits include medical assistants reviewing patient records before visits to identify care gaps, ordering and administering immunizations using protocols, making outreach calls to patients, leading team huddles, and coaching patients to set self-management goals. The registered nurse role has evolved from an emphasis on triage to a focus on uncomplicated acute care, chronic care management, and hospital-to-home transitions. Behavioral health providers (licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, or licensed counselors) were colocated and integrated within practices and were readily available for immediate consults and brief interventions. Physicians have shifted from lone to shared responsibility for patient panels, with other team members empowered to provide significant portions of chronic and preventive care.An innovative team-based primary care workforce is emerging. Spreading and sustaining these changes will require training both health professionals and nonprofessionals in new ways. Without clinical experiences that model this new team-based care and role models who practice it, trainees will not be prepared to practice as a team.

  17. Practical Approaches for Achieving Integrated Behavioral Health Care in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ratzliff, Anna; Phillips, Kathryn E.; Sugarman, Jonathan R.; Unützer, Jürgen; Wagner, Edward H.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral health problems are common, yet most patients do not receive effective treatment in primary care settings. Despite availability of effective models for integrating behavioral health care in primary care settings, uptake has been slow. The Behavioral Health Integration Implementation Guide provides practical guidance for adapting and implementing effective integrated behavioral health care into patient-centered medical homes. The authors gathered input from stakeholders involved in behavioral health integration efforts: safety net providers, subject matter experts in primary care and behavioral health, a behavioral health patient and peer specialist, and state and national policy makers. Stakeholder input informed development of the Behavioral Health Integration Implementation Guide and the GROW Pathway Planning Worksheet. The Behavioral Health Integration Implementation Guide is model neutral and allows organizations to take meaningful steps toward providing integrated care that achieves access and accountability. PMID:26698163

  18. Literacy promotion: an essential component of primary care pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    High, Pamela C; Klass, Perri

    2014-08-01

    Reading regularly with young children stimulates optimal patterns of brain development and strengthens parent-child relationships at a critical time in child development, which, in turn, builds language, literacy, and social-emotional skills that last a lifetime. Pediatric providers have a unique opportunity to encourage parents to engage in this important and enjoyable activity with their children beginning in infancy. Research has revealed that parents listen and children learn as a result of literacy promotion by pediatricians, which provides a practical and evidence-based opportunity to support early brain development in primary care practice. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that pediatric providers promote early literacy development for children beginning in infancy and continuing at least until the age of kindergarten entry by (1) advising all parents that reading aloud with young children can enhance parent-child relationships and prepare young minds to learn language and early literacy skills; (2) counseling all parents about developmentally appropriate shared-reading activities that are enjoyable for children and their parents and offer language-rich exposure to books, pictures, and the written word; (3) providing developmentally appropriate books given at health supervision visits for all high-risk, low-income young children; (4) using a robust spectrum of options to support and promote these efforts; and (5) partnering with other child advocates to influence national messaging and policies that support and promote these key early shared-reading experiences. The AAP supports federal and state funding for children's books to be provided at pediatric health supervision visits to children at high risk living at or near the poverty threshold and the integration of literacy promotion, an essential component of pediatric primary care, into pediatric resident education. This policy statement is supported by the AAP technical report "School

  19. The STI and HIV testing practices of primary care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Mitchell; Solorio, M. Rosa

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV testing practices of primary care providers (PCPs) practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. PCPs were identified by matching ZIP codes of physician directories with ZIP codes of Los Angeles County areas that have a population that is > 50% Hispanic (N = 191). PCPs were mailed a survey that assessed their frequencies for asking patients about sexual history, offering STI and safe sex advice, total number of HIV tests ordered in the past six months and their perceived barriers to STI counseling. The survey response rate was 45% (N = 85). RESULTS: Although 73% of PCPs took sexual histories from patients regularly (daily-to-weekly), only 41% offered STI or safe sex advice regularly. PCPs who were white were less likely than those who were Hispanic/Asian/African American/other to take sexual histories from their patients regularly (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The total number of HIV tests ordered for patients by PCPs at their practice locations in the past six months were: none (6%), 1-10 tests (27%), 11-20 tests (24%) and > 20 tests (36%). Thirty-six percent of PCPs reported > or = 1 positive HIV test in the past six months. PCPs' perceived barriers to STI counseling included patient's young age (< 16 years), language and presence of patient's relative/partner in consultation room at time of visit. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a need for interventions with PCPs practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities to improve their STI and HIV practice patterns. PMID:17393950

  20. Coordination of care by primary care practices: strategies, lessons and implications.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Tynan, Ann; Cohen, Genna R; Kemper, Nicole; Davis, Matthew M

    2009-04-01

    Despite calls from numerous organizations and payers to improve coordination of care, there are few published accounts of how care is coordinated in real-world primary care practices. This study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) documents strategies that a range of physician practices use to coordinate care for their patients. While there was no single recipe for coordination given the variety of patient, physician, practice and market factors, some cross-cutting lessons were identified, such as the value of a commitment to interpersonal continuity of care as a foundation for coordination. Respondents also identified the importance of system support for the standardization of office processes to foster care coordination. While larger practices may have more resources to invest, many of the innovations described could be scaled to smaller practices. Some coordination strategies resulted in improved efficiency over time for practices, but by and large, physician practices currently pursue these efforts at their own expense. In addition to sharing information on effective strategies among practices, the findings also provide policy makers with a snapshot of the current care coordination landscape and implications for initiatives to improve coordination. Efforts to provide technical support to practices to improve coordination, for example, through medical-home initiatives, need to consider the baseline more typical practices may be starting from and tailor their support to practices ranging widely in size, resources and presence of standardized care processes. If aligned with payment incentives, some of these strategies have the potential to increase quality and satisfaction among patients and providers by helping to move the health care delivery system toward better coordinated care.

  1. Knowledge and practice of primary eye care among primary healthcare workers in northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    AbdulRahman, Aminatu Ali; Rabiu, Mansur Muhammad; Alhassan, Mahmoud Babanini

    2015-06-01

    To assess knowledge and practice of primary eye care among primary healthcare workers known as community health extension workers in Funtua district of Nigeria. Cross-sectional mixed method study among health workers employed in government-owned primary healthcare facilities. Quantitative data were obtained using self-administered questionnaires and checklists, while qualitative data by modified Delphi technique, role plays and observation. A score of 1 was given for each correct answer, while a total score of ≥60% was considered 'good'. Eighty three of 88 health workers participated (94%) in the questionnaire survey; while 16 of them were selected for the qualitative survey. Good scores regarding the knowledge of common eye diseases were obtained by 68.7%, but only 26.4% of them could identify their most important features. Participants could undertake 3 of 5 steps in visual acuity testing. Skills in recognising common eye diseases and their management were weak; while practice was often not according to the guidelines. Community health extension workers displayed good knowledge of common eye diseases. Areas of weakness are recognition and interpretation of eye signs, and practice rarely follows the guidelines. Preventive medicine was neglected; community health extension workers require practical retraining and supervision to achieve integration of primary eye care into primary healthcare services. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A practice-centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Bonds, Denise E; Ellis, Shellie D; Weeks, Erin; Palla, Shana L; Lichstein, Peter

    2006-10-25

    Interventions to change practice patterns among health care professionals have had mixed success. We tested the effectiveness of a practice centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices. A multifaceted intervention was conducted among primary care practice in North Carolina. All practices designated two individuals to serve as domestic violence resources persons, underwent initial training on screening for domestic violence, and participated in 3 lunch and learn sessions. Within this framework, practices selected the screening instrument, patient educational material, and content best suited for their environment. Effectiveness was evaluated using a pre/post cross-sectional telephone survey of a random selection of female patients from each practice. Seventeen practices were recruited and fifteen completed the study. Baseline screening for domestic violence was 16% with a range of 2% to 49%. An absolute increase in screening of 10% was achieved (range of increase 0 to 22%). After controlling for clustering by practice and other patient characteristics, female patients were 79% more likely to have been screened after the intervention (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.43-2.23). An intervention that allowed practices to tailor certain aspects to fit their needs increased screening for domestic violence. Further studies testing this technique using other outcomes are needed.

  3. [Use of ineffective practices in Primary Health Care: professional opinions].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Bustillo, L; Barrasa Villar, J I; Castán Ruíz, S; Moliner Lahoz, F J; Aibar Remón, C

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of ineffective practices in Primary Health Care (PHC) based on the opinions of clinical professionals from the sector, and to assess the significance, implications and factors that may be contributing to their continuance. An on line survey of opinion from a convenience sample of 575 professionals who had published articles over the last years in Atención Primaria and Semergen medical journals. A total of 212 professionals replied (37%). For 70.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64.5 to 73.3) the problem of ineffective practices is frequent or very frequent in PHC, and rate their importance with an average score of 7.3 (standard deviation [SD]=1.8) out of 10. The main consequences would be endangering the sustainability of the system (48.1%; 95% CI, 41.2 to 54.9) and harming patients (32.1%; 95% CI, 25.7 to 38.5). These ineffective practices are the result of the behaviour of the patients themselves (28%; 95% CI, 22.6 to 35.0) workload (26.4%; 95% CI, 20.3 to 32.5), and the lack of the continuous education (19.3%; 95% CI, 13.9 to 24.7). Clinical procedures of greatest misuse are the prescribing of antibiotics for certain infections, the frequency of cervical cancer screening, rigorous pharmacological monitoring of type 2 diabetes in patients over 65 years, the use of psychotropic drugs in the elderly, or the use of analgesics in patients with hypertension or renal failure. The use of ineffective procedures in PHC is considered a very important issue that negatively affects many patients and their treatment, and possibly endangering the sustainability of the system and causing harm to patients. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Medicare Chronic Care Management Payments and Financial Returns to Primary Care Practices: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Phillips, Russell S; Bitton, Asaf; Song, Zirui; Landon, Bruce E

    2015-10-20

    Physicians have traditionally been reimbursed for face-to-face visits. A new non-visit-based payment for chronic care management (CCM) of Medicare patients took effect in January 2015. To estimate financial implications of CCM payment for primary care practices. Microsimulation model incorporating national data on primary care use, staffing, expenditures, and reimbursements. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and other published sources. Medicare patients. 10 years. Practice-level. Comparison of CCM delivery approaches by staff and physicians. Net revenue per full-time equivalent (FTE) physician; time spent delivering CCM services. If nonphysician staff were to deliver CCM services, net revenue to practices would increase despite opportunity and staffing costs. Practices could expect approximately $332 per enrolled patient per year (95% CI, $234 to $429) if CCM services were delivered by registered nurses (RNs), approximately $372 (CI, $276 to $468) if services were delivered by licensed practical nurses, and approximately $385 (CI, $286 to $485) if services were delivered by medical assistants. For a typical practice, this equates to more than $75 ,00 of net annual revenue per FTE physician and 12 hours of nursing service time per week if 50% of eligible patients enroll. At a minimum, 131 Medicare patients (CI, 115 to 140 patients) must enroll for practices to recoup the salary and overhead costs of hiring a full-time RN to provide CCM services. If physicians were to deliver all CCM services, approximately 25% of practices nationwide could expect net revenue losses due to opportunity costs of face-to-face visit time. The CCM program may alter long-term primary care use, which is difficult to predict. Practices that rely on nonphysician team members to deliver CCM services will probably experience substantial net revenue gains but must enroll a sufficient number of eligible patients to recoup costs. None.

  5. [Assessment of preventive practices in primary care occurring in hospital].

    PubMed

    Lelong, H; Casadevall, M; Haus, F; Levezouet, C-A; Regnier, C; Durel, B; Torchin, D; Chicheportiche, G; Boronski, H; De Champs-Leger, H; Blacher, J

    2011-04-01

    Preventive measures are available for most of the pathological conditions causing premature mortality in France. Moreover, there is a seven-year discrepancy in life expectancy figures between persons in the least favorable socio-occupational categories and the rest of the general population. The overall target of our study was to analyze preventive practices applied as part of routine primary care in the outpatient clinics of a general medicine hospital in Paris (Hotel-Dieu) where the majority of patients belong to unfavorable social categories. We collected and analyzed the content of all outpatient visits conducted during a three-week period using a questionnaire designed to gather information about areas of preventive care requiring particular attention. Analysis of 211 outpatients visits shows that the population concerned was young (44±17-year-old) and that the visits lasted longer than commonly observed (21±8 min). Cancer screening was performed in 25 to 50% of the theoretical targeted population. Addictions were discussed during half of the visits, yet follow-up and advice on how to stop addictive behavior were insufficient. Blood pressure was measured during half of the visits. Vaccinations were checked for 60% of patients and STD status for 30%. Seventy percent of the patients stated they wanted to attend a preventive care consultation; the physician considered this type of consultation would be useful for 30% of patients; the opinions were in disagreement for half of the patients. Lack of time, heavy workload in terms of number of visits, and the current setup of charts prevented updating various precautionary measures, which would have been appropriate for each patient as a function of age, gender, past history and lifestyle. This inquiry highlights many weaknesses in our preventive practices. Delegating some medical acts, a more adapted medical file and the implementation of dedicated consultations could help improve prevention in this particularly

  6. Primary care physicians’ experiences with case finding for practice-based care management

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Tobias; Wensing, Michel; Geißler, Stefan; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Mahler, Cornelia; Boyd, Cynthia M.; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Objective The identification of patients most likely to benefit from care management programs case finding – is a crucial determinant of their effectiveness regarding improved health outcomes and reduced costs. Until now, research has mainly focused on claims data-based case finding. This study aimed to explore how primary care physicians (PCPs) select patients for practice-based care management and how risk prediction may complement their case finding. Study design Qualitative study Methods We performed 12 semi-structured interviews with PCPs from 10 small- to middle-sized primary care practices in Germany. The interviews focused on their criteria for selecting patients as potential participants of an on-site care management program and how PCPs evaluate claims data-based risk prediction as a case finding tool. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. We performed qualitative content analysis using the ATLAS.ti software. Results Three major categories emerged from the physicians interviewed: 1) the physicians’ interpretation of the program’s eligibility criteria, 2) physician-related criteria and 3) patient-related criteria. The physician-related criteria included “sympathy/aversion” and “knowing the patient”. Patient-related criteria concerned care sensitivity in terms of “willingness to participate”, “ability to participate” (e.g. sufficient language skills, cognitive status) and “manageable care needs”. PCPs believed that their case finding can be supported by additional information from claims-data based risk prediction. Conclusions Case finding for care management programs in primary care may benefit from a structured approach combining clinical judgement by PCPs and claims-data based risk modelling. However, further research is needed to identify the optimal case finding strategy for practice-based care management. PMID:22554041

  7. Geriatrics, interprofessional practice, and interorganizational collaboration: a knowledge-to-practice intervention for primary care teams.

    PubMed

    Ryan, David; Barnett, Robert; Cott, Cheryl; Dalziel, William; Gutmanis, Iris; Jewell, David; Kelley, Mary Lou; Liu, Barbara; Puxty, John

    2013-01-01

    Caring for frail seniors requires health professionals with skills and knowledge in 3 core competencies: geriatrics, interprofessional practice, and interorganizational collaboration. Despite a growing population of frail seniors in all developed countries, significant gaps exist in preparation of health professionals in these skills. To help close these gaps, a knowledge-to-practice (KTP) process was undertaken to increase the capacity of newly created family health teams and longer standing Community Health Centers in the Province of Ontario, Canada. Each team identified a staff member to become its facilitator in the 3 core skill sets. Guided by a KTP framework, a set of training modules were created, compiled into a digital toolkit for transfer into practice, translated in a multimethods workshop, and implemented using a variety of strategies to optimize practice change. Staff from 82% of the targeted primary care teams learned to use the toolkit in a train-the-facilitator process that was highly valued, and prompted a range of changes in personal and team practice. A digital toolkit for primary care teams remains an enduring and often used resource. Closing the knowledge gap in the core competencies for frailty focused care is complex. A KTP framework helped guide a staged multimethod process that produced both individual and team practice change and on online toolkit that has a continuing influence. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  8. Practice-Based Research in Primary Care: Facilitator of, or Barrier to, Practice Improvement?

    PubMed Central

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Young, Denise M.; MacGregor, Kate; Holtrop, Jodi Summers

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE In what ways is primary care practice-based research a facilitator of practice improvement vs a barrier to practice change? This article aims to alert investigators to the pitfalls they may face in undertaking the dual agenda of research and practice improvement. METHODS We derived examples of the relationship between the research and practice improvement goals of 17 Prescription for Health (P4H) grantees from verbal communications with the grantees, field notes from interviews and site visits, and entries made by grantees to an online diary managed by the P4H Analysis Team. RESULTS An analysis of key themes identified factors facilitating and impeding the dual goals of research and practice improvement. The requirements of conducting research mandated by institutional review boards, including patient enrollment and consent, often constituted barriers to practice improvement. The choice of practices in which to conduct research and improvement activities and the manner in which the practices are approached may affect the outcome of both research and practice improvement goals. Approaching practices with a time-limited project mentality can interfere with a process of permanent practice change. The RE-AIM construct (reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) is useful in designing research interventions that facilitate practice improvement. CONCLUSIONS Projects that meld research studies and practice improvement goals must pay attention to the potential conflicts between research and practice change, and must attempt to design research studies so that they facilitate rather than inhibit practice improvement. PMID:16049078

  9. Practice-based research in primary care: facilitator of, or barrier to, practice improvement?

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Young, Denise M; MacGregor, Kate; Holtrop, Jodi Summers

    2005-01-01

    In what ways is primary care practice-based research a facilitator of practice improvement vs a barrier to practice change? This article aims to alert investigators to the pitfalls they may face in undertaking the dual agenda of research and practice improvement. We derived examples of the relationship between the research and practice improvement goals of 17 Prescription for Health (P4H) grantees from verbal communications with the grantees, field notes from interviews and site visits, and entries made by grantees to an online diary managed by the P4H Analysis Team. An analysis of key themes identified factors facilitating and impeding the dual goals of research and practice improvement. The requirements of conducting research mandated by institutional review boards, including patient enrollment and consent, often constituted barriers to practice improvement. The choice of practices in which to conduct research and improvement activities and the manner in which the practices are approached may affect the outcome of both research and practice improvement goals. Approaching practices with a time-limited project mentality can interfere with a process of permanent practice change. The RE-AIM construct (reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) is useful in designing research interventions that facilitate practice improvement. Projects that meld research studies and practice improvement goals must pay attention to the potential conflicts between research and practice change, and must attempt to design research studies so that they facilitate rather than inhibit practice improvement.

  10. Strategies to accelerate translation of research into primary care within practices using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Lynne S; Wessell, Andrea M; Jenkins, Ruth G; Nietert, Paul J; Liszka, Heather A; Ornstein, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    This research describes implementation strategies used by primary care practices using electronic medical records in a national quality improvement demonstration project, Accelerating Translation of Research into Practice, conducted within the Practice Partner Research Network. Qualitative methods enabled identification of strategies to improve 36 quality indicators. Quantitative survey results provide mean scores reflecting the integration of these strategies by practices. Nursing staff plays important roles to facilitate quality improvement within collaborative primary care practices.

  11. Primary Care Advanced Practice RNs' Knowledge of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Screening.

    PubMed

    Link, Kimberly A; Smith, Lynette S

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may seek treatment for their symptoms within the primary care setting. Research suggests PTSD often goes undiagnosed in primary care. Primary care providers (PCPs) might have deficiencies in their knowledge of PTSD screening and screening practices. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to examine primary care advanced practice RNs' (APRN) knowledge of PTSD screening and screening practices, along with subjective norms, attitudes, and self-efficacy regarding PTSD screening. Deficiencies in knowledge of PTSD screening and screening practices were identified. Discrepancies were found between reported subjective norms and screening practices, and most participants reported low self-efficacy and stated screening was not important. Numerous barriers to screening were identified. Additional education and training may be needed to improve primary care APRNs' PTSD screening knowledge and screening practices. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(9), 23-32.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Applying community-oriented primary care methods in British general practice: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, Steve; Lenihan, Penny; Wallace, Paul; Drennan, Vari; Blanchard, Martin; Harris, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The '75 and over' assessments built into the 1990 contract for general practice have failed to enthuse primary care teams or make a significant impact on the health of older people. Alternative methods for improving the health of older people living at home are being sought. AIM: To test the feasibility of applying community-oriented primary care methodology to a relatively deprived sub-population of older people in a relatively deprived area. DESIGN OF STUDY: A combination of developmental and triangulation approaches to data analysis. SETTING: Four general practices in an inner London borough. METHOD: A community-oriented primary care approach was used to initiate innovative care for older people, supported financially by the health authority and practically by primary care academics. RESULTS: All four practices identified problems needing attention in the older population, developed different projects focused on particular needs among older people, and tested them in practice. Patient and public involvement were central to the design and implementation processes in only one practice. Innovations were sustained in only one practice, but some were adopted by a primary care group and others extended to a wider group of practices by the health authority. CONCLUSION: A modified community-oriented primary care approach can be used in British general practice, and changes can be promoted that are perceived as valuable by planning bodies. However, this methodology may have more impact at primary care trust level than at practice level. PMID:12171223

  13. Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC) practices. Methods This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30) were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources. Results Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening. Conclusions Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were willing to participate in and

  14. Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael E; Hogg, William; Savage, Colleen; Johnston, Sharon; Russell, Grant; Jaakkimainen, R Liisa; Glazier, Richard H; Barnsley, Janet; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2012-07-23

    To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC) practices. This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30) were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources. Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening. Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were willing to participate in and consent to, the collection and

  15. Obesity treatment for socioeconomically disadvantaged patients in primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Gary G; Warner, Erica T; Glasgow, Russell E; Askew, Sandy; Goldman, Julie; Ritzwoller, Debra P; Emmons, Karen M; Rosner, Bernard A; Colditz, Graham A

    2012-04-09

    Few evidence-based weight loss treatment options exist for medically vulnerable patients in the primary care setting. We conducted a 2-arm, 24-month randomized effectiveness trial in 3 Boston community health centers (from February 1, 2008, through May 2, 2011). Participants were 365 obese patients receiving hypertension treatment (71.2% black, 13.1% Hispanic, 68.5% female, and 32.9% with less than a high school educational level). We randomized participants to usual care or a behavioral intervention that promoted weight loss and hypertension self-management using eHealth components. The intervention included tailored behavior change goals, self-monitoring, and skills training, available via a website or interactive voice response; 18 telephone counseling calls; primary care provider endorsement; 12 optional group support sessions; and links with community resources. At 24 months, weight change in the intervention group compared with that in the usual care group was -1.03 kg (95% CI, -2.03 to -0.03 kg). Twenty-four-month change in body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) in the intervention group compared with that in the usual care group was -0.38 (95% CI, -0.75 to -0.004). Intervention participants had larger mean weight losses during the 24 months compared with that in the usual care group (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, -1.07 kg; 95% CI, -1.94 to -0.22). Mean systolic blood pressure was not significantly lower in the intervention arm compared with the usual care arm. The intervention produced modest weight losses, improved blood pressure control, and slowed systolic blood pressure increases in this high-risk, socioeconomically disadvantaged patient population. Trial Registration  clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00661817.

  16. New Roles for Medical Assistants in Innovative Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Susan A; Blash, Lisel K

    2017-02-01

    To identify and describe new roles for medical assistants (MAs) in innovative care models that improve care while providing training and career advancement opportunities for MAs. Primary data collected at 15 case study sites; 173 key informant interviews and de-identified secondary data on staffing, wages, patient satisfaction, and health outcomes. Researchers used snowball sampling and screening calls to identify 15 organizations using MAs in new roles. Conducted site visits from 2010 to 2012 and updated information in 2014. Thematic analysis explored key topics: factors driving MA role innovation, role description, training required, and wage gains. Categorized outcome data in patient and staff satisfaction, quality of care, and efficiency. New MA roles included health coach, medical scribe, dual role translator, health navigator, panel manager, cross-trained flexible role, and supervisor. Implementation of new roles required extensive training. MA incentives and enhanced compensation varied by role type. New MA roles are part of a larger attempt to reform workflow and relieve primary care providers. Despite some evidence of success, spread has been limited. Key challenges to adoption included leadership and provider resistance to change, cost of additional MA training, and lack of reimbursement for nonbillable services. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Practical Implementation of a Large Primary Care Pediatric Practice Patient Care Information System

    PubMed Central

    Mize, Susan G.; Kramer, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE USE OF A PATIENT CARE INFORMATION PORTION OF A COMPUTERIZED OFFICE PRACTICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. THE KEY TO IMPLEMENTING THIS SYSTEM IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER WAS THE ABILITY TO AUTOMATICALLY ABSTRACT MEDICAL INFORMATION FROM THE ACCOUNTING PROGRAMS WITHOUT HAVING TO REKEY THE DESIGNATED PATIENT MEDICAL INFORMATION ITEMS. THE PATIENT MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS SPECIFICALLY INCLUDE: (1) A MINIMAL PATIENT MEDICAL INFORMATION SET WHICH IS PRINTED ON THE PATIENT “CARE SLIP” OR “SUPERBILL”; (2) CLINICAL NOTES WHICH ALLOW NURSES AND PHYSICIANS TO DOCUMENT PATIENT PHONE CALLS; (3) A THERAPEUTIC GUIDE WHICH GIVES ACCESS TO NURSES TO READ ON THE TERMINAL SCREEN STANDARD RECOMMENDATIONS BY THEIR PHYSICIANS FOR THE MORE COMMON PROBLEMS AND QUESTIONS ENCOUNTERED WHILE HANDLING PATIENT PHONE CALLS; AND (4) A NURSE TELEPHONE MESSAGE SYSTEM.

  18. [Towards universal access to health care: incorporation of advanced practice nurses in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Achondo, Bernardita

    2016-10-01

    To move towards universal access to health, the Pan American Health Organization recommends strengthening primary health care (PHC). One of the strategies is to increase the number qualified professionals, both medical and non-medical, working in PHC. In Chile there is a lack of professionals in this level of care, hampering the provision of health. Physicians still prefer secondary and tertiary levels of health. International experience has shown that advanced practice nurses (APN), specialists in PHC are cost-effective professionals able to deliver a complete and quality care to patients. Strong evidence demonstrates the benefits that APN could provide to the population, delivering nursing care that incorporates medical tasks, for example in patients with chronic diseases, allowing greater availability of medical hours for patients requiring more complex management. The success in the implementation of this new role requires the support of the health team, especially PHC physicians, endorsing and promoting the benefits of the APN for the population.

  19. Translating Evidence-Based Depression Management Services to Community-Based Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Schulberg, Herbert C; Post, Edward P; Rollman, Bruce L; Belnap, Bea Herbeck; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2004-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of using treatment models for major depression in primary care settings. Nonetheless, translating these models into enduring changes in routine primary care has proved difficult. Various health system and organizational barriers prevent the integration of these models into primary care settings. This article discusses barriers to introducing and sustaining evidence-based depression management services in community-based primary care practices and suggests organizational and financial solutions based on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Depression in Primary Care Program. It focuses on strategies to improve depression care in medical settings based on adaptations of the chronic care model and discusses the challenges of implementing evidence-based depression care given the structural, financial, and cultural separation between mental health and general medical care. PMID:15595945

  20. Communicating with pediatricians: developing social work practice in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Sean; Franke, Todd

    2013-01-01

    While social work models of interdisciplinary collaboration suggest that communication is important, the research literature on social worker-physician collaboration infrequently considers work with pediatricians or practice outside the hospital setting. A cross-sectional survey was sent to a stratified random sample of social workers to assess their communication satisfaction with pediatricians. The study found that social workers in health settings were more satisfied than those in mental health settings. The implications of this finding for the development of colocated, collaborative care models are discussed.

  1. A practical approach to lifestyle change counselling in primary care.

    PubMed

    Elford, R W; Yeo, M; Jennett, P A; Sawa, R J

    1994-10-01

    Many contemporary medical conditions have been found to be the consequence of lifestyle choices. These adverse habit patterns have their origin in the individuals family and/or natural social network. Primary care practitioners frequently interact with their patients for the purpose of helping them resolve medical problems by clarifying issues or presenting different options. In lifestyle related conditions, the initiation and maintenance of possible behaviour changes is usually the optimal resolution. How people intentionally change well-established behaviour patterns is still not well understood, and most clinicians are not confident in their ability to help patients alter adverse behaviours. Several studies provide support for a 'stage-matched framework' of behaviour change that integrates readiness for change with intervention processes from various theoretical models. This article provides a brief overview of the current thinking with respect to self-initiated and professionally facilitated behaviour change, and then describes a generic five-step approach to individualized lifestyle counselling for use in primary care clinical settings.

  2. The Primary Care Research Object Model (PCROM): A Computable Information Model for Practice-based Primary Care Research

    PubMed Central

    Speedie, Stuart M.; Taweel, Adel; Sim, Ida; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Delaney, Brendan; Peterson, Kevin A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Chronic disease prevalence and burden is growing, as is the need for applicable large community-based clinical trials of potential interventions. To support the development of clinical trial management systems for such trials, a community-based primary care research information model is needed. We analyzed the requirements of trials in this environment, and constructed an information model to drive development of systems supporting trial design, execution, and analysis. We anticipate that this model will contribute to a deeper understanding of all the dimensions of clinical research and that it will be integrated with other clinical research modeling efforts, such as the Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) model, to complement and expand on current domain models. Design We used unified modeling language modeling to develop use cases, activity diagrams, and a class (object) model to capture components of research in this setting. The initial primary care research object model (PCROM) scope was the performance of a randomized clinical trial (RCT). It was validated by domain experts worldwide, and underwent a detailed comparison with the BRIDG clinical research reference model. Results We present a class diagram and associated definitions that capture the components of a primary care RCT. Forty-five percent of PCROM objects were mapped to BRIDG, 37% differed in class and/or subclass assignment, and 18% did not map. Conclusion The PCROM represents an important link between existing research reference models and the real-world design and implementation of systems for managing practice-based primary care clinical trials. Although the high degree of correspondence between PCROM and existing research reference models provides evidence for validity and comprehensiveness, existing models require object extensions and modifications to serve primary care research. PMID:18579829

  3. Costs and benefits of transforming primary care practices: a qualitative study of North Carolina's Improving Performance in Practice.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Kristin L; Halladay, Jacqueline R; Mitchell, C Madeline; Ward, Kimberly; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Steiner, Beat; Donahue, Katrina E

    2014-01-01

    Primary care organizations must transform care delivery to realize the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Triple Aim of better healthcare, better health, and lower healthcare costs. However, few studies have considered the financial implications for primary care practices engaged in transformation. In this qualitative, comparative case study, we examine the practice-level personnel and nonpersonnel costs and the benefits involved in transformational change among 12 primary care practices participating in North Carolina's Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) program. We found average annual opportunity costs of $21,550 ($6,659 per full-time equivalent provider) for maintaining core IPIP activities (e.g., data management, form development and maintenance, meeting attendance). This average represents the cost of a 50% full-time equivalent registered nurse or licensed practical nurse. Practices were able to limit transformation costs by scheduling meetings during relatively slow patient care periods and by leveraging resources such as the assistance of IPIP practice coaches. Still, the costs of practice transformation were not trivial and would have been much higher in the absence of these efforts. Benefits of transformation included opportunities for enhanced revenue through reimbursement incentives and practice growth, improved efficiency and care quality, and maintenance of certification. Given the potentially high costs for some practices, policy makers may need to consider reimbursement and other strategies to help primary care practices manage the costs of practice redesign.

  4. Developmental Surveillance and Screening Practices by Pediatric Primary Care Providers: Implications for Early Intervention Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sallie; Qureshi, Rubab; Caldwell, Barbara Ann; Echevarria, Mercedes; Dubbs, William B.; Sullivan, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a survey approach to investigate current developmental surveillance and developmental screening practices by pediatric primary care providers in a diverse New Jersey county. A total of 217 providers were contacted with a final sample size of 57 pediatric primary care respondents from 13 different municipalities. Most providers…

  5. Developmental Surveillance and Screening Practices by Pediatric Primary Care Providers: Implications for Early Intervention Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sallie; Qureshi, Rubab; Caldwell, Barbara Ann; Echevarria, Mercedes; Dubbs, William B.; Sullivan, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a survey approach to investigate current developmental surveillance and developmental screening practices by pediatric primary care providers in a diverse New Jersey county. A total of 217 providers were contacted with a final sample size of 57 pediatric primary care respondents from 13 different municipalities. Most providers…

  6. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care.

  7. An Exploration of Behavioral Health Productivity and Billing Practices Within Pediatric Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Ellens, Rebecca E. H.; Burrell, Katherine M.; Perry, Danika S.; Rafiq, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide descriptive information on behavioral health (BH) productivity and billing practices within a pediatric primary care setting. Methods This retrospective investigation reviewed 30 months of electronic medical records and financial data. Results The percent of BH provider time spent in direct patient care (productivity) was 35.28% overall, with a slightly higher quarterly average (M  =  36.42%; SD  =  6.46%). In the 646.75 hr BH providers spent in the primary care setting, $52,050.00 was charged for BH services delivered ($80.48 hourly average). Conclusions BH productivity and billing within pediatric primary care were suboptimal and likely multifactorially derived. To promote integrated primary care sustainability, the authors recommend three future aims: improve BH productivity, demonstrate the value-added contributions of BH services within primary care, and advocate for BH-supporting health care reform. PMID:27498983

  8. An Exploration of Behavioral Health Productivity and Billing Practices Within Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Cederna-Meko, Crystal L; Ellens, Rebecca E H; Burrell, Katherine M; Perry, Danika S; Rafiq, Fatima

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVES : To provide descriptive information on behavioral health (BH) productivity and billing practices within a pediatric primary care setting. METHODS : This retrospective investigation reviewed 30 months of electronic medical records and financial data. RESULTS : The percent of BH provider time spent in direct patient care (productivity) was 35.28% overall, with a slightly higher quarterly average (M  =  36.42%; SD  =  6.46%). In the 646.75 hr BH providers spent in the primary care setting, $52,050.00 was charged for BH services delivered ($80.48 hourly average). CONCLUSIONS : BH productivity and billing within pediatric primary care were suboptimal and likely multifactorially derived. To promote integrated primary care sustainability, the authors recommend three future aims: improve BH productivity, demonstrate the value-added contributions of BH services within primary care, and advocate for BH-supporting health care reform.

  9. Exodus of male physicians from primary care drives shift to specialty practice.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ha T; O'Malley, Ann S

    2007-06-01

    An exodus of male physicians from primary care is driving a marked shift in the U.S. physician workforce toward medical-specialty practice, according to a national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Two factors have helped mask the severity of the shift--a growing proportion of female physicians, who disproportionately choose primary care, and continued reliance on international medical graduates (IMGs), who now account for nearly a quarter of all U.S. primary care physicians. Since 1996-97, a 40 percent increase in the female primary care physician supply has helped to offset a 16 percent decline in the male primary care physician supply relative to the U.S. population. At the same time, primary care physicians' incomes have lost ground to both inflation and medical and surgical specialists' incomes. And women in primary care face a 22 percent income gap relative to men, even after accounting for differing characteristics. If real incomes for primary care physicians continue to decline, there is a risk that the migration of male physicians will intensify and that female physicians may begin avoiding primary care--trends that could aggravate a predicted shortage of primary care physicians.

  10. Collaborative care for depression in primary care: how psychiatry could "troubleshoot" current treatments and practices.

    PubMed

    Barkil-Oteo, Andres

    2013-06-01

    The bulk of mental health services for people with depression are provided in primary care settings. Primary care providers prescribe 79 percent of antidepressant medications and see 60 percent of people being treated for depression in the United States, and they do that with little support from specialist services. Depression is not effectively managed in the primary care setting. Collaborative care based on a team approach, a population health perspective, and measurement-based care has been proven to treat depression more effectively than care as usual in a variety of settings and for different populations, and it increases people's access to medications and behavioral therapies. Psychiatry has the responsibility of supporting the primary care sector in delivering mental health services by disseminating collaborative care approaches under recent initiatives and opportunities made possible by the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

  11. Population-focused care: a new rubric in the role definition for geriatric nurse practitioners in primary care practice?

    PubMed

    Kauffman, K S; Barlow, A R

    1999-03-01

    Traditionally, geriatric nurse practitioners (GNPs) provide care to individual older adults and their families in a primary care practice. Although the goal is to provide high-quality, cost-effective care, GNPs may be providing ineffective care by narrowly focusing on individuals and their families. Given today's health care climate, it is essential that GNPs practice with a wider perspective. This is done by noting health issue trends among the specific older adult population that are targeted for care and planning that care with a population focus delineated by either health issues or characteristics of the older adult population.

  12. Conducting medication safety research projects in a primary care physician practice-based research network.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Grace M; Steinbauer, Jeffrey R; Spann, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    To describe a roadmap for developing a practice-based research network (PBRN) through the experience of conducting medication safety research projects in a primary care physician PBRN. Southern Primary-care Urban Research Network (SPUR-Net) in Houston, Tex., from 2000 to 2007. SPUR-Net is a partnership of six health care organizations in Houston and includes 32 clinics with 313 primary care clinicians (50% family physicians, 25% general internists, and 25% pediatricians) who provide care for approximately 1 million patient encounters annually. The pharmacist principal investigator collaborates with physicians and researchers in primary care clinics to investigate medication safety practice in SPUR-Net. (1) A roadmap for PBRN research and (2) initiation of a research program focusing on medication safety through the PBRN. A roadmap with 10 steps for conducting practice-based research is recommended: (1) form collaborative partnership, (2) develop research infrastructure, (3) formulate research questions, (4) design study methods, (5) obtain funding support, (6) develop study instruments, (7) implement the study, (8) manage and analyze data, (9) disseminate results, and (10) translate research into practice. Four research projects focusing on medication safety were conducted in SPUR-Net from 2002 to 2007. Medication outcomes include improved medication use, increased awareness for medication counseling, decreased medication errors, and identification of best practices for medication reconciliation. Practice-based research conducted in primary care settings identifies, studies, and evaluates common problems encountered in busy clinic practice. With feedback from stakeholders, best practices and improved practice can be identified and "translated" back to practice. Grant funding for research projects helps sustain PBRNs. The implementation of medication safety research projects has helped primary care clinics, clinicians, and patients increase appropriate medication

  13. Optimizing full scope of practice for nurse practitioners in primary care: A proposed conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Boyd, Donald R; Clarke, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs), if utilized to their optimal potential, could play a key role in meeting the growing demand for primary care. The purpose of this study was to propose a comprehensive model for maximizing NP contributions to primary care which includes the factors affecting NP care and patient outcomes and explains their interrelated impact. We synthesized the results of the published literature to develop a model, which emphasizes NP scope of practice regulations, institutional policies, NP practice environment, and NP workforce outcomes as determinants of NP care and patient outcomes. Our model provides a framework to help explain how variations in scope of practice regulations at the state-level and institutional policies within organizations directly and indirectly influence the practice environment of NPs, NP workforce outcomes, and patient care and outcomes. Aligning policy change, organizational innovations, and future research are critical to NP optimal utilization and patient care and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nurse practitioner organizational climate in primary care settings: implications for professional practice.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Stone, Patricia W; Smaldone, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care is key to meeting the increased demand for care. Organizational climates in primary care settings affect NP professional practice and the quality of care. This study investigated organizational climate and its domains affecting NP professional practice in primary care settings. A qualitative descriptive design, with purposive sampling, was used to recruit 16 NPs practicing in primary care settings in Massachusetts. An interview guide was developed and pretested with two NPs and in 1 group interview with 7 NPs. Data collection took place in spring of 2011. Individual interviews lasted from 30-70 minutes, were audio recorded, and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software by 3 researchers. Content analysis was applied. Three previously identified themes, NP-physician relations, independent practice and autonomy, and professional visibility, as well as two new themes, organizational support and resources and NP-administration relations emerged from the analyses. NPs reported collegial relations with physicians, challenges in establishing independent practice, suboptimal relationships with administration, and lack of support. NP contributions to patient care were invisible. Favorable organizational climates should be promoted to support the expanding of NP workforce in primary care and to optimize recruitment and retention efforts.

  15. A taxonomy of primary health care practices: an avenue for informing management and policy implementation.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, John; Gulyas, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Health policy and practice managers often treat primary practices as being homogenous, despite evidence that these organisations vary along multiple dimensions. This treatment can be a barrier to the development of a strong health care system. Therefore, a more sophisticated taxonomy of organisations could inform management and policy to better cater to the diversity of practice contexts, needs and capabilities. The purpose of this study was to categorise primary practices using practice features and characteristics associated with the job satisfaction of GPs. The current study uses data from 3906 GPs from the 2008 wave of the MABEL survey. Seven configurations of primary health care practices emerged from multivariate cluster analyses. The configurations incorporate, yet move beyond, simplistic categorisations such as geographic location and highlight the complexity facing managers and health policy interventions. The multidimensional configurations in the taxonomy are a mechanism for informing health care management and policy. The process of deriving configurations can be applied in a variety of countries and contexts.

  16. Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practice Characteristics: Barriers and Opportunities for Interprofessional Teamwork.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Norful, Allison A; Martsolf, Grant R

    Developing team-based care models and expanding nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care are recommended by policy makers to meet demand. Little is known how to promote interprofessional teamwork. Using a mixed-methods design, we analyzed qualitative interview and quantitative survey data from primary care NPs to explore practice characteristics important for teamwork. The Interprofessional Teamwork for Health and Social Care Framework guided the study. We identified NP-physician and NP-administration relationships; organizational support and governance; time and space for teamwork; and regulations and economic impact as important. Practice and policy change addressing these factors is needed for effective interprofessional teamwork.

  17. Leaving the practice: effects of primary care physician departure on patient care.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Anne G; Kleinman, Ken P; Pearson, Steven D

    Recent changes in the organization of health care services, coupled with rising rates of primary care physician (PCP) turnover, pose threats to the maintenance of a continuous patient-physician relationship. Little is known, however, about how PCP departure may affect patients' quality of health care. Participants were adult patients whose PCPs left a large, multispecialty group practice from July 1, 1994, to June 30, 1996 (n = 3931), and adult patients of a set of matched PCPs who remained in the practice at least 2 years beyond the index PCPs departure dates (n = 8009). We compared the following measures of quality of care: adherence to recommended screening guidelines, adequacy of blood pressure and glycemic control in patients with hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus, and use of urgent care and emergency department services. Among the women who received a mammogram in the 2-year baseline period, a higher proportion of those whose PCP departed did not continue to receive mammograms, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (8.4% vs 5.1%; P =.08). For patients who had screening Papanicolaou smears or fecal occult blood testing during the baseline period, there was no significant difference between study and control groups in the likelihood that patients discontinued screening during the follow-up period (10.9% vs 10.7%; P =.93 and 28.8% vs 25.3%; P =.93, respectively). Similarly, diabetic patients of departed PCPs did not have higher risk of worsening glycemic control (31.7% vs 28.9%; P =.46); and hypertensive patients of departed PCPs actually had lower risks of worsening blood pressure control (16.5% vs 22.5%; P =.02). There was no difference in use of urgent care or emergency department services between patient groups. In this multispecialty group practice, patients of departed PCPs experienced little or no decrease in quality of care measures for routine screening, management of chronic disease, and use of urgent care and emergency

  18. Readiness for the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Structural Capabilities of Massachusetts Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Mark W.; Safran, Dana G.; Coltin, Kathryn L.; Dresser, Marguerite

    2008-01-01

    Background The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a popular model for primary care reorganization, includes several structural capabilities intended to enhance quality of care. The extent to which different types of primary care practices have adopted these capabilities has not been previously studied. Objective To measure the prevalence of recommended structural capabilities among primary care practices and to determine whether prevalence varies among practices of different size (number of physicians) and administrative affiliation with networks of practices. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Participants One physician chosen at random from each of 412 primary care practices in Massachusetts was surveyed about practice capabilities during 2007. Practice size and network affiliation were obtained from an existing database. Measurements Presence of 13 structural capabilities representing 4 domains relevant to quality: patient assistance and reminders, culture of quality, enhanced access, and electronic health records (EHRs). Main Results Three hundred eight (75%) physicians responded, representing practices with a median size of 4 physicians (range 2–74). Among these practices, 64% were affiliated with 1 of 9 networks. The prevalence of surveyed capabilities ranged from 24% to 88%. Larger practice size was associated with higher prevalence for 9 of the 13 capabilities spanning all 4 domains (P < 0.05). Network affiliation was associated with higher prevalence of 5 capabilities (P < 0.05) in 3 domains. Associations were not substantively altered by statistical adjustment for other practice characteristics. Conclusions Larger and network-affiliated primary care practices are more likely than smaller, non-affiliated practices to have adopted several recommended capabilities. In order to achieve PCMH designation, smaller non-affiliated practices may require the greatest investments. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10

  19. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics.

  20. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed for all 129 quality indicators from the domains: ‘infrastructure’, ‘information’, ‘finance’, and ‘quality and safety’ to examine changes over time. Results Significant improvements were found in three of four domains: ‘quality and safety’ (F=22.81, p<0.01), ‘information’ (F=27.901, p<0.01) and ‘finance’ (F=4.073, p<0.02). The 129 quality indicators showed a significant improvement within the three points of measurement (F=33.864, p<0.01). Conclusions The European Practice Assessment for primary care practices thus provides a functioning quality management programme, focusing on the sustainable improvement of structural and organisational aspects to promote high quality of primary care. The implementation of a quality management system which also includes a continuous improvement process would give added value to provide good care. PMID:25900466

  1. Family physicians' attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care--Suez Canal University, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

    2013-01-01

    The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians' attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians' practice. Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management.

  2. Primary care physicians' attitudes and practices regarding discussing organ donation with their patients.

    PubMed

    Thornton, J Daryl; Curtis, J Randall; Allen, Margaret D

    2010-01-01

    Among the general population, discussing organ donation with a primary care provider may be associated with increased willingness to donate. However, the frequency with which primary care providers hold these discussions with their patients has not been reported. Cross-sectional mail and an Internet survey of validated questions regarding organ donation were done. A national sample of 831 primary care physicians. black, and Hispanic physicians were oversampled. Few physicians reported receiving formal training in donation (17%). Only 5% of physicians have donor cards available in their practice, and only 11% have donation information available in their practice. While 30% of physicians reported discussing end-of-life care with their patients, fewer than 4% reported discussing donation with their patients. However, only 36% felt that discussing donation was outside of their scope of practice. In a multivariate regression model, predictors of discussing donation with patients included having received formal education about organ donation (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; p < .05) and discussing end-of-life care with patients (OR, 12.8; p < .001). Very few primary care physicians reported discussing organ donation with their patients despite the majority agreeing that it was within their scope of practice. Primary care physicians who had received education on the subject or who regularly discuss end-of-life care with their patients were more likely to discuss donation. Efforts to improve donation in the general population should include a focus on understanding and improving communication about organ donation between providers and their patients.

  3. Access to primary health care for immigrants: results of a patient survey conducted in 137 primary care practices in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Immigrants make up one fifth of the Canadian population and this number continues to grow. Adequate access to primary health care is important for this population but it is not clear if this is being achieved. This study explored patient reported access to primary health care of a population of immigrants in Ontario, Canada who were users of the primary care system and compared this with Canadian-born individuals; and by model of primary care practice. Methods This study uses data from the Comparison of Models of Primary Care Study (COMP-PC), a mixed-methods, practice-based, cross-sectional study that collected information from patients and providers in 137 primary care practices across Ontario, Canada in 2005-2006. The practices were randomly sampled to ensure an equal number of practices in each of the four dominant primary care models at that time: Fee-For-Service, Community Health Centres, and the two main capitation models (Health Service Organization and Family Health Networks). Adult patients of participating practices were identified when they presented for an appointment and completed a survey in the waiting room. Three measures of access were used, all derived from the patient survey: First Contact Access, First Contact Utilization (both based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool) and number of self-reported visits to the practice in the past year. Results Of the 5,269 patients who reported country of birth 1,099 (20.8%) were born outside of Canada. In adjusted analysis, recent immigrants (arrival in Canada within the past five years) and immigrants in Canada for more than 20 years were less likely to report good health compared to Canadian-born (Odds ratio 0.58, 95% CI 0.36,0.92 and 0.81, 95% CI 0.67,0.99). Overall, immigrants reported equal access to primary care services compared with Canadian-born. Within immigrant groups recently arrived immigrants had similar access scores to Canadian-born but reported 5.3 more primary care visits after

  4. Access to primary health care for immigrants: results of a patient survey conducted in 137 primary care practices in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Muggah, Elizabeth; Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William

    2012-12-28

    Immigrants make up one fifth of the Canadian population and this number continues to grow. Adequate access to primary health care is important for this population but it is not clear if this is being achieved. This study explored patient reported access to primary health care of a population of immigrants in Ontario, Canada who were users of the primary care system and compared this with Canadian-born individuals; and by model of primary care practice. This study uses data from the Comparison of Models of Primary Care Study (COMP-PC), a mixed-methods, practice-based, cross-sectional study that collected information from patients and providers in 137 primary care practices across Ontario, Canada in 2005-2006. The practices were randomly sampled to ensure an equal number of practices in each of the four dominant primary care models at that time: Fee-For-Service, Community Health Centres, and the two main capitation models (Health Service Organization and Family Health Networks). Adult patients of participating practices were identified when they presented for an appointment and completed a survey in the waiting room. Three measures of access were used, all derived from the patient survey: First Contact Access, First Contact Utilization (both based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool) and number of self-reported visits to the practice in the past year. Of the 5,269 patients who reported country of birth 1,099 (20.8%) were born outside of Canada. In adjusted analysis, recent immigrants (arrival in Canada within the past five years) and immigrants in Canada for more than 20 years were less likely to report good health compared to Canadian-born (Odds ratio 0.58, 95% CI 0.36,0.92 and 0.81, 95% CI 0.67,0.99). Overall, immigrants reported equal access to primary care services compared with Canadian-born. Within immigrant groups recently arrived immigrants had similar access scores to Canadian-born but reported 5.3 more primary care visits after adjusting for health status

  5. Innovation in nursing health care practice: expansion of access in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lowen, Ingrid Margareth Voth; Peres, Aida Maris; Ros, Carla da; Poli, Paulo; Faoro, Nilza Teresinha

    2017-01-01

    analyze the reorganization of the health care practice of nurses as an innovative strategy for expansion of access in primary care. qualitative and quantitative study, which interviewed 32 management and care nurses and collected documentary data from public reports of production of nursing consultations from 2010 to 2014, in a municipality in southern Brazil. Data processing for textual analysis was performed by IRAMUTEQ software; for simple descriptive statistical analysis, the program Excel 2013 was used. in the innovative care practice  class, associated with awareness of change, related to implementation of the FHS, its challenges and advantages, the following subclasses were identified: reorganization of schedules, nursing consultation, physical restructuring of BHUs, and shared consultation. the need to expand access to and valorization of care practice encourages the development of innovative strategies. The protagonism of care needs to be discussed in the various spaces so that each professional carry out the respective role with competence and efficacy. analisar a reorganização da prática assistencial do enfermeiro como estratégia inovadora para ampliação do acesso na atenção primária. estudo qualiquantitativo, tendo sido entrevistados 32 enfermeiros gerenciais e assistenciais e coletados dados documentais de relatórios públicos de produção de consultas dos enfermeiros de 2010 a 2014, num município sul-brasileiro. O processamento dos dados para análise textual foi realizado pelo software IRAMUTEQ; para análise estatística descritiva simples, o programa Excel 2013. na classe prática assistencial inovadora, associada à sensibilização para a mudança, relacionada à implantação da ESF, seus desafios e fortalezas, foram identificadas as subclasses: reorganização das agendas, consulta do enfermeiro, reestruturação física das UBS e consulta compartilhada. a necessidade de ampliar o acesso e valorização da prática assistencial

  6. Pharmacists' perceptions of their emerging general practice roles in UK primary care: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Jo; Sansom, Anna; Sims, Laura; Healey, Mark; Kingsland, Ellie; Campbell, John

    2017-09-01

    UK general practice is experiencing a workload crisis. Pharmacists are the third largest healthcare profession in the UK; however, their skills are a currently underutilised and potentially highly valuable resource for primary health care. This study forms part of the evaluation of an innovative training programme for pharmacists who are interested in extended roles in primary care, advocated by a UK collaborative '10-point GP workforce action plan'. To explore pharmacists' perceptions of primary care roles including the potential for greater integration of their profession into general practice. A qualitative interview study in UK primary care carried out between October 2015 and July 2016. Pharmacists were purposively sampled by level of experience, geographical location, and type of workplace. Two confidential semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted - one before and one after the training programme. A constant comparative, inductive approach to thematic analysis was used. Sixteen participants were interviewed. The themes related to: initial expectations of the general practice role, varying by participants' experience of primary care; the influence of the training course with respect to managing uncertainty, critical appraisal skills, and confidence for the role; and predictions for the future of this role. There is enthusiasm and willingness among pharmacists for new, extended roles in primary care, which could effectively relieve GP workload pressures. A definition of the role, with examples of the knowledge, skills, and attributes required, should be made available to pharmacists, primary care teams, and the public. Training should include clinical skills teaching, set in context through exposure to general practice, and delivered motivationally by primary care practitioners. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  7. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  8. Advanced training for primary care and general practice nurses: enablers and outcomes of postgraduate education.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, Christine M; Hegarty, Kelsey L

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to understand enablers to participation in postgraduate education for primary care nurses (PCNs), and to explore how postgraduate education has advanced their nursing practice. Cross-sectional questionnaires were mailed out in April 2012 to current and past students undertaking postgraduate studies in primary care nursing at The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Questionnaires were returned by 100 out of 243 nurses (response rate 41%). Ninety-one per cent (91/100) of the respondents were first registered as nurses in Australia. Fifty-seven per cent were hospital trained and 43% were university educated to attain their initial nurse qualification. The respondents reported opportunities to expand scope of practice (99%; 97/98), improve clinical practice (98%; 97/99), increase work satisfaction (93%; 91/98) and increase practice autonomy (92%; 89/97) as factors that most influenced participation in postgraduate education in primary care nursing. Major enablers for postgraduate studies were scholarship access (75%; 71/95) and access to distance education (74%; 72/98). Many respondents reported an increased scope of practice (98%; 95/97) and increased job satisfaction (71%; 70/98) as an education outcome. Only 29% (28/97) cited an increase in pay-rate as an outcome. Of the 73 PCNs currently working in general practice, many anticipated an increase in time spent on the preparation of chronic disease management plans (63%; 45/72), multidisciplinary care plans (56%; 40/72) and adult health checks (56%; 40/72) in the preceding 12 months. Recommendations emerging from findings include: (1) increased access to scholarships for nurses undertaking postgraduate education in primary care nursing is imperative; (2) alternative modes of course delivery need to be embedded in primary care nursing education; (3) the development of Australian primary care policy, including policy on funding models, needs to more accurately reflect the

  9. The Swedish National Diabetes Register in clinical practice and evaluation in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Hallgren Elfgren, Ing-Marie; Grodzinsky, Ewa; Törnvall, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Aim The purpose of this project is to describe the use of the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) in clinical practice in a Swedish county and to specifically monitor the diabetes care routines at two separate primary health-care centres (PHCC) with a special focus on older patients.

  10. Introduction of Asthma APGAR tools improve asthma management in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Bertram, Susan; Wollan, Peter

    2008-08-31

    Primary care asthma management is often not compatible with national evidence-based guidelines. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and impact of the Asthma APGAR tools to enhance implementation of asthma guideline-compatible management in primary care practices. Twenty-four primary care practices across the US. This is a mixed methods study. Quantitative data were used to assess changes in guideline recommended asthma management including use of daily controller therapy, planned care visits, and education and information documentation before and after implementation of the Asthma APGAR. Qualitative data from focus group sessions were used to assess health care professional and patient perceived usability and value of the Asthma APGAR tools during office visits for asthma. Implementing the Asthma APGAR tools in the 24 practices was associated with enhanced asthma visit-related medical record documentation including significant increases in recording of activity limitations due to asthma and asthma symptom frequency, asthma medication nonadherence, asthma triggers, and the patients' perceived response to therapy (p < 0.01 for each item). Some care processes also increased significantly including assessment of inhaler technique and prescribing of daily controller therapy among patients with persistent asthma. Focus groups of patients and of clinical staff reported that the Asthma APGAR tools were easy to use, "made sense" and "improved care" was given and received. The Asthma APGAR tools are feasible to implement in primary care practices and their implementation is associated with increased guideline-compliant asthma management.

  11. An interdisciplinary memory clinic: a novel practice setting for pharmacists in primary care.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos H; Patel, Tejal; Lee, Linda

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacists have developed innovative practices in various settings as singular providers or as members of multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary teams. Examples include pharmacists practicing in heart failure, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia clinics. There is a paucity of literature describing pharmacists in interdisciplinary memory clinics and specifically pharmacists practicing in interdisciplinary, primary care-based memory clinics. New practice models should be disseminated to guide others in the development of similar models given the complexity of this population. Patients with dementia are more difficult to manage because of cognitive impairment, behavioral and psychological symptoms, the common presence of multiple comorbidities, and related polypharmacy and caregiver issues. These challenges require expertise in neurodegenerative disorders and geriatrics. The purpose of this article is to describe the role of clinical pharmacists providing care to patients with cognitive complaints in a primary care-based, interdisciplinary memory clinic, with a focus on how the pharmacist practices and is integrated in this collaborative care setting. Patients are assessed using an interdisciplinary approach, with team consensus for assessment and planning of care. Pharmacists' activities include assessment of (1) appropriateness of medications based on frailty, (2) medications that can impair cognition and/or function, (3) medication adherence and management skills, and (4) vascular risk factor control. Pharmacists provide education regarding medications and diseases, ensure appropriate transitions in care, and conduct home visits. Pharmacist participation in this clinic represents a novel opportunity to advance pharmacy practice in primary care, interdisciplinary models. Work is ongoing to describe outcomes attributable to pharmacist participation in this clinic.

  12. A meta-ethnography of organisational culture in primary care medical practice.

    PubMed

    Grant, Suzanne; Guthrie, Bruce; Entwistle, Vikki; Williams, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been growing international interest in shaping local organisational cultures in primary healthcare. However, the contextual relevance of extant culture assessment instruments to the primary care context has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to derive a new contextually appropriate understanding of the key dimensions of primary care medical practice organisational culture and their inter-relationship through a synthesis of published qualitative research. A systematic search of six electronic databases followed by a synthesis using techniques of meta-ethnography involving translation and re-interpretation. A total of 16 papers were included in the meta-ethnography from the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand that fell into two related groups: those focused on practice organisational characteristics and narratives of practice individuality; and those focused on sub-practice variation across professional, managerial and administrative lines. It was found that primary care organisational culture was characterised by four key dimensions, i.e. responsiveness, team hierarchy, care philosophy and communication. These dimensions are multi-level and inter-professional in nature, spanning both practice and sub-practice levels. The research contributes to organisational culture theory development. The four new cultural dimensions provide a synthesized conceptual framework for researchers to evaluate and understand primary care cultural and sub-cultural levels. The synthesised cultural dimensions present a framework for practitioners to understand and change organisational culture in primary care teams. The research uses an innovative research methodology to synthesise the existing qualitative research and is one of the first to develop systematically a qualitative conceptual framing of primary care organisational culture.

  13. Practice-level quality improvement interventions in primary care: a review of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Ryan; Stokes, Tim; Marshall, Tom

    2015-11-01

    To present an overview of effective interventions for quality improvement in primary care at the practice level utilising existing systematic reviews. Quality improvement in primary care involves a range of approaches from the system-level to patient-level improvement. One key setting in which quality improvement needs to occur is at the level of the basic unit of primary care--the individual general practice. Therefore, there is a need for practitioners to have access to an overview of the effectiveness of quality improvement interventions available in this setting. A tertiary evidence synthesis was conducted (a review of systematic reviews). A systematic approach was used to identify and summarise published literature relevant to understanding primary-care quality improvement at the practice level. Quality assessment was via the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool for systematic reviews, with data extraction identifying evidence of effect for the examined interventions. Included reviews had to be relevant to quality improvement at the practice level and relevant to the UK primary-care context. Reviews were excluded if describing system-level interventions. A range of measures across care structure, process and outcomes were defined and interpreted across the quality improvement interventions. Audit and feedback, computerised advice, point-of-care reminders, practice facilitation, educational outreach and processes for patient review and follow-up all demonstrated evidence of a quality improvement effect. Evidence of an improvement effect was higher where baseline performance was low and was particularly demonstrated across process measures and measures related to prescribing. Evidence was not sufficient to suggest that multifaceted approaches were more effective than single interventions. Evidence exists for a range of quality improvement interventions at the primary-care practice level. More research is required to determine the use and impact of quality

  14. Cervical Screening for Women with Learning Disability: Current Practice and Attitudes within Primary Care in Edinburgh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Rachael; Douglas, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate current practice in, and to explore primary care professionals' views about, providing cervical screening to women with learning disability, in two areas of Edinburgh. A postal questionnaire was sent to all 24 GP practices in the project area: 20 responded. Seven respondents were invited to participate in follow up…

  15. Optimising the Collaborative Practice of Nurses in Primary Care Settings Using a Knowledge Translation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oelke, Nelly; Wilhelm, Amanda; Jackson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The role of nurses in primary care is poorly understood and many are not working to their full scope of practice. Building on previous research, this knowledge translation (KT) project's aim was to facilitate nurses' capacity to optimise their practice in these settings. A Summit engaging Alberta stakeholders in a deliberative discussion was the…

  16. Cervical Screening for Women with Learning Disability: Current Practice and Attitudes within Primary Care in Edinburgh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Rachael; Douglas, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate current practice in, and to explore primary care professionals' views about, providing cervical screening to women with learning disability, in two areas of Edinburgh. A postal questionnaire was sent to all 24 GP practices in the project area: 20 responded. Seven respondents were invited to participate in follow up…

  17. Optimising the Collaborative Practice of Nurses in Primary Care Settings Using a Knowledge Translation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oelke, Nelly; Wilhelm, Amanda; Jackson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The role of nurses in primary care is poorly understood and many are not working to their full scope of practice. Building on previous research, this knowledge translation (KT) project's aim was to facilitate nurses' capacity to optimise their practice in these settings. A Summit engaging Alberta stakeholders in a deliberative discussion was the…

  18. Primary Care Physicians’ Decisions About Discharging Patients from Their Practices

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Michelle E.; Silverstein, Julie; Collier, Virginia U.; Weiner, Joan; Boyer, E. Gil

    2008-01-01

    Objective There are few data available about factors which influence physicians’ decisions to discharge patients from their practices. To study general internists’ and family medicine physicians’ attitudes and experiences in discharging patients from their practices. Design A cross-sectional mailed survey was used. Participants One thousand general internists and family medicine physicians participated in this study. Measurements and Main Results We studied the likelihood physicians would discharge 12 hypothetical patients from their practices, and whether they had actually discharged such patients. The effect of demographic data on the number of scenarios in which patients were likely to be discharged, and the number of patients actually discharged were analyzed via ANOVA and multiple logistic regression analysis. Of 977 surveys received by subjects, 526 (54%) were completed and returned. A majority of respondents were willing to discharge patients in 5 of 12 hypothetical scenarios. Eighty-five percent had actually discharged at least one patient from their practices. Most respondents (71%) had discharged 10 or fewer patients, but 14% had discharged 11 to 200 patients. Respondents who were in private practice (p < 0.000001) were more likely to discharge both hypothetical and actual patients from their practices. Older physicians (≥48 years old) were more likely to discharge actual patients from their practices (p = 0.005) as were physicians practicing in rural settings (p = 0.003). Conclusions Most physicians in our sample were willing to discharge actual and hypothetical patients from their practices. This tendency may have significant implications for the initiation of pay-for-performance programs. Physicians should be educated about the importance of the patient–physician relationship and their fiduciary obligations to the patient. PMID:18176852

  19. Primary care physicians' decisions about discharging patients from their practices.

    PubMed

    Farber, Neil J; Jordan, Michelle E; Silverstein, Julie; Collier, Virginia U; Weiner, Joan; Boyer, E Gil

    2008-03-01

    There are few data available about factors which influence physicians' decisions to discharge patients from their practices. To study general internists' and family medicine physicians' attitudes and experiences in discharging patients from their practices. A cross-sectional mailed survey was used. One thousand general internists and family medicine physicians participated in this study. We studied the likelihood physicians would discharge 12 hypothetical patients from their practices, and whether they had actually discharged such patients. The effect of demographic data on the number of scenarios in which patients were likely to be discharged, and the number of patients actually discharged were analyzed via ANOVA and multiple logistic regression analysis. Of 977 surveys received by subjects, 526 (54%) were completed and returned. A majority of respondents were willing to discharge patients in 5 of 12 hypothetical scenarios. Eighty-five percent had actually discharged at least one patient from their practices. Most respondents (71%) had discharged 10 or fewer patients, but 14% had discharged 11 to 200 patients. Respondents who were in private practice (p < 0.000001) were more likely to discharge both hypothetical and actual patients from their practices. Older physicians (> or =48 years old) were more likely to discharge actual patients from their practices (p = 0.005) as were physicians practicing in rural settings (p = 0.003). Most physicians in our sample were willing to discharge actual and hypothetical patients from their practices. This tendency may have significant implications for the initiation of pay-for-performance programs. Physicians should be educated about the importance of the patient-physician relationship and their fiduciary obligations to the patient.

  20. Effectiveness of a quality-improvement program in improving management of primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Laux, Gunter; Willms, Sara; Wensing, Michel; Goetz, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Background: The European Practice Assessment program provides feedback and outreach visits to primary care practices to facilitate quality improvement in five domains (infrastructure, people, information, finance, and quality and safety). We examined the effectiveness of this program in improving management in primary care practices in Germany, with a focus on the domain of quality and safety. Methods: In a before–after study, 102 primary care practices completed a practice assessment using the European Practice Assessment instrument at baseline and three years later (intervention group). A comparative group of 102 practices was included that completed their first assessment using this instrument at the time of the intervention group’s second assessment. Mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100. Results: We found significant improvements in all domains between the first and second assessments in the intervention group. In the domain of quality and safety, improvements in scores (mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100) were observed in the following dimensions: complaint management (from a mean score of 51.2 at first assessment to 80.7 at second assessment); analysis of critical incidents (from 79.1 to 89.6); and quality development, quality policy (from 40.7 to 55.6). Overall scores at the time of the second assessment were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the comparative group. Interpretation: Primary care practices that completed the European Practice Assessment instrument twice over a three-year period showed improvements in practice management. Our findings show the value of the quality-improvement cycle in the context of practice assessment and the use of established organizational standards for practice management with the

  1. Effectiveness of a quality-improvement program in improving management of primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Laux, Gunter; Willms, Sara; Wensing, Michel; Goetz, Katja

    2011-12-13

    The European Practice Assessment program provides feedback and outreach visits to primary care practices to facilitate quality improvement in five domains (infrastructure, people, information, finance, and quality and safety). We examined the effectiveness of this program in improving management in primary care practices in Germany, with a focus on the domain of quality and safety. In a before-after study, 102 primary care practices completed a practice assessment using the European Practice Assessment instrument at baseline and three years later (intervention group). A comparative group of 102 practices was included that completed their first assessment using this instrument at the time of the intervention group's second assessment. Mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100. We found significant improvements in all domains between the first and second assessments in the intervention group. In the domain of quality and safety, improvements in scores (mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100) were observed in the following dimensions: complaint management (from a mean score of 51.2 at first assessment to 80.7 at second assessment); analysis of critical incidents (from 79.1 to 89.6); and quality development, quality policy (from 40.7 to 55.6). Overall scores at the time of the second assessment were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the comparative group. Primary care practices that completed the European Practice Assessment instrument twice over a three-year period showed improvements in practice management. Our findings show the value of the quality-improvement cycle in the context of practice assessment and the use of established organizational standards for practice management with the Europeaen Practice Assessment.

  2. Pharmacists’ perceptions of their emerging general practice roles in UK primary care: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, Jo; Sansom, Anna; Sims, Laura; Healey, Mark; Kingsland, Ellie; Campbell, John

    2017-01-01

    Background UK general practice is experiencing a workload crisis. Pharmacists are the third largest healthcare profession in the UK; however, their skills are a currently underutilised and potentially highly valuable resource for primary health care. This study forms part of the evaluation of an innovative training programme for pharmacists who are interested in extended roles in primary care, advocated by a UK collaborative ‘10-point GP workforce action plan’. Aim To explore pharmacists’ perceptions of primary care roles including the potential for greater integration of their profession into general practice. Design and setting A qualitative interview study in UK primary care carried out between October 2015 and July 2016. Method Pharmacists were purposively sampled by level of experience, geographical location, and type of workplace. Two confidential semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted — one before and one after the training programme. A constant comparative, inductive approach to thematic analysis was used. Results Sixteen participants were interviewed. The themes related to: initial expectations of the general practice role, varying by participants’ experience of primary care; the influence of the training course with respect to managing uncertainty, critical appraisal skills, and confidence for the role; and predictions for the future of this role. Conclusion There is enthusiasm and willingness among pharmacists for new, extended roles in primary care, which could effectively relieve GP workload pressures. A definition of the role, with examples of the knowledge, skills, and attributes required, should be made available to pharmacists, primary care teams, and the public. Training should include clinical skills teaching, set in context through exposure to general practice, and delivered motivationally by primary care practitioners. PMID:28673959

  3. The Harvard Medical School Academic Innovations Collaborative: transforming primary care practice and education.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Asaf; Ellner, Andrew; Pabo, Erika; Stout, Somava; Sugarman, Jonathan R; Sevin, Cory; Goodell, Kristen; Bassett, Jill S; Phillips, Russell S

    2014-09-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) need new approaches to delivering higher-quality care at lower costs, and engaging trainees in the work of high-functioning primary care practices. In 2012, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care, in partnership with with local AMCs, established an Academic Innovations Collaborative (AIC) with the goal of transforming primary care education and practice. This novel two-year learning collaborative consisted of hospital- and community-based primary care teaching practices, committed to building highly functional teams, managing populations, and engaging patients. The AIC built on models developed by Qualis Health and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, optimized for the local AMC context. Foundational elements included leadership engagement and development, application of rapid-cycle process improvement, and the creation of teams to care for defined patient populations. Nineteen practices across six AMCs participated, with nearly 260,000 patients and 450 resident learners. The collaborative offered three 1.5-day learning sessions each year featuring shared learning, practice coaches, and improvement measures, along with monthly data reporting, webinars, and site visits. Validated self-reports by transformation teams showed that practices made substantial improvement across all areas of change. Important factors for success included leadership development, practice-level resources, and engaging patients and trainees. The AIC model shows promise as a path for AMCs to catalyze health system transformation through primary care improvement. In addition to further evaluating the impact of practice transformation, expansion will require support from AMCs and payers, and the application of similar approaches on a broader scale.

  4. Design of a quality and performance improvement project for small primary care practices: reflections on the Center for Practice Innovation.

    PubMed

    Marsteller, Jill A; Woodward, Paula; Underwood, William S; Hsiao, Chun-Ju; Barr, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Small practices often lack the human, financial and technical resources to make necessary practice improvements and infrastructure investments in order to achieve sustainable change that promotes quality and efficiency. To report on an effort to assist small primary care practices in improving quality of care and efficiency of practice management to meet the needs of patients, improve physician satisfaction and enhance the ability of these small practices to survive. We report on an intervention design and the reflections of the implementers on what they learned and what went well or poorly during implementation. Results of the intervention are reported separately (in Quality in Primary Care). Thirty practices underwent the entire intervention. The practices were selected on the basis of practice size, diversity in patient factors, apparent dedication to making practice improvements and geographic location. The main components of the intervention were two site visits to the participating practices by Center for Practice Innovation (CPI); now known as the Centre for Practice Improvement and Innovation, team members. The CPI team provided ongoing advice and support in focus areas selected by practices after initial site visit and assessment. A customised session focusing on the practice report and on helping practices to think about which areas they wished to improve was more effective in engaging practices than didactic presentation. Quality and practice management improvements were observed in information posting, patient education, staff communication and patient safety practices. Having a strong physician champion and a strong office manager determined to make quality improvement changes were important elements for successful change. In addition, practices with greater stability of staff and strong finances were more likely to meet project goals. Small practices today are facing a range of important challenges. The CPI sought to provide successful guidance to

  5. Examining organizational change in primary care practices: experiences from using ethnographic methods.

    PubMed

    Russell, Grant; Advocat, Jenny; Geneau, Robert; Farrell, Barbara; Thille, Patricia; Ward, Natalie; Evans, Samantha

    2012-08-01

    Qualitative methods are an important part of the primary care researcher's toolkit providing a nuanced view of the complexity in primary care reform and delivery. Ethnographic research is a comprehensive approach to qualitative data collection, including observation, in-depth interviews and document analysis. Few studies have been published outlining methodological issues related to ethnography in this setting. This paper examines some of the challenges of conducting an ethnographic study in primary care setting in Canada, where there recently have been major reforms to traditional methods of organizing primary care services. This paper is based on an ethnographic study set in primary care practices in Ontario, Canada, designed to investigate changes to organizational and clinical routines in practices undergoing transition to new, interdisciplinary Family Health Teams (FHTs). The study was set in six new FHTs in Ontario. This paper is a reflexive examination of some of the challenges encountered while conducting an ethnographic study in a primary care setting. Our experiences in this study highlight some potential benefits of and difficulties in conducting an ethnographic study in family practice. Our study design gave us an opportunity to highlight the changes in routines within an organization in transition. A study with a clinical perspective requires training, support, a mixture of backgrounds and perspectives and ongoing communication. Despite some of the difficulties, the richness of this method has allowed the exploration of a number of additional research questions that emerged during data analysis.

  6. General practice based teaching exchanges in Europe. Experiences from the EU Socrates programme 'primary health care'.

    PubMed

    van Weel, Chris; Mattsson, Bengt; Freeman, George K; de Meyere, Marc; von Fragstein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of international exchange of medical students for general practice. The experience is based on the EU Socrates programme 'Primary Health Care' that offers, since 1992, clinical attachments and research electives in primary care. This programme involves 11 university departments of general practice/primary care in eight countries: Austria - Vienna; Belgium - Gent; Germany Düsseldorf; Italy - Monza, Udine; Netherlands Nijmegen; Slovenia - Ljubljana; Sweden - Göteborg; and the UK - Edinburgh, Imperial College London and Nottingham. More than 150 students have taken part in the programme, most in the last four years. For clinical attachment communication to patients is essential, and students should be able to speak the language of the host university. A research elective in primary care is less demanding and requires students' ability to communicate in English. Despite marked differences in health care structure in the countries involved, it is quite possible to provide a valuable teaching environment in general practice, and the experience gained by students in the exchanges more than equals that what they would gain at home. The added value is in experiencing the influence of another health care system and of working in another academic primary care centre. A substantial number of research electives have been published in international peer reviewed scientific journals with the student as first (occasionally second) author and staff members of the student's host and home university as co-authors. A further benefit of the exchange programme lies in the transfer teaching innovations between universities.

  7. Factors associated with the use of primary care services: the role of practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Rising demand for and costs of health care have led to an increasing role of practice nurses in primary care in many countries, including the United Kingdom. Previous research has explored how practice nurse care differs from that provided by general practitioners (GPs) in terms of costs and health outcomes, and has highlighted the importance of matching skills and experience with roles and responsibilities. However, there has been little research to compare the characteristics of patients seen by GPs and practice nurses in primary care. We aim to investigate the factors associated with the use of practice nurse visits, and to compare these with the factors associated with GP use. We jointly model the use of practice nurse and GP visits using a bivariate probit regression model with a large set of covariates taken from two rounds of the Health Survey for England (2001, 2002). We find that practice nurse use is associated with age and gender, health, socioeconomic and supply variables. There are differences in the factors associated with practice nurse and GP use. Chronically ill patients are more likely to see a practice nurse, while acute ill health has a stronger association with the probability of seeing the GP. Practice nurse use is also correlated with a narrower range of health conditions compared with GP use. We also found differences between practice nurse and GP visits with respect to the association with economic activity, ethnic group, number of children, degree of urbanisation, and distance to practice.

  8. Translating primary care practice climate into patient activation: the role of patient trust in physician.

    PubMed

    Becker, Edmund R; Roblin, Douglas W

    2008-08-01

    Little is known about processes by which proactive primary care teams might activate their patients. We examine the role of trust in patient-physician relationships for translating practice teamwork into patient activation. Data were collected by surveys of adult enrollees and primary care teams of a group-model managed care organization in metropolitan Atlanta. Enrollees who were 25-59 years of age were randomly sampled from 3 condition cohorts (diabetes, elevated lipids but no coronary artery disease history, and low risk). A total of 2224 responded to a mixed mode survey in 2005 (42% response rate). Ninety-seven practitioners and 187 support staff of 16 primary care teams responded to a practice climate survey in 2004 (85% response rate). Practice climate is a multidimensional concept measuring support and collaboration with a team. Linear models of patients nested within their primary care teams were estimated for patient trust in physician as a function of practice climate and for activation as a function of trust, adjusted for other respondent characteristics. We found significant, positive associations between practice climate and patient trust in their primary care physicians and between patient trust and activation in their health. Our study shows 1 process by which practice climate translates into patient activation. Supportive interactions among practitioners and staff within primary care teams facilitate trust-building interactions between practitioners and patients. Supportive, trustworthy interactions, in turn, help to ameliorate the inherent imbalance in power between patients and physicians, contributing to patients who take a more active role in their health.

  9. Predictors of relational continuity in primary care: patient, provider and practice factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuity is a fundamental tenet of primary care, and highly valued by patients; it may also improve patient outcomes and lower cost of health care. It is thus important to investigate factors that predict higher continuity. However, to date, little is known about the factors that contribute to continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyse practice, provider and patient predictors of continuity of care in a large sample of primary care practices in Ontario, Canada. Another goal was to assess whether there was a difference in the continuity of care provided by different models of primary care. Methods This study is part of the larger a cross-sectional study of 137 primary care practices, their providers and patients. Several performance measures were evaluated; this paper focuses on relational continuity. Four items from the Primary Care Assessment Tool were used to assess relational continuity from the patient’s perspective. Results Multilevel modeling revealed several patient factors that predicted continuity. Older patients and those with chronic disease reported higher continuity, while those who lived in rural areas, had higher education, poorer mental health status, no regular provider, and who were employed reported lower continuity. Providers with more years since graduation had higher patient-reported continuity. Several practice factors predicted lower continuity: number of MDs, nurses, opening on weekends, and having 24 hours a week or less on-call. Analyses that compared continuity across models showed that, in general, Health Service Organizations had better continuity than other models, even when adjusting for patient demographics. Conclusions Some patients with greater health needs experience greater continuity of care. However, the lower continuity reported by those with mental health issues and those who live in rural areas is concerning. Furthermore, our finding that smaller practices have higher continuity suggests that

  10. Cost of Transformation among Primary Care Practices Participating in a Medical Home Pilot.

    PubMed

    Martsolf, Grant R; Kandrack, Ryan; Gabbay, Robert A; Friedberg, Mark W

    2016-07-01

    Medical home initiatives encourage primary care practices to invest in new structural capabilities such as patient registries and information technology, but little is known about the costs of these investments. To estimate costs of transformation incurred by primary care practices participating in a medical home pilot. We interviewed practice leaders in order to identify changes practices had undertaken due to medical home transformation. Based on the principles of activity-based costing, we estimated the costs of additional personnel and other investments associated with these changes. The Pennsylvania Chronic Care Initiative (PACCI), a statewide multi-payer medical home pilot. Twelve practices that participated in the PACCI. One-time and ongoing yearly costs attributed to medical home transformation. Practices incurred median one-time transformation-associated costs of $30,991 per practice (range, $7694 to $117,810), equivalent to $9814 per clinician ($1497 to $57,476) and $8 per patient ($1 to $30). Median ongoing yearly costs associated with transformation were $147,573 per practice (range, $83,829 to $346,603), equivalent to $64,768 per clinician ($18,585 to $93,856) and $30 per patient ($8 to $136). Care management activities accounted for over 60% of practices' transformation-associated costs. Per-clinician and per-patient transformation costs were greater for small and independent practices than for large and system-affiliated practices. Error in interviewee recall could affect estimates. Transformation costs in other medical home interventions may be different. The costs of medical home transformation vary widely, creating potential financial challenges for primary care practices-especially those that are small and independent. Tailored subsidies from payers may help practices make these investments. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  11. Primary care physicians' cancer screening recommendation practices and perceptions of cancer risk of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians' perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information.

  12. Revisiting scope of practice facilitators and barriers for primary care nurse practitioners: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Smaldone, Arlene; Clarke, Sean; O'Rourke, Nancy C; Rosato, Barbara G; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2013-02-01

    Revisiting scope of practice (SOP) policies for nurse practitioners (NPs) is necessary in the evolving primary care environment with goals to provide timely access, improve quality, and contain cost. This study utilized qualitative descriptive design to investigate NP roles and responsibilities as primary care providers (PCPs) in Massachusetts and their perceptions about barriers and facilitators to their SOP. Through purposive sampling, 23 NPs were recruited and they participated in group and individual interviews in spring 2011.The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software, and content analysis was applied. In addition to NP roles and responsibilities, three themes affecting NP SOP were: regulatory environment; comprehension of NP role; and work environment. NPs take on similar responsibilities as physicians to deliver primary care services; however, the regulatory environment and billing practices, lack of comprehension of the NP role, and challenging work environments limit successful NP practice.

  13. Is exposure to a student-run clinic associated with future primary care practice?

    PubMed

    Tong, Sebastian T C; Phillips, Robert L; Berman, Rebecca

    2012-09-01

    The number of student-run clinics has increased in recent years, but student outcomes from participation are largely unknown. This study explored whether or not there is an association between presence of a student-run clinic at a medical school and future practice of medical school graduates in a primary care specialty. A 2005 survey of all student-run clinics associated with medical schools was supplemented by direct survey of schools missing from this dataset. We used multiple linear regression to test associations between presence of a student-run clinic and current primary care practice, using specialty designation in the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile and controlling for medical school confounders (urban versus rural, private versus public, and absence versus presence of family medicine department.) In 2005, 72 medical schools had at least one student-run clinic, and 43 schools did not (93.5% response rate). After controlling for confounders, the correlation coefficient between presence of student run clinic in 2005 and current primary care practice is -0.0122. We found no association between having a student-run clinic in 2005 at a medical school and proportion of its graduates who currently practice primary care. Since there are considerable limitations of an institution-based study, it may be useful to study specialty choice for individual students who participate in student-run clinics, given that prior research has shown longitudinal educational experience with underserved population is associated with increased likelihood of choosing primary care careers.

  14. Electronic Health Record Challenges, Workarounds, and Solutions Observed in Practices Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Maribel; Davis, Melinda; Fernald, Doug; Gunn, Rose; Dickinson, Perry; Cohen, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the electronic health record (EHR)-related experiences of practices striving to integrate behavioral health and primary care using tailored, evidenced-based strategies from 2012 to 2014; and the challenges, workarounds and initial health information technology (HIT) solutions that emerged during implementation. This was an observational, cross-case comparative study of 11 diverse practices, including 8 primary care clinics and 3 community mental health centers focused on the implementation of integrated care. Practice characteristics (eg, practice ownership, federal designation, geographic area, provider composition, EHR system, and patient panel characteristics) were collected using a practice information survey and analyzed to report descriptive information. A multidisciplinary team used a grounded theory approach to analyze program documents, field notes from practice observation visits, online diaries, and semistructured interviews. Eight primary care practices used a single EHR and 3 practices used 2 different EHRs, 1 to document behavioral health and 1 to document primary care information. Practices experienced common challenges with their EHRs' capabilities to 1) document and track relevant behavioral health and physical health information, 2) support communication and coordination of care among integrated teams, and 3) exchange information with tablet devices and other EHRs. Practices developed workarounds in response to these challenges: double documentation and duplicate data entry, scanning and transporting documents, reliance on patient or clinician recall for inaccessible EHR information, and use of freestanding tracking systems. As practices gained experience with integration, they began to move beyond workarounds to more permanent HIT solutions ranging in complexity from customized EHR templates, EHR upgrades, and unified EHRs. Integrating behavioral health and primary care further burdens EHRs. Vendors, in cooperation with

  15. Key elements of high-quality practice organisation in primary health care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Lisa; Janamian, Tina; Jackson, Claire L

    2014-08-04

    To identify elements that are integral to high-quality practice and determine considerations relating to high-quality practice organisation in primary care. A narrative systematic review of published and grey literature. Electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Emerald Insight, PsycInfo, the Primary Health Care Research and Information Service website, Google Scholar) were searched in November 2013 and used to identify articles published in English from 2002 to 2013. Reference lists of included articles were searched for relevant unpublished articles and reports. Data were configured at the study level to allow for the inclusion of findings from a broad range of study types. Ten elements were most often included in the existing organisational assessment tools. A further three elements were identified from an inductive thematic analysis of descriptive articles, and were noted as important considerations in effective quality improvement in primary care settings. Although there are some validated tools available to primary care that identify and build quality, most are single-strategy approaches developed outside health care settings. There are currently no validated organisational improvement tools, designed specifically for primary health care, which combine all elements of practice improvement and whose use does not require extensive external facilitation.

  16. A National Survey of Primary Care Practice-Based Research Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, William M.; Oppenheimer, Caitlin C.; Hudson, Brenda L.; Benz, Jennifer; Finn, Amy; Hickner, John M.; Lanier, David; Gaylin, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Increasing numbers of primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are being developed in the United States to perform research relevant to everyday practice. To assess the current status and potential value of this resource, we surveyed US primary care PBRNs in operation from late 2003 to early 2004. METHODS We performed a Web-based survey and structured interviews with PBRN directors and administrative officers, assessing PBRNs’ history, size, location, organization, resources, operations, and productivity (funding obtained, studies performed, and articles published). RESULTS Of 111 primary care PBRNs identified, 89 (80%) responded to the survey. The 86 (77%) meeting the criteria for primary care PBRNs contained 1,871 practices, 12,957 physicians (mean 152 per PBRN, median 100), and 14.7 million patients (mean 229,880 per PBRN, median 105,000). Minority and underinsured patients were overrepresented. The average PBRN was young (4.4 ± 5.7 years): one-half had performed 3 or fewer studies. Three-quarters were affiliated with universities. Common research foci included prevention, diabetes, cardiovascular risk factors, and mental health. Respondent PBRNs had published more than 600 articles in peer-reviewed journals. PBRNs studying questions posed by outside researchers had more federal funding (84% vs 27%, P=.006). PBRNs citing funding as a weakness relied more on local resources to fund research projects (70% vs 40%, P=.036). CONCLUSIONS American primary care PBRNs are mainly young, diverse, and pursuing a variety of research foci. Most have university links and provide a dynamic town-gown relationship that could be a vital national resource for improving primary care, translating research into practice, and meeting the National Institutes of Health Roadmap goals. PBRNs merit further attention from both private and public funding agencies and researchers interested in studying the delivery of primary care. PMID:17548852

  17. A qualitative study of processes used to implement evidence-based care in a primary care practice

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Jacquelyn A; Kottke, Thomas E; McGinnis, Paul; Nichols, Jolleen; Parker, Emily D; Tillema, Juliana O; Hanson, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based guidelines for care of coronary heart disease patients are not fully implemented. Primary care practices provide most of the care for these patients. Objective. To learn how providers and staff in a busy primary care practice implement interventions to provide evidence-based care of coronary heart disease patients. Methods. We conducted a qualitative analysis of the responses to open-ended questions in nine electronically administered bimonthly surveys of key physicians, clinic staff and managers in the practice. Results. Ten to 16 (mean = 12.3) personnel responded to each survey. Nearly 30% were physicians and 40.5% were clinic staff. Four major themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: (i) giving data about not-at-goal patients to providers for care plan development; (ii) developing team roles and defining tasks; (iii) providing patient care and implementing care plans and (iv) providing technology support to generate useful, accurate data. The frequency that the subthemes were mentioned varied from survey to survey, but their mention persisted over the entire time of all nine surveys. Conclusions. Developing a system for implementing evidence-based care involves considerations of roles and teamwork, technology use to develop a patient registry and obtain needed clinical data, care processes for pre-visit planning, and between-visit care management. A registered nurse care manager is a central figure in implementing and sustaining the process. Implementing evidence-based guidelines is an ongoing process of revision, retraining and reinforcement. PMID:26089298

  18. The journey of primary care practices to meaningful use: a Colorado Beacon Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Fernald, Douglas H; Wearner, Robyn; Dickinson, W Perry

    2013-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 provides for incentive payments through Medicare and Medicaid for clinicians who implement electronic health records (EHRs) and use this technology meaningfully to improve patient care. There are few comprehensive descriptions of how primary care practices achieve the meaningful use of clinical data, including the formal stage 1 meaningful use requirements. Evaluation of the Colorado Beacon Consortium project included iterative qualitative analysis of practice narratives, provider and staff interviews, and separate focus groups with quality improvement (QI) advisors and staff from the regional health information exchange (HIE). Most practices described significant realignment of practice priorities and aims, which often required substantial education and training of physicians and staff. Re-engineering office processes, data collection protocols, EHRs, staff roles, and practice culture comprised the primary effort and commitment to attest to stage 1 meaningful use and subsequent meaningful use of clinical data. While realizing important benefits, practices bore a significant burden in learning the true capabilities of their EHRs with little effective support from vendors. Attestation was an important initial milestone in the process, but practices faced substantial ongoing work to use their data meaningfully for patient care and QI. Key resources were instrumental to these practices: local technical EHR expertise; collaborative learning mechanisms; and regular contact and support from QI advisors. Meeting the stage 1 requirements for incentives under Medicare and Medicaid meaningful use criteria is the first waypoint in a longer journey by primary care practices to the meaningful use of electronic data to continuously improve the care and health of their patients. The intensive re-engineering effort for stage 1 yielded practice changes consistent with larger practice aims and goals

  19. [Information management skills: a practical guide in primary care medicine].

    PubMed

    Pasche, O; Cornuz, J

    2005-10-26

    Evidence-Based Medicine has taught us how to evaluate the validity of medical information. At the present time, with the abundance of information available, a doctor often lacks the time needed to select and apply what medical literature suggests. Consequently a new paradigm is called for, namely that of Information Management. In order to reconcile evidence with the principle of reality, a carefully measured use of medical literature has become necessary. The information consulted must not only be valid, but relevant to the context of the patient and must be easily accessible. The article under consideration offers some indication as to how to improve the management of information on a day to day basis through a system of up-dating by email newsletters and by the advantageous use of prefiltered medical literature.

  20. Behavioral Health Integration into Primary Care: a Microsimulation of Financial Implications for Practices.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Landon, Bruce E; Williams, John W; Bitton, Asaf; Song, Zirui; Phillips, Russell S

    2017-09-12

    New payments from Medicare encourage behavioral health services to be integrated into primary care practice activities. To evaluate the financial impact for primary care practices of integrating behavioral health services. Microsimulation model. We simulated patients and providers at federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), non-FQHCs in urban and rural high-poverty areas, and practices outside of high-poverty areas surveyed by the National Association of Community Health Centers, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and National Health Interview Survey. A collaborative care model (CoCM), involving telephone-based follow-up from a behaviorist care manager, or a primary care behaviorist model (PCBM), involving an in-clinic behaviorist. Net revenue change per full-time physician. When behavioral health integration services were offered only to Medicare patients, net revenue was higher under CoCM (averaging $25,026 per MD in year 1 and $28,548/year in subsequent years) than PCBM (-$7052 in year 1 and -$3706/year in subsequent years). When behavioral health integration services were offered to all patients and were reimbursed by Medicare and private payers, only practices adopting the CoCM approach consistently gained net revenues. The outcomes of the model were sensitive to rates of patient referral acceptance, presentation, and therapy completion, but the CoCM approach remained consistently financially viable whereas PCBM would not be in the long-run across practice types. New Medicare payments may offer financial viability for primary care practices to integrate behavioral health services, but this viability depends on the approach toward care integration.

  1. Return on Investment in Electronic Health Records in Primary Care Practices: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Sanche, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of electronic health records (EHR) in clinical settings is considered pivotal to a patient-centered health care delivery system. However, uncertainty in cost recovery from EHR investments remains a significant concern in primary care practices. Objective Guided by the question of “When implemented in primary care practices, what will be the return on investment (ROI) from an EHR implementation?”, the objectives of this study are two-fold: (1) to assess ROI from EHR in primary care practices and (2) to identify principal factors affecting the realization of positive ROI from EHR. We used a break-even point, that is, the time required to achieve cost recovery from an EHR investment, as an ROI indicator of an EHR investment. Methods Given the complexity exhibited by most EHR implementation projects, this study adopted a retrospective mixed-method research approach, particularly a multiphase study design approach. For this study, data were collected from community-based primary care clinics using EHR systems. Results We collected data from 17 primary care clinics using EHR systems. Our data show that the sampled primary care clinics recovered their EHR investments within an average period of 10 months (95% CI 6.2-17.4 months), seeing more patients with an average increase of 27% in the active-patients-to-clinician-FTE (full time equivalent) ratio and an average increase of 10% in the active-patients-to-clinical-support-staff-FTE ratio after an EHR implementation. Our analysis suggests, with a 95% confidence level, that the increase in the number of active patients (P=.006), the increase in the active-patients-to-clinician-FTE ratio (P<.001), and the increase in the clinic net revenue (P<.001) are positively associated with the EHR implementation, likely contributing substantially to an average break-even point of 10 months. Conclusions We found that primary care clinics can realize a positive ROI with EHR. Our analysis of the variances in the

  2. Return on investment in electronic health records in primary care practices: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeona; Lortie, Michel A; Sanche, Steven

    2014-09-29

    The use of electronic health records (EHR) in clinical settings is considered pivotal to a patient-centered health care delivery system. However, uncertainty in cost recovery from EHR investments remains a significant concern in primary care practices. Guided by the question of "When implemented in primary care practices, what will be the return on investment (ROI) from an EHR implementation?", the objectives of this study are two-fold: (1) to assess ROI from EHR in primary care practices and (2) to identify principal factors affecting the realization of positive ROI from EHR. We used a break-even point, that is, the time required to achieve cost recovery from an EHR investment, as an ROI indicator of an EHR investment. Given the complexity exhibited by most EHR implementation projects, this study adopted a retrospective mixed-method research approach, particularly a multiphase study design approach. For this study, data were collected from community-based primary care clinics using EHR systems. We collected data from 17 primary care clinics using EHR systems. Our data show that the sampled primary care clinics recovered their EHR investments within an average period of 10 months (95% CI 6.2-17.4 months), seeing more patients with an average increase of 27% in the active-patients-to-clinician-FTE (full time equivalent) ratio and an average increase of 10% in the active-patients-to-clinical-support-staff-FTE ratio after an EHR implementation. Our analysis suggests, with a 95% confidence level, that the increase in the number of active patients (P=.006), the increase in the active-patients-to-clinician-FTE ratio (P<.001), and the increase in the clinic net revenue (P<.001) are positively associated with the EHR implementation, likely contributing substantially to an average break-even point of 10 months. We found that primary care clinics can realize a positive ROI with EHR. Our analysis of the variances in the time required to achieve cost recovery from EHR

  3. Health promotion and disease prevention in general practice and primary care: a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Stephen; Hann, Alison; Kendall, Sally; Gillam, Steve

    2017-08-11

    This paper reports the findings of a scoping review on the organisation and delivery of health improvement activities in general practice and the primary healthcare team. The project was designed to examine who delivers these interventions, where they are located, what approaches are developed in practices and how individual practices and the primary healthcare team organise such public health activities and how these contribute to health improvement. Our focus was on health promotion and prevention activities and aimed to identify the current extent of knowledge about the health improvement activities in general practice and the wider primary healthcare team. Many of the research studies reviewed had some details about the type, process, location or who provided the intervention. Little attention is paid in the literature to examining the impact of the organisational context on the way services are delivered or how this affects the effectiveness of health improvement interventions in general practice. We found that the focus of attention is mainly on individual prevention approaches with practices engaging in both primary and secondary prevention. Although many GPs do not take a population approach and focus on individual patients some do see health promotion as an integral part of practice - whether as individual approaches to primary or secondary health improvement or as a practice-based approach to improving the health of their patients. Based on our analysis we conclude that there is insufficient good evidence to support many of the health improvement interventions undertaken in general practice and primary care.

  4. Torture and war trauma survivors in primary care practice.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, H M; Dansky, L; Iacopino, V

    1996-01-01

    Close to 1 million refugees from around the world have entered the United States, fleeing repression, war, terrorism, and disease. It has been estimated that among these are thousands who have experienced torture. Many refugees and immigrants will appear in the offices of health care professionals with symptoms that may be related either directly or indirectly to torture. Both physical and psychological torture may result in long-term sequelae. Physical effects may be found in every organ system, but psychological effects are most commonly manifest in the symptoms of the post-traumatic stress disorder. For physicians to recognize how torture can affect health status, it is important to understand that history taking may be difficult and that little information may emerge that would explain the origins of scars, fractures, or disabilities. Recognizing the clues to a torture history allows physicians to assist patients in describing the trauma. In addition, knowing the subacute and chronic signs and symptoms of torture enables physicians to diagnose and treat often obscure symptoms with a much clearer understanding of the sources of the difficulty. Paying special attention to the interview process will support torture survivors in detailing often horrific events. PMID:8909162

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Practice Facilitation Within Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Baskerville, N. Bruce; Liddy, Clare; Hogg, William

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was a systematic review with a quantitative synthesis of the literature examining the overall effect size of practice facilitation and possible moderating factors. The primary outcome was the change in evidence-based practice behavior calculated as a standardized mean difference. METHODS In this systematic review, we searched 4 electronic databases and the reference lists of published literature reviews to find practice facilitation studies that identified evidence-based guideline implementation within primary care practices as the outcome. We included randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies published from 1966 to December 2010 in English language only peer-reviewed journals. Reviews of each study were conducted and assessed for quality; data were abstracted, and standardized mean difference estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Publication bias, influence, subgroup, and meta-regression analyses were also conducted. RESULTS Twenty-three studies contributed to the analysis for a total of 1,398 participating practices: 697 practice facilitation intervention and 701 control group practices. The degree of variability between studies was consistent with what would be expected to occur by chance alone (I2 = 20%). An overall effect size of 0.56 (95% CI, 0.43–0.68) favored practice facilitation (z = 8.76; P <.001), and publication bias was evident. Primary care practices are 2.76 (95% CI, 2.18–3.43) times more likely to adopt evidence-based guidelines through practice facilitation. Meta-regression analysis indicated that tailoring (P = .05), the intensity of the intervention (P = .03), and the number of intervention practices per facilitator (P = .004) modified evidence-based guideline adoption. CONCLUSION Practice facilitation has a moderately robust effect on evidence-based guideline adoption within primary care. Implementation fidelity factors, such as

  6. Primary care quality improvement from a practice facilitator’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Practice facilitation has proven to be effective at improving care delivery. Practice facilitators are healthcare professionals who work with and support other healthcare providers. To the best of our knowledge, very few studies have explored the perspective of facilitators. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the barriers that facilitators face during the facilitation process and to identify approaches used to overcome these barriers to help practices move towards positive change. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with four practice facilitators who worked with 84 primary care practices in Eastern Ontario, Canada over a period of five years (2007–2012). The transcripts were analyzed independently by three members of the research team using an open coding technique. A qualitative data analysis using immersion/crystallization technique was applied to interpret the interview transcripts. Results Common barriers identified by the facilitators included accessibility to the practice (e.g., difficulty scheduling meetings, short meetings), organizational behaviour (team organization, team conflicts, etc.), challenges with practice engagement (e.g., lack of interest, lack of trust), resistance to change, and competing priorities. To help practices move towards positive change the facilitators had to tailor their approach, integrate themselves, be persistent with practices, and exhibit flexibility. Conclusions The consensus on redesigning and transforming primary care in North America and around the world is rapidly growing. Practice facilitation has been pivotal in materializing the transformation in the way primary care practices deliver care. This study provides an exclusive insight into facilitator approaches which will assist the design and implementation of small- and large-scale facilitation interventions. PMID:24490746

  7. Practice assistants in primary care in Germany - associations with organizational attributes on job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Gavartina, Amina; Zaroti, Stavria; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Miksch, Antje; Ose, Dominik; Campbell, Stephen M; Goetz, Katja

    2013-08-05

    Job satisfaction and organizational attributes in primary care teams are important issues as they affect clinical outcomes and the quality of health care provided. As practice assistants are an integral part of these teams it is important to gain insight into their views on job satisfaction and organizational attributes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the job satisfaction of practice assistants and the organizational attributes within their general practices in Germany and to explore the existence of possible associations. This observational study was based on a job satisfaction survey and measurement of organizational attributes in general practices in the German federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Job satisfaction was measured with the 10-item 'Warr-Cook-Wall job satisfaction scale'. Organizational attributes were evaluated with the 21-items 'survey of organizational attributes for primary care' (SOAPC). Linear regression analyses were performed in which each of SOAPC scales and the overall score of SOAPC was treated as outcome variables. 586 practice assistants out of 794 respondents (73.8%) from 234 general practices completed the questionnaire. Practice assistants were mostly satisfied with their colleagues and least of all satisfied with their income and recognition for their work. The regression analysis showed that 'freedom of working method' and 'recognition of work', the employment status of practice assistants and the mode of practice were almost always significantly associated with each subscale and overall score of SOAPC. Job satisfaction is highly associated with different aspects of organizational attributes for primary care ('communication', 'decision-making' and 'stress'). Consequently, improved job satisfaction could lead to a better-organized primary care team. This implication should be investigated directly in further intervention studies with a special focus on improving the recognition for work and income.

  8. Why primary care practices should become digital health information hubs for their patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Aaron; Nowak, Samantha

    2014-11-25

    Two interesting health care trends are currently occurring: 1) patient-facing technologies, such as personal health records, patient portals, and mobile health apps, are being adopted at rapid rates, and 2) primary care, which includes family practice, is being promoted as essential to reducing health care costs and improving health care outcomes. While these trends are notable and commendable, both remain subject to significant fragmentation and incentive misalignments, which has resulted in significant data coordination and value generation challenges. In particular, patient-facing technologies designed to increase care coordination, often fall prey to the very digital fragmentation issues they are supposed to overcome. Additionally, primary care providers are treating patients that may have considerable health information histories, but generating a single view of such multi-source data is nearly impossible. We contribute to this debate by proposing that primary care practices become digital health information hubs for their patients. Such hubs would offer health data coordination in a medically professional setting with the benefits of expert, trustworthy advice coupled with active patient engagement. We acknowledge challenges including: costs, information quality and provenance, willingness-to-share information and records, willingness-to-use (by both providers and patients), primary care scope creep, and determinations of technical and process effectiveness. Even with such potential challenges, we strongly believe that more debate is needed on this topic prior to full implementation of various health information technology incentives and reform programs currently being designed and enacted throughout the world. Ultimately, if we do not provide a meaningful way for the full spectrum of health information to be used by both providers and patients, especially early in the health care continuum, effectively improving health outcomes may remain elusive. We view

  9. Implementation of quality improvement skills by primary care teams: case study of a large academic practice.

    PubMed

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Singh, Simran; Wagner, Carol; Augustine, Sarah; Singh, Mamta K

    2014-04-01

    Continuous quality improvement (QI) is important to primary care in general, and is emphasized as a key tenet of the primary care patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. While team-based QI activities within the PCMH model are expected, concerns exist as to how successful efforts have been at implementing team-driven QI projects. To (a) identify opportunities and challenges to QI efforts in a large primary care practice in order to (b) develop action plans to facilitate QI work into primary care teams. We obtained qualitative and quantitative information about existing primary care team QI initiatives. Eleven interdisciplinary primary care teams and 4 facilitators/coaches. We conducted unstructured interviews and gathered documentation from primary care team members about QI efforts to (a) characterize team-based QI progress and (b) identify barriers and facilitators. In the 18 months since local leadership prioritized conducting team-based QI projects, team members described multiple exposures to QI training, coaching resources, and data/analysis support. No team developed a formal aim statement. Six of the 11 teams completed any steps beyond the initial team discussion. Four teams attempted to apply an intervention. Challenges included team time and competing demands/priorities; 3 of the 4 teams attempting to implement a project credited a data/informatics facilitator for their progress. In this large academic primary care clinic setting, interdisciplinary team training in QI, support for data collection, and dedicated coaching resources produced few sustainable continuous QI initiatives. Several potentially modifiable barriers to initiation, completion, and sustainability of QI initiatives by primary care teams were identified.

  10. Family physicians’ attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care - Suez Canal University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. The aim of the work: to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. Methods This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Results Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians′ attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians′ practice. Conclusion Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management. PMID:24244792

  11. Organizational culture predicts job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness in pediatric primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Brazil, Kevin; Wakefield, Dorothy B; Cloutier, Michelle M; Tennen, Howard; Hall, Charles B

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing understanding that organizational culture is related to an organization's performance. However, few studies have examined organizational culture in medical group practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of organizational culture on provider job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness in primary care pediatric practices. This cross-sectional study included 36 primary care pediatric practices located in Connecticut. There were 374 participants in this study, which included 127 clinicians and 247 nonclinicians. Office managers completed a questionnaire that recorded staff and practice characteristics; all participants completed the Organizational Culture Scale, a questionnaire that assessed the practice on four cultural domains (i.e., group, developmental, rational, and hierarchical), and the Primary Care Organizational Questionnaire that evaluated perceived effectiveness and job satisfaction. Hierarchical linear models using a restricted maximum likelihood estimation method were used to evaluate whether the practice culture types predicted job satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Group culture was positively associated with both satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. In contrast, hierarchical and rational culture were negatively associated with both job satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. These relationships were true for clinicians, nonclinicians, and the practice as a whole. Our study demonstrates that practice culture is associated with job satisfaction and perceived clinical effectiveness and that a group culture was associated with high job satisfaction and perceived effectiveness.

  12. Practice Facilitation to Improve Diabetes Care in Primary Care: A Report From the EPIC Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, W. Perry; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Nutting, Paul A.; Emsermann, Caroline B.; Tutt, Brandon; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Fisher, Lawrence; Harbrecht, Marjie; Gottsman, Allyson; West, David R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We investigated 3 approaches for implementing the Chronic Care Model to improve diabetes care: (1) practice facilitation over 6 months using a reflective adaptive process (RAP) approach; (2) practice facilitation for up to 18 months using a continuous quality improvement (CQI) approach; and (3) providing self-directed (SD) practices with model information and resources, without facilitation. METHODS We conducted a cluster-randomized trial, called Enhancing Practice, Improving Care (EPIC), that compared these approaches among 40 small to midsized primary care practices. At baseline and 9 months and 18 months after enrollment, we assessed practice diabetes quality measures from chart audits and Practice Culture Assessment scores from clinician and staff surveys. RESULTS Although measures of the quality of diabetes care improved in all 3 groups (all P <.05), improvement was greater in CQI practices compared with both SD practices (P <.0001) and RAP practices (P <.0001); additionally, improvement was greater in SD practices compared with RAP practices (P <.05). In RAP practices, Change Culture scores showed a trend toward improvement at 9 months (P = .07) but decreased below baseline at 18 months (P <.05), while Work Culture scores decreased from 9 to 18 months (P <.05). Both scores were stable over time in SD and CQI practices. CONCLUSIONS Traditional CQI interventions are effective at improving measures of the quality of diabetes care, but may not improve practice change and work culture. Short-term practice facilitation based on RAP principles produced less improvement in quality measures than CQI or SD interventions and also did not produce sustained improvements in practice culture. PMID:24445098

  13. Measuring Organizational Attributes of Primary Care Practices: Development of a New Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; John Orzano, A; Nutting, Paul A; Perry Dickinson, W; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Hahn, Karissa; Gibel, Michelle; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop an instrument to measure organizational attributes relevant for family practices using the perspectives of clinicians, nurses, and staff. Data Sources/Study Setting Clinicians, nurses, and office staff (n = 640) from 51 community family medicine practices. Design A survey, designed to measure a practices' internal resources for change, for use in family medicine practices was created by a multidisciplinary panel of experts in primary care research and health care organizational performance. This survey was administered in a cross-sectional study to a sample of diverse practices participating in an intervention trial. A factor analysis identified groups of questions relating to latent constructs of practices' internal resources for capacity to change. ANOVA methods were used to confirm that the factors differentiated practices. Data Collection The survey was administered to all staff from 51 practices. Principal Findings The factor analysis resulted in four stable and internally consistent factors. Three of these factors, “communication,” “decision-making,” and “stress/chaos,” describe resources for change in primary care practices. One factor, labeled “history of change,” may be useful in assessing the success of interventions. Conclusions A 21-item questionnaire can reliably measure four important organizational attributes relevant to family practices. These attributes can be used both as outcome measures as well as important features for targeting system interventions. PMID:17489913

  14. Measuring organizational attributes of primary care practices: development of a new instrument.

    PubMed

    Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; John Orzano, A; Nutting, Paul A; Perry Dickinson, W; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Hahn, Karissa; Gibel, Michelle; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2007-06-01

    To develop an instrument to measure organizational attributes relevant for family practices using the perspectives of clinicians, nurses, and staff. Clinicians, nurses, and office staff (n=640) from 51 community family medicine practices. A survey, designed to measure a practices' internal resources for change, for use in family medicine practices was created by a multidisciplinary panel of experts in primary care research and health care organizational performance. This survey was administered in a cross-sectional study to a sample of diverse practices participating in an intervention trial. A factor analysis identified groups of questions relating to latent constructs of practices' internal resources for capacity to change. ANOVA methods were used to confirm that the factors differentiated practices. The survey was administered to all staff from 51 practices. The factor analysis resulted in four stable and internally consistent factors. Three of these factors, "communication,"decision-making," and "stress/chaos," describe resources for change in primary care practices. One factor, labeled "history of change," may be useful in assessing the success of interventions. A 21-item questionnaire can reliably measure four important organizational attributes relevant to family practices. These attributes can be used both as outcome measures as well as important features for targeting system interventions.

  15. Primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kitai, A

    1986-07-01

    Development of primary care in Japan in still relatively unorganized and unstructured. As mentioned above, the author describes some strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese primary care system. In addressing the weaknesses the following suggestions are offered for the Japanese primary care delivery system: Increase the number of emergency rooms for all day, especially on holidays and at night. Introduce an appointment system. Introduce an open system of hospitals. Coordinate with public hospitals and primary care clinics. Organize the referral system between private practitioners and community hospitals. Increase the number of paramedical staff. Strengthen group practice among primary care physicians. Increase the establishment of departments of primary care practice with government financial incentives to medical schools and teaching hospitals. Develop a more active and direct teaching role for primary care practice or family practice at undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Improve and maintain present health insurance payment method, shifting from quantity of care to quality and continuity of care. Introduce formal continuing education. Introduce formal training programs of primary care and strengthen ambulatory care teaching programs.

  16. Registered Nurses in Primary Care: Emerging New Roles and Contributions to Team-Based Care in High-Performing Practices.

    PubMed

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D; Wagner, Edward H

    2017-03-20

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care management, their own daily schedule of patient visits and contacts, and considerable autonomy in the care of their patients.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  17. Effects of Hospital Systems on Medical Home Transformation in Primary Care Residency Training Practices.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Kyle; Hall, Tristen; Fernald, Douglas; Staff, Thomas J; Buscaj, Emilie; Allen, Jessica Cornett; Onysko, Mary; Dickinson, W Perry

    2016-11-23

    Most primary care residency training practices have close financial and administrative relationships with teaching hospitals and health systems. Many residency practices have begun integrating the core principles of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) into clinical workflows and educational experiences. Little is known about how the relationships with hospitals and health systems affect these transformation efforts. Data from the Colorado Residency PCMH Project were analyzed. Results show that teaching hospitals and health systems have significant opportunities to influence residency practices' transformation, particularly in the areas of supporting team-based care, value-based payment reforms, and health information technology.

  18. Using the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to identify practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Beehler, Gregory P; Funderburk, Jennifer S; King, Paul R; Wade, Michael; Possemato, Kyle

    2015-12-01

    Primary care-mental health integration (PC-MHI) is growing in popularity. To determine program success, it is essential to know if PC-MHI services are being delivered as intended. The investigation examines responses to the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to explore PC-MHI provider practice patterns. Latent class analysis was used to identify clusters of PC-MHI providers based on their self-report of adherence on the PPAQ. Analysis revealed five provider clusters with varying levels of adherence to PC-MHI model components. Across clusters, adherence was typically lowest in relation to collaboration with other primary care staff. Clusters also differed significantly in regard to provider educational background and psychotherapy approach, level of clinic integration, and previous PC-MHI training. The PPAQ can be used to identify PC-MHI provider practice patterns that have relevance for future clinical effectiveness studies, development of provider training, and quality improvement initiatives.

  19. Childhood asthma: considerations for primary care practice and chronic disease management in the village of care.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Childhood asthma is at historically high levels, with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite more than two decades of improved understanding of childhood asthma care and the evolution of beneficial medications, widespread control remains poor, leading to suboptimal patient outcomes and quality of life. This lack of control results in excessive emergency department use, hospitalizations, and inappropriate and/or unnecessary costs to the health care system. Advanced practice models that incorporate community-based approaches and services for childhood asthma are needed. Innovative, community-included methods of care to address the burden of childhood asthma may provide examples for care of other chronic diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of open-access endoscopy in routine primary-care practice.

    PubMed

    Charles, Roger J; Cooper, Gregory S; Wong, Richard C K; Sivak, Michael V; Chak, Amitabh

    2003-02-01

    Direct referral of patients for endoscopic procedures without prior consultation (open-access endoscopy) has become commonplace. However, the effect of open-access endoscopy on the care of patients in routine clinical practice has not been studied. The impact of open-access endoscopy was examined in 168 consecutive patients referred from 8 primary-care practices to our tertiary hospital-based endoscopy center. The effectiveness of open-access endoscopy was assessed by review of office medical records at the primary-care practice sites for a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Outcome measures evaluated included postprocedure communication between primary-care physician and patient, primary-care physician adherence to postprocedure recommendations, and the need for subsequent diagnostic evaluation and/or consultation. The mean age of the 168 patients was 60 years; 56 (33%) underwent EGD and 112 (67%) had colonoscopy; 65% were from hospital-based practices and 35% from community practices. The indication(s) for 77% of the procedures met American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines for the appropriate use of endoscopy. An office follow-up was noted for 82% of patients after the open-access procedure. Discussion of results was documented in 61% of the patient charts. Compliance with diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations was documented, respectively, in 75% and 90% of patient charts. A follow-up GI consultation was requested for only 7% of the patients. Open-access endoscopy in the primary-care setting is effective to the extent that subsequent GI consultations are rare and the level of compliance with endoscopist recommendations is high. However, documentation of communication of the results of endoscopy with the patient can be improved.

  1. Office systems for promoting screening mammography. A survey of primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Melville, S K; Luckmann, R; Coghlin, J; Gann, P

    1993-12-01

    Office tracking, scheduling, and reminder systems have been shown to improve utilization of screening mammography, but little is known about the use of these systems by primary care physicians. We surveyed 132 primary care and obstetrics and gynecology practices affiliated with an independent practice association model health maintenance organization in central Massachusetts to determine their use of reminder, scheduling, and follow-up systems, and education and counseling services aimed at increasing screening mammography rates. The use of chart flags to remind physicians of a patient's need for mammography screening was reported by 30% of practices. Thirty-one percent reported the use of flow sheets, and 27% reported the use of mail or telephone patient reminders. At least one of these three systems was used by 57% of the practices, whereas 43% reported having none of these three systems. Variations in the use of these office systems were related to specialty type, physician number, and clinical staffing. The majority of practices (77%) reported using written educational materials, and 42% offered prevention counseling with nonphysician staff. Very few offices (8%) reported using mail or telephone reminders for previously scheduled appointments. Despite the proven effectiveness of reminder systems for screening mammography, many practices do not have a system in place. Promotion of reminder systems in primary care practices could have a substantial impact on mammography utilization.

  2. Using knowledge as the basis for evidence-based practice in primary care nurses.

    PubMed

    Bennasar-Veny, M; Gonzalez-Torrente, S; De Pedro-Gomez, J; Morales-Asencio, J M; Pericas-Beltran, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perception of primary care nurses regarding the need and use of knowledge from research, as a basis for evidence-based practice in their workplace. Additionally, the study aimed to determine which factors might hinder or enable implementation into daily practice. Evidence-based practice involves integrating best results in research with clinical experience, which enables us to provide a higher quality of care, as well as to optimize the care given. International studies show that nurses feel that there are still many barriers that hinder their doing research and incorporating new findings into clinical practice; although in the field of primary care, few studies have been carried out. This descriptive qualitative study design used focus groups to collect data. This study was carried out in Spanish primary care centres. Forty-six registered nurses took part in this study and were divided into five focus groups. Three significant themes emerged: awareness of the need to use research, nurses as knowledge-generation agents and motivation to use research despite barriers. A limited number of participants and a convenience sample were used. Nurses recognize that professional health care must be based on evidence obtained from daily work - both originated by their colleagues and by themselves - and they are willing to work on it although they perceive a lack of competence for this purpose and demand support from their institutions. Primary care institutions should empower nursing coordinators as leaders of evidence-based practice and implicate clinical nurses from the beginning on the implementation of guidelines. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Building managed primary care practice networks to deliver better clinical care: a qualitative semi-structured interview study.

    PubMed

    Pawa, Jasmine; Robson, John; Hull, Sally

    2017-09-11

    Primary care practices are increasingly working in larger groups. In 2009, all 36 primary care practices in the London borough of Tower Hamlets were grouped geographically into eight managed practice networks to improve the quality of care they delivered. Quantitative evaluation has shown improved clinical outcomes. To provide insight into the process of network implementation, including the aims, facilitating factors, and barriers, from both the clinical and managerial perspectives. A qualitative study of network implementation in the London borough of Tower Hamlets, which serves a socially disadvantaged and ethnically diverse population. Nineteen semi-structured interviews were carried out with doctors, nurses, and managers, and were informed by existing literature on integrated care and GP networks. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and thematic analysis used to analyse emerging themes. Interviewees agreed that networks improved clinical care and reduced variation in practice performance. Network implementation was facilitated by the balance struck between 'a given structure' and network autonomy to adopt local solutions. Improved use of data, including patient recall and peer performance indicators, were viewed as critical key factors. Targeted investment provided the necessary resources to achieve this. Barriers to implementing networks included differences in practice culture, a reluctance to share data, and increased workload. Commissioners and providers were positive about the implementation of GP networks as a way to improve the quality of clinical care in Tower Hamlets. The issues that arose may be of relevance to other areas implementing similar quality improvement programmes at scale. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  4. Rural-Urban Differences in Primary Care Physicians' Practice Patterns, Characteristics, and Incomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, William B.; Wallace, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Low salaries and difficult work conditions are perceived as a major barrier to the recruitment of primary care physicians to rural settings. Purpose: To examine rural-urban differences in physician work effort, physician characteristics, and practice characteristics, and to determine whether, after adjusting for any observed differences,…

  5. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  6. Structured Pro-Active Care for Chronic Depression by Practice Nurses in Primary Care: A Qualitative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Madeleine; Walters, Kate; Drennan, Vari; Buszewicz, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This qualitative study explored the impact and appropriateness of structured pro-active care reviews by practice nurses for patients with chronic or recurrent depression and dysthymia within the ProCEED trial. ProCEED (Pro-active Care and its Evaluation for Enduring Depression) was a United Kingdom wide randomised controlled trial, comparing usual general practitioner care with structured ‘pro-active care’ which involved 3 monthly review appointments with practice nurses over 2 years for patients with chronic or recurrent depression. Method In-depth interviews were completed with 41 participants: 26 patients receiving pro-active care and 15 practice nurses providing this care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using a ‘framework’ approach. Results Patients perceived the practice nurses to be appropriate professionals to engage with regarding their depression and most nurses felt confident in a case management role. The development of a therapeutic alliance between the patient and nurse was central to this model and, where it appeared lacking, dissatisfaction was felt by both patients and nurses with a likely negative impact on outcomes. Patient and nurse factors impacting on the therapeutic alliance were identified and nurse typologies explored. Discussion Pro-active care reviews utilising practice nurses as case managers were found acceptable by the majority of patients and practice nurses and may be a suitable way to provide care for patients with long-term depression in primary care. Motivated and interested practice nurses could be an appropriate and valuable resource for this patient group. This has implications for resource decisions by clinicians and commissioners within primary care. PMID:24069451

  7. Developing a facilitation model to promote organisational development in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Rhydderch, Melody; Edwards, Adrian; Marshall, Martin; Elwyn, Glyn; Grol, Richard

    2006-06-19

    The relationship between effective organisation of general practices and health improvement is widely accepted. The Maturity Matrix is an instrument designed to assess organisational development in general practice settings and to stimulate quality improvement. It is undertaken by a practice team with the aid of a facilitator. There is a tradition in the primary care systems in many countries of using practice visitors to educate practice teams about how to improve. However the role of practice visitors as facilitators who enable teams to plan practice-led organisational development using quality improvement instruments is less well understood. The objectives of the study were to develop and explore a facilitation model to support practice teams in stimulating organisational development using a quality improvement instrument called the Maturity Matrix. A qualitative study based on transcript analysis was adopted. A model of facilitation was constructed based on a review of relevant literature. Audio tapes of Maturity Matrix assessment sessions with general practices were transcribed and facilitator skills were compared to the model. The sample consisted of two facilitators working with twelve general practices based in UK primary care. The facilitation model suggested that four areas describing eighteen skills were important. The four areas are structuring the session, obtaining consensus, handling group dynamics and enabling team learning. Facilitators effectively employed skills associated with the first three areas, but less able to consistently stimulate team learning. This study suggests that facilitators need careful preparation for their role and practices need protected time in order to make best use of practice-led quality improvement instruments. The role of practice visitor as a facilitator is becoming important as the need to engender ownership of the quality improvement process by practices increases.

  8. Developing a facilitation model to promote organisational development in primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Rhydderch, Melody; Edwards, Adrian; Marshall, Martin; Elwyn, Glyn; Grol, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background The relationship between effective organisation of general practices and health improvement is widely accepted. The Maturity Matrix is an instrument designed to assess organisational development in general practice settings and to stimulate quality improvement. It is undertaken by a practice team with the aid of a facilitator. There is a tradition in the primary care systems in many countries of using practice visitors to educate practice teams about how to improve. However the role of practice visitors as facilitators who enable teams to plan practice-led organisational development using quality improvement instruments is less well understood. The objectives of the study were to develop and explore a facilitation model to support practice teams in stimulating organisational development using a quality improvement instrument called the Maturity Matrix. A qualitative study based on transcript analysis was adopted. Method A model of facilitation was constructed based on a review of relevant literature. Audio tapes of Maturity Matrix assessment sessions with general practices were transcribed and facilitator skills were compared to the model. The sample consisted of two facilitators working with twelve general practices based in UK primary care. Results The facilitation model suggested that four areas describing eighteen skills were important. The four areas are structuring the session, obtaining consensus, handling group dynamics and enabling team learning. Facilitators effectively employed skills associated with the first three areas, but less able to consistently stimulate team learning. Conclusion This study suggests that facilitators need careful preparation for their role and practices need protected time in order to make best use of practice-led quality improvement instruments. The role of practice visitor as a facilitator is becoming important as the need to engender ownership of the quality improvement process by practices increases. PMID:16784540

  9. Implementing collaborative care for depression treatment in primary care: A cluster randomized evaluation of a quality improvement practice redesign

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Meta-analyses show collaborative care models (CCMs) with nurse care management are effective for improving primary care for depression. This study aimed to develop CCM approaches that could be sustained and spread within Veterans Affairs (VA). Evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) uses QI approaches within a research/clinical partnership to redesign care. The study used EBQI methods for CCM redesign, tested the effectiveness of the locally adapted model as implemented, and assessed the contextual factors shaping intervention effectiveness. Methods The study intervention is EBQI as applied to CCM implementation. The study uses a cluster randomized design as a formative evaluation tool to test and improve the effectiveness of the redesign process, with seven intervention and three non-intervention VA primary care practices in five different states. The primary study outcome is patient antidepressant use. The context evaluation is descriptive and uses subgroup analysis. The primary context evaluation measure is naturalistic primary care clinician (PCC) predilection to adopt CCM. For the randomized evaluation, trained telephone research interviewers enrolled consecutive primary care patients with major depression in the evaluation, referred enrolled patients in intervention practices to the implemented CCM, and re-surveyed at seven months. Results Interviewers enrolled 288 CCM site and 258 non-CCM site patients. Enrolled intervention site patients were more likely to receive appropriate antidepressant care (66% versus 43%, p = 0.01), but showed no significant difference in symptom improvement compared to usual care. In terms of context, only 40% of enrolled patients received complete care management per protocol. PCC predilection to adopt CCM had substantial effects on patient participation, with patients belonging to early adopter clinicians completing adequate care manager follow-up significantly more often than patients of clinicians with low

  10. Effectiveness of a primary care practice intervention for increasing colorectal cancer screening in Appalachian Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Dignan, Mark; Shelton, Brent; Slone, Stacey A; Tolle, Cheri; Mohammad, Sohail; Schoenberg, Nancy; Pearce, Kevin; Van Meter, Emily; Ely, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    This report describes findings from a randomized controlled trial of an intervention to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in primary care practices in Appalachian Kentucky. Sixty-six primary care practices were randomized to early or delayed intervention groups. The intervention was provided at practices using academic detailing, a method of education where providers receive information on a specific topic through personal contact. Data were collected in cross-sectional surveys of medical records at baseline and six months post-intervention. A total of 3844 medical records were reviewed at baseline and 3751 at the six-month follow-up. At baselines, colonoscopy was recommended more frequently (43.4%) than any other screening modality, followed by fecal occult blood testing (18.0%), flexible sigmoidoscopy (0.4%), and double-contrast barium enema (0.3%). Rates of documented screening results were higher for all practices at the six-month follow-up for colonoscopy (31.8% vs 29.6%) and fecal occult blood testing (12.2% vs 11.2%). For early intervention practices that recommended screening, colonoscopy rates increased by 15.7% at six months compared to an increase of 2.4% in the delayed intervention practices (p=.01). Using academic detailing to reach rural primary care providers with a CRC screening intervention was associated with an increase in colonoscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How eight primary care practices initiated and maintained quality monitoring and reporting.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Philip D; Wroth, Thomas; Halladay, Jacquie; Bray, Paul; Spragens, Lynn; Stearns, Sally; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2011-01-01

    Primary care medical practices increasingly are asked by payers, employers, and government agencies to report quality data, but the process of doing so is not well delineated. Providers and office staff in a diverse sample of eight primary care practices in North Carolina comprised this study population. Interviews were conducted and self-administered questionnaires were disseminated in practices that were successfully reporting data to one or more of 4 reporting programs. Our measures included responses to open-ended and Likert scale questions about experiences and potential facilitators and barriers, as well as subscales of the Practice Assessment tool and the Culture of Group Practices instrument. Study practices had stronger change histories, higher information and quality emphases, and lower business emphases than historical comparison practices. Motivation to participate, a leader who catalyzes the process, and establishment of new systems characterized successful practices. Staff time, information technology challenges, and resistance from some providers were common barriers. Practices achieve a sustainability state when numerous barriers have been successfully overcome and tangible results achieved from the process. Implementing and sustaining quality reporting requires a complex set of motivators, facilitators, and strategies to overcome inherent barriers that can present themselves in practices that seek to implement changes in this direction.

  12. Development of a questionnaire to measure primary care physicians' scope of practice.

    PubMed

    Ie, Kenya; Ichikawa, Shuhei; Takemura, Yousuke C

    2015-11-02

    Despite an increase in research devoted to primary care attributes, the patient benefits and educational aspects of broad scope practice of primary care physicians (PCPs) have not been well studied, due to a lack of validated measurement in each country. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Scope of Practice Inventory (SPI) to measure physicians' scope of practice within the Japanese primary care setting. The questionnaire was developed in seven phases: 1) item generation, 2) consensus method for necessity of each item, 3) Delphi process for the importance of each item, 4) pilot tests to limit the number of items, 5) preliminary cross-sectional study to examine factor structure and to validate the construct validity, 6) evaluation of internal consistency and intra-class reliability, and 7) evaluation of external validity. To confirm the interpretability of the SPI, the determinants of the SPI using a generalized linear model were evaluated. Among 359 items generated by a focus group, 180 reached a defined consensus on face and content validity after the Delphi process. After deletion of items with Kappa values less than 0.6, 120 items were selected for the preliminary study. The principle component analysis using responses from 451 PCPs eliminated 52 items. The final 68-point SPI had three subdomains: Inpatient care, 25 items; Urgent care and minor procedures, 27 items; and Ambulatory care, 16 items. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability for total SPI and each subdomain revealed acceptable reliability. Male sex, less years since graduation, working in a hospital, sub-urban or rural setting, having remote experience, and having board certification as a PCP were positively associated with higher SPI. We developed a self-administered 68-point scale, the SPI, which had satisfactory validity and reliability. Primary care quality and educational research using SPI are expected to contribute to comprehensive and efficient health care

  13. Primary care physician assistant and advance practice nurses roles: Patient healthcare utilization, unmet need, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine M; Morgan, Perri; Jackson, George L

    2016-12-01

    Team-based care involving physician assistants (PAs) and advance practice nurses (APNs) is one strategy for improving access and quality of care. PA/APNs perform a variety of roles on primary care teams. However, limited research describes the relationship between PA/APN role and patient outcomes. We examined multiple outcomes associated with primary care PA/APN roles. In this cross-sectional survey analysis, we studied adult respondents to the 2010 Health Tracking Household Survey. Outcomes included primary care and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, unmet need, and satisfaction. PA/APN role was categorized as physician only (no PA/APN visits; reference), usual provider (PA/APN provide majority of primary care visits) or supplemental provider (physician as usual provider, PA/APN provide a subset of visits). Multivariable logistic and multinomial logistic regressions were performed. Compared to people with physician only care, patients with PA/APNs as usual providers [5-9 visits RRR=2.4 (CI 1.8-3.4), 10+ visits RRR=3.0 (CI 2.0-4.5): reference 2-4 visits] and supplemental providers had increased risk of having 5 or more primary care visits [5-9 visits RRR=1.3 (CI 1.0-1.6)]. Patients reporting PA/APN as supplemental providers had increased risk of emergency department utilization [2+ visits: RRR 1.8 (CI 1.3, 2.5)], and lower satisfaction [very dissatisfied: RRR 1.8 (CI 1.03-3.0)]. No differences were seen for hospitalizations or unmet need. Healthcare utilization patterns and satisfaction varied between adults with PA/APN in different roles, but reported unmet need did not. These findings suggest a wide range of outcomes should be considered when identifying the best PA/APN role on primary care teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating Computer Capabilities in a Primary Care Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Adolfo J.; Binns, Helen J.; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to assess computer capabilities in a primary care practice-based research network and to understand how receptive the practices were to new ideas for automation of practice activities and research. METHOD This study was conducted among members of the Pediatric Practice Research Group (PPRG). A survey to assess computer capabilities was developed to explore hardware types, software programs, Internet connectivity and data transmission; views on privacy and security; and receptivity to future electronic data collection approaches. RESULTS Of the 40 PPRG practices participating in the study during the autumn of 2001, all used IBM-compatible systems. Of these, 45% used stand-alone desktops, 40% had networked desktops, and approximately 15% used laptops and minicomputers. A variety of software packages were used, with most practices (82%) having software for some aspect of patient care documentation, patient accounting (90%), business support (60%), and management reports and analysis (97%). The main obstacles to expanding use of computers in patient care were insufficient staff training (63%) and privacy concerns (82%). If provided with training and support, most practices indicated they were willing to consider an array of electronic data collection options for practice-based research activities. CONCLUSIONS There is wide variability in hardware and software use in the pediatric practice setting. Implementing electronic data collection in the PPRG would require a substantial start-up effort and ongoing training and support at the practice site. PMID:15506573

  15. Evaluating computer capabilities in a primary care practice-based research network.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Binns, Helen J; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer

    2004-01-01

    We wanted to assess computer capabilities in a primary care practice-based research network and to understand how receptive the practices were to new ideas for automation of practice activities and research. This study was conducted among members of the Pediatric Practice Research Group (PPRG). A survey to assess computer capabilities was developed to explore hardware types, software programs, Internet connectivity and data transmission; views on privacy and security; and receptivity to future electronic data collection approaches. Of the 40 PPRG practices participating in the study during the autumn of 2001, all used IBM-compatible systems. Of these, 45% used stand-alone desktops, 40% had networked desktops, and approximately 15% used laptops and minicomputers. A variety of software packages were used, with most practices (82%) having software for some aspect of patient care documentation, patient accounting (90%), business support (60%), and management reports and analysis (97%). The main obstacles to expanding use of computers in patient care were insufficient staff training (63%) and privacy concerns (82%). If provided with training and support, most practices indicated they were willing to consider an array of electronic data collection options for practice-based research activities. There is wide variability in hardware and software use in the pediatric practice setting. Implementing electronic data collection in the PPRG would require a substantial start-up effort and ongoing training and support at the practice site.

  16. Variations in Mental Health Diagnosis and Prescribing Across Pediatric Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Stephanie L.; Ross, Michelle E.; Song, Lihai; McCarn, Banita; Steffes, Jennifer; Liu, Weiwei; Margolis, Benyamin; Azuine, Romuladus; Gotlieb, Edward; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Localio, Russell; Wasserman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care pediatricians increasingly care for children’s mental health problems, but little is known about practice-level variation in diagnosis and psychotropic medication prescribing practices. METHODS: This retrospective review of electronic heath records from 43 US primary care practices included children aged 4 to 18 years with ≥1 office visit from January 1, 2009, to June 30, 2014. We examined variability in diagnosis and psychotropic prescribing across practices using logistic regression with practice fixed effects and evaluated associations of the availability of colocated or community-based mental health providers or the proportion of children in foster care with diagnosis and prescribing using generalized linear mixed models. RESULTS: Among 294 748 children, 40 932 (15%) received a mental health diagnosis and 39 695 (14%) were prescribed psychotropic medication. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder was most commonly diagnosed (1%–16% per practice). The proportion of children receiving any psychotropic medication (4%-26%) and the proportion receiving ≥2 medication classes (1%-12%) varied across practices. Prescribing of specific medication classes also varied (stimulants, 3%–18%; antidepressants, 1%–12%; α-agonists, 0%–8%; second-generation antipsychotics, 0%–5%). Variability was partially explained by community availability of psychiatrists (significantly higher odds of a diagnosis or prescription when not available) but not by colocation of mental health professionals or percentage of children in foster care. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of mental health diagnosis and psychotropic medication prescribing varies substantially across practices and is only partially explained by psychiatrist availability. Research is needed to better define the causes of variable practice-level diagnosis and prescribing and implications for child mental health outcomes. PMID:27244791

  17. Public health nurses' primary health care practice: strategies for fostering citizen participation.

    PubMed

    Aston, Megan; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Edwards, Nancy; Young, Linda M

    2009-01-01

    Citizen participation is heralded as a critical element of community health programs that emphasize empowerment and health promotion strategies. Although there is a growing body of research on public health nurses' primary health care practice, few studies have described how public health nurses foster citizen participation. This article presents findings from an interpretive qualitative study of public health nurses' perceptions of their role in fostering citizen participation in an eastern Canadian province at a time of significant health care restructuring. The findings from this study clearly profile public health nurses as integral to the practice of fostering citizen participation.

  18. Transforming general practice: the redistribution of medical work in primary care.

    PubMed

    Charles-Jones, Huw; Latimer, Joanna; May, Carl

    2003-01-01

    The paper focuses on the redistribution of medical work within primary health care teams. It reports the results of the analysis of interviews with general practitioners, practice nurses and managers, undertaken as part of an ethnographic study of primary care organisation and practice during a period of rapid organisational change. By examining the ways in which the respondents account for how work is being redefined and redistributed, we explore how current government policy and professional discourses combine to reconfigure both the identities of those who work in primary care and the nature of patienthood. In particular, we show how general practitioners are being reconfigured as medical specialists or consultants in ways that seem to depart radically from earlier claims that general practice is a distinctive field of social or biographical medicine. Within this new discourse medical work is distributed between doctors, nurses and unqualified staff in ways which make explicit the reduction of general practice work to sets of biomedical problems or tasks. At the same time, the devolution of much general practice work to less qualified and cheaper personnel is justified by drawing on a discourse of person-centred medicine.

  19. Primary care providers' knowledge, beliefs and treatment practices for gout: results of a physician questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Leslie R; Mazor, Kathleen M; Negron, Amarie; Ogarek, Jessica; Firneno, Cassandra; Yood, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    We sought to examine primary care providers' gout knowledge and reported treatment patterns in comparison with current treatment recommendations. We conducted a national survey of a random sample of US primary care physicians to assess their treatment of acute, intercritical and tophaceous gout using published European and American gout treatment recommendations and guidelines as a gold standard. There were 838 respondents (response rate of 41%), most of whom worked in private practice (63%) with >16 years experience (52%). Inappropriate dosing of medications in the setting of renal disease and lack of prophylaxis when initiating urate-lowering therapy (ULT) accounted for much of the lack of compliance with treatment recommendations. Specifically for acute podagra, 53% reported avoidance of anti-inflammatory drugs in the setting of renal insufficiency, use of colchicine at a dose of ≤2.4 mg/day and no initiation of a ULT during an acute attack. For intercritical gout in the setting of renal disease, 3% would provide care consistent with the recommendations, including initiating a ULT at the appropriate dose with dosing titration to a serum urate level of ≤6 mg/dl and providing prophylaxis. For tophaceous gout, 17% reported care consistent with the recommendations, including ULT use with dosing titration to a serum urate level of ≤6 mg/dl and prophylaxis. Only half of primary care providers reported optimal treatment practices for the management of acute gout and <20% for intercritical or tophaceous gout, suggesting that care deficiencies are common.

  20. School psychologists: strategic allies in the contemporary practice of primary care pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Wodrich, D L; Landau, S

    1999-10-01

    Immense changes in the developmental/behavioral aspects of primary care pediatrics have resulted from revisions in special education laws, introduction of managed care, widened dissemination of information about disabilities to parents, and the changing character of American society. Challenges associated with contemporary pediatric practice can be diminished by routine collaboration with school psychologists. An alliance with school-based psychologists permits pediatricians access to children in their natural environments and potential collaboration for preventing illness and emotional/behavior problems. Further, school psychologists can provide a partner for assessing and treating both common and low-incident disorders without the constraints imposed by managed care.

  1. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy: from bench to bedside at a primary care practice

    PubMed Central

    Gora, Michalina J.; Simmons, Leigh H.; Quénéhervé, Lucille; Grant, Catriona N.; Carruth, Robert W.; Lu, Weina; Tiernan, Aubrey; Dong, Jing; Walker-Corkery, Beth; Soomro, Amna; Rosenberg, Mireille; Metlay, Joshua P.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Due to the relatively high cost and inconvenience of upper endoscopic biopsy and the rising incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, there is currently a need for an improved method for screening for Barrett’s esophagus. Ideally, such a test would be applied in the primary care setting and patients referred to endoscopy if the result is suspicious for Barrett’s. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy (TCE) is a recently developed technology that rapidly acquires microscopic images of the entire esophagus in unsedated subjects. Here, we present our first experience with clinical translation and feasibility of TCE in a primary care practice. The acceptance of the TCE device by the primary care clinical staff and patients shows the potential of this device to be useful as a screening tool for a broader population. PMID:27689919

  2. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy: from bench to bedside at a primary care practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gora, Michalina J.; Simmons, Leigh H.; Quénéhervé, Lucille; Grant, Catriona N.; Carruth, Robert W.; Lu, Weina; Tiernan, Aubrey; Dong, Jing; Walker-Corkery, Beth; Soomro, Amna; Rosenberg, Mireille; Metlay, Joshua P.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-10-01

    Due to the relatively high cost and inconvenience of upper endoscopic biopsy and the rising incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, there is currently a need for an improved method for screening for Barrett's esophagus. Ideally, such a test would be applied in the primary care setting and patients referred to endoscopy if the result is suspicious for Barrett's. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy (TCE) is a recently developed technology that rapidly acquires microscopic images of the entire esophagus in unsedated subjects. Here, we present our first experience with clinical translation and feasibility of TCE in a primary care practice. The acceptance of the TCE device by the primary care clinical staff and patients shows the potential of this device to be useful as a screening tool for a broader population.

  3. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy: from bench to bedside at a primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Gora, Michalina J; Simmons, Leigh H; Quénéhervé, Lucille; Grant, Catriona N; Carruth, Robert W; Lu, Weina; Tiernan, Aubrey; Dong, Jing; Walker-Corkery, Beth; Soomro, Amna; Rosenberg, Mireille; Metlay, Joshua P; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2016-10-01

    Due to the relatively high cost and inconvenience of upper endoscopic biopsy and the rising incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, there is currently a need for an improved method for screening for Barrett’s esophagus. Ideally, such a test would be applied in the primary care setting and patients referred to endoscopy if the result is suspicious for Barrett’s. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy (TCE) is a recently developed technology that rapidly acquires microscopic images of the entire esophagus in unsedated subjects. Here, we present our first experience with clinical translation and feasibility of TCE in a primary care practice. The acceptance of the TCE device by the primary care clinical staff and patients shows the potential of this device to be useful as a screening tool for a broader population.

  4. The influence of international medical electives on career preference for primary care and rural practice.

    PubMed

    Law, Iain R; Walters, Lucie

    2015-11-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between medical students who undertake international medical electives (IMEs) in resource poor settings and their reported career preference for primary care in underserved areas such as rural practice. This study examines whether a similar correlation exists in the Australian medical school context. Data was extracted from the Medical Schools Outcomes Database (MSOD) of Australian medical students that completed commencing student and exit questionnaires between 2006 and 2011. Student responses were categorized according to preferred training program and preferred region of practice at commencement. The reported preferences at exit of students completing IMEs in low and middle income countries (LMIC) were compared to those completing electives in high income countries (HIC). The effect of elective experience for students expressing a preference for primary care at commencement was non-significant, with 40.32 % of LMIC and 42.11 % of HIC students maintaining a preference for primary care. Similarly there were no significant changes following LMIC electives for students expressing a preference for specialist training at commencement with 11.81 % of LMIC and 10.23 % of HIC students preferring primary care at exit. The effect of elective experience for students expressing a preference for rural practice at commencement was non-significant, with 41.51 % of LMIC and 49.09 % of HIC students preferring rural practice at exit. Similarly there were no significant changes following LMIC electives for students expressing a preference for urban practice at commencement, with 7.84 % of LMIC and 6.70 % of HIC students preferring rural practice at exit. This study did not demonstrate an association between elective experience in resource poor settings and a preference for primary care or rural practice. This suggests that the previously observed correlation between LMIC electives and interest in primary care in

  5. Accommodations for Patients with Disabilities in Primary Care: A Mixed Methods Study of Practice Administrators

    PubMed Central

    Pharr, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Structural barriers that limit access to health care services for people with disabilities have been identified through qualitative studies; however, little is known about how patients with disabilities are accommodated in the clinical setting when a structural barrier is encountered. The purpose of this study was to identify how primary care medical practices in the United States accommodated people with disabilities when a barrier to service is encountered. Primary care practice administrators from the medical management organization were identified through the organization’s website. Sixty-three administrators from across the US participated in this study. Practice administrators reported that patients were examined in their wheelchairs (76%), that parts of the exam where skipped when a barrier was encountered (44%), that patients were asked to bring someone with them (52.4%) or that patients were refused treatment due to an inaccessible clinic (3.2%). These methods of accommodation would not be in compliance with requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. There was not a significant difference (p>0.05) in accommodations for patients with disabilities between administrators who could describe the application of the ADA to their clinic and those who could not. Practice administrators need a comprehensive understanding of the array of challenges encountered by patients with disabilities throughout the health care process and of how to best accommodate patients with disabilities in their practice. PMID:24373261

  6. A qualitative study of processes used to implement evidence-based care in a primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Huebsch, Jacquelyn A; Kottke, Thomas E; McGinnis, Paul; Nichols, Jolleen; Parker, Emily D; Tillema, Juliana O; Hanson, Ann M

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for care of coronary heart disease patients are not fully implemented. Primary care practices provide most of the care for these patients. To learn how providers and staff in a busy primary care practice implement interventions to provide evidence-based care of coronary heart disease patients. We conducted a qualitative analysis of the responses to open-ended questions in nine electronically administered bimonthly surveys of key physicians, clinic staff and managers in the practice. Ten to 16 (mean=12.3) personnel responded to each survey. Nearly 30% were physicians and 40.5% were clinic staff. Four major themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: (i) giving data about not-at-goal patients to providers for care plan development; (ii) developing team roles and defining tasks; (iii) providing patient care and implementing care plans and (iv) providing technology support to generate useful, accurate data. The frequency that the subthemes were mentioned varied from survey to survey, but their mention persisted over the entire time of all nine surveys. Developing a system for implementing evidence-based care involves considerations of roles and teamwork, technology use to develop a patient registry and obtain needed clinical data, care processes for pre-visit planning, and between-visit care management. A registered nurse care manager is a central figure in implementing and sustaining the process. Implementing evidence-based guidelines is an ongoing process of revision, retraining and reinforcement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Observations of infection prevention and control practices in primary health care, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Guadalupe; Dolinger, Amy; Rogo, Khama; Mwaura, Njeri; Wafula, Francis; Coarasa, Jorge; Goicoechea, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices in primary health care in Kenya. Methods We used an observational, patient-tracking tool to assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices by 1680 health-care workers during outpatient interactions with 14 328 patients at 935 health-care facilities in 2015. Compliance was assessed in five domains: hand hygiene; protective glove use; injections and blood sampling; disinfection of reusable equipment; and waste segregation. We calculated compliance by dividing the number of correct actions performed by the number of indications and evaluated associations between compliance and the health-care worker’s and facility’s characteristics. Findings Across 106 464 observed indications for an infection prevention and control practice, the mean compliance was 0.318 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.315 to 0.321). The compliance ranged from 0.023 (95% CI: 0.021 to 0.024) for hand hygiene to 0.871 (95% CI: 0.866 to 0.876) for injection and blood sampling safety. Compliance was weakly associated with the facility’s characteristics (e.g. public or private, or level of specialization) and the health-care worker’s knowledge of, and training in, infection prevention and control practices. Conclusion The observational tool was effective for assessing compliance with infection prevention and control practices across multiple domains in primary health care in a low-income country. Compliance varied widely across infection prevention and control domains. The weak associations observed between compliance and the characteristics of health-care workers and facilities, such as knowledge and the availability of supplies, suggest that a broader focus on behavioural change is required. PMID:28670015

  8. Observations of infection prevention and control practices in primary health care, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Guadalupe; Dolinger, Amy; Rogo, Khama; Mwaura, Njeri; Wafula, Francis; Coarasa, Jorge; Goicoechea, Ana; Das, Jishnu

    2017-07-01

    To assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices in primary health care in Kenya. We used an observational, patient-tracking tool to assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices by 1680 health-care workers during outpatient interactions with 14 328 patients at 935 health-care facilities in 2015. Compliance was assessed in five domains: hand hygiene; protective glove use; injections and blood sampling; disinfection of reusable equipment; and waste segregation. We calculated compliance by dividing the number of correct actions performed by the number of indications and evaluated associations between compliance and the health-care worker's and facility's characteristics. Across 106 464 observed indications for an infection prevention and control practice, the mean compliance was 0.318 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.315 to 0.321). The compliance ranged from 0.023 (95% CI: 0.021 to 0.024) for hand hygiene to 0.871 (95% CI: 0.866 to 0.876) for injection and blood sampling safety. Compliance was weakly associated with the facility's characteristics (e.g. public or private, or level of specialization) and the health-care worker's knowledge of, and training in, infection prevention and control practices. The observational tool was effective for assessing compliance with infection prevention and control practices across multiple domains in primary health care in a low-income country. Compliance varied widely across infection prevention and control domains. The weak associations observed between compliance and the characteristics of health-care workers and facilities, such as knowledge and the availability of supplies, suggest that a broader focus on behavioural change is required.

  9. Measuring practice capacity for change: a tool for guiding quality improvement in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Bobiak, Sarah N; Zyzanski, Stephen J; Ruhe, Mary C; Carter, Caroline A; Ragan, Brian; Flocke, Susan A; Litaker, David; Stange, Kurt C

    2009-01-01

    Capacity for change, or the ability and willingness to undertake change, is an organizational characteristic with potential to foster quality management in health care. We report on the development and psychometric properties of a quantitative measure of capacity for change for use in primary care settings. Following review of previous conceptual and empirical studies, we generated 117 items that assessed organizational structure, climate, and culture. Using information from direct observation and key informant interviews, a research team member rated these items for 15 primary care practices engaged in a quality improvement intervention. Distributional statistics, pairwise correlation analysis, Rasch modeling, and item content review guided item reduction and instrument finalization. Reliability and convergent validity were assessed. Ninety-two items were removed because of limited response distributions and redundancy or because of poor Rasch model fit. The final instrument comprising 25 items had excellent reliability (alpha = .94). A Rasch model-derived capacity for change score correlated well with an independently determined, qualitatively derived summary assessment of each practice's capacity for change (rhoS = 0.82), suggesting good convergent validity. We describe a new instrument for quantifying organizational capacity for change in primary care settings. The ability to quantify capacity for change may enable better recognition of practices likely to be successful in their change efforts and those first requiring capacity building prior to change interventions.

  10. Diagnosis and management of endometriosis: the role of the advanced practice nurse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mao, Alexandra J; Anastasi, Joyce K

    2010-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of endometriosis for the advanced practice nurse (APN) in primary care. Selected research, clinical studies, clinical practice guidelines, and review articles. Commonly encountered by the APN in primary care, endometriosis is a chronic, progressive inflammatory disease characterized by endometrial lesions, cysts, fibrosis, or adhesions in the pelvic cavity, causing chronic pelvic pain and infertility in women of reproductive age. Because of its frequently normal physical examination findings, variable clinical presentations, and nonspecific, overlapping symptoms with other conditions, endometriosis can be difficult to diagnose. As there currently are no accurate noninvasive diagnostic tests specific for endometriosis, it is imperative for the APN to become knowledgeable about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and current treatment options of this disease. The APN in primary care plays an essential role in health promotion through disease management and infertility prevention by providing support and much needed information to the patient with endometriosis. APNs can also facilitate quality of care and manage treatments effectively to improve quality of life, reduce pain, and prevent further progression of disease. Practice recommendations include timely diagnosis, pain management, infertility counseling, patient education, and support for quality of life issues.

  11. Practice features associated with patient-reported accessibility, continuity, and coordination of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Jeannie L; Pineault, Raynald; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Brunelle, Yvon; Gauthier, Josée; Goulet, François; Rodrigue, Jean

    2008-01-01

    On the eve of major primary health care reforms, we conducted a multilevel survey of primary health care clinics to identify attributes of clinic organization and physician practice that predict accessibility, continuity, and coordination of care as experienced by patients. Primary health care clinics were selected by stratified random sampling in urban, suburban, rural, and remote locations in Quebec, Canada. Up to 4 family or general physicians were selected in each clinic, and 20 patients seeing each physician used the Primary Care Assessment Tool to report on first-contact accessibility (being able to obtain care promptly for sudden illness), relational continuity (having an ongoing relationship with a physician who knew their particulars), and coordination continuity (having coordination between their physician and specialists). Physicians reported on aspects of their practice, and secretaries and directors reported on organizational features of the clinic. We used hierarchical regression modeling on the subsample of regular patients at the clinic. One hundred clinics participated (61% response rate), for a total of 221 physicians and 2,725 regular patients (87% response and completion rate). First-contact accessibility was most problematic. Such accessibility was better in clinics with 10 or fewer physicians, a nurse, telephone access 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, operational agreements to facilitate care with other health care establishments, and evening walk-in services. Operational agreements and evening care also positively affected relational continuity. Physicians who valued continuity and felt attached to the community fostered better relational continuity, whereas an accessibility-oriented style (as indicated by a high proportion of walk-in care and high patient volume) hindered it. Coordination continuity was also associated with more operational agreements and continuous telephone access, and was better when physicians practiced part time in

  12. Facilitating Implementation of Interprofessional Collaborative Practices Into Primary Care: A Trilogy of Driving Forces.

    PubMed

    Bareil, Céline; Duhamel, Fabie; Lalonde, Lyne; Goudreau, Johanne; Hudon, Eveline; Lussier, Marie-Thérèse; Lévesque, Lise; Lessard, Sylvie; Turcotte, Alain; Lalonde, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Implementing interprofessional collaborative practices in primary care is challenging, and research about its facilitating factors remains scarce. The goal of this participatory action research study was to better understand the driving forces during the early stage of the implementation process of a community-driven and patient-focused program in primary care titled "TRANSforming InTerprofessional cardiovascular disease prevention in primary care" (TRANSIT). Eight primary care clinics in Quebec, Canada, agreed to participate by creating and implementing an interprofessional facilitation team (IFT). Sixty-three participants volunteered to be part of an IFT, and 759 patients agreed to participate. We randomized six clinics into a supported facilitation ("supported") group, with an external facilitator (EF) and financial incentives for participants. We assigned two clinics to an unsupported facilitation ("unsupported") group, with no EF or financial incentives. After 3 months, we held one interview for the two EFs. After 6 months, we held eight focus groups with IFT members and another interview with each EF. The analyses revealed three key forces: (1) opportunity for dialogue through the IFT, (2) active role of the EF, and (3) change implementation budgets. Decision-makers designing implementation plans for interprofessional programs should ensure that these driving forces are activated. Further research should examine how these forces affect interprofessional practices and patient outcomes.

  13. Clinical profile of orofacial infections: An experience from two primary care dental practices

    PubMed Central

    Hollinshead, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Orofacial infections are common reasons for dental consultations worldwide. However, there is scarcity of data on clinico-epidemiological profiles reported from primary care dental practices. To address this issue, a study was done to characterize the clinical pattern, age groups affected and sex predilection of orofacial infections in the primary care dental practice. Study design: Clinical data was evaluated from random electronic files of patients for whom antimicrobials were prescribed at two Dental Practices in UK between January 2009 and December 2010. Results: 200 case records were studied. 104 (52%) cases were females. Mean age was 37.2 (+/-15.1) years. 107 (53.5%) cases belonged to age group 21-40 years. Posterior teeth were involved in 112 (56%) cases. Types of disease were as follows: dentoalveolar abscess 63(31.5%), pulpitis 27(13.5%), apical periodontitis 21(10.5%), pericoronitis 21(10.5%), dry socket 13(6.5%), periodontitis 9(4.5%) infected root stump 5(2.5%), facial swelling 5(2.5%) and infections unspecified 36(18%) cases. Conclusions: Orofacial infections affect both sexes equally. 21-40 years is the commonest age-group affected. Dentoalveolar abscess is the commonest infection followed by unspecified infections and pulpitis. Key words:Orofacial infections, primary care dental practice, dentoalveolar abscess and pulpitis. PMID:22322492

  14. Observation of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care teams: An integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sonya; Pullon, Susan; McKinlay, Eileen

    2015-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration improves patient care, especially for those patients with complex and/or chronic conditions. Many studies examining collaborative practice in primary care settings have been undertaken, yet identification of essential elements of effective interprofessional collaboration in primary care settings remains obscure. To examine the nature of interprofessional collaboration (including interprofessional collaborative practice) and the key influences that lead to successful models of interprofessional practice in primary care teams, as reported in studies using direct observation methods. Integrative review using Whittemore and Knafl's (2005) five stage framework: problem identification, literature search, data evaluation, data analysis and presentation. Data sources and review method: Primary research studies meeting the search criteria were accessed from MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, King's Fund and Informit Health Collection databases, and by hand-searching reference lists. From 2005 to 2013, 105 studies closely examining elements of interprofessional collaboration were identified. Of these, 11 studies were identified which incorporated a range of 'real time' direct observation methods where the collaborative practice of health professionals was closely observed. Constant opportunity for effective, frequent, informal shared communication emerged as the overarching theme and most critical factor in achieving and sustaining effective interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional collaborative practice in this review. Multiple channels for repeated (often brief) informal shared communication were necessary for shared knowledge creation, development of shared goals, and shared clinical decision making. Favourable physical space configuration and 'having frequent brief time in common' were key facilitators. This review highlights the need to look critically at the body of research purported to investigate interprofessional collaboration

  15. Integration of geriatric mental health screening into a primary care practice: a patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Samuels, S; Abrams, R; Shengelia, R; Reid, M C; Goralewicz, R; Breckman, R; Anderson, M A; Snow, C E; Woods, E C; Stern, A; Eimicke, J P; Adelman, R D

    2015-05-01

    Colocation of mental health screening, assessment, and treatment in primary care reduces stigma, improves access, and increases coordination of care between mental health and primary care providers. However, little information exists regarding older adults' attitudes about screening for mental health problems in primary care. The objective of this study was to evaluate older primary care patients' acceptance of and satisfaction with screening for depression and anxiety. The study was conducted at an urban, academically affiliated primary care practice serving older adults. Study patients (N = 107) were screened for depression/anxiety and underwent a post-screening survey/interview to assess their reactions to the screening experience. Most patients (88.6%) found the length of the screening to be "just right." A majority found the screening questions somewhat or very acceptable (73.4%) and not at all difficult (81.9%). Most participants did not find the questions stressful (84.9%) or intrusive (91.5%); and a majority were not at all embarrassed (93.4%), upset (93.4%), or uncomfortable (88.8%) during the screening process. When asked about frequency of screening, most patients (72.4%) desired screening for depression/anxiety yearly or more. Of the 79 patients who had spoken with their physicians about mental health during the visit, 89.8% reported that it was easy or very easy to talk with their physicians about depression/anxiety. Multivariate results showed that patients with higher anxiety had a lower positive reaction to the screen when controlling for gender, age, and patient-physician communication. These results demonstrate strong patient support for depression and anxiety screening in primary care. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Adoption and implementation of strategies for diabetes management in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Bryan J; Helfrich, Christian D; Savitz, Lucy A; Swiger, Kathleen D

    2007-07-01

    Secondary and tertiary prevention of chronic illness is a major challenge for the United States healthcare system. Controlled studies show that interventions can enhance secondary prevention in primary care practices, but they shed little light on implementation of secondary prevention outside the experimental context. This study examines the adoption and implementation of an important set of secondary and tertiary prevention efforts--diabetes management strategies--for type 2 diabetes in the everyday clinical practice of primary care. It explores whether adoption and implementation processes differ by type of strategy or prevalence of diabetes among patients in the practice. Holistic case studies (those used to assess a single analytic unit, in this case, the physician group practice, as opposed to multiple embedded subunits) were conducted in 2001-2002 on six primary care practices in North Carolina identified from a statewide physician survey on strategies for diabetes management. Practices were selected by prevalence of diabetes and type of strategy for diabetes management--patient oriented (focused on self-management) versus biomedical (focused on secondary prevention practices). Results were derived from thematic analysis of interviews and secondary documents. Adoption and implementation did not differ by diabetes prevalence or type of diabetes strategy. All practices had a routine forum for vetting new strategies, and most used traditional channels for identifying them. Implementation often required adaptation of the strategy and the organization. Sustained use of a diabetes strategy depended on favorable organizational policies and procedures (e.g., training, job redesign) and ongoing commitment of resources. Diabetes management strategies are often complex and require adoption and implementation processes different from those described by classic innovation diffusion models. Alternative conceptual models that consider organizational process, structure, and

  17. Tailoring intervention procedures to routine primary health care practice; an ethnographic process evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Yvonne J F M; de Bont, Antoinette; Foets, Marleen; Bruijnzeels, Marc; Bal, Roland

    2007-08-07

    Tailor-made approaches enable the uptake of interventions as they are seen as a way to overcome the incompatibility of general interventions with local knowledge about the organisation of routine medical practice and the relationship between the patients and the professionals in practice. Our case is the Quattro project which is a prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases in high-risk patients in primary health care centres in deprived neighbourhoods. This programme was implemented as a pragmatic trial and foresaw the importance of local knowledge in primary health care and internal, or locally made, guidelines. The aim of this paper is to show how this prevention programme, which could be tailored to routine care, was implemented in primary care. An ethnographic design was used for this study. We observed and interviewed the researchers and the practice nurses. All the research documents, observations and transcribed interviews were analysed thematically. Our ethnographic process evaluation showed that the opportunity of tailoring intervention procedures to routine care in a pragmatic trial setting did not result in a well-organised and well-implemented prevention programme. In fact, the lack of standard protocols hindered the implementation of the intervention. Although it was not the purpose of this trial, a guideline was developed. Despite the fact that the developed guideline functioned as a tool, it did not result in the intervention being organised accordingly. However, the guideline did make tailoring the intervention possible. It provided the professionals with the key or the instructions needed to achieve organisational change and transform the existing interprofessional relations. As tailor-made approaches are developed to enable the uptake of interventions in routine practice, they are facilitated by the brokering of tools such as guidelines. In our study, guidelines facilitated organisational change and enabled the transformation of existing

  18. Tailoring intervention procedures to routine primary health care practice; an ethnographic process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Yvonne JFM; de Bont, Antoinette; Foets, Marleen; Bruijnzeels, Marc; Bal, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Background Tailor-made approaches enable the uptake of interventions as they are seen as a way to overcome the incompatibility of general interventions with local knowledge about the organisation of routine medical practice and the relationship between the patients and the professionals in practice. Our case is the Quattro project which is a prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases in high-risk patients in primary health care centres in deprived neighbourhoods. This programme was implemented as a pragmatic trial and foresaw the importance of local knowledge in primary health care and internal, or locally made, guidelines. The aim of this paper is to show how this prevention programme, which could be tailored to routine care, was implemented in primary care. Methods An ethnographic design was used for this study. We observed and interviewed the researchers and the practice nurses. All the research documents, observations and transcribed interviews were analysed thematically. Results Our ethnographic process evaluation showed that the opportunity of tailoring intervention procedures to routine care in a pragmatic trial setting did not result in a well-organised and well-implemented prevention programme. In fact, the lack of standard protocols hindered the implementation of the intervention. Although it was not the purpose of this trial, a guideline was developed. Despite the fact that the developed guideline functioned as a tool, it did not result in the intervention being organised accordingly. However, the guideline did make tailoring the intervention possible. It provided the professionals with the key or the instructions needed to achieve organisational change and transform the existing interprofessional relations. Conclusion As tailor-made approaches are developed to enable the uptake of interventions in routine practice, they are facilitated by the brokering of tools such as guidelines. In our study, guidelines facilitated organisational change and

  19. Cost of best-practice primary care management of chronic disease in a remote Aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Gador-Whyte, Andrew P; Wakerman, John; Campbell, David; Lenthall, Sue; Struber, Janet; Hope, Alex; Watson, Colin

    2014-06-16

    To estimate the cost of completing all chronic care tasks recommended by the Central Australian Rural Practitioners Association Standard Treatment Manual (CARPA STM) for patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study was conducted at a health service in a remote Central Australian Aboriginal community between July 2010 and May 2011. The chronic care tasks required were ascertained from the CARPA STM. The clinic database was reviewed for data on disease prevalence and adherence to CARPA STM guidelines. Recommended tasks were observed in a time-and-motion study of clinicians' work. Clinicians were interviewed about systematic management and its barriers. Expenditure records were analysed for salary and administrative costs. Diabetes and CKD prevalence; time spent on chronic disease care tasks; completion of tasks recommended by the CARPA STM; barriers to systematic care identified by clinicians; and estimated costs of optimal primary care management of all residents with diabetes or CKD. Projected annual costs of best-practice care for diabetes and CKD for this community of 542 people were $900 792, of which $645 313 would be met directly by the local primary care service. Estimated actual expenditure for these conditions in 2009-10 was $446 585, giving a projected funding gap of $198 728 per annum, or $1733 per patient. High staff turnover, acute care workload and low health literacy also hindered optimal chronic disease care. Barriers to optimal care included inadequate funding and workforce issues. Reduction of avoidable hospital admissions and overall costs necessitates adequate funding of primary care of chronic disease in remote communities.

  20. Rainbow of Chaos: A study into the Theory and Practice of Integrated Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Valentijn, Pim P.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to contribute to a better understanding of what integrated primary care is, and how it can be achieved by focussing on the collaboration processes that underlie the development of integrated primary care. The first part of this thesis operationalized the concept of integrated care from a primary care perspective. The second part of this thesis described the collaboration mechanisms among integrated care projects that were part of a national integrated primary care study in The Netherlands.

  1. Knowledge and Practice on Injection Safety among Primary Health Care Workers in Kaski District, Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Rathore, Devendra Singh; Shankar, P Ravi; Kc, Vikash Kumar; Jha, Nisha; Sharma, Damodar

    2016-01-01

    Background Unsafe injection practice can transmit various blood borne infections. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and practice of injection safety among injection providers, to obtain information about disposal of injectable devices, and to compare the knowledge and practices of urban and rural injection providers. Methods The study was conducted with injection providers working at primary health care facilities within Kaski district, Nepal. Ninety-six health care workers from 69 primary health care facilities were studied and 132 injection events observed. A semi-structured checklist was used for observing injection practice and a questionnaire for the survey. Respondents were interviewed to complete the questionnaire and obtain possible explanations for certain observed behaviors. Results All injection providers knew of at least one pathogen transmitted through use/re-use of unsterile syringes. Proportion of injection providers naming hepatitis/jaundice as one of the diseases transmitted by unsafe injection practice was significantly higher in urban (75.6%) than in rural (39.2%) area. However, compared to urban respondents (13.3%), a significantly higher proportion of rural respondents (37.3%) named Hepatitis B specifically as one of the diseases transmitted. Median (inter-quartile range) number of therapeutic injection and injectable vaccine administered per day by the injection providers were 2 (1) and 1 (1), respectively. Two handed recapping by injection providers was significantly higher in urban area (33.3%) than in rural areas (21.6%). Most providers were not aware of the post exposure prophylaxis guideline. Conclusion The knowledge of the injection providers about safe injection practice was acceptable. The use of safe injection practice by providers in urban and rural health care facilities was almost similar. The deficiencies noted in the practice must be addressed. PMID:27540325

  2. Knowledge and Practice on Injection Safety among Primary Health Care Workers in Kaski District, Western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Rathore, Devendra Singh; Shankar, P Ravi; Kc, Vikash Kumar; Jha, Nisha; Sharma, Damodar

    2016-01-01

    Unsafe injection practice can transmit various blood borne infections. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and practice of injection safety among injection providers, to obtain information about disposal of injectable devices, and to compare the knowledge and practices of urban and rural injection providers. The study was conducted with injection providers working at primary health care facilities within Kaski district, Nepal. Ninety-six health care workers from 69 primary health care facilities were studied and 132 injection events observed. A semi-structured checklist was used for observing injection practice and a questionnaire for the survey. Respondents were interviewed to complete the questionnaire and obtain possible explanations for certain observed behaviors. All injection providers knew of at least one pathogen transmitted through use/re-use of unsterile syringes. Proportion of injection providers naming hepatitis/jaundice as one of the diseases transmitted by unsafe injection practice was significantly higher in urban (75.6%) than in rural (39.2%) area. However, compared to urban respondents (13.3%), a significantly higher proportion of rural respondents (37.3%) named Hepatitis B specifically as one of the diseases transmitted. Median (inter-quartile range) number of therapeutic injection and injectable vaccine administered per day by the injection providers were 2 (1) and 1 (1), respectively. Two handed recapping by injection providers was significantly higher in urban area (33.3%) than in rural areas (21.6%). Most providers were not aware of the post exposure prophylaxis guideline. The knowledge of the injection providers about safe injection practice was acceptable. The use of safe injection practice by providers in urban and rural health care facilities was almost similar. The deficiencies noted in the practice must be addressed.

  3. Impact of remuneration and organizational factors on completing preventive manoeuvres in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William E; Russell, Grant; Tuna, Meltem; Geneau, Robert; Muldoon, Laura K; Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Fletcher, John

    2012-02-07

    Several jurisdictions attempting to reform primary care have focused on changes in physician remuneration. The goals of this study were to compare the delivery of preventive services by practices in four primary care funding models and to identify organizational factors associated with superior preventive care. In a cross-sectional study, we included 137 primary care practices in the province of Ontario (35 fee-for-service practices, 35 with salaried physicians [community health centres], 35 practices in the new capitation model [family health networks] and 32 practices in the established capitation model [health services organizations]). We surveyed 288 family physicians. We reviewed 4108 randomly selected patient charts and assigned prevention scores based on the proportion of eligible preventive manoeuvres delivered for each patient. A total of 3284 patients were eligible for at least one of six preventive manoeuvres. After adjusting for patient profile and contextual factors, we found that, compared with prevention scores in practices in the new capitation model, scores were significantly lower in fee-for-service practices (β estimate for effect on prevention score = -6.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] -11.9 to -0.6) and practices in the established capitation model (β = -9.1, 95% CI -14.9 to -3.3) but not for those with salaried remuneration (β = -0.8, 95% CI -6.5 to 4.8). After accounting for physician characteristics and organizational structure, the type of funding model was no longer a statistically significant factor. Compared with reference practices, those with at least one female family physician (β = 8.0, 95% CI 4.2 to 11.8), a panel size of fewer than 1600 patients per full-time equivalent family physician (β = 6.8, 95% CI 3.1 to 10.6) and an electronic reminder system (β = 4.6, 95% CI 0.4 to 8.7) had superior prevention scores. The effect of these three factors was largely but not always consistent across the funding models; it was largely

  4. Journey toward a Patient-Centered Medical Home: Readiness for Change in Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Christopher G; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Green, Lee A; Cohen, Genna R; Koster, Christina R

    2011-01-01

    Context: Information is limited regarding the readiness of primary care practices to make the transformational changes necessary to implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. Using comparative, qualitative data, we provide practical guidelines for assessing and increasing readiness for PCMH implementation. Methods: We used a comparative case study design to assess primary care practices' readiness for PCMH implementation in sixteen practices from twelve different physician organizations in Michigan. Two major components of organizational readiness, motivation and capability, were assessed. We interviewed eight practice teams with higher PCMH scores and eight with lower PCMH scores, along with the leaders of the physician organizations of these practices, yielding sixty-six semistructured interviews. Findings: The respondents from the higher and lower PCMH scoring practices reported different motivations and capabilities for pursuing PCMH. Their motivations pertained to the perceived value of PCMH, financial incentives, understanding of specific PCMH requirements, and overall commitment to change. Capabilities that were discussed included the time demands of implementation, the difficulty of changing patients' behavior, and the challenges of adopting health information technology. Enhancing the implementation of PCMH within practices included taking an incremental approach, using data, building a team and defining roles of its members, and meeting regularly to discuss the implementation. The respondents valued external organizational support, regardless of its source. Conclusions: The respondents from the higher and lower PCMH scoring practices commented on similar aspects of readiness—motivation and capability—but offered very different views of them. Our findings suggest the importance of understanding practice perceptions of the motivations for PCMH and the capability to undertake change. While this study identified some initial approaches that

  5. Journey toward a patient-centered medical home: readiness for change in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Wise, Christopher G; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Green, Lee A; Cohen, Genna R; Koster, Christina R

    2011-09-01

    Information is limited regarding the readiness of primary care practices to make the transformational changes necessary to implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. Using comparative, qualitative data, we provide practical guidelines for assessing and increasing readiness for PCMH implementation. We used a comparative case study design to assess primary care practices' readiness for PCMH implementation in sixteen practices from twelve different physician organizations in Michigan. Two major components of organizational readiness, motivation and capability, were assessed. We interviewed eight practice teams with higher PCMH scores and eight with lower PCMH scores, along with the leaders of the physician organizations of these practices, yielding sixty-six semistructured interviews. The respondents from the higher and lower PCMH scoring practices reported different motivations and capabilities for pursuing PCMH. Their motivations pertained to the perceived value of PCMH, financial incentives, understanding of specific PCMH requirements, and overall commitment to change. Capabilities that were discussed included the time demands of implementation, the difficulty of changing patients' behavior, and the challenges of adopting health information technology. Enhancing the implementation of PCMH within practices included taking an incremental approach, using data, building a team and defining roles of its members, and meeting regularly to discuss the implementation. The respondents valued external organizational support, regardless of its source. The respondents from the higher and lower PCMH scoring practices commented on similar aspects of readiness-motivation and capability-but offered very different views of them. Our findings suggest the importance of understanding practice perceptions of the motivations for PCMH and the capability to undertake change. While this study identified some initial approaches that physician organizations and practices have

  6. Nursing practices in the primary health care context: a scoping review 1

    PubMed Central

    Barbiani, Rosangela; Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Schaefer, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and categorize the practices performed by nurses working in Primary Health Care and Family Health Strategy Units in light of responsibilities established by the profession's legal and programmatic frameworks and by the Brazilian Unified Health System. Method: a scoping review was conducted in the following databases: LILACS, IBECS, BDENF, CINAHL and MEDLINE, and the Cochrane and SciELO libraries. Original research papers written by nurses addressing nursing practices in the primary health care context were included. Results: the review comprised 30 studies published between 2005 and 2014. Three categories emerged from the analysis: practices in the service; practices in the community; and management and education practices. Conclusion: the challenges faced by nurses are complex, as care should be centered on the population's health needs, which requires actions at other levels of clinical and health responsibility. Brazilian nursing has achieved important advancements since the implementation of policies intended to reorganize work. There is, however, a need to shift work processes from being focused on individual procedures to being focused on patients so that an enlarged clinic is the ethical-political imperative guiding the organization of services and professional intervention. PMID:27579928

  7. Process of care and prescribing practices for hypertension in public and private primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Seng Fah; Khoo, Ee Ming; Nordin, Saleh; Teng, Cheong-Lieng; Lee, Verna Kar Mun; Zailinawati, Abu Hassan; Chen, Wei Seng; Mimi, Omar

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the process of care and the choice of antihypertensive medications used in both public and private primary care clinics in Malaysia. A cross-sectional survey was completed in 2008 on randomly selected 100 public health clinics and 114 private primary care clinics in Malaysia. A total of 4076 patient records, 3753 (92.1%) from public clinics and 323 (7.9%) from private clinics were analyzed. Less than 80% of the records documented the recommended clinical and laboratory assessments. The rates of documentation for smoking status, family history of premature death, retinal assessment, and urine albumin tests were lower in public clinics. Overall, 21% of the prescription practices were less than optimal. The process of care and the use of antihypertensive medications were not satisfactory in both settings.

  8. The use of clinical practice guidelines in primary care: professional mindlines and control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gené-Badia, Joan; Gallo, Pedro; Caïs, Jordi; Sánchez, Emília; Carrion, Carme; Arroyo, Liliana; Aymerich, Marta

    2016-01-01

    To identify the relevant barriers and enablers perceived by primary care professionals in implementing the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Two focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians and nurses in Catalonia (Spain) between October and December 2012. Thirty-nine health professionals were selected based on their knowledge and daily use of CPG. Finally, eight general practitioners and eight nurses were included in the discussion groups. Participants were asked to share their views and beliefs on the accessibility of CPG, their knowledge and use of these documents, the content and format of CPG, dissemination strategy, training, professional-patient relationship, and the use of CPG by the management structure. We recorded and transcribed the content verbatim and analysed the data using qualitative analysis techniques. Physicians believed that, overall, CPG were of little practical use and frequently referred to them as a largely bureaucratic management control instrument that threatened their professional autonomy. In contrast, nurses believed that CPG were rather helpful tools in their day-to-day practice, although they would like them to be more sensitive to the current role of nurses. Both groups believed that CPG did not provide a response to most of the decisions they faced in the primary care setting. Compliance with CPG recommendations would be improved if these documents were brief, non-compulsory, not cost-containment oriented, more based on nursing care models, sensitive to the specific needs of primary care patients, and integrated into the computer workstation. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of clinical practice guidelines on patient outcomes in primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, G; Chaulk, P; Freake, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence for the effectiveness of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in improving patient outcomes in primary care. DATA SOURCES: A search of the MEDLINE, HEALTHPLAN, CINAHL and FAMLI databases was conducted to identify studies published between Jan. 1, 1980, and Dec. 31, 1995, concerning the use of guidelines in primary medical care. The keywords used in the search were "clinical guidelines," "primary care," "clinical care," "intervention," "randomized controlled trial" and "effectiveness." STUDY SELECTION: Studies of the use of CPGs were selected if they involved a randomized experimental or quasi-experimental method, concerned primary care, were related to clinical care and examined patient outcomes. Of 91 trials of CPGs identified through the search, 13 met the criteria for inclusion in the critical appraisal. DATA EXTRACTION: The following data were extracted, when possible, from the 13 trials: country and setting, number of physicians, number of patients (and the proportion followed to completion), length of follow-up, study method (including random assignment method), type of intervention, medical condition treated and effect on patient outcomes (including clinical and statistical significance, with confidence intervals). DATA SYNTHESIS: The most common conditions studied were hypertension (7 studies), asthma (2 studies) and cigarette smoking (2 studies). Four of the studies followed nationally developed guidelines, and 9 used locally developed guidelines. Six studies involved computerized or automated reminder systems, whereas the others relied on small-group workshops and education sessions. Only 5 of the 13 trials (38%) produced statistically significant results. CONCLUSION: There is very little evidence that the use of CPGs improves patient outcomes in primary medical care, but most studies published to date have used older guidelines and methods, which may have been insensitive to small changes in outcomes. Research is needed

  10. Practical Suicide-Risk Management for the Busy Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Anna K.; Lineberry, Timothy W.; Bostwick, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a public health problem and a leading cause of death. The number of people thinking seriously about suicide, making plans, and attempting suicide is surprisingly high. In total, primary care clinicians write more prescriptions for antidepressants than mental health clinicians and see patients more often in the month before their death by suicide. Treatment of depression by primary care physicians is improving, but opportunities remain in addressing suicide-related treatment variables. Collaborative care models for treating depression have the potential both to improve depression outcomes and decrease suicide risk. Alcohol use disorders and anxiety symptoms are important comorbid conditions to identify and treat. Management of suicide risk includes understanding the difference between risk factors and warning signs, developing a suicide risk assessment, and practically managing suicidal crises. PMID:21709131

  11. Child obesity prevention in primary health care: investigating practice nurse roles, attitudes and current practices.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Alison; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Laws, Rachel; Harris, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Overweight and obesity affects approximately 20% of Australian pre-schoolers. The general practice nurse (PN) workforce has increased in recent years; however, little is known of PN capacity and potential to provide routine advice for the prevention of child obesity. This mixed methods pilot study aims to explore the current practices, attitudes, confidence and training needs of Australian PNs surrounding child obesity prevention in the general practice setting. PNs from three Divisions of General Practice in New South Wales were invited to complete a questionnaire investigating PN roles, attitudes and practices in preventive care with a focus on child obesity. A total of 59 questionnaires were returned (response rate 22%). Semi-structured qualitative interviews were also conducted with a subsample of PNs (n = 10). Questionnaire respondent demographics were similar to that of national PN data. PNs described preventive work as enjoyable despite some perceived barriers including lack of confidence. Number of years working in general practice did not appear to strongly influence nurses' perceived barriers. Seventy per cent of PNs were interested in being more involved in conducting child health checks in practice, and 85% expressed an interest in taking part in child obesity prevention training. Findings from this pilot study suggest that PNs are interested in prevention of child obesity despite barriers to practice and low confidence levels. More research is needed to determine the effect of training on PN confidence and behaviours in providing routine healthy life-style messages for the prevention of child obesity. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Professional Experiences of International Medical Graduates Practicing Primary Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Bernheim, Susannah May; Berg, David; Gozu, Aysegul; Curry, Leslie Ann

    2010-01-01

    Background International medical graduates (IMGs) comprise approximately 25% of the US physician workforce, with significant representation in primary care and care of vulnerable populations. Despite the central role of IMGs in the US healthcare system, understanding of their professional experiences is limited. Objective To characterize the professional experiences of non-US born IMGs from limited-resource nations practicing primary care in the US. Design Qualitative study based on in-depth in-person interviews. Participants Purposeful sample of IMGs (n = 25) diverse in country of origin, length of practice in the US, specialty (internal medicine, family medicine and pediatrics), age and gender. Participants were currently practicing primary care physicians in New York, New Jersey or Connecticut. Approach A standardized interview guide was used to explore professional experiences of IMGs. Key Results Four recurrent and unifying themes characterize these experiences: 1) IMGs experience both overt and subtle forms of workplace bias and discrimination; 2) IMGs recognize professional limitations as part of “the deal”; 3) IMGs describe challenges in the transition to the culture and practice of medicine in the US; 4) IMGs bring unique skills and advantages to the workplace. Conclusions Our data reveal that IMGs face workplace challenges throughout their careers. Despite diversity in professional background and demographic characteristics, IMGs in our study reported common experiences in the transition to and practice of medicine in the US. Findings suggest that both workforce and workplace interventions are needed to enable IMG physicians to sustain their essential and growing role in the US healthcare system. Finally, commonalities with experiences of other minority groups within the US healthcare system suggest that optimizing IMGs’ experiences may also improve the experiences of an increasingly diverse healthcare workforce. PMID:20502974

  13. Professional experiences of international medical graduates practicing primary care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peggy Guey-Chi; Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Bernheim, Susannah May; Berg, David; Gozu, Aysegul; Curry, Leslie Ann

    2010-09-01

    International medical graduates (IMGs) comprise approximately 25% of the US physician workforce, with significant representation in primary care and care of vulnerable populations. Despite the central role of IMGs in the US healthcare system, understanding of their professional experiences is limited. To characterize the professional experiences of non-US born IMGs from limited-resource nations practicing primary care in the US. Qualitative study based on in-depth in-person interviews. Purposeful sample of IMGs (n = 25) diverse in country of origin, length of practice in the US, specialty (internal medicine, family medicine and pediatrics), age and gender. Participants were currently practicing primary care physicians in New York, New Jersey or Connecticut. A standardized interview guide was used to explore professional experiences of IMGs. Four recurrent and unifying themes characterize these experiences: 1) IMGs experience both overt and subtle forms of workplace bias and discrimination; 2) IMGs recognize professional limitations as part of "the deal"; 3) IMGs describe challenges in the transition to the culture and practice of medicine in the US; 4) IMGs bring unique skills and advantages to the workplace. Our data reveal that IMGs face workplace challenges throughout their careers. Despite diversity in professional background and demographic characteristics, IMGs in our study reported common experiences in the transition to and practice of medicine in the US. Findings suggest that both workforce and workplace interventions are needed to enable IMG physicians to sustain their essential and growing role in the US healthcare system. Finally, commonalities with experiences of other minority groups within the US healthcare system suggest that optimizing IMGs' experiences may also improve the experiences of an increasingly diverse healthcare workforce.

  14. Managing Obesity in Primary Care Practice: An Overview and Perspective from the POWER-UP Study

    PubMed Central

    Wadden, Thomas A.; Volger, Sheri; Tsai, Adam G.; Sarwer, David B.; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Diewald, Lisa; Carvajal, Raymond; Moran, Caroline H.; Vetter, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Primary care practitioners (PCPs) have been encouraged to screen all adults for obesity and to offer behavioral weight loss counseling to affected individuals. However, there is limited research and guidance on how to provide such intervention in primary care settings. This led the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in 2005 to issue a request for applications to investigate the management of obesity in routine clinical care. Three institutions were funded under a cooperative agreement to undertake the Practice-based Opportunities for Weight Reduction (POWER) trials. The present article reviews selected randomized controlled trials, published prior to the initiation of POWER, and then provides a detailed overview of the rationale, methods, and results of the POWER trial conducted at the University of Pennsylvania (POWER-UP). POWER-UP’s findings are briefly compared with those from the two other POWER Trials, conducted at Johns Hopkins University and Harvard University/Washington University. The methods of delivering behavioral weight loss counseling differed markedly across the three trials, as captured by an algorithm presented in the article. Delivery methods ranged from having medical assistants and PCPs from the practices provide counseling to using a commercially-available call center, coordinated with an interactive web-site. Evaluation of the efficacy of primary care-based weight loss interventions must be considered in light of costs, as discussed in relation to the recent treatment model proposed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. PMID:23921779

  15. Performance indicators for clinical practice management in primary care in Portugal: consensus from a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Basto-Pereira, Miguel; Furtado, Sara Isabel Félix; Silva, Ricardo Jorge Pereira; Fachado González, Francisco; Vara Fernandes, Tito Manuel; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Yaphe, John

    2015-03-01

    Performance indicators assessing the quality of medical care and linked to pay for performance may cause disagreement. Portuguese indicators included in recent health care reform are controversial. To obtain consensus from opinion leaders in family medicine regarding the performance indicators for practice management used in the evaluation of Family Health Units in Portugal. Eighty-nine specialists in primary care were invited to answer the following question in an online Delphi study: 'Which performance indicators should be assessed regarding the organization and management of clinical practice in primary care in Portugal?' A Likert scale was used to evaluate validity, reliability, feasibility and sensitivity to change. Twenty-seven experts participated in the second round and achieved a high degree of consensus. Eight categories were created for analysis. The experts suggested the use of existing indicators as well as new indicators. Thirty-nine indicators suggested by the experts are currently in use in Portugal. The assessment of the number of clinical acts performed, the number of administrative acts, and evaluation of the clinical demographic profile achieved a high degree of consensus. The expert panel suggested fifty new indicators. Five categories of these new indicators had a high degree of consensus, and three categories had a low degree of consensus. The expert panel recommended that performance indicators of practice management should first assess the quantity of clinical and administrative activities undertaken. These indicators must take into account the human and financial resources available to the clinic and its demographic context.

  16. Patient Portal as a Tool for Enhancing Patient Experience and Improving Quality of Care in Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Fathima, Samreen; Bayleran, Janet; Sabbagh, Iyad

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed whether patient portals influence patients' ability for self-management, improve their perception of health state, improve their experience with primary care practices, and reduce healthcare utilization. Patients participating in a nurse-led care coordination program received personalized training to use the portal to communicate with the care team. Data analysis included pre-post comparison of self-efficacy (CDSES), health state (EQVAS), functional status (PROMIS(®)), experience with the provider/practice (CG-CAHPS), and healthcare utilization (admissions and ED visits). A total of 94 patients were enrolled, and 92 (Intent to Treat) were followed up for 7 months to assess their experience, and for 12 months to assess healthcare utilization. Seventy four (mean age 60+13 years) used the portal (Users). Comparison between baseline and 7-month follow-up showed no statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy, perception of health state or experience with the primary care practice. Only functional status improved significantly. ED visits/1000 patients were reduced by 26% and 21% in the Intent to Treat and Users groups, respectively. Hospital admissions/1000 patients were reduced by 46% in the Intent to Treat group and by 38% in the Users group. For patients in care coordination, having access to patient portals may improve access to providers and health data that lead to improvements in patients' functional status and reduce high-cost healthcare utilization, but it does not seem to improve self-efficacy, perception of health state, or experience with primary care practices. In this study, the use of patient portals improved functional status and reduced high-cost healthcare utilization in patients with chronic conditions.

  17. Patient Portal as a Tool for Enhancing Patient Experience and Improving Quality of Care in Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Fathima, Samreen; Bayleran, Janet; Sabbagh, Iyad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study assessed whether patient portals influence patients’ ability for self-management, improve their perception of health state, improve their experience with primary care practices, and reduce healthcare utilization. Methods: Patients participating in a nurse-led care coordination program received personalized training to use the portal to communicate with the care team. Data analysis included pre-post comparison of self-efficacy (CDSES), health state (EQVAS), functional status (PROMIS®), experience with the provider/practice (CG-CAHPS), and healthcare utilization (admissions and ED visits). Results: A total of 94 patients were enrolled, and 92 (Intent to Treat) were followed up for 7 months to assess their experience, and for 12 months to assess healthcare utilization. Seventy four (mean age 60+13 years) used the portal (Users). Comparison between baseline and 7-month follow-up showed no statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy, perception of health state or experience with the primary care practice. Only functional status improved significantly. ED visits/1000 patients were reduced by 26% and 21% in the Intent to Treat and Users groups, respectively. Hospital admissions/1000 patients were reduced by 46% in the Intent to Treat group and by 38% in the Users group. Discussion: For patients in care coordination, having access to patient portals may improve access to providers and health data that lead to improvements in patients’ functional status and reduce high-cost healthcare utilization, but it does not seem to improve self-efficacy, perception of health state, or experience with primary care practices. Conclusion: In this study, the use of patient portals improved functional status and reduced high-cost healthcare utilization in patients with chronic conditions. PMID:28203611

  18. A Review of Antidepressant Therapy in Primary Care: Current Practices and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To provide general practitioners with a comparison of major depressive disorder treatments received in primary care and psychiatric clinic settings, a focus on treatment outcomes related to currently prescribed antidepressants, and a review of new and emerging therapeutic strategies. Data Sources: English-language evidence-based guidelines and peer-reviewed literature published between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were identified using PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. All searches contained the terms major depressive disorder and unipolar depression, and excluded the terms bipolar disorder/manic depressive disorder. The following search terms were also included: naturalistic study, antidepressant, relapse, recurrence, residual symptoms, response, remission, sequential medication trials, and treatment-resistant depression. Study Selection: Meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines were included. Bibliographies were used to identify additional articles of interest. Data Extraction: Abstracts and articles were screened for relevance to primary care practice. Population-based studies and those involving patients treated in primary care were used whenever possible. Data Synthesis: Achieving remission from a major depressive episode is important to improve functional outcomes and to reduce relapse and recurrence. Despite the availability of numerous antidepressants, as many as 50% of patients require treatment modifications beyond first-line therapy. Among remitters, 90% report residual symptoms that may interfere with function. Patients treated in primary care often have chronic depression (symptom duration ≥ 24 months at presentation) and medical comorbidities. These are clinical predictors of worse outcomes and require individualized attention when treatment is initiated. Antidepressants differ in efficacy, tolerability, and side effects—factors that may affect adherence to treatment. Conclusions: Major depressive disorder is

  19. Virtual Patients in Primary Care: Developing a Reusable Model That Fosters Reflective Practice and Clinical Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Zary, Nabil; Björklund, Karin; Toth-Pal, Eva; Leanderson, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care is an integral part of the medical curriculum at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. It is present at every stage of the students’ education. Virtual patients (VPs) may support learning processes and be a valuable complement in teaching communication skills, patient-centeredness, clinical reasoning, and reflective thinking. Current literature on virtual patients lacks reports on how to design and use virtual patients with a primary care perspective. Objective The objective of this study was to create a model for a virtual patient in primary care that facilitates medical students’ reflective practice and clinical reasoning. The main research question was how to design a virtual patient model with embedded process skills suitable for primary care education. Methods The VP model was developed using the Open Tufts University Sciences Knowledgebase (OpenTUSK) virtual patient system as a prototyping tool. Both the VP model and the case created using the developed model were validated by a group of 10 experienced primary care physicians and then further improved by a work group of faculty involved in the medical program. The students’ opinions on the VP were investigated through focus group interviews with 14 students and the results analyzed using content analysis. Results The VP primary care model was based on a patient-centered model of consultation modified according to the Calgary-Cambridge Guides, and the learning outcomes of the study program in medicine were taken into account. The VP primary care model is based on Kolb’s learning theories and consists of several learning cycles. Each learning cycle includes a didactic inventory and then provides the student with a concrete experience (video, pictures, and other material) and preformulated feedback. The students’ learning process was visualized by requiring the students to expose their clinical reasoning and reflections in-action in every learning cycle. Content analysis of the focus

  20. An evaluation of gender equity in different models of primary care practices in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization calls for more work evaluating the effect of health care reforms on gender equity in developed countries. We performed this evaluation in Ontario, Canada where primary care models resulting from reforms co-exist. Methods This cross sectional study of primary care practices uses data collected in 2005-2006. Healthcare service models included in the study consist of fee for service (FFS) based, salaried, and capitation based. We compared the quality of care delivered to women and men in practices of each model. We performed multi-level, multivariate regressions adjusting for patient socio-demographic and economic factors to evaluate vertical equity, and adjusting for these and health factors in evaluating horizontal equity. We measured seven dimensions of health service delivery (e.g. accessibility and continuity) and three dimensions of quality of care using patient surveys (n = 5,361) and chart abstractions (n = 4,108). Results Health service delivery measures were comparable in women and men, with differences ≤ 2.2% in all seven dimensions and in all models. Significant gender differences in the health promotion subjects addressed were observed. Female specific preventive manoeuvres were more likely to be performed than other preventive care. Men attending FFS practices were more likely to receive influenza immunization than women (Adjusted odds ratio: 1.75, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.05, 2.92). There was no difference in the other three prevention indicators. FFS practices were also more likely to provide recommended care for chronic diseases to men than women (Adjusted difference of -11.2%, CI -21.7, -0.8). A similar trend was observed in Community Health Centers (CHC). Conclusions The observed differences in the type of health promotion subjects discussed are likely an appropriate response to the differential healthcare needs between genders. Chronic disease care is non equitable in FFS but not in capitation based

  1. Primary care physicians' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices regarding childhood obesity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Gerwen, M; Franc, C; Rosman, S; Le Vaillant, M; Pelletier-Fleury, N

    2009-03-01

    Obesity is an important public health issue with an epidemic spread in adolescents and children, which needs to be tackled. This systematic review of primary care physicians' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices (KABP) regarding childhood obesity will help to implement or adjust the actions necessary to counteract obesity. Eligible studies were identified through a systematic database search for all available years to 2007. Articles were selected if they included data on primary care physicians' KABP regarding childhood obesity: 130 articles were assessed and eventually 11 articles covering the period 1987-2007 and responding to the inclusion criteria were analyzed. The included studies showed that almost all physicians agreed on the necessity to treat childhood obesity but they believed to have a low self-efficacy in the treatment and experienced a negative feeling regarding obesity management. There was a large heterogeneity in the assessment of childhood obesity between the different studies but the awareness of the importance of using body mass index increased over the years among physicians. Almost all studies noted that physicians recommended dietary advice, exercise or referral to a dietician. From this review, it is obvious that there is a need for education of primary care physicians to increase the uniformity of the assessment and to improve physicians' self-efficacy in managing childhood obesity. Multidisciplinary treatment including general practitioners, paediatricians and specialized dieticians appears to be the way to counteract the growing obesity epidemic and thus, primary care physicians have to initiate, coordinate and obviously participate in obesity prevention initiatives.

  2. An evaluation of TQM in primary care: in search of best practice.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M; Matthew, A

    1995-01-01

    Presents an evaluation of a TQM initiative which was designed to help the general level of awareness and knowledge within general practices and to encourage the implementation of TQM in primary care. The purposes of the initiative were to assess the effectiveness of the TQM approach used, not only in terms of tangible results but also in terms of cost effectiveness suitability and workability; and to check the transferability of the model used and its replicability with similar levels of benefits in other general practices on a nationwide basis.

  3. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  4. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  5. The use of negative indexes of health to evaluate quality of care in a primary-care group practice.

    PubMed

    Heineken, P A; Charles, G; Stimson, D H; Wenell, C; Stimson, R H

    1985-03-01

    A quality assessment method using negative indexes of health as a measure of the quality of medical care was applied in a hospital-based primary-care group practice. During a 5-year period, records of 1,147 patients were analyzed. The study led to several observations regarding the use of this method in this setting: 1) The negative indexes of health method encourages physicians to include both primary and secondary preventive measures in their practice of medicine and to see their role as a broad one, from providing good care to individual patients to influencing public policy. 2) Most medical records do not now contain all the data required for use of this method. 3) In cases where this method identifies only a few instances of possibly preventable disease or untimely death, it is impossible to know whether the care is good and the method of evaluation is sensitive, or whether the care is poor and the method is insensitive to deficiencies in care.

  6. [Health status of the elderly in primary health care practices using an integral geriatric assessment].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Becerra, Roxana Gisela; Villarreal Ríos, Enrique; Galicia Rodríguez, Liliana; Vargas Daza, Emma Rosa; Martínez González, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    To determine the health status of patients 60 years of age or over in Primary Health Care practices using an integral geriatric assessment. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Five primary care units, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; México. Elderly patient aged 60 years of age or over, who were seen in primary health care practices. Previously signed informed consent was given, with exclusion criteria being non-completion of the integral geriatric assessment. A technical sample of conglomerates and quota was used. Medical dimension variables: visual, hearing (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly), urinary incontinence (Consultation in Incontinence Questionnaire), nutritional condition (Mini Nutritional Assessment), personal clinical history, polypharmacy; mental impairment (Mini Mental State Examination), depression (Yesavaje); functional: basic (Katz) and instrumental (Lawton and Brody) activities of daily living, mobility (Up and go) and social (Social sources scale). The analysis included percentages and confidence intervals. In the medical dimensions; 42.3% with visual impairment, 27.7% hearing, 68.3% urinary incontinence, 37.0% malnutrition, and 54.7% polypharmacy. In the mental dimension: 4.0% severe mental impairment, and 11% depression: functional dimension: 2.0% total dependence of activities of daily living; 14.3% instrumental activities impairment; 29.0% mobility impairment, and 48.0% had moderately deteriorated social resources. The health status of the elderly seen in primary health care practices is characterized by independent patients with different levels of alterations in the medical dimensions, low levels in mental alteration, and moderately deteriorated social resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Practical and relevant self-report measures of patient health behaviors for primary care research.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Russell E; Ory, Marcia G; Klesges, Lisa M; Cifuentes, Maribel; Fernald, Douglas H; Green, Larry A

    2005-01-01

    With increasing evidence for the value of behavior change counseling, there is a need for health behavior measurements that can be implemented in primary care research. This article discusses criteria for and reviews self-report measures to briefly assess cigarette smoking, eating patterns, physical activity, and risky drinking across the life course. It then proposes pragmatic measures for use in practice-based research. Drawing from literature reviews, previous multisite studies, personal communications with experts in the field, and guidance from an expert panel, we identified self-report behavior change measures and gave priority to items that addressed Healthy People 2010 goals, as well as those that were practical (ie, shorter, and easier to score and use for intervention), were sensitive to change, and produced results that could directly inform primary care intervention. Separate recommendations are described for measures for adults and for children/adolescents. We recommend a set of 22 items for adults and 16 items for adolescents to track succinctly their status on the 4 health behaviors above. Perfected measures remain elusive: newly developed measures of physical activity and eating patterns are recommended, and in general, the brief measures for adults are currently better validated than are the child measures. A set of totally satisfactory practical instruments for measuring behavior change in primary care settings does not yet exist. There is sufficient progress to encourage use of and further research on the proposed items. Use of a common set of items across different interventions and projects will help to advance clinical and behavioral research in primary care settings.

  8. A Multilevel Analysis of Patient Engagement and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Primary Care Practices of Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Shortell, Stephen M; Poon, Bing Ying; Ramsay, Patricia P; Rodriguez, Hector P; Ivey, Susan L; Huber, Thomas; Rich, Jeremy; Summerfelt, Tom

    2017-06-01

    The growing movement toward more accountable care delivery and the increasing number of people with chronic illnesses underscores the need for primary care practices to engage patients in their own care. For adult primary care practices seeing patients with diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease, we examined the relationship between selected practice characteristics, patient engagement, and patient-reported outcomes of care. Cross-sectional multilevel observational study of 16 randomly selected practices in two large accountable care organizations (ACOs). Patients with diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease (CVD) who met study eligibility criteria (n = 4368) and received care in 2014 were randomly selected to complete a patient activation and PRO survey (51% response rate; n = 2176). Primary care team members of the 16 practices completed surveys that assessed practice culture, relational coordination, and teamwork (86% response rate; n = 411). Patient-reported outcomes included depression (PHQ-4), physical functioning (PROMIS SF12a), and social functioning (PROMIS SF8a), the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care instrument (PACIC-11), and the Patient Activation Measure instrument (PAM-13). Patient-level covariates included patient age, gender, education, insurance coverage, limited English language proficiency, blood pressure, HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol, and disease comorbidity burden. For each of the 16 practices, patient-centered culture and the degree of relational coordination among team members were measured using a clinician and staff survey. The implementation of shared decision-making activities in each practice was assessed using an operational leader survey. Having a patient-centered culture was positively associated with fewer depression symptoms (odds ratio [OR] = 1.51; confidence interval [CI] 1.04, 2.19) and better physical function scores (OR = 1.85; CI 1.25, 2.73). Patient activation was positively associated with fewer

  9. Community-based participatory action research: transforming multidisciplinary practice in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Hills, Marcia; Mullett, Jennifer; Carroll, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Health care systems throughout the world are in the process of restructuring and reforming their health service delivery systems, reorienting themselves to a primary health care (PHC) model that uses multidisciplinary practice (MDP) teams to provide a range of coordinated, integrated services. This study explores the challenges of putting the MDP approach into practice in one community in a city in Canada. The data we analyzed were derived from a community-based participatory action research (CBPAR) project, conducted in 2004, that was used to enhance collaborative MDP in a PHC center serving a residential and small-business community of 11,000 within a medium-sized city of approximately 300,000 people in Canada. CBPAR is a planned, systematic approach to issues relevant to the community of interest, requires community involvement, has a problem-solving focus, is directed at societal change, and makes a lasting contribution to the community. We drew from one aspect of this complex, multiyear project aimed at transforming the rhetoric advocating PHC reform into actual sustainable practices. The community studied was diverse with respect to age, socioeconomics, and lifestyle. Its interdisciplinary team serves approximately 3,000 patients annually, 30% of whom are 65 years or older. This PHC center's multidisciplinary, integrated approach to care makes it a member of a very distinct minority within the larger primary care system in Canada. Analysis of practice in PHC revealed entrenched and unconscious ideas of the limitations and boundaries of practice. In the rhetoric of PHC, MDP was lauded by many. In practice, however, collaborative, multidisciplinary team approaches to care were difficult to achieve. The successful implementation of an MDP approach to PHC requires moving away from physician-driven care. This can only be achieved once there is a change in the underlying structures, values, power relations, and roles defined by the health care system and the

  10. Assessment of injection practice in primary health care facilities of Shiraz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mclaws, Mary-Louise; Ghahramani, Sulmaz; Palenik, Charles John; Keshtkar, Vahid; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2014-03-01

    Occupational risk for several bloodborne viruses is attributable to unsafe injection practices. To understand injection frequency and safety, we surveyed injection rates and factors influencing injection prescription in primary health care facilities and associated health clinics in Shiraz, Iran. We used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to study the frequency and safety of injections delivered in 27 primary health care facilities. We used observations and 3 data collecting tools. Patterns of 600 general practice physicians' (GPs) prescriptions were also reviewed. In-depth interviews to elicit the factors contributing to injection prescriptions were conducted. The annual per capita injection rate was 3.12. Corticosteroids were prescribed more frequently than antibiotics (P < .001). Knowledge of participants concerning transmission risks for 3 of the most common bloodborne infections (BBIs) was less than 75%. Factors affecting use of injections by GPs included strong patient preference for injections over oral medications and financial benefit for GPs, especially those in private practice settings. Frequency of therapeutic injections in the participating facilities in Shiraz was high. Sociocultural factors in the patient community and their beliefs in the effectiveness of injections exerted influence on GP prescribing practices. Programs for appropriate and safe injection practices should target GP and injection providers, as well as patients, informing them about alternative treatments and possible complications of unnecessary and unsafe injections. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. What are patients' expectations about the organization of their primary care physicians' practices?

    PubMed

    Sebo, Paul; Herrmann, François R; Bovier, Patrick; Haller, Dagmar M

    2015-08-14

    To our knowledge no study has at the same time assessed patients' satisfaction and their expectations concerning the organizational and contextual aspects of health care provided by their primary care physician (PCP). Assessing these aspects is important to inform future primary healthcare service planning. Our objective was thus to document patients' satisfaction with and expectations from their PCP, in terms of availability and organization of their practices, and to assess whether these indicators varied across age groups and type of practice (solo, duo, group). Cross-sectional study based on the answers to questionnaires completed by patients consulting their PCP in Geneva, Switzerland. A random sample of PCPs was asked to recruit consecutively between 50 and 100 patients coming to the practice for a scheduled medical consultation. The patients were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire centered on their satisfaction levels and expectations towards their PCP. One thousand six hundred thirty-seven patients agreed to participate (participation rate: 97%, women: 63%, mean age: 54 years). Patient satisfaction was high for all the items, except for the availability of the doctor by phone and for the waiting time in the waiting room. The satisfaction rate increased with age and was higher for small practices. In relation to patients' expectations from their doctor, older patients and patients visiting larger practices tended to be more demanding. Patients are generally highly satisfied with their PCP. They have a wide range of expectations which should be taken into account when considering potential improvements.

  12. Patient safety culture in primary care: developing a theoretical framework for practical use

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Susan; Parker, Dianne; Claridge, Tanya; Esmail, Aneez; Marshall, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Objective Great importance has been attached to a culture of safe practice in healthcare organisations, but it has proved difficult to engage frontline staff with this complex concept. The present study aimed to develop and test a framework for making the concept of safety culture meaningful and accessible to managers and frontline staff, and facilitating discussion of ways to improve team/organisational safety culture. Setting Eight primary care trusts and a sample of their associated general practices in north west England. Methods In phase 1 a comprehensive review of the literature and a postal survey of experts helped identify the key dimensions of safety culture in primary care. Semistructured interviews with 30 clinicians and managers explored the application of these dimensions to an established theory of organisational maturity. In phase 2 the face validity and utility of the framework was assessed in 33 interviews and 14 focus groups. Results Nine dimensions were identified through which safety culture is expressed in primary care organisations. Organisational descriptions were developed for how these dimensions might be characterised at five levels of organisational maturity. The resulting framework conceptualises patient safety culture as multidimensional and dynamic, and seems to have a high level of face validity and utility within primary care. It aids clinicians' and managers' understanding of the concept of safety culture and promotes discussion within teams about their safety culture maturity. Conclusions The framework moves the agenda on from rhetoric about the importance of safety culture to a way of understanding why and how the shared values of staff working within a healthcare organisation may be operationalised to create a safe environment for patient care. PMID:17693682

  13. Alignment between Chronic Disease Policy and Practice: Case Study at a Primary Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Claire A.; Draper, Catherine E.; Bresick, Graham F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic disease is by far the leading cause of death worldwide and of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries, including South Africa, where chronic diseases disproportionately affect the poor living in urban settings. The Provincial Government of the Western Cape (PGWC) has prioritized the management of chronic diseases and has developed a policy and framework (Adult Chronic Disease Management Policy 2009) to guide and improve the prevention and management of chronic diseases at a primary care level. The aim of this study is to assess the alignment of current primary care practices with the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy. Methods One comprehensive primary care facility in a Cape Town health district was used as a case study. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews (n = 10), focus groups (n = 8) and document review. Participants in this study included clinical staff involved in chronic disease management at the facility and at a provincial level. Data previously collected using the Integrated Audit Tool for Chronic Disease Management (part of the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy) formed the basis of the guide questions used in focus groups and interviews. Results The results of this research indicate a significant gap between policy and its implementation to improve and support chronic disease management at this primary care facility. A major factor seems to be poor policy knowledge by clinicians, which contributes to an individual rather than a team approach in the management of chronic disease patients. Poor interaction between facility- and community-based services also emerged. A number of factors were identified that seemed to contribute to poor policy implementation, the majority of which were staff related and ultimately resulted in a decrease in the quality of patient care. Conclusions Chronic disease policy implementation needs to be improved in order to support chronic disease

  14. Alignment between chronic disease policy and practice: case study at a primary care facility.

    PubMed

    Draper, Claire A; Draper, Catherine E; Bresick, Graham F

    2014-01-01

    Chronic disease is by far the leading cause of death worldwide and of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries, including South Africa, where chronic diseases disproportionately affect the poor living in urban settings. The Provincial Government of the Western Cape (PGWC) has prioritized the management of chronic diseases and has developed a policy and framework (Adult Chronic Disease Management Policy 2009) to guide and improve the prevention and management of chronic diseases at a primary care level. The aim of this study is to assess the alignment of current primary care practices with the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy. One comprehensive primary care facility in a Cape Town health district was used as a case study. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews (n = 10), focus groups (n = 8) and document review. Participants in this study included clinical staff involved in chronic disease management at the facility and at a provincial level. Data previously collected using the Integrated Audit Tool for Chronic Disease Management (part of the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy) formed the basis of the guide questions used in focus groups and interviews. The results of this research indicate a significant gap between policy and its implementation to improve and support chronic disease management at this primary care facility. A major factor seems to be poor policy knowledge by clinicians, which contributes to an individual rather than a team approach in the management of chronic disease patients. Poor interaction between facility- and community-based services also emerged. A number of factors were identified that seemed to contribute to poor policy implementation, the majority of which were staff related and ultimately resulted in a decrease in the quality of patient care. Chronic disease policy implementation needs to be improved in order to support chronic disease management at this facility. It is possible that similar

  15. Implementation and assessment of a fall screening program in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Landis, Suzanne E; Galvin, Shelley L

    2014-12-01

    Fall prevention strategies for older adults are underused in primary care. A study was designed to examine the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) fall measures and to reduce injuries and costs from falls by 10%. This quality improvement project using a pre/post design was implemented in four primary care practices with 2,021 patients aged 65 and older in Asheville, North Carolina. The project used a patient registry, electronic templates, standardized care protocols, a falls clinic to evaluate individuals who reported falling, and patient resource materials. Data were collected from medical records on processes of care, fall-related injuries, and anticipated payments. Individuals billed for at least one outpatient visit from July 2011 through June 2012 (n = 2,021) constituted the cohort for the intervention and for analysis of injuries from falls requiring hospital visits (before the intervention (T1): July 2010 to March 2011; after the intervention (T2): July 2012 to March 2013). Practice sites properly screened 68.8% of older adults for falls, assessed 87% of those who reported falling, and documented the PQRS required plan of care in 23%. Only 20% self-reported falls. Numbers of falls requiring a visit to the hospital were small overall and did not decrease (T1, 2.4%; T2, 2.9%; P = .32); 61% of individuals seen in the hospital for fall-related injuries had not reported previous falls. Incorporating the PQRS fall measures into primary care was challenging, and the program was not robust enough to reduce serious falls and hospital costs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Primary care providers’ knowledge, beliefs and treatment practices for gout: results of a physician questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Negron, Amarie; Ogarek, Jessica; Firneno, Cassandra; Yood, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We sought to examine primary care providers’ gout knowledge and reported treatment patterns in comparison with current treatment recommendations. Methods. We conducted a national survey of a random sample of US primary care physicians to assess their treatment of acute, intercritical and tophaceous gout using published European and American gout treatment recommendations and guidelines as a gold standard. Results. There were 838 respondents (response rate of 41%), most of whom worked in private practice (63%) with >16 years experience (52%). Inappropriate dosing of medications in the setting of renal disease and lack of prophylaxis when initiating urate-lowering therapy (ULT) accounted for much of the lack of compliance with treatment recommendations. Specifically for acute podagra, 53% reported avoidance of anti-inflammatory drugs in the setting of renal insufficiency, use of colchicine at a dose of ≤2.4 mg/day and no initiation of a ULT during an acute attack. For intercritical gout in the setting of renal disease, 3% would provide care consistent with the recommendations, including initiating a ULT at the appropriate dose with dosing titration to a serum urate level of ≤6 mg/dl and providing prophylaxis. For tophaceous gout, 17% reported care consistent with the recommendations, including ULT use with dosing titration to a serum urate level of ≤6 mg/dl and prophylaxis. Conclusion. Only half of primary care providers reported optimal treatment practices for the management of acute gout and <20% for intercritical or tophaceous gout, suggesting that care deficiencies are common. PMID:23620554

  17. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restructuring of the health care system, development of comprehensive benefit packages for older people under the national health financing scheme, training of the primary care workforce, effective use of electronic medical records and clinical guidelines; and empowering older people and their caregivers with knowledge, skills and positive attitudes to ageing and self care. Ultimately, family medicine specialists must become the agents for change to lead multidisciplinary teams and work with various agencies to ensure that better coordination, continuity and quality of care are eventually delivered to older patients across time and settings. PMID:21385446

  18. Stakeholders' Recommendations to Improve Patient-centered "LGBTQ" Primary Care in Rural and Multicultural Practices.

    PubMed

    Kano, Miria; Silva-Bañuelos, Alma Rosa; Sturm, Robert; Willging, Cathleen E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals among gender/sexual minorities share experiences of stigma and discrimination, yet have distinctive health care needs influenced by ethnic/racial minority and rural realities. We collected qualitative data from lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT) and queer persons across the largely rural, multicultural state of New Mexico, particularly those from understudied ethnic groups, regarding factors facilitating or impeding patient-centered primary care. The themes identified formed the basis for a statewide summit on LGBT health care guidelines and strategies for decreasing treatment gaps. Three to 15 individuals, ages 18 to 75 years, volunteered for 1 of 4 town hall dialogues (n = 32), and 175 people took part in the summit. Participants acknowledged health care gaps pertinent to LGBT youth, elders, American Indians, and Latinos/Latinas, expressing specific concern for rural residents. This preliminary research emphasizes the need to improve primary care practices that treat rural and ethnic-minority LGBT people and offers patient-driven recommendations to enhance care delivery while clinic-level transformations are implemented. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Health Care Resource Utilization for Outpatient Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Care Delivery Among Advanced Practice Providers and Physician Providers in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Virani, Salim S; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Deswal, Anita; Nasir, Khurram; Rajan, Suja S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A

    2017-10-10

    Although effectiveness of diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) care delivery between physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) has been shown to be comparable, health care resource utilization between these 2 provider types in primary care is unknown. This study compared health care resource utilization between patients with diabetes or CVD receiving care from APPs or physicians. Diabetes (n = 1,022,588) or CVD (n = 1,187,035) patients with a primary care visit between October 2013 and September 2014 in 130 Veterans Affairs facilities were identified. Using hierarchical regression adjusting for covariates including patient illness burden, the authors compared number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) tests among diabetes patients, and number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and cardiac stress tests among CVD patients receiving care from physicians and APPs. Physicians had significantly larger patient panels compared with APPs. In adjusted analyses, diabetes patients receiving care from APPs received fewer primary and specialty care visits and a greater number of lipid panels and HbA1c tests compared with patients receiving care from physicians. CVD patients receiving care from APPs received more frequent lipid testing and fewer primary and specialty care visits compared with those receiving care from physicians, with no differences in the number of stress tests. Most of these differences, although statistically significant, were numerically small. Health care resource utilization among diabetes or CVD patients receiving care from APPs or physicians appears comparable, although physicians work with larger patient panels.

  20. Primary health care and general practice--a comparison between Australia and Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ee-Ming Khoo; Kidd, Michael Richard

    2002-01-01

    The Australian and Malaysian systems of general practice were examined and compared. The issues of similarity and difference identified are discussed in this paper. Quality clinical practice and the importance of compulsory vocational training prior to entry into general practice and continuing professional development is one important area. A move towards preventive health care and chronic disease management was observed in both countries. Practice incentive programmes to support such initiatives as improved rates of immunisation and cervical smear testing and the implementation of information technology and information management systems need careful implementation. The Medicare system used in Australia may not be appropriate for general practitioners in Malaysia and, if used, a pharmaceutical benefit scheme would also need to be established. In both countries the corporatisation of medical practice is causing concern for the medical profession. Rural and aboriginal health issues remain important in both countries. Graduate medical student entry is an attractive option but workforce requirements mean that medical education will need individual tailoring for each country. Incorporating nurses into primary health care may provide benefits such as cost savings. The integration model of community centres in Malaysia involving doctors, nurses and allied health professionals, such as physiotherapists, in a single location deserves further examination.

  1. Recognising Kawasaki disease in UK primary care: a descriptive study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    PubMed

    Moore, Abigail; Harnden, Anthony; Mayon-White, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is a rare childhood illness that can present non-specifically, making it a diagnostic challenge. The clinical presentation of Kawasaki disease has not been previously described in primary care. To describe how children with an eventual diagnosis of Kawasaki disease initially present to primary care in the UK. The Clinical Practice Research Datalink was used to find cases coded as Kawasaki disease. Hospital Episode Statistics, hospital admissions, and hospital outpatient attendances were used to identify the children with a convincing diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. Questionnaires and a request for copies of relevant hospital summaries, discharge letters, and reports were sent to GPs of the 104 children with a diagnosis of Kawasaki disease between 2007 and 2011. Most children presented with few clinical features typical of Kawasaki disease. Of those with just one feature, a fever or a polymorphous rash were the most common. By the time that most children were admitted to hospital they had a more recognisable syndrome, with three or more clinical features diagnostic of Kawasaki disease. Most GPs did not consider Kawasaki disease among their differential diagnoses, but some GPs did suspect that the child's illness was unusual. The study highlighted the difficulty of early diagnosis, with most children having a non-specific presentation to primary care. GPs are encouraged to implement good safety netting, and to keep Kawasaki disease in mind when children present with fever and rashes. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  2. Role of Geography and Nurse Practitioner Scope-of-Practice in Efforts to Expand Primary Care System Capacity: Health Reform and the Primary Care Workforce.

    PubMed

    Graves, John A; Mishra, Pranita; Dittus, Robert S; Parikh, Ravi; Perloff, Jennifer; Buerhaus, Peter I

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the geographic distribution of the overall primary care workforce that includes both physician and nonphysician clinicians--particularly in areas with restrictive nurse practitioner scope-of-practice laws and where there are relatively large numbers of uninsured. We investigated whether geographic accessibility to primary care clinicians (PCCs) differed across urban and rural areas and across states with more or less restrictive scope-of-practice laws. An observational study. 2013 Area Health Resource File (AHRF) and US Census Bureau county travel data. The measures included percentage of the population in low-accessibility, medium-accessibility, and high-accessibility areas; number of geographically accessible primary care physicians (PCMDs), nurse practitioners (PCNPs), and physician assistants (PCPAs) per 100,000 population; and number of uninsured per PCC. We found divergent patterns in the geographic accessibility of PCCs. PCMDs constituted the largest share of the workforce across all settings, but were relatively more concentrated within urban areas. Accessibility to nonphysicians was highest in rural areas: there were more accessible PCNPs per 100,000 population in rural areas of restricted scope-of-practice states (21.4) than in urban areas of full practice states (13.9). Despite having more accessible nonphysician clinicians, rural areas had the largest number of uninsured per PCC in 2012. While less restrictive scope-of-practice states had up to 40% more PCNPs in some areas, we found little evidence of differences in the share of the overall population in low-accessibility areas across scope-of-practice categorizations. Removing restrictive scope-of-practice laws may expand the overall capacity of the primary care workforce, but only modestly in the short run. Additional efforts are needed that recognize the locational tendencies of physicians and nonphysicains.

  3. Meaningful use of electronic prescribing in 5 exemplar primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Jesse C; Etz, Rebecca S; Wu, Shinyi; Straus, Susan G; Eisenman, David; Bell, Douglas S

    2011-01-01

    Successful use of electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) is a key requirement for demonstrating meaningful use of electronic health records to qualify for federal incentives. Currently, many physicians who implement e-prescribing fail to make substantial use of these systems, and little is known about factors contributing to successful e-prescribing use. The objective of this study was to identify successful implementation and use techniques. We conducted a multimethod qualitative case study of 5 ambulatory primary care practices identified as exemplars of effective e-prescribing. The practices were identified by a group of e-prescribing experts. Field researchers conducted in-depth interviews and observed prescription-related workflow in these practices. In these exemplar practices, successful use of e-prescribing required practice transformation. Practice members reported extensive efforts to redesign work processes to take advantage of e-prescribing capabilities and to create specific e-prescribing protocols to distribute prescription-related work among practice team members. These practices had substantial resources to support e-prescribing use, including local physician champions, ongoing training for practice members, and continuous on-site technical support. Practices faced considerable challenges during use of e-prescribing, however, deriving from problems coordinating new work processes with pharmacies and ineffective health information exchange that required workarounds to ensure the completeness of patient medical records. More widespread implementation and effective use of e-prescribing in ambulatory care settings will require practice transformation efforts that focus on work process redesign while being attentive to effects on patient and pharmacy involvement in prescribing. Improved health information exchange is required to fully realize expected quality, safety, and efficiency gains of e-prescribing.

  4. Implications of New Colorectal Cancer Screening Technologies for Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Ann G.; Levin, Theodore R; Jaffe, C. Carl; Galen, Barbara A.; Ransohoff, David F.; Brown, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces the risk of CRC mortality but is currently not well utilized, with adherence only 50% in the eligible U.S. population and rates that lag behind those for breast and cervical cancer. The primary care physician has the pivotal role of facilitating patient adherence to CRC screening by informed choice of the screening tests, follow up of positive tests, and coordination of medical resources when diagnostic intervention is required. Consequently, the primary care setting is where significant improvements can be made in CRC screening adherence. This article provides a summary of the newer CRC screening technologies that can be used by primary care physicians in shared decision making with their patients. There are now multiple CRC screening tests which vary in their ability to detect the different stages in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Current guidelines of the Multi-Society (Gastroenterology) Task Force (1997, 2003, 2006, 2008), the American Cancer Society (2001, 2003, 2007, 2008), and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (2002) recommend a menu of CRC screening options, including fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) (Hemoccult II, Hemoccult SENSA, fecal immunochemical tests (FIT)), double contrast barium enema (DCBE), flexible sigmoidoscopy with or without annual FOBT’s, and colonoscopy. In this report, we assess the options of fecal immunochemical tests, colonoscopy, CT-colonography (CTC or virtual colonoscopy), and fecal DNA tests. The tests are discussed with respect to the evidence in support of their use and within the context of how they could be managed and implemented in primary care practice. Primary care physicians will want to understand the tradeoffs among accuracy, costs, and patient preferences for the current and emerging CRC tests. PMID:18725826

  5. Organizational climate in primary care settings: implications for nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Clarke, Sean

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to investigate literature related to organizational climate, define organizational climate, and identify its domains for nurse practitioner (NP) practice in primary care settings. A search was conducted using MEDLINE, PubMed, HealthSTAR/Ovid, ISI Web of Science, and several other health policy and nursingy databases. In primary care settings, organizational climate for NPs is a set of organizational attributes, which are perceived by NPs about their practice setting, emerge from the way the organization interacts with NPs, and affect NP behaviors and outcomes. Autonomy, NP-physician relations, and professional visibility were identified as organizational climate domains. NPs should be encouraged to assess organizational climate in their workplace and choose organizations that promote autonomy, collegiality between NPs and physicians, and encourage professional visibility. Organizational and NP awareness of qualities that foster NP practice will be a first step for developing strategies to creating an optimal organizational climate for NPs to deliver high-quality care. More research is needed to develop a comprehensive conceptual framework for organizational climate and develop new instruments to accurately measure organizational climate and link it to NP and patient outcomes. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Primary Care Practice-Based Research Networks: Working at the Interface Between Research and Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mold, James W.; Peterson, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to describe the emerging role of primary care practice-based in research, quality improvement (QI), and translation of research into practice (TRIP). METHODS We gathered information from the published literature, discussions with PBRN leaders, case examples, and our own personal experience to describe a role for PBRNs that comfortably bridges the gap between research and QI, discovery and application, academicians and practitioners—a role that may lead to the establishment of true learning communities. We provide specific recommendations for network directors, network clinicians, and other potential stakeholders. RESULTS PBRNs function at the interface between research and QI, an interface called TRIP by some members of the research community. In doing so, PBRNs are helping to clarify the difficulty of applying study findings to everyday care as an inappropriate disconnect between discovery and implementation, research and practice. Participatory models are emerging in which stakeholders agree on their goals; apply their collective knowledge, skills, and resources to accomplish these goals; and use research and QI methods when appropriate. CONCLUSIONS PBRNs appear to be evolving from clinical laboratories into learning communities, proving grounds for generalizable solutions to clinical problems, and engines for improvement of primary care delivery systems. PMID:15928213

  7. Primary care for tinnitus: practice and opinion among GPs in England

    PubMed Central

    El-Shunnar, Suliman K; Hoare, Derek J; Smith, Sandra; Gander, Phillip E; Kang, Sujin; Fackrell, Kathryn; Hall, Deborah A

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aim and objective Effective tinnitus management starts with appropriate general practitioner (GP) triage, which in England can be guided by the Department of Health's Good Practice Guide (GPG). Despite the prevalence of the condition, there has never been a systematic survey of its management in primary care in England. We aimed to evaluate how people with tinnitus are assessed and managed in general practice, noting variation in practice across GPs and health authorities, and evaluating how closely typical practice aligns to the GPG for tinnitus. Methods A nine-item postal questionnaire was sent to 2000 GPs randomly selected to proportionally represent the number of primary care trusts and strategic health authorities in England. Results We received 368 responses. Responses indicated a mix of frequent and infrequent practices, for example, 90% of GPs assessed the impact of tinnitus on quality of life, but fewer examined cranial nerves (38%) or assessed for a carotid bruit (26%) during a tinnitus consultation. In the management of tinnitus, 83% routinely removed earwax, and 87% provided information-based advice. In contrast, only 4% of responders would offer antidepressant drugs or psychological therapies. Thematic analysis revealed a desire for concise training on tinnitus management. Conclusions GP assessment and management of tinnitus represents potential inequity of service for tinnitus patients. While the GPG aims to promote equity of care, it is only referred to by a minority of clinicians and so its utility for guiding service delivery is questionable. Although some GPs highlighted little demand for tinnitus management within their practice, many others expressed an unmet need for specific and concise GP training on tinnitus management. Further work should therefore evaluate current informational resources and propose effective modes of delivering educational updates. PMID:21707872

  8. Barriers to translating emerging genetic research on smoking into clinical practice. Perspectives of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Shields, Alexandra E; Blumenthal, David; Weiss, Kevin B; Comstock, Catherine B; Currivan, Douglas; Lerman, Caryn

    2005-02-01

    Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death nationally. Emerging research may lead to improved smoking cessation treatment options, including tailoring treatment by genotype. Our objective was to assess primary care physicians' attitudes toward new genetic-based approaches to smoking treatment. A 2002 national survey of primary care physicians. Respondents were randomly assigned a survey including 1 of 2 scenarios: a scenario in which a new test to tailor smoking treatment was described as a "genetic" test or one in which the new test was described as a "serum protein" test. The study sample was randomly drawn from all U.S. primary care physicians in the American Medical Association Masterfile (e.g., those with a primary specialty of internal medicine, family practice, or general practice). Of 2,000 sampled physicians, 1,120 responded, yielding a response rate of 62.3%. Controlling for physician and practice characteristics, describing a new test as "genetic" resulted in a regression-adjusted mean adoption score of 73.5, compared to a score of 82.5 for a nongenetic test, reflecting an 11% reduction in physicians' likelihood of offering such a test to their patients. Merely describing a new test to tailor smoking treatment as "genetic" poses a significant barrier to physician adoption. Considering national estimates of those who smoke on a daily basis, this 11% reduction in adoption scores would translate into 3.9 million smokers who would not be offered a new genetic-based treatment for smoking. While emerging genetic research may lead to improved smoking treatment, the potential of novel interventions will likely go unrealized unless barriers to clinical integration are addressed.

  9. Predictors of Insulin Initiation in Metformin and Sulfonylurea Users in Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Dippel, Franz-Werner; Rathmann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The aims were to investigate predictors of insulin initiation in new users of metformin or sulfonylureas in primary care practices, in particular, its association with decreased renal function. Data from 9103 new metformin and 1120 sulfonylurea users with normal baseline glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >90 ml/min/1.73 m2 from 1072 practices were retrospectively analyzed (Disease Analyzer Germany: 01/2003-06/2012). Cox regression models and propensity score matching was used to adjust for confounders (age, sex, practice characteristics, comorbidity). Insulin treatment was started in 394 (4.3%) metformin and in 162 (14.5%) sulfonylurea users within 6 years (P < .001). Kaplan-Meier curves (propensity score matched patients) showed that the metformin group was at a lower risk of insulin initiation compared to sulfonylurea users throughout the study period. A substantial eGFR decline (category: 15-<30 ml/min/1.73 m2) was significantly associated with a higher likelihood to have insulin initiated (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.09-5.23) in metformin but not in sulfonylurea (HR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.16-1.30) users. New users of sulfonylurea monotherapy in primary care practices in Germany were about 3-fold more likely to start insulin therapy than those with metformin. Kidney function decline was associated with earlier insulin initiation in metformin but not in sulfonylurea users. PMID:24876433

  10. Association between satisfaction and stress with aspects of job and practice management among primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Lapi, Francesco; Silvestri, Caterina; Roti, Lorenzo; Giustini, Saffi Ettore; Buiatti, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Reforms introduced in the last decade in Italian general practice, have contributed to the changing role of primary care physicians (PCPs) within the Italian National Health Service, with potential difficulties adapting that may lead to job stress and dissatisfaction. The present study aims to compare job satisfaction and stress levels of PCPs working in primary healthcare teams (PHCTs) with those for practitioners operating in single ambulatory offices, and to assess potential associations with aspects of job and practice management. A postal survey was conducted between January and March 2005 among PCPs working in Tuscany. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire containing questions concerning personal, professional, job and practice characteristics. The Warr-Cook-Wall scale and the Cooper test were used to assess job satisfaction and stress, respectively. From 3043 PCPs, a response rate of 45.2% was achieved. Significant differences were found between PHCT physicians and solo practitioners in several aspects of their job. Physicians working in PHCTs appeared more satisfied in some aspects of their practice such as organisation, whereas they were less satisfied about workload and interaction with other healthcare providers. Multivariate modelling showed relevant aspects of dissatisfaction and stress, particularly the difficulties of collaboration with other healthcare providers, and access to specialised services. Reform strategies aimed at improving the quality of care among PCPs needs to take into account the contextual determinants of physician satisfaction and stress, and should highlight programmes that might be pursued to improve the integration of PCPs within the Italian National Health System.

  11. Influence of primary care practices on patients' uptake of diabetic retinopathy screening: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Lindenmeyer, Antje; Sturt, Jackie A; Hipwell, Alison; Stratton, Irene M; Al-Athamneh, Nidal; Gadsby, Roger; O'Hare, Joseph Paul; Scanlon, Peter H

    2014-08-01

    The NHS Diabetic Eye Screening Programme aims to reduce the risk of sight loss among people with diabetes in England by enabling prompt diagnosis of sight-threatening retinopathy. However, the rate of screening uptake between practices can vary from 55% to 95%. Existing research focuses on the impact of patient demographics but little is known about GP practice-related factors that can make a difference. To identify factors contributing to high or low patient uptake of retinopathy screening. Qualitative case-based study; nine purposively selected GP practices (deprived/affluent; high/low screening uptake) in three retinopathy screening programme areas. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients, primary care professionals, and screeners. A comparative case-based analysis was carried out to identify factors related to high or low screening uptake. Eight possible factors that influenced uptake were identified. Five modifiable factors related to service and staff interactions: communication with screening services; contacting patients; integration of screening with other care; focus on the newly diagnosed; and perception of non-attenders. Three factors were non-modifiable challenges related to practice location: level of deprivation; diversity of ethnicities and languages; and transport and access. All practices adopted strategies to improve uptake, but the presence of two or more major barriers made it very hard for practices to achieve higher uptake levels. A range of service-level opportunities to improve screening attendance were identified that are available to practices and screening teams. More research is needed into the complex interfaces of care that make up retinopathy screening. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  12. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Primary Care Physicians About Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Northern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazmi, Ahmad H.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim: Primary health care (PHC) physicians manage most patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In Saudi Arabia, there are limited data on their knowledge, attitudes, and practices about this disorder. This study aimed to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices of primary care physicians about IBS. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 70 practitioners aged 36 ± 10.25 years was carried out in primary care centers in AlJouf Province of Saudi Arabia. The physicians were asked to fill a valid questionnaire containing their sociodemographic data, and well-modified questions regarding their knowledge, attitudes, and practices about IBS. Data was processed and analyzed using SPSS (version 15) program, and the level of significance was set at P<0.05. Results: A response rate of 92.9% yielded 65 questionnaires for analysis. Majority of physicians surveyed (83.1%) considered IBS as a common health problem in Saudi Arabia, and (55.4%) believed it is underestimated. There was a significant association between physicians’ qualifications and using diagnostic tools to facilitate IBS diagnosis (14.3% vs 35.5%; P<0.05), while utilization of “Rome or Manning criteria” was more frequent by physicians with master's degree (35.5%) compared to residents (14.3%). Also, 35.4% of physicians (15 males and 8 females) were not sure how to diagnose IBS. Conclusions: This study suggested that PHC physicians had a suitable attitude toward IBS, but they lacked knowledge, and their practices toward this condition were inappropriate. PMID:22626796

  13. Patient preferences for and satisfaction with methods of communicating test results in a primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Leekha, Surbhi; Thomas, Kris G; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Thomas, Matthew R

    2009-10-01

    Appropriate and timely communication of test results is an important element of high-quality health care. Patients' preferences regarding and satisfaction with test result notification methods in a primary care practice were evaluated. Some 1,458 consecutive patients were surveyed for whom routine blood tests were performed in the primary care internal medicine division at the Mayo Clinic Rochester (Minnesota) between January and March 2006. Among 888 respondents, test result notification occurred by telephone call (43%), return visit (35%), letter (3%), e-mail (0.1%), or a combination of methods (19%). Most (60%) telephone calls were handled by nurses. Patient preferences for notification method were telephone call (55%), return visit (20%), letter (19%), e-mail (5%), and automated answering mechanism (1%). Among patients reporting preference for telephone call, 67% wanted a call from a physician or nurse practitioner. Overall, 44% of patients received results by their preferred method; patients who did not were more likely to be dissatisfied with the communication method than those who did (10% vs. 5%, p = 0.01). A majority of patients were at least somewhat anxious to learn their test results, and patients greatly valued timeliness in test-result notification. The results describe primary care patients preferences for communication from their providers. Disparities exist between current practice and patient preferences in this important care delivery process. A telephone call from a physician or nurse practitioner was used to deliver test results for fewer than half of the patients who preferred to receive their results by this method. Future work should explore reimbursement of patient-preferred options and assess ways to improve resource-conscious test result communication methods.

  14. Using a knowledge translation framework to implement asthma clinical practice guidelines in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Licskai, Christopher; Sands, Todd; Ong, Michael; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Quality problem International guidelines establish evidence-based standards for asthma care; however, recommendations are often not implemented and many patients do not meet control targets. Initial assessment Regional pilot data demonstrated a knowledge-to-practice gap. Choice of solutions We engineered health system change in a multi-step approach described by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework. Implementation Knowledge translation occurred at multiple levels: patient, practice and local health system. A regional administrative infrastructure and inter-disciplinary care teams were developed. The key project deliverable was a guideline-based interdisciplinary asthma management program. Six community organizations, 33 primary care physicians and 519 patients participated. The program operating cost was $290/patient. Evaluation Six guideline-based care elements were implemented, including spirometry measurement, asthma controller therapy, a written self-management action plan and general asthma education, including the inhaler device technique, role of medications and environmental control strategies in 93, 95, 86, 100, 97 and 87% of patients, respectively. Of the total patients 66% were adults, 61% were female, the mean age was 35.7 (SD = ±24.2) years. At baseline 42% had two or more symptoms beyond acceptable limits vs. 17% (P< 0.001) post-intervention; 71% reported urgent/emergent healthcare visits at baseline (2.94 visits/year) vs. 45% (1.45 visits/year) (P< 0.001); 39% reported absenteeism (5.0 days/year) vs. 19% (3.0 days/year) (P< 0.001). The mean follow-up interval was 22 (SD = ±7) months. Lessons learned A knowledge-translation framework can guide multi-level organizational change, facilitate asthma guideline implementation, and improve health outcomes in community primary care practices. Program costs are similar to those of diabetes programs. Program savings offset costs in a ratio of 2.1:1 PMID:22893665

  15. Using a knowledge translation framework to implement asthma clinical practice guidelines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Licskai, Christopher; Sands, Todd; Ong, Michael; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Quality problem International guidelines establish evidence-based standards for asthma care; however, recommendations are often not implemented and many patients do not meet control targets. Initial assessment Regional pilot data demonstrated a knowledge-to-practice gap. Choice of solutions We engineered health system change in a multi-step approach described by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework. Implementation Knowledge translation occurred at multiple levels: patient, practice and local health system. A regional administrative infrastructure and inter-disciplinary care teams were developed. The key project deliverable was a guideline-based interdisciplinary asthma management program. Six community organizations, 33 primary care physicians and 519 patients participated. The program operating cost was $290/patient. Evaluation Six guideline-based care elements were implemented, including spirometry measurement, asthma controller therapy, a written self-management action plan and general asthma education, including the inhaler device technique, role of medications and environmental control strategies in 93, 95, 86, 100, 97 and 87% of patients, respectively. Of the total patients 66% were adults, 61% were female, the mean age was 35.7 (SD = ± 24.2) years. At baseline 42% had two or more symptoms beyond acceptable limits vs. 17% (P< 0.001) post-intervention; 71% reported urgent/emergent healthcare visits at baseline (2.94 visits/year) vs. 45% (1.45 visits/year) (P< 0.001); 39% reported absenteeism (5.0 days/year) vs. 19% (3.0 days/year) (P< 0.001). The mean follow-up interval was 22 (SD = ± 7) months. Lessons learned A knowledge-translation framework can guide multi-level organizational change, facilitate asthma guideline implementation, and improve health outcomes in community primary care practices. Program costs are similar to those of diabetes programs. Program savings offset costs in a ratio of 2.1:1.

  16. On-site mental health workers delivering psychological therapy and psychosocial interventions to patients in primary care: effects on the professional practice of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Elaine F; Bower, Peter J

    2009-01-21

    Mental health problems are common in primary care and mental health workers (MHWs) are increasingly working in this setting delivering psychological therapy and psychosocial interventions to patients. In addition to treating patients directly, the introduction of on-site MHWs represents an organisational change that may lead to changes in the clinical behaviour of primary care providers (PCPs). To assess the effects of on-site MHWs delivering psychological therapy and psychosocial interventions in primary care on the clinical behaviour of primary care providers (PCPs). The following sources were searched in 1998: the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CounselLit, NPCRDC skill-mix in primary care bibliography, and reference lists of articles. Additional searches were conducted in February 2007 using the following sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library). Randomised trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series analyses of MHWs working alongside PCPs in primary care settings. The outcomes included objective measures of PCP behaviours such as consultation rates, prescribing, and referral. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Forty-two studies were included in the review. There was evidence that MHWs caused significant reductions in PCP consultations (standardised mean difference -0.17, 95% CI -0.30 to -0.05), psychotropic prescribing (relative risk 0.67, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.79), prescribing costs (standardised mean difference -0.22, 95% CI -0.38 to -0.07), and rates of mental health referral (relative risk 0.13, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.20) for the patients they were seeing. In controlled before and after studies, the addition of MHWs to a practice did not affect prescribing behaviour towards the wider practice

  17. Swimming Against the Tide: Primary Care Physicians' Views on Deprescribing in Everyday Practice.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Katharine A; Andrews, Abby; Henderson, Michelle

    2017-07-01

    Avoidable hospitalizations due to adverse drug events and high-risk prescribing are common in older people. Primary care physicians prescribe most on-going medicines. Deprescribing has long been essential to best prescribing practice. We sought to explore the views of primary care physicians on the barriers and facilitators to deprescribing in everyday practice to inform the development of an intervention to support safer prescribing. We used a snowball sampling technique to identify potential participants. Physicians were selected on the basis of years in practice, employment status, and practice setting, with an additional focus on information-rich participants. Twenty-four semistructured interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to identify emergent themes. Physicians described deprescribing as "swimming against the tide" of patient expectations, the medical culture of prescribing, and organizational constraints. They said deprescribing came with inherent risks for both themselves and patients and conveyed a sense of vulnerability in practice. The only incentive to deprescribing they identified was the duty to do what was right for the patient. Physicians recommended organizational changes to support safer prescribing, including targeted funding for annual medicines review, computer prompts, improved information flows between prescribers, improved access to expert advice and user-friendly decision support, increased availability of non-pharmaceutical therapies, and enhanced patient engagement in medicines management. Interventions to support safer prescribing in everyday practice should consider the sociocultural, personal, relational, and organizational constraints on deprescribing. Regulations and policies should be designed to support physicians in practicing according to their professional ethical values. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  18. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices – how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. Methods This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). Results The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. Conclusions This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German

  19. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices--how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Juliana J; Paulitsch, Michael A; Mergenthal, Karola; Gensichen, Jochen; Hansen, Heike; Weyerer, Siegfried; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Fuchs, Angela; Maier, Wolfgang; Bickel, Horst; König, Hans-Helmut; Wiese, Birgitt; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Scherer, Martin; Dahlhaus, Anne

    2014-08-07

    In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German primary care practices, the

  20. Managing boundaries in primary care service improvement: a developmental approach to communities of practice.

    PubMed

    Kislov, Roman; Walshe, Kieran; Harvey, Gill

    2012-10-15

    Effective implementation of change in healthcare organisations involves multiple professional and organisational groups and is often impeded by professional and organisational boundaries that present relatively impermeable barriers to sharing knowledge and spreading work practices. Informed by the theory of communities of practice (CoPs), this study explored the effects of intra-organisational and inter-organisational boundaries on the implementation of service improvement within and across primary healthcare settings and on the development of multiprofessional and multi-organisational CoPs during this process. The study was conducted within the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester-a collaborative partnership between the University of Manchester and local National Health Service organisations aiming to undertake applied health research and enhance its implementation in clinical practice. It deployed a qualitative embedded case study design, encompassing semistructured interviews, direct observation and documentary analysis, conducted in 2010-2011. The sample included practice doctors, nurses, managers and members of the CLAHRC implementation team. The study showed that in spite of epistemic and status differences, professional boundaries between general practitioners, practice nurses and practice managers co-located in the same practice over a relatively long period of time could be successfully bridged, leading to the formation of multiprofessional CoPs. While knowledge circulated relatively easily within these CoPs, barriers to knowledge sharing emerged at the boundary separating them from other groups existing in the same primary care setting. The strongest boundaries, however, lay between individual general practices, with inter-organisational knowledge sharing and collaboration between them remaining unequally developed across different areas due to historical factors, competition and strong

  1. Managing boundaries in primary care service improvement: A developmental approach to communities of practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Effective implementation of change in healthcare organisations involves multiple professional and organisational groups and is often impeded by professional and organisational boundaries that present relatively impermeable barriers to sharing knowledge and spreading work practices. Informed by the theory of communities of practice (CoPs), this study explored the effects of intra-organisational and inter-organisational boundaries on the implementation of service improvement within and across primary healthcare settings and on the development of multiprofessional and multi-organisational CoPs during this process. Methods The study was conducted within the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester—a collaborative partnership between the University of Manchester and local National Health Service organisations aiming to undertake applied health research and enhance its implementation in clinical practice. It deployed a qualitative embedded case study design, encompassing semistructured interviews, direct observation and documentary analysis, conducted in 2010–2011. The sample included practice doctors, nurses, managers and members of the CLAHRC implementation team. Findings The study showed that in spite of epistemic and status differences, professional boundaries between general practitioners, practice nurses and practice managers co-located in the same practice over a relatively long period of time could be successfully bridged, leading to the formation of multiprofessional CoPs. While knowledge circulated relatively easily within these CoPs, barriers to knowledge sharing emerged at the boundary separating them from other groups existing in the same primary care setting. The strongest boundaries, however, lay between individual general practices, with inter-organisational knowledge sharing and collaboration between them remaining unequally developed across different areas due to historical factors

  2. Inadequate Systems to Support Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in Primary Care Practice.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Sprague, Brian L; Klabunde, Carrie N; Tosteson, Anna N A; Bitton, Asaf; Chen, Jane S; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Onega, Tracy; MacLean, Charles D; Harris, Kimberly; Howe, Kathleen; Pearson, Loretta; Feldman, Sarah; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Haas, Jennifer S

    2016-10-01

    Despite substantial resources devoted to cancer screening nationally, the availability of clinical practice-based systems to support screening guidelines is not known. To characterize the prevalence and correlates of practice-based systems to support breast and cervical cancer screening, with a focus on the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Web and mail survey of primary care providers conducted in 2014. The survey assessed provider (gender, training) and facility (size, specialty training, physician report of National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) PCMH recognition, and practice affiliation) characteristics. A hierarchical multivariate analysis clustered by clinical practice was conducted to evaluate characteristics associated with the adoption of practice-based systems and technology to support guideline-adherent screening. Primary care physicians in family medicine, general internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology, and nurse practitioners or physician assistants from four clinical care networks affiliated with PROSPR (Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens) consortium research centers. The prevalence of routine breast cancer risk assessment, electronic health record (EHR) decision support, comparative performance reports, and panel reports of patients due for routine screening and follow-up. There were 385 participants (57.6 % of eligible). Forty-seven percent (47.0 %) of providers reported NCQA recognition as a PCMH. Less than half reported EHR decision support for breast (48.8 %) or cervical cancer (46.2 %) screening. A minority received comparative performance reports for breast (26.2 %) or cervical (19.7 %) cancer screening, automated reports of patients overdue for breast (18.7 %) or cervical (16.4 %) cancer screening, or follow-up of abnormal breast (18.1 %) or cervical (17.6 %) cancer screening tests. In multivariate analysis, reported NCQA recognition as a PCMH was associated with greater use of

  3. Policy Levers Key for Primary Health Care Organizations to Support Primary Care Practices in Meeting Medical Home Expectations: Comparing Leading States to the Australian Experience.

    PubMed

    Takach, Mary

    2016-10-01

    Several countries with highly ranked delivery systems have implemented locally-based, publicly-funded primary health care organizations (PHCOs) as vehicles to strengthen their primary care foundations. In the United States, state governments have started down a similar pathway with models that share similarities with international PHCOs. The objective of this study was to determine if these kinds of organizations were working with primary care practices to improve their ability to provide comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible patient-centered care that met quality, safety, and efficiency outcomes-all core attributes of a medical home. This qualitative study looked at 4 different PHCO models-3 from the United States and 1 from Australia-with similar objectives and scope. Primary and secondary data included semi-structured interviews with 26 PHCOs and a review of government documents. The study found that the 4 PHCO models were engaging practices to meet a number of medical home expectations, but the US PHCOs were more uniform in efforts to work with practices and focused on arranging services to meet the needs of complex patients. There was significant variation in level of effort between the Australian PHCOs. These differences can be explained through the state governments' selection of payment models and use of data frameworks to support collaboration and incentivize performance of both PHCOs and practices. These findings offer policy lessons to inform health reform efforts under way to better capitalize on the potential of PHCOs to support a high-functioning primary health foundation as an essential component to a reformed health system.

  4. Policy Levers Key for Primary Health Care Organizations to Support Primary Care Practices in Meeting Medical Home Expectations: Comparing Leading States to the Australian Experience

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several countries with highly ranked delivery systems have implemented locally-based, publicly-funded primary health care organizations (PHCOs) as vehicles to strengthen their primary care foundations. In the United States, state governments have started down a similar pathway with models that share similarities with international PHCOs. The objective of this study was to determine if these kinds of organizations were working with primary care practices to improve their ability to provide comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible patient-centered care that met quality, safety, and efficiency outcomes—all core attributes of a medical home. This qualitative study looked at 4 different PHCO models—3 from the United States and 1 from Australia—with similar objectives and scope. Primary and secondary data included semi-structured interviews with 26 PHCOs and a review of government documents. The study found that the 4 PHCO models were engaging practices to meet a number of medical home expectations, but the US PHCOs were more uniform in efforts to work with practices and focused on arranging services to meet the needs of complex patients. There was significant variation in level of effort between the Australian PHCOs. These differences can be explained through the state governments' selection of payment models and use of data frameworks to support collaboration and incentivize performance of both PHCOs and practices. These findings offer policy lessons to inform health reform efforts under way to better capitalize on the potential of PHCOs to support a high-functioning primary health foundation as an essential component to a reformed health system. PMID:26636485

  5. Raising the topic of weight in general practice: perspectives of GPs and primary care nurses

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Maxine; Stathi, Afroditi; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore general practitioners’ (GPs) and primary care nurses’ perceived barriers to raising the topic of weight in general practice. Design A qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). 34 semistructured interviews were conducted to explore views, opinions and experiences of initiating a discussion about weight. Content and thematic analyses were used to analyse the interview transcripts. Setting General practices located in one primary care trust in the South West of England. Participants 17 GPs and 17 nurses aged between 32 and 66 years. The modal age range for GPs was 30–39 years and for nurses, 40–49 years. Results Barriers were synthesised into three main themes: (1) limited understanding about obesity care, (2) concern about negative consequences, and (3) having time and resources to raise a sensitive topic. Most barriers were related to raising the topic in more routine settings, rather than when dealing with an associated medical condition. GPs were particularly worried about damaging their relationship with patients and emphasised the need to follow their patient's agenda. Conclusions Uncertainty about obesity, concerns about alienating patients and feeling unable to raise the topic within the constraints of a 10 min consultation, is adding to the reluctance of GPs and nurses to broach the topic of weight. Addressing these concerns through training or by providing evidence of effective interventions that are feasible to deliver within consultations may lead to greater practitioner engagement and willingness to raise the topic. PMID:26254471

  6. Professional centred shared decision making: Patient decision aids in practice in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Burges Watson, Duika; Thomson, Richard G; Murtagh, Madeleine J

    2008-01-01

    Background Patient decision aids are increasingly regarded as important components of clinical practice that enable shared decision making (SDM) and evidence based patient choice. Despite broad acceptance of their value, there remains little evidence of their successful implementation in primary care settings. Methods Health care practitioners from five general practice surgeries in northern England participated in focus group sessions around the themes of patient decision aids, patient and practitioner preferences and SDM. Participants included general practitioners (n = 19), practice nurses (n = 5) and auxiliary staff (n = 3). Transcripts were analysed using a framework approach. Results We report a) practitioners' discussion of the current impetus towards sharing decisions and their perspectives on barriers to SDM, and b) the implementation of patient decision aids in practice and impediments such as lack of an evidence base and time available in consultations. Conclusion We demonstrate two orientations to sharing decisions: practitioner-centred and patient-centred with the former predominating. We argue that it is necessary to rethink the changes required in practice for the implementation of SDM. PMID:18190683

  7. An Assessment of the Mastery of Entry-Level Practice Competencies Using a Primary Care Clerkship Training Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Arthur A., Jr.; Maddox, Ray R.

    1992-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness on entry-level skills of training six pharmacy graduate students in a primary care facility. Required clerkships in medicine, ambulatory care, and geriatrics were combined into a single rotation in a family practice ambulatory care clinic. Results were positive and have implications for improving some…

  8. Correlates of routine HIV testing practices: a survey of New York State primary care physicians, 2011.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Mary; Leung, Shu-Yin J; Akkaya-Hocagil, Tugba; Rowe, Kirsten A; Ortega-Peluso, Christina; Smith, Lou C

    2015-01-01

    The New York State (NYS) HIV Testing Law of 2010 mandates that medical providers offer HIV testing to patients aged between 13 and 64 years during primary care, to increase the number of people aware of their infection status, and to ensure linkage to medical treatment. To assess physician practices related to this legislation, we conducted a study to identify the frequency and correlates of routine HIV testing behavior among primary care physicians approximately 15 months after the new law went into effect. During September 2011 to January 2012, we mailed self-administered surveys to a representative sample of NYS primary care physicians drawn from the AMA Masterfile of Physicians. Questions included physician practices, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs related to routine HIV testing. Bivariate and multivariate analyses with a sample of 973 physicians were conducted to identify the most influential predictors of routine HIV testing behaviors. A minority of physicians reported "always" or "frequently" practicing behaviors consistent with routine HIV testing, with 41.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 37.4 to 46.2] routinely offering tests to patients aged 13-64 years, 40.5% (95% CI: 36.3 to 44.8) to new patients, and 33.3% (95% CI: 29.4 to 37.6) to patients during routine physicals. Only 61.4% (95% CI: 57.4 to 65.6) said they had heard of the new law. In multivariate analyses, specialty, perceived barriers, familiarity with the law, and interaction terms representing familiarity by region and self-efficacy by region were significant predictors across the 3 scenarios of routine HIV testing behavior. Additional technical assistance and training is needed for physicians on adopting routine testing behaviors, minimizing barriers and enhancing skills.

  9. HPV vaccine attitudes and practices among primary care providers in Appalachian Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Huey, Nicole L; Clark, Allison D; Kluhsman, Brenda C; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in Appalachia exceeds the national rate; rural Appalachian women are at especially high risk. We assessed the attitudes and practices related to human papillomavirus vaccination among providers in primary care practices in a contiguous 5-county area of Appalachian Pennsylvania. In December 2006 and May 2007, all family medicine, pediatric, and gynecology practices (n = 65) in the study area were surveyed by 2 faxed survey instruments. Of the 65 practices, 55 completed the first survey instrument. Of these 55, 44 offered the vaccine to their patients. Forty of the 44 practices offered it to girls and women aged 9 to 26 years, and 11 were willing to accept referrals from other practices for vaccination. The average reported charge for each of the 3 required injections was $150. Of the 55 practices that responded to the first survey instrument, 49 responded to the second survey instrument, 46 of which recommended the vaccine to their patients. The prevalence of offering the vaccine against human papillomavirus was high in this area of Appalachian Pennsylvania. Future interventions may focus on community education because the vaccine is available from most providers.

  10. PrimeAnswers: A practical interface for answering primary care questions.

    PubMed

    Ketchell, Debra S; St Anna, Leilani; Kauff, David; Gaster, Barak; Timberlake, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an institutional approach taken to build a primary care reference portal. The objective for the site is to make access to and use of clinical reference faster and easier and to facilitate the use of evidence-based answers in daily practice. Reference objects were selected and metadata applied to a core set of sources. Metadata were used to search, sort, and filter results and to define deep-linked queries and structure the interface. User feedback resulted in an expansion in the scope of reference objects to meet the broad spectrum of information needs, including patient handouts and interactive risk management tools. RESULTS of a user satisfaction survey suggest that a simple interface to customized content makes it faster and easier for primary care clinicians to find information during the clinic day and to improve care to their patients. The PrimeAnswers portal is a first step in creating a fast search of a customized set of reference objects to match a clinician's patient care questions in the clinic. The next step is developing methods to solve the problem of matching a clinician's question to a specific answer through precise retrieval from reference sources; however, lack of internal structure and Web service standards in most clinical reference sources is an unresolved problem.

  11. Development of a targeted naloxone coprescribing program in a primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Courtenay Gilmore; Rodriguez, Franklin; Carrington, Anne C; Fagan, E Blake

    To develop a targeted naloxone coprescribing program in a primary care practice. Large academic family medicine practice in western North Carolina. A robust pain management program was developed at this institution in 2012 which incorporated many of the recommendations later outlined in the 2016 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain. The only guideline-recommended initiative that was not addressed involves providing naloxone to patients on chronic opioid therapy at high risk for opioid overdose. Pharmacists embedded in this practice developed a targeted naloxone coprescribing program for patients who are on chronic opioid therapy and have doses of 50 mg or more morphine equivalents daily (MED), are taking benzodiazepines, have a history of substance use disorder, or have a history of overdose. A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine the number of patients on chronic opioid therapy who meet the CDC guidelines for offering naloxone. A total of 1297 patients were identified, and 709 met the criteria for chronic opioid use. Nearly one-half (n = 350; 49.4%) of these patients met the criteria for naloxone, although only 3.4% had naloxone on their medication list. Doses of 50 mg or more MED was the primary reason for needing naloxone (n = 216; 61%) with concomitant benzodiazepine use as the second most likely reason (n = 130; 37.1%). For patients taking 50 mg or more MED, 37.5% were also on a benzodiazepine and 4.1% also had a history of substance use disorder. Pharmacists embedded in a primary care practice are well poised to develop a targeted naloxone coprescribing program to increase patients' access to naloxone. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of an EHR-based diabetes management form on quality and outcomes of diabetes care in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Herrin, Jeph; da Graca, Briget; Aponte, Phil; Stanek, H Greg; Cowling, Terianne; Fullerton, Cliff; Hollander, Priscilla; Ballard, David J

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology shows promise for improving chronic disease care. This study assessed the impact of a diabetes management form (DMF), accessible within an electronic health record. From 2007 to 2009, 2108 diabetes patients were seen in 20 primary care practices; 1103 visits involved use of the DMF in 2008. The primary outcome was "optimal care": HbA1c ≤8%, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol <100 mg/dL, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, not smoking, and aspirin prescription in patients ≥40 years. After adjusting for number of visits, age, sex, and insulin use, DMF-exposed patients showed less improvement in attaining "optimal care" (estimated difference-in-difference [DID] = -2.06 percentage points; P < .001), LDL cholesterol (DID = -2.30; P = .023), blood pressure (DID = -3.05; P < .001), and total cholesterol (DID = -0.47; P = .004) targets. Documented microalbumin tests, aspirin prescription, and eye and foot exams increased more. Thus, DMF use was associated with smaller gains in achieving evidence-based targets, but greater improvement in documented delivery of care. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  13. Managing change in the culture of general practice: qualitative case studies in primary care trusts.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Martin N; Mannion, Russell; Nelson, Elizabeth; Davies, Huw T O

    2003-09-13

    To explore the potential tension between the need for managers to produce measurable change and the skills required to produce cultural change, and to investigate how managers of primary care trusts are attempting to deal with this tension. Qualitative case studies using data derived from semistructured interviews and a review of published documents. An established cultural framework was to used to help interpret the findings. Six primary care trusts in England purposefully sampled to represent a range of cultural, structural, geographical, and demographic characteristics. 42 interviews with 39 different senior and middle primary care trust managers conducted over an 18 month period. We found two distinct and polarised styles of management. One group of managers adopts a directive style and challenges the prevailing norms and values of clinicians, an approach characteristically seen in organisations with hierarchical cultures. This group is made up mostly of senior managers who are driven principally by the imperative to deliver a political agenda. Managers in the second group are more inclined to work with the prevailing cultures found in general practice, attempting to facilitate change from within rather than forcing change from outside. This management style is characteristically seen in organisations with a clan-type culture. The approach was manifest mostly by middle managers, who seem to act as buffers between the demands of senior managers and their own perception of the ability and willingness of health professionals to cope with change. The different management approaches can lead to tension and dysfunction between tiers of management. The development of primary care depends on high quality managers who are able to draw on a range of different management skills and styles. Managers are most likely to be effective if they appreciate the merits and drawbacks of their different styles and are willing to work in partnership.

  14. The implementation evaluation of primary care groups of practice: a focus on organizational identity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Since 2002 the Health Ministry of Québec (Canada) has been implementing a primary care organizational innovation called 'family medicine groups'. This is occurring in a political context in which the reorganization of primary care is considered necessary to improve health care system performance. More specifically, the purpose of this reform has been to overcome systemic deficiencies in terms of accessibility and continuity of care. This paper examines the first years of implementation of the family medicine group program, with a focus on the emergence of the organizational identity of one of the pilot groups located in the urban area of Montreal. Methods An in-depth longitudinal case study was conducted over two and a half years. Face to face individual interviews with key informants from the family medicine group under study were conducted over the research period considered. Data was gathered throuhg observations and documentary analysis. The data was analyzed using temporal bracketing and Fairclough's three-dimensional critical discourse analytical techniques. Results Three different phases were identified over the period under study. During the first phase, which corresponded to the official start-up of the family medicine group program, new resources and staff were only available at the end of the period, and no changes occurred in medical practices. Power struggles between physicians and nurses characterized the second phase, resulting in a very difficult integration of advanced nurse practitioners into the group. Indeed, the last phase was portrayed by initial collaborative practices associated with a sensegiving process prompted by a new family medicine group director. Conclusions The creation of a primary care team is a very challenging process that goes beyond the normative policy definitions of who is on the team or what the team has to do. To fulfil expectations of quality improvement through team-based care, health care professionals who

  15. Comparative effectiveness of outpatient cardiovascular disease and diabetes care delivery between advanced practice providers and physician providers in primary care: Implications for care under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Virani, Salim S; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Chan, Winston J; Frazier, Lorraine; Nasir, Khurram; S Rajan, Suja; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to compare quality of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) care between advanced practice providers (APPs) and physicians in a primary care setting. We identified diabetes (n=1,022,588) and CVD (n=1,187,035) patients receiving primary care between October 2013 and September 2014 in 130 Veterans Affairs facilities. We compared glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c <7%) in diabetic patients, blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg in diabetic or CVD patients, cholesterol control (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol<100 mg/dL, receiving a statin) in diabetic or CVD patients, and those receiving a β-blocker (with history of myocardial infarction in the last 2 years) among patients receiving care from physicians and APPs. We also compared the proportion meeting composite measure (glycemic, BP, and cholesterol control in diabetic patients; BP, cholesterol control, and receipt of β-blocker among eligible CVD patients). Diabetic patients receiving care from APPs were statistically more likely to have glycemic (50% vs 51.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.06 [1.05-1.08]) and BP control (77.5% vs 78.4%, OR 1.04 [1.03-1.06]), whereas patients receiving care from physicians were more likely to have cholesterol control (receipt of statin 68% vs 66.5%, OR 0.94 [0.93-0.95]) in adjusted models, although these differences are not clinically significant. Similar results were seen in CVD patients. Few patients met the composite measure (27.1% and 27.6% of diabetic and 54.0% and 54.8% of CVD patients receiving care from physicians and APPs, respectively). Diabetes and CVD care quality was comparable between physicians and APPs with clinically insignificant differences. Regardless of provider type, there is a need to improve performance on eligible measures in diabetes or CVD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Primary care: the next renaissance.

    PubMed

    Showstack, Jonathan; Lurie, Nicole; Larson, Eric B; Rothman, Arlyss Anderson; Hassmiller, Susan

    2003-02-04

    Three decades ago, a renaissance helped create the foundations of primary care as we know it today. In recent years, however, new challenges have confronted primary care. We believe that the current challenges can be overcome and may, in fact, present an opportunity for a new renaissance of primary care to address the needs of our population. In this paper, we suggest seven core principles and a set of actions that will support a renaissance in, and a positive future for, primary care. The seven principles are 1) Health care must be organized to serve the needs of patients; 2) the goal of primary care systems should be the delivery of the highest-quality care as documented by measurable outcomes; 3) information and information systems are the backbone of the primary care process; 4) current health care systems must be reconstructed; 5) the health care financing system must support excellent primary care practice; 6) primary care education must be revitalized, with an emphasis on new delivery models and training in sites that deliver excellent primary care; and 7) the value of primary care practice must be continually improved, documented, and communicated. At the start of the 21st century, a vital, patient-centered primary care system has much to offer a rapidly changing population with increasingly diverse needs and expectations. If we keep the needs of persons and patients clearly in sight and design systems to meet those needs, primary care will thrive and our patients will be well served.

  17. Treatment strategies for acid reflux: EncomPASSing practical solutions for primary care.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2010-11-01

    Despite a steady diet of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for over three decades, nearly all of our routine clinical decisions remain incompletely supported, or even totally unaddressed, by the burgeoning pile of RCT data. The biomedical literature tends to focus on explanatory RCTs that compare new agents with placebo; it is less common to find pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) that test the risks, benefits, and costs of competing active therapies within the context of usual practice settings. In this issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, Moayeddi and colleagues report the results of the EncomPASS study-a novel PCT for the primary care management of reflux disease. In this editorial, the results of EncomPASS are discussed, and the study is highlighted as a model for investigators to follow as we continue to emphasize pragmatic trials that address everyday challenges in clinical care.

  18. [Primary care in Ireland].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-03-27

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. [Application of the Smoking Scale for Primary Care (ETAP) in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    González Romero, M P; Cuevas-Fernández, F J; Marcelino-Rodríguez, I; Covas, V J; Rodríguez Pérez, M C; Cabrera de León, A; Aguirre-Jaime, A

    2017-08-23

    To determine if the ETAP smoking scale, which measures accumulated exposure to tobacco, both actively and passively, is applicable and effective in the clinical practice of Primary Care for the prevention of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Location Barranco Grande Health Centre in Tenerife, Spain. A study of 61 cases (AMI) and 144 controls. Sampling with random start, without matching. COR-II curves were analysed, and effectiveness was estimated using sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV). A questionnaire was provided to participating family physicians on the applicability of ETAP in the clinic. The opinion of the participating physicians was unanimously favourable. ETAP was easy to use in the clinic, required less than 3min per patient, and was useful to reinforce the preventive intervention. The ETAP COR-II curve showed that 20years of exposure was the best cut-off point, with an area under the curve of 0.70 (95%CI: 0.62-0.78), and a combination of sensitivity (98%) and NPV (96%) for AMI. When stratifying age and gender, all groups achieved sensitivities and NPVs close to 100%, except for men aged ≥55years, in whom the NPV fell to 75%. The results indicate that ETAP is a valid tool that can be applied and be effective in the clinical practice of Primary Care for the prevention of AMI related to smoking exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Managers' perspectives on recruitment and human resource development practices in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Kinnunen, Juha

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe primary health care managers' attitudes and views on recruitment and human resource development in general and to ascertain whether there are any differences in the views of managers in the southern and northern regions of Finland. A postal questionnaire was sent to 315 primary health care managers, of whom 55% responded. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and cross-tabulation according to the location of the health centre. There were few differences in managers' attitudes and views on recruitment and human resource development. In the southern region, managers estimated that their organization would be less attractive to employees in the future and they were more positive about recruiting employees abroad. Furthermore, managers in the northern region were more positive regarding human resource development and its various practices. Although the results are preliminary in nature, it seems that managers in different regions have adopted different strategies in order to cope with the shrinking pool of new recruits. In the southern region, managers were looking abroad to find new employees, while in the northern region, managers put effort into retaining the employees in the organization with different human resource development practices.

  1. A hidden jewel: social work in primary health care practice in Aotearoa New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Döbl, Stefanie; Huggard, Peter; Beddoe, Liz

    2015-12-01

    The New Zealand (NZ) Ministry of Health's Primary Health Care Strategy (2001) has an overall vision of better health for all and the reduction of health inequalities between different population groups. This goal can be achieved by comprehensive, integrated primary health care (PHC) service delivery. One useful approach is to place social workers within PHC practices. This study aimed to explore the perceptions about, and the experiences gained by, such integrated social workers regarding their contributions towards the PHC vision. This qualitative study focused on three participant groups, namely social workers, PHC professionals and key informants. Overall, 18 one-to-one, semi-structured interviews were undertaken in various locations in NZ. Key themes were identified via a general inductive approach. Three key themes emerged from the data: wider factors, organisational factors and social work factors. The last theme encompassed the social workers' professional understanding, knowledge and approaches. The organisational factors (a community needs focus and provision of a supportive work environment) and the wider factors identified (funding and issues experienced by communities) had variable impact on these social work positions. Participants viewed social workers as facilitating appropriate access to and engagement by people with services; enhancing ongoing, coordinated, safe service provision; and contributing to staff development. The potential of the social work profession within PHC practices was well recognised by non-social worker participants. This study provides initial insights into the unique contributions made by social workers towards achieving NZ Ministry of Health's PHC vision.

  2. Ethical and legal issues in the clinical practice of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Francisco Javier; Martinez-Romero, Marcos; Vazquez-Naya, Jose Manuel; Pereira, Javier; Pazos, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Since it was conceived, the notion of primary care has been a crucial concept in health services. Most health care is provided at this level and primary care clinicians have an essential role, both in terms of disease prevention and disease management. During the last decades, primary health care has evolved from a traditional paternalistic model, in which patients played the role of passive recipient of care, towards a situation in which patients are partners involved in the decision making-process. This new context opened a considerable number of new ethical and legal aspects, which need to be comprehensively analyzed and discussed in order to preserve the quality of primary health care all around the world. This work reviews the most important ethical and legal issues in primary health care. Legislation issues are explained in the context of the Spanish Health Services.

  3. Practice nurse involvement in primary care depression management: an observational cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most evidence on the effect of collaborative care for depression is derived in the selective environment of randomised controlled trials. In collaborative care, practice nurses may act as case managers. The Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP) aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative models of practice nurse involvement in a real world Australian setting. Previous analyses have demonstrated the value of high level practice nurse involvement in the management of diabetes and obesity. This paper reports on their value in the management of depression. Methods General practices were assigned to a low or high model of care based on observed levels of practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of depression (i.e. percentage of depression patients seen, percentage of consultation time spent on clinical-based activities). Linked, routinely collected data was used to determine patient level depression outcomes (proportion of depression-free days) and health service usage costs. Standardised depression assessment tools were not routinely used, therefore a classification framework to determine the patient’s depressive state was developed using proxy measures (e.g. symptoms, medications, referrals, hospitalisations and suicide attempts). Regression analyses of costs and depression outcomes were conducted, using propensity weighting to control for potential confounders. Results Capacity to determine depressive state using the classification framework was dependent upon the level of detail provided in medical records. While antidepressant medication prescriptions were a strong indicator of depressive state, they could not be relied upon as the sole measure. Propensity score weighted analyses of total depression-related costs and depression outcomes, found that the high level model of care cost more (95% CI: -$314.76 to $584) and resulted in 5% less depression-free days (95% CI: -0.15 to 0.05), compared to the

  4. Challenges in recruiting minority-serving private practice primary care physicians to a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Thomas P; Van Hoof, Thomas J; Galusha, Deron; Barr, Judith K; Curry, Maureen; Kelvey-Albert, Michele; Meehan, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the following: (1) describe one organization's experience with recruiting minority-serving private practice primary care physicians to an ambulatory quality improvement (QI) project; (2) compare and contrast physicians who agreed to participate with those who declined; and (3) list incentives and barriers to participation. The authors identified eligible physicians by analyzing Medicare Part B claims data, a publicly available physician database, and office staff responses to telephone inquiries. The recruitment team had difficulty identifying, contacting, and recruiting eligible physicians. Solo practitioners and physicians who had lower scores on certain quality measures were more likely to participate. Barriers to participation were similar in all practices and included concerns about extra work, difficulty of change, and impact on office work flow. Commonly used incentives were offered but were not universally embraced. Additional work is required to refine the process of physician recruitment and to find more compelling incentives for QI.

  5. The Sexual History-Taking and Counseling Practices of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Charles E.; Freeman, Howard E.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a statewide survey of experiences related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and competencies of a random sample of primary care physicians in California done in early 1986, we interviewed 1,000 internists, family and general practitioners about their sexual history-taking and counseling practices. Less than 4% have patients complete a history form that includes questions about sexual orientation or practices, and only 10% ask new patients questions specific enough to identify those at high risk of exposure to the human immunodeficiency virus. Internists, women and younger physicians and those expressing little discomfort in dealing with gay men more often took adequate sexual histories and gave appropriate advice. Among those physicians with patients at risk of becoming infected, only half recommended the use of condoms and 60% advised a reduction in the number of partners. More than 15% recommended abstention from sexual intercourse, and 8% suggested these patients should switch to a heterosexual life-style. PMID:3660773

  6. Doubling down: Lessons learned from building a new electronic health record as part of primary care practice redesign.

    PubMed

    Schutzbank, Andrew; Fernandopulle, Rushika

    2014-03-01

    Iora Health is a primary care delivery company creating de novo primary care practices with the mission of restoring humanity to health care. To support our very different and evolving model of team-based primary care we realized we needed to build our own electronic health record (EHR). This perspective shares four key lessons from the software development process: the tight relationship between delivery innovation and software development, the benefits of Agile development, the value of having the clinicians at all levels as part of the software development team, and different ways to think about clinical information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Establishment of a Representative Practice-based Research Network (PBRN) for the Monitoring of Primary Care in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Selby, Kevin; Cornuz, Jacques; Senn, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Data are urgently needed to better understand processes of care in Swiss primary care (PC). A total of 2027 PC physicians, stratified by canton, were invited to participate in the Swiss Primary care Active Monitoring network, of whom 200 accepted to join. There were no significant differences between participants and a random sample drawn from the same physician databases based on sex, year of obtaining medical school diploma, or location. The Swiss Primary care Active Monitoring network represents the first large-scale, nationally representative practice-based research network in Switzerland and will provide a unique opportunity to better understand the functioning of Swiss PC.

  8. Prevalence and management of hypertension in primary care practices with electronic medical records: a report from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Tyler; Khan, Shahriar; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Asghari, Shabnam; Morkem, Rachel; Dawes, Martin; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Most epidemiologic reports on hypertension in Canada are based on data from surveys or on administrative data. We report on the prevalence and management of hypertension based on data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), which consists of validated, national, point-of-care data from primary care practices. Methods We included CPCSSN data as of Dec. 31, 2012, for patients 18 years and older who had at least 1 clinical encounter during the previous 2 years with one of the 444 family physicians and nurse-practitioners who participate in the CPCSSN. We calculated the prevalence of hypertension, the proportion of patients who achieved blood pressure targets, the number of encounters with primary care providers, comorbidities and pharmacologic management. Results Of the 250 346 patients who met the eligibility criteria, 57 180 (22.8%) had a diagnosis of hypertension. Of the 44 981 patients for whom blood pressure data were available, 35 094 (78.0%) had achieved both targets for systolic (≤□140 mm Hg) and diastolic (≤□90 mm Hg) pressure. Compared with patients who did not have a hypertension diagnosis, those with hypertension were significantly more likely to have a comorbidity and visited their primary care provider more often. Among the patients with hypertension, 12.1% were not taking antihypertensive medications; nearly two-thirds (61.7%) had their condition controlled with 1 or 2 drugs. Interpretation The prevalence of hypertension based on CPCSSN data was similar to estimates from the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Although achievement of blood pressure targets was high, patients with hypertension had more comorbidities and saw their primary care provider more often than those without hypertension. PMID:25844373

  9. Prevalence and management of dementia in primary care practices with electronic medical records: a report from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Neil; Birtwhistle, Richard; Williamson, Tyler; Khan, Shahriar; Garies, Stephanie; Molnar, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The proportion of Canadians living with Alzheimer disease and related dementias is projected to rise, with an increased burden on the primary health care system in particular. Our objective was to describe the prevalence and management of dementia in a community-dwelling sample using electronic medical record (EMR) data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), which consists of validated, national, point-of-care data from primary care practices. We used CPCSSN data as of Dec. 31, 2012, for patients 65 years and older with at least 1 clinical encounter in the previous 2 years. A validated case definition for dementia was used to calculate the national and provincial prevalence rates, to examine variations in prevalence according to age, sex, body mass index, rural or urban residence, and select comorbid conditions, and to describe patterns in the pharmacologic management of dementia over time at the provincial level. The age-standardized prevalence of dementia among community-dwelling patients 65 years and older was 7.3%. Prevalence estimates increased with age; they also varied between provinces, and upward trends were observed. Dementia was found to be associated with comorbid diabetes, depression, epilepsy and parkinsonism. Most of the patients with dementia did not have a prescription for a dementia-related medication recorded in their EMR between 2008 and 2012 inclusive. Those who had a prescription were most often prescribed donepezil by their primary care provider. Overall prevalence estimates for dementia based on EMR data in this sample managed in primary care were generally in line with previous estimates based on administrative data, survey results or clinical sources.

  10. Primary care hypnotic and anxiolytic prescription: Reviewing prescribing practice over 8 years

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.; Raitt, Neil; Riaz, Muhammed Awais; Baldwin, Sarah-Jane; Erskine, Kay; Graham, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last few years, hypnotic and anxiolytic medications have had their clinical efficacy questioned in the context of concerns regarding dependence, tolerance alongside other adverse effects. It remains unclear how these concerns have impacted clinical prescribing practice. Materials and Methods: This is a study reviewing community-dispensed prescribing data for patients on the East Practice Medical Center list in Arbroath, Scotland, in 2007, 2011 and 2015. Anxiolytic and hypnotic medications were defined in accordance with the British National Formulary chapter 4.1.1 and chapter 4.1.2. All patients receiving a drug within this class in any of the study years were collated and anonymized using primary care prescribing data. The patients’ age, gender, name of the prescribed drug(s), and total number of prescriptions in this class over the year were extracted. Results: The proportion of patients prescribed a benzodiazepine medication decreased between 2007 and 2015: 83.8% (n = 109) in 2007, 70.5% (n = 122) in 2011, and 51.7% (n = 138) in 2015 (P = 0.006). The proportion of these patients prescribed a nonbenzodiazepine drug increased between 2007 and 2015: 30% (n = 39) in 2007, 46.2% (n = 80) in 2011, and 52.4% (n = 140) in 2015 (P = 0.001). There was a significant increase in the number of patients prescribed melatonin (P = 0.020). Discussion: This study reports a reduction in benzodiazepine prescriptions in primary care alongside increases in nonbenzodiazepine and melatonin prescribing, with an increase in prescribing rates of this drug class overall. Conclusion: Changes in this prescribing practice may reflect the medicalization of insomnia, local changes in prescribing practice and alongside national recommendations. PMID:28217600

  11. Patient safety in primary care: incident reporting and significant event reviews in British general practice.

    PubMed

    Rea, David; Griffiths, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, healthcare has adapted to the 'quality revolution' by moving away from direct provision and hierarchical control mechanisms. In their place, new structures based on contractual relationships are being developed coupled with attempts to create an organisational culture that shares learning and that scrutinises existing practice so that it can be improved. The issue here is that contractual arrangements require surveillance, monitoring, regulation and governance systems that can be perceived as antipathetic to the examination of practice and subsequent learning. Historically, reporting levels from general practice have remained low; little information is shared and consequently lessons are not shared across the general practice community. Given large-scale under-engagement of general practitioners (GPs) in incident reporting systems, significant event analysis is advocated to encourage sharing of information about incidents to inform the patient safety agenda at a local and national level. Previous research has concentrated on the secondary care environment and little is known about the situation in primary care, where the majority of patient contacts with healthcare occur. To explore attitudes to incident reporting, the study adopted a qualitative approach to GPs working in a mixture of urban and rural practices reporting to a Welsh Local Health Board. The study found that GPs used significant event analysis methodology to report incidents within their practice, but acknowledged under-reporting. They were less enthusiastic about reporting externally. A number of barriers exist to reporting, including insufficient time to report, lack of feedback, fear of blame, and damage to reputations and patient confidence in a competitive environment. If incident reporting processes are perceived as supportive and formative, and where protected time is allocated to discuss incidents, then GPs are willing to participate. They also need to know how the

  12. Perception and practice of malaria prophylaxis in pregnancy among primary health care providers in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fawole, A O; Onyeaso, N C

    2008-04-01

    Pregnant women and their unborn babies are especially vulnerable to malaria. Malaria infection during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of maternal anaemia, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, low birth weight and neonatal death. To assess knowledge and practice of malaria prophylaxis during pregnancy among primary health care providers in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria. Participants were randomly selected from primary health centres and private health facilities in two local governments within Ibadan municipality. All cadres of health professionals in the selected health facilities were interviewed using a semi-structured self -administered questionnaire. Two hundred and eighty-seven participants selected from 42 primary healthcare facilities comprising of 48 (16.7%) CHEWs, 133 (46.3%) auxiliary nurses, 84 (29.3%) trained nurses and 22 (7.7%) medical doctors completed the questionnaires. Healthcare providers in private health facilities formed the bulk (80.5%) of respondents. Respondents' knowledge of malaria prevention strategies was generally poor across all professional cadres. Only 40 (13.9%) respondents had correct knowledge of WHO strategies. Awareness of IPT was significantly higher among respondents from public health facilities compared with private health facilities--93.0% versus 80.9% (p < 0.05) One hundred and fifty-six (54.4%) respondents knew the correct drug, dosage and timing of IPT. Only forty-six (16.0%) respondents were aware that at least three doses of IPT were required for HIV patients. Pyrimethamine was significantly more commonly prescribed in private health facilities compared with public health facilities (p < 0.05) Chloroquine was still commonly prescribed by respondents in public and private health facilities. The use of insecticide treated nets was recommended by 77.4% of respondents. Knowledge about current malaria prevention strategies during pregnancy is poor among health care providers at the primary level of care. Efforts

  13. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo; Lucatorto, Michelle A; Hawthorne, Kara; Hersh, Janis; Myers, Raquel; Elwy, A Rani; Graham, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP) and the primary care provider (PCP) is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1) what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2) how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively) to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts.

  14. Characterisation of antimicrobial usage in cats and dogs attending UK primary care companion animal veterinary practices.

    PubMed

    Buckland, E L; O'Neill, D; Summers, J; Mateus, A; Church, D; Redmond, L; Brodbelt, D

    2016-11-12

    There is scant evidence describing antimicrobial (AM) usage in companion animal primary care veterinary practices in the UK. The use of AMs in dogs and cats was quantified using data extracted from 374 veterinary practices participating in VetCompass. The frequency and quantity of systemic antibiotic usage was described.Overall, 25 per cent of 963,463 dogs and 21 per cent of 594,812 cats seen at veterinary practices received at least one AM over a two-year period (2012-2014) and 42 per cent of these animals were given repeated AMs. The main agents used were aminopenicillin types and cephalosporins. Of the AM events, 60 per cent in dogs and 81 per cent in cats were AMs classified as critically important (CIAs) to human health by the World Health Organisation. CIAs of highest importance (fluoroquinolones, macrolides, third-generation cephalosporins) accounted for just over 6 per cent and 34 per cent of AMs in dogs and cats, respectively. The total quantity of AMs used within the study population was estimated to be 1473 kg for dogs and 58 kg for cats.This study has identified a high frequency of AM usage in companion animal practice and for certain agents classified as of critical importance in human medicine. The study highlights the usefulness of veterinary practice electronic health records for studying AM usage. British Veterinary Association.

  15. Why is there variation in the practice of evidence-based medicine in primary care? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hisham, Ranita; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Liew, Su May; Hamzah, Nurazira; Ho, Gah Juan

    2016-03-09

    To explore the factors, including barriers and facilitators, influencing the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) across various primary care settings in Malaysia based on the doctors' views and experiences. The qualitative study was used to answer the research question. 37 primary care physicians participated in six focus group discussions and six individual in-depth interviews. A semistructured topic guide was used to facilitate both the interviews and focus groups, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analysed using a thematic approach. 37 primary care doctors including medical officers, family medicine specialists, primary care lecturers and general practitioners with different working experiences and in different settings. The study was conducted across three primary care settings-an academic primary care practice, private and public health clinics in Klang Valley, Malaysia. The doctors in this study were aware of the importance of EBM but seldom practised it. Three main factors influenced the implementation of EBM in the doctors' daily practice. First, there was a lack of knowledge and skills in searching for and applying evidence. Second, workplace culture influenced doctors' practice of EBM. Third, some doctors considered EBM as a threat to good clinical practice. They were concerned that rigid application of evidence compromised personalised patient care and felt that EBM did not consider the importance of clinical experience. Despite being aware of and having a positive attitude towards EBM, doctors in this study seldom practised EBM in their routine clinical practice. Besides commonly cited barriers such as having a heavy workload and lack of training, workplace 'EBM culture' had an important influence on the doctors' behaviour. Strategies targeting barriers at the practice level should be considered when implementing EBM in primary care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  16. Why is there variation in the practice of evidence-based medicine in primary care? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hisham, Ranita; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Liew, Su May; Hamzah, Nurazira; Ho, Gah Juan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the factors, including barriers and facilitators, influencing the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) across various primary care settings in Malaysia based on the doctors’ views and experiences. Research design The qualitative study was used to answer the research question. 37 primary care physicians participated in six focus group discussions and six individual in-depth interviews. A semistructured topic guide was used to facilitate both the interviews and focus groups, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analysed using a thematic approach. Participants 37 primary care doctors including medical officers, family medicine specialists, primary care lecturers and general practitioners with different working experiences and in different settings. Setting The study was conducted across three primary care settings—an academic primary care practice, private and public health clinics in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Results The doctors in this study were aware of the importance of EBM but seldom practised it. Three main factors influenced the implementation of EBM in the doctors’ daily practice. First, there was a lack of knowledge and skills in searching for and applying evidence. Second, workplace culture influenced doctors’ practice of EBM. Third, some doctors considered EBM as a threat to good clinical practice. They were concerned that rigid application of evidence compromised personalised patient care and felt that EBM did not consider the importance of clinical experience. Conclusions Despite being aware of and having a positive attitude towards EBM, doctors in this study seldom practised EBM in their routine clinical practice. Besides commonly cited barriers such as having a heavy workload and lack of training, workplace ‘EBM culture’ had an important influence on the doctors’ behaviour. Strategies targeting barriers at the practice level should be considered when implementing EBM in primary care. PMID

  17. Behind closed doors: management of patient expectations in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Keitz, Sheri A; Stechuchak, Karen M; Grambow, Steven C; Koropchak, Celine M; Tulsky, James A

    2007-03-12

    Managed care restrictions on resource use may affect communication between patients and health care professionals. To characterize negotiations between primary care physicians and patients with expectations for new medications, tests, or referrals, this observational study combined survey data with audiotape recordings of clinical encounters. Fifty-five physicians from 20 randomly selected primary care practices in a managed care network and 211 patients who voiced specific expectations in a previsit survey were included. From the recorded clinic visits we determined modes of negotiation of patient expectations and requests. From the surveys we determined patient previsit expectations, postvisit fulfillment of expectations, satisfaction, and trust. Two-hundred fifty-six self-reported expectations were captured in 200 audiotape-recorded encounters. Of the previsit expectations, 97.3% were discussed during the encounter. Expectations were expressed by direct patient request (40.6%), mentioning of symptoms related to request (29.7%), or physician-initiated discussion (27.0%). Most expectations were met (66.8%); physicians suggested an alternative 21.6% of the time. Expectations for medications and tests were met more frequently than expectations for referrals (75.6% and 71.4% vs 40.8%). Patient satisfaction and trust remained high regardless of whether expectations were met. Physicians reported that they would not have ordered 62 (44.9%) of 138 requests had the patients not directly asked, and they were uncomfortable filling 8 requests (12.9%). Previsit expectations for medications, tests, or referrals were discussed at the visit, and physicians met or offered alternatives for nearly 90%. Patients generally received what they asked for and altered physician behavior nearly half of the time.

  18. Nutritional screening for improving professional practice for patient outcomes in hospital and primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Vali, Yasaman; Murray, Susan M; Wonderling, David; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-06-06

    Given the prevalence of under-nutrition and reports of inadequate nutritional management of patients in hospitals and the community, nutritional screening may play a role in reducing the risks of malnutrition. Screening programmes can invoke costs to health systems and patients. It is therefore important to assess the effectiveness of nutritional screening programmes. To examine the effectiveness of nutritional screening in improving quality of care (professional practice) and patient outcomes compared with usual care. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL up to June 2012 to find relevant studies. Randomised controlled studies, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies assessing the effectiveness of nutritional screening were eligible for inclusion in the review. We considered process outcomes (for example patient identification, referral to dietitian) and patient outcomes (for example mortality, change in body mass index (BMI)). Participants were adult patients aged 16 years or over. We included studies conducted in different settings, including hospitals, out-patient clinics, primary care or long term care settings. We independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included studies. Meta-analysis was considered but was not conducted due to the discrepancies between the studies. The studies were heterogeneous in their design, setting, intervention and outcomes. We analysed the data using a narrative synthesis approach. After conducting initial searches and screening the titles and abstracts of the identified literature, 77 full text papers were retrieved and read. Ultimately three studies were included. Two controlled before-after studies were conducted in hospital settings (one in the UK and one in the Netherlands) and one cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary care setting (in the USA).The study conducted in

  19. Primary care obesity management in Hungary: evaluation of the knowledge, practice and attitudes of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Rurik, Imre; Torzsa, Péter; Ilyés, István; Szigethy, Endre; Halmy, Eszter; Iski, Gabriella; Kolozsvári, László Róbert; Mester, Lajos; Móczár, Csaba; Rinfel, József; Nagy, Lajos; Kalabay, László

    2013-10-19

    Obesity, a threatening pandemic, has an important public health implication. Before proper medication is available, primary care providers will have a distinguished role in prevention and management. Their performance may be influenced by many factors but their personal motivation is still an under-researched area. The knowledge, attitudes and practice were reviewed in this questionnaire study involving a representative sample of 10% of all Hungarian family physicians. In different settings, 521 practitioners (448 GPs and 73 residents/vocational trainees) were questioned using a validated questionnaire. The knowledge about multimorbidity, a main consequence of obesity was balanced.Only 51% of the GPs were aware of the diagnostic threshold for obesity; awareness being higher in cities (60%) and the highest among residents (90%). They also considered obesity an illness rather than an aesthetic issue.There were wider differences regarding attitudes and practice, influenced by the the doctors' age, gender, known BMI, previous qualification, less by working location.GPs with qualification in family medicine alone considered obesity management as higher professional satisfaction, compared to physicians who had previously other board qualification (77% vs 68%). They measured their patients' waist circumference and waist/hip ratio (72% vs 62%) more frequently, provided the obese with dietary advice more often, while this service was less frequent among capital-based doctors who accepted the self-reported body weight dates by patients more commonly. Similar reduced activity and weight-measurement in outdoor clothing were more typical among older doctors.Diagnosis based on BMI alone was the highest in cities (85%). Consultations were significantly shorter in practices with a higher number of enrolled patients and were longer by female providers who consulted longer with patients about the suspected causes of developing obesity (65% vs 44%) and offered dietary records for

  20. Primary care obesity management in Hungary: evaluation of the knowledge, practice and attitudes of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity, a threatening pandemic, has an important public health implication. Before proper medication is available, primary care providers will have a distinguished role in prevention and management. Their performance may be influenced by many factors but their personal motivation is still an under-researched area. Methods The knowledge, attitudes and practice were reviewed in this questionnaire study involving a representative sample of 10% of all Hungarian family physicians. In different settings, 521 practitioners (448 GPs and 73 residents/vocational trainees) were questioned using a validated questionnaire. Results The knowledge about multimorbidity, a main consequence of obesity was balanced. Only 51% of the GPs were aware of the diagnostic threshold for obesity; awareness being higher in cities (60%) and the highest among residents (90%). They also considered obesity an illness rather than an aesthetic issue. There were wider differences regarding attitudes and practice, influenced by the the doctors’ age, gender, known BMI, previous qualification, less by working location. GPs with qualification in family medicine alone considered obesity management as higher professional satisfaction, compared to physicians who had previously other board qualification (77% vs 68%). They measured their patients’ waist circumference and waist/hip ratio (72% vs 62%) more frequently, provided the obese with dietary advice more often, while this service was less frequent among capital-based doctors who accepted the self-reported body weight dates by patients more commonly. Similar reduced activity and weight-measurement in outdoor clothing were more typical among older doctors. Diagnosis based on BMI alone was the highest in cities (85%). Consultations were significantly shorter in practices with a higher number of enrolled patients and were longer by female providers who consulted longer with patients about the suspected causes of developing obesity (65% vs 44

  1. Practice environments and job satisfaction and turnover intentions of nurse practitioners: Implications for primary care workforce capacity.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang; Shang, Jingjing; D'Aunno, Thomas

    Health care professionals, organizations, and policy makers are calling for expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care to assure timely access and high-quality care. However, most efforts promoting NP practice have been focused on state level scope of practice regulations, with limited attention to the organizational structures. We examined NP practice environments in primary care organizations and the extent to which they were associated with NP retention measures. Data were collected through mail survey of NPs practicing in 163 primary care organizations in Massachusetts in 2012. NP practice environment was measured by the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire, which has four subscales: Professional Visibility, NP-Administration Relations, NP-Physician Relations, and Independent Practice and Support. Two global items measured job satisfaction and NPs' intent to leave their job. We aggregated NP level data to organization level to attain measures of practice environments. Multilevel logistic regression models were used. NPs rated the relationship between NPs and physicians favorably, contrary to the relationship between NPs and administrators. All subscales measuring NP practice environment had similar influence on the outcome variables. With every unit increase in each standardized subscale score, the odds of job satisfaction factors increased about 20% whereas the odds of intention of turnover decreased about 20%. NPs from organizations with higher mean scores on the NP-Administration subscale had higher satisfaction with their jobs (OR = 1.24, 95% CI [1.12, 1.39]) and had lower intent to leave (OR = 0.79, 95% CI [0.70, 0.90]). NPs were more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and less likely to report intent to leave if their organizations support NP practice, favorable relations with physicians and administration, and clear role visibility. Creating productive practice environments that can retain NPs

  2. Breast self-care practices in women with primary relatives with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, K I; Luker, K A

    1996-06-01

    Breast cancer is a major threat to the health of women; two-thirds of women diagnosed with breast cancer are likely to die from the disease. In North America one woman in nine will experience breast cancer at some point in her lifetime. In the United Kingdom, the figure is somewhat lower, one in 12, and increasing. Increasing age and a family history of breast cancer are considered major risk factors. With no known primary prevention, early detection measures remain the main hope of decreasing mortality. Despite controversy surrounding the effectiveness of breast self-examination in reducing mortality, breast self-examination or breast self-'awareness' are advocated by health departments and voluntary cancer organizations. In this paper, breast self-care practices of women with a family history of breast cancer are reported. A descriptive study using in-depth semi-structured interviews as the prime data collection procedure was conducted with 55 women who had mothers, sister(s) or mothers and another primary relative with breast cancer. All interviews were tape recorded, transcribed and analysed using latent content analysis and constant comparison techniques. The findings revealed that women constructed their own personal meanings about the benefits and limitations of breast self-examination and their use of this self-care behaviour within their daily lives. Women used breast self-examination as a means of gaining control over their feelings of the threat of breast cancer. Women's earlier involvement with their relative during the cancer experience and their own processing of their personal risk for breast cancer influenced their breast self-care practices.

  3. Primary care providers' knowledge, practices, and perceived barriers to the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Jordan G; Swietlik, Maggie; Alessandrini, Evaline; Faith, Myles S

    2010-07-01

    This study evaluated primary care providers' (PCPs, pediatricians, and nurse practitioners) knowledge, current practices, and perceived barriers to childhood obesity prevention and treatment, with an emphasis on first-year well-child care visits. A questionnaire was distributed to 192 PCPs in the primary care network at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) addressing (i) knowledge of obesity and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines, (ii) anticipatory guidance practices at well visits regarding nutrition and exercise, and (iii) perceived barriers to childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Eighty pediatricians and seven nurse practitioners responded, and a minority correctly identified the definition (26%) and prevalence (9%) of childhood overweight and AAP guidelines for exercise (39%) and juice consumption (44%). Most PCPs (81%) spent 11-20 min per well visit during the first 2 years, and 79% discussed diet, nutrition, and exercise for > or =3 min. Although >95% of PCPs discussed juice, fruits and vegetables, sippy cups, and finger foods during the first year, over 35% never discussed fast food, TV, or candy, and 55% never discussed exercise. Few rated current resources as adequate to treat or prevent childhood obesity. Over 90% rated the following barriers for obesity prevention and treatment as important or very important: parent is not motivated, child is not motivated, parents are overweight, families often have fast food, watch too much TV, and do not get enough exercise. In conclusion, there is much room to improve PCPs' knowledge of obesity and AAP guidelines. Although PCPs rate fast-food consumption, TV viewing, and lack of exercise as important treatment barriers, many never discussed these topics during the first year.

  4. Diabetes Patient Tracker, a personal digital assistant-based diabetes management system for primary care practices in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Nagykaldi, Zsolt; Mold, James W

    2003-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that electronic patient registries combined with a clinical decision support system have a significant positive impact on the documentation and delivery of services provided by health care professionals. While implementation of available commercial systems has not always been proven effective in a number of primary care practices, development and implementation of such a system in a practice-based research network might enhance successful implementation. Physicians in our practice-based research network (Oklahoma Physicians Resource/Research Network) initiated a project that aimed at designing, testing, and implementing a personal digital assistant-based diabetes management system. We utilized the "best practice" approach to determine the principles on which the application must operate. System development and beta testing were also accomplished based on the direct feedback of user clinicians. Practice Enhancement Assistants (PEAs) were available in the practices for assistance with implementation. Implementation of the Diabetes Patient Tracker (DPT) resulted in a significant improvement (p<0.05) in nine of 10 diabetic quality of care measures compared with pre-intervention levels in 20 primary care practices. Regular PEA visits similarly increased the number of foot exams and retinal exams performed in the last year (p=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). DPT is a low-cost, feasible, easily implementable, and very effective paper-less tool that significantly improves patient care and documentation in primary care practices.

  5. Use of the NHS Choices website for primary care consultations: results from online and general practice surveys

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joanna; Majeed, Azeem; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Lee, John Tayu; Nelson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of using the NHS Choices website on primary care consultations in England and Wales. We examined the hypothesis that using NHS Choices may reduce the frequency of primary care consultations among young, healthy users. Design Two cross-sectional surveys of NHS Choices users. Setting Survey of NHS Choices users using an online pop-up questionnaire on the NHS Choices website and a snapshot survey of patients in six general practices in London. Participants NHS Choices website users and general practice patients. Main outcome measures For both surveys, we measured the proportion of people using NHS Choices when considering whether to consult their GP practice and on subsequent frequency of primary care consultations. Results Around 59% (n = 1559) of online and 8% (n = 125) of general practice survey respondents reported using NHS Choices in relation to their use of primary care services. Among these, 33% (n = 515) of online and 18% (n = 23) of general practice respondents reported reduced primary care consultations as a result of using NHS Choices. We estimated the equivalent capacity savings in primary care from reduced consultations as a result of using NHS Choices to be approximately £94 million per year. Conclusions NHS Choices has been shown to alter healthcare-seeking behaviour, attitudes and knowledge among its users. Using NHS Choices results in reduced demand for primary care consultations among young, healthy users for whom reduced health service use is likely to be appropriate. Reducing potentially avoidable consultations can result in considerable capacity savings in UK primary care. PMID:21847438

  6. Weekend opening in primary care: analysis of the General Practice Patient Survey.

    PubMed

    Ford, John A; Jones, Andy P; Wong, Geoff; Steel, Nick

    2015-12-01

    Seven-day opening in primary care is a key policy for the UK government. However, it is unclear if weekend opening will meet patients' needs or lead to additional demand. To identify patient groups most likely to use weekend opening in primary care. The General Practice Patient Survey 2014, which sampled from all general practices in England, was used. Logistic regression was used to measure the associations between perceived benefit from seeing or speaking to someone at the weekend and age, sex, deprivation, health conditions, functioning, work status, rurality, and quality of life. Out of 881 183 participants who responded to the questionnaire, 712 776 (80.9%) did not report any problems with opening times. Of the 168 407 responders (19.1%) who reported inconvenient opening times, 73.9% stated that Saturday opening, and 35.8% Sunday opening, would make it easier for them to see or speak to someone. Only 2.2% of responders reported that Sunday, but not Saturday, opening would make it easier for them. Younger people, those who work full time, and those who could not get time off work were more likely to report that weekend opening would help. People with Alzheimer's disease, learning difficulties, or problems with walking, washing, or dressing were less likely to report that weekend opening would help. Most people do not think they need weekend opening, but it may benefit certain patient groups, such as younger people in full-time work. Sunday opening, in addition to Saturday, is unlikely to improve access. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  7. Physical activity assessment in practice: a mixed methods study of GPPAQ use in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Insufficient physical activity (PA) levels which increase the risk of chronic disease are reported by almost two-thirds of the population. More evidence is needed about how PA promotion can be effectively implemented in general practice (GP), particularly in socio-economically disadvantaged communities. One tool recommended for the assessment of PA in GP and supported by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) is The General Practice Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPPAQ) but details of how it may be used and of its acceptability to practitioners and patients are limited. This study aims to examine aspects of GPPAQ administration in non-urgent patient contacts using different primary care electronic recording systems and to explore the views of health professionals regarding its use. Methods Four general practices, selected because of their location within socio-economically disadvantaged areas, were invited to administer GPPAQs to patients, aged 35-75 years, attending non-urgent consultations, over two-week periods. They used different methods of administration and different electronic medical record systems (EMIS, Premiere, Vision). Participants’ (general practitioners (GPs), nurses and receptionists) views regarding GPPAQ use were explored via questionnaires and focus groups. Results Of 2,154 eligible consultations, 192 (8.9%) completed GPPAQs; of these 83 (43%) were categorised as inactive. All practices were located within areas ranked as being in the tertile of greatest socio-economic deprivation in Northern Ireland. GPs/nurses in two practices invited completion of the GPPAQ, receptionists did so in two. One practice used an electronic template; three used paper copies of the questionnaires. End-of-study questionnaires, completed by 11 GPs, 3 nurses and 2 receptionists and two focus groups, with GPs (n = 8) and nurses (n = 4) indicated that practitioners considered the GPPAQ easy to use but not in every consultation

  8. Physical activity assessment in practice: a mixed methods study of GPPAQ use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Heron, Neil; Tully, Mark A; McKinley, Michelle C; Cupples, Margaret E

    2014-01-15

    Insufficient physical activity (PA) levels which increase the risk of chronic disease are reported by almost two-thirds of the population. More evidence is needed about how PA promotion can be effectively implemented in general practice (GP), particularly in socio-economically disadvantaged communities. One tool recommended for the assessment of PA in GP and supported by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) is The General Practice Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPPAQ) but details of how it may be used and of its acceptability to practitioners and patients are limited. This study aims to examine aspects of GPPAQ administration in non-urgent patient contacts using different primary care electronic recording systems and to explore the views of health professionals regarding its use. Four general practices, selected because of their location within socio-economically disadvantaged areas, were invited to administer GPPAQs to patients, aged 35-75 years, attending non-urgent consultations, over two-week periods. They used different methods of administration and different electronic medical record systems (EMIS, Premiere, Vision). Participants' (general practitioners (GPs), nurses and receptionists) views regarding GPPAQ use were explored via questionnaires and focus groups. Of 2,154 eligible consultations, 192 (8.9%) completed GPPAQs; of these 83 (43%) were categorised as inactive. All practices were located within areas ranked as being in the tertile of greatest socio-economic deprivation in Northern Ireland. GPs/nurses in two practices invited completion of the GPPAQ, receptionists did so in two. One practice used an electronic template; three used paper copies of the questionnaires.End-of-study questionnaires, completed by 11 GPs, 3 nurses and 2 receptionists and two focus groups, with GPs (n = 8) and nurses (n = 4) indicated that practitioners considered the GPPAQ easy to use but not in every consultation. Its use extended consultation time

  9. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO.

    PubMed

    Shook, Lisa M; Farrell, Christina B; Kalinyak, Karen A; Nelson, Stephen C; Hardesty, Brandon M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Saving, Kay L; Whitten-Shurney, Wanda J; Panepinto, Julie A; Ware, Russell E; Crosby, Lori E

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs) who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM) is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO(®) methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care.

  10. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO

    PubMed Central

    Shook, Lisa M.; Farrell, Christina B.; Kalinyak, Karen A.; Nelson, Stephen C.; Hardesty, Brandon M.; Rampersad, Angeli G.; Saving, Kay L.; Whitten-Shurney, Wanda J.; Panepinto, Julie A.; Ware, Russell E.; Crosby, Lori E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs) who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM) is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO® methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care. PMID:27887664

  11. Nurse Practitioner Autonomy and Relationships with Leadership Affect Teamwork in Primary Care Practices: a Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang

    2016-07-01

    The Nurse Practitioner (NP) workforce represents a substantial supply of primary care providers able to contribute to meeting a growing demand for care. However, controversy exists regarding the expanding role of NPs in primary care in terms of challenging the teamwork between NPs and physicians. To date, no empirical evidence exists regarding how to promote teamwork in primary care between NPs and physicians. We investigated whether NP autonomy within primary care practices and the relationships they have with leadership affect teamwork between NPs and physicians. Using a cross-sectional survey design, data was collected from 163 primary care practices in Massachusetts. Three hundred and fourteen primary care NPs completed and returned the mail survey yielding a response rate of 40 %. The Autonomy and Independent Practice (AIP) and NP-Administration Relations (NP-AR) scales were used to measure NP independent practice and the relationships with leadership, respectively. These measures were aggregated to the practice level. Teamwork between NPs and physicians was measured at the individual NP level using the Teamwork (TW) scale. The multilevel linear regression models investigated the influence of practice-level NP autonomy and the relationship between NPs and leadership on teamwork. With every unit increase on the practice-level mean score of AIP centered at the grand mean, the mean TW score increased by 0.271 units (p < 0.0001). With every unit increase of NP-AR centered at the grand mean, the mean TW score increased by 0.375 (p < 0.001). Over one-third (41.3 %) of the variance in teamwork could be explained by the final model. The study findings demonstrate that NP autonomy and favorable relationships with leadership improve teamwork. Policy and organizational change should focus on promoting NP autonomy and improving the relationship between NPs and leadership to improve teamwork and consequently improve patient care and outcomes.

  12. Iron deficiency intravenous substitution in a Swiss academic primary care division: analysis of practices

    PubMed Central

    Varcher, Monica; Zisimopoulou, Sofia; Braillard, Olivia; Favrat, Bernard; Junod Perron, Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is a common problem in primary care and is usually treated with oral iron substitution. With the recent simplification of intravenous (IV) iron administration (ferric carboxymaltose) and its approval in many countries for iron deficiency, physicians may be inclined to overutilize it as a first-line substitution. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate iron deficiency management and substitution practices in an academic primary care division 5 years after ferric carboxymaltose was approved for treatment of iron deficiency in Switzerland. Methods All patients treated for iron deficiency during March and April 2012 at the Geneva University Division of Primary Care were identified. Their medical files were analyzed for information, including initial ferritin value, reasons for the investigation of iron levels, suspected etiology, type of treatment initiated, and clinical and biological follow-up. Findings were assessed using an algorithm for iron deficiency management based on a literature review. Results Out of 1,671 patients, 93 were treated for iron deficiency. Median patients’ age was 40 years and 92.5% (n=86) were female. The average ferritin value was 17.2 μg/L (standard deviation 13.3 μg/L). The reasons for the investigation of iron levels were documented in 82% and the suspected etiology for iron deficiency was reported in 67%. Seventy percent of the patients received oral treatment, 14% IV treatment, and 16% both. The reasons for IV treatment as first- and second-line treatment were reported in 57% and 95%, respectively. Clinical and biological follow-up was planned in less than two-thirds of the cases. Conclusion There was no clear overutilization of IV iron substitution. However, several steps of the iron deficiency management were not optimally documented, suggesting shortcuts in clinical reasoning. PMID:27445502

  13. Prescribing and dispensing for drug misusers in primary care: current practice in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Matheson, C; Bond, C M; Hickey, F

    1999-08-01

    Substitute prescribing has increased in Scotland, as in the rest of the UK. Both GPs and pharmacists are becoming increasingly involved in service provision for drug misusers, but anecdotal evidence has suggested considerable variation in prescribing and dispensing practice. We aimed to gain baseline data on (i) current prescribing practice by medical practitioners and drug agencies, (ii) dispensing practice by community pharmacists across Scotland for the management of drug misuse and (iii) variations in practice between health boards. A structured questionnaire was posted to all community pharmacies in Scotland (n = 1142), in order to gather information on prescribing from prescriptions held at the time of the survey and information on current dispensing practice in managing drug misusers. The response rate was 79%. Sixty-one per cent of pharmacists were currently dispensing drugs for the management of drug misuse. The most frequently prescribed drug was methadone, dispensed by 46% of pharmacists, followed by diazepam (37%), dihydrocodeine (26%) and temazepam (25%). Sixty-five per cent of methadone prescriptions were dispensed daily on request from the prescriber. Of the 3387 people receiving a methadone prescription, 32.9% had to consume their daily dose on the pharmacy premises under a pharmacist's supervision. Nineteen per cent of pharmacies currently provided a service to supervise the consumption of methadone by clients and a further 14% were prepared to but had no current demand. The proportion of prescriptions requiring supervision of methadone consumption varied considerably between health board areas. Methadone is the most widely prescribed drug for drug misuse across Scotland, but there is considerable variation between health board areas in how prescribing is managed. Prescribing practice should be revised locally, in a process involving GPs and pharmacists. Pharmacists have an important role in preventing drug misuse in primary care, but need further

  14. Suburban Families' Experience With Food Insecurity Screening in Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Palakshappa, Deepak; Doupnik, Stephanie; Vasan, Aditi; Khan, Saba; Seifu, Leah; Feudtner, Chris; Fiks, Alexander G

    2017-07-01

    Food insecurity (FI) remains a major public health problem. With the rise in suburban poverty, a greater understanding of parents' experiences of FI in suburban settings is needed to effectively screen and address FI in suburban practices. We conducted 23 semistructured interviews with parents of children <4 years of age who presented for well-child care in 6 suburban pediatric practices and screened positive for FI. In the interviews, we elicited parents' perceptions of screening for FI, how FI impacted the family, and recommendations for how practices could more effectively address FI. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. We used a modified grounded theory approach to code the interviews inductively and identified emerging themes through an iterative process. Interviews continued until thematic saturation was achieved. Of the 23 parents interviewed, all were women, with 39% white and 39% African American. Three primary themes emerged: Parents expressed initial surprise at screening followed by comfort discussing their unmet food needs; parents experience shame, frustration, and helplessness regarding FI, but discussing FI with their clinician helped alleviate these feelings; parents suggested practices could help them more directly access food resources, which, depending on income, may not be available to them through government programs. Although most parents were comfortable discussing FI, they felt it was important for clinicians to acknowledge their frustrations with FI and facilitate access to a range of food resources. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Practice-Level Effects of Interventions to Improve Asthma Care in Primary Care Settings: The Pediatric Asthma Care Patient Outcomes Research Team

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Lozano, Paula; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L; Carey, Vincent J; Inui, Thomas S; Soumerai, Stephen B; Sullivan, Sean D; Wagner, Edward H; Weiss, Scott T; Weiss, Kevin B

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the practice-level effects of (1) a physician peer leader intervention and (2) peer leaders in combination with the introduction of asthma education nurses to facilitate care improvement. And, to compare findings with previously reported patient-level outcomes of trial enrollees. Study Setting Data were included on children 5–17 years old with asthma in 40 primary care practices, affiliated with managed health care plans enrolled in the Pediatric Asthma Care Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) randomized trial. Study Design Primary care practices were randomly assigned to one of two care improvement arms or to usual care. Automated claims data were analyzed for 12-month periods using a repeated cross-sectional design. The primary outcome was evidence of at least one controller medication dispensed among patients with persistent asthma. Secondary outcomes included controller dispensing among all identified asthmatics, evidence of chronic controller use, and the dispensing of oral steroids. Health service utilization outcomes included numbers of ambulatory visits and hospital-based events. Principal Findings The proportion of children with persistent asthma prescribed controllers increased in all study arms. No effect of the interventions on the proportion receiving controllers was detected (peer leader intervention effect 0.01, 95 percent confidence interval [CI]: −0.07, 0.08; planned care intervention effect −0.03, 95 percent CI: −0.09, 0.02). A statistical trend was seen toward an increased number of oral corticosteroid bursts dispensed in intervention practices. Significant adjusted increases in ambulatory visits of 0.08–0.10 visits per child per year were seen in the first intervention year, but only a statistical trend in these outcomes persisted into the second year of follow-up. No differences in hospital-based events were detected. Conclusions This analysis showed a slight increase in ambulatory asthma visits as a result of

  16. Organizational change: a way to increase colon, breast and cervical cancer screening in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Ana Maria; Penaranda, Eribeth K; Lewis, Carmen L

    2011-04-01

    Screening tests for colon, cervical and breast cancer remain underutilized despite their proven effectiveness in reducing morbidity and mortality. Stone et al. concluded that cancer screening is most likely to improve when a health organization supports performance through organizational changes (OC) in staffing and clinical procedures. OC interventions include the use of separate clinics devoted to prevention, use of a planned care visit, designation of non-physician staff for specific prevention activities and continuous quality improvement interventions. To identify specific elements of OC interventions that increases the selected cancer screening rates. To determine to which extent practices bought into the interventions. Eleven randomized controlled trials from January 1990 to June 2010 that instituted OC to increase cancer screening completion were included. Qualitative data was analyzed by using a framework to facilitate abstraction of information. For quantitative data, an outcome of measure was determined by the change in the proportion of eligible individuals receiving cancer screening services between intervention and control practices. The health prevention clinic intervention demonstrated a large increase (47%) in the proportion of completed fecal occult blood test; having a non-physician staff demonstrated an increase in mammography (18.4%); and clinical breast examination (13.7%); the planned care visit for prevention intervention increased mammography (8.8%); continuous quality improvement interventions showed mixed results, from an increase in performance of mammography 19%, clinical breast examination (13%); Pap smear (15%) and fecal occult blood test (13%), to none or negative change in the proportion of cancer screening rates. To increase cancer screening completion goals, OC interventions should be implemented tailored to the primary care practice style. Interventions that circumvent the physicians were more effective. We could not conclude

  17. Vaccine knowledge and practices of primary care providers of exempt vs. vaccinated children.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Daniel A; Pan, William K Y; Omer, Saad B; Navar, Ann Marie; Orenstein, Walter; Marcuse, Edgar K; Taylor, James; deHart, M Patricia; Stokley, Shannon; Carter, Terrell; Halsey, Neal A

    2008-01-01

    Compare vaccine knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary care providers for fully vaccinated children and children who are exempt from school immunization requirements. We conducted a mailed survey of parent-identified primary care providers from four states to measure perceived risks and benefits of vaccination and other key immunization beliefs. Frequencies of responses were stratified by type of provider, identified by exempt versus vaccinated children. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for responses by provider type. 551 surveys were completed (84.3% response rate). Providers for exempt children had similar attitudes to providers for non-exempt children. However, there were statistically significant increased concerns among providers for exempt children regarding vaccine safety and lack of perceived individual and community benefits for vaccines compared to other providers. The great majority of providers for exempt children had similar attitudes about vaccine safety, effectiveness and benefits as providers of non-exempt children. Although providers for exempt children were more likely to believe that multiple vaccines weaken a child's immune system and were concerned about vaccine safety and less likely to consider vaccines were beneficial, a substantial proportion of providers of both exempt and vaccinated children have concerns about vaccine safety and believe that CDC underestimates the frequency of vaccine side effects. Effective continuing education of providers about the risks and benefits of immunization and including in vaccine recommendations more information on pre and post licensing vaccine safety evaluations may help address these concerns.

  18. Laboratory medicine handoff gaps experienced by primary care practices: A report from the shared networks of collaborative ambulatory practices and partners (SNOCAP).

    PubMed

    West, David R; James, Katherine A; Fernald, Douglas H; Zelie, Claire; Smith, Maxwell L; Raab, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors in laboratory medicine testing are thought to occur in the pre- and postanalytic testing phases, and a large proportion of these errors are secondary to failed handoffs. Because most laboratory tests originate in ambulatory primary care, understanding the gaps in handoff processes within and between laboratories and practices is imperative for patient safety. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand, based on information from primary care practice personnel, the perceived gaps in laboratory processes as a precursor to initiating process improvement activities. A survey was used to assess perceptions of clinicians, staff, and management personnel of gaps in handoffs between primary care practices and laboratories working in 21 Colorado primary care practices. Data were analyzed to determine statistically significant associations between categorical variables. In addition, qualitative analysis of responses to open-ended survey questions was conducted. Primary care practices consistently reported challenges and a desire/need to improve their efforts to systematically track laboratory test status, confirm receipt of laboratory results, and report results to patients. Automated tracking systems existed in roughly 61% of practices, and all but one of those had electronic health record-based tracking systems in place. One fourth of these electronic health record-enabled practices expressed sufficient mistrust in these systems to warrant the concurrent operation of an article-based tracking system as backup. Practices also reported 12 different procedures used to notify patients of test results, varying by test result type. The results highlight the lack of standardization and definition of roles in handoffs in primary care laboratory practices for test ordering, monitoring, and receiving and reporting test results. Results also identify high-priority gaps in processes and the perceptions by practice personnel that practice improvement

  19. A comprehensive situation assessment of injection practices in primary health care hospitals in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding injection practices is crucial for evidence-based development of intervention initiatives. This study explored the extent of injection use and injection safety practices in primary care hospitals in Bangladesh. Methods The study employed both quantitative and qualitative research methods. The methods used were - a retrospective audit of prescriptions (n = 4320), focus group discussions (six with 43 participants), in-depth interviews (n = 38) with a range service providers, and systematic observation of the activities of injection providers (n = 120), waste handlers (n = 48) and hospital facilities (n = 24). Quantitative and qualitative data were assessed with statistical and thematic analysis, respectively, and then combined. Results As many as 78% of our study sample (n = 4230) received an injection. The most commonly prescribed injections (n = 3354) including antibiotics (78.3%), IV fluids (38.6%), analgesics/pain killers (29.4%), vitamins (26.7%), and anti-histamines (18.5%). Further, 43.7% (n = 1145) of the prescribed antibiotics (n = 2626) were given to treat diarrhea and 42.3% (n = 600) of IV fluids (n = 1295) were used to manage general weakness conditions. Nearly one-third (29.8%; n = 36/120) of injection providers reported needle-stick injuries in the last 6 months with highest incidences in Rajshahi division followed by Dhaka division. Disposal of injection needles, syringes and other materials was not done properly in 83.5% (n = 20/24) of the facilities. Health providers' safety concerns were not addressed properly; only 23% (n = 28/120) of the health providers and 4.2% (n = 2/48) of the waste handlers were fully immunized against Hepatitis B virus. Moreover, 73% (n = 87/120) of the injection providers and 90% (n = 43/48) of the waste handlers were not trained in injection safety practices and infection prevention. Qualitative data further confirmed that both providers and patients preferred injections, believing that they

  20. Value of recruitment strategies used in a primary care practice-based trial.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Shellie D; Bertoni, Alain G; Bonds, Denise E; Clinch, C Randall; Balasubramanyam, Aarthi; Blackwell, Caroline; Chen, Haiying; Lischke, Michael; Goff, David C

    2007-05-01

    "Physicians-recruiting-physicians" is the preferred recruitment approach for practice-based research. However, yields are variable; and the approach can be costly and lead to biased, unrepresentative samples. We sought to explore the potential efficiency of alternative methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the yield and cost of 10 recruitment strategies used to recruit primary care practices to a randomized trial to improve cardiovascular disease risk factor management. We measured response and recruitment yields and the resources used to estimate the value of each strategy. Providers at recruited practices were surveyed about motivation for participation. Response to 6 opt-in marketing strategies was 0.40% (53/13290), ranging from 0% to 2.86% by strategy; 33.96% (18/53) of responders were recruited to the study. Of those recruited from opt-out strategies, 8.68% joined the study, ranging from 5.35% to 41.67% per strategy. A strategy that combined both opt-in and opt-out approaches resulted in a 51.14% (90/176) response and a 10.80% (19/90) recruitment rate. Cost of recruitment was $613 per recruited practice. Recruitment approaches based on in-person meetings (41.67%), previous relationships (33.33%), and borrowing an Area Health Education Center's established networks (10.80%), yielded the most recruited practices per effort and were most cost efficient. Individual providers who chose to participate were motivated by interest in improving their clinical practice (80.5%); contributing to CVD primary prevention (54.4%); and invigorating their practice with new ideas (42.1%). This analysis provides suggestions for future recruitment efforts and research. Translational studies with limited funds could consider multi-modal recruitment approaches including in-person presentations to practice groups and exploitation of previous relationships, which require the providers to opt-out, and interactive opt-in approaches which rely on borrowed networks. These

  1. Value of Recruitment Strategies Used in a Primary Care Practice-based Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Bonds, Denise E.; Clinch, C. Randall; Balasubramanyam, Aarthi; Blackwell, Caroline; Chen, Haiying; Lischke, Michael; Goff, David C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose “Physicians-recruiting-physicians” is the preferred recruitment approach for practice-based research. However, yields are variable; and the approach can be costly and lead to biased, unrepresentative samples. We sought to explore the potential efficiency of alternative methods. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the yield and cost of 10 recruitment strategies used to recruit primary care practices to a randomized trial to improve cardiovascular disease risk factor management. We measured response and recruitment yields and the resources used to estimate the value of each strategy. Providers at recruited practices were surveyed about motivation for participation. Results Response to 6 opt-in marketing strategies was 0.40% (53/13290), ranging from 0% to 2.86% by strategy; 33.96% (18/53) of responders were recruited to the study. Of those recruited from opt-out strategies, 8.68% joined the study, ranging from 5.35% to 41.67% per strategy. A strategy that combined both opt-in and opt-out approaches resulted in a 51.14% (90/176) response and a 10.80% (19/90) recruitment rate. Cost of recruitment was $613 per recruited practice. Recruitment approaches based on in-person meetings (41.67%), previous relationships (33.33%), and borrowing an Area Health Education Center’s established networks (10.80%), yielded the most recruited practices per effort and were most cost efficient. Individual providers who chose to participate were motivated by interest in improving their clinical practice (80.5%); contributing to CVD primary prevention (54.4%); and invigorating their practice with new ideas (42.1%). Conclusions This analysis provides suggestions for future recruitment efforts and research. Translational studies with limited funds could consider multi-modal recruitment approaches including in-person presentations to practice groups and exploitation of previous relationships, which require the providers to opt-out, and interactive opt-in approaches

  2. Understanding the drivers of interprofessional collaborative practice among HIV primary care providers and case managers in HIV care programmes.

    PubMed

    Mavronicolas, Heather A; Laraque, Fabienne; Shankar, Arti; Campbell, Claudia

    2017-05-01

    Care coordination programmes are an important aspect of HIV management whose success depends largely on HIV primary care provider (PCP) and case manager collaboration. Factors influencing collaboration among HIV PCPs and case managers remain to be studied. The study objective was to test an existing theoretical model of interprofessional collaborative practice and determine which factors play the most important role in facilitating collaboration. A self-administered, anonymous mail survey was sent to HIV PCPs and case managers in New York City. An adapted survey instrument elicited information on demographic, contextual, and perceived social exchange (trustworthiness, role specification, and relationship initiation) characteristics. The dependent variable, perceived interprofessional practice, was constructed from a validated scale. A sequential block wise regression model specifying variable entry order examined the relative importance of each group of factors and of individual variables. The analysis showed that social exchange factors were the dominant drivers of collaboration. Relationship initiation was the most important predictor of interprofessional collaboration. Additional influential factors included organisational leadership support of collaboration, practice settings, and frequency of interprofessional meetings. Addressing factors influencing collaboration among providers will help public health programmes optimally design their structural, hiring, and training strategies to foster effective social exchanges and promote collaborative working relationships.

  3. A community-oriented primary care experience for medical students and family practice residents.

    PubMed

    Summerlin, H H; Landis, S E; Olson, P R

    1993-02-01

    Medical students and residents are more likely to understand the health needs of a community if they have community-based practical experience during their training. This report describes a community-oriented educational experience for medical students and family practice residents in rural North Carolina. Medical students and residents from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and residents from Asheville spend one month in a small community in western North Carolina. During the month-long experience, these trainees live in the community and provide clinical care to patients. They also meet with local health officials, service agencies, and community organizations to learn about the community's health system. The trainees then prepare a written report about the community's health system, a community health problem identified by the trainee, and a proposal to solve the problem. Trainees report that the rotation provides a unique opportunity to understand the health system of a community. Some of the trainee-proposed solutions to problems have been implemented by community leaders. A community-oriented primary care rotation can provide students and residents with an important understanding of the health system and health problems of a community.

  4. Beliefs about generic drugs among elderly adults in hospital-based primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Iosifescu, Alice; Halm, Ethan A.; McGinn, Thomas; Siu, Albert L.; Federman, Alex D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to characterize seniors’ beliefs about generic drugs, and examine potential correlates of these beliefs, including socioeconomic and health status variables, health literacy, and physician communication skills. Methods Older adults (≥65 years) were interviewed in two primary care practices of an inner-city, tertiary care hospital (n = 311). Beliefs about generics were measured using a scale that compared generic and brand name drugs across four domains. Beliefs were modeled with multivariable linear regression. Results Negative beliefs about generics were associated with non-white race (p < 0.0001), lower education (p = 0.008) and income (p = 0.001), and having Medicaid coverage (p = 0.001). Individuals with low health literacy and who reported that their physicians had poor communication skills were more likely to hold negative views (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.003, respectively). In multivariable analysis, black race (β = -2.30, p = 0.006) and inadequate health literacy (β = -2.17, p = 0.0004) remained strongly associated with negative views about generic drugs. Poor physician communication skills also predicted negative beliefs about generics but the association was not significant for all levels of communication skill. Conclusion Many low-income seniors mistrust generic medications, especially African-Americans and seniors with low health literacy. Practice implications Educational efforts to promote generic medications should account for patients’ health literacy and cultural backgrounds. PMID:18706784

  5. When Frontline Practice Innovations Are Ahead of the Health Policy Community: The Example of Behavioral Health and Primary Care Integration.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin F

    2015-01-01

    Innovation in health care delivery often far outpaces the speed at which health policy changes to accommodate this innovation. Integrating behavioral health and primary care is a promising approach to defragment health care and help health care achieve the triple aim of decreasing costs, improving outcomes, and enhancing patients' experiences. However, the problem remains that health policy does not frequently support the integration of care. This commentary describes some of the reasons policy falters as well as potential opportunities to begin to influence health policy to better support practices that take an integrated approach to health care. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. Prescribing practices of primary-care veterinary practitioners in dogs diagnosed with bacterial pyoderma.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jennifer F; Hendricks, Anke; Brodbelt, David C

    2014-10-08

    Concern has been raised regarding the potential contributions of veterinary antimicrobial use to increasing levels of resistance in bacteria critically important to human health. Canine pyoderma is a frequent, often recurrent diagnosis in pet dogs, usually attributable to secondary bacterial infection of the skin. Lesions can range in severity based on the location, total area and depth of tissue affected and antimicrobial therapy is recommended for resolution. This study aimed to describe patient signalment, disease characteristics and treatment prescribed in a large number of UK, primary-care canine pyoderma cases and to estimate pyoderma prevalence in the UK vet-visiting canine population. Of 54,600 dogs presented to 73 participating practices in 2010, 683 (1.3%) had a pyoderma diagnosis recorded in available electronic patient record (EPR) data. Antimicrobials were dispensed in 97% of cases and most dogs were prescribed systemic therapy (92%). Agents most frequently prescribed were amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefalexin, clindamycin and cefovecin. Systemic antimicrobials were prescribed for fewer than 14 days in around 40% of study cases reviewed in detail. Prescribed daily doses were below minimum recommended daily dose (MRDD) in 26% of 43 dogs with sufficient information for calculation of minimum dose. Antimicrobial prescribing behaviour for treatment of canine pyoderma was variable but frequently appeared inconsistent with current recommendations. Use of clinical data from primary practice EPRs can provide valuable insight into common clinical conditions and associated prescribing.

  7. Primary Care Physicians and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Practice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makrides, Lydia; Veinot, Paula L.; Richard, Josie; Allen, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of primary care physicians in coronary heart disease prevention is explored, and a model for patient education by physicians is offered. A qualitative study in Nova Scotia examines physicians' expectations about their role in prevention, obstacles to providing preventive care, and mechanisms by which preventive care occurs. (Author/EMK)

  8. To Give or Not to Give: Approaches to Early Childhood Immunization Delivery in Oregon Rural Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnan, Lyle J.; Shipman, Scott A.; Gaudino, James A.; Mahler, Jo; Sussman, Andrew L.; Holub, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Context: Little is known about rural clinicians' perspectives regarding early childhood immunization delivery, their adherence to recommended best immunization practices, or the specific barriers they confront. Purpose: To examine immunization practices, beliefs, and barriers among rural primary care clinicians for children in Oregon and compare…

  9. To Give or Not to Give: Approaches to Early Childhood Immunization Delivery in Oregon Rural Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnan, Lyle J.; Shipman, Scott A.; Gaudino, James A.; Mahler, Jo; Sussman, Andrew L.; Holub, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Context: Little is known about rural clinicians' perspectives regarding early childhood immunization delivery, their adherence to recommended best immunization practices, or the specific barriers they confront. Purpose: To examine immunization practices, beliefs, and barriers among rural primary care clinicians for children in Oregon and compare…

  10. Specialized Nursing Practice for Chronic Disease Management in the Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In response to the increasing demand for better chronic disease management and improved health care efficiency in Ontario, nursing roles have expanded in the primary health care setting. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of specialized nurses who have a clinical role in patient care in optimizing chronic disease management among adults in the primary health care setting. Data Sources and Review Methods A literature search was performed using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database. Results were limited to randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews and were divided into 2 models: Model 1 (nurse alone versus physician alone) and Model 2 (nurse and physician versus physician alone). Effectiveness was determined by comparable outcomes between groups in Model 1, or improved outcomes or efficiency in Model 2. Results Six studies were included. In Model 1, there were no significant differences in health resource use, disease-specific measures, quality of life, or patient satisfaction. In Model 2, there was a reduction in hospitalizations and improved management of blood pressure and lipids among patients with coronary artery disease. Among patients with diabetes, there was a reduction in hemoglobin A1c but no difference in other disease-specific measures. There was a trend toward improved process measures, including medication prescribing and clinical assessments. Results related to quality of life were inconsistent, but patient satisfaction with the nurse-physician team was improved. Overall, there were more and longer visits to the nurse, and physician workload did not change. Limitations There was heterogeneity across patient populations, and in the titles, roles, and scope of practice of the specialized nurses. Conclusions Specialized nurses with

  11. Determinants of parental discipline practices: a national sample from primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Shari; Scheindlin, Benjamin; Ip, Edward H; Richardson, Irma; Finch, Stacia

    2007-01-01

    National guidelines urge pediatricians to address discipline as part of anticipatory guidance, yet pediatricians know little about what leads parents to use different discipline approaches. Parents seen in Pediatric Research in Office Settings practices participated in an office-based survey before the well-child visit for children 2 to 11 years old (N = 2134). Parents reported using the following discipline approaches frequently: time-outs (42%), removal of privileges (41%), sent to bedroom (27%), yelling (13%), and spanking (9%). A third of parents believe their discipline approach to be ineffective. This directs the pediatric provider to help families develop effective discipline practices tailored to their context.

  12. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient perceptions of their role in undergraduate medical education within a primary care teaching practice.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Beverley; Pearson, David

    2012-07-01

    The importance of patient involvement as a positive contribution to both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education is now widely acknowledged. Patient contact has become an integral component of teaching, learning and assessment strategies. Research has considered the pedagogic advantage; however, a view from the patient on structure, process and outcome of their contribution has gone largely unexplored. The role of real patients in medical education is changing from passive to a more active involvement. Various commentators have called for more research into patients' perceptions of their role and involvement across a spectrum of educational activities and settings. This study offers an in-depth exploration of the patient perspective from primary care; a setting increasingly important for undergraduate medical education. The aim of this study is to explore patients' perceptions of their role in undergraduate medical education within a UK primary care setting. A case study approach with an emphasis on data from in-depth interviews of 18 volunteer patients conducted within a purposively selected single teaching practice. The study captures patient perceptions of their experience, process and an evaluation of their involvement in medical student education. Findings highlight four key themes of involvement that reflect the existing literature but provide additional insights. The themes are; reflections on level of involvement and organisational support; benefits to students; perceived benefits to patients themselves; and wider benefits to medical education and educators. Patient perceptions of their involvement in clinical teaching support their key intended role within the educational process. Patients identified perceptions of benefit for students, educators and themselves. The implications of these findings are explored within the context of educational practice.

  14. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Kapur, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically relevant short- and long-term benefits for low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, chronic neck pain, and headache. The integration of acupuncture into a primary care setting also appears to be cost-effective. Furthermore, the practice of acupuncture in primary care involves rigorous training, financial discipline, and art of communication. When it is done correctly, acupuncture proves to be beneficial for both patients and providers. PMID:20189001

  16. Irritability and Problem Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Practice Pathway for Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Kelly; Fung, Lawrence K; Hagopian, Louis; Vasa, Roma A; Mahajan, Rajneesh; Bernal, Pilar; Silberman, Anna E; Wolfe, Audrey; Coury, Daniel L; Hardan, Antonio Y; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Whitaker, Agnes H

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric primary care providers (PCPs) caring for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often encounter irritability (vocal or motoric outbursts expressive of anger, frustration, or distress) and problem behavior (directed acts of aggression toward other people, self, or property). The Autism Intervention Research Network on Physical Health and Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network charged a multidisciplinary workgroup with developing a practice pathway to assist PCPs in the evaluation and treatment of irritability and problem behavior (I/PB). The workgroup reviewed the literature on the evaluation and treatment of contributory factors for I/PB in ASD. The workgroup then achieved consensus on the content and sequence of each step in the pathway. The practice pathway is designed to help the PCP generate individualized treatment plans based on contributing factors identified in each patient. These factors may include medical conditions, which the PCP is in a key position to address; functional communication challenges that can be addressed at school or at home; psychosocial stressors that may be ameliorated; inadvertent reinforcement of I/PB; and co-occurring psychiatric conditions that can be treated. The pathway provides guidance on psychotropic medication use, when indicated, within an individualized treatment plan. In addition to guidance on assessment, referral, and initial treatment, the pathway includes monitoring of treatment response and periodic reassessment. The pediatric PCP caring for the patient with ASD is in a unique position to help generate an individualized treatment plan that targets factors contributing to I/PB and to implement this plan in collaboration with parents, schools, and other providers. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Test result communication in primary care: a survey of current practice

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Lilford, Richard; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of blood tests ordered in primary care continues to increase and the timely and appropriate communication of results remains essential. However, the testing and result communication process includes a number of participants in a variety of settings and is both complicated to manage and vulnerable to human error. In the UK, guidelines for the process are absent and research in this area is surprisingly scarce; so before we can begin to address potential areas of weakness there is a need to more precisely understand the strengths and weaknesses of current systems used by general practices and testing facilities. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of practices across England to determine the methods of managing the testing and result communication process. In order to gain insight into the perspectives from staff at a large hospital laboratory we conducted paired interviews with senior managers, which we used to inform a service blueprint demonstrating the interaction between practices and laboratories and identifying potential sources of delay and failure. Results Staff at 80% of practices reported that the default method for communicating normal results required patients to telephone the practice and 40% of practices required that patients also call for abnormal results. Over 80% had no fail-safe system for ensuring that results had been returned to the practice from laboratories; practices would otherwise only be aware that results were missing or delayed when patients requested results. Persistent sources of missing results were identified by laboratory staff and included sample handling, misidentification of samples and the inefficient system for collating and resending misdirected results. Conclusions The success of the current system relies on patients both to retrieve results and in so doing alert staff to missing and delayed results. Practices appear slow to adopt available technological solutions despite their potential for

  18. Test result communication in primary care: a survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Lilford, Richard; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-11-01

    The number of blood tests ordered in primary care continues to increase and the timely and appropriate communication of results remains essential. However, the testing and result communication process includes a number of participants in a variety of settings and is both complicated to manage and vulnerable to human error. In the UK, guidelines for the process are absent and research in this area is surprisingly scarce; so before we can begin to address potential areas of weakness there is a need to more precisely understand the strengths and weaknesses of current systems used by general practices and testing facilities. We conducted a telephone survey of practices across England to determine the methods of managing the testing and result communication process. In order to gain insight into the perspectives from staff at a large hospital laboratory we conducted paired interviews with senior managers, which we used to inform a service blueprint demonstrating the interaction between practices and laboratories and identifying potential sources of delay and failure. Staff at 80% of practices reported that the default method for communicating normal results required patients to telephone the practice and 40% of practices required that patients also call for abnormal results. Over 80% had no fail-safe system for ensuring that results had been returned to the practice from laboratories; practices would otherwise only be aware that results were missing or delayed when patients requested results. Persistent sources of missing results were identified by laboratory staff and included sample handling, misidentification of samples and the inefficient system for collating and resending misdirected results. The success of the current system relies on patients both to retrieve results and in so doing alert staff to missing and delayed results. Practices appear slow to adopt available technological solutions despite their potential for reducing the impact of recurring errors in the

  19. Anti-nuclear antibodies in daily clinical practice: prevalence in primary, secondary, and tertiary care.

    PubMed

    Avery, Thomas Y; van de Cruys, Mart; Austen, Jos; Stals, Frans; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C

    2014-01-01

    For the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD), patients are screened for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). ANA, as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), have a poor specificity. This hampers interpretation of positive results in clinical settings with low pretest probability of SARD. We hypothesized that the utility of positive ANA IIF results increases from primary to tertiary care. We retrospectively determined ANA, anti-ENA, and anti-dsDNA antibody prevalence in patient cohorts from primary (n = 1453), secondary (n = 1621), and tertiary (n = 1168) care settings. Results reveal that from primary care to tertiary care, ANA prevalence increases (6.2, 10.8, and 16.0%, resp.). Moreover, in primary care low titres (70% versus 51% and 52% in secondary and tertiary care, resp.) are more frequent and anti-ENA/dsDNA reactivities are less prevalent (21% versus 39% in secondary care). Typically, in tertiary care the prevalence of anti-ENA/dsDNA reactivities (21%) is lower than expected. From this descriptive study we conclude that positive ANA IIF results are more prone to false interpretation in clinical settings with low pretest probabilities for SARD, as in primary care. Whether alternative approaches, that is, immunoadsorption of anti-DFS70 antibodies or implementation of anti-ENA screen assays, perform better, needs to be determined.

  20. Chronic Care Improvement in Primary Care: Evaluation of an Integrated Pay-for-Performance and Practice-Based Care Coordination Program among Elderly Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Peter J; Schuster, Alyson B; Boyd, Cynthia; Marsteller, Jill A; Griswold, Michael; Murphy, Shannon M E; Dunbar, Linda; Forrest, Christopher B

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of an intervention comprising (1) a practice-based care coordination program, (2) augmented by pay for performance (P4P) for meeting quality targets, and (3) complemented by a third-party disease management on quality of care and resource use for older adults with diabetes. Data Sources/Study Setting Claims files of a managed care organization (MCO) for 20,943 adults aged 65 and older with diabetes receiving care in Alabama, Tennessee, or Texas, from January 2004 to March 2007. Study Design A quasi-experimental, longitudinal study in which pre- and postdata from 1,587 patients in nine intervention primary care practices were evaluated against 19,356 patients in MCO comparison practices (>900). Five incentivized quality measures, two nonincentivized measures, and two resource-use measures were investigated. We examined trends and changes in trends from baseline to follow-up, contrasting intervention and comparison group member results. Principal Findings Quality of care generally improved for both groups during the study period. Only slight differences were seen between the intervention and comparison group trends and changes in trends over time. Conclusions This study did not generate evidence supporting a beneficial effect of an on-site care coordination intervention augmented by P4P and complemented by third-party disease management on diabetes quality or resource use. PMID:20849553

  1. Barriers and facilitators to recruitment of physicians and practices for primary care health services research at one centre

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While some research has been conducted examining recruitment methods to engage physicians and practices in primary care research, further research is needed on recruitment methodology as it remains a recurrent challenge and plays a crucial role in primary care research. This paper reviews recruitment strategies, common challenges, and innovative practices from five recent primary care health services research studies in Ontario, Canada. Methods We used mixed qualitative and quantitative methods to gather data from investigators and/or project staff from five research teams. Team members were interviewed and asked to fill out a brief survey on recruitment methods, results, and challenges encountered during a recent or ongoing project involving primary care practices or physicians. Data analysis included qualitative analysis of interview notes and descriptive statistics generated for each study. Results Recruitment rates varied markedly across the projects despite similar initial strategies. Common challenges and creative solutions were reported by many of the research teams, including building a sampling frame, developing front-office rapport, adapting recruitment strategies, promoting buy-in and interest in the research question, and training a staff recruiter. Conclusions Investigators must continue to find effective ways of reaching and involving diverse and representative samples of primary care providers and practices by building personal connections with, and buy-in from, potential participants. Flexible recruitment strategies and an understanding of the needs and interests of potential participants may also facilitate recruitment. PMID:21144048

  2. Sharing resources: opportunities for smaller primary care practices to increase their capacity for patient care. Findings from the 2009 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Ashley-Kay; Doty, Michelle M; Audet, Anne-Marie J

    2011-03-01

    Most Americans get their health care in small physician practices. Yet, small practice settings are often unable to provide the same range of services or partici­pate in quality improvement initiatives as large practices because they lack the staff, infor­mation technology, and office systems. One promising strategy is to share clinical sup­port services and information systems with other practices. New findings from the 2009 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians suggest smaller practices that share resources are more likely than those without shared resources to have advanced electronic medical records and health information technology, routinely track and manage patient information, have after-hours care arrangements, and engage in quality monitoring and benchmarking. This issue brief highlights strategies that can increase resources among small- and medium-sized practices and efforts supported by states, the private sector, and the Affordable Care Act that encourage the expansion of shared-resource models.

  3. Juggling efficiency. An ethnographic study exploring healthcare seeking practices and institutional logics in Danish primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rikke Sand; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the mutually constituting relationship between healthcare seeking practices and the socio-political context of clinical encounters. On the basis of ethnographic fieldwork carried out in the context of Danish primary care (general practice) and inspired by recent writings on institutional logics, we illustrate how a logic of efficiency organise and give shape to healthcare seeking practices as they manifest in local clinical settings. Overall, patient concerns are reconfigured to fit the local clinical setting and healthcare professionals and patients are required to juggle efficiency in order to deal with uncertainties and meet more complex or unpredictable needs. Lastly, building on the empirical case of cancer diagnostics, we discuss the implications of the pervasiveness of the logic of efficiency in the clinical setting and argue that provision of medical care in today's primary care settings requires careful balancing of increasing demands of efficiency, greater complexity of biomedical knowledge and consideration for individual patient needs.

  4. The "battering syndrome": prevalence and clinical characteristics of domestic violence in primary care internal medicine practices.

    PubMed

    McCauley, J; Kern, D E; Kolodner, K; Dill, L; Schroeder, A F; DeChant, H K; Ryden, J; Bass, E B; Derogatis, L R

    1995-11-15

    This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence of domestic violence among female patients presenting to four community-based primary care internal medicine practices in Baltimore, Maryland, between February and July, 1993. Furthermore, it identified clinical characteristics associated with domestic violence. A total of 1952 female patients of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds participated in a self-administered, anonymous survey that solicited data on physical and sexual abuse, alcohol abuse, emotional status, demographic characteristics, physical symptoms, use of street drugs and prescribed medications, and medical and psychiatric history. Of the 1952 respondents, 108 (5.5%) had experienced domestic violence in the previous year, 418 (21.4%) had experienced violence sometime in their adult lives, 429 (22%) before age 18 years, and 639 (32.7%) as either an adult or a child. Current violence status is associated with single or separated status, substance abuse, specific psychological symptoms, specific physical symptoms, and the total number of physical symptoms. In a logistic regression model, the likelihood of current abuse increased with the number of risk factors. The magnitude of these associations supports the idea that domestic violence is a significant medical public health problem. Detection of domestic violence by physicians or other health care professionals might alter both the diagnostic and treatment plans for these women.

  5. Maintenance of Increased Childhood Influenza Vaccination Rates 1 Year After an Intervention in Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Zimmerman, Richard K; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Reis, Evelyn Cohen; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Moehling, Krissy K; Hannibal, Kristin M; Matambanadzo, Annamore; Shenouda, Emeil M; Allred, Norma J

    2016-01-01

    Influenza vaccination rates among some groups of children remain below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 70%. Multistrategy interventions to increase childhood influenza vaccination have not been evaluated recently. Twenty pediatric and family medicine practices were randomly assigned to receive the intervention in either year 1 or year 2. This study focuses on influenza vaccine uptake in the 10 year 1 intervention sites during intervention and the following maintenance year. The intervention included the 4 Pillars Immunization Toolkit-a practice improvement toolkit, early delivery of donated vaccine for disadvantaged children, staff education, and feedback on progress. During the maintenance year, practices were not assisted or contacted, except to complete follow-up surveys. Student's t tests assessed vaccine uptake of children aged 6 months to 18 years, and multilevel regression modeling in repeated measures determined variables related to the likelihood of vaccination. Influenza vaccine uptake increased 12.4 percentage points (PP; P < .01) during active intervention and uptake was sustained (+0.4 PP; P > .05) during maintenance, for an average change of 12.7 PP over all sites, increasing from 42.2% at baseline to 54.9% (P < .001) during maintenance. In regression modeling that controlled for age, race, and insurance, likelihood of vaccination was greater during intervention than baseline (odds ratio 1.47; 95% confidence interval 1.44-1.50; P < .001) and greater during maintenance than baseline (odds ratio 1.50; 95% confidence interval 1.47-1.54; P < .001). In primary care practices, a multistrategy intervention that included the 4 Pillars Immunization Toolkit, early delivery of vaccine, and feedback was associated with significant improvements in childhood influenza vaccination rates that were maintained 1 year after active intervention. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Two-day primary trauma care workshop: early and late evaluation of knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hassan; Gholipour, Changiz; Mokhtarpour, Mohammad; Shams Vahdati, Samad; Hashemi Aghdam, Yashar; Bakhshayeshi, Mina

    2013-04-01

    The management of multiply injured trauma patients is a skill requiring broad knowledge and remarkable skills. The aim of the primary trauma care (PTC) module is to orient medical staff to the initial assessment of an injured patient. This workshop was held in the Education Development Center of Tabriz Medical University in April, September, and November 2007. The participants were given lectures, completed practices, and case scenarios about the management of traumatic patients. All participants were given a pretest and a post-test including a questionnaire and procedural skill exams. Finally, the same post-tests were performed 6-12 months later. Sixty-four individuals were interested in attending the workshop from the total of 90 invited, and 53 individuals responded to the late post-test. The mean score in the pretest, early post-test, and late post-test was 18.84, 26.72, and 22.17, respectively (P<0.001). Most of the medical staff did not have sufficient knowledge of basic PTC. We have shown that the incorporation of hands-on patient scenarios into an expanded course on the basis of PTC principles helps medical staff gain the knowledge and skills needed to perform the primary survey sequence correctly. Furthermore, extra educational planning seems to be necessary to retain these abilities as needed.

  7. Perceptions of primary health care service users regarding dental team practices in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Alexandre; Veiga, Rochelle Santos Da; Bulgarelli, Patricia Tavora; Diesel, Vitor Motta; Bulgarelli, Alexandre Favero

    2017-10-09

    The Unified Health System (SUS) is the Brazilian set of public health services that offers global access to health care and disease treatments for all citizens. These services have been evaluated by means of a national survey assessing the users' perceptions. Aim To explore and characterize the SUS users' perceptions regarding primary dental team practices in the five Brazilian geographical regions. Descriptive study. The sample consisted of 37 262 subjects. Data were collected by means of the Ministry of Health survey, conducted between 2012 and 2014. Variables used in the present study are associated with SUS users' perspectives of satisfaction, access, and use of services. The study utilized bivariate data analysis, and dichotomous variables were derived for analysis following 95% reliability. Findings This study observed similarities and proportionality of perceptions in the Brazilian territory. In most macro-regions, dental teams did not develop an active search for dental treatment absentees. However, the SUS users reported very good and good perceptions, which were homogeneously distributed across five Brazilian regions, thereby showing an overall positive perception of primary dental treatment.

  8. The interaction between research and practice: a pan-European approach to managing H.pylori infection in primary care.

    PubMed

    Hungin, A P

    2000-08-01

    The transposition of evidence into clinical care presents many challenges. New knowledge may be immediately translatable to the practice setting, with barriers to be overcome before implementation. The early guidelines on Helicobacter pylori management presented an overview but were not able to take into account local factors and health care traditions, such as the non-availability of tests and established primary-secondary care relationships. Primary care is a specific specialty across most of Europe, existing within different health care systems and clinical traditions. The creation of H. pylori management guidelines, aimed at European primary care but adaptable to local national circumstances, presented a challenge in methodology and formulation. The process exposed similarities but also tensions between differing health care systems, as well as variations in the conditions in which GPs practise. Clinical differences, such as varying ulcer prevalence and drug resistance rates, highlighted the importance of guidelines being adaptable. This paper analyses the European Society for Primary Care Gastroenterology process of pan-European primary care agreement towards H.pylori management and how diverse views, traditions and national settings were reconciled through an evidence-based approach.

  9. Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Practices of Diabetes Management During Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mujtaba; Adams, Alexandra; Hossain, Md Anwar; Sutin, David; Han, Benjamin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 3.5 million Muslims in North America. During the holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims are to fast from predawn to after sunset. While there are exemptions for older and sick adults, many adults with diabetes fast during Ramadan. However, there are risks associated with fasting and specific management considerations for patients with diabetes. We evaluated provider practices and knowledge regarding the management of patients with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. A 15-question quality improvement survey based on a literature review and the American Diabetes Association guidelines was developed and offered to providers at the outpatient primary care and geriatric clinics at an inner-city hospital in New York City. Forty-five providers completed the survey. Most respondents did not ask their Muslim patients with diabetes if they were fasting during the previous Ramadan. Knowledge of fasting practices during Ramadan was variable, and most felt uncomfortable managing patients with diabetes during Ramadan. There is room for improvement in educating providers about specific cultural and medical issues regarding fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan.

  10. Primary care guidelines: Senior executives’ views on changing health centre practices in hypertension treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna; Ketola, Eeva; Nyberg, Solja; Välimäki, Maritta A.; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. Design A cross-sectional telephone survey. Setting All municipal health centres in Finland. Subjects Health centres where both the head physician and the senior nursing officer responded. Main outcome measures Agreement in views of the senior executives on the adoption of clinical practices as recommended in the Hypertension Guideline. Results Data were available from 143 health centres in Finland (49%). The views of head physicians and senior nursing officers on the adoption of the Hypertension Guideline were not consistent. Head physicians more often than senior nursing officers (44% vs. 29%, p < 0.001) reported that no agreements on recording target blood pressure in patient records existed. A similar discrepancy was seen in recording cardiovascular risk (64% vs. 44%, p < 0.001). Senior executives agreed best on the calibration of sphygmomanometers and the provision of weight-control group counselling. Conclusions Hypertension Guideline recommendations that require joint agreements between professionals are less often adopted than simple, precise recommendations. More emphasis on effective multidisciplinary collaboration is needed. PMID:19929184

  11. Clinical Practice Guideline Implementation Strategy Patterns in Veterans Affairs Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Best, Richard G; Pugh, Jacqueline A

    2007-01-01

    Background The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) mandated the system-wide implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in the mid-1990s, arming all facilities with basic resources to facilitate implementation; despite this resource allocation, significant variability still exists across VA facilities in implementation success. Objective This study compares CPG implementation strategy patterns used by high and low performing primary care clinics in the VA. Research Design Descriptive, cross-sectional study of a purposeful sample of six Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) with high and low performance on six CPGs. Subjects One hundred and two employees (management, quality improvement, clinic personnel) involved with guideline implementation at each VAMC primary care clinic. Measures Participants reported specific strategies used by their facility to implement guidelines in 1-hour semi-structured interviews. Facilities were classified as high or low performers based on their guideline adherence scores calculated through independently conducted chart reviews. Findings High performing facilities (HPFs) (a) invested significantly in the implementation of the electronic medical record and locally adapting it to provider needs, (b) invested dedicated resources to guideline-related initiatives, and (c) exhibited a clear direction in their strategy choices. Low performing facilities exhibited (a) earlier stages of development for their electronic medical record, (b) reliance on preexisting resources for guideline implementation, with little local adaptation, and (c) no clear direction in their strategy choices. Conclusion A multifaceted, yet targeted, strategic approach to guideline implementation emphasizing dedicated resources and local adaptation may result in more successful implementation and higher guideline adherence than relying on standardized resources and taxing preexisting channels. PMID:17355583

  12. An algorithm to identify rheumatoid arthritis in primary care: a Clinical Practice Research Datalink study

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Sara; Hider, Samantha L; Raza, Karim; Stack, Rebecca J; Hayward, Richard A; Mallen, Christian D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multisystem, inflammatory disorder associated with increased levels of morbidity and mortality. While much research into the condition is conducted in the secondary care setting, routinely collected primary care databases provide an important source of research data. This study aimed to update an algorithm to define RA that was previously developed and validated in the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Methods The original algorithm consisted of two criteria. Individuals meeting at least one were considered to have RA. Criterion 1: ≥1 RA Read code and a disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) without an alternative indication. Criterion 2: ≥2 RA Read codes, with at least one ‘strong’ code and no alternative diagnoses. Lists of codes for consultations and prescriptions were obtained from the authors of the original algorithm where these were available, or compiled based on the original description and clinical knowledge. 4161 people with a first Read code for RA between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012 were selected from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD, successor to the GPRD), and the criteria applied. Results Code lists were updated for the introduction of new Read codes and biological DMARDs. 3577/4161 (86%) of people met the updated algorithm for RA, compared to 61% in the original development study. 62.8% of people fulfilled both Criterion 1 and Criterion 2. Conclusions Those wishing to define RA in the CPRD, should consider using this updated algorithm, rather than a single RA code, if they wish to identify only those who are most likely to have RA. PMID:26700281

  13. Longevity and mortality of cats attending primary care veterinary practices in England.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Dan G; Church, David B; McGreevy, Paul D; Thomson, Peter C; Brodbelt, David C

    2015-02-01

    Enhanced knowledge on longevity and mortality in cats should support improved breeding, husbandry, clinical care and disease prevention strategies. The VetCompass research database of primary care veterinary practice data offers an extensive resource of clinical health information on companion animals in the UK. This study aimed to characterise longevity and mortality in cats, and to identify important demographic risk factors for compromised longevity. Crossbred cats were hypothesised to live longer than purebred cats. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise the deceased cats. Multivariable linear regression methods investigated risk factor association with longevity in cats that died at or after 5 years of age. From 118,016 cats attending 90 practices in England, 4009 cats with confirmed deaths were randomly selected for detailed study. Demographic characterisation showed that 3660 (91.7%) were crossbred, 2009 (50.7%) were female and 2599 (64.8%) were neutered. The most frequently attributed causes of mortality in cats of all ages were trauma (12.2%), renal disorder (12.1%), non-specific illness (11.2%), neoplasia (10.8%) and mass lesion disorders (10.2%). Overall, the median longevity was 14.0 years (interquartile range [IQR] 9.0-17.0; range 0.0-26.7). Crossbred cats had a higher median longevity than purebred cats (median [IQR] 14.0 years [9.1-17.0] vs 12.5 years [6.1-16.4]; P <0.001), but individual purebred cat breeds varied substantially in longevity. In cats dying at or after 5 years (n = 3360), being crossbred, having a lower bodyweight, and being neutered and non-insured were associated with increased longevity. This study described longevity in cats and identified important causes of mortality and breed-related associations with compromised longevity.

  14. Practical Approach to Detection and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease for the Primary Care Clinician.

    PubMed

    Vassalotti, Joseph A; Centor, Robert; Turner, Barbara J; Greer, Raquel C; Choi, Michael; Sequist, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    A panel of internists and nephrologists developed this practical approach for the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative to guide assessment and care of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by primary care clinicians. Chronic kidney disease is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and/or markers of kidney damage for at least 3 months. In clinical practice the most common tests for CKD include GFR estimated from the serum creatinine concentration (eGFR) and albuminuria from the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Assessment of eGFR and albuminuria should be performed for persons with diabetes and/or hypertension but is not recommended for the general population. Management of CKD includes reducing the patient's risk of CKD progression and risk of associated complications, such as acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease, anemia, and metabolic acidosis, as well as mineral and bone disorder. Prevention of CKD progression requires blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with albuminuria and hypertension, hemoglobin A1c ≤7% for patients with diabetes, and correction of CKD-associated metabolic acidosis. To reduce patient safety hazards from medications, the level of eGFR should be considered when prescribing, and nephrotoxins should be avoided, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The main reasons to refer to nephrology specialists are eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), severe albuminuria, and acute kidney injury. The ultimate goal of CKD management is to prevent disease progression, minimize complications, and promote quality of life.

  15. Beliefs, Knowledge, Implementation, and Integration of Evidence-Based Practice Among Primary Health Care Providers: Protocol for a Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipa; Salvi, Mireille; Verloo, Henk

    2017-08-01

    The adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted because it is widely recognized for improving the quality and safety of health care for patients, and reducing avoidable costs. Providers of primary care face numerous challenges to ensuring the effectiveness of their daily practices. Primary health care is defined as: the entry level into a health care services system, providing a first point of contact for all new needs and problems; patient-focused (not disease-oriented) care over time; care for all but the most uncommon or unusual conditions; and coordination or integration of care, regardless of where or by whom that care is delivered. Primary health care is the principal means by which to approach the main goal of any health care services system: optimization of health status. This review aims to scope publications examining beliefs, knowledge, implementation, and integration of EBPs among primary health care providers (HCPs). We will conduct a systematic scoping review of published articles in the following electronic databases, from their start dates until March 31, 2017: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) via PubMed (from 1946), Embase (from 1947), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1937), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from 1992), PsycINFO (from 1806), Web of Science (from 1900), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) database (from 1998), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE; from 1996), Trip medical database (from 1997), and relevant professional scientific journals (from their start dates). We will use the predefined search terms of, "evidence-based practice" and, "primary health care" combined with other terms, such as, "beliefs", "knowledge", "implementation", and "integration". We will also conduct a hand search of the bibliographies of all relevant articles and a search for unpublished studies using Google Scholar, ProQuest, Mednar, and World

  16. How teams work--or don't--in primary care: a field study on internal medicine practices.

    PubMed

    Chesluk, Benjamin J; Holmboe, Eric S

    2010-05-01

    We conducted a field study in three primary care practices representing different practice types: a solo practice; a certified patient-centered medical home; and a multiphysician, multispecialty practice connected to a local university. All three practices shared a common culture in the way that practice members related to each other. In each instance, the practice team operated in separate social "silos," isolating physicians from each other and from the rest of the practice staff. We concluded that current practice structures are primarily focused on supporting physicians' hectic routines and have trouble accommodating the diversity of patients' needs. For practices to succeed in managing diverse patients and in helping them understand and manage their own health, it will be critical to break down the silos and organize teams with shared roles and responsibilities.

  17. Chiropractor perceptions and practices regarding interprofessional service delivery in the Danish primary care context.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Corrie; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Fogh-Schultz, Anders Lyck

    2014-03-01

    For the past 20 years, chiropractors have enjoyed access to the Danish health care system and have been free to build integrated health care delivery partnerships. An electronic survey of chiropractic clinics around Denmark was conducted in order to observe interprofessional practice trends. From the available population of 252 practices, 166 responses were received. Ninety-six percent of respondents considered inter-disciplinary/interprofessional practice to be either "very" or "extremely" important in the context of modern Danish health care. Three occupational groups appear to be commonly involved in practice alongside chiropractors, these being massage therapists (82%), physiotherapists (58%) and acupuncturists (37%). Interestingly only 11% considered a medical practitioner to be an active participant in their current interprofessional service delivery. Danish chiropractors consider interprofessional practice to be important and as a group, perceive themselves to be offering such models of service provision. Medical practitioners are perceived as desirable, but under utilized partners.

  18. Development and pilot study of the Primary Care Practice Improvement Tool (PC-PIT): an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Lisa; Janamian, Tina; Sheehan, Mary; Siskind, Victor; Hepworth, Julie; Jackson, Claire L

    2014-08-04

    To assess the usability and validity of the Primary Care Practice Improvement Tool (PC-PIT), a practice performance improvement tool based on 13 key elements identified by a systematic review. It was co-created with a range of partners and designed specifically for primary health care. This pilot study examined the PC-PIT using a formative assessment framework and mixed-methods research design. Six high-functioning general practices in Queensland, Australia, between February and July 2013. A total of 28 staff participated - 10 general practitioners, six practice or community nurses, 12 administrators (four practice managers; one business manager and eight reception or general administrative staff). Readability, content validity and staff perceptions of the PC-PIT. The PC-PIT offers an appropriate and acceptable approach to internal quality improvement in general practice. Quantitative assessment scores and qualitative data from all staff identified two areas in which the PC-PIT required modification: a reduction in the indicative reading age, and simplification of governance-related terms and concepts. The PC-PIT provides an innovative approach to address the complexity of organisational improvement in general practice and primary health care. This initial validation will be used to develop a suite of supporting, high-quality and free-to-access resources to enhance the use of the PC-PIT in general practice. Based on these findings, a national trial is now underway.

  19. Exploring knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward older adults with hypertension in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Chotisiri, Luckwirun; Yamarat, Khemika; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High blood pressure increases the risk of cardiovascular and kidney diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore a baseline of hypertension knowledge, attitudes, and practices among older adults with hypertension at a sub-district Health Promoting Hospital in the Pathum Thani province of Thailand. Patients and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the outpatient clinic of the sub-district Health Promoting Hospital, one of the primary care sectors, between January and March 2015, and a total of 144 cases were recruited. All clinical parameters were collected and a structured questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results Most of the participants (74.3%) were females, and their mean age was 66.1 years. Two-thirds (66.7%) were married, unemployed/retired (67.4%), and had completed elementary education (79.2%). The screenings showed that their mean blood pressure was 136.4 (±14.4)/79.2 (±10.1) mmHg, the group’s mean body mass index was 24.9 kg/m2 (± 3.6 kg/m2), and their mean waist circumference was 88.6 cm (±7.1 cm) for males and 85.7 cm (±6.8 cm) for females. In addition, their mean score of hypertension knowledge was high, and most of the participants had a neutral attitude toward hypertension; their practices in terms of dietary and exercise habits for controlling blood pressure were low in nature. Conclusion This study indicated that increasing patients’ practices would be useful for promoting their healthy behaviors to achieve blood pressure control. PMID:27822057

  20. Co-located specialty care within primary care practice settings: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Elrashidi, Muhamad Y; Mohammed, Khaled; Bora, Pavithra R; Haydour, Qusay; Farah, Wigdan; DeJesus, Ramona; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Ebbert, Jon O

    2017-09-23

    Co-location of specialists in primary care has been suggested as an approach to reduce care fragmentation, inefficiency, and cost. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the impact of co-located specialty care models in primary care settings. Ovid Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus was conducted through February 2015. A manual search of the included studies' bibliographies was conducted. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies reporting physically co-located specialties in primary care on the following outcomes were included: patient satisfaction; provider satisfaction; health care access and utilization; clinical outcomes, and costs. Of 1620 articles, 22 studies met inclusion criteria, including 9 RCTs and 13 observational studies. Co-located care was observed to be associated with increased patient satisfaction (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.04-3.98), primary care provider satisfaction (OR 6.49, 95% CI 4.28-9.85), and outpatient visits (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.13-3.33). Co-located care was associated with reduced appointment wait time (OR 0.20, 95%CI 0.10 - 0.41). Reduced costs and improvement in quality of life and selected diabetes related outcomes were also observed. Evidence quality was limited by few studies, high risk of bias, and heterogeneity. Co-located specialty care in primary care settings may support the aims of high value care delivery. However, additional studies are needed to further evaluate the value of co-location of specific specialties and stronger data on impact to health outcomes and cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An educational process to strengthen primary care nursing practices in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, A M; Fracolli, L A

    2007-12-01

    To describe the experience of a registered nurse (RN) training process related to the Family Health Program (FHP) developed in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The FHP is a national, government strategy to restructure primary care services. It focuses on the family in order to understand its physical and social structure in regards to the health-illness process. In the FHP, the RN is a member of a team with the same number as medical doctors - an unprecedented situation. The FHP requires a discussion of the RNs' practice, by qualifying and empowering them with tools and knowledge. The training process was based on Freire's approach founded on critical pedagogy in order to address the fundamental problem of inequalities in health. The first phase included workshops and the second one included a course. The workshops identified the following problems related to the RN's work: lack of tools to identify the population's needs; overload of work due to the accumulation of management and assistance activities; difficulties regarding teamwork; lack of tools to evaluate the impact of nursing interventions; lack of tools to improve the participation of the community. The course was organized to tackle these problems under five thematic headings. The RN's training process allowed the group to reflect deeply on its work. This experience led to the need for the construction of tools to intervene in the reality, mainly against social exclusion, rescuing and adapting of the knowledge accumulated in the healthcare practice, identifying settings which demand institutional solutions and engaging the RN in research groups in order to develop projects according to the complexity of the primary care services. The application of the concept of equity in the health sector represented a reaction against the processes of social exclusion, starting from performance at a local level to become a reality in the accomplishments achieved by the Brazilian National Health System. This training

  2. Primary Care Residents Improve Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes, and Practice After a Clinical Curriculum With a Hospice.

    PubMed

    von Gunten, Charles F; Mullan, Patricia B; Nelesen, Richard; Garman, Karen; McNeal, Helen; Savoia, Maria; Muchmore, Elaine; Ikeda, Tyson; Amundson, Stan; McKennett, Marianne; Diamant, Joel; Pepper, Patricia; Gray, Cynthia; Weissman, David

    2017-09-01

    Effective approaches to teaching attitudes, knowledge, and skills to resident physicians in primary care that can be implemented in any residency program are needed. We examined the feasibility and impact of a single palliative care residency curriculum, including a clinical rotation with a hospice program, across 5 cohorts of residents in 7 divergent primary care residency programs (both family medicine and internal medicine). The didactic content was drawn from the national Education for Physicians on End-of-Life Care Project. A total of 448 residents completed the curriculum. A large effect size was seen in measures of knowledge change (*Cohen d = .89) when compared to a national sample of primary care residency programs. Additionally, measures of confidence to perform palliative care skills and ethical concerns also improved significantly ( P < .001). A frequent comment is wishing the rest of medicine were like that experienced in the hospice setting. In a separate, ancillary evaluation, the average length of stay of patients enrolled in hospice care was 18.5 days longer for the alumni of this program when compared to physicians referring for hospice care who hadn't experienced the curriculum.

  3. Current therapy for HIV infection and its infectious complications. A practical summary for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Falloon, J

    1992-06-01

    Primary care physicians can play a crucial role in the care of patients with HIV infection. Treatment often requires orchestration of many complex drug regimens. In addition, the patient must make informed decisions about a broad range of care-related issues. Steps in the care of such patients include (1) staging of HIV infection, (2) instituting antiretroviral therapy, and (3) preventing opportunistic infections plus treating opportunistic infections when present. A wide range of established and investigational agents are available for these purposes, and new ones are continually being discovered.

  4. Impact of primary care funding on secondary care utilisation and patient outcomes: a retrospective cross-sectional study of English general practice.

    PubMed

    L'Esperance, Veline; Sutton, Matt; Schofield, Peter; Round, Thomas; Malik, Umer; White, Patrick; Ashworth, Mark

    2017-09-25

    In international studies, greater investment in primary health care is associated with improved population health outcomes. To determine whether investment in general practice is associated with secondary care utilisation, patient satisfaction, and clinical outcomes. Retrospective cross-sectional study of general practices in England, 2014-2015. Practice-level data were stratified into three groups according to GP contract type: national General Medical Services (GMS) contracts, with or without the capitation supplement (mean practice income guarantee), or local Personal Medical Services (PMS) contracts. Regression models were used to explore associations between practice funding (capitation payments and capitation supplements) and secondary care usage, patient satisfaction (general practice patient survey scores), and clinical outcomes (Quality and Outcomes Framework [QOF] scores). The authors conducted financial modelling to predict secondary care cost savings associated with notional changes in primary care funding. Mean capitation payments per patient were £69.82 in GMS practices in receipt of capitation supplements (n = 2784), £78.79 in GMS practices without capitation supplements (n = 1672), and £84.43 in PMS practices (n = 3022). The mean capitation supplement was £5.72 per patient. Financial modelling demonstrated little or no relationship between capitation payments and secondary care costs. In contrast, notional investment in capitation supplements was associated with modelled savings in secondary care costs. The relationship between funding and patient satisfaction was inconsistent. QOF performance was not associated with funding in any practice type. Capitation payments appear to be broadly aligned to patient need in terms of secondary care usage. Supplements to the current capitation formula are associated with reduced secondary care costs. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  5. Management of Type 2 Diabetes in the Primary Care Setting: A Practice-Based Research Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Spann, Stephen J.; Nutting, Paul A.; Galliher, James M.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Pavlik, Valory N.; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Volk, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to describe how primary care clinicians care for patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS We undertook a cross-sectional study of 95 primary care clinicians and 822 of their established patients with type 2 diabetes from 4 practice-based, primary care research networks in the United States. Clinicians were surveyed about their training and practice. Patients completed a self-administered questionnaire about their care, and medical records were reviewed for complications, treatment, and diabetes-control indicators. RESULTS Participating clinicians (average age, 45.7 years) saw an average of 32.6 adult patients with diabetes per month. Patients (average age, 59.7 years) reported a mean duration of diabetes of 9.1 years, with 34.3% having had the disease more than 10 years. Nearly one half (47.5%) of the patients had at least 1 diabetes-related complication, and 60.8% reported a body mass index greater than 30. Mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.6% (SD 1.73), and 40.5% of patients had values <7%. Only 35.3% of patients had adequate blood pressure control (<130/85 mm Hg), and only 43.7% had low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels <100 mg/dL. Only 7.0% of patients met all 3 control targets. Multilevel models showed that patient ethnicity, practice type, involvement of midlevel clinicians, and treatment were associated with HbA1c level; patient age, education level, and practice type were associated with blood pressure control; and patient ethnicity was associated with LDL-C control. CONCLUSIONS Only modest numbers of patients achieve established targets of diabetes control. Reengineering primary care practice may be necessary to substantially improve care. PMID:16449393

  6. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in canine pyoderma cases in primary care veterinary practices in Canada: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Daniel; Goulding, Fiona; Langelier, Ken; Magyar, Gabor; McCurdy, Les; Milstein, Moe; Nielsen, Kia; Villemaire, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma in dogs is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus spp., and significant emergence of methicillin resistance in staphylococcal pyoderma has been reported. This preliminary study of the prevalence of methicillin resistance in canine pyoderma cases in Canadian primary care veterinary practices revealed that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. were present in 12.1% of 149 staphylococcal positive skin culture cases. PMID:26483585

  7. Childhood Emotional Abuse and Neglect as Predictors of Psychological and Physical Symptoms in Women Presenting to a Primary Care Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spertus, Ilyse L.; Yehuda, Rachel; Wong, Cheryl M.; Halligan, Sarah; Seremetis, Stephanie V.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: There were two aims to this study: first to examine whether emotional abuse and neglect are significant predictors of psychological and somatic symptoms, and lifetime trauma exposure in women presenting to a primary care practice, and second to examine the strength of these relationships after controlling for the effects of other types…

  8. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in canine pyoderma cases in primary care veterinary practices in Canada: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Daniel; Goulding, Fiona; Langelier, Ken; Magyar, Gabor; McCurdy, Les; Milstein, Moe; Nielsen, Kia; Villemaire, Stephanie

    2015-10-01

    Pyoderma in dogs is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus spp., and significant emergence of methicillin resistance in staphylococcal pyoderma has been reported. This preliminary study of the prevalence of methicillin resistance in canine pyoderma cases in Canadian primary care veterinary practices revealed that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. were present in 12.1% of 149 staphylococcal positive skin culture cases.

  9. An Exploratory Study of GP Perceptions of the Impact of a Primary Care Counselling Service on Their Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Tim; Amoateng, Geoffrey; Wrycraft, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research into GP perceptions of the impact of on-site counselling on general practice. The research is part of a larger evaluation of a local enhanced primary care mental service. The initial survey and in-depth interviews with GPs reported here focused on the pre-existing counselling service. The results suggest…

  10. An Exploratory Study of GP Perceptions of the Impact of a Primary Care Counselling Service on Their Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Tim; Amoateng, Geoffrey; Wrycraft, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research into GP perceptions of the impact of on-site counselling on general practice. The research is part of a larger evaluation of a local enhanced primary care mental service. The initial survey and in-depth interviews with GPs reported here focused on the pre-existing counselling service. The results suggest…

  11. Incorporating shared savings programs into primary care: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Hayen, Arthur P; van den Berg, Michael J; Meijboom, Bert R; Struijs, Jeroen N; Westert, Gert P

    2015-12-30

    In several countries, health care policies gear toward strengthening the position of primary care physicians. Primary care physicians are increasingly expected to take accountability for overall spending and quality. Yet traditional models of paying physicians do not provide adequate incentives for taking on this new role. Under a so-called shared savings program physicians are instead incentivized to take accountability for spending and quality, as the program lets them share in cost savings when quality targets are met. We provide a structured approach to designing a shared savings program for primary care, and apply this approach to the design of a shared savings program for a Dutch chain of primary care providers, which is currently being piloted. Based on the literature, we defined five building blocks of shared savings models that encompass the definition of the scope of the program, the calculation of health care expenditures, the