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Sample records for primary care practitioners

  1. Nurse Practitioners and Men's Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Marina B; Oliffe, John L; Kelly, Mary T

    2017-09-01

    Though life expectancy sex differences are decreasing in many Western countries, men experience higher mortality rates at all ages. Men are often reluctant to seek medical care because health help-seeking is strongly linked to femininity, male weakness, and vulnerability. Many men are also more likely to access emergency care services in response to injury and/or severe pain instead of engaging primary health care (PHC) services. Nurse practitioners are well positioned to increase men's engagement with PHC to waylay the pressure on emergency services and advance the well-being of men. This article demonstrates how nurse practitioners can work with men in PHC settings to optimize men's self-health and illness prevention and management. Four recommendations are discussed: (1) leveling the hierarchies, (2) talking it through, (3) seeing diversity within patterns, and (4) augmenting face-to-face PHC services. In terms of leveling the hierarchies nurse practitioners can engage men in effectual health decision making. Within the interactions detailed in the talking it through section are strategies for connecting with male patients and mapping their progress. In terms of seeing diversity with in patterns and drawing on the plurality of masculinities, nurse practitioners are encouraged to adapt a variety of age sensitive assessment tools to better intervene and guide men's self-health efforts. Examples of community and web based men's health resources are shared in the augmenting face-to-face PHC services section to guide the work of nurse practitioners. Overall, the information and recommendations shared in this article can proactively direct the efforts of nurse practitioners working with men.

  2. Psoriasis for the primary care practitioner.

    PubMed

    Young, Melodie; Aldredge, Lakshi; Parker, Patti

    2017-03-01

    Primary care practitioners (PCPs) are playing an increasingly important role in the management and care of psoriasis. Thus, it is important for PCPs to be knowledgeable about the disease and to be able to differentiate between common myths and facts related to diagnosis and treatment. By building relationships with their patients and working collaboratively with dermatology health professionals and other specialists, PCPs can facilitate communication about the patient's treatment preferences and expectations for symptom relief, and they may be better able to work with the patient to optimize treatment adherence. This review aims to provide PCPs with a primer on psoriasis, its associated comorbidities, and its impact on patients' quality of life. Discussion topics include psoriasis epidemiology, triggering factors, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, comorbidities, and approaches to treatment. This review also highlights the importance of staying abreast of advances in the understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis as well as emerging therapeutic treatment options, because these advances may change the treatment landscape and increase patients' expectations for skin clearance. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Teaching nutrition skills to primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Charles B; McBride, Patrick E; Gans, Kim A; Underbakke, Gail L

    2003-02-01

    Primary care physicians have the potential to decrease morbidity and mortality for many chronic diseases if they provide effective nutrition counseling. Given the time constraints of primary care practice, nutrition counseling needs to be brief, be part of an organized office system and refer appropriate patients to qualified nutrition professionals to be effective. This paper reviews a system of primary care nutrition counseling using the 5A's of patient-centered counseling, the elements necessary to develop an office-based system and some successful tools developed by nutrition researchers for the primary care setting to be used in an office-based system.

  4. The role of nurse practitioners in reinventing primary care.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Mary D; Kurtzman, Ellen T

    2010-05-01

    Nurse practitioners are the principal group of advanced-practice nurses delivering primary care in the United States. We reviewed the current and projected nurse practitioner workforce, and we summarize the available evidence of their contributions to improving primary care and reducing more costly health resource use. We recommend that nurse practice acts--the state laws governing how nurses may practice--be standardized, that equivalent reimbursement be paid for comparable services regardless of practitioner, and that performance results be publicly reported to maximize the high-quality care that nurse practitioners provide.

  5. Clinical productivity of primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; Tuttle, Jane

    Nurse practitioners are increasingly being integrated into primary care delivery to help meet the growing demand for primary care. It is therefore important to understand nurse practitioners' productivity in primary care practice. We examined nurse practitioners' clinical productivity in regard to number of patients seen per week, whether they had a patient panel, and patient panel size. We further investigated practice characteristics associated with their clinical productivity. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners. The sample included full-time primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings. Multivariable survey regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between practice characteristics and nurse practitioners' clinical productivity. Primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings saw an average of 80 patients per week (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79-82), and 64% of them had their own patient panel. The average patient panel size was 567 (95% CI: 522-612). Nurse practitioners who had their own patient panel spent a similar percent of time on patient care and documentation as those who did not. However, those with a patient panel were more likely to provide a range of clinical services to most patients. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity was associated with several modifiable practice characteristics such as practice autonomy and billing and payment policies. The estimated number of patients seen in a typical week by nurse practitioners is comparable to that by primary care physicians reported in the literature. However, they had a significantly smaller patient panel. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity can be further improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary care nurse practitioner clinical education: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sroczynski, Maureen; Dunphy, Lynne M

    2012-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine report and the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act present significant opportunities for the nursing profession. As the largest group of primary care providers, nurse practitioners are the critical element in the provision of comprehensive primary care, and a critical element to the success of the redesigned health care system. Nurse practitioners can bridge the gap between coverage and access and provide the patient-centered innovative approaches needed. There are, however, significant barriers that need to be addressed. This article presents a framework for creating innovative approaches to the redesign of nurse practitioner clinical education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nurse practitioner workforce: a substantial supply of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Lucero, Robert; Rauch, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    For about 5 decades, nurse practitioners (NPs) have been utilized to deliver primary care, traditionally in underserved areas or to vulnerable populations. However, over the years, this workforce has experienced a steady growth and has expanded its reach to provide primary care in diverse settings. An additional 32 million patients will have access to primary care with full implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It is unlikely that the scarce supply of primary care physicians will be able to properly meet the demand and the health care needs of the nation. NPs face challenges but practice, policy, and research recommendations for better utilizing NPs in primary care can mediate the workforce shortages and meet the demand for care.

  8. Nurse practitioner caseload in primary health care: Scoping review.

    PubMed

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Donald, Faith; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Rayner, Jennifer; Valaitis, Ruta; Carter, Nancy; Miller, Patricia A; Landry, Véronique; Harbman, Patricia; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; McKinlay, R James; Ziegler, Erin; Boesveld, Sarah; Lamb, Alyson

    2016-10-01

    To identify recommendations for determining patient panel/caseload size for nurse practitioners in community-based primary health care settings. Scoping review of the international published and grey literature. The search included electronic databases, international professional and governmental websites, contact with experts, and hand searches of reference lists. Eligible papers had to (a) address caseload or patient panels for nurse practitioners in community-based primary health care settings serving an all-ages population; and (b) be published in English or French between January 2000 and July 2014. Level one testing included title and abstract screening by two team members. Relevant papers were retained for full text review in level two testing, and reviewed by two team members. A third reviewer acted as a tiebreaker. Data were extracted using a structured extraction form by one team member and verified by a second member. Descriptive statistics were estimated. Content analysis was used for qualitative data. We identified 111 peer-reviewed articles and grey literature documents. Most of the papers were published in Canada and the United States after 2010. Current methods to determine panel/caseload size use large administrative databases, provider work hours and the average number of patient visits. Most of the papers addressing the topic of patient panel/caseload size in community-based primary health care were descriptive. The average number of patients seen by nurse practitioners per day varied considerably within and between countries; an average of 9-15 patients per day was common. Patient characteristics (e.g., age, gender) and health conditions (e.g., multiple chronic conditions) appear to influence patient panel/caseload size. Very few studies used validated tools to classify patient acuity levels or disease burden scores. The measurement of productivity and the determination of panel/caseload size is complex. Current metrics may not capture

  9. [A general practitioners' program for primary care in Chile].

    PubMed

    Bass del Campo, Germán Camilo

    2015-03-13

    The public health system in Chile does not have a comprehensive development policy for physician resources in primary care, so there is currently a significant deficit of hours for medical care. The article contains a proposal for a "General Program for Primary Care Physicians", which aims to reduce the gap of general practitioners and specialists in primary care. The program proposes to integrate newly graduated physicians to work in the public medical offices with the subsequent possibility of applying for a scholarship specialty, and consecutively a return period as a specialist in the public health network. The immediate implementation of this program is perfectly feasible given the current availability of doctors, over 1400 medical graduates from universities.

  10. Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, M. Katherine; Stanley, Joan; Werner, Kathryn E.; Schmid, Emily

    This document presents the nurse practitioner primary care competencies that a national panel of representatives of nine national organizations of the five primary care nurse practitioner specialties--adult, family, gerontological, pediatric, and women's health--identified as necessary for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners. Section 1…

  11. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    PubMed

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  12. The primary care practitioner and the diagnosis of occupational diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rather than a clinical diagnosis, in occupational medicine the critical point is the etiological diagnosis. The first is useful for the therapy, the latter for preventive, epidemiological, regulatory, and insurance measures. Discussion As with causality criteria which are employed in population studies, the answering of four easy questions allows a Primary Care Practitioner to establish a causal link between the work activities and a potential disease that a specific patient may present. After determining the clinical diagnosis and the actual pathology of an occupational disease, the identity, duration, and intensity of the exposure have to be detected for establishing a close-causal effect. The judgment on the occupational origin of the disease requires an integrated approach using multiple sources of information, and goes beyond the clinical diagnosis. This may require consultation with a specialist in occupational medicine. Summary It is important that the Primary Care Practitioner takes an accurate medical history since this may be the only chance a patient has to have their occupational disease recognised and properly detected/identified. Proper identification of the causative nature of such diseases is important for establishing preventive measures in eliminating and controlling future cases against exposure, epidemiological reporting and studies (particularly in identifying the rates of disease), regulatory reporting requirements and insurance compensation. PMID:20618928

  13. Traditional health practitioners as primary health care workers.

    PubMed

    Hoff, W

    1997-01-01

    The author conducted a field study in 1993 to evaluate the effectiveness of four projects that were training traditional health practitioners (THPs) to provide primary health care (PHC) services in Ghana, Mexico, and Bangladesh. The study, funded by a grant from the World Health Organization, Division of Strengthening Health Services, concluded that incorporating trained THPs in PHC programmes can be cost effective in providing essential and culturally relevant health services to communities. The main objective of the study was to evaluate how effective the training projects were and to determine what impacts they might have upon the communities served. A qualitative field evaluation was performed using data collected from project documents, observations, and field interviews with a selection of health agency staff, THPs, and community members. A summary of results is presented from the four field studies. For details refer to the full report.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary and specialised ambulatory care: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Reid, Kim; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Marshall, Deborah A; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners delivering primary and specialised ambulatory care. Design A systematic review of randomised controlled trials reported since 1980. Data sources 10 electronic bibliographic databases, handsearches, contact with authors, bibliographies and websites. Included studies Randomised controlled trials that evaluated nurse practitioners in alternative and complementary ambulatory care roles and reported health system outcomes. Results 11 trials were included. In four trials of alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but seven patient outcomes favouring nurse practitioner care and in all but four health system outcomes, one favouring nurse practitioner care and three favouring physician care. In a meta-analysis of two studies (2689 patients) with minimal heterogeneity and high-quality evidence, nurse practitioner care resulted in lower mean health services costs per consultation (mean difference: −€6.41; 95% CI −€9.28 to −€3.55; p<0.0001) (2006 euros). In two trials of alternative provider specialised ambulatory care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but three patient outcomes and one health system outcome favouring nurse practitioner care. In five trials of complementary provider specialised ambulatory care roles, 16 patient/provider outcomes favouring nurse practitioner plus usual care, and 16 were equivalent. Two health system outcomes favoured nurse practitioner plus usual care, four favoured usual care and 14 were equivalent. Four studies of complementary specialised ambulatory care compared costs, but only one assessed costs and outcomes jointly. Conclusions Nurse practitioners in alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles have equivalent or better patient outcomes than comparators and are potentially cost-saving. Evidence for their cost-effectiveness in alternative provider

  15. The HIV Primary Care Workforce of Tomorrow: The UCSF Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Carmen J; Stringari-Murray, Suzan; Fox, Christopher B; Monasterio, Erica; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for primary care services and the current health care workforce shortage is predicted to cause drastic reductions in the number of clinicians who are competent to provide HIV care. For the past decade, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing has provided HIV specialty education for Advanced Practice Nursing students in the Master's curriculum. In 2013, UCSF was funded by the Health Resources Services Administration to establish a nurse practitioner (NP) HIV primary care education program to expand the number of NPs prepared to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive HIV primary care. To this end, UCSF faculty have developed and validated a set of HIV Primary Care entry-level NP competencies, integrated general HIV knowledge into the NP curriculum, and enhanced our current HIV Specialty curriculum and clinical training. Described herein is UCSF's Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

  16. Approach to Red Eye for Primary Care Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Anne L; Wells, Jill Razor

    2015-09-01

    A red eye is a common presenting complaint in the primary care setting. Redness of the eye indicates the presence of ocular inflammation, and most commonly represents benign conditions that can be readily treated by the primary care provider. However, there are emergent conditions that can present as a red eye. Primary care providers must readily recognize the danger signs that indicate these more serious ophthalmologic conditions that warrant immediate referral to an ophthalmologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Language barriers in mental health care: a survey of primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Camille; Leanza, Yvan; Rosenberg, Ellen; Vissandjée, Bilkis; Kirmayer, Laurence J; Muckle, Gina; Xenocostas, Spyridoula; Laforce, Hugues

    2014-12-01

    Many migrants do not speak the official language of their host country. This linguistic gap has been found to be an important contributor to disparities in access to services and health outcomes. This study examined primary care mental health practitioners' experiences with linguistic diversity. 113 practitioners in Montreal completed a self-report survey assessing their experiences working with allophones. About 40% of practitioners frequently encountered difficulties working in mental health with allophone clients. Few resources were available, and calling on an interpreter was the most common practice. Interpreters were expected to play many roles, which went beyond basic language translation. There is a clear need for training of practitioners on how to work with different types of interpreters. Training should highlight the benefits and limitations of the different roles that interpreters can play in health care delivery and the differences in communication dynamics with each role.

  18. Autonomy of nurse practitioners in primary care: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min; De Gagne, Jennie C

    2016-03-01

    This integrative review of the existing literature was conducted to identify dimensions related to nurse practitioner (NP) autonomy and to recommend future areas of research related to the important topic of NP autonomy in this era of cost-conscious healthcare reform. Articles were identified from the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, Ovid, Scopus, Google Scholar, and EBSCO. Over 24 articles were found; 12 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria of research conducted with NPs, physicians, and patients. The results revealed three categories of association with regard to NP autonomy: job satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and physician-NP collaboration. This review was undertaken to advance understanding of autonomy among NPs and the dynamics involved in their delivery of care. Further research into the associations between NP autonomy and its dimensions are necessary to indicate a future direction to the NP role. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  19. Practitioners' views on managing childhood obesity in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katrina M; Shield, Julian PH; Salisbury, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Background In 2006 the Department of Health and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published guidance on the management of childhood obesity, for use by primary care practitioners. Little is known, however, about practitioners' views and experiences of managing childhood obesity in primary care. Aim To explore practitioners' views of primary care as a setting in which to treat childhood obesity. Design of study Qualitative interview study. Setting Primary care and other community settings based in Bristol, England. Method Interviews explored practitioners' views and experiences of managing childhood obesity and their knowledge of the recent guidance provided by the Department of Health and NICE. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was thematic and comparisons made both within and across the interviews. Results Thirty practitioners were interviewed: 12 GPs, 10 practice nurses, four school nurses, and four health visitors. Participants varied in their views about whether primary care is an appropriate treatment setting for childhood obesity. However, all described factors that limited the extent to which they could intervene effectively: a lack of expertise, resources, and contact with primary school children; the causes of childhood obesity; and the need to work with parents. It was also apparent that very few participants had knowledge of the recent guidance. Conclusion Practitioners do not currently view primary care as an effective treatment setting for childhood obesity and it is unlikely that the guidance from the Department of Health and NICE will have a meaningful impact on their management of this condition. PMID:19712545

  20. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  1. Nurse Practitioner Mental Health Care in the Primary Context: A Californian Case Study.

    PubMed

    Theophilos, Theane; Green, Roger; Cashin, Andrew

    2015-03-18

    In America, mental health needs surpass the availability of specialized providers. This vulnerable population also has other obstacles for comprehensive care including gaps in medical coverage, stigma, economic barriers, and a geographical mal‑distribution of qualified mental health professionals. A wide availability of primary care providers, including primary care and family nurse practitioners, are well-positioned to deliver integrated mental and physical health care. A case study from a Southern California Coachella Valley primary care clinic with integrated services is used to demonstrate the much-needed approach of care to address health disparities that face low‑income immigrants, migrant workers, and others without access to specialized care centers and providers. It is argued that mental health care should be part of all holistic treatment provided by primary care and family nurse practitioners. This has implications for curricula and practice development.

  2. Nurse Practitioner Mental Health Care in the Primary Context: A Californian Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Theophilos, Theane; Green, Roger; Cashin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In America, mental health needs surpass the availability of specialized providers. This vulnerable population also has other obstacles for comprehensive care including gaps in medical coverage, stigma, economic barriers, and a geographical mal-distribution of qualified mental health professionals. A wide availability of primary care providers, including primary care and family nurse practitioners, are well-positioned to deliver integrated mental and physical health care. A case study from a Southern California Coachella Valley primary care clinic with integrated services is used to demonstrate the much-needed approach of care to address health disparities that face low-income immigrants, migrant workers, and others without access to specialized care centers and providers. It is argued that mental health care should be part of all holistic treatment provided by primary care and family nurse practitioners. This has implications for curricula and practice development. PMID:27417754

  3. [Diabetic retinopathy screening programme in primary health care. Diagnostic concordance between family and eye care practitioners].

    PubMed

    Alonso Porcel, C; Martínez Ibán, M; Arboleya Álvarez, L; Suárez Gil, P; Sánchez Rodríguez, L M

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic concordance in retinography interpretation between primary care and eye care practitioners and assess the soundness index of a diabetic retinography screening programme during its implementation stage. Descriptive, observational study was conducted on a sample of 243 patients with diabetes mellitus (type 1 and 2) over age 14, in 2 urban health care centers, gathered in an opportunistic manner between the dates of 21/07/2011 and 26/01/2012. A 45° digital bilateral retinography, intraocular pressure and visual acuity were obtained from each patient. The primary care practitioners prepared a report for each patient, which was telematically sent to the eye care doctor within the corresponding retinographies. A new diagnostic report was prepared then by the eye care doctor after revising the images. The lack of retinographies and/or reports were considered both as losses. The diagnostic concordance between the observers and the validity and reliability from the screening programme were estimated. The kappa value obtained was 0.62 (95% CI 0.42-0.82) and 0.89 PABAK. The following validity indexes were obtained: Sensitivity 68.8%, specificity 96.5%, positive and negative predictive values: 61.1 and 97.5%, respectively. A percentage of 57.2 of the patients were not observed any pathology requiring referral to a eye care doctor. The concordance value obtained varied between considerable and almost perfect, depending on the index used for the analysis (kappa/PABAK, respectively). It's worth highlighting that carrying out retinographies in the primary care centers enhances patient-treatment capacity of the primary care doctors and the patients accessibility to screening. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. General practitioners' perceptions of the current status and pharmacists' contribution to primary care in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Blondal, Anna Bryndis; Jonsson, Jon Steinar; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark; Almarsdottir, Anna Birna

    2017-08-01

    Background For the past several years pharmacists' responsibilities have expanded globally from traditional tasks of dispensing medications to collaborating with other health care professionals in patient care. Similar developments have not occurred in outpatient settings in Iceland. Objective The aim of this study was to explore Icelandic general practitioners' views on the current status of primary care, their perceptions of pharmacists as a health care profession, and their attitudes towards future GP-pharmacist collaboration in primary care in Iceland. Setting Twelve primary care clinics in Iceland. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with general practitioners from different primary care clinics in Iceland. A purposive and snowball sampling technique was used to select participants. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were categorized by themes and then analyzed using conventional content analysis. Main outcome measure General practitioners' attitudes towards pharmacists. Results Twenty general practitioners from twelve different primary care clinics in Iceland were interviewed. There are several unmet needs regarding medicines and patient monitoring in the Icelandic health care system. General practitioners suggested ways in which these gaps may be addressed and pharmacist-led clinical service was one of the suggestions. Currently, their communication with pharmacists in the primary sector solely surrounds practical non-clinical issues. Due to increasing polypharmacy and multimorbidity, they suggested that pharmacists should be more involved in patient care. Conclusions General practitioners believe that pharmacist-led clinical service can increase the quality of patient therapy. To improve communication between these health care providers, pharmacists must also re-professionalize (strengthening the profession´s status through new responsibilities and tasks), not having a conflict of interest and

  5. New tool for patient evaluation of nurse practitioner in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kravos, Andrej; Poplas-Susič, Tonka; Svab, Igor; Kersnik, Janko

    2014-05-01

    To validate a tool for patient evaluation of nurse practitioners. The roles of nurse practitioners in family practice settings are health promotion and routine follow-up of patients with chronic diseases. So far, several tools for patient evaluation of nurse practitioners have been developed. They revealed several dimensions of nurse practitioners' work and high levels of patient satisfaction with their work. The studies also reported conflicting data on the associations between demographic and other variables and the level of nurse practitioners' evaluation by patients. A cross-sectional study. This study was performed in a sample of seven model family medicine practices in Slovenia. We included 30 consecutive adult patients in each model family practice aiming at the final sample of 210 respondents. Patient evaluation of nurse practitioners was assessed using a Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale. The response rate was 80·9%. Mean total score on Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale was 87·9 ± 12·4 points. Cronbach's alpha of Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale was 0·941. Factor analyses revealed three factors: clinical approach factor, comprehensive approach factor and patient-centred approach factor. Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale proved to be a reliable tool for patient evaluations of nurse practitioners in primary care settings. Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale can be used in terms of a whole scale as well as in terms of three separate subscales. This newly developed tool can be used to monitor quality performance of nurse practitioners and to plan quality improvement actions in nurse practitioners' performance in primary care settings. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Obesity in primary care: a qualitative synthesis of patient and practitioner perspectives on roles and responsibilities

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is a top-priority global health issue; however, a clear way to address obesity in primary care is not yet in view. Aim To conduct a meta-ethnography of patient and primary care practitioner perspectives of roles and responsibilities in how to address obesity in the UK, to inform evidence-based services that are acceptable to, and appropriate for, patients and practitioners. Design and setting Qualitative synthesis applying meta-ethnographic methods according to the Noblit and Hare monograph. Database searches in MEDLINE®, Social Sciences Citation Index®, CINAHL, and Health Management Information Consortium were limited to 1997–2012 to examine recent perspectives. Method Full articles of practitioner and/or patient perspectives on obesity services in primary care were reviewed, and included semi-structured or unstructured interviews and focus groups, and participant observations. Results Nine studies were synthesised with perspectives from patients (n = 105) and practitioners (n = 144). Practitioners believe that patients are responsible for obesity, and that primary care should not help, or is poorly equipped to do so. Patients ‘take responsibility’ by ‘blaming’ themselves, but feel that practitioners should demonstrate more leadership. The empowerment of patients to access health services is reliant on the empowerment of practitioners to take an unambiguous position. Conclusion Primary care has the potential either to perpetuate or counter obesity-related stigma. There needs to be a firm decision as to what role primary care will take in the prevention and treatment of obesity. To remain ambiguous runs the risk of losing patients’ confidence and adding to a growing sense of futility. PMID:25824184

  7. Obesity in primary care: a qualitative synthesis of patient and practitioner perspectives on roles and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a top-priority global health issue; however, a clear way to address obesity in primary care is not yet in view. To conduct a meta-ethnography of patient and primary care practitioner perspectives of roles and responsibilities in how to address obesity in the UK, to inform evidence-based services that are acceptable to, and appropriate for, patients and practitioners. Qualitative synthesis applying meta-ethnographic methods according to the Noblit and Hare monograph. Database searches in MEDLINE(®), Social Sciences Citation Index(®), CINAHL, and Health Management Information Consortium were limited to 1997-2012 to examine recent perspectives. Full articles of practitioner and/or patient perspectives on obesity services in primary care were reviewed, and included semi-structured or unstructured interviews and focus groups, and participant observations. Nine studies were synthesised with perspectives from patients (n = 105) and practitioners (n = 144). Practitioners believe that patients are responsible for obesity, and that primary care should not help, or is poorly equipped to do so. Patients 'take responsibility' by 'blaming' themselves, but feel that practitioners should demonstrate more leadership. The empowerment of patients to access health services is reliant on the empowerment of practitioners to take an unambiguous position. Primary care has the potential either to perpetuate or counter obesity-related stigma. There needs to be a firm decision as to what role primary care will take in the prevention and treatment of obesity. To remain ambiguous runs the risk of losing patients' confidence and adding to a growing sense of futility. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  8. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A

    2015-10-01

    To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Retrospective cohort study. Primary care in communities. Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94-1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98-1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84-0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79-0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21-1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48-1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67-2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01-1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline-concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K.; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Primary care in communities. Participants Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Measurements Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Results Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94–1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98–1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84– 0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79– 0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21–1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48–1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67–2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01–1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Conclusion Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline–concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. PMID:26480967

  10. Validation of Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire: A New Tool to Study Nurse Practitioner Practice Settings.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Chaplin, William F; Shaffer, Jonathan A

    2017-04-01

    Favorable organizational climate in primary care settings is necessary to expand the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce and promote their practice. Only one NP-specific tool, the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ), measures NP organizational climate. We confirmed NP-PCOCQ's factor structure and established its predictive validity. A crosssectional survey design was used to collect data from 314 NPs in Massachusetts in 2012. Confirmatory factor analysis and regression models were used. The 4-factor model characterized NP-PCOCQ. The NP-PCOCQ score predicted job satisfaction (beta = .36; p < .001) and intent to leave job (odds ratio = .28; p = .011). NP-PCOCQ can be used by researchers to produce new evidence and by administrators to assess organizational climate in their clinics. Further testing of NP-PCOCQ is needed.

  11. Views and experiences of nurse practitioners and medical practitioners with collaborative practice in primary health care – an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This integrative review synthesises research studies that have investigated the perceptions of nurse practitioners and medical practitioners working in primary health care. The aggregation of evidence on barriers and facilitators to working collaboratively and experiences about the processes of collaboration is of value to understand success factors and factors that impede collaborative working relationships. Methods An integrative review, which used systematic review processes, was undertaken to summarise qualitative and quantitative studies published between 1990 and 2012. Databases searched were the Cochrane Library, the Joanna Briggs Institute Library, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Informit and ProQuest. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed for quality. Study findings were extracted relating to a) barriers and facilitators to collaborative working and b) views and experiences about the process of collaboration. The findings were narratively synthesised, supported by tabulation. Results 27 studies conducted in seven different countries met the inclusion criteria. Content analysis identified a number of barriers and facilitators of collaboration between nurse practitioners and medical practitioners. By means of data comparison five themes were developed in relation to perceptions and understanding of collaboration. Nurse practitioners and medical practitioners have differing views on the essentials of collaboration and on supervision and autonomous nurse practitioner practice. Medical practitioners who have a working experience with NPs express more positive attitudes towards collaboration. Both professional groups report concerns and negative experiences with collaborative practice but also value certain advantages of collaboration. Conclusions The review shows that working in collaboration is a slow progression. Exposure to working together helps to overcome professional hurdles, dispel concerns and provide clarity around roles and the

  12. Addressing the primary care workforce: a study of nurse practitioner students' plans after graduation.

    PubMed

    Budd, Geraldine M; Wolf, Andrea; Haas, Richard Eric

    2015-03-01

    Primary care is a growing area, and nurse practitioners (NPs) hold promise for meeting the need for additional providers. This article reports on the future plans of more than 300 primary care NP students in family, adult, and adult gerontology programs. The sample was obtained through NP faculty, and data were collected via an online survey. Results indicated that although these students chose primary care, only 48% anticipated working in primary care; 26% planned to practice in rural areas, and 16% planned to work in an inner city. Reasons cited as important for pursuing a primary care position included the long-term patient relationship, faculty and preceptor mentors from the NP program, and clinical experiences as a student. Implications include providing more intensive faculty mentoring to increase the number of individuals seeking primary care positions after graduation and help with future career planning to meet personal career and nursing profession needs.

  13. Economic evaluation of a general practitioner with special interests led dermatology service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Coast, Joanna; Noble, Sian; Noble, Alison; Horrocks, Sue; Asim, Oya; Peters, Tim J; Salisbury, Chris

    2005-12-17

    To carry out an economic evaluation of a general practitioner with special interest service for non-urgent skin problems compared with hospital outpatient care. Cost effectiveness analysis and cost consequences analysis alongside a randomised controlled trial. General practitioner with special interest dermatology service covering 29 general practices in Bristol. Adults referred to a hospital dermatology clinic who were potentially suitable for management by a general practitioner with special interest. Participants were randomised 2:1 to receive either care by general practitioner with special interest service or usual hospital outpatient care. Costs to NHS, patients, and companions, and costs of lost production. Cost effectiveness, using the two primary outcomes of dermatology life quality index scores and improved patient perceived access, was assessed by incremental cost effectiveness ratios and cost effectiveness acceptability curves. Cost consequences are presented in relation to all costs and both primary and secondary outcomes from the trial. Costs to the NHS for patients attending the general practitioner with special interest service were 208 pounds sterling (361 dollars; 308 euro) compared with 118 pounds sterling for hospital outpatient care. Based on analysis with imputation of missing data, costs to patients and companions were 48 pounds sterling and 51 pounds sterling, respectively; costs of lost production were 27 pounds sterling and 34 pounds sterling, respectively. The incremental cost effectiveness ratios for general practitioner with special interest care over outpatient care were 540 pounds sterling per one point gain in the dermatology life quality index and 66 pounds sterling per 10 point change in the access scale. The general practitioner with special interest service for dermatology is more costly than hospital outpatient care, but this additional cost needs to be weighed against improved access and broadly similar health outcomes.

  14. Guideline use behaviours and needs of primary care practitioners in China: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Linan; Li, Youping; Zhang, Lingli; Liu, Guanjian; Zhang, Yang; Zhen, Shangwei; Li, Honghao; Song, Xue; Duan, Yanjun; Yu, Jiajie; Wang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-03

    Clinical guidelines have been recognised as an effective way to improve healthcare performance. However, little is known about the uptake and implementation of guidelines by general practitioners in China. The aim of this study was to investigate the guideline use behaviours and needs of practitioners in primary care settings in China. We conducted a cross-sectional survey from December 2015 to May 2016 that included practitioners at 268 institutions in 15 provinces in China. Questionnaire development was informed by the execution of a literature review and consultation of experts. On-site surveys were implemented using a paper questionnaire to minimise missing responses. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with provider knowledge of and attitudes towards clinical guidelines. Of the respondents, 91.7% (1568/1708) were aware of clinical guidelines, but only 11.3% (177/1568) frequently used them. The main mechanism by which primary care practitioners accessed guidelines was public search engines (63.4%; 911/1438), and practitioners seldom reported using biomedical databases. The most frequently identified barriers to guideline use were lack of training (49.9%; 778/1560), lack of access (44.6%; 696/1560) and lack of awareness (38.0%; 592/1560). Less than one-quarter of respondents considered current guidelines 'entirely appropriate' for use in primary care (23.5%; 339/1442). Most participants (96.2%; 1509/1568) believed it was necessary to develop primary care guidelines. Provider attitudes towards current guidelines were associated with the location and level of the institution and professional title of the practitioner (p<0.05). Our survey revealed poor knowledge and uptake of clinical guidelines in primary care, and we identified a gap between the needs of practitioners and availability of clinical guidelines for use in primary care in China. In addition, lacking access to and training in guidelines also

  15. Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practice Characteristics: Barriers and Opportunities for Interprofessional Teamwork.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Norful, Allison A; Martsolf, Grant R

    Developing team-based care models and expanding nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care are recommended by policy makers to meet demand. Little is known how to promote interprofessional teamwork. Using a mixed-methods design, we analyzed qualitative interview and quantitative survey data from primary care NPs to explore practice characteristics important for teamwork. The Interprofessional Teamwork for Health and Social Care Framework guided the study. We identified NP-physician and NP-administration relationships; organizational support and governance; time and space for teamwork; and regulations and economic impact as important. Practice and policy change addressing these factors is needed for effective interprofessional teamwork.

  16. Evolution of a Family Nurse Practitioner Program to Improve Primary Care Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrus, Len Hughes; Fenley, Mary D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a Family Nurse Practitioner Program that has effectively improved the distribution of primary health care manpower in rural areas. Program characteristics include selection of personnel from areas of need, decentralization of clinical and didactic training sites, competency-based portable curriculum, and circuit-riding institutionally…

  17. 12th Update in Gastroenterology and Hepatology for the Primary Care Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Stephen, F Otis; Rossaro, Lorenzo

    2008-10-01

    The 12th Update in Gastroenterology and Hepatology for the Primary Care Practitioner is an annual course organized by the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of California, Davis, and held in beautiful Monterey, California. The course was geared towards primary care physicians, nurse practitioners and other allied health professionals. The goals of this symposium were to provide current information regarding the diagnosis and management of digestive diseases commonly seen in the primary care setting and to provide practical guidelines for disease management. Topics covered during this symposium included viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, gastroparesis and bariatric surgery. The course was organized into two sessions each morning, over 2 days, with three or four 30-min lectures. A brief question-and-answer session followed each lecture.

  18. The relationship of primary care providers to dental practitioners in rural and remote Australia.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2017-08-01

    Rural residents have poorer oral health and more limited access to dental services than their city counterparts. In rural communities, health care professionals often work in an extended capacity due to the needs of the community and health workforce shortages in these areas. Improved links and greater collaboration between resident rural primary care and dental practitioners could help improve oral health service provision such that interventions are both timely, effective and lead to appropriate follow-up and referral. This study examined the impact oral health problems had on primary health care providers; how primary care networks could be more effectively utilised to improve the provision of oral health services to rural communities; and identified strategies that could be implemented to improve oral health. Case studies of 14 rural communities across three Australian states. Between 2013 and 2016, 105 primary and 12 dental care providers were recruited and interviewed. Qualitative data were analysed in Nvivo 10 using thematic analysis. Quantitative data were subject to descriptive analysis using SPSSv20. Rural residents presented to primary care providers with a range of oral health problems from "everyday" to "10 per month". Management by primary care providers commonly included short-term pain relief, antibiotics, and advice that the patient see a dentist. The communication between non-dental primary care providers and visiting or regional dental practitioners was limited. Participants described a range of strategies that could contribute to better oral health and oral health oral services in their communities. Rural oral health could be improved by building oral health capacity of non-dental care providers; investing in oral health promotion and prevention activities; introducing more flexible service delivery practices to meet the dental needs of both public and private patients; and establishing more effective communication and referral pathways between

  19. Novice Nurse Practitioner Workforce Transition Into Primary Care: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Faraz, Asefeh

    2016-05-18

    The purpose of this integrative review was to analyze the current state of the science related to the novice nurse practitioner (NP) transition into primary care. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the databases Pubmed, MEDLINE, Ovid, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) with the terms nurse practitioner, role, and transition to search articles published after 1997. Three major themes emerged from the literature related to the novice NP transition into primary care. These themes were categorized as "experiencing role ambiguity," "quality of professional and interpersonal relationships," and "facing intrinsic and extrinsic obstacles." Strategies to reduce role ambiguity, improve the quality of professional relationships, and mitigate extrinsic obstacles faced by novice NPs may improve their transition into the primary care workforce. Educational institutions, employers, and novice NPs all have a stake in the successful transition from student to primary care practitioner and should be engaged in developing effective NP transition-to-practice programs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Federal Polices Influence Access to Primary Care and Nurse Practitioner Workforce.

    PubMed

    Carthon, J Margo Brooks; Barnes, Hilary; Sarik, Danielle Altares

    2015-05-01

    Although most nurse practitioners (NPs) are aware of state-level regulations that influence practice, many are unaware of the ways that federal policies affect NP workforce supply and the delivery of primary care. In this investigation we provide an overview of federal initiatives enacted through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that impact the NP workforce. We explore how the law supports NP workforce supply and settings in which NPs provide care. We then describe challenges that may prevent full utilization of the NP workforce. Examining both federal policies and state-level regulations is essential to achieving an increased NP workforce supply and improved access to care.

  1. Development and psychometric testing of the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Finkelstein, Stacey R; Mason, Emanuel; Shaffer, Jonathan A

    2013-01-01

    Policy makers and healthcare organizations are calling for expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care settings to assure timely access and high-quality care for the American public. However, many barriers, including those at the organizational level, exist that may undermine NP workforce expansion and their optimal utilization in primary care. This study developed a new NP-specific survey instrument, Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ), to measure organizational climate in primary care settings and conducted its psychometric testing. Using instrument development design, the organizational climate domain pertinent for primary care NPs was identified. Items were generated from the evidence and qualitative data. Face and content validity were established through two expert meetings. Content validity index was computed. The 86-item pool was reduced to 55 items, which was pilot tested with 81 NPs using mailed surveys and then field-tested with 278 NPs in New York State. SPSS 18 and Mplus software were used for item analysis, reliability testing, and maximum likelihood exploratory factor analysis. Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire had face and content validity. The content validity index was .90. Twenty-nine items loaded on four subscale factors: professional visibility, NP-administration relations, NP-physician relations, and independent practice and support. The subscales had high internal consistency reliability. Cronbach's alphas ranged from.87 to .95. Having a strong instrument is important to promote future research. Also, administrators can use it to assess organizational climate in their clinics and propose interventions to improve it, thus promoting NP practice and the expansion of NP workforce.

  2. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    PubMed Central

    Paquette-Warren, Jann; Vingilis, Evelyn; Greenslade, Jaimi; Newnam, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting. PMID:17041680

  3. Optimizing full scope of practice for nurse practitioners in primary care: A proposed conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Boyd, Donald R; Clarke, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs), if utilized to their optimal potential, could play a key role in meeting the growing demand for primary care. The purpose of this study was to propose a comprehensive model for maximizing NP contributions to primary care which includes the factors affecting NP care and patient outcomes and explains their interrelated impact. We synthesized the results of the published literature to develop a model, which emphasizes NP scope of practice regulations, institutional policies, NP practice environment, and NP workforce outcomes as determinants of NP care and patient outcomes. Our model provides a framework to help explain how variations in scope of practice regulations at the state-level and institutional policies within organizations directly and indirectly influence the practice environment of NPs, NP workforce outcomes, and patient care and outcomes. Aligning policy change, organizational innovations, and future research are critical to NP optimal utilization and patient care and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Population-focused care: a new rubric in the role definition for geriatric nurse practitioners in primary care practice?

    PubMed

    Kauffman, K S; Barlow, A R

    1999-03-01

    Traditionally, geriatric nurse practitioners (GNPs) provide care to individual older adults and their families in a primary care practice. Although the goal is to provide high-quality, cost-effective care, GNPs may be providing ineffective care by narrowly focusing on individuals and their families. Given today's health care climate, it is essential that GNPs practice with a wider perspective. This is done by noting health issue trends among the specific older adult population that are targeted for care and planning that care with a population focus delineated by either health issues or characteristics of the older adult population.

  5. The establishment of a primary spine care practitioner and its benefits to health care reform in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the dramatic increase in health care costs in the United States has not led to a corresponding improvement in the health care experience of patients or the clinical outcomes of medical care. In no area of medicine is this more true than in the area of spine related disorders (SRDs). Costs of medical care for SRDs have skyrocketed in recent years. Despite this, there is no evidence of improvement in the quality of this care. In fact, disability related to SRDs is on the rise. We argue that one of the key solutions to this is for the health care system to have a group of practitioners who are trained to function as primary care practitioners for the spine. We explain the reasons we think a primary spine care practitioner would be beneficial to patients, the health care system and society, some of the obstacles that will need to be overcome in establishing a primary spine care specialty and the ways in which these obstacles can be overcome. PMID:21777444

  6. Open Mouth, Open Mind: Expanding the Role of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Clark, Carol A; Kent, Kathleen A; Jackson, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Oral health is essential to overall health at any age, although in children it is particularly important because poor oral health can have a deleterious effect on deciduous and permanent dentition. For decades, oral health providers have urged primary care providers to incorporate oral health assessment, risk factor identification, parent education, and preventive therapy into routine well-child visits. Despite recommendations from various professional associations and governmental organizations, the incidence of dental disease in young children remains relatively unchanged. Although the literature has clearly demonstrated that preventive care treatments, such as the application of fluoride varnish performed in the primary care setting, improve oral health in children, very few primary care providers include oral health services in their well-child visits. The purpose of this article is to reduce the barriers and knowledge gaps identified in recent pediatric oral health research and educate primary care nurse practitioners on the application of fluoride varnish to reduce the risk of the development of dental caries in young children. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Getting a visit: how district nurses and general practitioners 'organise' each other in primary care.

    PubMed

    Speed, Shaun; Luker, Karen A

    2006-11-01

    This paper examines the ways in which district nurses and general practitioners interacted and influenced each other's work within primary care services. The data presented here examine how the developments in the organisation of primary care affected the work of district nurses during a time of turbulent change. Qualitative data from 300 hours of participant observation and 40 semi-structured interviews with 33 district nurses were analysed using grounded theory, after which a literature review was undertaken. The findings from this study were interpreted using a Foucauldian notion of power and Fox's (1995) analysis of 'organisation'. The shift in power to general practitioners (GPs) has meant that they can exercise ever-increasing authority over nurses in their employ. Strict rules governed the process of inter-professional work and nurses and doctors used creative strategies to overcome the problems that existed between them. The data show that nurses could and did resist the power of GPs but this resistance generally elicited other more punishing forms of authority. Direct and indirect threats were commonplace. The data suggest that district nurses were moving into a closer, more business-like and tightly-controlled working relationship with general practitioners, through which competing discourses interplayed and circulated between GPs and district nurses in the organisation of primary care services.

  8. Nurse practitioner organizational climate in primary care settings: implications for professional practice.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Stone, Patricia W; Smaldone, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care is key to meeting the increased demand for care. Organizational climates in primary care settings affect NP professional practice and the quality of care. This study investigated organizational climate and its domains affecting NP professional practice in primary care settings. A qualitative descriptive design, with purposive sampling, was used to recruit 16 NPs practicing in primary care settings in Massachusetts. An interview guide was developed and pretested with two NPs and in 1 group interview with 7 NPs. Data collection took place in spring of 2011. Individual interviews lasted from 30-70 minutes, were audio recorded, and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software by 3 researchers. Content analysis was applied. Three previously identified themes, NP-physician relations, independent practice and autonomy, and professional visibility, as well as two new themes, organizational support and resources and NP-administration relations emerged from the analyses. NPs reported collegial relations with physicians, challenges in establishing independent practice, suboptimal relationships with administration, and lack of support. NP contributions to patient care were invisible. Favorable organizational climates should be promoted to support the expanding of NP workforce in primary care and to optimize recruitment and retention efforts.

  9. Enhancing youth health in primary care: lessons learned from general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dadich, Ann; Jarrett, Carmen; Robards, Fiona; Bennett, David

    2014-01-01

    Primary care represents a fundamental component of the health system, particularly for young people. However, youth access to primary care is less than ideal. To optimize clinician capacity to promote youth health, an interactive training module was developed and tailored to the needs of general practitioners. As part of an exploratory study, 11 participants were interviewed to determine the perceived capacity of the module to promote youth-friendly primary care. Findings suggest the module can enhance clinician skills, knowledge, and confidence to promote youth health; however, it has a limited ability to inform how organizational capacity might be bolstered-this includes the development of interagency networks. In this epoch of primary care reform, these findings are important for two key reasons. First, they reveal the need to bolster clinicians' perceived ability to use youth healthcare skills; second, they highlight the complementary importance of organizational support to ensure and sustain youth-friendly practices. The article concludes with a discussion of key implications for policymakers, practitioners, and researchers.

  10. Brief cognitive behavioral therapy compared to general practitioners care for depression in primary care: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Depressive disorders are highly prevalent in primary care (PC) and are associated with considerable functional impairment and increased health care use. Research has shown that many patients prefer psychological treatments to pharmacotherapy, however, it remains unclear which treatment is most optimal for depressive patients in primary care. Methods/Design A randomized, multi-centre trial involving two intervention groups: one receiving brief cognitive behavioral therapy and the other receiving general practitioner care. General practitioners from 109 General Practices in Nijmegen and Amsterdam (The Netherlands) will be asked to include patients aged between 18-70 years presenting with depressive symptomatology, who do not receive an active treatment for their depressive complaints. Patients will be telephonically assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) to ascertain study eligibility. Eligible patients will be randomized to one of two treatment conditions: either 8 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy by a first line psychologist or general practitioner's care according to The Dutch College of General Practitioners Practice Guideline (NHG- standaard). Baseline and follow-up assessments are scheduled at 0, 6, 12 and 52 weeks following the start of the intervention. Primary outcome will be measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS-17) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Outcomes will be analyzed on an intention to treat basis. Trial Registration ISRCTN65811640 PMID:20939917

  11. General practitioners' views on leadership roles and challenges in primary health care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Spehar, Ivan; Sjøvik, Hege; Karevold, Knut Ivar; Rosvold, Elin Olaug; Frich, Jan C

    2017-03-01

    To explore general practitioners' (GPs) views on leadership roles and leadership challenges in general practice and primary health care. We conducted focus groups (FGs) with 17 GPs. Norwegian primary health care. 17 GPs who attended a 5 d course on leadership in primary health care. Our study suggests that the GPs experience a need for more preparation and formal training for the leadership role, and that they experienced tensions between the clinical and leadership role. GPs recognized the need to take on leadership roles in primary care, but their lack of leadership training and credentials, and the way in which their practices were organized and financed were barriers towards their involvement. GPs experience tensions between the clinical and leadership role and note a lack of leadership training and awareness. There is a need for a more structured educational and career path for GPs, in which doctors are offered training and preparation in advance. KEY POINTS Little is known about doctors' experiences and views about leadership in general practice and primary health care. Our study suggests that: There is a lack of preparation and formal training for the leadership role. GPs experience tensions between the clinical and leadership role. GPs recognize leadership challenges at a system level and that doctors should take on leadership roles in primary health care.

  12. Revisiting scope of practice facilitators and barriers for primary care nurse practitioners: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Smaldone, Arlene; Clarke, Sean; O'Rourke, Nancy C; Rosato, Barbara G; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2013-02-01

    Revisiting scope of practice (SOP) policies for nurse practitioners (NPs) is necessary in the evolving primary care environment with goals to provide timely access, improve quality, and contain cost. This study utilized qualitative descriptive design to investigate NP roles and responsibilities as primary care providers (PCPs) in Massachusetts and their perceptions about barriers and facilitators to their SOP. Through purposive sampling, 23 NPs were recruited and they participated in group and individual interviews in spring 2011.The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software, and content analysis was applied. In addition to NP roles and responsibilities, three themes affecting NP SOP were: regulatory environment; comprehension of NP role; and work environment. NPs take on similar responsibilities as physicians to deliver primary care services; however, the regulatory environment and billing practices, lack of comprehension of the NP role, and challenging work environments limit successful NP practice.

  13. Referral to Chinese medicine practitioners in Australian primary care: a survey of New South Wales rural and regional general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chinese medicine practitioners (CMPs) play an important part in rural and regional Australian healthcare. A survey was conducted to investigate referral practices between Chinese medicine (CM) and conventional primary health care practitioners in this region. Methods A 27-item questionnaire was sent to all 1486 general practitioners (GPs) currently practising in rural and regional Divisions of General Practice in New South Wales, Australia. This survey explored GP opinions, perceptions and practices in relation to complementary and alternative medicine or Chinese medicine specifically. Results A total of 585 GPs completed the questionnaire. Forty-nine were returned as ‘no longer at this address’, resulting in an adjusted response rate of 40.7%. One in ten GPs (9.9%) had referred their patients to CMPs at least a few times over the past 12 months, one in five GPs (17.4%) could not locate a CMP to refer to in their local area, and over one-third of GPs (37.7%) stated they would not refer to a CMP under any circumstances. GPs that had graduated from an Australian medical college (OR = 3.71; CI: 1.22, 11.23), GPs observing positive responses previously in patients using CM (OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.12, 8.58), GPs perceiving a lack of other options for patients (OR = 3.10; 95% CI: 1.12, 8.58), GPs reporting satisfactory or higher levels of CM knowledge (OR = 15.62; 95% CI: 5.47, 44.56), and GPs interested in increasing their complementary and alternative medicine knowledge (OR = 3.28; 95% CI: 1.17, 9.21) referred to CMPs more frequently than did other groups of GPs amongst the rural GPs included in this study. Conclusion There has been little interaction between CMPs and Australian rural and regional GPs. PMID:23566291

  14. Suicide prevention in primary care: General practitioners' views on service availability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Primary care may be a key setting for suicide prevention. However, comparatively little is known about the services available in primary care for suicide prevention. The aims of the current study were to describe services available in general practices for the management of suicidal patients and to examine GPs views on these services. We carried out a questionnaire and interview study in the North West of England. We collected data on GPs views of suicide prevention generally as well as local mental health service provision. Findings During the study period (2003-2005) we used the National Confidential Inquiry Suicide database to identify 286 general practitioners (GPs) who had registered patients who had died by suicide. Data were collected from GPs and practice managers in 167 practices. Responses suggested that there was greater availability of services and training for general mental health issues than for suicide prevention specifically. The three key themes which emerged from GP interviews were: barriers accessing primary or secondary mental health services; obstacles faced when referring a patient to mental health services; managing change within mental health care services Conclusions Health professionals have an important role to play in preventing suicide. However, GPs expressed concerns about the quality of primary care mental health service provision and difficulties with access to secondary mental health services. Addressing these issues could facilitate future suicide prevention in primary care. PMID:20920302

  15. [Acute head injuries in primary health care--internet survey conducted with general practitioners].

    PubMed

    Luoto, Teemu M; Artsola, Minna; Helminen, Mika; Liimatainen, Suvi; Kosunen, Elise; Ohman, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Patients with head injury constitute a large population treated in primary health care. It is essential to recognize patients with traumatic brain injury among this notable population to determine the need for more specific evaluation. General practitioners (n=331) in Pirkanmaa hospital district in Finland received an email link to answer the survey. The response rate was 54.1% (n=179). Mean survey score was 20.5 points (max. 25). Only acquaintance with the national traumatic brain injury practice guidelines was associated with greater survey scores. The general practitioners' level of knowledge in managing head injuries was good. Deficiencies were found in the questions dealt with post-traumatic amnesia and the definition of traumatic brain injury.

  16. Training in Parent Consultation Skills for Primary Care Practitioners in Early Intervention in the Pre-School Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisante, Lea

    2003-01-01

    Describes the implementation of a brief behavioral intervention, based on the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program, by 13 pre-school practitioners with 39 parents. The results point to the role of primary care practitioners in providing services in settings that are easily accessed by parents, thus increasing the availability of support to parents…

  17. Veteran Affairs Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education: transforming nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Rugen, Kathryn Wirtz; Watts, Sharon A; Janson, Susan L; Angelo, Laura A; Nash, Melanie; Zapatka, Susan A; Brienza, Rebecca; Gilman, Stuart C; Bowen, Judith L; Saxe, JoAnne M

    2014-01-01

    To integrate health care professional learners into patient-centered primary care delivery models, the Department of Veterans Affairs has funded five Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCEs). The main goal of the CoEPCEs is to develop and test innovative structural and curricular models that foster transformation of health care training from profession-specific "silos" to interprofessional, team-based educational and care delivery models in patient-centered primary care settings. CoEPCE implementation emphasizes four core curricular domains: shared decision making, sustained relationships, interprofessional collaboration, and performance improvement. The structural models allow interprofessional learners to have longitudinal learning experiences and sustained and continuous relationships with patients, faculty mentors, and peer learners. This article presents an overview of the innovative curricular models developed at each site, focusing on nurse practitioner (NP) education. Insights on transforming NP education in the practice setting and its impact on traditional NP educational models are offered. Preliminary outcomes and sustainment examples are also provided.

  18. Organizational climate in primary care settings: implications for nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Clarke, Sean

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to investigate literature related to organizational climate, define organizational climate, and identify its domains for nurse practitioner (NP) practice in primary care settings. A search was conducted using MEDLINE, PubMed, HealthSTAR/Ovid, ISI Web of Science, and several other health policy and nursingy databases. In primary care settings, organizational climate for NPs is a set of organizational attributes, which are perceived by NPs about their practice setting, emerge from the way the organization interacts with NPs, and affect NP behaviors and outcomes. Autonomy, NP-physician relations, and professional visibility were identified as organizational climate domains. NPs should be encouraged to assess organizational climate in their workplace and choose organizations that promote autonomy, collegiality between NPs and physicians, and encourage professional visibility. Organizational and NP awareness of qualities that foster NP practice will be a first step for developing strategies to creating an optimal organizational climate for NPs to deliver high-quality care. More research is needed to develop a comprehensive conceptual framework for organizational climate and develop new instruments to accurately measure organizational climate and link it to NP and patient outcomes. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  19. The 5As team intervention: bridging the knowledge gap in obesity management among primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ogunleye, Ayodele; Osunlana, Adedayo; Asselin, Jodie; Cave, Andrew; Sharma, Arya Mitra; Campbell-Scherer, Denise Lynn

    2015-12-22

    Despite opportunities for didactic education on obesity management, we still observe low rates of weight management visits in our primary care setting. This paper describes the co-creation by front-line interdisciplinary health care providers and researchers of the 5As Team intervention to improve obesity prevention and management in primary care. We describe the theoretical foundations, design, and core elements of the 5AsT intervention, and the process of eliciting practitioners' self-identified knowledge gaps to inform the curricula for the 5AsT intervention. Themes and topics were identified through facilitated group discussion and a curriculum relevant to this group of practitioners was developed and delivered in a series of 12 workshops. The research question and approach were co-created with the clinical leadership of the PCN; the PCN committed internal resources and a practice facilitator to the effort. Practice facilitation and learning collaboratives were used in the intervention For the content, front-line providers identified 43 topics, related to 13 themes around obesity assessment and management for which they felt the need for further education and training. These needs included: cultural identity and body image, emotional and mental health, motivation, setting goals, managing expectations, weight-bias, caregiver fatigue, clinic dynamics and team-based care, greater understanding of physiology and the use of a systematic framework for obesity assessment (the "4Ms" of obesity). The content of the 12 intervention sessions were designed based on these themes. There was a strong innovation values fit with the 5AsT intervention, and providers were more comfortable with obesity management following the intervention. The 5AsT intervention, including videos, resources and tools, has been compiled for use by clinical teams and is available online at http://www.obesitynetwork.ca/5As_Team . Primary care interdisciplinary practitioners perceive important

  20. Patient and practitioner characteristics predict brief alcohol intervention in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, E F; Heather, N; Brodie, J; Lock, C A; McAvoy, B R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of an evidence-based health care intervention depends on it being delivered consistently to appropriate patients. Brief alcohol intervention is known to be effective at reducing excessive drinking and its concomitant health and social problems. However, a recent implementation trial reported partial delivery of brief alcohol intervention by general practitioners (GPs) which is likely to have reduced its impact. AIM: To investigate patient-practitioner characteristics influencing brief alcohol intervention in primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional analysis of 12,814 completed Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) screening questionnaires. SETTING: Eighty-four GPs who had implemented a brief alcohol intervention programme in a previous trial based in the Northeast of England. METHOD: GPs were requested to screen all adults (aged over 16 years) presenting to their surgery and follow a structured protocol to give a brief intervention (five minutes of advice plus an information booklet) to all 'risk' drinkers. Anonymized carbon copies of the screening questionnaire were collected from all practices after a three-month implementation period. RESULTS: Although AUDIT identified 4080 'risk' drinkers, only 2043 (50%) received brief intervention. Risk drinkers that were most likely to receive brief intervention were males (58%), unemployed (61%), and technically-trained patients (55%). Risk drinkers that were least likely to receive brief intervention were females (44%), students (38%), and university educated patients (46%). Logistic regression modelling showed that patients' risk status was the most influential predictor of brief intervention. Also, GPs' experience of relevant training and longer average practice consultations predicted brief intervention. However, personal characteristics relating to patients and GPs also predicted brief intervention in routine practice. CONCLUSION: Interpersonal factors relating to

  1. General practitioners' attitudes towards research in primary care: qualitative results of a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Thomas; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Background Research in General Practice requires the participation of General practitioners (GPs). In Germany there is little tradition of research in this field, and GPs are not used to be participants in research. Little is known about German GPs attitudes towards research. Therefore the aim of our study was to assess the willingness of German General Practitioners to participate in primary care research and their attitude towards research in general practice. The results should enable a more successful approach to GPs in further studies. Methods Cross sectional study using semi-structured interviews with a random sample of 76 General Practitioners who participate in the teaching of medical students at the University of Heidelberg. Results Despite little experience, over 85 % of GPs appreciated research in their field. Important reasons for scepticism about research were the gap between theoretical research and practical work of GPs and the domination of research by specialists. Main barriers for participation are clinical workload, administrative overload and the newly introduced Disease Management Programs. The highest motivation for GPs to participate in research emanates from the will to substantiate their quality of care with solid research data. Conclusions Financial incentives and personal support e.g. with study nurses are certainly necessary to establish a research culture and to overcome main barriers against participation. The most successful approach to motivate GPs to participate is to convince them that research documents their quality of care. This data may reflect the facts on which the financial resources are provided in the future health care system. PMID:15613246

  2. Placebo use in the United kingdom: results from a national survey of primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Howick, Jeremy; Bishop, Felicity L; Heneghan, Carl; Wolstenholme, Jane; Stevens, Sarah; Hobbs, F D Richard; Lewith, George

    2013-01-01

    Surveys in various countries suggest 17% to 80% of doctors prescribe 'placebos' in routine practice, but prevalence of placebo use in UK primary care is unknown. We administered a web-based questionnaire to a representative sample of UK general practitioners. Following surveys conducted in other countries we divided placebos into 'pure' and 'impure'. 'Impure' placebos are interventions with clear efficacy for certain conditions but are prescribed for ailments where their efficacy is unknown, such as antibiotics for suspected viral infections. 'Pure' placebos are interventions such as sugar pills or saline injections without direct pharmacologically active ingredients for the condition being treated. We initiated the survey in April 2012. Two reminders were sent and electronic data collection closed after 4 weeks. We surveyed 1715 general practitioners and 783 (46%) completed our questionnaire. Our respondents were similar to those of all registered UK doctors suggesting our results are generalizable. 12% (95% CI 10 to 15) of respondents used pure placebos while 97% (95% CI 96 to 98) used impure placebos at least once in their career. 1% of respondents used pure placebos, and 77% (95% CI 74 to 79) used impure placebos at least once per week. Most (66% for pure, 84% for impure) respondents stated placebos were ethical in some circumstances. Placebo use is common in primary care but questions remain about their benefits, harms, costs, and whether they can be delivered ethically. Further research is required to investigate ethically acceptable and cost-effective placebo interventions.

  3. Patient safety in primary care: a survey of general practitioners in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Gaal, Sander; Verstappen, Wim; Wensing, Michel

    2010-01-21

    Primary care encompasses many different clinical domains and patient groups, which means that patient safety in primary care may be equally broad. Previous research on safety in primary care has focused on medication safety and incident reporting. In this study, the views of general practitioners (GPs) on patient safety were examined. A web-based survey of a sample of GPs was undertaken. The items were derived from aspects of patient safety issues identified in a prior interview study. The questionnaire used 10 clinical cases and 15 potential risk factors to explore GPs' views on patient safety. A total of 68 GPs responded (51.5% response rate). None of the clinical cases was uniformly judged as particularly safe or unsafe by the GPs. Cases judged to be unsafe by a majority of the GPs concerned either the maintenance of medical records or prescription and monitoring of medication. Cases which only a few GPs judged as unsafe concerned hygiene, the diagnostic process, prevention and communication. The risk factors most frequently judged to constitute a threat to patient safety were a poor doctor-patient relationship, insufficient continuing education on the part of the GP and a patient age over 75 years. Language barriers and polypharmacy also scored high. Deviation from evidence-based guidelines and patient privacy in the reception/waiting room were not perceived as risk factors by most of the GPs. The views of GPs on safety and risk in primary care did not completely match those presented in published papers and policy documents. The GPs in the present study judged a broader range of factors than in previously published research on patient safety in primary care, including a poor doctor-patient relationship, to pose a potential threat to patient safety. Other risk factors such as infection prevention, deviation from guidelines and incident reporting were judged to be less relevant than by policy makers.

  4. A framework to assess nurse practitioner role integration in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Judith; Martin, Alietha; Senner, Wayne

    2011-03-01

    In the Canadian province of British Columbia, the nurse practitioner (NP) role was formally introduced in 2005. A participatory action research study was undertaken with NPs to examine how collaboration advances NP role integration in primary health care (PHC). The authors report on the study, in which the meaning of NP role integration was explored. The study uncovered 5 dimensions of NP role integration: autonomy, recognition, inclusion, contribution, and alliance. These dimensions, along with sample indicators, informed development of the NP Role Integration in PHC Framework. The significance of collaboration for advancing NP role integration is discussed; NP role integration is linked to the politics of PHC reform and the promise of holistic health promoting care for clients and communities. The framework has utility for policy leaders, decision-makers, and researchers in addressing barriers to role integration, supporting role evaluation, and securing and safeguarding the NP role.

  5. Usefulness of primary care electronic networks to assess the incidence of chlamydia, diagnosed by general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chlamydia is the most common curable sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the Netherlands. The majority of chlamydia diagnoses are made by general practitioners (GPs). Baseline data from primary care will facilitate the future evaluation of the ongoing large population-based screening in the Netherlands. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of electronic medical records for monitoring the incidence of chlamydia cases diagnosed in primary care in the Netherlands. Methods In the electronic records of two regional and two national networks, we identified chlamydia diagnoses by means of ICPC codes (International Classification of Primary Care), laboratory results in free text and the prescription of antibiotics. The year of study was 2007 for the two regional networks and one national network, for the other national network the year of study was 2005. We calculated the incidence of diagnosed chlamydia cases per sex, age group and degree of urbanization. Results A large diversity was observed in the way chlamydia episodes were coded in the four different GP networks and how easily information concerning chlamydia diagnoses could be extracted. The overall incidence ranged from 103.2/100,000 to 590.2/100,000. Differences were partly related to differences between patient populations. Nevertheless, we observed similar trends in the incidence of chlamydia diagnoses in all networks and findings were in line with earlier reports. Conclusions Electronic patient records, originally intended for individual patient care in general practice, can be an additional source of data for monitoring chlamydia incidence in primary care and can be of use in assessing the future impact of population-based chlamydia screening programs. To increase the usefulness of data we recommend more efforts to standardize registration by (specific) ICPC code and laboratory results across the existing GP networks. PMID:21740536

  6. Ulcerative colitis outpatient management: development and evaluation of tools to support primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A L; Buckton, S; Lawrance, I; Leong, R W; Moore, G; Andrews, J M

    2015-12-01

    Current models of care for ulcerative colitis (UC) across healthcare systems are inconsistent with a paucity of existing guidelines or supportive tools for outpatient management. This study aimed to produce and evaluate evidence-based outpatient management tools for UC to guide primary care practitioners and patients in clinical decision-making. Three tools were developed after identifying current gaps in the provision of healthcare services for patients with UC at a Clinical Insights Meeting in 2013. Draft designs were further refined through consultation and consolidation of feedback by the steering committee. Final drafts were developed following feasibility testing in three key stakeholder groups (gastroenterologists, general practitioners and patients) by questionnaire. The tools were officially launched into mainstream use in Australia in 2014. Three quarters of all respondents liked the layout and content of each tool. Minimal safety concerns were aired and those, along with pieces of information that were felt to be omitted, that were reviewed by the steering committee and incorporated into the final documents. The majority (over 80%) of respondents felt that the tools would be useful and would improve outpatient management of UC. Evidence-based outpatient clinical management tools for UC can be developed. The concept and end-product have been well received by all stakeholder groups. These tools should support non-specialist clinicians to optimise UC management and empower patients by facilitating them to safely self-manage and identify when medical support is needed. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Placebo Use in the United Kingdom: Results from a National Survey of Primary Care Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Howick, Jeremy; Bishop, Felicity L.; Heneghan, Carl; Wolstenholme, Jane; Stevens, Sarah; Hobbs, F. D. Richard; Lewith, George

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Surveys in various countries suggest 17% to 80% of doctors prescribe ‘placebos’ in routine practice, but prevalence of placebo use in UK primary care is unknown. Methods We administered a web-based questionnaire to a representative sample of UK general practitioners. Following surveys conducted in other countries we divided placebos into ‘pure’ and ‘impure’. ‘Impure’ placebos are interventions with clear efficacy for certain conditions but are prescribed for ailments where their efficacy is unknown, such as antibiotics for suspected viral infections. ‘Pure’ placebos are interventions such as sugar pills or saline injections without direct pharmacologically active ingredients for the condition being treated. We initiated the survey in April 2012. Two reminders were sent and electronic data collection closed after 4 weeks. Results We surveyed 1715 general practitioners and 783 (46%) completed our questionnaire. Our respondents were similar to those of all registered UK doctors suggesting our results are generalizable. 12% (95% CI 10 to 15) of respondents used pure placebos while 97% (95% CI 96 to 98) used impure placebos at least once in their career. 1% of respondents used pure placebos, and 77% (95% CI 74 to 79) used impure placebos at least once per week. Most (66% for pure, 84% for impure) respondents stated placebos were ethical in some circumstances. Conclusion and implications Placebo use is common in primary care but questions remain about their benefits, harms, costs, and whether they can be delivered ethically. Further research is required to investigate ethically acceptable and cost-effective placebo interventions. PMID:23526969

  8. Nurse practitioner screening for childhood adversity among adult primary care patients: A mixed-method study.

    PubMed

    Kalmakis, Karen A; Chandler, Genevieve E; Roberts, Susan Jo; Leung, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated an association between experiencing childhood abuse and multiple chronic health conditions in adulthood, yet this evidence has not been routinely translated to practice. The purpose of this research study was to examine nurse practitioner (NP) practices, skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers associated with screening adult patients for childhood abuse to determine the extent to which evidence of the association between childhood abuse and negative health outcomes has been translated to NP practice. A mixed-method approach with web-based questionnaires and online focus groups was used to examine NP screening for histories of childhood abuse. A total of 188 complete NP surveys were analyzed along with data from focus groups with 12 NPs. One third of the NPs regularly screened for childhood abuse and believed screening was their responsibility. Six barriers, including insufficient time and lack of confidence when inquiring about abuse, were significantly associated with NP screening practices. The focus group participants discussed how and when one should ask about childhood abuse, and the need for education about screening. Time constraints and NPs' lack of confidence in their ability to screen for histories of childhood abuse must be addressed to encourage routine screening in primary care practice. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Teamwork in primary care: perspectives of general practitioners and community nurses in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A team approach in primary care has proven benefits in achieving better outcomes, reducing health care costs, satisfying patient needs, ensuring continuity of care, increasing job satisfaction among health providers and using human health care resources more efficiently. However, some research indicates constraints in collaboration within primary health care (PHC) teams in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon of teamwork in Lithuania by exploring the experiences of teamwork by general practitioners (GPs) and community nurses (CNs) involved in PHC. Methods Six focus groups were formed with 29 GPs and 27 CNs from the Kaunas Region of Lithuania. Discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis of these data was then performed. Results The analysis of focus group data identified six thematic categories related to teamwork in PHC: the structure of a PHC team, synergy among PHC team members, descriptions of roles and responsibilities of team members, competencies of PHC team members, communications between PHC team members and the organisational background for teamwork. These findings provide the basis for a discussion of a thematic model of teamwork that embraces formal, individual and organisational factors. Conclusions The need for effective teamwork in PHC is an issue receiving broad consensus; however, the process of teambuilding is often taken for granted in the PHC sector in Lithuania. This study suggests that both formal and individual behavioural factors should be targeted when aiming to strengthen PHC teams. Furthermore, this study underscores the need to provide explicit formal descriptions of the roles and responsibilities of PHC team members in Lithuania, which would include establishing clear professional boundaries. The training of team members is an essential component of the teambuilding process, but not sufficient by itself. PMID:23945286

  10. Teamwork in primary care: perspectives of general practitioners and community nurses in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Liseckiene, Ida; Valius, Leonas; Kontrimiene, Ausrine; Jarusevicius, Gediminas; Lapão, Luís Velez

    2013-08-15

    A team approach in primary care has proven benefits in achieving better outcomes, reducing health care costs, satisfying patient needs, ensuring continuity of care, increasing job satisfaction among health providers and using human health care resources more efficiently. However, some research indicates constraints in collaboration within primary health care (PHC) teams in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon of teamwork in Lithuania by exploring the experiences of teamwork by general practitioners (GPs) and community nurses (CNs) involved in PHC. Six focus groups were formed with 29 GPs and 27 CNs from the Kaunas Region of Lithuania. Discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis of these data was then performed. The analysis of focus group data identified six thematic categories related to teamwork in PHC: the structure of a PHC team, synergy among PHC team members, descriptions of roles and responsibilities of team members, competencies of PHC team members, communications between PHC team members and the organisational background for teamwork. These findings provide the basis for a discussion of a thematic model of teamwork that embraces formal, individual and organisational factors. The need for effective teamwork in PHC is an issue receiving broad consensus; however, the process of teambuilding is often taken for granted in the PHC sector in Lithuania. This study suggests that both formal and individual behavioural factors should be targeted when aiming to strengthen PHC teams. Furthermore, this study underscores the need to provide explicit formal descriptions of the roles and responsibilities of PHC team members in Lithuania, which would include establishing clear professional boundaries. The training of team members is an essential component of the teambuilding process, but not sufficient by itself.

  11. Attitudes towards domestic violence in Lebanon: a qualitative study of primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Usta, Jinan; Feder, Gene; Antoun, Jumana

    2014-06-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is highly prevalent in the developing and developed world. Healthcare systems internationally are still not adequately addressing the needs of patients experiencing violence. To explore physicians' attitudes about responding to DV, their perception of the physician's role, and the factors that influence their response. Qualitative study using individual interviews among primary care practitioners working in Lebanon. Primary care clinicians practising for >5 years and with >100 patient consultations a week were interviewed. Physicians were asked about their practice when encountering women disclosing abuse, their opinion about the engagement of the health services with DV, their potential role, and the anticipated reaction of patients and society to this extended role. Physicians felt that they were well positioned to play a pivotal role in addressing DV; yet they had concerns related to personal safety, worry about losing patients, and opposing the norms of a largely conservative society. Several physicians justified DV or blamed the survivor rather than the perpetrator for triggering the violent behaviour. Moreover, religion was perceived as sanctioning DV. Perceived cultural norms and religious beliefs seem to be major barriers to physicians responding to DV in Lebanon, and possibly in the Arab world more generally. Financial concerns also need to be addressed to encourage physicians to address DV. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  12. Activities and Attributes of Nurse Practitioner Leaders: Lessons from a Primary Care System Change.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Tammy; Higuchi, Kathryn Smith

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are being encouraged to practice to the full extent of their skills, and they have a critical role to play in leading health system reform. The evidence in support of NP-led initiatives is growing; however, in spite of the positive outcomes associated with these initiatives, considerable opposition to and debate about the potential for NPs to lead health system change and interprofessional teams continues. To date, we know very little about NP leadership activities, particularly those activities that contribute to primary care system change, and there are very few examples of this type of leadership. The qualitative descriptive study here was part of a larger case study that examined stakeholder participation in a system change led by NPs. The change involved the introduction of a new NP-led model of team-based primary care delivery in Ontario, Canada. Data from participant interviews and public documents were analyzed to describe the activities and attributes (perseverance, risk-taking and effective communication) of two NP leaders who were the drivers of this change. Knowledge of these activities and attributes has the potential to inform NP leadership roles in health system policy planning and implementation. However, to be able to provide effective leadership in system change, NPs need access to educational content about public policy and opportunities to develop and practice the skills required to work with multiple stakeholders, including those who oppose change.

  13. Management of orthodontic emergencies in primary care - self-reported confidence of general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Popat, H; Thomas, K; Farnell, D J J

    2016-07-08

    Objective To determine general dental practitioners' (GDPs) confidence in managing orthodontic emergencies.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Primary dental care.Subjects and methods An online survey was distributed to dentists practicing in Wales. The survey collected basic demographic information and included descriptions of ten common orthodontic emergency scenarios.Main outcome measure Respondents' self-reported confidence in managing the orthodontic emergency scenarios on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences between the Likert responses and the demographic variables were investigated using chi-squared tests.Results The median number of orthodontic emergencies encountered by respondents over the previous six months was 1. Overall, the self-reported confidence of respondents was high with 7 of the 10 scenarios presented scoring a median of 4 indicating that GDPs were 'confident' in their management. Statistical analysis revealed that GDPs who saw more orthodontic emergencies in the previous six months were more confident when managing the presented scenarios. Other variables such as age, gender, geographic location of practice and number of years practising dentistry were not associated with self-reported confidence.Conclusions Despite GDPs encountering very few orthodontic emergencies in primary care, they appear to be confident in dealing with commonly arising orthodontic emergency situations.

  14. Nurse practitioners as primary care providers with their own patient panels and organizational structures: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang; Norful, Allison A

    2017-05-25

    Health care systems globally are facing challenges of meeting the growing demand for primary care services due to a shortage of primary care physicians. Policy makers and administrators are searching for solutions to increase the primary care capacity. The effective utilization of nurse practitioners (NPs) has been proposed as a solution. However, organizations utilize NPs in variable capacities. In some settings, NPs serve as primary care providers delivering ongoing continuous care to their patients, referred to as patient panels, whereas in other settings they deliver episodic care. Little is known about why organizations deploy NPs differently. Investigate the NP role in care delivery-primary care providers with the own patient panels or delivering episodic care-within their organizations and understand how work environments affect their role. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from primary care NPs. The study was conducted in one state in the United States (Massachusetts). Data from 163 primary care organizations was obtained, which employed between one to 12 NPs. 807 NPs recruited from the Massachusetts Provider Database received mail surveys; 314 completed and returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 40%. The survey contained measures of NP role in care delivery and work environment. NP role was measured by an item asking NPs to report if they deliver ongoing continuous care to their patient panel or if they do not have patient panel. The work environment was measured with the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ). The multilevel Cox regression models investigated the influence of organization-level work environment on NP role in care delivery. About 45% of NPs served as primary care providers with their own patient panel. Organization-level Independent Practice and Support subscale, an NP-PCOCQ subscale, had a significant positive effect on NP role (risk ratio=2.33; 95% CI: 1

  15. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  16. Comparing the Cost of Care Provided to Medicare Beneficiaries Assigned to Primary Care Nurse Practitioners and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Perloff, Jennifer; DesRoches, Catherine M; Buerhaus, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to assess the cost of services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by nurse practitioners (NPs) billing under their own National Provider Identification number as compared to primary care physicians (PCMDs). Medicare Part A (inpatient) and Part B (office visit) claims for 2009-2010. Retrospective cohort design using propensity score weighted regression. Beneficiaries cared for by a random sample of NPs and primary care physicians. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, geography, comorbidities, and the propensity to see an NP, Medicare evaluation and management payments for beneficiaries assigned to an NP were $207, or 29 percent, less than PCMD assigned beneficiaries. The same pattern was observed for inpatient and total office visit paid amounts, with 11 and 18 percent less for NP assigned beneficiaries, respectively. Results are similar for the work component of relative value units as well. This study provides new evidence of the lower cost of care for beneficiaries managed by NPs, as compared to those managed by PCMDs across inpatient and office-based settings. Results suggest that increasing access to NP primary care will not increase costs for the Medicare program and may be cost saving. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners.

  18. Skin tumour surgery in primary care: do general practitioners need to improve their surgical skills?

    PubMed

    van Rijsingen, Margit C J; Vossen, Robin; van Huystee, Barbara E W L; Gorgels, Wim J M J; Gerritsen, Marie-Jeanne P

    2015-01-01

    Due to a rapid increase in the incidence of skin cancer, it seems inevitable that general practitioners (GPs) will play a larger role in skin cancer care. To assess surgical procedures used by GPs in skin tumour management. We performed a retrospective study of 1,898 pathology reports of skin tumours excised by GPs in 2009. In 22.9% no diagnosis was provided on the application form. Mostly, once-off excisions (no preceding biopsy) were performed, 7% of the excised lesions were malignant, and 35% of incisions were incomplete. Excisions in the face and neck region were incomplete in 65.4%; 22% of melanomas were biopsied or shaved. This study underlines the difficulties in skin tumour management in primary care. To stimulate adequate resource use, the number of excisions of benign lesions could be lowered, and pretreatment biopsy in non-melanoma skin cancer management should be encouraged. GPs should be aware of their limitations and consider referral of high-risk malignancies.

  19. Partnership in Education: Preparation of the Family Nurse-Practitioner for Primary Care in Rural Health Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Judith T.

    A model program to educate primary care nurse-practitioners for rural areas illustrates successful collaboration between university and rural health settings. Part of the Intercampus Graduate Studies program of the University of California--San Francisco School of Nursing and the University of California--San Diego School of Medicine, the model…

  20. Under the same roof: co-location of practitioners within primary care is associated with specialized chronic care management.

    PubMed

    Rumball-Smith, Juliet; Wodchis, Walter P; Koné, Anna; Kenealy, Tim; Barnsley, Jan; Ashton, Toni

    2014-09-02

    International and national bodies promote interdisciplinary care in the management of people with chronic conditions. We examine one facilitative factor in this team-based approach - the co-location of non-physician disciplines within the primary care practice. We used survey data from 330 General Practices in Ontario, Canada and New Zealand, as a part of a multinational study using The Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe (QUALICOPC) surveys. Logistic and linear multivariable regression models were employed to examine the association between the number of disciplines working within the practice, and the capacity of the practice to offer specialized and preventive care for patients with chronic conditions. We found that as the number of non-physicians increased, so did the availability of special sessions/clinics for patients with diabetes (odds ratio 1.43, 1.25-1.65), hypertension (1.20, 1.03-1.39), and the elderly (1.22, 1.05-1.42). Co-location was also associated with the provision of disease management programs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and asthma; the equipment available in the centre; and the extent of nursing services. The care of people with chronic disease is the 'challenge of the century'. Co-location of practitioners may improve access to services and equipment that aid chronic disease management.

  1. Consultations in primary care for symptoms attributed to electromagnetic fields – a survey among general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Anke; Röösli, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Five percent of the Swiss population attribute symptoms to electromagnetic fields (EMF). General practitioners (GPs) might play a key role in recognising an emerging health risk, since they are the first to observe and follow up persons who attribute symptoms to EMF. It is unclear to what extent EMFs have become an issue in general practice and which experiences GPs report from the consultations. Methods We conducted telephone interviews in a random sample of GPs in Switzerland in order to assess the frequency of consultations in primary care due to EMF and the GPs' experience with these patients. Results 342 general practitioners were interviewed, corresponding to a response rate of 28.2%. 69% of the GPs reported at least one consultation due to EMF, but GPs with a certificate in complementary medicine were much more likely to report EMF consultations. The median of EMF consultation numbers within one year was three. An overview of the most recent EMF-related consultation per GP yielded sleep disorders, headaches and fatigue as the most often reported symptoms and mobile phone base stations, power lines and the own use of mobile phones as the main EMF sources suspected to be associated to symptoms. GPs judged the association between EMF and the symptoms to be plausible in 54% of the cases. There was no combination of symptoms and EMF sources that was remarkably and consistently judged to be a plausible cause of the symptoms. Conclusion In our survey, GPs often judged the association between the health problems and the suspected exposure to be plausible. This plausibility assessment seems to be based on grounds of preventive positions in a situation of scientific uncertainty. More research effort is needed to obtain more insight on a potential association between long term EMF exposure and unspecific symptoms. PMID:17074080

  2. The nurse practitioner-client therapeutic encounter: an integrative review of interaction in aged and primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Michael; Stirling, Christine; Robinson, Andrew; Minstrell, Melinda

    2016-09-01

    To review the key features of the nurse practitioner-client interaction in the thera-peutic encounter to inform the development of nurse practitioner-led memory clinics. Nurse practitioners spend significant time interacting with clients and their families/caregivers yet there is limited research on this interaction during therapeutic encounters in aged and primary care contexts. Integrative review. Electronic search of CINAHL, Embase, Medline, PsychINFO, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science 2004-2013; hand search of the Journal of Advanced Nursing, Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and Journal of Clinical Nursing. Integrative literature review using Whittemore and Knafl's methodology. Ten published studies were included, representing over 900 nurse practitioners and their clients. Three key factors of nurse practitioner-client interaction were identified: nurse practitioner expertise and the influence of the therapeutic encounter context; affirming exchange as a bedrock of communication; and high levels of client engagement. In aged and primary care settings, where the therapeutic encounter requires and allows longer consultations, such as nurse practitioner-led memory clinics, patient-centred approaches can engage clients in consultations using a biopsychosocial framework, resulting in improved client satisfaction and, potentially, increased adherence to treatment plans. Nurse practitioners who are open and respectful, who encourage patients to provide more information about their lives and condition and are perceived by the client to be empathetic, are providing affirmation to the client. Affirming interactions are a key feature of successful therapeutic encounters when time and context do not allow or warrant the full repertoire of patient-centred communication. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. An Overview of the Peer Assessment Rating (par) Index for Primary Dental Care Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Green, James Ij

    2016-11-01

    The Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index is a valid and reliable measure of orthodontic treatment outcome and is the most widely accepted such index. Assessing outcomes with the PAR index requires the examination of pre-treatment and post-treatment orthodontic study models. Beginning with the pre-treatment models, a score is given to each feature that deviates from an ideal occlusion (all anatomical contact points adjacent, good interdigitation between posterior teeth and non-excessive overjet/overbite), the scores are then added together to give a total that represents the severity of the malocclusion. The process is then repeated with the post-treatment models. The difference between the pre-treatment and the post-treatment scores reflects the improvement that has taken place during treatment. A score of zero represents an ideal occlusion and in general the higher the score, the more extensive the malocclusion. It is currently a condition of the NHS orthodontic contract for providers to monitor a proportion of their cases using the PAR index. This paper aims to provide primary dental care practitioners with an overview of the PAR index and should provide a useful guide for those wishing to seek calibration in the use of the index.

  4. General practitioners' perspectives of education and collaboration with physiotherapists in Primary Health Care: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Paz-Lourido, Berta; Kuisma, Raija M E

    2013-05-01

    This paper explores the educational factors that underlie the poor collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and physiotherapists (PTs) in Primary Health Care (PHC), from the GP's perspective. This study was conducted in Majorca, the Balearic Islands (Spain). Participants were nine GPs who graduated from different universities in mainland Spain. A discourse analysis study was developed employing the social-critical paradigm as theoretical framework and in-depth interviews for data collection. The perceived lack of knowledge about physiotherapy was considered by the interviewees as a major factor in the current poor communication between GPs and PTs. The individual learning during medical studies and poor interprofessional learning during clinical residency influenced their gatekeeper role, putting at risk the equity of the health system. Collaboration was considered beneficial for patients but challenging to improve in context due to multiple factors ranging from individual to systemic. The latter encompasses inadequate resources and organization for interprofessional learning. There is a need to further explore other factors influencing the poor collaboration, including PTs' views on this process.

  5. Recruiting general practitioners as participants for qualitative and experimental primary care studies in Australia.

    PubMed

    McKinn, Shannon; Bonner, Carissa; Jansen, Jesse; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Recruiting general practitioners (GPs) for participation in primary care research is vitally important, but it can be very difficult for researchers to engage time-poor GPs. This paper describes six different strategies used by a research team recruiting Australian GPs for three qualitative interview studies and one experimental study, and reports the response rates and costs incurred. Strategies included: (1) mailed invitations via Divisions of General Practice; (2) electronic newsletters; (3) combining mailed invitations and newsletter; (4) in-person recruitment at GP conferences; (5) conference satchel inserts; and (6) combining in-person recruitment and satchel inserts. Response rates ranged from 0 (newsletter) to 30% (in-person recruitment). Recruitment costs perparticipant ranged from A$83 (in-person recruitment) to A$232 (satchel inserts). Mailed invitations can be viable for qualitative studies, especially when free/low-cost mailing lists are used, if the response rate is less important. In-person recruitment at GP conferences can be effective for short quantitative studies, where a higher response rate is important. Newsletters and conference satchel inserts were expensive and ineffective.

  6. Training practitioners to deliver opportunistic multiple behaviour change counselling in primary care: a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Sharon A; Hood, Kerenza; Cohen, David; Pickles, Tim; Spanou, Clio; McCambridge, Jim; Moore, Laurence; Randell, Elizabeth; Alam, M Fasihul; Kinnersley, Paul; Edwards, Adrian; Smith, Christine; Rollnick, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of training primary care health professionals in behaviour change counselling on the proportion of patients self reporting change in four risk behaviours (smoking, alcohol use, exercise, and healthy eating). Design Cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of randomisation. Setting General practices in Wales. Participants 53 general practitioners and practice nurses from 27 general practices (one each at all but one practice) recruited 1827 patients who screened positive for at least one risky behaviour. Intervention Behaviour change counselling was developed from motivational interviewing to enable clinicians to enhance patients’ motivation to change health related behaviour. Clinicians were trained using a blended learning programme called Talking Lifestyles. Main outcome measures Proportion of patients who reported making beneficial changes in at least one of the four risky behaviours at three months. Results 1308 patients from 13 intervention and 1496 from 14 control practices were approached: 76% and 72% respectively agreed to participate, with 831 (84%) and 996 (92%) respectively screening eligible for an intervention. There was no effect on the primary outcome (beneficial change in behaviour) at three months (362 (44%) v 404 (41%), odds ratio 1.12 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.39)) or on biochemical or biometric measures at 12 months. More patients who had consulted with trained clinicians recalled consultation discussion about a health behaviour (724/795 (91%) v 531/966 (55%), odds ratio 12.44 (5.85 to 26.46)) and intended to change (599/831 (72%) v 491/996 (49%), odds ratio 2.88 (2.05 to 4.05)). More intervention practice patients reported making an attempt to change (328 (39%) v 317 (32%), odds ratio 1.40 (1.15 to 1.70)), a sustained behaviour change at three months (288 (35%) v 280 (28%), odds ratio 1.36 (1.11 to 1.65)), and reported slightly greater improvements in healthy eating at three and 12 months, plus

  7. Association of State-Level Restrictions in Nurse Practitioner Scope of Practice With the Quality of Primary Care Provided to Medicare Beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Perloff, Jennifer; Clarke, Sean; DesRoches, Catherine M; O'Reilly-Jacob, Monica; Buerhaus, Peter

    2017-09-01

    State scope of practice (SoP) laws impose significant restrictions on the services that a nurse practitioner (NP) may provide in some states, yet evidence about SoP limitations on the quality of primary care is very limited. This study uses six different classifications of state regulations and bivariate and multivariate analyses to compare beneficiaries attributed to primary care nurse practitioners and primary care physicians in 2013 testing two hypotheses: (1) chronic disease management, cancer screening, preventable hospitalizations, and adverse outcomes of care provided by primary care nurse practitioners are better in reduced and restricted practice states compared to states without restrictions and (2) by decreasing access to care, SoP restrictions negatively affect the quality of primary care. Results show a lack of consistent association between quality of primary care provided by NPs and state SoP restrictions. State regulations restricting NP SoP do not improve the quality of care.

  8. Entry-Level Competencies Required of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners Providing HIV Specialty Care: A National Practice Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Relf, Michael V; Harmon, James L

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only 30% of HIV-infected persons are diagnosed, engaged in care, provided antiretroviral therapy, and virologically suppressed. Competent HIV care providers are needed to achieve optimal clinical outcomes for all people living with HIV, but 69% of Ryan White Clinics in the United States report difficulty recruiting HIV clinicians, and one in three current HIV specialty physicians are expected to retire in the next decade. Nurse practitioners who specialize in HIV and have caseloads with large numbers of HIV-infected patients have care outcomes that are equal to or better than that provided by physicians, especially generalist non-HIV specialist physicians. We designed a national practice validation study to help prepare the next generation of primary care nurse practitioners who desire to specialize in HIV. This manuscript reports the results of the national study and identifies entry-level competencies for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners specializing in HIV.

  9. Nurse practitioner-physician comanagement of primary care patients: The promise of a new delivery care model to improve quality of care.

    PubMed

    Norful, Allison Andreno; Swords, Kyleen; Marichal, Mickaela; Cho, Hwayoung; Poghosyan, Lusine

    2017-04-25

    The U.S. primary care system is under tremendous strain to deliver care to an increased volume of patients with a concurrent primary care physician shortage. Nurse practitioner (NP)-physician comanagement of primary care patients has been proposed by some policy makers to help alleviate this strain. To date, no collective evidence demonstrates the effects of NP-physician comanagement in primary care. This is the first review to synthesize all available studies that compare the effects of NP-physician comanagement to an individual physician managing primary care. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) framework guided the conduct of this systematic review. Five electronic databases were searched. Titles, abstracts, and full texts were reviewed, and inclusion/exclusion criteria were applied to narrow search results to eligible studies. Quality appraisal was performed using Downs and Black's quality checklist for randomized and nonrandomized studies. Six studies were identified for synthesis. Three outcome categories emerged: (a) primary care provider adherence to recommended care guidelines, (b) empirical changes in clinical patient outcomes, and (c) patient/caregiver quality of life. Significantly more recommended care guidelines were completed with NP-physician comanagement. There was variability of clinical patient outcomes with some findings favoring the comanagement model. Limited differences in patient quality of life were found. Across all studies, the NP-physician comanagementcare delivery model was determined to produce no detrimental effect on measured outcomes and, in some cases, was more beneficial in reaching practice and clinical targets. The use of NP-physician comanagement of primary care patients is a promising delivery care model to improve the quality of care delivery and alleviate organizational strain given the current demands of increased patient panel sizes and primary care physician shortages. Future

  10. Cardiovascular risk scores: qualitative study of how primary care practitioners understand and use them.

    PubMed

    Liew, Su May; Blacklock, Claire; Hislop, Jenny; Glasziou, Paul; Mant, David

    2013-06-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines and the Quality Outcomes Framework require practitioners to use cardiovascular risk scores in assessments for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. To explore GPs understanding and use of cardiovascular risk scores. Qualitative study with purposive maximum variation sampling of 20 GPs working in Oxfordshire, UK. Method Thematic analysis of transcriptions of face-to-face interviews with participants undertaken by two individuals (one clinical, one non-clinical). GPs use cardiovascular risk scores primarily to guide treatment decisions by estimating the risk of a vascular event if the patient remains untreated. They expressed considerable uncertainty about how and whether to take account of existing drug treatment or other types of prior risk modification. They were also unclear about the choice between the older scores, based on the Framingham study, and newer scores, such as QRISK. There was substantial variation in opinion about whether scores could legitimately be used to illustrate to patients the change in risk as a result of treatment. The overall impression was of considerable confusion. The drive to estimate risk more precisely by qualifying guidance and promoting new scores based on partially-treated populations appears to have created unnecessary confusion for little obvious benefit. National guidance needs to be simplified, and, to be fit for purpose, better reflect the ways in which cardiovascular risk scores are currently used in general practice. Patients may be better served by simple advice to use a Framingham score and exercise more clinical judgement, explaining to patients the necessary imprecision of any individual estimate of risk.

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as part of primary health care in Germany-comparison of patients consulting general practitioners and CAM practitioners: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Krug, Katja; Kraus, Katharina I; Herrmann, Kathrin; Joos, Stefanie

    2016-10-24

    In Germany, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in primary health care is offered by general practitioners (GPs) and by natural health practitioners, so called 'Heilpraktiker' (HPs). Considering the steadily growing number of unregulated HPs, the aim of the study was to assess characteristics of patients consulting HPs in comparison to patients consulting GPs. In a cross-sectional study, patients of randomly selected GPs and HPs were asked to complete a questionnaire about their health care status, health care behavior, and symptoms rated on the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP-D). Patient groups were compared based on health care provider (HP, GP with high use of CAM (CAM-GP), and GP with no/little use of CAM (nCAM-GP)) using Kruskal-Wallis tests and analyses of variance (ANOVA). Altogether, 567 patients (91 of 11 HPs, 223 of 15 CAM-GPs, 253 of 19 nCAM-GPs) filled in the questionnaire. Patients of HPs had a higher education level and were more often female. The most common reason for encounter among all three groups were musculoskeletal problems (30.2-31.1 %). Patients seeing HPs reported more psychological (4.4 % vs. 17.8 %), but less respiratory problems (19.9 % vs. 7.8 %), and longer symptom duration (>5 years: 21.1 % vs. 40.7 %), than patients of nCAM-GPs. The high percentage of patients with psychological illness and chronic health problems consulting HPs demonstrates the urgent need for action with regard to CAM therapy in primary care and regulation of natural health practitioners. Appropriate measures with regard to quality and patient safety should be taken given the growing numbers of HPs and the absence of a regulatory body.

  12. Early return visits by primary care patients: a retail nurse practitioner clinic versus standard medical office care.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, James E; Angstman, Kurt B; Garrison, Gregory

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare return visits made by patients within 2 weeks after using retail nurse practitioner clinics to return visits made by similar patients after using standard medical office clinics. Retail medicine clinics have become widely available. However, their impact on return visit rates compared to standard medical office visits for similar patients has not been extensively studied. Electronic medical records of adult primary care patients seen in a large group practice in Minnesota in 2009 were analyzed for this study. Patients who were treated for sinusitis were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: those who used one of 2 retail walk-in clinics staffed by nurse practitioners and a comparison group who used one of 4 regular office clinics. The dependent variable was a return office visit to any site within 2 weeks. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for case-mix differences between groups. Unadjusted odds of return visits were lower for retail clinic patients than for standard office care patients. After adjustment for case mix, patients with more outpatient visits in the previous 6 months had higher odds of return visits within 2 weeks (2-6 prior visits: odds ratio [OR]=1.99, P=0.00; 6 or more prior visits: OR=6.80, P=0.00). The odds of a return visit within 2 weeks were not different by clinic type after adjusting for propensity to use services (OR=1.17, P=0.28). After adjusting for case mix differences, return visit rates did not differ by clinic type.

  13. General practitioners' procedures for sexual history taking and treating sexual dysfunction in primary care.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Alarcão, Violeta; Simões, Rui; Miranda, Filipe Leão; Carreira, Mário; Galvão-Teles, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Good history-taking skills are the first step towards achieving a correct diagnosis of sexual dysfunction (SD). However, studies show most general practitioners (GPs) do not take the initiative to ask the patient about SD, and when diagnosing a condition, they tend to give preference to their own criteria over clinical guidelines. The aim of this study is to characterize GPs' attitudes towards taking sexual history, identifying its frequency and focus, and to describe GPs' diagnostics and therapeutic approaches including the use of clinical guidelines, exploring patients' and doctor-related differences. Cross-sectional study using confidential self-administrated questionnaires applied to GPs working in primary healthcare units in the Lisbon region. Data concerning GPs' consultation of guidelines, active exploration of SD in male and in female patients, and focus on sexual history taking was collected. Of the 50 participants (73.5% response rate), 15.5% actively ask their patients about SD. The main reasons for asking patients about their sexuality are diabetes (84.0%), prescription of medication with adverse effects on sexuality (78.0%), and family planning (72.0%), the latter being a significantly more frequent reason for GPs with 20 or less years of practice. Routine sexual history taking (22.0%) appears as one of the least mentioned motives. The percentage of appointments with active exploration of SD was positively associated with guidelines' consultation, as well as considering the specialty as a good source of information and having longer appointments when SD is mentioned. However, 76.0% report not having consulted any guidelines in the previous year. Lack of time (31.6%) and low accessibility (25.0%) were referred to as the main reasons for not consulting guidelines. Routine sexual history taking and consultation of guidelines about SD are not yet a generalized practice in primary care. Data should be interpreted with caution as they are self

  14. Knowledge and attitudes of primary care physicians toward the nurse practitioner role in the Kingdom of Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Nasaif, Husain Ali

    2012-03-01

    The Kingdom of Bahrain is facing a number of challenges, including an escalating cost of health services, increasing incidence of chronic diseases, and shortage of primary care physicians (PCPs). Introducing the nurse practitioner (NP) specialty in the primary care setting is one way to meet these challenges. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the knowledge and attitudes of PCPs about the NP role prior to and following an educational intervention. The modified Northern Emergency Nurse Practitioner Staff Survey was used to measure the PCPs' attitudes and knowledge. A total of 90 PCPs completed the pretest and posttest. The study findings showed that PCPs had poor understanding of the NP role. Their knowledge and attitudes changed significantly after the educational intervention. Also, posttest data indicated a positive correlation between knowledge and attitudes toward the NP role. More educational preparation and orientation to the NP role for PCPs and other healthcare professionals are needed before the implementation of the role in the primary care setting in Bahrain. There is a need for the role to be clearly defined prior to implementation to help gain understanding and acceptance. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Prescribing exercise for older adults: A needs assessment comparing primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Dauenhauer, Jason A; Podgorski, Carol A; Karuza, Jurgis

    2006-01-01

    To inform the development of educational programming designed to teach providers appropriate methods of exercise prescription for older adults, the authors conducted a survey of 177 physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners (39% response rate). The survey was designed to better understand the prevalence of exercise prescriptions, attitudes, barriers, and educational needs of primary care practitioners toward older adults. Forty-seven percent of primary care providers report not prescribing exercise for older adults; 85% of the sample report having no formal training in exercise prescription. Practitioner attitudes were positive toward exercise, but were not predictive of their exercise prescribing behavior, which indicates that education efforts aimed at changing attitudes as a way of increasing exercise-prescribing behaviors would not be sufficient. In order to facilitate and reinforce practice changes to increase exercise-prescribing behaviors of primary care providers, results suggest the need for specific skill training on how to write an exercise prescription and motivate older adults to follow these prescriptions.

  16. A case study of nurse practitioner role implementation in primary care: what happens when new roles are introduced?

    PubMed

    Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Burge, Fred

    2013-01-23

    At the time of this study (2009) the role of the nurse practitioner was new to the province of British Columbia. The provincial government gave the responsibility for implementing the role to health authorities. Managers of health authorities, many of whom were unfamiliar with the role, were responsible for identifying the need for the NP role, determining how the NP would function, and gaining team members' acceptance for the new role. The purpose of the study was to explain the process of nurse practitioner role implementation as it was occurring and to identify factors that could enhance the implementation process. An explanatory, single case study with embedded units of analysis was used. The technique of explanation building was used in data analysis. Three primary health care settings in one health authority in British Columbia were purposively selected. Data sources included semi-structured interviews with participants (n=16) and key documents. The results demonstrate the complexity of implementing a new role in settings unfamiliar with it. The findings suggest that early in the implementation process and after the nurse practitioner was hired, team members needed to clarify intentions for the role and they looked to senior health authority managers for assistance. Acceptance of the nurse practitioner was facilitated by team members' prior knowledge of either the role or the individual nurse practitioner. Community health care providers needed to be involved in the implementation process and their acceptance developed as they gained knowledge and understanding of the role. The findings suggest that the interconnectedness of the concepts of intention, involvement and acceptance influences the implementation process and how the nurse practitioner is able to function in the setting. Without any one of the three concepts not only is implementation difficult, but it is also challenging for the nurse practitioner to fulfill role expectations. Implications for

  17. Role of Geography and Nurse Practitioner Scope-of-Practice in Efforts to Expand Primary Care System Capacity: Health Reform and the Primary Care Workforce.

    PubMed

    Graves, John A; Mishra, Pranita; Dittus, Robert S; Parikh, Ravi; Perloff, Jennifer; Buerhaus, Peter I

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the geographic distribution of the overall primary care workforce that includes both physician and nonphysician clinicians--particularly in areas with restrictive nurse practitioner scope-of-practice laws and where there are relatively large numbers of uninsured. We investigated whether geographic accessibility to primary care clinicians (PCCs) differed across urban and rural areas and across states with more or less restrictive scope-of-practice laws. An observational study. 2013 Area Health Resource File (AHRF) and US Census Bureau county travel data. The measures included percentage of the population in low-accessibility, medium-accessibility, and high-accessibility areas; number of geographically accessible primary care physicians (PCMDs), nurse practitioners (PCNPs), and physician assistants (PCPAs) per 100,000 population; and number of uninsured per PCC. We found divergent patterns in the geographic accessibility of PCCs. PCMDs constituted the largest share of the workforce across all settings, but were relatively more concentrated within urban areas. Accessibility to nonphysicians was highest in rural areas: there were more accessible PCNPs per 100,000 population in rural areas of restricted scope-of-practice states (21.4) than in urban areas of full practice states (13.9). Despite having more accessible nonphysician clinicians, rural areas had the largest number of uninsured per PCC in 2012. While less restrictive scope-of-practice states had up to 40% more PCNPs in some areas, we found little evidence of differences in the share of the overall population in low-accessibility areas across scope-of-practice categorizations. Removing restrictive scope-of-practice laws may expand the overall capacity of the primary care workforce, but only modestly in the short run. Additional efforts are needed that recognize the locational tendencies of physicians and nonphysicains.

  18. Practice environments and job satisfaction and turnover intentions of nurse practitioners: Implications for primary care workforce capacity.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang; Shang, Jingjing; D'Aunno, Thomas

    Health care professionals, organizations, and policy makers are calling for expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care to assure timely access and high-quality care. However, most efforts promoting NP practice have been focused on state level scope of practice regulations, with limited attention to the organizational structures. We examined NP practice environments in primary care organizations and the extent to which they were associated with NP retention measures. Data were collected through mail survey of NPs practicing in 163 primary care organizations in Massachusetts in 2012. NP practice environment was measured by the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire, which has four subscales: Professional Visibility, NP-Administration Relations, NP-Physician Relations, and Independent Practice and Support. Two global items measured job satisfaction and NPs' intent to leave their job. We aggregated NP level data to organization level to attain measures of practice environments. Multilevel logistic regression models were used. NPs rated the relationship between NPs and physicians favorably, contrary to the relationship between NPs and administrators. All subscales measuring NP practice environment had similar influence on the outcome variables. With every unit increase in each standardized subscale score, the odds of job satisfaction factors increased about 20% whereas the odds of intention of turnover decreased about 20%. NPs from organizations with higher mean scores on the NP-Administration subscale had higher satisfaction with their jobs (OR = 1.24, 95% CI [1.12, 1.39]) and had lower intent to leave (OR = 0.79, 95% CI [0.70, 0.90]). NPs were more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and less likely to report intent to leave if their organizations support NP practice, favorable relations with physicians and administration, and clear role visibility. Creating productive practice environments that can retain NPs

  19. From new nurse practitioner to primary care provider: bridging the transition through FQHC-based residency training.

    PubMed

    Flinter, Margaret

    2011-11-28

    Community Health Center, Inc. (CHCI), a multi-site, federally qualified, health center (FQHC) in Connecticut, implemented a one-year-residency program for new nurse practitioners (NPs) in 2007. This residency program is specifically designed for family nurse practitioners intending to practice as primary care providers in federally qualified health centers. These centers comprise the nation's largest safety net setting; they are commonly referred to as community health centers. Supported in part by the Health Resources Service Administration, health centers are private nonprofit or public organizations serving populations with limited access to healthcare. They are located in designated, high need communities; governed by patient-majority boards of directors; and provide comprehensive, primary healthcare services. The author begins by reviewing the background and context for a nurse practitioner residency program, the importance of NP residency programs, and the recruitment and selection of NP residents. She explains how the residents are trained to a model of care and the content of care. She furthers the discussion by addressing program evaluation and outcomes and costs. Implications for national health policy, clinical practice, and nursing and areas for further research are presented. This article is timely in light of recent recommendations in the Institute of Medicine's 2010 report on the future of nursing recommending the development of residency programs for new, advanced practice registered nurses.

  20. Factors influencing decision of general practitioners and managers to train and employ a nurse practitioner or physician assistant in primary care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    van der Biezen, Mieke; Derckx, Emmy; Wensing, Michel; Laurant, Miranda

    2017-02-07

    Due to the increasing demand on primary care, it is not only debated whether there are enough general practitioners (GPs) to comply with these demands but also whether specific tasks can be performed by other care providers. Although changing the workforce skill mix care by employing Physician Assistants (PAs) and Nurse Practitioners (NPs) has proven to be both effective and safe, the implementation of those professionals differs widely between and within countries. To support policy making regarding PAs/NPs in primary care, the aim of this study is to provide insight into factors influencing the decision of GPs and managers to train and employ a PA/NP within their organisation. A qualitative study was conducted in 2014 in which 7 managers of out-of-hours primary care services and 32 GPs who owned a general practice were interviewed. Three main topic areas were covered in the interviews: the decision-making process in the organisation, considerations and arguments to train and employ a PA/NP, and the tasks and responsibilities of a PA/NP. Employment of PAs/NPs in out-of-hours services was intended to substitute care for minor ailments in order to decrease GPs' caseload or to increase service capacity. Mangers formulated long-term planning and role definitions when changing workforce skill mix. Lastly, out-of-hours services experienced difficulties with creating team support among their members regarding the employment of PAs/NPs. In general practices during office hours, GPs indented both substitution and supplementation for minor ailments and/or target populations through changing the skill mix. Supplementation was aimed at improving quality of care and extending the range of services to patients. The decision-making in general practices was accompanied with little planning and role definition. The willingness to employ PAs/NPs was highly influenced by an employees' motivation to start the master's programme and GPs' prior experience with PAs/NPs. Knowledge about

  1. Coding of procedures documented by general practitioners in Swedish primary care-an explorative study using two procedure coding systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Procedures documented by general practitioners in primary care have not been studied in relation to procedure coding systems. We aimed to describe procedures documented by Swedish general practitioners in electronic patient records and to compare them to the Swedish Classification of Health Interventions (KVÅ) and SNOMED CT. Methods Procedures in 200 record entries were identified, coded, assessed in relation to two procedure coding systems and analysed. Results 417 procedures found in the 200 electronic patient record entries were coded with 36 different Classification of Health Interventions categories and 148 different SNOMED CT concepts. 22.8% of the procedures could not be coded with any Classification of Health Interventions category and 4.3% could not be coded with any SNOMED CT concept. 206 procedure-concept/category pairs were assessed as a complete match in SNOMED CT compared to 10 in the Classification of Health Interventions. Conclusions Procedures documented by general practitioners were present in nearly all electronic patient record entries. Almost all procedures could be coded using SNOMED CT. Classification of Health Interventions covered the procedures to a lesser extent and with a much lower degree of concordance. SNOMED CT is a more flexible terminology system that can be used for different purposes for procedure coding in primary care. PMID:22230095

  2. [Feedback from primary care practitioners two years after the chikungunya epidemic on Reunion Island, 2005-2006].

    PubMed

    Fenétrier, E; Sissoko, D; Vernazza-Licht, N; Bley, D; Gaüzère, B-A; Malvy, D

    2013-08-01

    Primary care practitioners constitute key stakeholders in the surveillance and control of epidemic-prone infectious diseases. We carried out a survey in Reunion Island two years after the 2006 chikungunya epidemic using a purposive random sample of 100 general practitioners (GP). The objective was to describe and identity factors associated to GP involvement in case notification during the 2006 chikungunya epidemic. The methods were: administered face-to-face questionnaire and identification of notification determinants by univariate and multivariate analyses. Nearly 60% of participants declared having failed to join the case notification procedure. The main impeding factor was the acknowledgment of limited capacities consecutive to massive influx of patients. Inversely, practicing in group organization tended to show a favorable effect on case notification. In addition, most responders reported the relevance of the information provided by health authorities, despite a perceived limited efficacy of the procedure in the field. Primary care practitioners' involvement in the surveillance of epidemic infectious diseases requires to be reinforced by a preestablished partnership within a proactive network. This goal comprehends relevant training and preparation for epidemic surveillance.

  3. Coding of procedures documented by general practitioners in Swedish primary care-an explorative study using two procedure coding systems.

    PubMed

    Vikström, Anna; Hägglund, Maria; Nyström, Mikael; Strender, Lars-Erik; Koch, Sabine; Hjerpe, Per; Lindblad, Ulf; Nilsson, Gunnar H

    2012-01-09

    Procedures documented by general practitioners in primary care have not been studied in relation to procedure coding systems. We aimed to describe procedures documented by Swedish general practitioners in electronic patient records and to compare them to the Swedish Classification of Health Interventions (KVÅ) and SNOMED CT. Procedures in 200 record entries were identified, coded, assessed in relation to two procedure coding systems and analysed. 417 procedures found in the 200 electronic patient record entries were coded with 36 different Classification of Health Interventions categories and 148 different SNOMED CT concepts. 22.8% of the procedures could not be coded with any Classification of Health Interventions category and 4.3% could not be coded with any SNOMED CT concept. 206 procedure-concept/category pairs were assessed as a complete match in SNOMED CT compared to 10 in the Classification of Health Interventions. Procedures documented by general practitioners were present in nearly all electronic patient record entries. Almost all procedures could be coded using SNOMED CT.Classification of Health Interventions covered the procedures to a lesser extent and with a much lower degree of concordance. SNOMED CT is a more flexible terminology system that can be used for different purposes for procedure coding in primary care.

  4. An investigation into the perceptions of primary care practitioners of their education and development needs for communicating with patients who may not be fluent in English.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark; Phillips, Pauline

    2003-05-01

    This paper reports on an empirical research project that assessed educational needs of primary care practitioners for communicating with minority ethnic patients who are not fluent in English. The qualitative study was carried out in general practice settings in a northern inner city locality. Discrepancies are highlighted between patient and practitioner understandings, and between educational models and practitioner views. Educational needs are identified to enhance practitioners' specific skills, knowledge of patient perspectives, and self-awareness. Organisational influences on communication are explored. Key arguments are that "transcultural" educational models should be used critically, and education should enable practitioners to integrate their personal coping strategies with structured practice development planning.

  5. A randomised controlled trial of joint consultations with general practitioners and cardiologists in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Vlek, J F; Vierhout, W P M; Knottnerus, J A; Schmitz, J J; Winter, J; Wesselingh-Megens, A M K; Crebolder, H F

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Joint consultation sessions of a small group of general practitioners (GPs) and a specialist in orthopaedics proved to be an effective way of decreasing the referral rate of orthopaedic patients. Cardiac complaints comprise an important category of health problems with high referral rates. AIMS: To study the effects of joint consultation on the quality of care and referrals for patients with cardiac complaints. DESIGN OF STUDY: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Forty-nine GPs participated in 16 consultation groups, each with one of 13 cardiologists, in monthly joint consultations over a period of about 18 months. METHOD: The GPs selected patients about whom they were uncertain, and those needing urgent referral were excluded. Patients were randomly assigned to joint consultation or to usual care. After a follow-up period all patients had a joint consultation for outcome assessment. Referral data were provided by two regional health insurance companies and questionnaires were given to the patients, GPs, and cardiologists to gauge their opinion of the trial. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-eight patients in the intervention group and 158 patients in the control group fulfilled the whole protocol. The quality of care was similar in both groups. In the intervention group, 34% of the patients were referred, compared with 55% in the control group (P = 0.001), and fewer patients underwent further diagnostic procedures (7% compared with 16%, P = 0.013). Referrals to cardiology as a proportion of all referrals decreased in the practices of the participating GPs, compared with their reference districts (P = 0.024). CONCLUSION: Joint consultation is an effective method that provides a quality of care that at least equals usual care and that contributes to a better selection of patients who need specialist care. PMID:12817355

  6. Nurse Practitioner Autonomy and Relationships with Leadership Affect Teamwork in Primary Care Practices: a Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang

    2016-07-01

    The Nurse Practitioner (NP) workforce represents a substantial supply of primary care providers able to contribute to meeting a growing demand for care. However, controversy exists regarding the expanding role of NPs in primary care in terms of challenging the teamwork between NPs and physicians. To date, no empirical evidence exists regarding how to promote teamwork in primary care between NPs and physicians. We investigated whether NP autonomy within primary care practices and the relationships they have with leadership affect teamwork between NPs and physicians. Using a cross-sectional survey design, data was collected from 163 primary care practices in Massachusetts. Three hundred and fourteen primary care NPs completed and returned the mail survey yielding a response rate of 40 %. The Autonomy and Independent Practice (AIP) and NP-Administration Relations (NP-AR) scales were used to measure NP independent practice and the relationships with leadership, respectively. These measures were aggregated to the practice level. Teamwork between NPs and physicians was measured at the individual NP level using the Teamwork (TW) scale. The multilevel linear regression models investigated the influence of practice-level NP autonomy and the relationship between NPs and leadership on teamwork. With every unit increase on the practice-level mean score of AIP centered at the grand mean, the mean TW score increased by 0.271 units (p < 0.0001). With every unit increase of NP-AR centered at the grand mean, the mean TW score increased by 0.375 (p < 0.001). Over one-third (41.3 %) of the variance in teamwork could be explained by the final model. The study findings demonstrate that NP autonomy and favorable relationships with leadership improve teamwork. Policy and organizational change should focus on promoting NP autonomy and improving the relationship between NPs and leadership to improve teamwork and consequently improve patient care and outcomes.

  7. [Role of the general practitioner or primary care physician in the management of adult congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Thambo, Jean-Benoît

    2013-03-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common inborn defect, occurring approximately 0.8% according to the last European Union count. This rate is stable for decades. Nowadays, up to 90% of children born with congenital heart diseases underwent surgical correction and reach adulthood, gratefully to the surgery and interventional cardiology advances, in conjunction to the post-surgery and following cares improvement. Both of this facts results to a growing population of adults with congenital heart diseases, actually exceeding the infant population. This arising population will lead general practitioners and primary care physicians to face more often this kind of patient. The needed cares are specifics, regarding the typical evolutions of this pathologies, as well as because congenital heart diseases wil impact other pathologies or usual cares. The need of an extended knowledge of the adult patients with congenital heart diseases is clearly emerging, and should lead the whole medical corps to work in close network.

  8. Barriers to providing nutrition counseling cited by physicians: a survey of primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, Kathryn M; Rickett, Katherine

    2010-10-01

    In a 1995 pivotal study, Kushner described the attitudes, practice behaviors, and barriers to the delivery of nutrition counseling by primary care physicians. This article recognized nutrition and dietary counseling as key components in the delivery of preventive services by primary care physicians. Kushner called for a multifaceted approach to change physicians' counseling practices. The prevailing belief today is that little has changed. Healthy People 2010 and the U.S. Preventive Task Force identify the need for physicians to address nutrition with patients. The 2010 objective was to increase to 75% the proportion of office visits that included ordering or providing diet counseling for patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or hypertension. At the midcourse review, the proportion actually declined from 42% to 40%. Primary care physicians continue to believe that providing nutrition counseling is within their realm of responsibility. Yet the gap remains between the proportion of patients who physicians believe would benefit from nutrition counseling and those who receive it from their primary care physician or are referred to dietitians and other healthcare professionals. The barriers cited in recent years continue to be those listed by Kushner: lack of time and compensation and, to a lesser extent, lack of knowledge and resources. The 2010 Surgeon General's Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation and First Lady Obama's "Let's Move Campaign" spotlight the need for counseling adults and children on diet and physical activity.

  9. Community Partnerships: Educational Linkages to Increase the Number of Primary Care Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ronald W.; Henry, Rebecca C.

    1993-01-01

    The Kellogg Foundation's Community Partnerships in Health Professions Education, a program designed to increase multidisciplinary, comprehensive, cost-effective primary care teams in communities, uses an organizational structure linking academic medical education with communities. The new structures have resulted in new curricula and other…

  10. Towards an optimal composition of general practitioners and nurse practitioners in out-of-hours primary care teams: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    van der Biezen, Mieke; Wensing, Michel; van der Burgt, Regi; Laurant, Miranda

    2017-05-30

    To gain insights into the ability of general practitioners (GPs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) to meet patient demands in out-of-hours primary care by comparing the outcomes of teams with different ratios of practitioners. Quasi-experimental study. A GP cooperative (GPC) in the Netherlands. Team 2 (1 NP, 3 GPs) and team 3 (2 NPs, 2 GPs) were compared with team 1 (4 GPs). Each team covered 35 weekend days. All 9503 patients who were scheduled for a consultation at the GPC through a nurse triage system. The primary outcome was the total number of consultations per provider for weekend cover between 10:00 and 18:00 hours. Secondary outcomes concerned the numbers of patients outside the NPs' scope of practice, patient safety, resource use, direct healthcare costs and GPs' performance. The mean number of consultations per shift was lower in teams with NPs (team 1: 93.9, team 3: 87.1; p<0.001). The mean proportion of patients outside NPs' scope of practice per hour was 9.0% (SD 6.7), and the highest value in any hour was 40%. The proportion of patients who did not receive treatment within the targeted time period was higher in teams with NPs (team 2, 5.2%; team 3, 8.3%) compared with GPs only (team 1 3.5%) (p<0.01). Team 3 referred more patients to the emergency department (14.7%) compared with team 1 (12.0%; p=0.028). In teams with NPs, GPs more often treated urgent patients (team 1: 13.2%, team 2: 16.3%, team 3: 21.4%; p<0.01) and patients with digestive complaints (team 1: 11.1%, team 2: 11.8%, team 3: 16.7%; p<0.01). Primary healthcare teams with a ratio of up to two GPs and two NPs provided sufficient capacity to provide care to all patients during weekend cover. Areas of concern are the number of consultations, delay in patient care and referrals to the emergency department. NCT02407847. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise

  11. Division of primary care services between physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners for older patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Gilchrist, Valerie J; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-10-01

    Team-based care involving physician assistants and/or nurse practitioners (PA/NPs) in the patient-centered medical home is one approach to improving care quality. However, little is known about how to incorporate PA/NPs into primary care teams. Using data from a large physician group, we describe the division of patients and services (e.g., acute, chronic, preventive, other) between primary care providers for older diabetes patients on panels with varying levels of PA/NP involvement (i.e., no role, supplemental provider, or usual provider of care). Panels with PA/NP usual providers had higher proportions of patients with Medicaid, disability, and depression. Patients with physician usual providers had similar probabilities of visits with supplemental PA/NPs and physicians for all service types. However, patients with PA/NP usual providers had higher probabilities of visits with a supplemental physician. Understanding how patients and services are divided between PA/NPs and physicians will assist in defining provider roles on primary care teams.

  12. Using information to deliver safer care: a mixed-methods study exploring general practitioners' information needs in North West London primary care.

    PubMed

    Mastellos, Nikolaos; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Aylin, Paul

    2014-12-08

    The National Health Service in England has given increasing priority to improving inter-professional communication, enabling better management of patients with chronic conditions and reducing medical errors through effective use of information. Despite considerable efforts to reduce patient harm through better information usage, medical errors continue to occur, posing a serious threat to patient safety. This study explores the range, quality and sophistication of existing information systems in primary care with the aim to capture what information practitioners need to provide a safe service and identify barriers to its effective use in care pathways. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with general practitioners from surgeries in North West London and a survey evaluating their experience with information systems in care pathways. Important information is still missing, specifically discharge summaries detailing medication changes and changes in the diagnosis and management of patients, blood results ordered by hospital specialists and findings from clinical investigations. Participants identified numerous barriers, including the communication gap between primary and secondary care, the variable quality and consistency of clinical correspondence and the inadequate technological integration. Despite attempts to improve integration and information flow in care pathways, existing systems provide practitioners with only partial access to information, hindering their ability to take informed decisions. This study offers a framework for understanding what tools should be in place to enable effective use of information in primary care.

  13. Attitudes and trends of primary care dentists to continuing professional development: a report from the Scottish dental practitioners survey 2000.

    PubMed

    Leggate, M; Russell, E

    2002-10-26

    To describe the current and intended continuing professional development activity of dentists in general and community practice. A cross-sectional survey by postal questionnaire. A semi-structured questionnaire was sent to all general practice and community dentists identified from the dental practices division as being in practice in Scotland. The issues addressed included personal demographics, current working patterns and job satisfaction, training and professional development and finally career and working intentions. Of the 1,917 questionnaires sent to general dental practitioners (GDPs), 1,357 were returned useable (70% response rate); 212 of the 283 questionnaires to community dental practitioners (CDPs) were returned giving a 75% response rate. Of the responders, 89% of GDPs (1,188) and 95% of CDPs (178) reported participating in some form of CPD in the preceding year. One sixth of GDPs (211) and one third of CDPs (62) had a further qualification. Short courses such as Section 63 were very popular with over 90% of GDPs, but more than half the respondents did not think that further qualifications would enhance their career prospects. The most commonly identified barriers to further qualifications were heavy clinical commitments (78%), with 73% citing the substantial cost with no additional benefit. Over a third of GDPs under the age of 30 indicated they intended to sit a postgraduate qualification, but this fell to 12% for those aged over 30. The number of dentists identified on a career break was low (18). Two years before implementation of the General Dental Council's mandatory revalidation scheme, over 90% of Scottish primary care dentists reported active participation in continuing professional development. Future initiatives must be sufficiently sophisticated to fulfil the educational needs of different age groups, and to focus on part-time and career break dentists as well as full-time practitioners. It is important to establish career pathways in

  14. The Role of Practitioner Self-Efficacy, Training, Program and Workplace Factors on the Implementation of an Evidence-Based Parenting Intervention in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Karen M. T.; Nicholson, Jan M.; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting the implementation by primary care practitioners (nursing, education, allied health, and medical) of a brief parenting and family support intervention (the Primary Care Triple P--Positive Parenting Program) following professional training. It assesses the impact of prior experience, self-efficacy, program…

  15. The Role of Practitioner Self-Efficacy, Training, Program and Workplace Factors on the Implementation of an Evidence-Based Parenting Intervention in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Karen M. T.; Nicholson, Jan M.; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting the implementation by primary care practitioners (nursing, education, allied health, and medical) of a brief parenting and family support intervention (the Primary Care Triple P--Positive Parenting Program) following professional training. It assesses the impact of prior experience, self-efficacy, program…

  16. The contribution of physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners toward rural primary care: findings from a 13-state survey.

    PubMed

    Doescher, Mark P; Andrilla, C Holly A; Skillman, Susan M; Morgan, Perri; Kaplan, Louise

    2014-06-01

    Estimates of the relative contributions of physicians, physician assistants (PAs), and nurse practitioners (NPs) toward rural primary care are needed to inform workforce planning activities aimed at reducing rural primary shortages. For each provider group, this study quantifies the average weekly number of outpatient primary care visits and the types of services provided within and beyond the outpatient setting. A randomly drawn sample of 788 physicians, 601 PAs, and 918 NPs with rural addresses in 13 US states responded to a mailed questionnaire that measured reported weekly outpatient visits and scope of services provided within and beyond the outpatient setting. Analysis of variance and χ(2) testing were used to test for bivariate associations. Multivariate regression was used to model average weekly outpatient volume adjusting for provider sociodemographics and geographical location. Compared with physicians, average weekly outpatient visit quantity was 8% lower for PAs and 25% lower for NPs (P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment, this gap became negligible for PAs (P=0.56) and decreased to 10% for NPs (P<0.001). Compared with PAs and NPs, primary care physicians were more likely to provide services beyond the outpatient setting, including hospital care, emergency care, childbirth attending deliveries, and after-hours call coverage (all P<0.001). Although our findings suggest that a greater reliance on PAs and NPs in rural primary settings would have a minor impact on outpatient practice volume, this shift might reduce the availability of services that have more often been traditionally provided by rural primary care physicians beyond the outpatient clinic setting.

  17. The role of practitioner self-efficacy, training, program and workplace factors on the implementation of an evidence-based parenting intervention in primary care.

    PubMed

    Turner, Karen M T; Nicholson, Jan M; Sanders, Matthew R

    2011-04-01

    This study examines factors affecting the implementation by primary care practitioners (nursing, education, allied health, and medical) of a brief parenting and family support intervention (the Primary Care Triple P-Positive Parenting Program) following professional training. It assesses the impact of prior experience, self-efficacy, program supports, program barriers, satisfaction with training, and workplace characteristics on reported extent of program use. The majority of practitioners (97%) reported using Triple P following training. Implementation was assessed as the proportion of cases seen who received the full program. Program supports (quality of format and materials) and barriers (management difficulties and lack of fit) impacted on practitioner self-efficacy, and higher self-efficacy was positively associated with implementation. Prior professional experience, satisfaction with training, and workplace factors were not significant predictors. These results highlight the importance of promoting practitioners' sense of competence or mastery of a program for facilitating the implementation of evidence-based programs in primary care settings.

  18. Dementia in primary care: the first survey of Irish general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Suzanne; Clark, Maeve; Walsh, Cathal; O'Connell, Henry; Lawlor, Brian

    2006-04-01

    To investigate General Practitioners' (GPs) attitudes and practices in relation to screening, diagnosing, and disclosing a dementia diagnosis to patients. National postal survey. A random sample of 600 GPs from a national database of 2,400. Of the 600 GPs surveyed, 60% returned questionnaires of which 50% (300) were useable. GPs reported diagnosing on average four new cases of dementia annually. A multivariate analysis revealed that females diagnosed significantly fewer cases annually (t=5.532, df=289, p<0.001). A large majority of GPs reported performing thyroid function tests (77%), B(12) (75%) and Folic acid tests (75%) to out rule reversible causes of cognitive impairment. The most reliable signs and symptoms of dementia identified were memory problems (58%). Main barriers to diagnosis were difficulty differentiating normal ageing from symptoms of dementia (31%), lack of confidence (30%) and the impact of the diagnosis on the patient (28%). GPs' age (chi(2)=14.592, df=3, p<0.005) and gender (chi(2)=11.436, df=3, p<0.01) were significantly associated with barriers to diagnosis. Only 19% claimed they often or always disclosed a diagnosis to a patient. Over one-third of GPs (38%) reported that the key factor influencing their disclosure patterns was their perceptions of the patient's level of comprehension. Most GPs (90%) had never undergone any dementia specific training and most (83%) expressed a desire for this. GPs experience difficulty diagnosing and disclosing a diagnosis of dementia to patients. To improve dementia care in Ireland, there is an urgent need to develop an active and more systematic approach to GP training in dementia care.

  19. Australian military primary care practitioners do not believe clinical practice guidelines are needed for postdeployment medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jon; MacKenzie, Alison; McLaughlin, Ruth; Burke, Nicholas; Bennett, Sonya; Mobbs, Robyn; Ellis, Niki

    2009-04-01

    In Australia, little research has been undertaken on the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to assist with the impact of postdeployment ill-health including medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and it has been unclear whether such a development is desired by Australian primary care practitioners. In response an empirical investigation into the perceptions and experiences of 24 medical officers from the Australian military with regard to postdeployment ill-health, medically unexplained symptoms, and the potential development of CPGs in this area was undertaken. The analysis suggests that although MUS are accepted as common in general practice they are not perceived by practitioners to be as prevalent in the Australian Defense Forces. Although the medical officers do not perceive clinical practice guidelines as the best tool for managing MUS, there was interest in the development of practical tools to assist in the diagnosis of medically unexplained symptoms. The response by practitioners is of critical importance for the potential implementation of clinical practice guidelines in this area.

  20. Drivers for change in primary care of diabetes following a protected learning time educational event: interview study of practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena, Aloysius Niroshan; Middlemass, Jo B; Ward, Kate; Wilkinson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Background A number of protected learning time schemes have been set up in primary care across the United Kingdom but there has been little published evidence of their impact on processes of care. We undertook a qualitative study to investigate the perceptions of practitioners involved in a specific educational intervention in diabetes as part of a protected learning time scheme for primary health care teams, relating to changing processes of diabetes care in general practice. Methods We undertook semistructured interviews of key informants from a sample of practices stratified according to the extent they had changed behaviour in prescribing of ramipril and diabetes care more generally, following a specific educational intervention in Lincolnshire, United Kingdom. Interviews sought information on facilitators and barriers to change in organisational behaviour for the care of diabetes. Results An interprofessional protected learning time scheme event was perceived by some but not all participants as bringing about changes in processes for diabetes care. Participants cited examples of change introduced partly as a result of the educational session. This included using ACE inhibitors as first line for patients with diabetes who developed hypertension, increased use of aspirin, switching patients to glitazones, and conversion to insulin either directly or by referral to secondary care. Other reported factors for change, unrelated to the educational intervention, included financially driven performance targets, research evidence and national guidance. Facilitators for change linked to the educational session were peer support and teamworking supported by audit and comparative feedback. Conclusion This study has shown how a protected learning time scheme, using interprofessional learning, local opinion leaders and early implementers as change agents may have influenced changes in systems of diabetes care in selected practices but also how other confounding factors

  1. Increasing awareness with recognition of pulsatile tinnitus for nurse practitioners in the primary care setting: A case study.

    PubMed

    Vecchiarelli, Kelly; Amar, Arun Paul; Emanuele, Donna

    2017-09-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is a whooshing sound heard synchronous with the heartbeat. It is an uncommon symptom affecting fewer than 10% of patients with tinnitus. It often goes unrecognized in the primary care setting. Failure to recognize this symptom can result in a missed or delayed diagnosis of a potentially life-threatening condition known as a dural arteriovenous fistula. The purpose of this case study is to provide a structured approach to the identification of pulsatile tinnitus and provide management recommendations. A case study and review of pertinent literature. Pulsatile tinnitus usually has a vascular treatable cause. A comprehensive history and physical examination will alert the nurse practitioner (NP) when pulsatile tinnitus is present. Auscultation in specific areas of the head can detect audible or objective pulsatile tinnitus. Pulsatile tinnitus that is audible to the examiner is an urgent medical condition requiring immediate consultation and referral. Knowledge of pulsatile tinnitus and awareness of this often treatable condition directs the NP to perform a detailed assessment when patients present with tinnitus, directs appropriate referral for care and treatment, and can reduce the risk of delayed or missed diagnosis. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations in primary care: an explanatory study among French general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Sicsic, Jonathan; Le Vaillant, Marc; Franc, Carine

    2012-12-01

    Like many other OECD nations, France has implemented a pay-for-performance (P4P) model in primary care. However, the benefits have been debated, particularly regarding the possibly undesirable effects of extrinsic motivation (EM) on intrinsic motivation (IM). To examine the relationship between French GPs' IM and EM based on an intrinsic motivation composite score (IMCS) developed for this purpose. If a negative relationship is found, P4P schemes could have side effects on GPs' IM that is a key determinant of quality of care. From data on 423 GPs practicing in a region of France, IM indicators are selected using a multiple correspondence analysis and aggregated from a multilevel model. Several doctors' characteristics have significant impacts on IMCS variability, especially group practice and salaried practice. Qualitative EM variables are negatively correlated with the IMCS: GPs who report not being satisfied with their income or feeling "often" constrained by patients' requests in terms of consultations length and office appointments obtain a lower mean IMCS than other GPs. Our results provide a cautionary message to regulators who should take into account the potential side effects of increasing EM through policies such as P4P. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prescribing practices of primary-care veterinary practitioners in dogs diagnosed with bacterial pyoderma.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jennifer F; Hendricks, Anke; Brodbelt, David C

    2014-10-08

    Concern has been raised regarding the potential contributions of veterinary antimicrobial use to increasing levels of resistance in bacteria critically important to human health. Canine pyoderma is a frequent, often recurrent diagnosis in pet dogs, usually attributable to secondary bacterial infection of the skin. Lesions can range in severity based on the location, total area and depth of tissue affected and antimicrobial therapy is recommended for resolution. This study aimed to describe patient signalment, disease characteristics and treatment prescribed in a large number of UK, primary-care canine pyoderma cases and to estimate pyoderma prevalence in the UK vet-visiting canine population. Of 54,600 dogs presented to 73 participating practices in 2010, 683 (1.3%) had a pyoderma diagnosis recorded in available electronic patient record (EPR) data. Antimicrobials were dispensed in 97% of cases and most dogs were prescribed systemic therapy (92%). Agents most frequently prescribed were amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefalexin, clindamycin and cefovecin. Systemic antimicrobials were prescribed for fewer than 14 days in around 40% of study cases reviewed in detail. Prescribed daily doses were below minimum recommended daily dose (MRDD) in 26% of 43 dogs with sufficient information for calculation of minimum dose. Antimicrobial prescribing behaviour for treatment of canine pyoderma was variable but frequently appeared inconsistent with current recommendations. Use of clinical data from primary practice EPRs can provide valuable insight into common clinical conditions and associated prescribing.

  4. When peers count: The effects on integrated type II diabetes care of communication within general practitioner-only subgroups in interprofessional primary care teams.

    PubMed

    Compagni, Amelia; Armeni, Patrizio; Tasselli, Stefano

    2017-03-16

    Primary care teams (hereafter referred to as primary care units [PCUs]) composed of general practitioners (GPs), nurses, and specialist doctors have recently been established in the Italian context, with the main aim of improving integrated care for chronic diseases. The aim of the study was to assess whether the increased professional diversity of PCUs has resulted in an improvement in the integrated care of type II diabetes and to identify a potential mechanism mediating this effect. We analyzed 213 PCUs, comparing their performance in integrated type II diabetes care at two time points. Using social categorization theory and a fixed effects regression analysis, we tested a mediation model in which the frequency of communication among GPs in the PCUs, that is, within-subgroup communication, mediates the relationship between PCU professional diversity and team performance in diabetes care. We show that when the professional diversity of the PCUs increases, integrated care of type II diabetes improves and better meets the standards of optimal care. Within-GP subgroup communication works as a mediating mechanism that translates the PCU professional diversity into better team performance. The mediation effect, however, is curvilinear. Beyond certain levels, within-subgroup communication can hamper PCUs' capacity to work collaboratively in integrated type II diabetes care. The article suggests that, when creating interprofessional primary care teams, managers might be able to steer teams toward a better performance by encouraging communication among peers of the same profession.

  5. Implementation of brief alcohol intervention in primary health care: do nurses' and general practitioners' attitudes, skills and knowledge change?

    PubMed

    Aalto, Mauri; Pekuri, Petteri; Seppä, Kaija

    2005-11-01

    Brief alcohol intervention reduces heavy drinking, but its implementation has been challenging. The purpose was to evaluate self-reported changes in attitudes, skills and knowledge regarding brief intervention among nurses and general practitioners (GPs) during an implementation project. A questionnaire survey was used before and after the implementation to all nurses and GPs working at the time in the seven primary health-care centres of the city of Tampere, Finland. Several positive changes indicate an increased amount of knowledge regarding brief intervention among the professionals during the implementation. This was found especially among the nurses. The success in increasing the knowledge can also be seen in a decrease of training needs. Instead, attitudes and skills among the professionals did not seem to develop positively. Increasing motivational skills especially seems to be the future challenge.

  6. Effects of an educational outreach campaign (IMPACT) on depression management delivered to general practitioners in one primary care trust.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bharat; Afghan, Safiullah

    2009-09-01

    Objective An educational outreach initiative with general practitioners (GPs) within Walsall, led by pharmacists and aimed at delivering evidence-based guidance on stepped care management of clinical depression.Methods Standardised educational material was produced with key messages and contributions by experts on prescribing principles and management of clinical depression based on NICE guidance. The primary care pharmacists together with a psychiatrist or other professional delivered the training through initial face-to-face meetings with GP practices and carrying out follow-up visits.Evaluation Analysis of prescribing data (PACT) on antidepressants, which included prescribing of defined daily doses (DDD) and net ingredient cost (NIC) of commonly prescribed antidepressants for the whole of Walsall teaching Primary Care Trust (tPCT) and comparison with prescribing data for the West Midlands and for England during the period June 2000 to June 2006.Results The use of Fluoxetine increased slightly and the prescribing of Dosulepin continued to fall. The prescribing of Escitalopram, which had steadily increased prior to the launch of campaign, showed decline, resulting in savings of over £50K in the year 2005 to 2006. This was in comparison to a relative increase in the prescribing for Escitalopram for the same time period in the West Midlands and nationally. Prescribing of Dosulepin continued to fall. The total cost of prescribing for the four antidepressants fell and theses changes were sustained over the following year.Conclusions The educational outreach campaign successfully influenced prescribing behaviour in terms of adhering to NICE guidance and cost-effective prescribing, and also facilitated improved communication among clinicians at the primary-secondary care interface.

  7. Rural geriatric glue: a nurse practitioner-led model of care for enhancing primary care for frail older adults within an ecosystem approach.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sadhana; Dunn, Wendy; Hillier, Loretta M; McAiney, Carrie A; Warren, Rex; Rutherford, Paul

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the implementation of the Care for Seniors model of care, an innovative approach to improving care coordination and integration, and provides preliminary evidence of effective use of specialist resources and acute care services. Retrospective. Primary care; cross-sector. Older adults living in a rural area in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Number of new geriatrician referrals and follow-up visits before and after the launch of the Care for Seniors program, number of Nurse Practitioner visits in a primary care setting, in-home, retirement home and hospital, number of discharges home from hospital and length of hospital stay between. In the 2 years before the launch of the program, the total number of visits to the geriatrician for individuals from this FHT was relatively low, 21 and 15, respectively for 2005-06 and 2006-07, increasing to 73 for the 2011-12 year. Although the absolute number of individuals supported by the NP-Geri has remained relatively the same, the numbers seen in the primary care office or in the senior's clinic has declined over time, and the number of home visits has increased, as have visits in the retirement homes. The percentage of individuals discharged home increased from 19% in 2008-09 to 31% in 2009-10 and 26% in 2011-12 and the average length of stay decreased over time. This model of care represents a promising collaboration between primary care and specialist care for improving care to frail older adults living in rural communities, potentially improving timely access to health care and crisis intervention. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. The feminization of the medical work force, implications for Scottish primary care: a survey of Scottish general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, Brian; Colthart, Iain; Elliott, Katy; Hunter, Colin

    2006-01-01

    Background The number of women working in general practice internationally has been steadily rising. In Scotland there have been concerns that such a change may lead to increased part-time working and subsequently to a fall in available general practice manpower despite an apparently rising overall number of general practitioners. However, there is very little information on the actual hours worked by men and women general practitioners or on the types of work they are undertaking. Methods Anonymous workload questionnaires of all Scottish general practitioner principals and non-principals Results Response rates for general practice principals and non-principals were 67.2% and 65.2% respectively. Male principals spent on average 18% more time on general medical services (GMS) and 50% more time on non-GMS activities (such as teaching, specialist sessions, administration and research) than women (both p <0.01). This difference was similar for non-principals. In no age group did the hours worked by women doctors approach that of male doctors. Conclusion Women doctors in primary care in Scotland work fewer hours in all age groups than their male counterparts. The rapidly increasing proportion of women in general practice may lead to an increasing shortfall of medical availability in the future if current work patterns are maintained. Further longitudinal research is required to establish this and man-power planning is required now to address this. More worryingly auxiliary activities such as teaching and administrative duties are not being taken up by women. This may have serious implications for the future development of the specialty in Scotland. PMID:16686957

  9. The potential for cross-addiction in post-bariatric surgery patients: Considerations for primary care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bak, Melissa; Seibold-Simpson, Susan M; Darling, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    Possible mental health issues for post-bariatric surgery patients include the development of cross-addictions after the rapid weight loss period. No validated screening tool to assess for possible cross-addictions exists. The main purpose of this study was to develop recommendations for modifying an existing addiction screening tool (the Shorter PROMIS Questionnaire) for use by primary care providers. A qualitative descriptive design was used with triangulation of input from the scholarly literature, content experts (CEs), and post-bariatric surgery patients. Three focus groups were conducted with post-bariatric surgery patients (n = 12) with the same questions asked of the CEs (n = 3). Content analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. The following themes regarding addictions after bariatric surgery were identified through consensus: alcohol, gambling, shopping, exercise, food starving/bingeing, and sexuality/relationships. Dissonant themes included caffeine and tobacco by the post-bariatric surgery patients and prescription/illicit medications by the CEs. Targeted screening for early identification of problem behaviors by primary care providers may result in appropriate referral to and management by mental health providers, assisting ongoing success of bariatric surgery. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Primary Care Physicians', Nurse Practitioners' and Physician Assistants' Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding COPD: 2007 To 2014.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C; Textor, Kyle B; Yawn, Roy A

    2016-05-06

    To assess current primary care physicians', nurse practitioners' (NP) and physicians assistants' (PA) knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and changes from a similar 2007 assessment, we surveyed attendees of 3 regional continuing medical education programs and compared the 2013/2014 responses with responses to a similar survey completed in 2007. Survey data included information on personal demographics, agreement with perceived barriers to COPD diagnosis, awareness, and use of COPD guidelines, and beliefs regarding the value of available COPD therapies. In 2013/2014, 426 primary care clinicians (278 medical doctors [MDs] and doctors of osteopathic medicine [DO] and 148 NPs/PAs) provided useable responses (overall response rate 61%). Overall these physicians were older and more experienced than the NPs/PAs but with few other differences in responses except significantly greater physician reported use of spirometry for COPD diagnosis. About half of the clinicians reported having in-office spirometers but less than two thirds reported using them for all COPD diagnoses. All respondents reported multiple barriers to COPD diagnosis but with fewer than in 2007 reporting lack of knowledge or awareness of COPD guidelines as a major barrier. The most striking difference between 2007 and 2013/2014 responses was the marked increase in beliefs by all clinicians in the ability of COPD treatments to reduce symptoms and numbers of exacerbations. These data affirm that primary care clinicians continue to report multiple barriers to COPD diagnosis including lack of easy access to spirometry and frequent failure to include spirometry in diagnostic confirmation. However, since 2007, the clinicians report a remarkable decline in therapeutic nihilism, which may enhance their interest in learning more about diagnosing and managing COPD.

  11. The risks of opioid treatment: Perspectives of primary care practitioners and patients from safety-net clinics.

    PubMed

    Hurstak, Emily E; Kushel, Margot; Chang, Jamie; Ceasar, Rachel; Zamora, Kara; Miaskowski, Christine; Knight, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Patients with a history of substance use are more likely than those without substance use to experience chronic noncancer pain (CNCP), to be prescribed opioids, and to experience opioid misuse or overdose. Primary care practitioners (PCPs) in safety-net settings care for low-income patients with CNCP and substance use, usually without specialist consultation. To inform communication related to opioid risk, we explored PCPs' and patients' perceptions of the risks of chronic opioid therapy. We conducted semistructured interviews with 23 PCPs and 46 of their patients, who had a history of CNCP and substance use. We recruited from 6 safety-net health care settings in the San Francisco Bay Area. We transcribed interviews verbatim and analyzed transcripts using grounded theory methodology. (1) PCPs feared harming patients and the community by opioid prescribing. PCPs emphasized fear of opioid overdose. (2) Patients did not highlight concerns about the adverse health consequences of opioids, except for addiction. (3) Both patients and PCPs were concerned about PCPs' medicolegal risks related to opioid prescribing. (4) Patients reported feeling stigmatized by policies aimed at reducing opioid misuse. We identified differences in how clinicians and patients perceive opioid risk. To improve the informed consent process for opioid therapy, patients and PCPs need to have a shared understanding of the risks of opioids and engage in discussions that promote patient autonomy and safety. As clinics implement opioid prescribing policies, clinicians must develop effective communication strategies in order to educate patients about opioid risks and decrease patients' experiences of stigma and discrimination.

  12. The productivity and cost-efficiency of models for involving nurse practitioners in primary care: a perspective from queueing analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; D'Aunno, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    To develop simple stylized models for evaluating the productivity and cost-efficiencies of different practice models to involve nurse practitioners (NPs) in primary care, and in particular to generate insights on what affects the performance of these models and how. The productivity of a practice model is defined as the maximum number of patients that can be accounted for by the model under a given timeliness-to-care requirement; cost-efficiency is measured by the corresponding annual cost per patient in that model. Appropriate queueing analysis is conducted to generate formulas and values for these two performance measures. Model parameters for the analysis are extracted from the previous literature and survey reports. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the model performance under different scenarios and to verify the robustness of findings. Employing an NP, whose salary is usually lower than a primary care physician, may not be cost-efficient, in particular when the NP's capacity is underutilized. Besides provider service rates, workload allocation among providers is one of the most important determinants for the cost-efficiency of a practice model involving NPs. Capacity pooling among providers could be a helpful strategy to improve efficiency in care delivery. The productivity and cost-efficiency of a practice model depend heavily on how providers organize their work and a variety of other factors related to the practice environment. Queueing theory provides useful tools to take into account these factors in making strategic decisions on staffing and panel size selection for a practice model. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. The Productivity and Cost-Efficiency of Models for Involving Nurse Practitioners in Primary Care: A Perspective from Queueing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; D'Aunno, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop simple stylized models for evaluating the productivity and cost-efficiencies of different practice models to involve nurse practitioners (NPs) in primary care, and in particular to generate insights on what affects the performance of these models and how. Data Sources and Study Design The productivity of a practice model is defined as the maximum number of patients that can be accounted for by the model under a given timeliness-to-care requirement; cost-efficiency is measured by the corresponding annual cost per patient in that model. Appropriate queueing analysis is conducted to generate formulas and values for these two performance measures. Model parameters for the analysis are extracted from the previous literature and survey reports. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the model performance under different scenarios and to verify the robustness of findings. Principal Findings Employing an NP, whose salary is usually lower than a primary care physician, may not be cost-efficient, in particular when the NP's capacity is underutilized. Besides provider service rates, workload allocation among providers is one of the most important determinants for the cost-efficiency of a practice model involving NPs. Capacity pooling among providers could be a helpful strategy to improve efficiency in care delivery. Conclusions The productivity and cost-efficiency of a practice model depend heavily on how providers organize their work and a variety of other factors related to the practice environment. Queueing theory provides useful tools to take into account these factors in making strategic decisions on staffing and panel size selection for a practice model. PMID:22092009

  14. Results and Lessons Learned from a Nurse Practitioner-Guided Dementia Care Intervention for Primary Care Patients and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Delaney, Colleen; Harel, Ofer; Pasquale, Karen; Schjavland, Elena; Lynch, John; Kleppinger, Alison; Crumb, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Older adults with dementia care needs often visit primary care physicians (PCPs), but PCP dementia care limitations are widely documented. This study tested the value of employing a nurse practitioner (NP) with geropsychiatric expertise to augment PCP care for newly and recently diagnosed patients and family caregivers. Twenty-one dyads received the NP intervention; 10 dyads were controls. Outcomes included patient neuropsychiatric symptom and quality of life changes, and caregiver depression, burden, and self-efficacy changes. Intervention acceptability by patients, caregivers, and PCPs was determined. No outcome differences were found; however, the NP intervention was deemed highly satisfactory by all stakeholders. Patients experienced no significant cognitive decline during their 12-month study period, helping explain why outcomes did not change. Given widespread acceptability, future tests of this PCP-enhancing intervention should include patients with more progressive cognitive decline at study entry. NPs with geropsychiatric expertise are ideal interventionists for this rapidly growing target population. PMID:24444453

  15. Results and lessons learned from a nurse practitioner-guided dementia care intervention for primary care patients and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Fortinsky, Richard H; Delaney, Colleen; Harel, Ofer; Pasquale, Karen; Schjavland, Elena; Lynch, John; Kleppinger, Alison; Crumb, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Older adults with dementia care needs often visit primary care physicians (PCPs), but PCP dementia care limitations are widely documented. This study tested the value of employing a nurse practitioner (NP) with geropsychiatric expertise to augment PCP care for newly and recently diagnosed patients and family caregivers. Twenty-one dyads received the NP intervention; 10 dyads were controls. Outcomes included patient neuropsychiatric symptom and quality of life changes, and caregiver depression, burden, and self-efficacy changes. Intervention acceptability by patients, caregivers, and PCPs was determined. No outcome differences were found; however, the NP intervention was deemed highly satisfactory by all stakeholders. Patients experienced no significant cognitive decline during the 12-month study period, helping explain why outcomes did not change. Given widespread acceptability, future tests of this PCP-enhancing intervention should include patients with more progressive cognitive decline at study entry. NPs with geropsychiatric expertise are ideal interventionists for this rapidly growing target population. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Examining differences in characteristics between patients receiving primary care from nurse practitioners or physicians using Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data and Medicare claims data.

    PubMed

    Loresto, Figaro L; Jupiter, Daniel; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have examined differences in functional, cognitive, and psychological factors between patients utilizing only nurse practitioners (NPs) and those utilizing only primary care medical doctors (PCMDs) for primary care. Patients utilizing NP-only or PCMD-only models for primary care will be characterized and compared in terms of functional, cognitive, and psychological factors. Cohorts were obtained from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey linked to Medicare claims data. Weighted analysis was conducted to compare the patients within the two care models in terms of functional, cognitive, and psychological factors. From 2007 to 2013, there was a 170% increase in patients utilizing only NPs for primary care. In terms of health status, patients utilizing only NPs in their primary care were not statistically different from patients utilizing only PCMDs. There is a perception that NPs, as compared with PCMDs, tend to provide care to healthier patients. Our results are contrary to this perception. In terms of health status, NP-only patients are similar to PCMD-only patients. Results of this study may inform research comparing NP-only care and PCMD-only care using Medicare and the utilization of NPs in primary care. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  18. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  19. Interprofessional teamwork innovations for primary health care practices and practitioners: evidence from a comparison of reform in three countries

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Mark F; Advocat, Jenny; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Miller, William L; Gunn, Jane M; Hogg, William; Scott, Cathie M; Chase, Sabrina M; Halma, Lisa; Russell, Grant M

    2016-01-01

    Context A key aim of reforms to primary health care (PHC) in many countries has been to enhance interprofessional teamwork. However, the impact of these changes on practitioners has not been well understood. Objective To assess the impact of reform policies and interventions that have aimed to create or enhance teamwork on professional communication relationships, roles, and work satisfaction in PHC practices. Design Collaborative synthesis of 12 mixed methods studies. Setting Primary care practices undergoing transformational change in three countries: Australia, Canada, and the USA, including three Canadian provinces (Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec). Methods We conducted a synthesis and secondary analysis of 12 qualitative and quantitative studies conducted by the authors in order to understand the impacts and how they were influenced by local context. Results There was a diverse range of complex reforms seeking to foster interprofessional teamwork in the care of patients with chronic disease. The impact on communication and relationships between different professional groups, the roles of nursing and allied health services, and the expressed satisfaction of PHC providers with their work varied more within than between jurisdictions. These variations were associated with local contextual factors such as the size, power dynamics, leadership, and physical environment of the practice. Unintended consequences included deterioration of the work satisfaction of some team members and conflict between medical and nonmedical professional groups. Conclusion The variation in impacts can be understood to have arisen from the complexity of interprofessional dynamics at the practice level. The same characteristic could have both positive and negative influence on different aspects (eg, larger practice may have less capacity for adoption but more capacity to support interprofessional practice). Thus, the impacts are not entirely predictable and need to be monitored, and so that

  20. Cost effectiveness of treating primary care patients in accident and emergency: a comparison between general practitioners, senior house officers, and registrars.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, J.; Lang, H.; Roberts, J. A.; Green, J.; Glucksman, E.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare outcome and costs of general practitioners, senior house officers, and registrars treating patients who attended accident and emergency department with problems assessed at triage as being of primary care type. DESIGN--Prospective intervention study which was later costed. SETTING--Inner city accident and emergency department in south east London. SUBJECTS--4641 patients presenting with primary care problems: 1702 were seen by general practitioners, 2382 by senior house officers, and 557 by registrars. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Satisfaction and outcome assessed in subsample of 565 patients 7-10 days after hospital attendance and aggregate costs of hospital care provided. RESULTS--Most patients expressed high levels of satisfaction with clinical assessment (430/562 (77%)), treatment (418/557 (75%)), and consulting doctor's manner (434/492 (88%)). Patients' reported outcome and use of general practice in 7-10 days after attendance were similar: 206/241 (85%), 224/263 (85%), and 52/59 (88%) of those seen by general practitioners, senior house officers, and registrars respectively were fully recovered or improving (chi2 = 0.35, P = 0.840), while 48/240 (20%), 48/268 (18%), and 12/57 (21%) respectively consulted a general practitioner or practice nurse (chi2 = 0.51, P = 0.774). Excluding costs of admissions, the average costs per case were 19.30 pounds, 17.97 pounds, and 11.70 pounds for senior house officers, registrars, and general practitioners respectively. With cost of admissions included, these costs were 58.25 pounds, 44.68 pounds, and 32.30 pounds respectively. CONCLUSION--Management of patients with primary care needs in accident and emergency department by general practitioners reduced costs with no apparent detrimental effect on outcome. These results support new role for general practitioners. PMID:8646050

  1. Acute Gastroenteritis and Campylobacteriosis in Swiss Primary Care: The Viewpoint of General Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bless, Philipp J; Muela Ribera, Joan; Schmutz, Claudia; Zeller, Andreas; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) is frequently caused by infectious intestinal diseases (IID) including food- and waterborne pathogens of public health importance. Among these pathogens, Campylobacter spp. plays a major role. Many European countries monitor selected IIDs within disease surveillance systems. In Switzerland, the information on IIDs is restricted to limited surveillance data, while no data is available for AG. We conducted a qualitative study among Swiss general practitioners (GPs) to investigate the case management of AG and campylobacteriosis patients, the associated disease burden and the determinants leading to registration in the National Notification System for Infectious Diseases (NNSID). Interviews were conducted with a semi-structured questionnaire and underwent inductive content analysis based on Grounded Theory. The questionnaire was repeatedly adapted to capture emerging themes until the point of theoretical saturation. GPs perceived AG and campylobacteriosis of little relevance to their daily work and public health in general. According to GP self-estimates each consults about two cases of AG per week and diagnoses a median of five campylobacteriosis cases per year. A large proportion of AG cases receives telephone consultations only and gets medical advice from the practice nurse. Antibiotic therapy is considered useful and stool diagnostics are performed for about a fifth of consulting AG patients. Stool diagnostics ("test") and antibiotic therapy ("treat") are interrelated and follow four strategies: "Wait & See", "Treat & See", "Treat & Test", and "Test & See". AG case management is diverse and includes different triage steps. A small proportion of AG patients have stool diagnostics performed and only positive tested patients are reported to the NNSID. As a result severe cases and cases with a history of travel abroad are overrepresented in the NNSID. The use of multiplex PCR panels in routine diagnostics likely leads to improved case

  2. Acute Gastroenteritis and Campylobacteriosis in Swiss Primary Care: The Viewpoint of General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Bless, Philipp J.; Muela Ribera, Joan; Schmutz, Claudia; Zeller, Andreas; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) is frequently caused by infectious intestinal diseases (IID) including food- and waterborne pathogens of public health importance. Among these pathogens, Campylobacter spp. plays a major role. Many European countries monitor selected IIDs within disease surveillance systems. In Switzerland, the information on IIDs is restricted to limited surveillance data, while no data is available for AG. We conducted a qualitative study among Swiss general practitioners (GPs) to investigate the case management of AG and campylobacteriosis patients, the associated disease burden and the determinants leading to registration in the National Notification System for Infectious Diseases (NNSID). Interviews were conducted with a semi-structured questionnaire and underwent inductive content analysis based on Grounded Theory. The questionnaire was repeatedly adapted to capture emerging themes until the point of theoretical saturation. GPs perceived AG and campylobacteriosis of little relevance to their daily work and public health in general. According to GP self-estimates each consults about two cases of AG per week and diagnoses a median of five campylobacteriosis cases per year. A large proportion of AG cases receives telephone consultations only and gets medical advice from the practice nurse. Antibiotic therapy is considered useful and stool diagnostics are performed for about a fifth of consulting AG patients. Stool diagnostics (“test”) and antibiotic therapy (“treat”) are interrelated and follow four strategies: “Wait & See”, “Treat & See”, “Treat & Test”, and “Test & See”. AG case management is diverse and includes different triage steps. A small proportion of AG patients have stool diagnostics performed and only positive tested patients are reported to the NNSID. As a result severe cases and cases with a history of travel abroad are overrepresented in the NNSID. The use of multiplex PCR panels in routine diagnostics likely

  3. How can primary care enhance end-of-life care for liver disease? Qualitative study of general practitioners' perceptions and experiences.

    PubMed

    Standing, Holly; Jarvis, Helen; Orr, James; Exley, Catherine; Hudson, Mark; Kaner, Eileen; Hanratty, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    Liver disease is the third most common cause of premature death in the UK. The symptoms of terminal liver disease are often difficult to treat, but very few patients see a palliative care specialist and a high proportion die in hospital. Primary care has been identified as a setting where knowledge and awareness of liver disease is poor. Little is known about general practitioners' (GPs) perceptions of their role in managing end-stage liver disease. To explore GPs' experiences and perceptions of how primary care can enhance end-of-life care for patients with liver disease. Qualitative interview study, thematic analysis. Purposive sample of 25 GPs from five regions of England. GPs expressed a desire to be more closely involved in end-of-life care for patients with liver disease but identified a number of factors that constrained their ability to contribute. These fell into three main areas; those relating directly to the condition, (symptom management and the need to combine a palliative care approach with ongoing medical interventions); issues arising from patients' social circumstances (stigma, social isolation and the social consequences of liver disease) and deficiencies in the organisation and delivery of services. Collaborative working with support from specialist hospital clinicians was regarded as essential, with GPs acknowledging their lack of experience and expertise in this area. End-of-life care for patients with liver disease merits attention from both primary and secondary care services. Development of care pathways and equitable access to symptom relief should be a priority. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Should General Practitioners Issue a Sick Certificate to Employees Who Consult for Low Back Pain in Primary Care?

    PubMed

    Lewis, M; Wynne-Jones, G; Barton, P; Whitehurst, D G T; Wathall, S; Foster, N E; Hay, E M; van der Windt, D

    2015-09-01

    Back pain is a common problem and has significant societal impact. Sickness certification is commonly issued to patients consulting their general practitioner with low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of certification for low back pain with clinical outcomes and cost consequences. A prospective cohort study using linked questionnaire and medical record data from 806 low back pain patients in 8 UK general practices: comparison of 116 (14.4%) who received a sickness certificate versus 690 who did not receive certification. The primary clinical measure was the Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). Data on back pain consultation and work absenteeism were used to calculate healthcare and societal costs. Participants issued a sickness certificate had higher back-related disability at baseline consultation and 6-month follow-up [mean difference 3.1 (95% CI 1.8, 4.4) on the RMDQ], indicating worse health status. After fully adjusting for baseline differences, most changes in clinical outcomes at 6 months were not significantly different between study groups. Productivity losses were significantly higher for the certification group, with most absence occurring after the expected end of certification; mean difference in costs due to absenteeism over 6 months was £1,956 (95% CI £941, £3040). There was no clear evidence of a difference in clinical outcomes between individuals issued a sickness certificate and those not issued a certification for their back pain. With little overall contrast in clinical outcomes, policy makers and care providers may wish to draw on the likely difference in societal costs alongside issues in ethical and moral care in their consideration of patient care for low back pain.

  5. Primary care approaches to musculoskeletal multiple-site joint pain pharmacological therapy: a survey of general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Raja, Rafi; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Wise, Elspeth; Conaghan, Philip G

    2014-10-01

    Chronic multiple-site joint pain (MSJP) due to osteoarthritis and soft tissue disorders is common in people over 50 years old and associated with poor outcomes. This study examined current pharmacological approaches to MSJP management in primary care. One hundred and fifty general practitioners (GPs) attending an educational seminar participated in an electronic survey (mean response rate 96%). Most GPs reported treating multiple painful joints concurrently (78%) compared with focusing on a single joint (21%). The majority believed there was no difference in analgesia for different disorders when selecting paracetamol (84%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)/COX-2 inhibitors (57%) or opioids (70%). When optimising therapy, intra-class optimisation (increase NSAID dose 41%, change to another NSAID/COX-2 inhibitor 30%) was preferred to inter-class step up therapy (add opioid 23%, change to opioid 6%). For NSAID gastrointestinal intolerance, the preference was to add a gastro-protective agent (74%). There is a need to better characterise MSJP and examine optimal pharmacotherapy regimens.

  6. On the primary care frontlines: the role of the general practitioner in smoking-cessation activities and diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Kunzel, Carol; Lalla, Evanthia; Albert, David A; Yin, Hong; Lamster, Ira B

    2005-08-01

    Advances in understanding the relationship between oral disease and systemic conditions need to be translated into clinical practice. Relevant here is assessing dentists' active involvement in in-office smoking-cessation activities and management of the patient with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The authors mailed a survey to a net sample of 132 active general practitioners (GPs) in the northeastern United States during fall 2002. They drew a random sample of GPs listed in the designated states from the 2001 American Dental Association directory. They received 105 responses, for a response rate of 80 percent. With regard to smoking-cessation activities and management of diabetic patients, a majority of GPs reported having a lack of knowledge, viewed such activities as peripheral to their role and disagreed that colleagues and/or patients expected them to perform such activities. More GPs performed both activities on an assessing/advising basis than on an active management basis. Results suggest that approaches to changing dentists' behavior should aim not only at increasing knowledge but at overcoming attitudes and orientations associated with actively managing patients who smoke and patients who have diabetes. The profession's growing evidence base supports an increased primary and preventive care role for dentists. This role affords them opportunities to expand the bounds of dental practice, improve therapeutic outcomes and promote patients' overall health.

  7. Nurse practitioners in primary care. VII. A cohort study of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, K.; Fortin, F.; Spitzer, W. O.; Kergin, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term surveillance of the employment experience and developing roles of 99 nurses and 79 associated physicians who participated in the first 5 years of the McMaster University educational program for family practice nurses was undertaken with a descriptive survey. Data were gathered by mailed questionnaires; a 97.8% response rate was attained. Sociodemographic profiles of both groups and characteristics of the practice setting where copractitioner teams functioned were determined. Selected noteworthy results show that 92.7% of the nurses were currently employed, and that 82.5% of the graduates continued in their original practice. Nurses' time invested in patient care activities increased by 105%; time devoted to clerical and housekeeping duties decreased by 42%. Changes in roles for both categories of copractitioners were important. The interdisciplinary arrangements resulted in appreciable financial disadvantages to physicians and only modest income incentives to nurses. A series of successes of the model of practice under assessment has been identified; offsetting ongoing difficulties and problems have also been enumerated. The data from this project and preceding studies can facilitate the solution of unresolved problems on the basis of evidence rather than opinion. PMID:856429

  8. Establishing a Viable Workforce Pipeline of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners: Benefits of a Health System and Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Madler, Billie; Helland, Mary

    Maldistribution and shortages of primary care providers, changing reimbursement structures, movement from inpatient to community-based models of care, an aging population, and health care reform lead to increased numbers of patients seeking care. All of these phenomena have a part in creating a health care landscape that requires industry leaders enlist innovative strategies to meet the health care needs of their communities. Delivery of high-quality, efficient care by qualified providers is essential for the success of any health care system. Partnerships between health systems and academic centers of learning to develop a pipeline of providers is one inventive approach that can address primary care workforce needs. The purpose of this article was to share an example of an academic/health care system partnership to address primary care workforce needs in a rural Midwestern region.

  9. Primary care-led survivorship care for patients with colon cancer and the use of eHealth: a qualitative study on perspectives of general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Duineveld, Laura A M; Wieldraaijer, Thijs; Wind, Jan; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; van Weert, Henk C P M; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of general practitioners (GPs) regarding their current and future role in survivorship care of patients with colon cancer, and to assess their perspectives on patients’ self-management capacities and the value of the eHealth application Oncokompas2.0 used by patients. Setting GPs from the central part of the Netherlands were interviewed at their location of preference. Participants 20 GPs participated (10 men, 10 women, age range 34–65 years, median age 49.5 years). The median years of experience as a GP was 14.5 years (range 3–34 years). Results GPs indicated attempting to keep in contact with patients after colon cancer treatment and mentioned being aware of symptoms of recurrent disease. Most participants would have liked to be more involved and expected to be able to provide survivorship care of colon cancer. Requirements mentioned were agreements with secondary care and a protocol. GPs considered Oncokompas2.0, which stimulates patients to structure their own survivorship care, as a useful additional tool for a specific group of patients (ie, young and highly-educated patients). Conclusions Based on the perspectives of the GPs, survivorship care of colon cancer in primary care is deemed feasible and the use of an eHealth application such as Oncokompas2.0 is expected to benefit specific groups of patients after colon cancer treatment. PMID:27126977

  10. Primary care practitioner and patient understanding of the concepts of multimorbidity and self-management: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Cassandra; Fisher, Louise; Bee, Penny; Bower, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to offer insight into how professionals and patients understand and experience multimorbidity and how these accounts differ, and how they affect attitudes and engagement with self-management. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 primary healthcare practitioners and 20 patients with at least 2 long-term conditions (including coronary heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and depression). Thematic analysis was used, and themes were identified using an open-coding method. Results: Practitioners associated multimorbidity with complexity and uncertainty in the clinic, leading to emotional strain and ‘heart sink’. Patient accounts differed. Some described multimorbidity as problematic when it exacerbated their symptoms and caused emotional and psychological strain. Others did not perceive multimorbidity as problematic. Self-management was seen by practitioners and patients to be a key element of managing multiple conditions, but drivers for prompting and engaging in self-management differed between patients and practitioners. Conclusion: This study suggests that recommendations for clinical practice for multimorbid patients should take into account the gap in perceptions between practitioner and patients about experiences of multimorbidity. Not least, practice would need to reflect the tension between practitioners’ and patients’ accounts about the role and benefits of self-management in the presence of multimorbidity. PMID:26770690

  11. PaTz groups for primary palliative care: reinventing cooperation between general practitioners and district nurses in palliative care: an evaluation study combining data from focus groups and a questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background PaTz (an acronym for ‘PAlliatieve Thuis Zorg’; palliative care at home) is an intervention to improve palliative care provision and strengthen the generalist knowledge of palliative care. In PaTz general practitioners and district nurses meet on a regular basis to identify patients with palliative care needs and to discuss care for these patients. This study explores experiences with regard to collaboration between general practitioners and district nurses, and perceived benefits of and barriers for implementation of PaTz. Methods This study is conducted within the primary care setting. Participants were 24 general practitioners who filled in a questionnaire, and seven general practitioners, five district nurses and two palliative care consultants who attended one of two focus groups. Results PaTz led to improved collaboration. Participants felt informational and emotional support from other PaTz participants. Also they felt that continuity of care was enhanced by PaTz. Practical recommendations for implementation were: meetings every 6 to 8 weeks, regular attendance from both general practitioners and district nurses, presence of a palliative care consultant, and a strong chairman. Conclusions PaTz is successful in enhancing collaboration in primary palliative care and easy to implement. Participants felt it improved continuity of care and knowledge on palliative care. Further research is needed to investigate whether patient and carer outcomes improve. PMID:24444024

  12. Effects of practitioner education, practitioner payment and reimbursement of patients' drug costs on smoking cessation in primary care: a cluster randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Twardella, Dorothee; Brenner, Hermann

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate new strategies to enhance the promotion of smoking cessation in general practice. Cluster randomised trial, 2x2 factorial design. 82 medical practices in Germany, including 94 general practitioners. 577 patients who smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day (irrespective of their intention to stop smoking) and were aged 36-75 years. Provision of a 2-h physician group training in smoking cessation methods and direct physician payments for every participant not smoking 12 months after recruitment (TI, training+incentive); provision of the same training and direct participant reimbursements for pharmacy costs associated with nicotine replacement therapy or bupropion treatment (TM, training+medication). Self-reported smoking abstinence obtained at 12 months follow-up and validated by serum cotinine. In intention-to-treat analysis, smoking abstinence at 12 months follow-up was 3% (2/74), 3% (5/144), 12% (17/140) and 15% (32/219) in the usual care, and interventions TI, TM and TI+TM, respectively. Applying a mixed logistic regression model, no effect was identified for intervention TI (odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65 to 2.43), but intervention TM strongly increased the odds of cessation (OR 4.77, 95% CI 2.03 to 11.22). Providing cost-free effective drugs to patients along with improved training opportunities for general practitioners could be an effective measure to achieve successful promotion of smoking cessation in general practice.

  13. Practices used for recommending sickness certification by general practitioners: a conversation analytic study of UK primary care consultations.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Hannah C; Barnes, Rebecca K; Byng, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Existing research indicates that many patients and doctors find the process of negotiating sickness certification for time off work to be a difficult one. This study examined how patients and general practitioners (GPs) managed these negotiations in a sample of UK primary care consultations. The study made use of an existing dataset of audio-recorded consultations between 13 GPs and 506 unselected adult patients in five general practices in London. Forty-nine consultations included discussions for both initial and repeat sickness certification across a wide range of conditions. Here we report our findings on doctor practices for recommending, as opposed to patient practices for advocating for, sickness certification (n = 26 cases). All cases were transcribed in detail and analysed using conversation analytic methods. Four main communication practices were observed: (1) declarative statements of need for sickness certification; (2) 'do you need' offers for sickness certification; (3) 'do you want' offers for sickness certification; and (4) conditional 'If X, Y' offers for sickness certification. These different communication practices indexed doctor agency, doctor endorsement and patient entitlement to varying degrees. In the main, recommendations to patients presenting with biomedical problems or a repeat occurrence of a psychosocial problem displayed stronger doctor endorsement and patient entitlement. Contrastingly, recommendations to patients presenting with new psychosocial and biopsychosocial problems, displayed weaker endorsement and patient entitlement. This study offers new evidence to support the Parsonian argument that becoming sick involves entering a social role with special rights and obligations. Through documenting doctors' orientations to their gatekeeping role as well as patients' orientations to differential rights vis à vis legitimacy, we demonstrate the contrasting stances of doctors in situ when giving sick notes for biomedical problems as

  14. Agreement between self-reported and general practitioner-reported chronic conditions among multimorbid patients in primary care - results of the MultiCare Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity is a common phenomenon in primary care. Until now, no clinical guidelines for multimorbidity exist. For the development of these guidelines, it is necessary to know whether or not patients are aware of their diseases and to what extent they agree with their doctor. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the agreement of self-reported and general practitioner-reported chronic conditions among multimorbid patients in primary care, and to discover which patient characteristics are associated with positive agreement. Methods The MultiCare Cohort Study is a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study of 3,189 multimorbid patients, ages 65 to 85. Data was collected in personal interviews with patients and GPs. The prevalence proportions for 32 diagnosis groups, kappa coefficients and proportions of specific agreement were calculated in order to examine the agreement of patient self-reported and general practitioner-reported chronic conditions. Logistic regression models were calculated to analyze which patient characteristics can be associated with positive agreement. Results We identified four chronic conditions with good agreement (e.g. diabetes mellitus κ = 0.80;PA = 0,87), seven with moderate agreement (e.g. cerebral ischemia/chronic stroke κ = 0.55;PA = 0.60), seventeen with fair agreement (e.g. cardiac insufficiency κ = 0.24;PA = 0.36) and four with poor agreement (e.g. gynecological problems κ = 0.05;PA = 0.10). Factors associated with positive agreement concerning different chronic diseases were sex, age, education, income, disease count, depression, EQ VAS score and nursing care dependency. For example: Women had higher odds ratios for positive agreement with their GP regarding osteoporosis (OR = 7.16). The odds ratios for positive agreement increase with increasing multimorbidity in almost all of the observed chronic conditions (OR = 1.22-2.41). Conclusions For multimorbidity research, the

  15. Treatment by a nurse practitioner in primary care improves the severity and impact of urinary incontinence in women. An observational study.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Doreth T A M; Stegeman, Marjolein M; Bor, Hans H; Lagro-Janssen, Toine A L M

    2015-06-12

    Urinary Incontinence (UI) is a common problem in women. The management of UI in primary care is time consuming and suboptimal. Shift of incontinence-care from General Practitioners (GP's) to a nurse practitioner maybe improves the quality of care. The purpose of this observational (pre/post) study is to determine the effectiveness of introducing a nurse practitioner in UI care and to explore women's reasons for not completing treatment. Sixteen trained nurse practitioners treated female patients with UI. All patients were examined and referred by the GP to the nurse practitioner working in the same practice. At baseline the severity of the UI (Sandvik-score), the impact on the quality of life (IIQ) and the impressed severity (PGIS) was measured and repeated after three months Differences were tested by the paired t and the NcNemar test. Reasons for not completing treatment were documented by the nurse practitioner and differences between the group that completed treatment and the drop-out group were tested. We included 103 women, mean age 55 years (SD 12.6). The Sandvik severity categories improved significantly (P < 0.001), as did the impact on daily life (2.54 points, P = 0.012). Among the IIQ score the impact on daily activities increased 0.73 points (P = 0.032), on social functioning 0.60 points (P = 0.030) and on emotional well-being 0.63 points (P = 0.031). The PGIS-score improved in 41.3% of the patients. The most important reasons for not completing the treatment were lack of improvement of the UI and difficulties in performing the exercises. Women who withdraw from guidance by the nurse practitioner perceived more impact on daily life (P = 0.036), in particular on the scores for social functioning (P = 0.015) and emotional well-being (P = 0.015). Treatment by a trained nurse practitioner seems positively affects the severity of the UI and the impact on the quality of life. Women who did not complete treatment suffer from

  16. Developing a Pipeline for the Community-Based Primary Care Workforce and Its Leadership: The Kraft Center for Community Health Leadership's Fellowship and Practitioner Programs.

    PubMed

    Shtasel, Derri; Hobbs-Knutson, Katherine; Tolpin, Harriet; Weinstein, Debra; Gottlieb, Gary L

    2015-09-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) face challenges recruiting and retaining primary care clinicians. Providing advanced training that enhances clinical skills within a public health framework, teaches leadership, protects time for scholarly activities, and focuses on the social mission may be a successful career development strategy. In July 2012, the Kraft Center for Community Health Leadership developed and implemented two 2-year programs to develop physician and nursing leaders with blended academic-community career paths and identities. The fellowship program for physicians and the practitioner program for early-career physicians and advanced practice nurses include mentored practice in a CHC; monthly learning days; completion of a community-based research project; and, for fellows, matriculation in an MPH program and engagement in a bimonthly leadership seminar. The first classes of 5 fellows and 14 practitioners graduated in June 2014. All 5 fellowship graduates were offered full-time positions at the CHCs where they practiced, and 2 have accepted leadership positions at their CHCs. All 14 practitioner graduates remain in community health, 5 have accepted leadership positions, and 2 have obtained grants to support ongoing projects. The authors are tracking graduates' career paths and the programs' impact on CHCs while modifying the programs on the basis of feedback; identifying elements of the programs that may be amenable to more cost-effective delivery; and exploring the potential for federal funding to support expansion of the practitioner program, and for the practitioner program to increase the return on investment provided by the National Health Service Corps.

  17. Primary care research ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R; Murphy, E; Crosland, A

    1995-01-01

    Research activity in primary care is increasing rapidly, and raises a range of specific ethical issues. Many of these relate to the involvement of individuals in the community who are not seeking medical care and to the impact of research participation on relationships between general practitioners and their patients. The ethical issues pertinent to a range of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in primary care are identified and considered. PMID:8554844

  18. Diabetes and hypertension guidelines and the primary health care practitioner in Barbados: knowledge, attitudes, practices and barriers--a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Adams, O Peter; Carter, Anne O

    2010-12-03

    Audits have shown numerous deficiencies in the quality of hypertension and diabetes primary care in Barbados, despite distribution of regional guidelines. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the barriers faced by primary care practitioners in Barbados concerning the recommendations of available diabetes and hypertension guidelines. Focus groups using a moderator's manual were conducted at all 8 public sector polyclinics, and 5 sessions were held for private practitioners. Polyclinic sessions were attended by 63 persons (17 physicians, 34 nurses, 3 dieticians, 3 podiatrists, 5 pharmacists, and 1 other), and private sector sessions by 20 persons (12 physicians, 1 nurse, 3 dieticians, 2 podiatrists and 2 pharmacists). Practitioners generally thought they gave a good quality of care. Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council 1995 diabetes and 1998 hypertension guidelines, and the Ministry of Health 2001 diabetes protocol had been seen by 38%, 32% and 78% respectively of polyclinic practitioners, 67%, 83%, and 33% of private physicians, and 25%, 0% and 38% of non-physician private practitioners. Current guidelines were considered by some to be outdated, unavailable, difficult to remember and lacking in advice to tackle barriers. Practitioners thought that guidelines should be circulated widely, promoted with repeated educational sessions, and kept short. Patient oriented versions of the guidelines were welcomed. Patient factors causing barriers to ideal outcome included denial and fear of stigma; financial resources to access an appropriate diet, exercise and monitoring equipment; confusion over medication regimens, not valuing free medication, belief in alternative medicines, and being unable to change habits. System barriers included lack of access to blood investigations, clinic equipment and medication; the lack of human resources in polyclinics; and an uncoordinated team approach. Patients faced cultural barriers with

  19. Surgical care practitioners...our experience.

    PubMed

    Quick, Julie; Williams, Sarah; Addison, Sarah

    2010-09-01

    Julie Quick and Sarah Williams--surgical care practitioners and Sarah Addison--consultant surgeon, present their own experiences of the surgical care practitioner (SCP) role and answer the question posed by Kim Sayers (pseudonym): 'Surgical care practitioners...why?' (JPP March 2010).

  20. Interventions targeted at primary care practitioners to improve the identification and referral of patients with co-morbid obesity: a realist review protocol.

    PubMed

    Blane, David N; Macdonald, Sara; Morrison, David; O'Donnell, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is one of the most significant public health challenges in the developed world. Recent policy has suggested that more can be done in primary care to support adults with obesity. In particular, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs) could improve the identification and referral of adults with obesity to appropriate weight management services. Previous interventions targeted at primary care practitioners in this area have had mixed results, suggesting a more complex interplay between patients, practitioners, and systems. The objectives of this review are (i) to identify the underlying 'programme theory' of interventions targeted at primary care practitioners to improve the identification and referral of adults with obesity and (ii) to explore how and why GPs and PNs identify and refer individuals with obesity, particularly in the context of weight-related co-morbidity. This protocol will explain the rationale for using a realist review approach and outline the key steps in this process. Realist review is a theory-led approach to knowledge synthesis that provides an explanatory analysis aimed at discerning what works, for whom, in what circumstances, how, and why. In this review, scoping interviews with key stakeholders involved in the planning and delivery of adult weight management services in Scotland helped to inform the identification of formal theories - from psychology, sociology, and implementation science - that will be tested as the review progresses. A comprehensive search strategy is described, including scope for iterative searching. Data analysis is outlined in three stages (describing context-mechanism-outcome configurations, exploring patterns in these configurations, and developing and testing middle-range theories, informed by the formal theories previously identified), culminating in the production of explanatory programme theory that considers individual, interpersonal, and institutional/systems-level components. This is the

  1. Manual Therapy by General Medical Practitioners for Nonspecific Low Back Pain in Primary Care: The ManRück Study Protocol of a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmiemann, Guido; Blase, Lena; Seeber, Christoph; Joos, Stefanie; Steinhäuser, Jost; Ernst, Stefanie; Großhennig, Anika; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Lingner, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonspecific low back pain (LBP) is a common reason for accessing primary care. Manual therapy (MT) may be an effective treatment, but data from clinical studies including relevant subgroups and clinical settings are sparse. The objective of this article is to describe the protocol of a study that will measure whether an MT protocol provided by general medical practitioners will lead to a faster pain reduction in patients with nonspecific LBP than does standard medical care. Methods/Design The study is an experimental pre-/postintervention design. The intervention consists of add-on MT treatment by general medical practitioners who have received MT training but are otherwise inexperienced in mobilization techniques. Participating general medical practitioners (n = 10) will consecutively recruit and treat patients before and after their training, serving as their own internal controls. The primary end point is a combined outcome assessing change in pain score over days 0 to 3 and time until pain is reduced by 2 points on an 11-point numeric pain scale and painkiller use is stopped. Secondary outcomes are patients’ functional capacities assessed using a questionnaire, amount of sick leave taken, patient satisfaction, and referrals for further treatment. Trial registration German clinical trials register: DRKS-ID DRKS00003240. PMID:26693216

  2. A guide to childhood motor stereotypies, tic disorders and the tourette spectrum for the primary care practitioner.

    PubMed

    Mills, Sarah; Hedderly, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders presenting in childhood are often complex and a heterogenous group of difficulties which can be a minefield for the primary care doctor. The recent activities of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS) have included publication of European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other Tic disorders aimed at guiding paediatricians and psychiatrists in managing these children. This paper aims to summarise the key points for primary care teams and impart important facts and general information on related childhood movement disorders in early development.

  3. A Guide to Childhood Motor Stereotypies, Tic Disorders and the Tourette Spectrum for the Primary Care Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Sarah; Hedderly, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders presenting in childhood are often complex and a heterogenous group of difficulties which can be a minefield for the primary care doctor. The recent activities of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS) have included publication of European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other Tic disorders aimed at guiding paediatricians and psychiatrists in managing these children. This paper aims to summarise the key points for primary care teams and impart important facts and general information on related childhood movement disorders in early development. PMID:24757265

  4. Accuracy of diagnosing atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram by primary care practitioners and interpretative diagnostic software: analysis of data from screening for atrial fibrillation in the elderly (SAFE) trial.

    PubMed

    Mant, Jonathan; Fitzmaurice, David A; Hobbs, F D Richard; Jowett, Sue; Murray, Ellen T; Holder, Roger; Davies, Michael; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2007-08-25

    To assess the accuracy of general practitioners, practice nurses, and interpretative software in the use of different types of electrocardiogram to diagnose atrial fibrillation. Prospective comparison with reference standard of assessment of electrocardiograms by two independent specialists. 49 general practices in central England. 2595 patients aged 65 or over screened for atrial fibrillation as part of the screening for atrial fibrillation in the elderly (SAFE) study; 49 general practitioners and 49 practice nurses. All electrocardiograms were read with the Biolog interpretative software, and a random sample of 12 lead, limb lead, and single lead thoracic placement electrocardiograms were assessed by general practitioners and practice nurses independently of each other and of the Biolog assessment. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. General practitioners detected 79 out of 99 cases of atrial fibrillation on a 12 lead electrocardiogram (sensitivity 80%, 95% confidence interval 71% to 87%) and misinterpreted 114 out of 1355 cases of sinus rhythm as atrial fibrillation (specificity 92%, 90% to 93%). Practice nurses detected a similar proportion of cases of atrial fibrillation (sensitivity 77%, 67% to 85%), but had a lower specificity (85%, 83% to 87%). The interpretative software was significantly more accurate, with a specificity of 99%, but missed 36 of 215 cases of atrial fibrillation (sensitivity 83%). Combining general practitioners' interpretation with the interpretative software led to a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 91%. Use of limb lead or single lead thoracic placement electrocardiograms resulted in some loss of specificity. Many primary care professionals cannot accurately detect atrial fibrillation on an electrocardiogram, and interpretative software is not sufficiently accurate to circumvent this problem, even when combined with interpretation by a general practitioner. Diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in

  5. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Interactive Didactic Lecture Versus Online Simulation-Based CME Programs Directed at Improving the Diagnostic Capabilities of Primary Care Practitioners.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Pam; Crim, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic errors in primary care contribute to increased morbidity and mortality, and billions in costs each year. Improvements in the way practicing physicians are taught so as to optimally perform differential diagnosis can increase patient safety and lower the costs of care. This study represents a comparison of the effectiveness of two approaches to CME training directed at improving the primary care practitioner's diagnostic capabilities against seven common and important causes of joint pain. Using a convenience sampling methodology, one group of primary care practitioners was trained by a traditional live, expert-led, multimedia-based training activity supplemented with interactive practice opportunities and feedback (control group). The second group was trained online with a multimedia-based training activity supplemented with interactive practice opportunities and feedback delivered by an artificial intelligence-driven simulation/tutor (treatment group). Before their respective instructional intervention, there were no significant differences in the diagnostic performance of the two groups against a battery of case vignettes presenting with joint pain. Using the same battery of case vignettes to assess postintervention diagnostic performance, there was a slight but not statistically significant improvement in the control group's diagnostic accuracy (P = .13). The treatment group, however, demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy (P < .02; Cohen d, effect size = 0.79). These data indicate that within the context of a CME activity, a significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy can be achieved by the use of a web-delivered, multimedia-based instructional activity supplemented by practice opportunities and feedback delivered by an artificial intelligence-driven simulation/tutor.

  6. Engaging primary care practitioners in quality improvement: making explicit the program theory of an interprofessional education intervention.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Brigitte; Désorcy, Bruno; Camirand, Michel; Rodrigue, Jean; Quesnel, Louise; Guimond, Claude; Labelle, Martin; Fournier, Johanne; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2013-03-20

    The scientific literature continues to advocate interprofessional collaboration (IPC) as a key component of primary care. It is recommended that primary care groups be created and configured to meet the healthcare needs of the patient population, as defined by patient demographics and other data analyses related to the health of the population being served. It is further recommended that the improvement of primary care services be supported by the delivery of feedback and performance measurements. This paper describes the theory underlying an interprofessional educational intervention developed in Quebec's Montérégie region (Canada) for the purpose of improving chronic disease management in primary care. The objectives of this study were to explain explicitly the theory underlying this intervention, to describe its components in detail and to assess the intervention's feasibility and acceptability. A program impact theory-driven evaluation approach was used. Multiple sources of information were examined to make explicit the theory underlying the education intervention: 1) a literature review and a review of documents describing the program's development; 2) regular attendance at the project's committee meetings; 3) direct observation of the workshops; 4) interviews of workshop participants; and 5) focus groups with workshop facilitators. Qualitative data collected were analysed using thematic analysis. The theoretical basis of the interprofessional education intervention was found to be work motivation theory and reflective learning. Five themes describing the workshop objectives emerged from the qualitative analysis of the interviews conducted with the workshop participants. These five themes were the importance of: 1) adopting a regional perspective, 2) reflecting, 3) recognizing gaps between practice and guidelines, 4) collaborating, and 5) identifying possible practice improvements. The team experienced few challenges implementing the intervention. However

  7. Integrating Nurse Practitioners Into Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Simone, Shari; McComiskey, Carmel A; Andersen, Brooke

    2016-12-01

    As demand for nurse practitioners in all types of intensive care units continues to increase, ensuring successful integration of these nurses into adult and pediatric general and specialty intensive care units poses several challenges. Adding nurse practitioners requires strategic planning to define critical aspects of the care delivery model before the practitioners are hired, develop a comprehensive program for integrating and training these nurses, and create a plan for implementing the program. Key strategies to ensure successful integration include defining and implementing the role of nurse practitioners, providing options for orientation, and supporting and training novice nurse practitioners. Understanding the importance of appropriate role utilization, the depth of knowledge and skill expected of nurse practitioners working in intensive care units, the need for a comprehensive training program, and a commitment to continued professional development beyond orientation are necessary to fully realize the contributions of these nurses in critical care. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kitai, A

    1986-07-01

    Development of primary care in Japan in still relatively unorganized and unstructured. As mentioned above, the author describes some strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese primary care system. In addressing the weaknesses the following suggestions are offered for the Japanese primary care delivery system: Increase the number of emergency rooms for all day, especially on holidays and at night. Introduce an appointment system. Introduce an open system of hospitals. Coordinate with public hospitals and primary care clinics. Organize the referral system between private practitioners and community hospitals. Increase the number of paramedical staff. Strengthen group practice among primary care physicians. Increase the establishment of departments of primary care practice with government financial incentives to medical schools and teaching hospitals. Develop a more active and direct teaching role for primary care practice or family practice at undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Improve and maintain present health insurance payment method, shifting from quantity of care to quality and continuity of care. Introduce formal continuing education. Introduce formal training programs of primary care and strengthen ambulatory care teaching programs.

  9. Ambulatory care centers: a unique opportunity for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Henne, S J; Warner, N E; Frank, K J

    1988-10-01

    Nurse practitioners continue to struggle to find avenues for professional fulfillment. Urgent care or ambulatory care centers (ACCs) may, because of their need to respond to consumer demands for more comprehensive services, offer nurse practitioners a unique opportunity to establish productive primary care practices based on the concepts of total patient care. A model for such a practice has operated successfully since 1983, establishing that both professional and business success can result from the collaborative efforts of nurse practitioners and physicians in an ACC setting.

  10. Community-based medical systems advancement in a hospital-primary health care centre in Crete, Greece: concepts, methods, and the new role of the general practitioner.

    PubMed

    Chatziarsenis, M; Lionis, C; Faresjö, T; Fioretos, M; Trell, E

    1998-06-01

    Modern health systems research and development emphasize the transition from hospital to primary health care. Importantly, this transition is projected to be coordinated and interactive, as facilitated, e.g., by improved information systems and collaboration between the involved parties, including Universities and health authorities. An ideal combination of this might accordingly be offered by a synthesis of a basic hospital and primary health care center in an area of suitable site, size, and structure. We believe that our institution, Nosokomion Neapolis, in; the moderate-size Cretan township of Neapolis (New-city) offers an interesting model example of this, because of its affiliation with the University of Heraklion and its international and EU-supported project status. In the present report we want to emphasize the elements that are particularly well suited and manageable and in many ways both opportunistic and conscientious "back to the future" instances of a successful Hospital/Primary Health Care integration. Specifically, we think that the advantages in local area epidemiology, prevention, and quality assurance are apparent, and nurture a--rather renewed that new-role of the general practitioner as both a holistic population doctor and a health systems researcher for the year 2,000 and beyond.

  11. General practitioners' reasons for the failure of a randomized controlled trial (The TIGER Trial) to implement epilepsy guidelines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brian; Skinner, James; Dowell, Jon; Roberts, Richard; Crombie, Iain; Davis, Julian

    2007-07-01

    To explore reasons for the failure of a randomized controlled trial to influence implementation of epilepsy guidelines in primary care, and to generate theory about likely contexts in which guidelines would lead to changes in clinician behavior. Qualitative study based on focus groups and a single in-depth interview. Participants included 47 primary health care staff selected from a purposive sample of 13 urban and rural general practices. The key reason for the lack of implementation of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network epilepsy guideline was an established pattern of general practitioner behavior, supported by practice staff, with which there was little perceived need to change. Secondary to this was a lack of knowledge of the existence and/or content of the guideline and perceived difficulties in implementing them in practice stemming from resource constraints and possible patient resistance. The individual behavior of clinicians was therefore rooted in wider service structures and policies. Guidelines may be more likely to be implemented where there are perceived problems with current service delivery. Attempts to facilitate the implementation of guidelines could also focus on areas where there is already a perceived need for guidance or a disruption in one of the underlying variables that maintain the health professional's role and practice. They may also be more likely where initiatives are focused more widely than individual physician behavior and are more broadly directed toward redesigning the wider care delivery systems by incorporating other providers to provide care coordination, enhancing patient self-management, and using information technology tools.

  12. The effect of nurses' preparedness and nurse practitioner status on triage call management in primary care: A secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the ESTEEM trial.

    PubMed

    Varley, Anna; Warren, Fiona C; Richards, Suzanne H; Calitri, Raff; Chaplin, Katherine; Fletcher, Emily; Holt, Tim A; Lattimer, Valerie; Murdoch, Jamie; Richards, David A; Campbell, John

    2016-06-01

    Nurse-led telephone triage is increasingly used to manage demand for general practitioner consultations in UK general practice. Previous studies are equivocal about the relationship between clinical experience and the call outcomes of nurse triage. Most research is limited to investigating nurse telephone triage in out-of-hours settings. To investigate whether the professional characteristics of primary care nurses undertaking computer decision supported software telephone triage are related to call disposition. Questionnaire survey of nurses delivering the nurse intervention arm of the ESTEEM trial, to capture role type (practice nurse or nurse practitioner), prescriber status, number of years' nursing experience, graduate status, previous experience of triage, and perceived preparedness for triage. Our main outcome was the proportion of triaged patients recommended for follow-up within the practice (call disposition), including all contact types (face-to-face, telephone or home visit), by a general practitioner or nurse. 15 general practices and 7012 patients receiving the nurse triage intervention in four regions of the UK. 45 nurse practitioners and practice nurse trained in the use of clinical decision support software. We investigated the associations between nursing characteristics and triage call disposition for patient 'same-day' appointment requests in general practice using multivariable logistic regression modelling. Valid responses from 35 nurses (78%) from 14 practices: 31/35 (89%) had ≥10 years' experience with 24/35 (69%) having ≥20 years. Most patient contacts (3842/4605; 86%) were recommended for follow-up within the practice. Nurse practitioners were less likely to recommend patients for follow-up odds ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.07; 0.49 than practice nurses. Nurses who reported that their previous experience had prepared them less well for triage were more likely to recommend patients for follow-up (OR 3.17, 95% CI 1

  13. The effect of nurses’ preparedness and nurse practitioner status on triage call management in primary care: A secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the ESTEEM trial

    PubMed Central

    Varley, Anna; Warren, Fiona C.; Richards, Suzanne H.; Calitri, Raff; Chaplin, Katherine; Fletcher, Emily; Holt, Tim A.; Lattimer, Valerie; Murdoch, Jamie; Richards, David A.; Campbell, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurse-led telephone triage is increasingly used to manage demand for general practitioner consultations in UK general practice. Previous studies are equivocal about the relationship between clinical experience and the call outcomes of nurse triage. Most research is limited to investigating nurse telephone triage in out-of-hours settings. Objective To investigate whether the professional characteristics of primary care nurses undertaking computer decision supported software telephone triage are related to call disposition. Design Questionnaire survey of nurses delivering the nurse intervention arm of the ESTEEM trial, to capture role type (practice nurse or nurse practitioner), prescriber status, number of years’ nursing experience, graduate status, previous experience of triage, and perceived preparedness for triage. Our main outcome was the proportion of triaged patients recommended for follow-up within the practice (call disposition), including all contact types (face-to-face, telephone or home visit), by a general practitioner or nurse. Settings 15 general practices and 7012 patients receiving the nurse triage intervention in four regions of the UK. Participants 45 nurse practitioners and practice nurse trained in the use of clinical decision support software. Methods We investigated the associations between nursing characteristics and triage call disposition for patient ‘same-day’ appointment requests in general practice using multivariable logistic regression modelling. Results Valid responses from 35 nurses (78%) from 14 practices: 31/35 (89%) had ≥10 years’ experience with 24/35 (69%) having ≥20 years. Most patient contacts (3842/4605; 86%) were recommended for follow-up within the practice. Nurse practitioners were less likely to recommend patients for follow-up odds ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.07; 0.49 than practice nurses. Nurses who reported that their previous experience had prepared them less well for triage were more

  14. [Primary care in Ireland].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-03-27

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical considerations and practical recommendations for the primary care practitioner in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Basile, Jan N

    2007-12-01

    Anemia is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a risk factor for poor disease outcome. Anemia acts as a risk multiplier, significantly increasing the risk of death in anemic versus nonanemic CKD patients with similar comorbidities. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are a mainstay for the treatment of anemia in renal patients on dialysis, but recent data suggests that earlier treatment of anemia in CKD may delay the onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and decrease mortality. Nonetheless, anemia of CKD is under-recognized and undertreated during the period before initiation of dialysis, when anemia correction may have the greatest impact on disease outcome. This report describes anemia in CKD and its association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and poor disease outcome, and offers suggestions for the recognition and treatment of anemia of CKD in the primary care setting.

  16. Using information and communication technologies to consult with patients in Victorian primary care: the views of general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Lisa; Fairhurst, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Information and communication technologies such as email, text messaging and video messaging are commonly used by the general population. However, international research has shown that they are not used routinely by GPs to communicate or consult with patients. Investigating Victorian GPs' perceptions of doing so is timely given Australia's new National Broadband Network, which may facilitate web-based modes of doctor-patient interaction. This study therefore aimed to explore Victorian GPs' experiences of, and attitudes toward, using information and communication technologies to consult with patients. Qualitative telephone interviews were carried out with a maximum variation sample of 36GPs from across Victoria. GPs reported a range of perspectives on using new consultation technologies within their practice. Common concerns included medico-legal and remuneration issues and perceived patient information technology literacy. Policy makers should incorporate GPs' perspectives into primary care service delivery planning to promote the effective use of information and communication technologies in improving accessibility and quality of general practice care.

  17. Risky business: what primary care practitioners need to know about the influence of the media on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2006-06-01

    Media can be powerfully prosocial, educational, and entertaining. Negative effects do exist, however, and they have been well documented. Despite the power of the new multinational media conglomerates and the intransigence of the entertainment industry,practitioners can make a difference in the future.

  18. Prescribing Exercise for Older Adults: A Needs Assessment Comparing Primary Care Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, and Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauenhauer, Jason A.; Podgorski, Carol A.; Karuza, Jurgis

    2006-01-01

    To inform the development of educational programming designed to teach providers appropriate methods of exercise prescription for older adults, the authors conducted a survey of 177 physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners (39% response rate). The survey was designed to better understand the prevalence of exercise prescriptions,…

  19. Curriculum Guidelines & Regulatory Criteria for Family Nurse Practitioners Seeking Prescriptive Authority To Manage Pharmacotherapeutics in Primary Care. Summary Report 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Chicago, IL.

    This report describes a multi-organizational project to accomplish two goals: (1) to develop pharmacology/pharmacotherapeutics curriculum guidelines designed to prepare family nurse practitioners (FNPs) for full prescriptive authority; and (2) to develop regulatory criteria for evaluating the academic preparation and clinical competencies of FNPs…

  20. Recommendations to the primary care practitioners and the patients for managing pelvic pain, especially in painful bladder syndrome for early and better prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Jin; Han, Adelaide Na Yeon; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2015-01-01

    Painful bladder syndrome (PBS) is a common disease presenting with chronic pelvic pain and discomfort with at least one urinary symptom with no identifiable cause. The etiology is still unknown, and the medication has limited effects on pelvic pain or other urinary symptoms. This article presents advanced insight regarding the approach to PBS, particularly pelvic pain for primary care practitioners and patients. We suggest six tips for medical staff and suspected patients for easy diagnosis and proper treatment of pelvic pain. These six tips cover: Self-awareness of the disease; immediate urine culture test; specifying the location of pain urinary incontinence; frequency, or urgency without functional disorder of an overactive bladder helpful dietary control; complementary, and alternative medicine, and finding an expert. These tips might be helpful in advancing the schematic approach and in achieving better prognosis of PBS. Further study should be conducted to achieve better treatment for this disease, including development of a definitive test and diagnosis. PMID:26535214

  1. Referral to yoga therapists in rural primary health care: A survey of general practitioners in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Jon; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: Yoga is an increasingly accepted complementary treatment modality for referral in Australian general practice, yet this practitioner group has largely escaped research attention in Australia. Complementary medicine use is highest in rural and regional areas, where a number of primary health care challenges are also more pronounced. Despite the significant role of complementary therapists in rural and regional Australia, and the increasing acceptance of yoga therapy in general practice, there has been little exploration of the interface between yoga therapists and conventional primary health care practitioners in this area. Materials and Methods: A 27-item questionnaire was sent to all 1486 general practitioners (GPs) currently practising in rural and regional Divisions of General Practice in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 585 GPs, with 49 returned as ‘no longer at this address’ (response rate 40.7%). One-in-eight GPs (12.1%) advised their patients of specific yoga therapies and protocols, and 7.2% advised specific meditation techniques. Three-quarters of GPs (76.6%) referred to a yoga therapist at least a few times per year, with 12.5% of GPs referring at least once per week. GPs being in a remote location (OR = 10.95; CI: 1.55, 77.31), being female (OR = 1.85; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.94), GPs graduating from an Australian medical school (OR = 4.52; 95% CI: 2.61, 7.80), perceiving lack of other treatment options (OR = 3.29; 95% CI: 1.61, 6.74), GPs reporting good or very good knowledge of yoga therapies (OR = 18.2; 95% CI: 9.19, 36.19), and GPs using CAM for their own personal health (OR = 4.53; 95% CI: 2.60, 7.87) were all independently predictive of increased referral to yoga therapists amongst the rural GPs in this study. Conclusions: There is a significant interface between yoga therapists in Australian rural and regional general practice. There is generally high support for yoga therapies among Australian

  2. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The perceived meaning of a (w)holistic view among general practitioners and district nurses in Swedish primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Eva Lena; Ovhed, Ingvar; Borgquist, Lars; Wilhelmsson, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background The definition of primary care varies between countries. Swedish primary care has developed from a philosophic viewpoint based on quality, accessibility, continuity, co-operation and a holistic view. The meaning of holism in international literature differs between medicine and nursing. The question is, if the difference is due to different educational traditions. Due to the uncertainties in defining holism and a holistic view we wished to study, in depth, how holism is perceived by doctors and nurses in their clinical work. Thus, the aim was to explore the perceived meaning of a holistic view among general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses (DNs). Methods Seven focus group interviews with a purposive sample of 22 GPs and 20 nurses working in primary care in two Swedish county councils were conducted. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis resulted in three categories, attitude, knowledge, and circumstances, with two, two and four subcategories respectively. A professional attitude involves recognising the whole person; not only fragments of a person with a disease. Factual knowledge is acquired through special training and long professional experience. Tacit knowledge is about feelings and social competence. Circumstances can either be barriers or facilitators. A holistic view is a strong motivator and as such it is a facilitator. The way primary care is organised can be either a barrier or a facilitator and could influence the use of a holistic approach. Defined geographical districts and care teams facilitate a holistic view with house calls being essential, particularly for nurses. In preventive work and palliative care, a holistic view was stated to be specifically important. Consultations and communication with the patient were seen as important tools. Conclusion 'Holistic view' is multidimensional, well implemented and very much alive among both GPs and DNs. The word

  4. Referral to massage therapy in primary health care: a survey of medical general practitioners in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Jon L; Sibbritt, David W; Adams, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Massage therapists are an important part of the health care setting in rural and regional Australia and are the largest complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) profession based on both practitioner numbers and use. The purpose of this study was to survey medical general practitioners (GPs) in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia, to identify their knowledge, attitudes, relationships, and patterns of referral to massage therapy in primary health care. A 27-item questionnaire was sent to all 1486 GPs currently practicing in rural and regional Divisions of General Practice in New South Wales, Australia. The survey had 5 general areas: the GP's personal use and knowledge of massage, the GP's professional relationships with massage practice and massage practitioners, the GP's specific opinions on massage, the GP's information-seeking behavior in relation to massage, and the GP's assumptions on massage use by patients in their local areas. A total of 585 questionnaires were returned completed, with 49 survey questionnaires returned as "no longer at this address" (response rate of 40.7%). More than three-quarters of GPs (76.6%) referred to massage therapy at least a few times per year, with 12.5% of GPs referring at least once per week. The GP being in a nonremote location (odds ratio [OR], 14.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-50.0), graduating from an Australian medical school (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.09-3.70), perceiving a lack of other treatment options (OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.15-6.01), perceiving good patient access to a wide variety of medical specialists (OR, 11.1; 95% CI, 1.7-50.0), believing in the efficacy of massage therapy (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.58-4.78), experiencing positive results from patients using massage therapy previously (OR, 13.95; 95% CI, 5.96-32.64), or having prescribed any CAM previously (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.03-3.27) were all independently predictive of increased referral to massage therapy among the GPs in this study. There appears to

  5. Collaboration between traditional practitioners and primary health care staff in South Africa: developing a workable partnership for community mental health services.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Hall, Vicky; Petersen, Inge; Bhana, Arvin; Mjadu, Sithembile; Hosegood, Victoria; Flisher, Alan J

    2010-09-01

    The majority of the black African population in South Africa utilize both traditional and public sector Western systems of healing for mental health care. There is a need to develop models of collaboration that promote a workable relationship between the two healing systems. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of service users and providers of current interactions between the two systems of care and ways in which collaboration could be improved in the provision of community mental health services. Qualitative individual and focus group interviews were conducted with key health care providers and service users in one typical rural South African health sub-district. The majority of service users held traditional explanatory models of illness and used dual systems of care, with shifting between treatment modalities reportedly causing problems with treatment adherence. Traditional healers expressed a lack of appreciation from Western health care practitioners but were open to training in Western biomedical approaches and establishing a collaborative relationship in the interests of improving patient care. Western biomedically trained practitioners were less interested in such an arrangement. Interventions to acquaint traditional practitioners with Western approaches to the treatment of mental illness, orientation of Western practitioners towards a culture-centred approach to mental health care, as well as the establishment of fora to facilitate the negotiation of respectful collaborative relationships between the two systems of healing are required at district level to promote an equitable collaboration in the interests of improved patient care.

  6. Reimbursement for acute care nurse practitioner services.

    PubMed

    Richmond, T S; Thompson, H J; Sullivan-Marx, E M

    2000-01-01

    Until the passage of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, acute care nurse practitioners could not be directly reimbursed for inpatient services provided to Medicare patients. With the enactment of this legislation, acute care nurse practitioners may now be directly compensated for care provided. The historical and contextual issues that surround reimbursement for nursing and advanced practice nursing services are reviewed to serve as a foundation for understanding the current Medicare reimbursement regulations. The implications of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 for acute care nurse practitioners and their professional colleagues are critically examined. The language of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and the subsequent rules and regulations issued by the Health Care Financing Administration are reviewed with specific focus on implications for acute care nurse practitioners. The opportunities for reimbursement for services provided by acute care nurse practitioners are more extensive than ever before. Acute care nurse practitioners and their physician colleagues will be wise to become fully conversant with the changes in Medicare reimbursement regulations.

  7. Ethical religion in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Malcolm

    2017-01-01

    Religion is increasingly significant in UK society, and is highly significant for many patients and primary care practitioners. An important task for the practitioner is to ensure that the place of religion in the patient/practitioner relationship is treated with the same ethical seriousness as every other aspect of that relationship. The article finds the ‘four principles of biomedical ethics’ to be applicable, and recent GMC guidelines to be consistent with the four principles. The article applies the four principles to the particular case of practitioners wearing religious symbolism. PMID:28811838

  8. [Primary care in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-09-01

    Belgium is an attractive country to work in, not just for doctors but for all Spanish workers, due to it having the headquarters of European Union. The health job allure is double; on the one hand, the opportunity to find a decent job, and on the other, because it is possible to develop their professional abilities with patients of the same nationality in a health system with a different way of working. The Belgium health care system is based on security social models. Health care is financed by the government, social security contributions, and voluntary private health insurance. Primary care in Belgium is very different to that in Spain. Citizens may freely choose their doctor (general practitioner or specialist) increasing the lack of coordination between primary and specialized care. This leads to serious patient safety problems and loss of efficiency within the system. Belgium is a European country with room to improve preventive coverage. General practitioners are self-employed professionals with free choice of setting, and their salary is linked to their professional activity. Ambulatory care is subjected to co-payment, and this fact leads to great inequities on access to care. The statistics say that there is universal coverage but, in 2010, 14% of the population did not seek medical contact due to economic problems. It takes 3 years to become a General Practitioner and continuing medical education is compulsory to be revalidated. In general, Belgian and Spaniards living and working in Belgium are happy with the functioning of the health care system. However, as doctors, we should be aware that it is a health care system in which access is constrained for some people, and preventive coverage could be improved. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Transsexual primary care.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Christopher O

    2010-08-01

    Transsexual presentations in primary care stress mainstream health care physical resources, institutional organization, and the cultural flexibility of providers and interdisciplinary staff. This article describes the ethical landscape, examines gender identity culture, and considers gender reassignment physiology. Nurse practitioners are challenged to advocate for this population. Sources for the discussion derive from published institutional guidelines, institutional and civic policies, web-based information in the public domain, and professional journal articles. Advocacy for cultural sensitivity, institutional policy change,and professional integrity will determine healthcare quality for this population. Advocacy for cultural awareness and institutional change has begun in larger institutions and metropolitan areas, but is necessary across primary care settings. Caring for transsexuals requires knowledge of anatomical reassignments, hormonal therapy effects, and cultural sensitivities particular to the gender identity community. Healthcare screening and physical exam modifications for these presentations require forethought and appropriate adjustments.

  10. Child and adolescent psychiatry: which knowledge and skills do primary care physicians need to have? A survey in general practitioners and paediatricians.

    PubMed

    Lempp, Thomas; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; Bachmann, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) play a key role in the initial assessment and management of children and adolescents with mental health problems. However, it is unclear whether current medical education curricula sufficiently equip PCPs for this task. The aim of this study was to investigate, which child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP)-related skills and knowledge PCPs say they require in their daily practice. A questionnaire was generated, employing a modified two-step Delphi approach. Besides socio-demographic items, the questionnaire contained 17 CAP-related knowledge items and 13 CAP-related skills items, which had to be rated by importance in daily practice. The questionnaire was distributed to 348 office-based paediatricians and 500 general practitioners (GPs) in Germany. The overall return rate was 51.3% (435/848). Regarding CAP-related knowledge, both paediatricians and GPs rated somatoform disorders and obesity as highly important for daily practice. Moreover, paediatricians also deemed regulatory disorders during infancy (e.g. crying, sleep disorders) as important, while GPs assessed knowledge on paediatric depression as relevant. For paediatricians and GPs, the most relevant CAP-related skills were communicating with children and adolescents and their parents. Additionally, paediatricians rated differentiating between non-pathologic and clinically relevant behaviour problems very relevant, while GPs considered basic psychotherapeutic skills essential. The CAP-related knowledge and skills perceived relevant for doctors in primary care differ from the majority of current medical school CAP curricula, which cover mainly typical, epitomic CAP disorders and are predominantly knowledge-oriented. Therefore, medical education in CAP should be amended to reflect the needs of PCPs to improve healthcare for children and adolescents with mental health problems.

  11. The care of patients with subthreshold depression in primary care: Is it all that bad? A qualitative study on the views of general practitioners and patients

    PubMed Central

    Backenstrass, Matthias; Joest, Katharina; Rosemann, Thomas; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Background Studies show that subthreshold depression is highly prevalent in primary care, has impact on the quality of life and causes immense health care costs. Although this points to the clinical relevance of subthreshold depression, contradictory results exist regarding the often self-remitting course of this state. However, first steps towards quality improvement in the care of subthreshold depressive patients are being undertaken. This makes it important to gather information from both a GPs' and a patients' point of view concerning the clinical relevance as well as the status quo of diagnosis and treatment in order to appraise the need for quality improvement research. Method We conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews for the questioning of 20 GPs and 20 patients with subthreshold depression on aspects of clinical relevance and on the status quo of diagnosis and treatment. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed on a content analytical theoretical background using Atlas.ti software. Results Most of the GPs found subthreshold depression to be clinically significant. Although some problems in diagnosis and treatment were mentioned, the GPs had sensible diagnostic and treatment strategies at hand which resulted from the long and trustful relationship with the patients and which corresponded to the patients' expectations. The patients rather expected their GP to listen to them than to take specific actions towards symptom relief and, in the main, were satisfied with the GPs' care. Conclusion The study shows that subthreshold depression is a clinically relevant issue for GPs but raises the possibility that quality improvement might not be as necessary as past studies showed. Further quantitative research using larger random samples is needed to determine the effectiveness of the strategies used by the GPs, patients' satisfaction with these strategies and the course of these patients' symptoms in primary care. PMID:18031573

  12. General practitioner views on the determinants of test ordering: a theory-based qualitative approach to the development of an intervention to improve immunoglobulin requests in primary care.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, S L; McHugh, S M; Bradley, C P; Browne, J P; Cahill, M R

    2016-07-19

    Research suggests that variation in laboratory requesting patterns may indicate unnecessary test use. Requesting patterns for serum immunoglobulins vary significantly between general practitioners (GPs). This study aims to explore GP's views on testing to identify the determinants of behaviour and recommend feasible intervention strategies for improving immunoglobulin test use in primary care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs requesting laboratory tests at Cork University Hospital or University Hospital Kerry in the South of Ireland. GPs were identified using a Health Service Executive laboratory list of GPs in the Cork-Kerry region. A random sample of GPs (stratified by GP requesting patterns) was generated from this list. GPs were purposively sampled based on the criteria of location (urban/rural); length of time qualified; and practice size (single-handed/group). Interviews were carried out between December 2014 and February 2015. Interviews were transcribed verbatim using NVivo 10 software and analysed using the framework analysis method. Emerging themes were mapped to the theoretical domains framework (TDF), which outlines 12 domains that can enable or inhibit behaviour change. The behaviour change wheel and behaviour change technique (BCT) taxonomy were then used to identify potential intervention strategies. Sixteen GPs were interviewed (ten males and six females). Findings suggest that intervention strategies should specifically target the key barriers to effective test ordering, while considering the context of primary care practice. Seven domains from the TDF were perceived to influence immunoglobulin test ordering behaviours and were identified as 'mechanisms for change' (knowledge, environmental context and resources, social/professional role and identity, beliefs about capabilities, beliefs about consequences, memory, attention and decision-making processes and behavioural regulation). Using these TDF domains, seven BCTs

  13. [Primary care in Italy].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-05-25

    Italy is not a country where Spanish doctors emigrate, as there is an over-supply of health care professionals. The Italian Servizio Sanitario Nazionale has some differences compared to the Spanish National Health System. The Servizio Sanitario Nazionale is financed by national and regional taxes and co-payments. There are taxes earmarked for health, and Primary Care receives 50% of the total funds. Italian citizens and residents in Italy have the right to free health cover. However, there are co-payments for laboratory and imaging tests, pharmaceuticals, specialist ambulatory services, and emergencies. Co-payments vary in the different regions. The provision of services is regional, and thus fragmentation and major inequities are the norm. Doctors in Primary Care are self-employed and from 2000 onwards, there are incentives to work in multidisciplinary teams. Salary is regulated by a national contract and it is the sum of per-capita payments and extra resources for specific activities. Responsibilities are similar to those of Spanish professionals. However, medical care is more personal. Relationships between Primary Care and specialised care depend on the doctors' relationships. Primary Care doctors are gatekeepers for specialised care, except for gynaecology, obstetrics and paediatrics. Specialised training is compulsory in order to work as general practitioner. The Italian Health Care System is a national health system like the Spanish one. However, health care professionals are self-employed, and there are co-payments. In spite of co-payments, Italians have one of the highest average life expectancy, and they support a universal and publicly funded health-care system. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. General practitioner management related to skin cancer prevention and screening during standard medical encounters: a French cross-sectional study based on the International Classification of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Rat, Cédric; Houd, Sara; Gaultier, Aurélie; Grimault, Charlotte; Quereux, Gaelle; Mercier, Alain; Letrilliart, Laurent; Dreno, Brigitte; Nguyen, Jean Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess general practitioner (GP) management practices related to skin cancer prevention and screening during standard medical encounters. Setting Data on medical encounters addressing skin cancer issues were obtained from a French database containing information from 17 019 standard primary care consultations. Participants Data were collected between December 2011 and April 2012 by 54 trainees who reported the regular practice of 128 GPs using the International Classification of Primary Care. Outcome measures Reasons for encounters and the following care processes were recorded: counselling, clinical examinations and referral to a specialist. Medical encounters addressing skin cancer issues were compared with medical encounters that addressed other health problems using a multivariate analysis. Results Only 0.7% of medical encounters addressed skin cancer issues. When patients did require management of a skin cancer-related issue, this was more likely initiated by the doctor than the patient (70.7% vs 29.3%; p<0.001). Compared with medical encounters addressing other health problems, encounters that addressed skin cancer problems required more tasks (3.7 vs 2.5; p<0.001) and lasted 1 min and 20 s longer (p=0.003). GPs were less involved in clinical examinations (67.5% vs 97.1%; p<0.001), both complete (7.3% vs 22.3%, p<0.001) and partial examinations (60.2% vs 74.9%), and were less involved in counselling (5.7% vs 16.9%; p<0.001). Patients presenting skin cancer issues were referred to a specialist more often than patients consulting for other health problems (39.0% vs 12.1%; p<0.001). GPs performed a biopsy in 6.7% of all skin cancer-related encounters. Conclusions This study demonstrates discrepancies between the high prevalence of skin cancer and the low rate of medical encounters addressing these issues in general practice. Our findings should be followed by qualitative interviews to better understand the observed

  15. Primary care development zones.

    PubMed

    Beardshaw, V; Gordon, P; Plamping, D

    1993-01-30

    Most commentators on the Tomlinson report have agreed with its emphasis on improving primary and community care. The three elements of such a strategy are a remedial programme to bring primary care up to national standards, a programme to provide such services to people with non-standard needs such as mobile Londoners, ethnic minorities, and homeless people, and the development of an expanded model of primary care. No one model will be appropriate across all of London. The process should start with an audit of existing resources and services within each community, together with an analysis of needs. From this would develop a local programme with specific plans for investment in premises, staffing, training, and management. New contractual mechanisms may be needed to attract practitioners, improve their premises, secure out of hours services, and provide medical cover for community beds. There should also be incentives for closer working between primary and secondary services. No developments on the scale needed for London have been carried out in primary care within the lifetime of the NHS--but their success will be critical to the calibre of health services for Londoners into the next century.

  16. The impact of genetic outreach education and support to primary care on practitioner's confidence and competence in dealing with familial cancers.

    PubMed

    Bethea, J; Qureshi, N; Drury, N; Guilbert, P

    2008-01-01

    To determine the level of competence and confidence in general practice in relation to the management of familial cancers and to determine the impact of providing genetic educational outreach on confidence and competence. Confidence and competence in dealing with familial cancers was measured using a postal questionnaire sent to all general practitioners and practice nurses in 4 geographical areas in central England. In 2 areas, genetic educational outreach was provided to 10 randomly selected practices and a matched analysis of questionnaire responses before and after intervention was done to determine the impact of the intervention. Respondents were more confident in dealing with patient queries around familial breast cancer risk than those around bowel cancer. This was inconsistent with the ability to correctly assign familial risk, with 48% incorrectly assigning a high-risk categorisation to a low-risk breast cancer scenario. Respondents who had taken part in the intervention reported more confidence in dealing with issues related to the management of patient queries around bowel cancer. Following intervention, participants were more likely to report feeling confident in knowing the relevant family history to collect (72.4% of respondents from participating practices compared to 56.1% from non-participating practices; OR 2.39, p = 0.02, 95% CI 1.14-5.00) and in making a basic assessment of risk (72.4% compared to 38.9%; OR 3.65, p = 0.01, 95% CI 1.38-9.61). Providing genetic educational outreach has a positive impact upon how confident primary care staff feel in dealing with patient queries over familial cancers, particularly in relation to bowel cancer. Further research is needed to explore the impact of providing this service on other relevant outcomes such as appropriateness of referrals to genetic services. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Spirituality and choice of health care practitioner.

    PubMed

    Petry, Judith J; Finkel, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Patients who include a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioner in their health care represent a small percentage of the population identified as CAM users. Their choice may be motivated by intangible personality or worldview characteristics. A prospective study was designed to determine if a patient's choice of conventional or alternative health care practitioner was related to total score on an instrument for scaling psychospiritual characteristics. A sequential convenience sample of patients attending five different health care practices in New England. A family practitioner (FP) who uses CAM. (1) A FP clearly not identified with CAM. (3) A chiropractor. (4) A naturopath, and (5) A homeopath. Total scores on the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale (SIBS), plus item scores of five separate questions and two factors. With 210 respondents, SIBS scores in Practice 2 were significantly lower than in practice 1 (p = 0.004), 3 (p = 0.001), 4 (p = 0.018), and 5 (p = 0.02). This pattern remained over the five question scores and two factors. Patients who chose a physician associated with CAM, or an alternative practitioner (chiropractor, naturopath, or homeopath) for their direct health care scored higher on a psychospiritual testing instrument (SIBS) than those who chose a conventional physician.

  18. New tools for an old trade: a socio-technical appraisal of how electronic decision support is used by primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Peiris, David; Usherwood, Tim; Weeramanthri, Tarun; Cass, Alan; Patel, Anushka

    2011-11-01

    This article explores Australian general practitioners' (GPs) views on a novel electronic decision support (EDS) tool being developed for cardiovascular disease management. We use Timmermans and Berg's technology-in-practice approach to examine how technologies influence and are influenced by the social networks in which they are placed. In all, 21 general practitioners who piloted the tool were interviewed. The tool occupied an ill-defined middle ground in a dialectical relationship between GPs' routine care and factors promoting best practice. Drawing on Lipsky's concept of 'street-level bureaucrats', the tool's ability to process workloads expeditiously was of greatest appeal to GPs. This feature of the tool gave it the potential to alter the structure, process and content of healthcare encounters. The credibility of EDS tools appears to be mediated by fluid notions of best practice, based on an expert scrutiny of the evidence, synthesis via authoritative guidelines and dissemination through trusted and often informal networks. Balanced against this is the importance of 'soft' forms of knowledge such as intuition and timing in everyday decision-making. This resonates with Aristotle's theory of phronesis (practical wisdom) and may render EDS tools inconsequential if they merely process biomedical data. While EDS tools show promise in improving health practitioner performance, the socio-technical dimensions of their implementation warrant careful consideration. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Attitudes toward nurse practitioner-led chronic disease management to improve outpatient quality of care.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Alvarez, Kristy; Miller, Judith; Gary, Tiffany; Bowen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    To understand the acceptability for a model of chronic disease management, in which primary care patients see nurse practitioners for structured visits using an evidence-based encounter form, the authors sent a mailed survey to primary care physicians and nurse practitioners. A total of 212 subjects completed the survey, for a total response rate of 53% (physicians, 44%; nurse practitioners, 61%). Most physicians (79.5%) reported that nurse practitioners saw patients in their practice. Most physicians (80.0%) and nurse practitioners (95.7%) believed that the proposed model of care would improve the control of chronic illnesses. In addition, most physicians (73.8%) and nurse practitioners (87.6%) believed that the model of care would be of interest to similar providers. Overall, the high level of support for the model and the presence of nurse practitioners in most physician offices suggests that future studies are warranted to understand how best to implement this.

  20. The challenges of boundary spanners in supporting inter-organizational collaboration in primary care--a qualitative study of general practitioners in a new role.

    PubMed

    Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Joensen, Anne Sofie Kjær; Thorsen, Thorkil

    2015-02-13

    The visions of more integrated care have created new roles and accountabilities for organizations and professionals. Thus, professionals are increasingly expected to engage in boundary spanning activities in order to facilitate inter-organizational and inter-sectoral collaboration. However, this task can be difficult for individual actors and it is important to investigate the work and challenges of boundary spanners in various settings. This study explores the challenges related to a new boundary spanning role for general practitioners employed to facilitate collaboration between the municipalities and general practice. The study is based on semi-structured interviews with ten general practitioners acting as municipal practice consultants in the Capital Region of Denmark. The transcribed interviews were analyzed in several steps organizing the material into a set of coherent and distinct categories covering the different types of challenges experienced by the informants. The main challenges of the general practitioners acting as boundary spanners were: 1) defining and negotiating the role in terms of tasks and competencies; 2) representing and mobilizing colleagues in general practice; 3) navigating in an unfamiliar organizational context. The results support previous studies in emphasizing the difficult and multifaceted character of the boundary spanning role. While some of these challenges are not easily dealt with due to their structural causes, organizations employing boundary spanners should take note of these challenges and support their boundary spanners with matching resources and competencies.

  1. Telematics for rural health care practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Robert H.; Kardaun, Jan W. P. F.

    1990-06-01

    The " crisis" in rural health care i. e. the decreasing number of practitioners is partially caused by the increasing use of technology in health care. Health care practitioners in rural Canada are progressively finding their practice more difficult because of their isolation from the population centers housing many of the services and supplies needed in the modern practice of medicine. The centralization of these supplies and services results from the increasing use of technology in medicine. It is uneconomical to place expensive equipment highly trained technicians and consultants and well-stocked and current information sources in rural locations where they are underutilized. Thus over the years the increasing use of technology makes rural practice more difficult and less attractive in comparison to an urban practice that can easily and cheaply employ the benefits of technology and expert consultation. The Saskatchewan situation is examined using data collected by the authors and compared to other rural areas reported in the literature. The ways that computer communications can help alleviate this situation are explained and illustrated through a review of North American telematics activities. Telematic services for physicians are developing in North America. This is in synergy with the increasing ownership of computers by physicians. We contrast the Canadian scene with the American. Telematics is a technological approach that can be employed to reduce the isolation of rural health care practitioners. It can provide

  2. [Primary care in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first European Union countries that saw the opportunity in the free movement of professionals. First offers for jobs were managed in 2000. Since then, a large number of professionals have taken the opportunity of a decent job and have moved from Spain to Sweden. The Swedish health care model belongs to the group of national health systems. The right to health care is linked to legal citizenship. Health is financed through regional taxes, but there is a compulsory co-payment regardless of the financial situation of the patient. The provision of health care is decentralised at a regional level, and there is a mixture of private and public medical centres. Primary care is similar to that in Spain. Health professionals work as a team with a division of tasks. Like in Spain, waiting lists and coordination between primary and specialised care are a great problem. Patients may register with any public or private primary care centre and hospital provider within their region. Access to diagnostic tests and specialists are restricted to those selected by specialists. Doctors are salaried and their job and salary depend on their experience, professional abilities and regional needs. Medicine is curative. General practitioners are the gateway to the system, but they do not act as gatekeeper. Hospitals offer a number of training post, and the access is through an interview. Continuing medical education is encouraged and financed by the health centre in order to increase its revenues. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The costs of training a nurse practitioner in primary care: the importance of allowing for the cost of education and training when making decisions about changing the professional-mix.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Lesley; Netten, Ann

    2007-05-01

    What is already known on this topic * Cost containment through the most effective mix of staff achievable within available resources and organisational priorities is of increasing importance in most health systems. However, there is a dearth of information about the full economic implications of changing skill mix. * In the UK a major shift in the primary care workforce is likely in response to the rapidly developing role of nurse practitioners and policies aimed to encourage GP practices to transfer some of their responsibilities to other, less costly, professionals. * Previous research has developed an approach to incorporating the costs of qualifications, and thus the investment required to develop a skilled workforce, for a variety of health service professionals including GPs. What this study adds * This paper describes a methodology of costing nurse practitioners that incorporates the human capital cost implications of developing a skilled nurse practitioner workforce. With appropriate sources of data the method could be adapted for use internationally. * Including the full cost of qualifications results in nearly a 24 per cent increase in the unit cost of a Nurse Practitioner. * Allowing for all investment costs and adjusting for length of consultation, the cost of a GP consultation was nearly 60 per cent higher than that of a Nurse Practitioner.

  4. The surgical care practitioner: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The role of the surgical care practitioner has been in existence for many years in some form or another with a variety of job titles and a wide range of duties. With the adoption of the European Working Time Directive and the need for skilled assistance, not only at the operating table but also pre and post surgery, the role is becoming formalised with voluntary codes of conduct, performance, ethics, standards and scope of practice.

  5. The collaboration of general practitioners and nurses in primary care: a comparative analysis of concepts and practices in Slovenia and Spain.

    PubMed

    Hämel, Kerstin; Vössing, Carina

    2017-09-01

    Aim A comparative analysis of concepts and practices of GP-nurse collaborations in primary health centres in Slovenia and Spain. Cross-professional collaboration is considered a key element for providing high-quality comprehensive care by combining the expertise of various professions. In many countries, nurses are also being given new and more extensive responsibilities. Implemented concepts of collaborative care need to be analysed within the context of care concepts, organisational structures, and effective collaboration. Background review of primary care concepts (literature analysis, expert interviews), and evaluation of collaboration in 'best practice' health centres in certain regions of Slovenia and Spain. Qualitative content analysis of expert interviews, presentations, observations, and group discussions with professionals and health centre managers. Findings In Slovenian health centres, the collaboration between GPs and nurses has been strongly shaped by their organisation in separate care units and predominantly case-oriented functions. Conventional power structures between professions hinder effective collaboration. The introduction of a new cross-professional primary care concept has integrated advanced practice nurses into general practice. Conventional hierarchies still exist, but a shared vision of preventive care is gradually strengthening attitudes towards team-oriented care. Formal regulations or incentives for teamwork have yet to be implemented. In Spain, health centres were established along with a team-based care concept that encompasses close physician-nurse collaboration and an autonomous role for nurses in the care process. Nurses collaborate with GPs on more equal terms with conflicts centring on professional disagreements. Team development structures and financial incentives for team achievements have been implemented, encouraging teams to generate their own strategies to improve teamwork. Clearly defined structures, shared visions of

  6. Integrated Primary Care Information Database (IPCI)

    Cancer.gov

    The Integrated Primary Care Information Database is a longitudinal observational database that was created specifically for pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, inlcuding data from computer-based patient records supplied voluntarily by general practitioners.

  7. The primary healthcare nurse practitioner role in Canada.

    PubMed

    Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Harbman, Patricia; Bourgeault, Ivy; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    Primary healthcare nurse practitioners (PHCNPs), also known as family or all-ages nurse practitioners, are the fastest growing advanced practice nursing role in Canada. All 10 provinces and three territories now have legislation that authorizes their role. Their introduction is linked to countrywide health reform efforts to improve the accessibility and quality of primary healthcare.

  8. Using Medicare data to assess nurse practitioner-provided care.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Catherine M; Gaudet, Jennifer; Perloff, Jennifer; Donelan, Karen; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Buerhaus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To mitigate shortages of primary care physicians and ensure access to health care services for a growing number of Medicare beneficiaries, some policy makers have recommended expanding the supply and roles of nurse practitioners (NPs). Little is known about the number of NPs billing Medicare or their practice patterns. This study examines the geographic distribution and county characteristics of NPs billing Medicare, compares the types and quantities of primary care services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by NPs and primary care physicians, and analyzes the characteristics of beneficiaries receiving primary care from each type of clinician. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 2008 Medicare administrative data from 959,848 aged and/or disabled beneficiaries continuously enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare during the study period. Outcome measures included geographic distribution of NPs measured by the rate of NPs per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries by state, average utilization, and patient characteristics. States with the highest rate of NPs billing were rural. Over 80% of the payments received by both NPs and primary care physicians were for evaluation and management services. Beneficiaries assigned to an NP were more likely to be female, to be dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, and to have qualified for Medicare because of a disability. NPs with assigned beneficiaries were significantly more likely than similar primary care physicians to practice in federally designated primary care shortage areas. Approximately 45,000 NPs were providing services to beneficiaries and billing under their own provider numbers in 2008. Aspects of NP practice patterns were different from primary care physicians, and NPs appeared more likely to provide services to disadvantaged Medicare beneficiaries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anxiety disorders in primary care.

    PubMed

    Combs, Heidi; Markman, Jesse

    2014-09-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric condition presenting to primary care practitioners. Yet they can be easily overlooked or misdiagnosed. Patients that struggle with anxiety disorders are more likely to seek treatment from primary care providers than mental health specialists. Given the costs in terms of debilitation and associated financial burden, and increased risk of suicide, the identification and successful treatment of anxiety is imperative. By means of clinical acumen and the use of screening tools, the provider can develop expertise in recognition and effective treatment of anxiety disorders.

  10. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  11. [Role of secondary care too small in Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) practice guideline 'Dementia'].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Lemstra, Evelien W; Verhey, Frans R J

    2012-01-01

    The third revision of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Dementia' is a major improvement and stimulates the general practitioner by providing concrete advice on stepped care in dementia diagnostics and organizing care management in order to obtain improvement in the quality and realization of dementia care in the primary care setting. However, this practice guideline does not address more effective and efficient dementia care by collaboration between primary and secondary care as it discourages the prescription of cholinesterase inhibitors and recommends limiting further diagnostic procedures to patients in whom a treatable condition is likely. Although, this new practice guideline strengthens the central role of the general practitioner in Dutch dementia care, this role would be further reinforced if general practitioners were to adopt integrated diagnostics of dementia and relevant additional diseases burden as the starting point.

  12. Primary care for the Roma in Europe: Position paper of the European forum for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Rotar Pavlič, Danica; Zelko, Erika; Vintges, Marga; Willems, Sara; Hanssens, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Roma populations’ low health status and limited access to health services, including primary care, has been documented in many European countries, and warrants specific health policies and practices. A variety of experiences shows how primary care can adjust its practices to reduce the barriers to primary care for Roma populations. At local level, establishing collaboration with Roma organisations helps primary care to improve mutual relations and quality of care. Mediation has proved to be an effective tool. Skills training of primary care practitioners may enhance their individual competences. Research and international sharing of experiences are further tools to improve primary care for the Roma people. PMID:27703542

  13. The primary healthcare nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

    PubMed

    van Soeren, Mary; Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Goodwin, Sharon; Baker, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The role of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (NP-PHC) has a long history in Ontario. In this paper, we describe the evolution of the role with a focus on geographic distribution, a profile of client populations and the services provided by NP-PHCs. Comparisons will be made to findings from previous studies and reports on the NP-PHC role in Ontario. In 2004 and 2005, two-thirds of the nurse practitioners registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario responded to a descriptive self-reporting survey. The data collected revealed that NP-PHCs work throughout the healthcare system, including with underserviced and marginalized populations, in community health centres and in outpatient areas within acute care hospitals. They provide the entire spectrum of primary healthcare services. Barriers to fully enacting the role are related to restrictive legislation that limits NP prescribing and diagnosing, and the ability to work to full scope of practice in hospitals (for example, in emergency departments). Targeted funding has promoted the role throughout the province. However, inadequate and insecure pilot funding continues to be a concern. Findings from this study indicate that policy decisions to support the NP role in rural and remote areas have resulted in expansion of the role across the province. Yet, NPs perceive that legislation has lagged and inhibits their ability to meet patient and health systems needs.

  14. Primary care teams: New Zealand's experience with community-governed non-profit primary care.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Peter; Davis, Peter; Lay-Yee, Roy

    2005-05-01

    Community-governed non-profit primary care organisations started developing in New Zealand in the late 1980s with the aim to reduce financial, cultural and geographical barriers to access. New Zealand's new primary health care strategy aims to co-ordinate primary care and public health strategies with the overall objective of improving population health and reducing health inequalities. The purpose of this study is to carry out a detailed examination of the composition and characteristics of primary care teams in community-governed non-profit practices and compare them with more traditional primary care organisations, with the aim of drawing conclusions about the capacity of the different structures to carry out population-based primary care. The study used data from a representative national cross-sectional survey of general practitioners in New Zealand (2001/2002). Primary care teams were largest and most heterogeneous in community-governed non-profit practices, which employed about 3% of the county's general practitioners. Next most heterogeneous in terms of their primary care teams were practices that belonged to an Independent Practitioner Association, which employed the majority of the country's general practitioners (71.7%). Even though in absolute and relative terms the community-governed non-profit primary care sector is small, by providing a much needed element of professional and organisational pluralism and by experimenting with more diverse staffing arrangements, it is likely to continue to have an influence on primary care policy development in New Zealand.

  15. Integrating Bipolar Disorder Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodrich, David E.; O’Donnell, Allison N.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care management, and measurement-based care, are well-established in primary care settings, and may help primary care practitioners manage bipolar disorder. However, further research is required to adapt CCMs to support complexities in diagnosing persons with bipolar disorder, and integrate decision-making processes regarding medication safety and tolerability in primary care. Additional implementation studies are also needed to adapt CCMs for persons with bipolar disorder in primary care, especially those seen in smaller practices with limited infrastructure and access to mental health care. PMID:23001382

  16. Substitution of Hospital Care with Primary Care: Defining the Conditions of Primary Care Plus

    PubMed Central

    Kroese, Mariëlle Elisabeth Aafje Lydia; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke Dingena; Elissen, Arianne Mathilda Josephus; Meerlo, Ronald Johan; Hanraets, Monique Margaretha Henriëtte; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyse barriers and facilitators in substituting hospital care with primary care to define preconditions for successful implementation. Methods: A descriptive feasibility study was performed to collect information on the feasibility of substituting hospital care with primary care. General practitioners were able to refer patients, about whom they had doubts regarding diagnosis, treatment and/or the need to refer to hospital care, to medical specialists who performed low-complex consultations at general practitioner practices. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with general practitioners and medical specialists, focus groups and notes from meetings in the Netherlands between April 2013 and January 2014. Data were analysed using a conventional content analysis which resulted in categorised barriers, facilitators and policy adjustments, after which preconditions were formulated. Results: The most important preconditions were make arrangements on governmental level, arrange a collective integrated IT-system, determine the appropriate profile for medical specialists, design a referral protocol for eligible patients, arrange deliberation possibilities for general practitioners and medical specialists and formulate a diagnostic protocol. Conclusions: The barriers, facilitators and formulated preconditions provided relevant input to change the design of substituting hospital care with primary care. PMID:27616956

  17. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  18. [General practitioners as gatekeepers: Better health care than in countries with self-referral to specialists?].

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands and a number of other European countries general practitioners are the gatekeepers for specialist and hospital care. European health care systems with gatekeeping general practitioners, i.e. those with comprehensive, strong primary care, perform better on a number of health indicators and on equity. However, it is less clear if gatekeeping health care systems have lower health expenditure. There is ongoing debate on whether gatekeeping plays a role in diagnostic delay of cancers. At health care system level research is being hampered by small numbers and should be combined with in-depth research into health care mechanisms.

  19. [Computerized medical records in monitoring hypertension. Longitudinal and horizontal evaluation of 25 general practitioners in a primary care setting of Modena, Italy].

    PubMed

    Perrone, Enrica; Padula, Maria Stella; Scarpa, Marina; Acerbi, Maria Angela; Andreoli, Claudio; Baldoni, Patrizia; Bannò, Gabriella; Bregoli, Renato; Campolieti, Manfredo; Cataldo, Nicola; Daya, Ghassan; D'Urso, Anna Rita; Feltri, Gaetano; Gualandrini, Alessandra; Lambertini, Giorgio; Mazzi, Wainer; Modafferi, Gino Paolo; Mussati, Pierpaolo; Onesti, Luca; Piancone, Cataldo; Pieralisi, Fernando; Poppi, Maria Cristina; Scaglioni, Alberto; Tsoutsis, Nycolaos; Turrini, Stefano; Viola, Elisabetta; Capelli, Oreste

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of a computerized-based Clinical Record in monitoring hypertension in a Primary Care Setting. Blood pressure (BP) recording increased by 62% to 70% in the years 2004 to 2006. No improvement, however, was noticeable in the achievement of gold-standard targets in BP control (62% in all period). At the end of 2006 BP was recorded in 65% of patients. Among them, 2/3 of the non diabetics reached < 140/90 mmHg standard, while only 23% of diabetics reached < 130/80 mmHg standard. In conclusion, using a computerized clinical record appears not to be sufficient to obtain good clinical performances, yet it is a necessary first step to clinical audit.

  20. Type D Personality and Essential Hypertension in Primary Care: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study Within a Cohort of Patients Visiting General Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Versino, Elisabetta; Gammino, Lorenzo; Colombi, Nicoletta; Ostacoli, Luca; Carletto, Sara; Furlan, Pier Maria; Picci, Rocco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the relationship between type D personality and essential hypertension among patients visiting their GPs for any health problem, 101 hypertensive and 138 nonhypertensive patients were consecutively recruited and assessed using the Type D Personality Scale (DS14). The predictive value of type D personality was determined using a logistic regression model, taking into account the differences in recognized confounders between groups. Type D personality in the hypertension group was twice as frequent as in the no hypertension group and hypertension was more frequent among type D than non-type D patients. Logistic regression showed a significant predictive value of type D personality for hypertension, adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, family history of hypertension, living condition, education, and employment. Therefore, type D personality was strongly related to hypertension and it was a noteworthy predictor of hypertension in a real-world cohort of primary care patients.

  1. Nurse practitioner-led transitional care interventions: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Mora, Kathlyen; Dorrejo, Xiomara M; Carreon, Kimberly Mae; Butt, Sadia

    2017-08-28

    Chronically ill patients 65 and above have an increased risk of preventable readmission within 30 days of discharge from the hospital. The Transitional Care Model (TCM) introduced by Naylor and colleagues was implemented to improve the transition between hospital and home while decreasing readmissions. This article examines whether nurse practitioner (NP)- led TCM interventions as compared to standard care decrease hospital readmission rates in older adults. A literature review was conducted from June 2016 to March 2017 using Cochrane Library, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL) PLUS, Joanna Briggs Institute, and ProQuest Central to seek out the highest level of evidence. Search results were refined to focus on randomized control trials (RTCs) containing NP-led TCM interventions with older adults. Synthesis of three RTCs, one meta-analysis, and four nonrandomized studies reviewed TCM interventions that included these interventions: follow-up phone calls post discharge, home visits, and handoff of information to the patient's primary care provider. These interventions, although not exclusively led by NPs, decreased hospital readmission rates. NP-led TCM interventions have the potential to decrease readmissions, but the level of evidence is insufficiently high to allow for generalizability, warranting further study. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Mental disorders in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Mühlig, Stephan; Beesdo, Katja

    2003-01-01

    Current estimates indicate that 50% of the population experience at least one mental disorder in their lifetime and that at least 25% have suffered a mental disorder in the past year. recognition, diagnosis, treatment, and referral depend overwhelmingly on general practitioners, at least one third of whose consultations have a direct and explicit psychological component. Yet despite this intensive familiarization with the presentation of mental pathology, and the appropriateness of the primary care setting to its management, even the most recent surveys indicate that performance is best described by the rule of diminishing halves: only half the patients with a thresh-old disorder are recognized; only half of those recognized are treated; and only half of those treated are effectively treated. There is no single solution to this problem, only multiple solutions, which must be aimed, consistently and simultaneously, at the patient, practitioner, practice, and research levels. PMID:22034245

  3. Praxis and the role development of the acute care nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2008-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioner roles have been introduced in many countries. The acute care nurse practitioner provides nursing and medical care to meet the complex needs of patients and their families using a holistic, health-centred approach. There are many pressures to adopt a performance framework and execute activities and tasks. Little time may be left to explore domains of advanced practice nursing and develop other forms of knowledge. The primary objective of praxis is to integrate theory, practice and art, and facilitate the recognition and valuing of different types of knowledge through reflection. With this framework, the acute care nurse practitioner assumes the role of clinician and researcher. Praxis can be used to develop the acute care nurse practitioner role as an advanced practice nursing role. A praxis framework permeates all aspects of the acute care nurse practitioner's practice. Praxis influences how relationships are structured with patients, families and colleagues in the work setting. Decision-makers at different levels need to recognize the contribution of praxis in the full development of the acute care nurse practitioner role. Different strategies can be used by educators to assist students and practitioners to develop a praxis framework.

  4. Costing interventions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kernick, D

    2000-02-01

    Against a background of increasing demands on limited resources, studies that relate benefits of health interventions to the resources they consume will be an important part of any decision-making process in primary care, and an accurate assessment of costs will be an important part of any economic evaluation. Although there is no such thing as a gold standard cost estimate, there are a number of basic costing concepts that underlie any costing study. How costs are derived and combined will depend on the assumptions that have been made in their derivation. It is important to be clear what assumptions have been made and why in order to maintain consistency across comparative studies and prevent inappropriate conclusions being drawn. This paper outlines some costing concepts and principles to enable primary care practitioners and researchers to have a basic understanding of costing exercises and their pitfalls.

  5. Knee osteoarthritis: Therapeutic alternatives in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Allison L; Evaniew, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    AIM To discusses pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic alternatives for managing knee osteoarthritis in primary care by primary health care nurse practitioners. METHODS A case example is presented, the evidence-based guideline recommendations of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons are reviewed, and a plan of care is developed. RESULTS Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis seen in primary care, and it is a major public health issue because the aging population and widespread obesity have drastically increased incidence. Osteoarthritis is clinically associated with escalating chronic pain, physical disability, and decreased quality of life. Early diagnosis of mild osteoarthritis in relatively young patients presents an opportunity for primary health care providers to manage pain, increase quality of life, and decrease risk of disability. CONCLUSION Primary health care providers can implement these recommendations in their own practices to provide care to patients with knee osteoarthritis based on current best evidence. PMID:28251070

  6. Preparation and Evolving Role of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Leslie A; Guttendorf, Jane

    2017-08-18

    Acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) are increasingly being employed as members of critical care teams, an outcome driven by increasing demand for intensive care services, a mandated reduction in house officer hours, and evidence supporting the ability of ACNPs to provide high-quality care as collaborative members of critical care teams. Integration of adult ACNPs into critical care teams is most likely to be successful when practitioners have appropriate training, supervision, and mentoring to facilitate their ability to practice efficiently and effectively. Accomplishing this goal requires understanding the educational preparation and skill set potential hires bring to the position as well as the development of an orientation program designed to integrate the practitioner into the critical care team. Pediatric ACNPs are also commonly employed in critical care settings; however, this commentary focuses on the adult ACNP role. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Practitioners' Constructions of Love in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Sarah Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    Love is rarely mentioned in Early Childhood Education and Care and there is no agreed definition for love in this context. In order to explore love in settings practitioner views on the topic should be sought. Unstructured interviews were carried out with senior practitioners in five contrasting settings. A range of qualitative methods were…

  8. Practitioners' Constructions of Love in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Sarah Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    Love is rarely mentioned in Early Childhood Education and Care and there is no agreed definition for love in this context. In order to explore love in settings practitioner views on the topic should be sought. Unstructured interviews were carried out with senior practitioners in five contrasting settings. A range of qualitative methods were…

  9. Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) in occupational and primary health care: A nation-wide survey among general practitioners, occupational physicians and hygienists in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Slottje, Pauline; van Moorselaar, Imke; van Strien, Rob; Vermeulen, Roel; Kromhout, Hans; Huss, Anke

    2017-04-01

    Subjects who attribute health complaints to every day levels of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been referred to as electrohypersensitive (EHS). Previous surveys in Europe showed that 68-75% of general practitioners had ever been consulted on EHS. Given the lack of data on EHS in the Netherlands in the general population and on EHS in occupational settings, we performed a national survey among three professional groups that are likely in the first line of being consulted by EHS individuals. Results show that about one third of occupational hygienists, occupational physicians and general practitioners had ever been consulted by one or more EHS subjects. Many of these professionals considered a causal relationship between EMF and health complaints to some degree plausible, and their approach often included exposure reduction advice. Given the lack of scientific evidence for EHS and how low level EMF exposure could cause reported health complaints and given the finding that the majority of these professionals felt insufficiently informed about EMF and health, targeted information campaigns might assist them in their evidence based dealing with subjects who attribute symptoms to EMF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. General practitioners' views on quality specifications for "outpatient referrals and care contracts".

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, A; Jacobson, B; Southgate, L; Formby, J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain general practitioners' views about which quality specifications should be included in contracts for hospital care. DESIGN--In depth interview study and postal survey. SETTING--General practitioners in City and Hackney Health District. SUBJECTS--Fourteen doctors were interviewed in depth; 77 of 131 doctors (59%) returned postal questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Rating of listed quality specifications. RESULTS--The most popular items which doctors thought should be included in contracts by April 1991 related to the availability of patients' notes in outpatient clinics, respect shown to general practitioners in telephone communications with hospital doctors, supply of medicines after discharge, patient management plans for general practitioners, the earlier arrival of discharge slips, the type of hospital doctor to see new outpatients, and the unnecessary duplication of investigations. CONCLUSIONS--A high premium was attached by general practitioners to effective organisation, effective communication between primary and secondary sources of care, and effective communication with patients. PMID:1888933

  11. Physical therapy plus general practitioners' care versus general practitioners' care alone for sciatica: a randomised clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Verhagen, Arianne P; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; van den Hoogen, Hans J M M; Peul, Wilco C; Avezaat, Cees J J; Koes, Bart W

    2008-04-01

    A randomised clinical trial in primary care with a 12-months follow-up period. About 135 patients with acute sciatica (recruited from May 2003 to November 2004) were randomised in two groups: (1) the intervention group received physical therapy (PT) added to the general practitioners' care, and (2) the control group with general practitioners' care only. To assess the effectiveness of PT additional to general practitioners' care compared to general practitioners' care alone, in patients with acute sciatica. There is a lack of knowledge concerning the effectiveness of PT in patients with sciatica. The primary outcome was patients' global perceived effect (GPE). Secondary outcomes were severity of leg and back pain, severity of disability, general health and absence from work. The outcomes were measured at 3, 6, 12 and 52 weeks after randomisation. At 3 months follow-up, 70% of the intervention group and 62% of the control group reported improvement (RR 1.1; 95% CI 0.9-1.5). At 12 months follow-up, 79% of the intervention group and 56% of the control group reported improvement (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1; 1.8). No significant differences regarding leg pain, functional status, fear of movement and health status were found at short-term or long-term follow-up. At 12 months follow-up, evidence was found that PT added to general practitioners' care is only more effective regarding GPE, and not more cost-effective in the treatment of patients with acute sciatica than general practitioners' care alone. There are indications that PT is especially effective regarding GPE in patients reporting severe disability at presentation.

  12. An International Career Development Survey of Critical Care Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mayur B.; Laudanski, Krzysztof; Pandharipande, Pratik P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To understand the career development needs of an international multidisciplinary group of critical care practitioners in the 21st century. DESIGN A web-accessible survey deployed by the In-Training Section of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). SETTING University health sciences center. SUBJECTS Physicians (MD, DO), Advanced Practice Provider (NP, PA), Nurses (RN), Pharmacists, and Student members of the SCCM. INTERVENTIONS The survey covered domains of demographics, opinions about career development, and opinions about the SCCM In-Training Section. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS 1,049 of approximately 16,000 SCCM members responded to the survey (7% response rate). Continuing education (280, 26.7%), leadership skills (197, 18.8%), and scientific development (192, 18.3%) are among the most important issues for the respondents. Many critical care practitioners would like to assist SCCM's efforts in career development (948, 90.4%) and many would consider some aspect of committee involvement (796, 75.9%). The SCCM In-Training Section, whose primary mission is career development across the spectrum of providers and expertise levels, needs improved advertisement (981, 93.7%). There is strong support for upcoming Annual Congresses dedicated to career development (834, 79.5%). Of the three main methods of information dissemination for SCCM career development initiatives from the In-Training Section, respondents rank email highest (762, 72.6%), followed by webpages (228, 21.7%) and I-rooms (59, 5.6%). Over half of the SCCM membership surveyed lack a career development mentor in critical care. CONCLUSIONS This is the largest assessment of the international critical care community regarding the career development needs of 21st century critical care practitioner, although the limited response rate makes this work prone to sampling bias. Career development issues are broad and in need of further development by the SCCM In-Training Section. Although these

  13. Homeopathy in rural Australian primary health care: a survey of general practitioner referral and practice in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wardle, J; Adams, J; Sibbritt, D

    2013-07-01

    Homeopathy has attracted considerable recent attention from the Australian conventional medical community. However, despite such increased attention there has been little exploration of the interface between homeopathy and Australian conventional medical practice. This article addresses this research gap by exploring homeopathic practice and referral by rural and regional Australian general practitioners (GPs). A 27-item questionnaire was sent to all 1486 GPs currently practising in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia (response rate 40.7%). Few GPs in this study utilised homeopathy in their personal practice, with only 0.5% of GPs prescribing homeopathy in the past 12 months, and 8.5% referring patients for homeopathic treatment at least a few times over the past 12 months. Nearly two-thirds of GPs (63.9%) reported that they would not refer for homeopathy under any circumstances. Being in a remote location, receiving patient requests for homeopathy, observing positive responses from homeopathy previously, using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners as information sources, higher levels of knowledge of homeopathy, and being interested in increasing CAM knowledge were all independently predictive of increased referral to homeopathy amongst GPs in this study. GPs in this study were less likely to refer to homeopathy if they used peer-reviewed literature as the major source of their information on CAM. Homeopathy is not integrated significantly in rural general practice either via GP utilisation or referral. There is significant opposition to homeopathy referral amongst rural and regional GPs, though some level of interaction with homeopathic providers exists. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nurse practitioner challenges to the orthodox structure of health care delivery: regulation and restraints on trade.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, physicians have been the primary health care providers in the United States. In response to the rising health care costs and public demand of the past decade, allied health care providers have challenged this orthodox structure of health care delivery. Among these allied health care providers are nurse practitioners, who have attempted to expand traditional roles of the registered nurse. This article focuses on the legal issues raised by several major obstacles to the expansion of nurse practitioner services: licensing restrictions, third party reimbursement policies, and denial of access to medical facilities and physician back-up services. The successful judicial challenges to discriminatory practices against other allied health care providers will be explored as a solution to the nurse practitioners' dilemma.

  15. The PULSAR primary care protocol: a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial to test a training intervention for general practitioners in recovery-oriented practice to optimize personal recovery in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Enticott, Joanne C; Shawyer, Frances; Brophy, Lisa; Russell, Grant; Fossey, Ellie; Inder, Brett; Mazza, Danielle; Vasi, Shiva; Weller, Penelope June; Wilson-Evered, Elisabeth; Edan, Vrinda; Meadows, Graham

    2016-12-20

    General practitioners (GPs) in Australia play a central role in the delivery of mental health care. This article describes the PULSAR (Principles Unite Local Services Assisting Recovery) Primary Care protocol, a novel mixed methods evaluation of a training intervention for GPs in recovery-oriented practice. The aim of the intervention is to optimize personal recovery in patients consulting study GPs for mental health issues. The intervention mixed methods design involves a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial testing the outcomes of training in recovery-oriented practice, together with an embedded qualitative study to identify the contextual enablers and challenges to implementing recovery-oriented practice. The project is conducted in Victoria, Australia between 2013 and 2017. Eighteen general practices and community health centers are randomly allocated to one of two steps (nine months apart) to start an intervention comprising GP training in the delivery of recovery-oriented practice. Data collection consists of cross-sectional surveys collected from patients of participating GPs at baseline, and again at the end of Steps 1 and 2. The primary outcome is improvement in personal recovery using responses to the Questionnaire about the Process of Recovery. Secondary outcomes are improvements in patient-rated measures of personal recovery and wellbeing, and of the recovery-oriented practice they have received, using the INSPIRE questionnaire, the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Participant data will be analyzed in the group that the cluster was assigned to at each study time point. Another per-protocol dataset will contain all data time-stamped according to the date of intervention received at each cluster site. Qualitative interviews with GPs and patients at three and nine months post-training will investigate experiences and challenges related to implementing recovery-oriented practice in primary

  16. Teaching primary care obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith B.; Jordan, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences and recommendations for recruitment of family physicians who practise and teach primary care obstetrics. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Setting Six primary care obstetrics groups in Edmonton, Alta, that were involved in teaching family medicine residents in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Alberta. Participants Twelve family physicians who practised obstetrics in groups. All participants were women, which was reasonably representative of primary care obstetrics providers in Edmonton. Methods Each participant underwent an in-depth interview. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The investigators independently reviewed the transcripts and then analyzed the transcripts together in an iterative and interpretive manner. Main findings Themes identified in this study include lack of confidence in teaching, challenges of having learners, benefits of having learners, and recommendations for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. While participants described insecurity and challenges related to teaching, they also identified positive aspects, and offered suggestions for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. Conclusion Despite describing poor confidence as teachers and having challenges with learners, the participants identified positive experiences that sustained their interest in teaching. Supporting these teachers and recruiting more such role models is important to encourage family medicine learners to enter careers such as primary care obstetrics. PMID:24627402

  17. Primary care--opportunities and threats. Developing prescribing in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, C. P.; Taylor, R. J.; Blenkinsopp, A.

    1997-01-01

    The latest white papers on the NHS focus on stimulating innovation in the delivery of primary care and removing barriers to further development. Some of this innovation relates directly to prescribing in primary care, and in this article the authors speculate on what might happen if the prescribing initiatives referred to in the white papers were extended and disseminated more widely. The initiatives which might have the biggest impact are those encouraging closer collaboration between general practitioners and community pharmacists and those aiding extension of the current nurse prescribing scheme in primary care. Both offer considerable opportunities to improve primary care, but both bear some potential risks. PMID:9116557

  18. What Do Resource-Oriented Approaches Mean to General Practitioners and How Can They Be Facilitated in Primary Care? A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Prüfer, Franziska; Miksch, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Although resource orientation, as a part of health promotion, should play a major role in general practice, the anchoring and realization of resource-oriented approaches remain small in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyze what resource orientation means to general practitioners (GPs) and develop strategies as to how this can be facilitated in GP practice. Within a qualitative research approach, 19 semi-structured telephone interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Within the interviews, the inclusion of the patients' individual resources is described as core competence of GPs. Supporting the patients' disease coping strategies and self-help were seen as important by GPs. However, perceptions as to which resources are considered to be fundamental ranged widely across the participant group. The results confirm the important role of resource-oriented approaches in general practice. However, a general definition of resource orientation is needed. In addition, working conditions for GPs need to be taken into account to ensure that these contribute to a healthy work-life balance. The need for GP training was identified to improve communication skills. Further integration of GPs in health promotion and communal structures would be beneficial. PMID:23986779

  19. Primary care practice composition in 34 countries.

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, Peter; Heinemann, Stephanie; Greß, Stefan; Schäfer, Willemijn

    2015-12-01

    Health care needs in the population change through ageing and increasing multimorbidity. Primary health care might accommodate to this through the composition of practices in terms of the professionals working in them. The aim of this article is to describe the composition of primary care practices in 34 countries and to analyse its relationship to practice circumstances and the organization of the primary care system. The data were collected through a survey among samples of general practitioners (n=7183) in 34 countries. In some countries, primary care is mainly provided in single-handed practices. Other countries which have larger practices with multiple professional groups. There is no overall relationship between the professional groups in the practice and practice location. Practices that are located further from other primary care practices have more different professions. Practices with a more than average share of socially disadvantaged people and/or ethnic minorities have more different professions. In countries with a stronger pro-primary care workforce development and more comprehensive primary care delivery the number of different professions is higher. In conclusion, primary care practice composition varies strongly. The organizational scale of primary care is largely country dependent, but this is only partly explained by system characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Mehus, Christopher J.; Hawkins, J. David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C.; Metzler, Carol W.; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V. Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2017-01-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are: (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings. PMID:27498167

  1. A comparison of job descriptions for nurse practitioners working in out-of-hours primary care services: implications for workforce planning, patients and nursing.

    PubMed

    Teare, Jean; Horne, Maria; Clements, Gill; Mohammed, Mohammed A

    2017-03-01

    To compare and contrast job descriptions for nursing roles in out-of-hours services to obtain a general understanding of what is required for a nurse working in this job. Out-of-hours services provide nursing services to patients either through telephone or face-to-face contact in care centres. Many of these services are newly created giving job opportunities to nurses working in this area. It is vital that nurses know what their role entails but also that patients and other professionals know how out-of-hours nurses function in terms of competence and clinical role. Content analysis of out-of-hours job descriptions. Content analysis of a convenience sample of 16 job descriptions of out-of-hours nurses from five out-of-hours care providers across England was undertaken. The findings were narratively synthesised, supported by tabulation. Key role descriptors were examined in terms of job titles, managerial skills, clinical skills, professional qualifications and previous experience. Content analysis of each out-of-hours job description revealed a lack of consensus in clinical competence and skills required related to job title although there were many similarities in skills across all the roles. This study highlights key differences and some similarities between roles and job titles in out-of-hours nursing but requires a larger study to inform workforce planning. Out-of-hours nursing is a developing area of practice which requires clarity to ensure patient safety and quality care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 'Can he have the test for bipolar, doctor? His dad's got it': exploring the potential of general practitioners to work with children and young people presenting in primary care with common mental health problems - a clinical initiative.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jane H; Bernard, Paul M

    2012-06-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in assessing and managing adult mental health problems, but this input is not seen in their management of child and adolescent mental health. Mental health problems in 5-19-year-olds are common, yet detection rates in primary care are low. The symptoms of most adult diagnoses of mental health problems are present by mid-adolescence, yet the typical time from onset to diagnosis is 5-15 years. The role of general practice in this area has been underexplored. Aim This pilot study explores the potential of GPs to respond to common mental health problems in children and adolescents. Design Children and young people who would have ordinarily been referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) were seen in a GP setting. In a UK general practice surgery serving a disadvantaged population. Method Children and young people were seen for an initial biopsychosocial assessment and formulation of the presenting concerns. GP-based interventions were offered as appropriate or referred to CAMHS. Results Data from the first 50 children (2-19 years) are presented. Twenty younger children (10 years and under) and 30 older children (11 years and above) were seen. Eighteen referrals were made to CAMHS. GP interventions included watchful waiting, brief behavioural interventions, non-directive counselling, brief cognitive- behavioural therapy (CBT) and liaison with colleagues in education, CAMHS and the voluntary sector. Conclusion This clinical pilot demonstrates that with adequate time, access to supervision and practice support, children and young people experiencing emotional and behavioural problems associated with common mental health issues can be helped in primary care.

  3. ‘Can he have the test for bipolar, doctor? His dad's got it’: exploring the potential of general practitioners to work with children and young people presenting in primary care with common mental health problems – a clinical initiative

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in assessing and managing adult mental health problems, but this input is not seen in their management of child and adolescent mental health. Mental health problems in 5–19-year-olds are common, yet detection rates in primary care are low. The symptoms of most adult diagnoses of mental health problems are present by mid-adolescence, yet the typical time from onset to diagnosis is 5–15 years. The role of general practice in this area has been underexplored. Aim This pilot study explores the potential of GPs to respond to common mental health problems in children and adolescents. Design Children and young people who would have ordinarily been referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) were seen in a GP setting. In a UK general practice surgery serving a disadvantaged population. Method Children and young people were seen for an initial biopsychosocial assessment and formulation of the presenting concerns. GP-based interventions were offered as appropriate or referred to CAMHS. Results Data from the first 50 children (2–19 years) are presented. Twenty younger children (10 years and under) and 30 older children (11 years and above) were seen. Eighteen referrals were made to CAMHS. GP interventions included watchful waiting, brief behavioural interventions, non-directive counselling, brief cognitive– behavioural therapy (CBT) and liaison with colleagues in education, CAMHS and the voluntary sector. Conclusion This clinical pilot demonstrates that with adequate time, access to supervision and practice support, children and young people experiencing emotional and behavioural problems associated with common mental health issues can be helped in primary care. PMID:23730336

  4. Development and testing of an instrument to measure holistic nursing values in nurse practitioner care.

    PubMed

    Kinchen, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    As primary care delivery evolves in the United States with nurse practitioners (NPs) as key providers, exploring the patient's perception of the nature and quality of NPs' care is of critical importance to healthcare consumers, providers, educators, policy makers, and underwriters. The aim of this study was to describe the development and testing of the Nurse Practitioner Holistic Caring Instrument, a new, investigator-developed measure of the preservation of holistic nursing values in NP care. Results suggest that NPs provide patient-centered, comprehensive, and clinically competent care, rendering them ideally suited to leading primary health care delivery. However, further testing in more diverse populations and settings is needed to strengthen preliminary findings.

  5. Primary care for refugees.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Barbara

    2011-02-15

    Over the past decade, at least 600,000 refugees from more than 60 different countries have been resettled in the United States. The personal history of a refugee is often marked by physical and emotional trauma. Although refugees come from many different countries and cultures, their shared pattern of experiences allows for some generalizations to be made about their health care needs and challenges. Before being accepted for resettlement in the United States, all refugees must pass an overseas medical screening examination, the purpose of which is to identify conditions that could result in ineligibility for admission to the United States. Primary care physicians have the opportunity to care for members of this unique population once they resettle. Refugees present to primary care physicians with a variety of health problems, including musculoskeletal and pain issues, mental and social health problems, infectious diseases, and longstanding undiagnosed chronic illnesses. Important infectious diseases to consider in the symptomatic patient include tuberculosis, parasites, and malaria. Health maintenance and immunizations should also be addressed. Language barriers, cross-cultural medicine issues, and low levels of health literacy provide additional challenges to caring for this population. The purpose of this article is to provide primary care physicians with a guide to some of the common issues that arise when caring for refugee patients.

  6. The advance nurse practitioner in critical care: a workload evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Audrey; Carberry, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Critical Care role was developed to support the critical care team by undertaking specific roles traditionally associated with medical staff in the intensive care unit and high dependency unit. The rationale for the evaluation was to establish the specific tasks undertaken and scope of workload of these newly created posts. To report on an evaluation of the specific activities, workload and patterns of prescribing of advanced nursing practice posts within a critical care settings A data collection form was designed to capture clinically and patient-related activities of these post-holders. Data from 1 week were recorded on one post-holder and subsequently analysed. During the evaluation the nurse practitioners worked with the consultant anaesthetist. Data were entered into Microsoft Excel and analysed using descriptive statistics. The intensive care and high dependency unit ward round attributed to 46% of the nurse practitioners weekly activity and mainly consisted of patient assessments and prescribing. The rest of the time was mainly split between documentation and unsupervised patient assessments. The nurse practitioners contributed to the majority of interventions traditionally performed by anaesthetic trainees. Independent patient assessment was highlighted as a significant part of that workload (12%). The evaluation also highlighted the broad nature required of nurse practitioner prescribing and thus reinforced the strategic decision not to introduce a restricted formulary. Advanced nurse practitioners in critical care effectively carried out the traditional medical tasks in which they were trained. As already experienced nurses with new enhanced skills they successfully contributed to and enhanced the delivery of care to the critically ill. © 2014 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  7. Expanding rural access to mental health care through online postgraduate nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan; Kozeniewski, Kate

    2016-12-01

    Workforce shortages in mental health care are especially relevant to rural communities. People often turn to their primary care providers for mental healthcare services, yet primary care providers indicate that more education is needed to fill this role. Rural primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) are ideal candidates for educational enhancement. Online programs allow NPs to continue living and working in their communities while developing the competencies to provide comprehensive and integrated mental healthcare services. This article presents a review of current online postgraduate psychiatric mental health NP (PMHNP) options. Website descriptions of online PMHNP programs were located using keywords: PMHNP or psychiatric nurse practitioner, postgraduate or post-master's, and distance or online. Across the United States, 15 online postgraduate certificate programs were located that are designed for primary care NPs seeking additional PMHNP specialization. For rural primary care NPs who are ready, willing, and able, a postgraduate PMHNP specialty certificate can be obtained online in as few as three to four semesters. The expected outcome is a cadre of dually credentialed NPs capable of functioning in an integrated role and of increasing rural access to comprehensive mental healthcare services. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. How family practice physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants incorporate spiritual care in practice.

    PubMed

    Tanyi, Ruth A; McKenzie, Monica; Chapek, Cynthia

    2009-12-01

    To investigate how primary care family practice providers incorporate spirituality into their practices in spite of documented barriers. A phenomenological qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with three physicians, five nurse practitioners, and two physician assistants. Five major theme clusters emerged: (1) discerning instances for overt spiritual assessment; (2) displaying a genuine and caring attitude; (3) encouraging the use of existing spiritual practices; (4) documenting spiritual care for continuity of care; (5) managing perceived barriers to spiritual care. Findings support that patients' spiritual needs can be addressed in spite of documented barriers. Techniques to assist providers in providing spiritual care are discussed and directions for future research are suggested.

  9. Experiences of nurse practitioners and medical practitioners working in collaborative practice models in primary healthcare in Australia - a multiple case study using mixed methods.

    PubMed

    Schadewaldt, Verena; McInnes, Elizabeth; Hiller, Janet E; Gardner, Anne

    2016-07-29

    legal liability and reimbursement for shared patient care; 3) Nurse practitioners' and medical practitioners' adjustment to new routines and facilitating the collaborative work relied on the willingness and personal commitment of individuals. Findings of this study suggest that the willingness of practitioners and their individual relationships partially overcame the effect of system restrictions. However, strategic support from healthcare reform decision-makers is needed to strengthen nurse practitioner positions and ensure the sustainability of collaborative practice models in primary healthcare.

  10. Redesigning a School Health Workforce for a New Health Care Environment: Training School Nurses as Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindis, Claire D.; Sanghvi, Rupal; Melinkovich, Paul; Kaplan, David W.; Ahlstrand, Karin R.; Phibbs, Stephanie L.

    1998-01-01

    School nurses trained as nurse practitioners can help resolve the problems of ready access to and appropriate use of primary care, early detection of medical problems, and efficient use of school staff. This paper describes a project in which Denver's school nurses received training as nurse practitioners, suggesting ways to solve problems in role…

  11. Redesigning a School Health Workforce for a New Health Care Environment: Training School Nurses as Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindis, Claire D.; Sanghvi, Rupal; Melinkovich, Paul; Kaplan, David W.; Ahlstrand, Karin R.; Phibbs, Stephanie L.

    1998-01-01

    School nurses trained as nurse practitioners can help resolve the problems of ready access to and appropriate use of primary care, early detection of medical problems, and efficient use of school staff. This paper describes a project in which Denver's school nurses received training as nurse practitioners, suggesting ways to solve problems in role…

  12. Use of the PRIME-MD Patient Health Questionnaire for estimating the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in French primary care: comparison with family practitioner estimates and relationship to psychotropic medication use.

    PubMed

    Norton, Joanna; De Roquefeuil, Guilhem; Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Ritchie, Karen; Mann, Anthony; Tylee, Andre

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish provisional psychiatric diagnoses using the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and to describe family practitioner (FP) case recognition, survey-day prescription of anxiolytic and antidepressant medications and overall consumption rates (medication use). Between October 2003 and April 2004, 1151 consecutive patients (> or = 18 years old) of 46 FPs practicing in and around the city of Montpellier, France, completed the PHQ. During the consultation, FPs rated the severity of any psychiatric disorder. PHQ prevalence rates (FP case recognition percentages are given in parentheses) were as follows: 10.9% (36%) for probable alcohol abuse/dependence; 11.3% (40%) for somatoform disorder; 9.1% (75%) for major depression; 7.4% (42%) for other depressive disorders; 7.5% (69%) for panic disorder; and 6% (69%) for other anxiety disorders. The prescription rate for all study patients was 11.3%, ranging from 6.2% for those without a PHQ disorder to 30.3% for those with a PHQ diagnosis of anxiety or depression to 48.2% for FP-recognized cases. The estimated survey-day consumption rate for these medications was 19.4%. High consumption of anxiolytic and antidepressant medications in France is confirmed but not explained either by higher prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders as compared with other locations or by unusually high survey-day prescription rates. A possible explanation would be the organization of the French health care system, which has multiple sources for obtaining medication.

  13. The acute care nurse practitioner in collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, L

    1996-01-01

    Nurse-physician relationships remain, for the most part, hierarchical in nature. A hierarchical structure allows the person at the top, most notably the physician, the highest level of authority and power for decision making. Other health care providers are delegated various tasks related to the medical plan of care. One role of nonmedical health care providers, including nurses, is to support the medical plan of care and increase the productivity of physicians. Medical centers have house staff, usually interns and residents, who work collaboratively with the attending physicians in care delivery. At one medical center, a shortage of medical house staff for internal medicine prompted the development and evaluation of an alternative service. The alternative service utilized master prepared, certified nurse practitioners on a nonteaching service to provide care for selected types of medical patients. Physicians consulted with nurse practitioners, but retained decision-making authority concerning patient admission to the service. This paper describes the development and evaluation of an alternative service based on a collaborative practice model and the role of nurse practitioners working under such a model. Discussion includes suggestions for process guideline development for organizations that want to improve collaborative practice relationships between unit nursing staff, nurse practitioners, and physicians.

  14. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Kapur, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically relevant short- and long-term benefits for low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, chronic neck pain, and headache. The integration of acupuncture into a primary care setting also appears to be cost-effective. Furthermore, the practice of acupuncture in primary care involves rigorous training, financial discipline, and art of communication. When it is done correctly, acupuncture proves to be beneficial for both patients and providers. PMID:20189001

  15. Primary care technicians: a solution to the primary care workforce gap.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Arthur L; Saultz, John W; Mehrotra, Ateev; Jones, Spencer S; Dalal, Siddartha

    2013-11-01

    Efforts to close the primary care workforce gap typically employ one of three basic strategies: train more primary care physicians; boost the supply of nurse practitioners or physician assistants, or both; or use community health workers to extend the reach of primary care physicians. In this article we briefly review each strategy and the barriers to its success. We then propose a new approach adapted from the widely accepted model of emergency medical services. Translating this model to primary care and leveraging the capabilities of modern health information technology, it should be possible to create primary care technicians who can dramatically expand the impact and reach of patient-centered medical homes by providing basic preventive, minor illness, and stable chronic disease care in rural and resource-deprived communities.

  16. Putting population health into practice through primary health care.

    PubMed

    Neuwelt, Pat; Matheson, Don; Arroll, Bruce; Dowell, Anthony; Winnard, Doone; Crampton, Peter; Sheridan, Nicolette Fay; Cumming, Jacqueline

    2009-02-27

    The introduction of the Primary Health Care Strategy has offered opportunities to take a population health approach to the planning and delivery of primary health care. The lack of a common understanding of population health between primary care and public health has been the prompt for a group of academics and practitioners to join forces and produce this statement on a population health approach to primary care, through primary health care. This paper takes the position that the features of a population health approach (such as a concern for equity, community participation, teamwork and attention to the determinants of health) enhance general practice care rather than undermine it. We conclude that the contribution of the health sector towards population health goals can be achieved through collaboration between GPs, nurses, other primary health care workers, and communities, together with health promotion and public health practitioners. Finding common language and understanding is an important step towards improving that collaboration.

  17. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    PubMed

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation.

  18. Ethical conflict associated with managed care: views of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M; Soeken, Karen L; Miller, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Ethical conflict of nurse practitioners (NPs) practicing within a managed care environment has not been systematically examined, yet like physician practitioners, NPs are confronted with daily ethical conflicts. To determine perceptions toward ethical conflict in practice espoused by NPs affiliated with managed care systems and to identify the relationship between selected individual, organizational, and societal/market contextual factors and ethical conflict in practice. Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational survey of a stratified random sample of 700 NPs licensed and certified to practice in the state of Maryland, conducted from November 2000 to January 2001. A majority of respondents reported being moderately to extremely concerned with managed care. Eighty percent of the sample perceived that it was sometimes necessary to bend managed care guidelines with 61% agreeing that the practitioner must weigh the patient's interest against managed care organizations' interests. The NPs in a staff/group model health maintenance organization (a) were less ethically concerned (p <.001); (b) perceived the ethical environment more positively (p <.001); and (c) had lower ethical conflict scores (p <.001) than NPs in other types of practice settings. Results from this study indicate that NPs are experiencing ethical conflict associated with practicing within a managed care environment; however, NPs in a staff/group model health maintenance organization report these concerns less. Ethical support through intervening strategies (i.e., ethics education and interdisciplinary ethics support systems) may help mitigate the conflict associated with this system of care.

  19. A process-based framework to guide nurse practitioners integration into primary healthcare teams: results from a logic analysis.

    PubMed

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Brousselle, Astrid; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Perroux, Mélanie; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Brault, Isabelle; Kilpatrick, Kelley; D'Amour, Danielle; Sansgter-Gormley, Esther

    2015-02-27

    Integrating Nurse Practitioners into primary care teams is a process that involves significant challenges. To be successful, nurse practitioner integration into primary care teams requires, among other things, a redefinition of professional boundaries, in particular those of medicine and nursing, a coherent model of inter- and intra- professional collaboration, and team-based work processes that make the best use of the subsidiarity principle. There have been numerous studies on nurse practitioner integration, and the literature provides a comprehensive list of barriers to, and facilitators of, integration. However, this literature is much less prolific in discussing the operational level implications of those barriers and facilitators and in offering practical recommendations. In the context of a large-scale research project on the introduction of nurse practitioners in Quebec (Canada) we relied on a logic-analysis approach based, on the one hand on a realist review of the literature and, on the other hand, on qualitative case-studies in 6 primary healthcare teams in rural and urban area of Quebec. Five core themes that need to be taken into account when integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams were identified. Those themes are: planning, role definition, practice model, collaboration, and team support. The present paper has two objectives: to present the methods used to develop the themes, and to discuss an integrative model of nurse practitioner integration support centered around these themes. It concludes with a discussion of how this framework contributes to existing knowledge and some ideas for future avenues of study.

  20. Primary care: the next renaissance.

    PubMed

    Showstack, Jonathan; Lurie, Nicole; Larson, Eric B; Rothman, Arlyss Anderson; Hassmiller, Susan

    2003-02-04

    Three decades ago, a renaissance helped create the foundations of primary care as we know it today. In recent years, however, new challenges have confronted primary care. We believe that the current challenges can be overcome and may, in fact, present an opportunity for a new renaissance of primary care to address the needs of our population. In this paper, we suggest seven core principles and a set of actions that will support a renaissance in, and a positive future for, primary care. The seven principles are 1) Health care must be organized to serve the needs of patients; 2) the goal of primary care systems should be the delivery of the highest-quality care as documented by measurable outcomes; 3) information and information systems are the backbone of the primary care process; 4) current health care systems must be reconstructed; 5) the health care financing system must support excellent primary care practice; 6) primary care education must be revitalized, with an emphasis on new delivery models and training in sites that deliver excellent primary care; and 7) the value of primary care practice must be continually improved, documented, and communicated. At the start of the 21st century, a vital, patient-centered primary care system has much to offer a rapidly changing population with increasingly diverse needs and expectations. If we keep the needs of persons and patients clearly in sight and design systems to meet those needs, primary care will thrive and our patients will be well served.

  1. Spirometry in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  2. Primary medical care in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Roland, Martin; Guthrie, Bruce; Thomé, David Colin

    2012-03-01

    Since 1948 health care in the United Kingdom (UK) has been centrally funded through the National Health Service (NHS). The NHS provides both primary and specialist health care which is largely free at the point of delivery. Family practitioners are responsible for registered populations of patients and typically work in groups of 4-6 self-employed physicians. They hire nurses and a range of other ancillary staff, and act as gatekeepers to specialist care. Recent reforms include a wide range of national quality improvement initiatives and a pay for performance scheme that accounts for around 25% of family practitioners' income. These reforms have been associated with some major improvements in quality, including improved chronic disease management and reduced waiting times for specialist care. The four countries of the UK differ in some important aspects of health care organization: proposed reforms in England would move towards a more market-driven system, with family practitioners acting as payers for specialist care and controlling 70% of the NHS budget. The other countries (Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) focus more on trying to create area-based integrated systems of care.

  3. Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner: The 2014 Practice Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Madden, Maureen A; Gutknecht, Sarah; Foerster, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Practice research serves as the certification framework for validating advanced practice roles and updating national qualifying examinations. This national study describes the current practice of the acute care pediatric nurse practitioner (AC PNP) to inform an update of the Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner-Acute Care (CPNP-AC) examination content outline. A descriptive analysis was performed of the responses of 319 pediatric nurse practitioners, practicing in an acute care role, who completed a practice survey in 2014. Respondents were primarily White women with a mean age of 40 years; 75% had been formally educated as AC PNPs, compared with 48% in 2009. Regional practice was most heavily concentrated in the Southeast (28%) and Midwest (27%). Most respondents (81%) practiced in urban areas. Respondents reported spending 75% of practice time in inpatient settings. The most frequently cited areas of practice were critical care (36%), followed by emergency department (9%) and subspecialty practices. This third analysis of AC PNP practice 10 years after initiation of the CPNP-AC certification examination demonstrates changes in clinical practice and educational preparation. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and psychometric testing of the EverCare Nurse Practitioner Role and Activity Scale (ENPRAS).

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Lisa; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Kane, Robertl; Dick, Karen; Chen, Jie

    2005-01-01

    To develop and test an instrument measuring the frequency of the performance of role activities by EverCare nurse practitioners (NPs), who provide primary care to nursing home residents. One hundred thirty-one EverCare Nurse Practitioner Role and Activity Scale (ENPRAS) activities were identified through telephone interviews (n= 11), participant observation (n= 5), and a focus group (n= 4). Two content validity tests (n= 11; n= 15) (Content Validity Index > or = .78 for all retained items) and internal consistency reliability testing (n= 127; Cronbach's alpha = .78-.96) yielded 99 activities arranged in six role subscales-Collaborator, Clinician, Care Manager/Coordinator, Counselor, Communicator/Cheerleader, and Coach/Educator. The ENPRAS can be used to measure similarities and differences in NP practice activities performed by EverCare NPs working at different EverCare program sites and to compare practice activities performed by EverCare NPs and other NPs. The EverCare program is sponsored by United Health Care, which leads the field in collaborative NP/MD primary care in nursing homes. Future studies should be directed toward testing the generalizability of the ENPRAS with NPs working in other collaborative models, as well as NPs in noncollaborative models of care delivery in the long-term care setting.

  5. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  6. Early palliative home care: Evaluation of an interprofessional educational intervention for district nurses and general practitioners about nutritional care.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Erika; Ödlund Olin, Ann; Orrevall, Ylva; Strang, Peter; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Törnkvist, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Teamwork is important in early palliative home care, and interprofessional education is required to achieve teamwork. It is thus crucial to ensure that interprofessional education works well for the members of all participating professions because levels of knowledge and educational needs may vary. To evaluate, by profession, the effectiveness of an interprofessional educational intervention for district nurses and general practitioners on three areas of nutritional care for patients in a palliative phase. A quasi-experimental study that used a computer-based, study-specific questionnaire to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The continuing education in primary health care (ConPrim(®)) model was used to create the intervention. ConPrim includes a web-based program, a practical exercise and a case seminar, all with interprofessional training. Primary health care centers in Stockholm County, Sweden. Intervention group (n = 87; 48 district nurses, 39 general practitioners); control group (n = 53; 36 district nurses, 17 general practitioners). The total intervention effect was significant in all three areas, p = 0.000-0.004. The intervention effects were similar and significant for both professions in areas 1 and 2. In area 3, the intervention effects were significant for general practitioners but not for district nurses. The intervention seems promising, as it may create better prerequisites for teamwork and caring for patients living at home. However, it needs to be optimized to better increase district nurses' level of knowledge (area 3).

  7. 42 CFR 414.80 - Incentive payment for primary care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specified by the Secretary are for primary care services. (ii) A nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... following criteria: (A) Enrolled in Medicare with a primary specialty designation of 50-nurse practitioner, 89-certified clinical nurse, or 97-physician assistant. (B) At least 60 percent of the practitioner's...

  8. 42 CFR 414.80 - Incentive payment for primary care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specified by the Secretary are for primary care services. (ii) A nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... following criteria: (A) Enrolled in Medicare with a primary specialty designation of 50-nurse practitioner, 89-certified clinical nurse, or 97-physician assistant. (B) At least 60 percent of the practitioner's...

  9. 42 CFR 414.80 - Incentive payment for primary care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specified by the Secretary are for primary care services. (ii) A nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... following criteria: (A) Enrolled in Medicare with a primary specialty designation of 50-nurse practitioner, 89-certified clinical nurse, or 97-physician assistant. (B) At least 60 percent of the practitioner's...

  10. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrative medicine: enhancing quality in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Grace, Sandra; Higgs, Joy

    2010-09-01

    Integrative medicine (IM) is an emerging model of health care in Australia. However, little is known about the contribution that IM makes to the quality of health care. The aim of the research was to understand the contribution IM can make to the quality of primary care practices from the perspectives of consumers and providers of IM. This interpretive research used hermeneutic phenomenology to understand meanings and significance that patients and practitioners attach to their experiences of IM. Various qualitative research techniques were used: case studies; focus groups; and key informant interviews. Data sets were generated from interview transcripts and field notes. Data analysis consisted of repeatedly reading and examining the data sets for what they revealed about experiences of health care and health outcomes, and constantly comparing these to allow themes and patterns to emerge. The setting for this research was Australian IM clinics where general medical practitioners and CAM practitioners were co-located. From the perspective of patients and practitioners, IM: (1) provided authentically patient-centered care; (2) filled gaps in treatment effectiveness, particularly for certain patient populations (those with complex, chronic health conditions, those seeking an alternative to pharmaceutical health care, and those seeking health promotion and illness prevention); and (3) enhanced the safety of primary health care (because IM retained a general medical practitioner as the primary contact practitioner and because IM used strategies to increase disclosure of treatments between practitioners). According to patients and practitioners, IM enhanced the quality of primary health care through its provision of health care that was patient-centered, effective (particularly for chronic health conditions, nonpharmaceutical treatments, and health promotion) and safe.

  12. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than...) Qio Review Functions § 476.102 Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a... reviews care and services delivered by health care practitioners other than physicians. (2) Assure that in...

  13. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than...) Qio Review Functions § 476.102 Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a... reviews care and services delivered by health care practitioners other than physicians. (2) Assure that in...

  14. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than...) Qio Review Functions § 476.102 Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a... reviews care and services delivered by health care practitioners other than physicians. (2) Assure that in...

  15. Epigenetics and primary care.

    PubMed

    Wright, Robert; Saul, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Epigenetics, the study of functionally relevant chemical modifications to DNA that do not involve a change in the DNA nucleotide sequence, is at the interface between research and clinical medicine. Research on epigenetic marks, which regulate gene expression independently of the underlying genetic code, has dramatically changed our understanding of the interplay between genes and the environment. This interplay alters human biology and developmental trajectories, and can lead to programmed human disease years after the environmental exposure. In addition, epigenetic marks are potentially heritable. In this article, we discuss the underlying concepts of epigenetics and address its current and potential applicability for primary care providers.

  16. Describing Primary Care Encounters: The Primary Care Network Survey and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    PubMed Central

    Binns, Helen J.; Lanier, David; Pace, Wilson D.; Galliher, James M.; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Grey, Margaret; Ariza, Adolfo J.; Williams, Robert

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to describe clinical encounters in primary care research networks and compare them with those of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). METHODS Twenty US primary care research networks collected data on clinicians and patient encounters using the Primary Care Network Survey (PRINS) Clinician Interview (PRINS-1) and Patient Record (PRINS-2), which were newly developed based on NAMCS tools. Clinicians completed a PRINS-1 about themselves and a PRINS-2 for each of 30 patient visits. Data included patient characteristics; reason for the visit, diagnoses, and services ordered or performed. We compared PRINS data with data obtained from primary care physicians during 5 cycles of NAMCS (1997–2001). Data were weighted; PRINS reflects participating networks and NAMCS provides national estimates. RESULTS By discipline, 89% of PRINS clinicians were physicians, 4% were physicians in residency training, 5% were advanced practice nurses/nurse-practitioners, and 2% were physician’s assistants. The majority (53%) specialized in pediatrics (34% specialized in family medicine, 9% in internal medicine, and 4% in other specialties). All NAMCS clinicians were physicians, with 20% specializing in pediatrics. When NAMCS and PRINS visits were compared, larger proportions of PRINS visits involved preventive care and were made by children, members of minority racial groups, and individuals who did not have private health insurance. A diagnostic or other assessment service was performed for 99% of PRINS visits and 76% of NAMCS visits (95% confidence interval, 74.9%–78.0%). A preventive or counseling/education service was provided at 64% of PRINS visits and 37% of NAMCS visits (95% confidence interval, 35.1%–38.0%). CONCLUSIONS PRINS presents a view of diverse primary care visits and differs from NAMCS in its methods and findings. Further examinations of PRINS data are needed to assess their usefulness for describing encounters that

  17. Nurse practitioners in aged care: documentary analysis of successful project proposals.

    PubMed

    Clark, Shannon J; Parker, Rhian M; Davey, Rachel

    2014-11-01

    Meeting the primary health care needs of an aging population is an increasing challenge for many Western nations. In Australia, the federal government introduced a program to develop, test, and evaluate nurse practitioner models in aged care settings. In this article, we present a documentary analysis of 32 project proposals awarded funding under the Nurse Practitioner-Aged Care Models of Practice Program. Successfully funded models were diverse and were operated by a range of organizations across Australia. We identified three key priorities as underlying the proposed models: "The right care," "in the right place," and "at the right time." In this article, we explore how these priorities were presented by different applicants in different ways. Through the presentation of their models, the program's applicants identified and proposed to address current gaps in health services. Applicants contrasted their proposed models with available services to create persuasive and competitive applications for funding.

  18. Continuity of care by cardiothoracic nurse practitioners: impact on outcome.

    PubMed

    Southey, Dawn; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Nevill, Alan; Aktuerk, Dincer; Luckraz, Heyman

    2014-10-01

    There have been recent reports on increased mortality in British National Health Service hospitals during weekends. This study aimed to assess the impact on patient care following the introduction of nurse practitioner cover for the cardiothoracic ward, including weekends. Prospectively collected and validated data of patients operated on from January 2005 to October 2011 were analyzed. The patients were grouped according to era: before (n = 2385) and after (n = 3910) the introduction of nurse practitioners in October 2007. There were no significant differences in preoperative patient characteristics such as age, logistic EuroSCORE, sex, smoking, and extracardiac vascular problems. There were more patients from an Asian background (p < 0.01), more with noninsulin-dependent diabetes (p < 0.01), and more requiring urgent cardiac surgery (p < 0.01) in the later era. Following the introduction of nurse practitioner grade, there was a decrease in the rate of cardiac intensive care unit readmission from 2.6% to 1.9% (p = 0.05) and length of hospital stay from 10 to 8 days (p < 0.01). There was a significant improvement in overall survival after cardiac surgery from 96.5% to 98.0% (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis confirmed that the presence of nurse practitioners on the ward was the strongest predictor of survival with an odds ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.23-3.01). The introduction of the nurse practitioner grade to provide continuity in patient care including at weekends has been confirmed to improve patient outcomes including survival after cardiac surgery. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    PubMed

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  20. Neonatal nurse practitioners provide quality, cost-effective care.

    PubMed

    Geiss, Donna M; Cavaliere, Terri A

    2003-09-01

    Loretta Ford, the pioneer of nurse practitioners, was the recipient of the Crystal Trailblazer Award from the American College of Nurse Practitioners in February 2003. In her acceptance speech, the stated that "in some ways, the profession had expanded beyond my wildest dreams," but cautioned against the medicalization of the NP role: "The profession is rooted in nursing ... and we enhance, advance, and influence through nursing." She added: "Medical and nursing interdependency sets the stage for the highest level of care. No one profession can deliver comprehensive health care themselves." NNPs, functioning collaboratively with neonatologists as part of a multidisciplinary team, illustrate the truth of Ford's words. They have clearly and unequivocally made significant strides during the past 20 years. Their achievements and contributions have been many but their potential has yet to be reached.

  1. Assessing primary care in Croatia: could it be moved forward?

    PubMed

    Keglević, Mladenka Vrcić; Kovačić, Luka; Pavleković, Gordana

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that countries with strong primary care achieve better health outcomes at lower costs. Therefore, the effort of World Health Organization in promoting primary care as a basic principal of successful health care system is an ongoing process. Although Croatia was recognized as a country with primary care orientation due to the development of health centers and introduction of specialist training of general practitioners, it seems that many health care reforms aimed at better organization of health institutions and decreasing of health care costs did not result with higher primary care orientation. By application of the Primary Care Score instrument in 2014 (Croatia received 11.2 out of 20 possible points), and international comparison performed in 2002, it was concluded that among the eighteen OECD countries Croatia could be categorized as an "intermediate primary care country", obtaining the scores just a bit above the average.

  2. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  3. 75 FR 4655 - National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: Reporting on... Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: Reporting on Adverse and Negative Actions... rule revises existing regulations under sections 401 through 432 of the Health Care Quality Improvement...

  4. 42 CFR 476.102 - Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Involvement of health care practitioners other than... Involvement of health care practitioners other than physicians. (a) Basic requirement. Except as provided in... practitioners who furnish the services under review if the QIO reviews care and services delivered by health...

  5. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model

    PubMed Central

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation. PMID:26951592

  6. Patient Perspectives on Nurse Practitioner Care in Oncology in Canada.

    PubMed

    Stahlke, Sarah; Rawson, Krista; Pituskin, Edith

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to add to what is known about patient satisfaction with nurse practitioner (NP) care, from the perspective of breast cancer patients who were followed by an NP. This study utilized Interpretive Description, a qualitative method aimed at making sense of the experiential aspects of health care and developing practical knowledge for improved care. Nine patients receiving NP-led care in an outpatient breast cancer clinic were interviewed about their perspectives on and experiences with NP-led care. Interview transcripts were thematically analyzed. The NP role has long been regarded as a way of addressing many contemporary health system problems, although there continue to be barriers to the effective utilization of the role, including public and patient misunderstandings. This study revealed that, despite persistent traditional role understandings about health professionals, the patient participants appreciated the benefits of NP care and were highly satisfied with both the physical care and holistic support they received during the course of their treatment. Today's healthcare system is characterized by accessibility issues, unmet patient need, workforce issues, and funding pressures. This research supports and enriches what is known about the benefits and usefulness of NP-provided care from the viewpoint of those receiving the care. The findings offer guidance to NPs in the clinical setting regarding patient needs and optimal care strategies. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Homelessness: a problem for primary care?

    PubMed

    Riley, Anthony J; Harding, Geoffrey; Underwood, Martin R; Carter, Yvonne H

    2003-06-01

    Homelessness is a social problem that affects all facets of contemporary society. This paper discusses the concept of homelessness in terms of its historical context and the dominance of the pervasive 'victim blaming' ideologies, which, together with the worldwide economic changes that have contributed to a fiscal crisis of the state, and the resultant policies and circumstances, have led to an increase in the number of 'new homeless' people. This paper attempts to challenge the dominant political discourse on homelessness. The widespread healthcare problems and heterogeneity of homeless people have a particular impact on health services, with many homeless people inappropriately accessing local accident and emergency (A&E) departments because of barriers inhibiting adequate access to primary care. A number of primary care schemes have been successfully implemented to enable the homeless to have better access to appropriate care. However, there is no consistency in the level of services around the United Kingdom (UK), and innovations in service are not widespread and by their nature they are ad hoc. Despite the successes of such schemes, many homeless people still access health care inappropriately. Until homeless people are fully integrated into primary care the situation will not change. The question remains, how can appropriate access be established? A start can be made by building on some of the positive work that is already being done in primary care, but in reality general practitioners (GPs) will be 'swimming against the tide' unless a more integrated policy approach is adopted to tackle homelessness.

  8. Homelessness: a problem for primary care?

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Anthony J; Harding, Geoffrey; Underwood, Martin R; Carter, Yvonne H

    2003-01-01

    Homelessness is a social problem that affects all facets of contemporary society. This paper discusses the concept of homelessness in terms of its historical context and the dominance of the pervasive 'victim blaming' ideologies, which, together with the worldwide economic changes that have contributed to a fiscal crisis of the state, and the resultant policies and circumstances, have led to an increase in the number of 'new homeless' people. This paper attempts to challenge the dominant political discourse on homelessness. The widespread healthcare problems and heterogeneity of homeless people have a particular impact on health services, with many homeless people inappropriately accessing local accident and emergency (A&E) departments because of barriers inhibiting adequate access to primary care. A number of primary care schemes have been successfully implemented to enable the homeless to have better access to appropriate care. However, there is no consistency in the level of services around the United Kingdom (UK), and innovations in service are not widespread and by their nature they are ad hoc. Despite the successes of such schemes, many homeless people still access health care inappropriately. Until homeless people are fully integrated into primary care the situation will not change. The question remains, how can appropriate access be established? A start can be made by building on some of the positive work that is already being done in primary care, but in reality general practitioners (GPs) will be 'swimming against the tide' unless a more integrated policy approach is adopted to tackle homelessness. PMID:12939894

  9. Registered Nurses in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D.

    2017-01-01

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care management, their own daily schedule of patient visits and contacts, and considerable autonomy in the care of their patients. PMID:28323721

  10. Primary health care models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  11. The potential for nurse practitioners in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Mandy M; Fraser, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    In Canada, health care reform is underway to address escalating costs, access and quality of care issues, and existing personnel shortages in various health disciplines. One response of the nursing profession to these stimuli has been the development of the advanced practice nurse, namely, the nurse practitioner (NP). NPs are in an excellent position to address current shortcomings through increasing points of access to the health care system, providing an emphasis on education and disease prevention, and delivering high-quality, cost-effective care in a multitude of practice settings. With an emphasis on the social determinants of health, NPs are in a prime position to provide care to underserved and vulnerable populations across Canada. Despite the potential for NPs to be instrumental in health care reform, there is a lack of support and regulation necessary for their optimal use. Barriers to mobilizing NPs in Canada exist and impede the integration of NPs into the Canadian health care system, which has both quality of care and social justice implications.

  12. Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Danielle H; Mahoney, David; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Investigation for a possible anxiety disorder should be considered in patients with multiple or persistent anxiety symptoms or multiple somatic complaints without a clear somatic etiology. The ideal treatment for anxiety disorders is a combination of pharmacologic and behavioral strategies. As primary care health care evolves, it is expected that the management of mental health disorders (including anxiety disorders) will largely occur in the context of collaborative care models in which patients and primary care clinicians are assisted by trained case managers who help facilitate a more comprehensive, holistic treatment plan between primary care and mental health providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. African Primary Care Research: qualitative interviewing in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reid, Steve; Mash, Bob

    2014-06-05

    This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research and focuses on the topic of qualitative interviewing in primary care. In particular it looks at issues of study design, sample size, sampling and interviewing in relation to individual and focus group interviews.There is a particular focus on helping postgraduate students at a Masters level to write their research proposals.

  14. Nurse practitioners and managed care: patient satisfaction and intention to adhere to nurse practitioner plan of care.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Eileen

    2007-08-01

    To explore patient satisfaction, intention to adhere to nurse practitioner (NP) plan of care, and the impact of managed care on NPs' patients in multiple settings, the final phase of a three-part study of NPs and managed care. Postvisit questionnaires and narrative comments about patient satisfaction with NP communication, overall satisfaction with visit, recall of plan of care, intention to adhere to NP's recommendations, and impact of managed care on ease of obtaining healthcare resources. Patients were very satisfied with NP communication and with their healthcare visit. They mostly intended to adhere to the NP-recommended plan of care but less so to recommended lifestyle changes. Patients trusted their NPs, valued their expertise, were confident in the NPs' care, and believed that the NPs considered their best interests. They appreciated that the NPs took time to listen to their concerns and helped them to obtain healthcare resources. Most patients were not greatly impacted by managed care and obtained needed healthcare resources with little difficulty. Although the first two phases of this study found that many NPs had strong negative attitudes toward managed care, these attitudes were not conveyed toward patients in this sample. NPs, however, will continue to face new challenges as third-party payers attempt to reduce healthcare costs, further testing NP adaptability and resourcefulness.

  15. Is Health Practitioner Regulation Keeping Pace with the Changing Practitioner and Health-Care Landscape? An Australian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Jonathan Lee; Sibbritt, David; Broom, Alex; Steel, Amie; Adams, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Health-care delivery is undergoing significant evolution and change. Task substitution has resulted in some practitioner groups expanding their scope of practice by assuming more complex clinical roles, new practitioner groups have emerged, and consumer-driven demand has changed the way the public engage with health practitioners and the way many health-care services are delivered. Using Australia as a case study, this paper explores the issue of the hesitancy to include new professions in health professions regulation schemes. Despite the significant changes in the health-care delivery landscape, policy development in this area has remained relatively static, with active resistance to extending formal registration to new practitioner groups. Ignoring the issue of new practitioner groups in regulatory schemes is unacceptable from a public health perspective and runs against the key public protection objectives of health practitioner regulation. Development of pathways for the entry of new health practitioner groups into regulatory schemes must be developed as a matter of priority. PMID:27379222

  16. It's just too hard! Australian health care practitioner perspectives on barriers to advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Boddy, Jennifer; Chenoweth, Lesley; McLennan, Vanette; Daly, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from six focus groups with health care practitioners in an Australian hospital during 2010, which sought to elicit their perspectives on the barriers for people to plan their future health care should they become unwell. Such knowledge is invaluable in overcoming the barriers associated with advance care planning and enhancing the uptake of advance directives and the appointment of an enduring power of attorney for people of all ages. A person's rights to self-determination in health care, including decision making about their wishes for future care in the event they lose cognitive capacity, should not be overlooked against the backdrop of increasing pressure on health care systems. Findings suggest that multiple barriers exist, from practitioners' perspectives, which can be divided into three major categories, namely: patient-centred, practitioner-centred and system-centred barriers. Specifically, patient-centred barriers include lack of knowledge, accessibility concerns, the small 'window of opportunity' to discuss advance care planning, emotional reactions and avoidance when considering one's mortality, and demographic influences. At the practitioner level, barriers relate to a lack of knowledge and uncertainty around advance care planning processes. Systemically, legislative barriers (including a lack of a central registry and conflicting state legislation), procedural issues (particularly in relation to assessing cognitive capacity and making decisions ad hoc) and questions about delegation, roles and responsibilities further compound the barriers to advance care planning.

  17. [Transforming health systems based on primary care].

    PubMed

    Durán-Arenas, Luis; Salinas-Escudero, Guillermo; Granados-García, Víctor; Martínez-Valverde, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Access to health services is a social basic determinant of health in Mexico unlike what happens in developed countries. The demand for health services is focused on primary care, but the design meets only the supply of hospital care services. So it generates a dissonance between the needs and the effective design of health services. In addition, the term affiliation refers to population contributing or in the recruitment process, that has been counted as members of these social security institutions (SS) and Popular Insurance (SP). In the case of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) three of four contributors are in contact with health services; while in the SP, this indicator does not exist. Moreover, the access gap between health services is found in the health care packages so that members of the SS and SP do not have same type of coverage. The question is: which model of health care system want the Mexicans? Primary care represents the first choice for increasing the health systems performance, as well as to fulfill their function of social protection: universal access and coverage based on needs, regardless whether it is a public or private health insurance. A central aspect for development of this component is the definition of the first contact with the health system through the creation of a primary health care team, led by a general practitioner as the responsible of a multidisciplinary health team. The process addresses the concepts of primary care nursing, consumption of inputs (mainly medical drugs), maintenance and general services. Adopting a comprehensive strategy that will benefit all Mexicans equally and without discrimination, this primary care system could be financed with a total operating cost of approximately $ 22,809 million by year.

  18. Classifying health problems in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bentsen, Bent Guttorm

    1976-01-01

    In ordinary general practice, and in medical research, the problems encountered must be labelled. The Characteristics and classification of the labels used are discussed in this paper. Some different classification systems are discussed including that of the Royal College of General Practitioners. The need for one international classification system is stressed. The World Organisation of National Colleges and Academies of General Practice (WONCA) has now approved an International Classification of Health Problems in Primary Care, which was accepted by all countries during the sixth World Conference on General Practice in November 1974. PMID:1053266

  19. [Ten years after "privatization" in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Marković, Biserka Bergman; Katić, Milica; Milaković, Sanja Blazeković; Petric, Dragomir

    2007-02-01

    Ten years after the privatization in primary health care its disadvantages have been noticed making it less quality and consequently increasing the costs of total health care of the patient. Current organization makes family practitioners inaccessible to the patient during a part of the day. Emergency health care and hospital emergency services are ever more burdened with the work that should be done by family practitioners, thus becoming hardly accessible in emergencies. Medical nurses are mostly occupied with administrative work, family practitioners are partly doing the work that should be done by nurses, while clinical specialists are doing the job of family practitioners. They all work a lot but they do the jobs that should not be in their domain and that are much under the level of their education. Health care becomes ineffective, below-quality and expensive. It is necessary to redefine the tasks of all health care participants starting from family practitioners, and to redefine the role of medical center. Solving the legal position of family practitioners working in "lease", introduction of the combined form of payment in family practice, and the possibility of interacting association of physicians could help eliminate the problems and promote the quality of health care.

  20. The Coming Primary Care Revolution.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Phillips, Russell S

    2017-04-01

    The United States has the most expensive, technologically advanced, and sub-specialized healthcare system in the world, yet it has worse population health status than any other high-income country. Rising healthcare costs, high rates of waste, the continued trend towards chronic non-communicable disease, and the growth of new market entrants that compete with primary care services have set the stage for fundamental change in all of healthcare, driven by a revolution in primary care. We believe that the coming primary care revolution ought to be guided by the following design principles: 1) Payment must adequately support primary care and reward value, including non-visit-based care. 2) Relationships will serve as the bedrock of value in primary care, and will increasingly be fostered by teams, improved clinical operations, and technology, with patients and non-physicians assuming an ever-increasing role in most aspects of healthcare. 3) Generalist physicians will increasingly focus on high-acuity and high-complexity presentations, and primary care teams will increasingly manage conditions that specialists managed in the past. 4) Primary care will refocus on whole-person care, and address health behaviors as well as vision, hearing, dental, and social services. Design based on these principles should lead to higher-value healthcare, but will require new approaches to workforce training.

  1. The acute care nurse practitioner role in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Harbman, Patricia; Carter, Nancy; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Bourgeault, Ivy; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    The acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) role was developed in Canada in the late 1980s to offset rapidly increasing physician workloads in acute care settings and to address the lack of continuity of care for seriously ill patients and increased complexity of care delivery. These challenges provided an opportunity to develop an advanced practice nursing role to care for critically ill patients with the intent of improving continuity of care and patient outcomes. For this paper, we drew on the ACNP-related findings of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing. The synthesis revealed that ACNPs are working in a range of clinical settings. While ACNPs are trained at the master's level, there is a gap in specialty education for ACNPs. Important barriers to the full integration of ACNP roles into the Canadian healthcare system include lack of full utilization of role components, limitations to scope of practice, inconsistent team acceptance and funding issues. Facilitators to ACNP role implementation include clear communication about the role, with messages tailored to the specific information needs of various stakeholder groups; supportive leadership of healthcare managers; and stable and predictable funding. The status of ACNP roles continues to evolve across Canada. Ongoing leadership and continuing research are required to enhance the integration of these roles into our healthcare system.

  2. Reflections of the Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System Regional Nurse Practitioner Residency Forum.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kameka; Poppe, Anne; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Wipf, Joyce A; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2016-01-01

    There is a proliferation of advanced practice residency programs. However, there is no uniform model of developing and evaluating program success. An information forum was convened by Veterans Health Administration Puget Sound Health Care System's Center for Primary Care Education on September 17, 2013, in Seattle, Washington, to explore critical aspects of residency models. The three objectives of this forum were to develop a shared understanding of key elements needed to support nurse practitioner residencies; define the unique needs of nurse practitioner trainees who are interested in applying for a residency; and examine the viability of designing a replicable nurse practitioner residency model benchmarking stakeholder best practices. This article describes the organization of the forum and summarizes the presentations during the program. The companion article explores key recommendations from the forum related to future development of residency "toolkits" to aid in future evaluation and accreditation. As nurse practitioner residencies continue to develop and evolve, more is needed in the area of structure and alignment. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Detecting mental disorders in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Managing mental health problems of people around the world is a major challenge for health workers as well as for policy makers. It is a particular problem for low- and middle-income countries for many reasons, especially due to lack of recourses. A computer-assisted interview, the GMHAT/PC (Global Mental Health Assessment Tool – Primary Care) has been developed to assist general practitioners and other health professionals to make a quick, convenient, and comprehensive, standardised mental health assessment. It has proved to be a reliable and valid tool in various studies. Its use by other health professionals may help in detecting and managing mental disorders in primary care and general health settings more effectively. The article outlines the development and potential use of the GMHAT/PC PMID:22477882

  4. The Direct Observation of Nurse Practitioner Care study: An overview of the NP/patient visit.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Sharon M; Cook, Michelle L; Riley, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    While there is a preponderance of studies that demonstrate the quality of nurse practitioner (NP) practice, little is known on the practice style of NPs. The Direct Observation of Nurse Practitioner Care study provided the first national direct observation and characterization of patient care delivered by primary care NPs. The setting for this study was ambulatory care practices of NPs located throughout the United States. A nested sample was utilized, consisting of 22 NPs during visits with 245 patients. Observational data were collected during each visit using the Davis observation code (DOC). Patient information was collected from chart reviews and postvisit surveys. Each NP filled out a demographic and practice survey. Visits to NPs were 18 min on average, and were most frequently for new/acute problems (45.1%) or routine chronic problems (30.2%). Overall, NPs spent the most time planning treatment, history taking, and providing health education. Topics that NPs frequently provided health education about included medication action and side effects, disease process education, diet, and nutrition. Data from this study will allow for detailed characterizations of a patient-NP visit and average length of the visit and the time use based on the DOC. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Counselling for depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    Rowland, N; Bower, P; Mellor, C; Heywood, P; Godfrey, C

    2001-01-01

    There is wide clinician and patient support for counselling in primary care, particularly in the UK. This review examines the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of counselling for psychological and psychosocial problems in the primary care setting. To assess the effects of counselling in primary care by reviewing cost and outcome data for patients with psychological and psychosocial problems considered suitable for counselling. The search strategy included electronic searching of databases (including the CCDAN Register of RCTs and CCTs) along with handsearching of a specialist journal. Published and unpublished sources (clinical trials, books, dissertations, agency reports etc.) were searched, and their reference lists scanned. Contact was made with subject experts and CCDAN members. Randomised and controlled patient preference trials comparing counselling in primary care with usual general practitioner care for patients with psychological and psychosocial problems considered suitable for counselling. Trials completed before the end of April 1998 were included in the review. Trials were independently assessed by at least two reviewers for appropriateness of inclusion and methdological quality. Four trials, involving 678 participants, of whom 487 were followed up, were included. Data for psychological symptom levels (four trials) were pooled statistically. Patients receiving counselling had significantly better psychological symptom levels post intervention than patients receiving usual general practitioner care (standardised mean difference -0.30, 95% CI, (-0.49 to - 0.11). The effect remained statistically significant when the results from studies with less rigorous methodology were excluded in a sensitivity analysis. Patients who received counselling tended to be more satisfied with their treatment (three trials). Health service utilisation data were reported in all trials reviewed, but only one trial undertook a cost analysis. No clear cost advantage was

  6. Nursing contributions to chronic disease management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lukewich, Julia; Edge, Dana S; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Tranmer, Joan

    2014-02-01

    As the prevalence of chronic diseases continues to increase, emphasis is being placed on the development of primary care strategies that enhance healthcare delivery. Innovations include interprofessional healthcare teams and chronic disease management strategies. To determine the roles of nurses working in primary care settings in Ontario and the extent to which chronic disease management strategies have been implemented. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a random sample of primary care nurses, including registered practical nurses, registered nurses, and nurse practitioners, in Ontario between May and July 2011. Nurses in primary care reported engaging in chronic disease management activities but to different extents depending on their regulatory designation (licensure category). Chronic disease management strategy implementation was not uniform across primary care practices where the nurses worked. There is the potential to optimize and standardize the nursing role within primary care and improve the implementation of chronic disease management strategies.

  7. [Levers in Primary Health Care - Identifying Strategic Success Factors for Improved Primary Care in Upper Austria].

    PubMed

    Kriegel, J; Rebhandl, E; Reckwitz, N; Hockl, W

    2016-12-01

    Current and projected general practitioner (GP) and primary care in Austria shows structural and process inadequacies in the quality as well as assurance of healthcare supply. The aim is therefore to develop solution- and patient-oriented measures that take patient-related requirements and medical perspectives into account. Using an effect matrix, subjective expert and user priorities were ascertained, cause and effect relationships were examined, and an expanded circle of success for the optimization of GP and primary care in Upper Austria was developed. Through this, the relevant levers for target-oriented development and optimization of the complex system of GP and primary care in Upper Austria were identified; these are training to become general practitioners, entrepreneurs as well as management and coordination. It is necessary to further adapt the identified levers conceptually and operationally in a targeted approach. This is to be achieved by means of the primary health care (PHC) concept as well as management tools and information and communication technologies (ICT) associated with it. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Breathlessness in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Noel

    2017-09-01

    Breathlessness is a high-volume problem with 10% of adults experiencing the symptom daily placing a heavy burden on the health and wider economy. As it worsens, they enter the specialist and hospital-based symptom services where costs quickly escalate and people may find themselves in a place not of their choosing. For many, their care will be delivered by a disease or organ specialist and can find themselves passing between physicians without coordination for symptom support. General practitioners (GPs) will be familiar with this scenario and can often feel out of their depth. Recent advances in our thinking about breathlessness symptom management can offer opportunities and a sense of hope when the GP is faced with this situation. Original research, reviews and other findings over the last 12-18 months that pertain to the value that general practice and the wider primary care system can add, include opportunities to help people recognize they have a problem that can be treated. We present systems that support decisions made by primary healthcare professionals and an increasingly strong case that a solution is required in primary care for an ageing and frail population where breathlessness will be common. Primary care practitioners and leaders must start to realize the importance of recognizing and acting early in the life course of the person with breathlessness because its impact is enormous. They will need to work closely with public health colleagues and learn from specialists who have been doing this work usually with people near to the end of life translating the skills and knowledge further upstream to allow people to live well and remain near home and in their communities.

  9. Determining Navy Primary Care Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    GMOs and UMOs) and flight surgeons, but not the interns and residents. The implicit assumption we made was that, for purposes of providing care to...than half of all of its providers being counted as providing primary care. This high value is attributable mainly to the large numbers of GMOs , UMOs...being either GMOs or contract civilians. The Navy couldn’t rely on only active-duty clinicians to provide primary care under the HMO system. The Navy

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Clinical and Research Update for Health Care Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    DeFina, Philip A.; Lichtenstein, Jonathan D.; Fellus, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 6.8 million Americans who have been diagnosed with dementia, over 5 million have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Due to the rise in the aging population, these figures are expected to double by 2050. The following paper provides an up-to-date review of clinical issues and relevant research. Research related to the methods of the earliest possible detection of AD is ongoing. Health care professionals should play a critical role in differentially diagnosing AD patients, as well as supporting their families. Novel interventions, including medications, natural supplements, and behavioral techniques, are constantly appearing in the literature. It is necessary for the health practitioner to remain current, regarding AD, as such information will facilitate better care for patients and their families. PMID:24083026

  11. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Kleinpell, Ruth M; Ely, E Wesley; Grabenkort, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Advanced practitioners including nurse practitioners and physician assistants are contributing to care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit through their participation on the multidisciplinary team and in collaborative physician practice roles. However, the impact of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit setting is not well known. To identify published literature on the role of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in acute and critical care settings; to review the literature using nonquantitative methods and provide a summary of the results to date incorporating studies assessing the impact and outcomes of nurse practitioner and physician assistant providers in the intensive care unit; and to identify implications for critical care practice. We conducted a systematic search of the English-language literature of publications on nurse practitioners and physician assistants utilizing Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, and the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases from 1996 through August 2007. None. Over 145 articles were reviewed on the role of the nurse practitioner and physician assistant in acute and critical care settings. A total of 31 research studies focused on the role and impact of these practitioners in the care of acute and critically ill patients. Of those, 20 were focused on nurse practitioner care, six focused on both nurse practitioner and physician assistant care, and five were focused on physician assistant care in acute and critical care settings. Fourteen focused on intensive care unit care, and 17 focused on acute care including emergency room, trauma, and management of patients with specific acute care conditions such as stroke, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure. Most studies used retrospective or prospective study designs and nonprobability sampling techniques. Only two randomized control trials were identified. The majority examined the impact of care on patient

  12. Impact of state nurse practitioner scope-of-practice regulation on health care delivery: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; Ye, Zhiqiu; Brewer, Carol; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    One proposed strategy to expand primary care capacity is to use nurse practitioners (NPs) more effectively in health care delivery. However, the ability of NPs to provide care to the fullest extent of their education is moderated by state scope-of-practice (SOP) regulations. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of state SOP regulations on the following three key issues: (a) NP workforce, (b) access to care and health care utilization, and (c) health care costs. Systematic review. States granting NPs greater SOP authority tend to exhibit an increase in the number and growth of NPs, greater care provision by NPs, and expanded health care utilization, especially among rural and vulnerable populations. Our review indicates that expanded NP practice regulation can impact health care delivery by increasing the number of NPs in combination with easing restrictions on their SOP. Findings show promise that removing restrictions on NP SOP regulations could be a viable and effective strategy to increase primary care capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. EverCare nurse practitioner practice activities: similarities and differences across five sites.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Lisa M

    2005-09-01

    To examine the similarities and differences in the performance and frequency of performance of EverCare nurse practitioner (NP) practice activities at demonstration sites in five states. This study builds upon a previous study in which the development and testing of the EverCare Nurse Practitioner Role and Activity Scale (ENPRAS) was conducted. A Background Data Sheet and the ENPRAS, a 99-item tool that encompasses six role subscales-Collaborator, Clinician, Care Manager/Coordinator, Counselor, Communicator/Cheerleader, and Coach/Educator, were completed by 127 EverCare NPs at demonstration sites in five states (Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Colorado, and Florida). Performance of NP activities across the demonstration sites in five states was generally consistent, with significant differences only in the amount of time spent on activities associated with the Collaborator and Coach/Educator roles. Overall, EverCare NPs spent more time on Clinician and Communicator/Cheerleader role activities than on activities associated with the other roles. EverCare NP patient caseload was positively related to frequency of performance of the Clinician and Care Manager/Coordinator roles. EverCare NPs provide proactive primary care to long-stay nursing home residents. The observed consistency reflects a strong centrally directed practice model. The identified roles and activities of the EverCare NP are consistent with previous studies and reports focused on the roles and activities of NPs who provide care to nursing home residents in other models of care delivery. Policy makers, healthcare providers, and the public should take these findings into account when considering a national model of care for this population. Future studies should examine the effect of variations in performance of activities on resident-specific and setting-specific outcomes.

  14. The primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: nurse practitioners using behaviour modification strategies.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Todd Charles; Keeping-Burke, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) places great financial strain on the health care system and dramatically affects individual quality of life. As primary health care providers, nurse practitioners (NPs) are ideally positioned to advise clients on risk factor and lifestyle modifications that ameliorate the impact of CVD. While the lifestyle targets for CVD prevention are established, the most effective means of achieving these goals remain uncertain. Behaviour modification strategies, including motivational interviewing (MI) and the transtheoretical model (TTM), have been suggested, but neither approach is established as being more efficacious than the other. In this paper, evidence on the effectiveness of the two approaches for modifying smoking, diet, and exercise behaviour are presented, and a recommendation for NP practice is made.

  15. Obesity care strategies in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Sawyer, Alexis; Batey, Sue; Maloney, Michelle; Wall, Tim; Hines, Valerie; Robles, Kattia; Sontag, Debbie; Haverkamp, Karen Susan; Lopez, Susan; Binns, Helen J

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated pediatric obesity clinics for internal referrals developed at 5 primary care offices. Clinics developed site-specific strategies: 1 group approach and 4 clinics providing individualized care only. Clinicians reported patient/family motivation as an important referral consideration and compliance as the greatest challenge and perceive clinics to have provided some help.

  16. Developing Primary Care: The Contribution of Primary Care Research Networks

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Stephen; Hutchison, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The performance of Canada's primary care sector remains lacklustre relative to other wealthy industrialized countries, and it has been suggested that a lack of investment in research and evaluation may be a cause. One approach to improving and sustaining primary care research is through research networks. Over the past few years, significant investments have begun to be made in developing primary care networks in Canada. While Canadian experience in this area is relatively new, in the United Kingdom primary care research networks were first established in the 1980s. Initially developed at a local level, these have more recently been incorporated into large-scale national networks. This paper reviews the UK experience and highlights potential lessons for the development of networks in Canada. PMID:23968616

  17. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, Bonnie; Laurant, Miranda G; Reeves, David

    2006-07-03

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected patients. Reductions in cost are context dependent and rarely achieved. This is because savings on nurses' salaries are often offset by their lower productivity (due to longer consultations, higher patient recall rates, and increased use of tests and investigations). Gains in efficiency are not achieved when GPs continue to provide the services that have been delegated to nurses, instead of focusing on the services that only doctors can provide. Unintended consequences of extending nursing roles include loss of personal continuity of care for patients and increased difficulties with coordination of care as the multidisciplinary team size increases. Rapid access to care is, however, improved. There is a high capital cost involved in moving to multidisciplinary teams because of the need to train staff in new ways of working; revise legislation governing scope of practice; address concerns about legal liability; and manage professional resistance to change. Despite the unintended consequences and the high costs, extending nursing roles in primary care is a plausible strategy for improving service capacity without compromising quality of care or health outcomes for patients.

  18. African Primary Care Research: Qualitative interviewing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research and focuses on the topic of qualitative interviewing in primary care. In particular it looks at issues of study design, sample size, sampling and interviewing in relation to individual and focus group interviews. There is a particular focus on helping postgraduate students at a Masters level to write their research proposals. PMID:26245436

  19. Using claims data to select primary care physicians for a managed care network.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, P; Noether, M; Ozminkowski, R J; Smith, K M; Raney, B E; Mickey, D; Hawley, P M

    1994-01-01

    An insurance claims databased profiling system was developed to help select new primary care physicians (PCPs) for a managed care network. PCPs (family practitioners, internists, and pediatricians) were ranked based on how closely their actual use of outpatient services conformed to the predictions of a mathematical model that adjusted for differences in age, sex, and case mix.

  20. The Effect of Nurse Practitioner Co-Management on the Care of Geriatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reuben, David B.; Ganz, David A.; Roth, Carol P.; McCreath, Heather E.; Ramirez, Karina D.; Wenger, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives The quality of care for geriatric conditions remains poor. The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE)-2 model (case finding, delegation of data collection, structured visit notes, physician and patient education, and linkage to community resources) improves the quality of care for geriatric conditions when implemented by primary care physicians (PCPs) or by nurse practitioners (NPs) co-managing care with an academic geriatrician. However, it is unclear whether community-based PCP-NP co-management can achieve similar results. Design Case study. Setting Two community-based primary care practices. Participants Patients > 75 years who screened positive for at least one condition: falls, urinary incontinence (UI), dementia, and depression. Intervention The ACOVE-2 model augmented by NP co-management of conditions. Measurements Quality of care by medical record review using ACOVE-3 quality indicators (QIs). Patients receiving co-management were compared with those who received PCP care alone in the same practices. Results Of 1084 screened patients, 658 (61%) screened positive for > 1 condition; 485 of these patients were randomly selected for chart review and triggered a mean of 7 QIs. A NP saw approximately half (49%) for co-management. Overall, patients received 57% of recommended care. Quality scores for all conditions (falls: 80% versus 34%; UI: 66% versus 19%; dementia: 59% versus 38%) except depression (63% versus 60%) were higher for patients seen by a NP. In analyses adjusted for gender, age of patient, number of conditions, site, and a NP estimate of medical management style, NP co-management remained significantly associated with receiving recommended care (p<0.001), as did the NP estimate of medical management style (p=0.02). Conclusion Compared to usual care using the ACOVE-2 model, NP co-management is associated with better quality of care for geriatric conditions in community-based primary care. PMID:23772723

  1. A nurse practitioner-led community workshop: Increasing adult participation in advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Splendore, Erin; Grant, Catherine

    2017-09-01

    Advance directives (ADs) and advance care planning (ACP) aid in expressing an individual's preferences and guide future medical decision-making. Despite the potential of ADs and ACP to positively impact care, consistently low rates of ADs and ACP (5%-39%) have been documented. The purpose of this project was to increase understanding and participation in the ACP process among rural-dwelling community members. A pre-post repeated measures design with an evaluation component to measure understanding, completion, discussion, and dissemination of ADs and ACP. A sample of N = 40 were recruited to participate in a one-time nurse practitioner-led Five Wishes workshop delivered in a community setting. Postworkshop evaluations indicated an overall acceptance and understanding of ADs and ACP. Completion rates of ADs and discussion in the ACP process significantly increased at 1-month follow-up. Nurses and advanced practice nurses are well positioned to educate individuals and facilitate the ACP process. There is a need to educate individuals on importance of sharing their AD wishes with their family and primary care provider. This nurse practitioner-led workshop using the Five Wishes demonstrated the feasibility and potential effectiveness of initiating the ACP process in the community. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Would a prehospital practitioner model improve patient care in rural Australia?

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, P

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Soft systems methodology was used to develop and critically appraise the prehospital practitioner model as an alternative to existing models. This approach started from the philosophical viewpoint that prehospital services should be patient centred. Soft systems methodology was used to structure the elements of prehospital systems and the relations between them into metaphors and pictures that could be analysed. Results: This analysis showed that the most powerful reason for advocating the prehospital practitioner model is that it places prehospital systems within a symbiotic relationship with the healthcare system. Unlike the existing emergency service models or the "chain of survival" model, it is an integrated system that provides a range of services at multiple points during the patient care cycle. Thus, the prehospital practitioner would have roles in the prevention of injury and illness, responding to emergencies, facilitating recovery, and planning future strategies for a healthy community. Conclusions: Implementing this new model would see the prehospital system using its available capacity more effectively to fulfill broader public health and primary care outreach roles than is currently the case. Patients would be referred or transported to the most appropriate and cost effective facility as part of a seamless system that provides patients with well organised and high quality care. PMID:12642545

  3. The medical care practitioner: developing a physician assistant equivalent for the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Parle, Jim V; Ross, Nick M; Doe, William F

    2006-07-03

    A range of demographic, social and other factors are creating a crisis in the provision of clinical care in the United Kingdom for which the physician assistant (PA) model developed in the United States appears to offer a partial solution. Local and national moves are underway to develop a similar cadre of registered health care professionals in England, with the current title of medical care practitioners (MCPs). A competence and curriculum framework document produced by a national steering group has formed the basis for a recent consultation process. A limited evaluation of US-trained PAs working in the West Midlands region of England in both primary care and acute secondary care suggests that PA activity is similar to that of doctors working in primary care and to primary care doctors working in the accident and emergency setting. The planned introduction of MCPs in England appears to offer, first, an effective strategy for increasing medical capacity, without jeopardising quality in frontline clinical services; and, second, the prospect of increased flexibility and stability in the medical workforce. The deployment of MCPs may offer advantages over increasing the number of doctors or taking nurses out of nursing roles. The introduction of MCPs may also enhance service effectiveness and efficiency.

  4. Cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and general practitioner care for neck pain: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Ingeborg B C Korthals-de; Hoving, Jan L; van Tulder, Maurits W; Mölken, Maureen P M H Rutten-van; Adèr, Herman J; de Vet, Henrica C W; Koes, Bart W; Vondeling, Hindrik; Bouter, Lex M

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. Design Economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. Setting Primary care. Participants 183 patients with neck pain for at least two weeks recruited by 42 general practitioners and randomly allocated to manual therapy (n=60, spinal mobilisation), physiotherapy (n=59, mainly exercise), or general practitioner care (n=64, counselling, education, and drugs). Main outcome measures Clinical outcomes were perceived recovery, intensity of pain, functional disability, and quality of life. Direct and indirect costs were measured by means of cost diaries that were kept by patients for one year. Differences in mean costs between groups, cost effectiveness, and cost utility ratios were evaluated by applying non-parametric bootstrapping techniques. Results The manual therapy group showed a faster improvement than the physiotherapy group and the general practitioner care group up to 26 weeks, but differences were negligible by follow up at 52 weeks. The total costs of manual therapy (€447; £273; $402) were around one third of the costs of physiotherapy (€1297) and general practitioner care (€1379). These differences were significant: P<0.01 for manual therapy versus physiotherapy and manual therapy versus general practitioner care and P=0.55 for general practitioner care versus physiotherapy. The cost effectiveness ratios and the cost utility ratios showed that manual therapy was less costly and more effective than physiotherapy or general practitioner care. Conclusions Manual therapy (spinal mobilisation) is more effective and less costly for treating neck pain than physiotherapy or care by a general practitioner. What is already known on this topicThe cost of treating neck pain is considerableMany conservative interventions are available, such as prescription drugs, yet their cost effectiveness has not been

  5. 42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or...) Qio Review Functions § 476.90 Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner. (a) If a health care facility or practitioner refuses to allow a QIO to enter and perform the duties and functions...

  6. 42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or...) Qio Review Functions § 476.90 Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner. (a) If a health care facility or practitioner refuses to allow a QIO to enter and perform the duties and functions...

  7. Primary care of adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, William F.; Berg, Joseph M.; Bradley, Elspeth; Cheetham, Tom; Denton, Richard; Heng, John; Hennen, Brian; Joyce, David; Kelly, Maureen; Korossy, Marika; Lunsky, Yona; McMillan, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2006 Canadian guidelines for primary care of adults with developmental disabilities (DD) and to make practical recommendations based on current knowledge to address the particular health issues of adults with DD. Quality of evidence Knowledgeable health care providers participating in a colloquium and a subsequent working group discussed and agreed on revisions to the 2006 guidelines based on a comprehensive review of publications, feedback gained from users of the guidelines, and personal clinical experiences. Most of the available evidence in this area of care is from expert opinion or published consensus statements (level III). Main message Adults with DD have complex health issues, many of them differing from those of the general population. Good primary care identifies the particular health issues faced by adults with DD to improve their quality of life, to improve their access to health care, and to prevent suffering, morbidity, and premature death. These guidelines synthesize general, physical, behavioural, and mental health issues of adults with DD that primary care providers should be aware of, and they present recommendations for screening and management based on current knowledge that practitioners can apply. Because of interacting biologic, psychoaffective, and social factors that contribute to the health and well-being of adults with DD, these guidelines emphasize involving caregivers, adapting procedures when appropriate, and seeking input from a range of health professionals when available. Ethical care is also emphasized. The guidelines are formulated within an ethical framework that pays attention to issues such as informed consent and the assessment of health benefits in relation to risks of harm. Conclusion Implementation of the guidelines proposed here would improve the health of adults with DD and would minimize disparities in health and health care between adults with DD and those in the general population

  8. Physician Satisfaction With Integrated Behavioral Health in Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hine, Jeffrey F; Grennan, Allison Q; Menousek, Kathryn M; Robertson, Gail; Valleley, Rachel J; Evans, Joseph H

    2017-04-01

    As the benefits of integrated behavioral health care services are becoming more widely recognized, this study investigated physician satisfaction with ongoing integrated psychology services in pediatric primary care clinics. Data were collected across 5 urban and 6 rural clinics and demonstrated the specific factors that physicians view as assets to having efficient access to a pediatric behavioral health practitioner. Results indicated significant satisfaction related to quality and continuity of care and improved access to services. Such models of care may increase access to care and reduce other service barriers encountered by individuals and their families with behavioral health concerns (ie, those who otherwise would seek services through referrals to traditional tertiary care facilities).

  9. 42 CFR 414.80 - Incentive payment for primary care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specified by the Secretary are for primary care services. (ii) A nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... following criteria: (A) Enrolled in Medicare with a primary specialty designation of 50-nurse practitioner, 89-certified clinical nurse, or 97-physician assistant. (B) At least 60 percent of the...

  10. What Pediatric Primary Care Clinicians Can Do When Confronting Aggressive Youth

    PubMed Central

    Stringham, Peter; Spivak, Howard

    1994-01-01

    Violence is a serious problem confronting primary care practitioners. This paper presents office-based primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies for dealing with relationship and street violence and gives practical skills for practitioners to respond to patients who are aggressive. PMID:19313103

  11. Primary care medicine in crisis: toward reconstruction and renewal.

    PubMed

    Moore, Gordon; Showstack, Jonathan

    2003-02-04

    Primary care is in crisis. Despite its proud history and theoretical advantages, the field has failed to hold its own among medical specialties. While the rest of medicine promises technology and sophistication, the basic model of primary care has changed little over the past half-century. Why has the transition from general practice to today's primary care been so difficult? Many of the causes of this struggle may lie within primary care itself, ranging from failure to articulate to the public (and insurers and policymakers) what value it, and it alone, can offer, to taking on an ever-broadening set of roles and responsibilities while all too often falling short of its promises. Perhaps most important, in the emerging health care system, the lack of a discrete definition of primary care has allowed managed care organizations and payers, among others, to define the role of primary care to suit their own interests. In response to a changing marketplace, political uncertainty, and shifting consumer expectations, primary care will need to reconstruct itself. The reconstruction will not be easy. Nevertheless, a process should begin that moves the field in the right direction. Building on its unique abilities, primary care can emerge as a redefined product that is attractive to patients, payers, and primary care practitioners alike.

  12. How do nurse practitioners in acute care affect perceptions of team effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2013-09-01

    To describe how acute care nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. Acute care nurse practitioners provide safe and effective care to patients. There is limited evidence of the effects of acute care nurse practitioner roles on healthcare teams, and many of the findings are contradictory. Research is lacking to describe how nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. A descriptive multiple-case study undertaken in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Canada. Data were collected from March-May 2009. Data sources included interviews (n = 59), time and motion study, non-participant observations, documents and field notes. Interviews were conducted individually or in groups using a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed within and across the cases to identify similarities and differences in perceptions of team effectiveness. Team members believed the nurse practitioners improved the team's effectiveness. They identified six team processes they believed were improved by the addition of the nurse practitioners to the teams. The processes included decision-making, communication, cohesion, care coordination, problem-solving and focus on patients and families. The study contributes to our understanding of how nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. Improved team communication and care coordination were believed to be particularly important. Nurse practitioner can facilitate patient- and family-centred care in healthcare teams. Nurse practitioners improve perceptions of team effectiveness. Further work is needed in different contexts and with patients and families to determine their perceptions of team effectiveness. The nurse practitioner role was believed to be particularly important to improve team communication and care coordination. This constitutes an added value of acute care nurse practitioners roles in healthcare teams. Nurse practitioner roles contribute to patient-centred care

  13. Primary care. The odd couple.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nick

    2004-06-24

    Acute and primary care trust relationships can be fraught with baggage, vagueness and stereotypes. Changing that is about overt behaviours as well as structural and strategic issues. Payment by results and attitudes to commissioning pose significant challenges.

  14. Primary medical care in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J T

    1990-01-01

    The extremely complex and rapidly but unevenly developing system of primary care in Spain is described. The health centre movement in Spain merits close attention, and could be a useful model for our own service. PMID:2117951

  15. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners perform effective roles on teams caring for Medicare patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine; Thorpe, Carolyn; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Bartels, Christie; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-11-01

    One approach to the patient-centered medical home, particularly for patients with chronic illnesses, is to include physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) on primary care teams. Using Medicare claims and electronic health record data from a large physician group, we compared outcomes for two groups of adult Medicare patients with diabetes whose conditions were at various levels of complexity: those whose care teams included PAs or NPs in various roles, and those who received care from physicians only. Outcomes were generally equivalent in thirteen comparisons. In four comparisons, outcomes were superior for the patients receiving care from PAs or NPs, but in three other comparisons the outcomes were superior for patients receiving care from physicians only. Specific roles performed by PAs and NPs were associated with different patterns in the measure of the quality of diabetes care and use of health care services. No role was best for all outcomes. Our findings suggest that patient characteristics, as well as patients' and organizations' goals, should be considered when determining when and how to deploy PAs and NPs on primary care teams. Accordingly, training and policy should continue to support role flexibility for these health professionals.

  16. Utilization of Psychiatry in a Primary Care Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaby, Andrew E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The pattern of use of psychiatry over a 12-month period in a university-based primary care center is reported. Interest in pursuing careers in family practice and amount of time spent in the center were related to seeking consultation. Differences in use by nurse practitioners, social workers, and patients are cited. ( Author/LBH)

  17. Teaching Strategies for Primary Health Care. A Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durana, Ines

    This book is intended to assist teachers, practitioners, and administrators to develop programs for training nonphysician, primary health care workers in Third World countries. It contains the instructional context of a comprehensive training program, organized into chapters and presented in outline form. Learning strategies follow each section of…

  18. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians.

  19. Information needs of rural health care practitioners in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Lundeen, G W; Tenopir, C; Wermager, P

    1994-04-01

    Rural health care workers need a wide range of specialized information but have difficulties locating and accessing information resources. The information needs of Hawaii's rural health care practitioners and their methods of accessing information were studied through interviews and mailed questionnaires. The following barriers to information access were identified: lack of funds, inadequate hardware, infrastructure problems, and insufficient knowledge about information sources and how to use them. Although many (85%) reported having computers, only a minority (30%) have modems, and even fewer use online resources or the free electronic databases at public and university libraries. Most reported that journal articles were the information source that best met their needs and that personal files or a colleague's collection were the most common places for accessing needed materials. Recommendations for solving some of the information problems include development of a State of Hawaii rural health information clearinghouse; better identification, training, and use of available services; and, most importantly, the establishment of rural health care information agents (modeled on agriculture extension agents) on each major island.

  20. Communication between primary care and physician specialist: is it improving?

    PubMed

    Biagetti, B; Aulinas, A; Dalama, B; Nogués, R; Zafón, C; Mesa, J

    2015-01-01

    Efforts have recently been made in Spain to improve the communication model between primary care and specialized care. The aim of our study was to analyze the impact of a change in the communication model between the two areas when comparing a traditional system to a consulting system in terms of satisfaction of general practitioners and the number of patient referrals. A questionnaire was used to assess the point of view on the relations with the endocrinologist team of 20 general practitioners from one primary care center at baseline and 18 months after the implementation of the new method of communication. In addition, we counted the number of referrals during the two periods. We analyzed 30 questionnaires; 13 before and 17 after the consulting system was established. Consulting system was preferred to other alternatives as a way of communication with endocrinologists. After the consulting system was implemented, general practitioners were more confident in treating hypothyroidism and diabetes. There was a decrease in the number of patient referrals to specialized care from 93.8 to 34.6 per month after implementation of the consultant system. The consultant system was more efficient in resolving problems and responding to general practitioners than the traditional system. General practitioners were more confident in self-management of hypothyroidism and diabetes. A very large decrease in the number of patient referrals was observed after implementation of the consultant system. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementing genetic education in primary care: the Gen-Equip programme.

    PubMed

    Paneque, Milena; Cornel, Martina C; Curtisova, Vaclava; Houwink, Elisa; Jackson, Leigh; Kent, Alastair; Lunt, Peter; Macek, Milan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Turchetti, Daniela; Skirton, Heather

    2017-03-13

    Genetics and genomics are increasingly relevant to primary healthcare but training is unavailable to many practitioners. Education that can be accessed by practitioners without cost or travel is essential. The Gen-Equip project was formed to provide effective education in genetics for primary healthcare in Europe and so improve patient care. Partners include patient representatives and specialists in genetics and primary care from six countries. Here, we report the progress and challenges involved in creating a European online educational program in genetics.

  2. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  3. The impact of substituting general practitioners with nurse practitioners on resource use, production and health-care costs during out-of-hours: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Van Der Biezen, Mieke; Adang, Eddy; Van Der Burgt, Regi; Wensing, Michel; Laurant, Miranda

    2016-09-13

    The pressure in out-of-hours primary care is high due to an increasing demand for care and rising health-care costs. During the daytime, substituting general practitioners (GPs) with nurse practitioners (NPs) shows positive results to contribute to these challenges. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the impact during out-of-hours. The current study aims to provide an insight into the impact of substitution on resource use, production and direct health-care costs during out-of-hours. At a general practitioner cooperative (GPC) in the south-east of the Netherlands, experimental teams with four GPs and one NP were compared with control teams with five GPs. In a secondary analysis, GP care versus NP care was also examined. During a 15-month period all patients visiting the GPC on weekend days were included. The primary outcome was resource use including X-rays, drug prescriptions and referrals to the Emergency Department (ED). We used logistic regression to adjust for potential confounders. Secondary outcomes were production per hour and direct health-care costs using a cost-minimization analysis. We analysed 6,040 patients in the experimental team (NPs: 987, GPs: 5,053) and 6,052 patients in the control team. There were no significant differences in outcomes between the teams. In the secondary analysis, in the experimental team NP care was associated with fewer drug prescriptions (NPs 37.1 %, GPs 43 %, p < .001) and fewer referrals to the ED (NPs 5.1 %, GPs 11.3 %, p = .001) than GP care. The mean production per hour was 3.0 consultations for GPs and 2.4 consultations for NPs (p < .001). The cost of a consultation with an NP was €3.34 less than a consultation with a GP (p = .02). These results indicated no overall differences between the teams. Nonetheless, a comparison of type of provider showed that NP care resulted in lower resource use and cost savings than GP care. To find the optimal balance between GPs and NPs in out

  4. Staffing Patterns of Primary Care Practices in the Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Peikes, Deborah N.; Reid, Robert J.; Day, Timothy J.; Cornwell, Derekh D. F.; Dale, Stacy B.; Baron, Richard J.; Brown, Randall S.; Shapiro, Rachel J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite growing calls for team-based care, the current staff composition of primary care practices is unknown. We describe staffing patterns for primary care practices in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative. METHODS We undertook a descriptive analysis of CPC initiative practices’ baseline staffing using data from initial applications and a practice survey. CMS selected 502 primary care practices (from 987 applicants) in 7 regions based on their health information technology, number of patients covered by participating payers, and other factors; 496 practices were included in this analysis. RESULTS Consistent with the national distribution, most of the CPC initiative practices included in this study were small: 44% reported 2 or fewer full-time equivalent (FTE) physicians; 27% reported more than 4. Nearly all reported administrative staff (98%) and medical assistants (89%). Fifty-three percent reported having nurse practitioners or physician assistants; 47%, licensed practical or vocational nurses; 36%, registered nurses; and 24%, care managers/coordinators—all of these positions are more common in larger practices. Other clinical staff were reported infrequently regardless of practice size. Compared with other CPC initiative practices, designated patient-centered medical homes were more likely to have care managers/coordinators but otherwise had similar staff types. Larger practices had fewer FTE staff per physician. CONCLUSIONS At baseline, most CPC initiative practices used traditional staffing models and did not report having dedicated staff who may be integral to new primary care models, such as care coordinators, health educators, behavioral health specialists, and pharmacists. Without such staff and payment for their services, practices are unlikely to deliver comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible care to patients at a sustainable cost. PMID:24615310

  5. Understanding acute care nurse practitioner communication and decision-making in healthcare teams.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to describe communication and decision-making in healthcare teams following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role. Healthcare teams need to establish clear processes for communication and decision-making about patient care to be effective. Little is known about how acute care nurse practitioners affect these team processes. Observational/descriptive study. Structured non-participant observations of acute care nurse practitioners and healthcare team members during routine patient care activities were completed to identify the verbal and non-verbal behaviours. Data were collected in two hospitals in one Canadian province from March-May 2009 for a total of 17 hours and 23 minutes. Descriptive statistics were generated. Differences in communication and decision-making were noted between the cases. The acute care nurse practitioners in Case 1 spoke most frequently with physicians when making patient care decisions while the acute care nurse practitioners in Case 2 spoke most frequently with the nurses. The acute care nurse practitioners needed to validate all patient care decisions if prescriptive authority had not been transferred to them. Much of the potential of acute care nurse practitioner roles rests on the ability to enact the full scope of their role. Acute care nurse practitioner scope of practice depends on the legislation, the transfer of decision-making authority in the organisation, and the messages received form the medical and nursing leadership group. This appears to be the first in-depth description of communication and decision-making in healthcare teams following the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners and furthers our understanding of how system-level imperatives filter down to healthcare teams. The transfer of prescriptive authority to acute care nurse practitioners affected communication and decision-making and changed the way routine activities were conducted. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The future and primary care.

    PubMed

    Alpert, J J

    1994-12-01

    Primary care is about the intimate contact that takes place when a patient comes to the physician because that individual is concerned that he or she, son or daughter, parent or grandparent is sick, or is well and wants to stay well. Our history has been that we have paid attention to important problems but we have missed so far on primary care as a megatrend. As noted, one of our most important societal megatrends is proverty and how poverty places children at risk. Poverty and primary care are linked. The reality that all of our citizens do not have access to primary care is not just our failure but it is society's as well. We pediatricians face many problems. In developing solutions, historically our profession has never lost sight of the fact that we are a helping and caring discipline. We are an advocate for the poor, advocates for children, advocates for community, and that is a large job. But the challenge is real, and we do not have much time. Now is not the time to be timid. We need to achieve consensus, accepting and acting on the megatrend of securing the future for primary care.

  7. Sustained partnership in primary care.

    PubMed

    Leopold, N; Cooper, J; Clancy, C

    1996-02-01

    In 1994, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened the Committee on the Future of Primary Care to provide a clearer understanding of the essential and desirable attributes of primary care. Perhaps the committee's most striking addition to the IOM's 1978 definition was the concept that primary care includes a sustained partnership with patients. Development of the partnership is considered an explicit responsibility of the primary care clinician. Although there is an extensive and growing body of literature on the effects of clinician-patient communication on outcomes such as patient satisfaction, adherence, symptom abatement, and physiological measures of health status, the impact of a sustained partnership in a clinician-patient relationship remains largely unstudied. There is also no consensus regarding either the definition or achievement of a sustained partnership. This paper reviews selected relevant literature and proposes a theoretical basis for assessing the existence, antecedents, and outcomes of sustained partnerships between clinicians and patients. At a time when there is increased discussion and clarification of optimal clinician and patient roles in a rapidly evolving health care delivery system, we believe this mode can provide guidance to clinicians and provider organizations seeking to improve the quality of primary care.

  8. Opinions of general practitioners in Nottinghamshire about provision of intrapartum care.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the beliefs of general practitioners concerning intrapartum care. DESIGN--Postal questionnaire survey. SUBJECTS--All general practitioners with patients in Nottinghamshire Family Health Services Authority in September 1993. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--General practitioners' current involvement in maternity care, and beliefs on intrapartum care. RESULTS--Of 694 general practitioners sent questionnaires, 550 (79.2%) replied. 529 of these were on the obstetric list; 437 had not attended a delivery in the past 12 months; 36 had attended two or more; 358 general practitioners did not wish to provide more intrapartum care; 349 did not feel competent to do so. Reasons for not wanting to provide intrapartum care included current workload (453), disruption to personal life (407), and the fear of litigation (377). General practitioners who already booked women for home delivery were more likely to wish to do more deliveries (62/42 v 61/316, chi 2 = 85.3; P < 0.0001) and to have more positive attitudes towards increasing women's choice in maternity care (90/22 v 195/151, chi 2 = 227; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS--The involvement of general practitioners in intrapartum care in Nottinghamshire is low, and most general practitioners are unwilling to increase their role. However, general practitioners who already book for home delivery are keen to do more. PMID:7950566

  9. Primary care training in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Masahiro J

    2003-06-01

    Primary care training during and after conflicts is one of the most challenging health care issues but is often neglected compared to emergency medical care. Recently, family medicine has been increasingly used as a model strategy to reconstruct primary care delivery systems in communities torn by conflicts. The lessons learned through providing primary pediatric care training in Kosovo, in two periods, both shortly before the NATO air strike and after the war in Kosovo, are shared in this paper. The training program was organized and provided in collaboration with the Kosovar nongovernmental organization, Mother Teresa Society, and Kinderberg International in support of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees as a pilot program. This paper provides a narrative description of training experiences that focused on practical bedside training and morale support throughout these two periods. Based on our evaluation, providing morale support at the field level to encourage the health care providers' motivation for learning and collegial support while suffering physical difficulties was beneficial. International primary care organizations should maintain collegial dialogue to support indigenization of family medicine, a process that adapts the principles of family medicine into their own needs in their communities.

  10. The nurse practitioner role in pain management in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Dicenso, Alba; Donald, Faith; Baxter, Pamela

    2010-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring the perceptions of long-term care team members and nurse managers about barriers and facilitators to optimal use of nurse practitioners to manage residents' pain in long-term care settings. Considering the high rates of pain in long-term care, research is needed to explore innovations in health-services delivery, including the emerging nurse practitioner role. For this study, an exploratory descriptive design was used to collect data in spring 2007 from five focus groups of nurses and 14 individual interviews with other healthcare team members and nurse managers. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Five pain management activities performed by nurse practitioners were identified, including assessing pain, prescribing pain medications, monitoring pain levels and side effects of pain medications, consulting and advocating for staff and patients, and leading and educating staff related to pain management. Factors that influenced the implementation of the nurse practitioner role included the availability of the nurse practitioner, scope of practice, role clarity, perceived added value of nurse practitioner role, terms of employment, nurse practitioner-physician relationship. Perceived outcomes of the nurse practitioner role were also described. The findings from this study contribute to our understanding of how the nurse practitioner role is perceived by other healthcare professionals, particularly in pain management. Stronger interprofessional collaborative relationships need to be facilitated within a model of care that includes a nurse practitioner, with the ultimate goal of improving pain management services in long-term care.

  11. Shifting patterns of practice: nurse practitioners in a managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rosemary

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to uncover patterns across nurse practitioner (NP) experiences that contribute to understanding their perceptions of managed care, how it affects daily practice, and how NPs respond to a changing managed care workplace. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 NPs representing primary care, specialty, and independent practices. Over an 18-month period, data collection and analysis occurred simultaneously using standard methods of purposive sampling, constant comparison, memoing, and member checks. This study illuminates the tension NPs experience between a business and a professional ethic and the strategies they use to reconcile this difference with core nursing values. Type of setting, workplace dynamics, and length of time in practice contributed to variation in NP perspectives.

  12. Effectiveness of two interventions based on improving patient-practitioner communication on diabetes self-management in patients with low educational level: study protocol of a clustered randomized trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the last decades the presence of social inequalities in diabetes care has been observed in multiple countries, including Spain. These inequalities have been at least partially attributed to differences in diabetes self-management behaviours. Communication problems during medical consultations occur more frequently to patients with a lower educational level. The purpose of this cluster randomized trial is to determine whether an intervention implemented in a General Surgery, based in improving patient-provider communication, results in a better diabetes self-management in patients with lower educational level. A secondary objective is to assess whether telephone reinforcement enhances the effect of such intervention. We report the design and implementation of this on-going study. Methods/Design The study is being conducted in a General Practice located in a deprived neighbourhood of Granada, Spain. Diabetic patients 18 years old or older with a low educational level and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c > 7%) were recruited. General Practitioners (GPs) were randomised to three groups: intervention A, intervention B and control group. GPs allocated to intervention groups A and B received training in communication skills and are providing graphic feedback about glycosylated haemoglobin levels. Patients whose GPs were allocated to group B are additionally receiving telephone reinforcement whereas patients from the control group are receiving usual care. The described interventions are being conducted during 7 consecutive medical visits which are scheduled every three months. The main outcome measure will be HbA1c; blood pressure, lipidemia, body mass index and waist circumference will be considered as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions will include multilevel regression analysis with three hierarchical levels: medical visit level, patient level and GP level. Discussion The results of

  13. Effectiveness of two interventions based on improving patient-practitioner communication on diabetes self-management in patients with low educational level: study protocol of a clustered randomized trial in primary care.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Olry de Labry-Lima, Antonio; Bolívar-Muñoz, Julia; Pastor-Moreno, Guadalupe; Bermudez-Tamayo, Clara; Ruiz-Pérez, Isabel; Quesada-Jiménez, Fermín; Moratalla-López, Enrique; Domínguez-Martín, Susana; de los Ríos-Álvarez, Ana M; Cruz-Vela, Pilar; Prados-Quel, Miguel A; López-De Hierro, José A

    2013-10-23

    In the last decades the presence of social inequalities in diabetes care has been observed in multiple countries, including Spain. These inequalities have been at least partially attributed to differences in diabetes self-management behaviours. Communication problems during medical consultations occur more frequently to patients with a lower educational level. The purpose of this cluster randomized trial is to determine whether an intervention implemented in a General Surgery, based in improving patient-provider communication, results in a better diabetes self-management in patients with lower educational level. A secondary objective is to assess whether telephone reinforcement enhances the effect of such intervention. We report the design and implementation of this on-going study. The study is being conducted in a General Practice located in a deprived neighbourhood of Granada, Spain. Diabetic patients 18 years old or older with a low educational level and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c > 7%) were recruited. General Practitioners (GPs) were randomised to three groups: intervention A, intervention B and control group. GPs allocated to intervention groups A and B received training in communication skills and are providing graphic feedback about glycosylated haemoglobin levels. Patients whose GPs were allocated to group B are additionally receiving telephone reinforcement whereas patients from the control group are receiving usual care. The described interventions are being conducted during 7 consecutive medical visits which are scheduled every three months. The main outcome measure will be HbA1c; blood pressure, lipidemia, body mass index and waist circumference will be considered as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions will include multilevel regression analysis with three hierarchical levels: medical visit level, patient level and GP level. The results of this study will provide new knowledge

  14. A future for primary care for the Greek population.

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, Peter P; Jurgutis, Arnoldas

    2013-01-01

    Greece is hit hard by the state debt crisis. This calls for comprehensive reforms to restore sustainable and balanced growth. Healthcare is one of the public sectors needing reform. The European Union (EU) Task Force for Greece asked the authors to assess the situation of primary care and to make recommendations for reform. Primary healthcare is especially relevant in that it might increase the efficiency of the healthcare system, and improve access to good quality healthcare. Assessment of the state of primary care in Greece was made on the basis of existing literature, site visits in primary care and consultations with stakeholders. The governance of primary care (and healthcare in general) is fragmented. There is no system of gatekeeping or patient lists. Private payments (formal and informal) are high. There are too many physicians, but too few general practitioners and nurses, and they are unevenly spread across the country. As a consequence, there are problems of access, continuity, co-ordination and comprehensiveness of primary care. The authors recommend the development of a clear vision and development strategy for strengthening primary care. Stepped access to secondary care should be realised through the introduction of mandatory referrals. Primary care should be accessible through the lowest possible out-of-pocket payments. The roles of purchaser and provider of care should be split. Quality of care should be improved through development of clinical guidelines and quality indicators. The education of health professionals should put more emphasis on primary care and medical specialists working in primary care should be (re-)trained to acquire the necessary competences to satisfy the job descriptions to be developed for primary care professionals. The advantages of strong primary care should be communicated to patients and the wider public.

  15. Find me the evidence: connecting the practitioner with the evidence on bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Tieman, Jennifer; Hayman, Sarah; Hall, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Care practices change as knowledge emerges and research findings challenge current approaches. Access to evidence has challenges. Bereavement care is diverse: practitioners often work alone or in small teams, terminology can be diffuse, and practitioners may not have time and skills for effective search strategies. CareSearch, an online palliative care resource, is hosting the Bereavement Search Filter, a validated search strategy to facilitate access to bereavement care evidence. The service connects practitioners to global best practice evidence; it is free and trustworthy. This article outlines the development of the Medline Bereavement Search Filter, translating it for PubMed and deploying it online.

  16. 42 CFR 440.60 - Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... practitioners. 440.60 Section 440.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.60 Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners. (a) “Medical care...

  17. 42 CFR 440.60 - Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.60 Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners. (a) “Medical care or... § 405.232(b) of this chapter; and (2) Consists of treatment by means of manual manipulation of the...

  18. 42 CFR 440.60 - Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.60 Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners. (a) “Medical care or... § 405.232(b) of this chapter; and (2) Consists of treatment by means of manual manipulation of the...

  19. 42 CFR 440.60 - Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.60 Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners. (a) “Medical care or... § 405.232(b) of this chapter; and (2) Consists of treatment by means of manual manipulation of the...

  20. Essential Elements of a Collaborative Mental Health Training Program for Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Giles, Lisa L; Martini, D Richard

    2017-10-01

    Mental health integration in primary care is based on creating an environment that encourages collaboration and supports appropriate care for patients and families while offering a full range of services. Training programs for primary care practitioners should include sessions on how to build and maintain such a practice along with information on basic mental health competencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute care nurse practitioners in transplantation: adding value to your program.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Janel

    2011-12-01

    Nurse practitioners are nurses who are prepared at the graduate level. They exercise autonomy in clinical decision making, perform physical examinations and obtain health histories, diagnose and treat a variety of illnesses, provide education and counseling to patients, perform procedures, and ultimately provide cost-effective care. The role of the nurse practitioner evolved in the 1960s, when nurse practitioners filled a void in response to the nationwide shortage of physicians. Today, nurse practitioners specialize both by degree and by certification examination. There are several types of nurse practitioners, including acute care, adult, family practice, and pediatric. The incorporation of acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) in transplant programs is an emerging field and varies across the country from center to center. The goals of this article are to (1) identify implications for ACNPs in transplant, (2) discuss the value of using ACNPs in practice, and (3) explore billing and regulatory aspects of ACNPs in transplant programs.

  2. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Furler, John; Cleland, Jennifer; Del Mar, Chris; Hanratty, Barbara; Kadam, Umesh; Lasserson, Daniel; McCowan, Colin; Magin, Parker; Mitchell, Caroline; Qureshi, Nadeem; Rait, Greta; Steel, Nick; van Driel, Mieke; Ward, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment. PMID:18822178

  3. Primary medical care in Seychelles.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, F M; Shamlaye, C

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes some of the current health problems faced by a tropical country whose standard of living and lifestyle is approaching that of many countries in Western Europe. Long-term health problems such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes have become at least as important as infectious diseases. A change in approach to a more proactive style of primary care is needed to allow the contribution of community doctors to be effective. The system of primary care in the Republic of Seychelles is based on the UK model of general practice where recent improvements in education and organization are raising standards. How some of these improvements might be transferred elsewhere is discussed.

  4. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  5. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Methods Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Results Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals’ beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples’ reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Conclusions Primary care professional beliefs about their clients’ religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity. PMID:23102514

  6. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Hagelaar, Anouk; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2012-10-26

    It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals' beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples' reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Primary care professional beliefs about their clients' religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity.

  7. How Primary Care Networks Can Help Integrate Academic and Service Initiatives in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul; Graffy, Jonathan; Wallace, Paul; Kirby, Mike

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Theory of effective network operation in primary care is underdeveloped. This study aimed to identify how primary care networks can best integrate academic and service initiatives. METHODS We performed a comparative case study of 4 primary care research networks in North London, England, for the years 1998–2002. Indicators were selected to assess changes in (1) research capacity, (2) multidisciplinary collaboration, and (3) research productivity. We compared the profiles of network outcome with descriptions of their contexts and organizational types from a previous evaluation. RESULTS Together, the networks supported 133 viable projects and 30 others; 399 practitioners, managers, and academics participated in the research teams. How the networks organized themselves was influenced by the circumstances in which they were formed. Different ways of organizing were associated with different outcome profiles. Shared projects and learning spaces helped participants to develop trusted relationships. A top-down, hierarchical approach based on institutional alliances and academic expertise attracted more funding and appeared to be stable. The bottom-up, individualistic network with research practices was good at reflecting on practical primary care concerns. Whole-system methods brought together stakeholder contributions from all parts of the system. CONCLUSIONS Networks can help integrate academic research and service development initiatives by facilitating interorganizational interactions and in shared leadership of projects. Researchers and practitioners stand to gain considerably from an integrated approach in both the short and the long term. Success requires agreement about a set of pathways, learning spaces, and feedback mechanisms to harness the insights and efforts of stakeholders throughout the whole system. PMID:16735525

  8. How primary care networks can help integrate academic and service initiatives in primary care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul; Graffy, Jonathan; Wallace, Paul; Kirby, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Theory of effective network operation in primary care is underdeveloped. This study aimed to identify how primary care networks can best integrate academic and service initiatives. We performed a comparative case study of 4 primary care research networks in North London, England, for the years 1998-2002. Indicators were selected to assess changes in (1) research capacity, (2) multidisciplinary collaboration, and (3) research productivity. We compared the profiles of network outcome with descriptions of their contexts and organizational types from a previous evaluation. Together, the networks supported 133 viable projects and 30 others; 399 practitioners, managers, and academics participated in the research teams. How the networks organized themselves was influenced by the circumstances in which they were formed. Different ways of organizing were associated with different outcome profiles. Shared projects and learning spaces helped participants to develop trusted relationships. A top-down, hierarchical approach based on institutional alliances and academic expertise attracted more funding and appeared to be stable. The bottom-up, individualistic network with research practices was good at reflecting on practical primary care concerns. Whole-system methods brought together stakeholder contributions from all parts of the system. Networks can help integrate academic research and service development initiatives by facilitating interorganizational interactions and in shared leadership of projects. Researchers and practitioners stand to gain considerably from an integrated approach in both the short and the long term. Success requires agreement about a set of pathways, learning spaces, and feedback mechanisms to harness the insights and efforts of stakeholders throughout the whole system.

  9. The Australian experiment: how primary health care organizations supported the evolution of a primary health care system.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Marley, John E; Wells, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Primary health care in Australia has undergone 2 decades of change. Starting with a vision for a national health strategy with general practice at its core, Australia established local meso-level primary health care organizations--Divisions of General Practice--moving from focus on individual practitioners to a professional collective local voice. The article identifies how these meso-level organizations have helped the Australian primary health care system evolve by supporting the roll-out of initiatives including national practice accreditation, a focus on quality improvement, expansion of multidisciplinary teams into general practice, regional integration, information technology adoption, and improved access to care. Nevertheless, there are still challenges to ensuring equitable access and the supply and distribution of a primary care workforce, addressing the increasing rates of chronic disease and obesity, and overcoming the fragmentation of funding and accountability in the Australian system.

  10. Genetic education for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Rideout, Andrea L.; Wilson, Brenda J.; Allanson, Judith MD; Blaine, Sean M.; Esplen, Mary Jane; Farrell, Sandra A.; Graham, Gail E.; MacKenzie, Jennifer; Meschino, Wendy; Miller, Fiona; Prakash, Preeti; Shuman, Cheryl; Summers, Anne; Taylor, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To increase primary care providers’ awareness and use of genetic services; increase their knowledge of genetic issues; increase their confidence in core genetic competencies; change their attitudes toward genetic testing for hereditary diseases; and increase their confidence as primary care genetic resources. DESIGN Participants completed a workshop and 3 questionnaires: a baseline questionnaire, a survey that provided immediate feedback on the workshop itself, and a follow-up questionnaire 6 months later. SETTING Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Primary care providers suggested by deans of nursing, midwifery, family medicine, and obstetric programs, as well as coordinators of nurse practitioner programs, in Ontario and by the Ontario College of Family Physicians. INTERVENTION A complex educational intervention was developed, including an interactive workshop and PowerPoint educational modules on genetic topics for participants’ use (available at www.mtsinai.on.ca/FamMedGen/). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Awareness and use of genetic services, knowledge of genetics, confidence in core clinical genetic skills, attitudes toward genetic testing, and teaching activities related to genetics. RESULTS The workshop was attended by 29 participants; of those, 21 completed the baseline questionnaire and the 6-month follow-up questionnaire. There was no significant change found in awareness or reported use of genetic services. There was significant improvement in self-assessed knowledge of (P = .001) and confidence in (P = .005) skills related to adult-onset genetic disorders. There were significant increases in confidence in many core genetic competencies, including assessing risk of hereditary disorders (P = .033), deciding who should be offered referral for genetic counseling (P = .003), discussing prenatal testing options (P = .034), discussing benefits, risks, and limitations of genetic testing (P = .033), and describing what to expect at a genetic counseling session

  11. Primary care clinicians' recognition and management of depression: a model of depression care in real-world primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Baik, Seong-Yi; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Gonzales, Junius J

    2013-11-01

    Depression is prevalent in primary care (PC) practices and poses a considerable public health burden in the United States. Despite nearly four decades of efforts to improve depression care quality in PC practices, a gap remains between desired treatment outcomes and the reality of how depression care is delivered. This article presents a real-world PC practice model of depression care, elucidating the processes and their influencing conditions. Grounded theory methodology was used for the data collection and analysis to develop a depression care model. Data were collected from 70 individual interviews (60 to 70 min each), three focus group interviews (n = 24, 2 h each), two surveys per clinician, and investigators' field notes on practice environments. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for analysis. Surveys and field notes complemented interview data. Seventy primary care clinicians from 52 PC offices in the Midwest: 28 general internists, 28 family physicians, and 14 nurse practitioners. A depression care model was developed that illustrates how real-world conditions infuse complexity into each step of the depression care process. Depression care in PC settings is mediated through clinicians' interactions with patients, practice, and the local community. A clinician's interactional familiarity ("familiarity capital") was a powerful facilitator for depression care. For the recognition of depression, three previously reported processes and three conditions were confirmed. For the management of depression, 13 processes and 11 conditions were identified. Empowering the patient was a parallel process to the management of depression. The clinician's ability to develop and utilize interactional relationships and resources needed to recognize and treat a person with depression is key to depression care in primary care settings. The interactional context of depression care makes empowering the patient central to depression care delivery.

  12. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians.

  13. Embattled and embittered or empowered and evolving: nurse practitioner attitudes toward managed care.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Eileen F

    2007-03-01

    To explore the attitudes of nurse practitioners (NPs) toward managed care and to identify the sources of negative attitudes and the factors that may ameliorate them. NPs, members of the Massachusetts Coalition of NPs, participated in in-depth interviews about the impact of managed care on their practice. The sources of NP negativity about managed care for many study participants lay in their not appreciating the importance of the business aspects of practice and the provider's role in controlling healthcare costs, reluctance to work with what they perceived as a rigid "system," and lack of support for them to navigate it. They felt pressured by productivity issues, time constraints, practice restrictions, and documentation demands associated with reimbursement. Those who sustained a more positive attitude were realistic about healthcare economics, were willing and able to negotiate the system, were creative and flexible, and felt empowered by knowledge of the business of practice. Some NPs, however, chose to work in practices where they did not feel as pressured as their counterparts in large, busy primary care practices. IMPLICATIONS FOR NP PRACTICE AND EDUCATION: Understanding experiences that have influenced NP attitudes regarding managed care may assist NP faculty to better prepare NP students for their future roles. NPs must be able to challenge, yet be part of, an evolving system that promotes cost-effective health care for everyone, which was what managed care originally was intended to do.

  14. Prolotherapy in primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Rabago, David; Slattengren, Andrew; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2010-03-01

    Prolotherapy is an injection-based complementary and alternative medical therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Prolotherapy techniques and injected solutions vary by condition, clinical severity, and practitioner preferences; over several treatment sessions, a fairly small volume of an irritant or sclerosing solution is injected at sites on painful ligament and tendon insertions and in adjacent joint space during several treatment sessions. Prolotherapy is becoming increasingly popular in the United States and internationally and is actively used in clinical practice. Prolotherapy has been assessed as a treatment for various painful chronic musculoskeletal conditions that are refractory to "standard of care" therapies. Although anecdotal clinical success guides the use of prolotherapy for many conditions, clinical trial literature supporting evidence-based decision-making for the use of prolotherapy exists for low back pain, several tendinopathies, and osteoarthritis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Treating impetigo in primary care.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Impetigo is a superficial, but contagious, bacterial infection of the skin that predominantly affects children and is common in primary care. In UK general practice, around half of the people with impetigo are treated with topical fusidic acid. However, bacterial resistance to this antibacterial drug is increasing. Here we discuss how patients with impetigo should be treated.

  16. Developmental monitoring in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, C. E.; Roberts, W.

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring child development is an essential part of primary health care. Successful surveillance depends on physicians' thorough knowledge of normal progress along the four developmental streams: motor, language, cognitive, and social and emotional. Being alert to "red flags" that suggest problems is important. Effective interventions can minimize developmental problems. PMID:8792021

  17. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  18. PAIR UP for primary care excellence: perspectives from a primary healthcare provider in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Singapore is facing an increasing noncommunicable disease burden due to its ageing population. Singapore’s primary healthcare services, provided by both polyclinic physicians and private general practitioners, are available to the public at differential fees for service. The resultant disproportionate patient loads lead to dissatisfaction for both healthcare providers and consumers. This article describes the ‘PAIR UP’ approach as a potential endeavour to facilitate primary care physicians (PCPs) in public and private sectors to collaborate to deliver enhanced primary care in Singapore. PAIR UP is an acronym referring to Policy, Academic development, Integration of healthcare information system, Research in primary care, Utility and safety evaluation, and Practice transformation. The current healthcare landscape is favourable to test out this multipronged approach. PCPs in both sectors can ride on it and work together synergistically to provide quality primary care in Singapore. PMID:24664374

  19. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  20. Assessing spirituality in primary care practice: is there time?

    PubMed

    Brush, B L; Daly, P R

    2000-03-01

    Over the past decade, increased attention has centered on the connection between spirituality and health. While there is general agreement that a balance of mind, body, and soul is necessary for the maintenance of health, many providers express discomfort in spiritual assessment and caregiving, citing lack of time, education, and spiritual self-awareness as key reasons. In response to these identified barriers to spiritual caregiving, faculty at the Boston College School of Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner Program designed a faculty-student practice whose focus is to integrate spiritual care into primary care practice. This article discusses the practice model and the process of preparing nurse practitioner (NP) students to assess patient spirituality within the context of a shifting care environment. It encourages all NPs to include spiritual assessment and care in daily practice.

  1. Efficacy of primary care in a nursing center.

    PubMed

    Helvie, C O

    1999-01-01

    Nursing opportunities have expanded beyond the traditional bedside role. Nurses serve in a variety of roles such as administrators, teachers, or primary care givers in a variety of settings. The role of primary care giver is a more recent role; it involves relatively independent nursing practice with clients who have acute or chronic illnesses. Client groups may include the elderly in high rise buildings, mothers and children at schools, or homeless and low-income populations at homeless shelters. This care is often provided in a nursing center. Nursing centers are nurse-managed centers in which nurses are accountable and responsible for care of clients; they are the primary provider of care and the one most seen by clients. Case managers may be in a position to refer patients to nursing centers or to work directly with nurse practitioners in nursing centers. However, questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be addressed for healthcare providers, insurance companies, and patients to be confident in the efficacy of this delivery system. Is the primary care comprehensive? Is it of high quality? Is it cost effective? Is it satisfactory to clients? These and other questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be answered to effect political and other changes needed to fulfill the role of nursing centers envisioned by early leaders of the movement. This article addresses questions related to the efficacy of primary care provided in nursing centers by family nurse practitioners. After defining efficacy, the discussion focuses on the components identified and studied in one nursing center and includes information on opportunities for case managers to utilize nursing centers for referral and appropriate follow-up of their patients.

  2. The nurse practitioner and policy in end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Janet C; Reed, Pamela G

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this column is the interface between policy and end-of-life care, particularly as provided by advanced nurse practitioners. The complexities of end-of-life along with barriers in practice can diminish quality of life for patients and their families. Changes in policy are needed to enable nurse practitioners their full scope of practice in a way that benefits patients and families at end-of-life. Three areas particularly relevant to policy for nursing practitioners and end-of-life care are addressed: scope of practice, reimbursement, and prescribing practices. Other recommendations for policy and end-of-life care are discussed.

  3. Should general practitioners have any role in maternity care in the future?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L F

    1996-01-01

    Maternity services in England are currently being reorganized. The success of the changes will be judged against the recommendations of the Changing Childbirth report. This paper describes the nature of maternity care and of general practice. It is argued that maternity care provision by general practitioners is a central and essential part of British general practice. Specifically, it is shown how general practitioners can help to achieve the objectives of the report, and thus, have a future role. It is suggested that all general practitioners who wish maternity care to remain an essential part of general practice need to argue the case with providers and purchasers. If they do not, then it is quite likely that general practitioners will be increasingly excluded as the commissioning and contracting mechanisms become more effective with midwives providing low-risk care and consultant obstetricians high-risk care. PMID:8703528

  4. Pediatric primary care as a component of systems of care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jonathan D

    2010-02-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of care is defined as serving only children and youth with serious emotional disturbance and their families and does not fully embrace the concept of primary prevention. Although similarities in the definitions of primary care and systems of care may provide a theoretical foundation for including primary care within the systems of care framework, a definition of systems of care that incorporates the idea of prevention and takes into account the broad population served in primary care would provide communities with a definition that can be used to further the work of integrating primary care into systems of care.

  5. [Continuous medical education of general practitioners/family doctors in chronic wound care].

    PubMed

    Sinozić, Tamara; Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    A number of healthcare professionals, specialists in different fields and with different levels of education, as well as non-healthcare professionals, are involved in the care of chronic wound patients, thus forming a multidisciplinary team that is not only responsible for the course and outcome of treatment, but also for the patient quality of life. Family doctor is also member of the team the task of which is to prevent, diagnose, monitor and anticipate complications and relapses, as well as complete recovery of chronic wound patients, with the overall care continuing even after the wound has healed, or is involved in palliative care. A family medicine practitioner with specialized education and their team of associates in the primary health care, along with material conditions and equipment improvement, can provide quality care for patients with peripheral cardiovascular diseases and chronic wounds, organized according to the holistic approach. It is essential that all professional associations of family medicine as well as professional associations of other specialties - fields that are involved in wound prevention and treatment - be included in developing the continuous medical education program. The benefits of modern information technology should be used to good advantage. The education should be adapted to the needs of family practitioners in terms of the form, place, time, volume, financial affordability and choice of topic. The interest shown in team education should be transformed into specialized programs in the creation of which it is essential to include both physicians and nurses and their respective professional associations. Special attention should be paid to education and training of young doctors/nurses, those with less work experience, those that have not yet been part of such education, those that lack experience in working with wound patients, those whose teams deal mostly with elderly patients, and also residents in family medicine and

  6. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  7. Learning from UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The Australian Government is wise to examine other health care systems as it strives to improve the quality of care and address rising costs to both governments and individuals. Focus is currently on the United Kingdom, whose National Health Service (NHS) stands out as one that delivers good care at a reasonable price to all who need it. The Australian and UK systems have many similarities: universal access, tax payer support, no or low cost at point of delivery, and good population health outcomes. They also face similar pressures on services from aging, increasingly unwell yet expectant populations.However, there are also differences, largely in the way that health care is funded, organised and delivered. The NHS is a huge system for 60 million people in four home countries with diverging policies. Within England, the system is managed through 10 strategic health authorities, each responsible for about 5 million people and having the right to interpret national policy. Population based health care, including tertiary care, is funded locally via primary care trusts.

  8. Retail clinics versus traditional primary care: Employee satisfaction guaranteed?

    PubMed

    Lelli, Vanessa R; Hickman, Ronald L; Savrin, Carol L; Peterson, Rachel A

    2015-09-01

    To examine if differences exist in the levels of autonomy and job satisfaction among primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) employed in retail clinics versus traditional primary care settings. Data were collected from 310 primary care NPs who attended the American Association of NP's 28th Annual Conference in June 2013. Participants completed a demographic form, the Misener NP Job Satisfaction Scale, and the Dempster Practice Behavior Scale. Overall, there were no differences in job satisfaction or autonomy among NPs by practice setting. Retail NPs felt less valued and were less satisfied with social interaction, but more satisfied with benefits compared to NPs in traditional settings. NPs working in retail clinics were less likely to have intentions to leave current position compared to NPs in traditional practice settings. The results of this study enhance our current understanding of the linkages between levels of autonomy, job satisfaction, and practice setting among primary care NPs. The findings of this descriptive study offer valuable insights for stakeholders devoted to the development of the primary care workforce and identify modifiable factors that may influence retention and turnover rates among NPs. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Practitioner Research in Early Childhood Education and Care: A 21-Year Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Darbianne; Smith, Sara; Dana, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Practitioner research has the potential to facilitate the ongoing knowledge and skill development of preservice and in-service early childhood education and care teachers. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to describe the landscape of practitioner research conducted in the United States. This study synthesizes more than 20 years…

  10. Views of pregnant women on the involvement of general practitioners in maternity care.

    PubMed

    Smith, L F

    1996-02-01

    The reorganization of maternity services in England following the report Changing childbirth is likely to impinge upon general practitioners' contribution to maternity care. Professionals and managers are increasingly expected to take account of patients' views when reorganizing services. This study aimed to elicit women's views about the involvement of general practitioners in maternity care and to establish the extent of continuity provided by general practitioners. A prospective cohort postal questionnaire survey was undertaken in the Bath health district to elicit the views of pregnant women about the general practitioner's role in maternity care, the continuity provided, patient satisfaction and the general practitioner-patient relationship. Responses were rated on five-point Likert scales. Women completed questionnaires at 24 and eight weeks before the birth and at two and eight weeks after the birth. Of 164 women entering the study (28 of whom were booked for home delivery and 136 for hospital delivery), 116 (71%) completed all four survey questionnaires. Of respondents 68% agreed that general practitioners play an important role in routine antenatal care and 53% that they have an important role in normal labour. These opinions appeared to be stable over time. Most women (73%) were cared for throughout their pregnancy by one general practitioner whom they knew well; such continuity was desired by nearly all the women in the study. Approximately three quarters of women were satisfied with the antenatal, postnatal and overall care provided by their general practitioner. Over half of respondents (56%) wished to get to know the doctor who would be present at the birth: the general practitioner was involved in 19 labours (16%), being present at the birth for only nine women. Women delivering at home were significantly more likely to agree with the statement that they knew the doctor present at the birth compared with those women delivering at hospital. Most women

  11. Use of email in communication between the Finnish primary healthcare system and general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Karhula, Tuula; Kauppila, Timo; Elonheimo, Outi; Brommels, Mats

    2011-01-01

    The volume of emails is rising rapidly everywhere. However, there is no data available concerning how primary healthcare physicians feel about the use of email communication between themselves, with their managers and with other people contacting them. The objective of this study was to find out what the attitudes of primary care physicians are towards email at work. The use of email was studied among a convenience sample of primary healthcare physicians. Physicians thought that email was a good instrument for delivering information but not as an instrument for leadership. Physicians in lead positions thought more often than ordinary general practitioners (GPs) that email is good for information. The leaders used email more actively than other GPs. The contents of the emails received by the GPs differed depending on the site of work. The total number of emails was higher in urban areas than in rural areas. Emails relating to administration, educational information and meeting materials were more often sent in rural than in urban primary healthcare settings. Information about daily work arrangements and about social events were more frequently emailed in urban than in rural surroundings. Email was considered important for information inside the system but a somewhat difficult tool for discussing complicated subjects. Generally, it was agreed that there was some unimportant information filtering through this medium to the target GPs. GPs were uncertain whether important data reached everybody who needed it or not. Still, almost everybody used the email system regularly and the use of it was considered relatively easy. GPs were generally prone to adopt advice and instructions given via email and implemented those in their working routines. The use of the email system was related to technical ability to use the system. The easier the GP thought that the email system was the more he used it. Rural GPs were more critical in applying advice shared via email than their

  12. Developing an advanced nurse practitioner service in emergency care: attitudes of nurses and doctors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Miriam; Melby, Vidar

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports a study to determine the attitudes of nurses, doctors and general medical practitioners towards the development of an advanced nurse practitioner service within an emergency department. The role of advanced nurse practitioner in emergency care has emerged in a number of countries, and has brought with it confusion about titles, role boundaries, clinical accountability and educational requirements. Initially, the role resulted from a need for healthcare professionals to provide a service to the increased numbers of patients presenting to hospital with less urgent problems. Since then, the service has evolved to one where nurse practitioners provide high-quality and cost-effective care to persons who seek help for non-urgent, urgent or emergent conditions in a variety of emergency care settings. However, little research could be identified on the attitudes of relevant nursing and medical staff towards the development of this role. A questionnaire survey was carried out, and a 29-item Likert rating scale was developed to measure attitudes. Along with some demographic variables, two open-ended questions were added to allow respondents to elaborate on what they perceived as benefits and difficulties associated with an advanced nurse practitioner service. All general practitioners, emergency nurses and emergency doctors in one health board in the Republic of Ireland were targeted, and 25 emergency nurses, 13 emergency doctors and 69 general practitioners were approached to take part. Data were collected in February 2004. An overall response rate of 74.8% was achieved. All respondents were positive towards the development of an advanced nurse practitioner service, with general practitioners being less positive. The principal differences appeared between general practitioners and hospital emergency care staff. There is a need for a multidisciplinary approach to the planning of advanced nurse practitioner services. To achieve multiprofessional acceptance

  13. Ways and Means to Utilize Private Practitioners for Tuberculosis Care in India

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest of utilizing the private practitioners in improving the outreach of public health services including Tuberculosis (TB) control programme stemmed out of people’s preference for private health facilities in situations where public health facilities fail to meet the expectations. In different parts of India, many models of Public Private Partnership have been tried and tested and proved successful in providing quality TB care in the concerned community. In this paper, several ways and means have been proposed to effectively utilize private practitioners for TB care in India. These strategies are discussed under different headings: (1) identification of potential private practitioners: (2) orientation of private practitioners: (3) networking of private practitioners with patients and Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) provider: (4) follow-up and sensitization of patients by private practitioners: (5) let the word of mouth work: and (6) evaluation of the involvement of private practitioners in TB care. However the following points must be addressed before utilizing the private practitioners for TB care: time constraints in notifying the disease, adherence to DOTS regime/alternative to DOTS regime, referral of patients to public health facilities for diagnosis and treatment, follow-up and sensitization of the patients and behaviour change communication and awareness in the community by the private practitioners. Few of these are mandatory for the private practitioners; most are practicable. With the effective utilization of private practitioners many problems can be sorted out that are currently plaguing the system such as irrational and excessive use of certain drugs, over reliance on chest X-ray for diagnosis, under use of sputum microscopy, lack of knowledge regarding standard treatment protocols and varied prescription practices. PMID:28384891

  14. The Acute Care Nurse Practitioner: challenging existing boundaries of emergency nurses in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Norris, Tracey; Melby, Vidar

    2006-03-01

    This study explored the opinions of nurses and doctors working in emergency departments towards the development of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner service in the United Kingdom. Studies carried out in the United States and Canada suggest that the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner can have a positive impact on the critically ill or injured patients' experiences in the emergency department. This role is well developed in the United States and Canada, but is still in its infancy in the United Kingdom. A descriptive, exploratory design incorporating questionnaires (n = 98) and semi-structured interviews (n = 6) was employed. The sample included nurses and doctors from seven emergency departments and minor injury units. Respondents felt it was important for the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner to have obtained a specialist nurse practitioner qualification and that the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner should retain a clinical remit. While participants seemed comfortable with nurses undertaking traditional advanced skills such as suturing, reluctance was displayed with other advanced skills such as needle thoracocentesis. Three main themes were identified from the interviews: inter-professional conflict, autonomy and the need for the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Doctors were reluctant to allow nurses to practise certain additional advanced skills and difficulties appear to be centred on the autonomy and other associated inter-professional conflicts with the role of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Nurses and doctors identified a need for the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, but the blurring of boundaries between doctors and nurses can result in inter-professional conflict unless this is addressed prior to the introduction of such advanced practitioners. Relevance to clinical practice. As the role of the emergency nurse diversifies and expands, this study re-affirms the importance of inter-professional collaboration when seeking approval for role expansions in nursing.

  15. Managing low back pain in the primary care setting: The know-do gap

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N Ann; Moga, Carmen; Harstall, Christa

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) in the primary care setting to prepare a scoping survey for identifying knowledge gaps in LBP management among Alberta’s primary care practitioners, and to identify potential barriers to implementing a multidisciplinary LBP guideline. METHODS: English language studies, published from 1996 to 2008, comparing the clinical practice patterns of primary care practitioners with guideline recommendations were identified by systematically searching literature databases, the websites of various health technology assessment agencies and libraries, and the Internet. Data were synthesized qualitatively. RESULTS: The literature search identified 14 relevant studies. Knowledge gaps were reported among various primary care practitioner groups in the assessment of red flags, use of diagnostic imaging, provision of advice regarding sick leave and continuing activity, administration of some medications (muscle relaxants, oral steroids and opioids) and recommendation of particular treatments (acupuncture, physiotherapy, spinal manipulation, traction, ultrasound, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal mobilization). CONCLUSIONS: A know-do gap clearly exists among primary care practitioners with respect to the diagnosis and treatment of LBP. The information on know-do gaps will be used to construct a survey tool for unearthing the local knowledge gaps extant among Alberta’s primary care practitioners, and to develop a dissemination strategy for a locally produced multidisciplinary LBP guideline, with the aim of ensuring that the know-do gaps inherent within each primary practice discipline are specifically targeted. PMID:21165374

  16. Boundary work and the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners in healthcare teams.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise; Doran, Diane

    2012-07-01

    This article is a report of a study of boundary work following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role in healthcare teams. Acute care nurse practitioners enacting their roles in healthcare teams have faced a number of challenges including a mix of positive and negative views of the acute care nurse practitioner role from healthcare team members and acute care nurse practitioner roles crossing the boundaries between the medical and nursing professions. Understanding the process by which the boundaries between professions changed following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role was important since this could affect scope of practice and the team's ability to give patient care. The study was conducted in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Canada. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. Data were collected from March to May 2009. Participants (N = 59) described boundary work as a process that included: (1) creating space; (2) loss of a valued function; (3) trust; (4) interpersonal dynamics; and (5) time. The development of trust among team members was essential. The co-location of team members working on common projects, and medical and nursing leadership facilitated boundary work. The micro-level processes of boundary work in healthcare teams have important implications for the development of full scope of practice for acute care nurse practitioners, effective inter-professional teamwork and the integration of new roles in healthcare systems. Future research needs to be undertaken in different contexts, and with patients and families. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Columbia University's Competency and Evidence-based Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Christine R.; Roberts, W. Dan

    2002-01-01

    Columbia University's acute care nurse practitioner curriculum incorporates evaluation strategies and standards to assess clinical competence and foster evidence-based practice. The curriculum consists of four core courses, supporting sciences, and specialty courses. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  18. Approaches to primary health care in the Commonwealth Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Garrett, E J; Kumar, A K; Standard, K L

    1981-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a brief review of the health problems of the Commonwealth Caribbean and of the primary care activities being implemented to solve them. Special attention is given to programs which develop new categories of health workers and direct health manpower toward learning a technology appropriate to the conditions in which they work. These programs enable the health worker and allied health personnel to adapt their roles and functions accordingly and thus provide quality health care within limited resources. The main programs are: development of new categories of health workers such as the community health aide and the nurse practitioner; education and training of allied health personnel; the training of primary health care physicians. An account is also given of primary health care in Jamaica and in the smaller territories of the Caribbean.

  19. Improving private practitioner care of sick children: testing new approaches in rural Bihar.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; D'Souza, S A; Northrup, R S

    2000-12-01

    Private practitioners are a major source of care for childhood illnesses in developing countries, but the care they provide is often of poor quality. This study tested the effectiveness of two new methods for improving the quality of private practitioner care of sick children: the verbal case review (VCR) and INFECTOM. The VCR is a method for evaluating private providers' quality of care based on mothers' reports and INFECTOM is a package of interventions for improving private providers' quality of care. The study was conducted in 110 villages of Bihar State, India, by three local non-governmental organizations (NGOs). First, the VCR was used for interviews with mothers of approximately 600 children sick with diarrhoea, ARI or fever in the past 2 weeks. The VCR identified practitioners consulted for the treatment of the sick children and recorded providers' case management practices as reported by the mothers. Based on the results of the VCR, the INFECTOM intervention was carried out. This consisted of INformation sessions for the providers regarding standard case management guidelines for ARI, diarrhoea and fever, FEedback to providers on their performance based on the results of the VCR, ConTracting with practitioners to gain their commitment to practice specific guidelines, and Ongoing Monitoring of practitioners' practices with feedback of the results to the practitioners and the community. Seven months after the interventions were initiated, another cross-sectional VCR survey of approximately 300 sick children was carried out to evaluate the impact of the activities on practitioners' case management practices. The results of the study show statistically significant improvements in private practitioners' history taking, examination and counselling practices for ARI, diarrhoea and fever. It was concluded that the VCR and INFECTOM were feasible for implementation by community-based NGOs, and were effective in improving the technical quality of care provided by

  20. Promoting group psychotherapy in managed care: basic economic principles for the clinical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Gross, J M

    1997-10-01

    Knowledge of the basic economic factors underlying managed mental health care directly impacts the clinical practitioners' ability to make constructive changes in the system. To aid understanding this article introduces the managed care marketplace model, the interactive relationship between medical necessity and patient co-payment, and demand management economics. The author encourages practitioners to develop strategies to overcome specific economic obstacles that prevent the promotion of group psychotherapy.

  1. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

    PubMed

    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  2. Descriptive study of association between quality of care and empathy and burnout in primary care.

    PubMed

    Yuguero, Oriol; Marsal, Josep Ramon; Buti, Miquel; Esquerda, Montserrat; Soler-González, Jorge

    2017-09-26

    The doctor-patient relationship is a crucial aspect of primary-care practice Research on associations between quality of care provision and burnout and empathy in a primary care setting could improve this relationship. Cross-sectional study of family physicians (108) and nurses (112) of twenty-two primary care centers in the health district of Lleida, Spain. Empathy and burnout were measured using the Jefferson Physician Empathy Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory, while quality of care delivery was evaluated using Quality Standard Indicator scores. JPSE and MBI results were grouped into low, medium, and high scores to analyze associations with QSI scores and sociodemographic variables. The mean QSI score recorded for the family physicians and nurses was 665 (out of a total of 1000). Higher, albeit insignificant, QSI scores were observed for practitioners with high burnout. No differences were observed according to level of empathy (p > 0.05). The differences with respect to sex, age, and area of practice (urban vs rural center) were not significant. Practitioners with low empathy had higher QSI scores than those with high empathy (672.8 vs. 654.4) while those with high burnout had higher scores than those with low burnout (702 vs. 671). Burnout and empathy did not significantly influence quality of care delivery scores in 22 primary care centers. More studies, however, are needed to investigate the unexpected trend observed that suggests that physicians and nurses with higher levels of burnout provide higher quality care.

  3. Vaccination in the primary care setting: when is it safe to proceed?

    PubMed

    Ngoh, Hui Lee Sharon; Ng, Mark Chung Wai

    2016-01-01

    Primary care practitioners play an important role in administering and advocating vaccinations against vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and ensuring herd immunity in our population. This is a follow-up article to an earlier one which dealt with the principles of vaccine scheduling and administration. This article describes several false contraindications to vaccination that a primary care practitioner may encounter, including pregnancy, current breastfeeding, history of febrile seizures, and having immunosuppressed or pregnant household contacts. We aimed to provide a guide for safe and timely vaccine administration in the primary care setting.

  4. Primary Care Clinics and Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chiung-Ya; Lin, Yi-Ling; Masri, Maysoun Dimachkie

    2016-01-01

    Background The Accountable Care Organization (ACO) is one of the new models of health care delivery in the U.S. To date, little is known about the characteristics of health care organizations that have joined ACOs. We report on the findings of a survey of primary care clinics, the objective of which was to investigate the opinions of clinic management about participation in ACOs, and the characteristics of clinic organizational structure that may contribute to joining ACOs or be willing to do so. Methods A 27-item survey questionnaire was developed and distributed by mail in 3 annual waves to all Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) in 9 states. Two dependent variables - participation in ACOs and willingness to join ACOs - were created and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach. Results 257 RHCs responded to the survey. A small percentage (5.2%) of the respondent clinics reported that they were participating in ACOs. RHCs in isolated areas were 78% less likely to be in ACOs (odds= 0.22, p= 0.059). Non-profit RHCs indicated a higher willingness to join an ACO than for-profit RHCs (B= 1.271, p= 0.054). There is a positive relationship between RHC size and willingness to join an ACO (B= 0.402, p=0.010). Conclusions At this early stage of ACO development, many RHC personnel are unfamiliar with the ACO model. Rural providers’ limited technological and human resources, and the lack of ACO development in rural areas, may delay or prevent their participation in ACOs. PMID:26900587

  5. Implementation of a medical intensive care unit acute-care nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Landsperger, Janna S; Williams, Kristina Jill; Hellervik, Susan M; Chassan, Cherry B; Flemmons, Lisa N; Davidson, Stephanie R; Evans, Emily R; Bacigalupo, Mary E; Wheeler, Arthur P

    2011-04-01

    Demands for critical care services are increasing, but the supply of qualified physicians is not. Moreover, there are mounting national expectations for continuous on-site, senior providers and for adherence to quality and safety practices. In teaching institutions, manpower shortages are exacerbated by shrinking trainee duty hours, and there is a growing desire to recoup the revenue lost when a non-credentialed provider delivers a service. Increasingly, hospitalists and acute-care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) are meeting these needs. This article describes the development of an ACNP service in a university hospital medical intensive care unit (ICU) designed to improve the range and quality of services and faculty staffing when the ICU expanded from 22 to 34 beds without adding physicians. Eight ACNPs were hired and, over 9 months, received didactic, procedural, simulation center, and supervised patient care training. Progressive workload and graded responsibility were used to transition to a 24-hour, in-house, resident-independent, attending-supervised service, which now admits just under half of all patients (3.4 ± 1.3 patients/day), cares for approximately one-fourth of the unit's critically ill patients (6.0 ± 1.4 patients/day), and responds to medical rapid response team calls daily (1.5 ± 1.7 calls/day). Over the first 5 months of operation, work output in all categories continued to increase, with ACNPs documenting an average of 11.1 ± 2.7 activities per day (all data mean ± standard deviation). Acute-care nurse practitioners also provide 40% of the daily resident core lectures and a monthly staff nurse conference. Insufficient data exist at this time, however, to report accurate billing or collection results. Specific areas discussed within this article include service structure, hiring and training, implementation, scheduling, supervision, problems encountered, productivity, monitoring, and future plans.

  6. What's a Primary Care Physician (PCP)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Internet What's a Primary Care Physician (PCP)? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's a Primary Care Physician ( ... getting the right amount of exercise. Types of PCPs Different types of PCPs treat kids and teens. ...

  7. Primary care physicians shortage: a Korean example.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Hwan; Roh, Yong-Kyun

    2003-01-01

    A mismatch in the demand and supply of primary care physicians could give rise to a disorganization of the health care system and public confusion about health care access. There is much evidence in Korea of the existence of a primary care physician shortage. The appropriate required ratio of primary care physicians to the total number of physicians is estimated by analyzing data for primary care insurance consumption in Korea. Sums of primary care expenditure and claims were calculated to estimate the need for primary care physicians by analyzing the nationwide health insurance claims data of the Korean National Medical Insurance Management Corporation (KNMIMC) between the years 1989-1998. The total number of physicians increased 183% from 1989 to 1998. However, the number of primary care physicians including general physicians, family physicians, general internists, and general pediatricians showed an increase of only 169% in those 10 years. The demand for primary care physicians reaches at least 58.6%, and up to 83.7%, of the total number of physicians in Korea. However, the number of primary care physicians comprises up to 22.0% of the total number of active physicians during the same research period, which showed a large gap between demand and supply of primary care physicians in Korea. To provide high quality care overall, a balanced supply of primary care physicians and specialists is required, based on the nation's demand for health services.

  8. Primary Care Physicians' Experience with Disease Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Alicia; Grumbach, Kevin; Vranizan, Karen; Osmond, Dennis H; Bindman, Andrew B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine primary care physicians' perceptions of how disease management programs affect their practices, their relationships with their patients, and overall patient care. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING The 13 largest urban counties in California. PARTICIPANTS General internists, general pediatricians, and family physicians. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Physicians' self-report of the effects of disease management programs on quality of patient care and their own practices. Respondents included 538 (76%) of 708 physicians: 183 (34%) internists, 199 (38%) family practitioners, and 156 (29%) pediatricians. Disease management programs were available 285 to (53%) physicians; 178 had direct experience with the programs. Three quarters of the 178 physicians believed that disease management programs increased the overall quality of patient care and the quality of care for the targeted disease. Eighty-seven percent continued to provide primary care for their patients in these programs, and 70% reported participating in major patient care decisions. Ninety-one percent reported that the programs had no effect on their income, decreased (38%) or had no effect (48%) on their workload, and increased (48%)) their practice satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS Practicing primary care physicians have generally favorable perceptions of the effect of voluntary, primary care-inclusive, disease management programs on their patients and on their own practice satisfaction. PMID:11318911

  9. Primary care providers' willingness to see unaccompanied adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bravender, Terrill; Price, C Nicole; English, Abigail

    2004-01-01

    To describe primary care practitioners' office policies and willingness to provide medical care for unaccompanied adolescents aged 11-17 years. A unique 32-item survey was mailed in June and July, 2001 to 1979 office-based pediatricians and family practitioners randomly selected from the American Medical Association's physician database. The survey included questions regarding demographic information, number of adolescents seen in the practice, office policies regarding adolescents alone in the clinic, and 5-point Likert scales regarding their willingness to see patients in various situations, as well as to see patients in 12 brief clinical scenarios. Predictors of the willingness to see adolescents alone were identified and entered into binomial logistic regression models. Specific policies included on the surveys were coded into groups. Survey responses (n = 710) represented a 36% response rate. This sample included 288 family practitioners and 368 pediatricians; 43.3% of physicians reported having a specific policy regarding seeing adolescents without their parents present. Family practitioners were more likely than pediatricians to report having such a policy (51.3% vs. 38.2%, p =.001,), yet pediatricians reported a higher percentage of adolescents in their practices than family practitioners (22.6% vs. 12.4%, p <.0005). Not having a policy was an independent predictor of "often" or "always" seeing an adolescent alone for routine health maintenance (OR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.91-4.24) and urgent care visits (OR = 3.01, 95% CI 1.90-4.77). Specific policies varied, and many physicians assessed each case on an individual basis. Specific policies are associated with a decreased willingness of physicians to see adolescents who are unaccompanied by a parent. Carefully developed clinic policies that are consistent with legal guidelines should be implemented in order to maximize adolescents' abilities to access care.

  10. Primary Care Dentistry in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Jessye Melgarejo do Amaral; Ferla, Alcindo Antônio; Hugo, Fernando Neves

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the association between sociodemographic characteristics, health care indicators, work process characteristics, and the performance of preventive dental procedures by oral health care teams (OHCTs) assessed during the first phase of the PMAQ in Brazil. A census of 10 334 primary OHCTs was conducted. The outcome included topical application of fluoride, application of sealants, detection of oral lesions, and monitoring of suspected or confirmed cases of oral cancer. The multilevel Poisson regression model was used to obtain crude and adjusted prevalence ratios. The performance of preventive dental procedures was 29.46% (3044/10 334; 95% confidence interval, 28.57-30.33), which was considered low. PMID:28252501

  11. Use of primary care teams by HMOS for care of long-stay nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Farley, D O; Zellman, G; Ouslander, J G; Reuben, D B

    1999-02-01

    To characterize the use of formal primary care programs by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) for their members who are long-stay residents of nursing homes. Using mail survey techniques, 34 Medicare risk-contracting HMOs with the largest Medicare beneficiary enrollments were asked to complete a written questionnaire. HMOs were asked how they evaluate care in nursing home settings and whether they operate a formal primary care program for members who are long-stay nursing home residents. Those reporting they had programs were asked about the program features, participation in the program, roles performed by clinical practitioners, and clinical caseloads. Surveys were completed by 21 (61.8%) of the HMOs. HMO management personnel who know the primary care programs the HMOs operate in affiliated nursing homes. Descriptive summaries of the HMOs' responses to the survey questions were generated. For HMOs with primary care programs, caseloads of physicians and nurse practitioners were estimated using survey data reported by the HMOs. Eight (38.1%) of the responding HMOs operate formal primary care programs in affiliated nursing homes. HMOs with programs consider more factors than non-program HMOs in evaluating care for nursing home residents. Reasons cited most frequently for not having a program are costs and too few nursing home residents. The most common primary care program features are designated physicians and use of physician extenders. Survey findings point to the potential importance of formal HMO primary care programs for long-term nursing home residents, which may expand with growth in the older population and Medicare-managed care. Program adoption, however, may depend on sufficient resident participation to be financially feasible.

  12. Screening and Identification in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonian, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews issues related to behavioral screening in pediatric primary care settings. Structural-organizational issues affecting the use of pediatric primary care screening are discussed. This study also reviewed selected screening instruments that have utility for use in the primary care setting. Clinical and research issues related to…

  13. 45 CFR 96.47 - Primary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care. 96.47 Section 96.47 Public Welfare... and Tribal Organizations § 96.47 Primary care. Applications for direct funding of Indian tribes and tribal organizations under the primary care block grant must comply with 42 CFR Part 51c (Grants...

  14. Screening and Identification in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonian, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews issues related to behavioral screening in pediatric primary care settings. Structural-organizational issues affecting the use of pediatric primary care screening are discussed. This study also reviewed selected screening instruments that have utility for use in the primary care setting. Clinical and research issues related to…

  15. Documentation and Management of CKD in Rural Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Cynthia D.; O’Malley, Jean P.; Davis, Melinda M.; Mori, Motomi; Anderson, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Recognition of CKD by primary care practitioners is essential in rural communities where nephrology access is limited. This study determined the prevalence of undocumented CKD in patients cared for in rural primary care practices and evaluated characteristics associated with undocumented CKD as well as CKD management. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective cohort study, conducted within the Oregon Rural Practice Based Research Network, consisted of 865 CKD patients with serum creatinine≥1.5 mg/dl in males and ≥1.3 mg/dl in females and an estimated GFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Documentation of a CKD diagnosis and laboratory values were abstracted by chart review. Results Of CKD patients, 51.9% had no documentation of CKD. Undocumented CKD occurred more frequently in female patients (adjusted odds ratio=2.93, 95% confidence interval=2.04, 4.21). The association of serum creatinine reporting versus automating reporting of estimated GFR on CKD documentation was dependent on patient sex, years of practitioner experience, and practitioner clinical training. Hypertensive patients with documented CKD were more likely to have a BP medication change than patients with undocumented CKD (odds ratio=2.07, 95% confidence interval=1.15, 3.73). Only 2 of 449 patients with undocumented CKD were comanaged with a nephrologist compared with 20% of patients with documented CKD (odds ratio=53.20, 95% confidence interval=14.90, 189.90). Conclusions Undocumented CKD in a rural primary care setting is frequent, particularly in female patients. Depending on practitioner characteristics, automatic reporting of estimated GFR might improve documentation of CKD in this population. PMID:23371962

  16. Role Clarification Processes for Better Integration of Nurse Practitioners into Primary Healthcare Teams: A Multiple-Case Study

    PubMed Central

    D'Amour, Danielle; Contandriopoulos, Damien; Chouinard, Véronique; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2014-01-01

    Role clarity is a crucial issue for effective interprofessional collaboration. Poorly defined roles can become a source of conflict in clinical teams and reduce the effectiveness of care and services delivered to the population. Our objective in this paper is to outline processes for clarifying professional roles when a new role is introduced into clinical teams, that of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (PHCNP). To support our empirical analysis we used the Canadian National Interprofessional Competency Framework, which defines the essential components for role clarification among professionals. A qualitative multiple-case study was conducted on six cases in which the PHCNP role was introduced into primary care teams. Data collection included 34 semistructured interviews with key informants involved in the implementation of the PHCNP role. Our results revealed that the best performing primary care teams were those that used a variety of organizational and individual strategies to carry out role clarification processes. From this study, we conclude that role clarification is both an organizational process to be developed and a competency that each member of the primary care team must mobilize to ensure effective interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25692039

  17. Rural primary care in Greece: working under limited resources.

    PubMed

    Oikonomidou, Eirini; Anastasiou, Foteini; Dervas, Dimitris; Patri, Fani; Karaklidis, Dionisis; Moustakas, Panagiotis; Andreadou, Niki; Mantzanas, Enagellos; Merkouris, Bodossakis

    2010-08-01

    Establishing sufficient primary health-care services in rural areas is of high interest in developing health systems. The objective of the present study was to describe the state of rural health services, in terms of personnel and equipment, in rural primary care settings in Greece. A questionnaire was sent to all Greek rural settings (RS) (practices) twice during 2007. The questionnaire included questions about the number of doctors in the practice, their specialty, presence of a nurse, population served and average distance from the regional Health Center and hospital. It also included questions about the average number of consultations per day, home visits, maintenance of medical records and medical equipment. Rural primary care settings in Greece. Doctors serving primary care needs during the second half of 2007. s) None. s) Data concerning staffing, function and available equipment of the RS have been collected. Five hundred eighty-two (40.9%) of the rural practitioners replied. Twenty-nine percent of the participants were general practitioners (GPs). Doctors reported average population of responsibility of 2263 citizens and a regular average of 26 consultations per day. A nurse was present in 174 RS (29.5%). Medical records of any form were kept in only 36% of the RS. GPs were more prone to maintain patients files compared with non-specialized doctors. Essential equipment proved to be limited in the majority of the RS. Rural practices in Greece report shortages of medical staff (GPs), nursing staff and equipment.

  18. Primary health care and the Midwest flood disaster.

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, C; Killam, P P; Gaston, M H; Stinson, N

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest flood disaster of 1993 ravaged communities across a 9-State area. Homes were destroyed, roads closed, and services disrupted. Economic costs, including loss of revenue from farming and loss of jobs, are estimated at more than $1 billion. Even as people continue to rebuild their lives 1 year later, renewed flooding has occurred in some areas. A community-based primary health care system can be described as a system of services that (a) offers all members of a family continuous, comprehensive, quality health services throughout their lives; (b) includes case management and coordinated referrals to other related services when necessary; (c) is usually provided by family practitioners, general internists, general pediatricians, obstetricians-gynecologists, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants; and (d) has community involvement in the development and management of the system to assure that it meets the changing needs and the diversity of the people it is designed to serve. This paper uses the floods to describe the impact of a disaster on primary health care services and primary health care systems. This includes changes in the demand for services (as evidenced by the frequency and type of patient visits) and the ability of the system to respond to these changes. The effect of a disaster on access to primary health care is discussed. PMID:7938379

  19. Considering disparities: How do nurse practitioner regulatory policies, access to care, and health outcomes vary across four states?

    PubMed

    Sonenberg, Andréa; Knepper, Hillary J

    Health disparities persist among morbidity and mortality rates in the United States. Contributing significantly to these disparities are the ability to pay for health care (largely, access to health insurance) and access to, and capacity of, the primary care health workforce. This article examines key determinants of health (DOH) including demographics, public and regulatory policies, health workforce capacity, and primary health outcomes of four states of the United States. The context of this study is the potential association among health care disparities and myriad DOH, among them, the restrictive nurse practitioner (NP) scope of practice (SOP) regulatory environment, which are documented to influence access to care and health outcomes. This descriptive study explores current NP SOP regulations, access to primary care, and health outcomes of key chronic disease indicators-diabetes, hypertension, and obesity in Alabama, Colorado, Mississippi, and Utah. These states represent both the greatest disparity in chronic disease health outcomes (obesity, diabetes, and hypertension) and the greatest difference in modernization of their NP SOP laws. The Affordable Care Act has greatly expanded access to health care. However, it is estimated that 23 million Americans, 7% of its total population, will remain uninsured by 2019. Restrictive and inconsistent NP SOP policies may continue to contribute to health workforce capacity and population health disparities across the country, with particular concern for primary care indicators. The study findings bring into question whether states with more restrictive NP SOP regulations impact access to primary care, which may in turn influence population health outcomes. These findings suggest the need for further research. NPs are essential for meeting the increasing demands of primary care in the United States, and quality-of-care indicator research supports their use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Issues in Primary Care: The Academic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersdorf, Robert G.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the problems requiring restructuring of programs to prepare two new types of primary care physicians: a family physician who is predominantly an ambulatory care specialist and a primary care internist, pediatrician, or obstetrician who cares for most diseases in office and hospital. (JT)

  1. Primary and managed care. Ingredients for health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Bindman, A B

    1994-01-01

    The use of primary and managed care is likely to increase under proposed federal health care reform. I review the definition of primary care and primary care physicians and show that this delivery model can affect access to medical care, the cost of treatment, and the quality of services. Because the use of primary care is often greater in managed care than in fee-for-service, I compare the two insurance systems to further understand the delivery of primary care. Research suggests that primary care can help meet the goal of providing accessible, cost-effective, and high-quality care, but that changes in medical education and marketplace incentives will be needed to encourage students and trained physicians to enter this field. PMID:7941522

  2. The RCGP Quality Practice Award for primary care teams.

    PubMed

    Ring, Nicola

    2003-03-01

    Accreditation is a means of improving quality through the process of externally reviewing performance against written standards. Following the introduction of clinical governance, participation in quality accreditation schemes has been encouraged. The Royal College of General Practitioners' Quality Practice Award (QPA) is an example of a quality accreditation scheme for primary care practice teams. QPA applies to the wider primary care team and is directly relevant to nursing and midwifery staff employed by or attached to practice teams. QPA supports evidence-based and reflective practice, continuing professional development and team working, all of which are integral to current nursing and midwifery practice. Nurses and midwives working in primary care teams must be aware of QPA and, where necessary, actively and collaboratively participate in this process.

  3. Delivering pharmacogenetic testing in a primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Rachel; Voora, Deepak; Peyser, Bruce; Haga, Susanne B

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic testing refers to a type of genetic test to predict a patient’s likelihood to experience an adverse event or not respond to a given drug. Despite revision to several labels of commonly prescribed drugs regarding the impact of genetic variation, the use of this testing has been limited in many settings due to a number of factors. In the primary care setting, the limited office time as well as the limited knowledge and experience of primary care practitioners have likely attributed to the slow uptake of pharmacogenetic testing. This paper provides talking points for primary care physicians to discuss with patients when pharmacogenetic testing is warranted. As patients and physicians become more familiar and accepting of pharmacogenetic testing, it is anticipated that discussion time will be comparable to that of other clinical tests. PMID:24101877

  4. Pediatric Hearing Healthcare in Kentucky's Appalachian Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew L; Alexander, David; Noblitt, Bryce; Lester, Cathy; Shinn, Jennifer B

    2015-08-01

    Diagnosis and intervention for infant hearing loss is often delayed in areas of healthcare disparity, such as rural Appalachia. Primary care providers play a key role in timely hearing healthcare. The purpose of this study was to assess the practice patterns of rural primary care providers (PCPs) regarding newborn hearing screening (NHS) and experiences with rural early hearing diagnosis and intervention programs in an area of known hearing healthcare disparity. Cross sectional questionnaire study. Appalachian PCP's in Kentucky were surveyed regarding practice patterns and experiences regarding the diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss. 93 Appalachian primary care practitioners responded and 85% reported that NHS is valuable for pediatric health. Family practitioners were less likely to receive infant NHS results than pediatricians (54.5 versus 95.2%, p < 0.01). A knowledge gap was identified in the goal ages for diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss. Pediatrician providers were more likely to utilize diagnostic testing compared with family practice providers (p < 0.001). Very rural practices (Beale code 7-9) were less likely to perform hearing evaluations in their practices compared with rural practices (Beale code 4-6) (p < 0.001). Family practitioners reported less confidence than pediatricians in counseling and directing care of children who fail newborn hearing screening. 46% felt inadequately prepared or completely unprepared to manage children who fail the NHS. Rural primary care providers face challenges in receiving communication regarding infant hearing screening and may lack confidence in directing and providing rural hearing healthcare for children.

  5. Innocent parties or devious drug users: the views of primary healthcare practitioners with respect to those who misuse prescription drugs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many health professionals engage in providing health services for drug users; however, there is evidence of stigmatisation by some health professionals. Prescription drug misusers as a specific group, may also be subject to such judgment. This study aimed to understand issues for primary care health practitioners in relation to prescription drug misuse (PDM), by exploring the attitudes and experiences of healthcare professionals with respect to PDM. Methods Tape-recorded interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of general practitioners (17), community pharmacists (16) and 'key experts' (18) in New Zealand. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis undertaken. Participants were offered vouchers to the value of NZ$30 for their participation. Results A major theme that was identified was that of two different types of patients involved in PDM, as described by participants - the 'abuser' and the 'overuser'. The 'abuser' was believed to acquire prescription medicines through deception for their own use or for selling on to the illicit market, to use the drugs recreationally, for a 'high' or to stave off withdrawal from illicit drugs. 'Overusers' were characterised as having become 'addicted' through inadvertent overuse and over prescribing, and were generally viewed more sympathetically by practitioners. It also emerged that practitioners' attitudes may have impacted on whether any harm reduction interventions might be offered. Furthermore, whilst practitioners might be more willing to offer help to the 'over-user', it seemed that there is a lack of appropriate services for this group, who may also lack a peer support network. Conclusions A binary view of PDM may not be helpful in understanding the issues surrounding PDM, nor in providing appropriate interventions. There is a need for further exploration of 'over users’ whose needs may not be being met by mainstream drug services, and issues of stigma in relation to

  6. Evaluation of an aged care nurse practitioner service: quality of care within a residential aged care facility hospital avoidance service.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Trudy; Craswell, Alison; Rossi, Dolene; Holzberger, Darren

    2017-01-13

    Reducing avoidable hospitialisation of aged care facility (ACF) residents can improve the resident experience and their health outcomes. Consequently many variations of hospital avoidance (HA) programs continue to evolve. Nurse practitioners (NP) with expertise in aged care have the potential to make a unique contribution to hospital avoidance programs. However, little attention has been dedicated to service evaluation of this model and the quality of care provided. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of an aged care NP model of care situated within a HA service in a regional area of Australia. Donabedian's structure, process and outcome framework was applied to evaluate the quality of the NP model of care. The Australian Nurse Practitioner Study standardised interview schedules for evaluating NP models of care guided the semi-structured interviews of nine health professionals (including ACF nurses, medical doctors and allied health professionals), four ACF residents and their families and two NPs. Theory driven coding consistent with the Donabedian framework guided analysis of interview data and presentation of findings. Structural dimensions identified included the 'in-reach' nature of the HA service, distance, limitations of professional regulation and the residential care model. These dimensions influenced the process of referring the resident to the NP, the NPs timely response and interactions with other professionals. The processes where the NPs take time connecting with residents, initiating collaborative care plans, up-skilling aged care staff and function as intra and interprofessional boundary spanners all contributed to quality outcomes. Quality outcomes in this study were about timely intervention, HA, timely return home, partnering with residents and family (knowing what they want) and resident and health professional satisfaction. This study provides valuable insights into the contribution of the NP model of care within an aged care

  7. Patients' and clinicians' experiences and perceptions of the primary care management of insomnia: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davy, Zowie; Middlemass, Jo; Siriwardena, Aloysius N

    2015-10-01

    Insomnia is common leading to patients with sleep problems often presenting to primary care services including general practice, community pharmacies and community mental health teams. Little is known about how health professionals in primary care respond to patients with insomnia. We aimed to explore health professionals' and patients' experiences and perceptions of the management of insomnia in primary care. We used a qualitative design and thematic approach. Primary care in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. We undertook focus groups and one-to-one interviews with a purposive sample of health professionals and adults with insomnia. We interviewed 28 patients and 23 health professionals. Practitioners focused on treating the cause of insomnia rather than the insomnia itself. They described providing stepped care for insomnia, but this focused on sleep hygiene which patients often disregarded, rather than cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Practitioners were ambivalent towards hypnotic drugs but often colluded with patients to prescribe to avoid confrontation or express empathy. Patients sometimes took hypnotics in ways that were not intended, for example together with over-the-counter medication. Practitioners and patients were sometimes but not always concerned about addiction. Practitioners sometimes prescribed despite these concerns but at other times withdrew hypnotics abruptly without treating insomnia. Both patients and practitioners wanted more options and better training for the management of insomnia in primary care. A better understanding of the current approaches and difficulties in the management of insomnia will help to inform more therapeutic options and health professional training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Blueprint for an Undergraduate Primary Care Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Sara B; Demasi, Monica; Farren, Erin; Frankl, Susan; Gottlieb, Barbara; Hoy, Jessica; Johnson, Amanda; Kasper, Jill; Lee, Patrick; McCarthy, Claire; Miller, Kathe; Morris, Juliana; O'Hare, Kitty; Rosales, Rachael; Simmons, Leigh; Smith, Benjamin; Treadway, Katherine; Goodell, Kristen; Ogur, Barbara

    2016-07-12

    In light of the increasing demand for primary care services and the changing scope of health care, it is important to consider how the principles of primary care are taught in medical school. While the majority of schools have increased students' exposure to primary care, they have not developed a standardized primary care curriculum for undergraduate medical education. In 2013, the authors convened a group of educators from primary care internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, and medicine-pediatrics, as well as five medical students to create a blueprint for a primary care curriculum that could be integrated into a longitudinal primary care experience spanning undergraduate medical education and delivered to all students regardless of their eventual career choice.The authors organized this blueprint into three domains: care management, specific areas of content expertise, and understanding the role of primary care in the health care system. Within each domain, they described specific curriculum content, including longitudinality, generalism, central responsibility for managing care, therapeutic alliance/communication, approach to acute and chronic care, wellness and prevention, mental and behavioral health, systems improvement, interprofessional training, and population health, as well as competencies that all medical students should attain by graduation.The proposed curriculum incorporates important core features of doctoring, which are often affirmed by all disciplines but owned by none. The authors argue that primary care educators are natural stewards of this curriculum content and can ensure that it complements and strengthens all aspects of undergraduate medical education.

  9. Training practitioners to communicate effectively in cancer care: it is the relationship that counts.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Howard B; Frankel, Richard M

    2003-05-01

    The motivation to learn new skills that improve patient care comes from practical experience. Once motivated, trainees and practitioners alike require excellent content and process to modify approaches that improve outcomes. This paper defines content areas the authors believe are needed to improve communication between cancer patients and their practitioners. Perhaps more importantly, the educational process to achieve improved outcomes is discussed and the importance of the context in which that education occurs is stressed. The linkage between administrative behavior and practitioner behavior is described. Synchronicity between the expectations for practitioner practice and the practice environment is needed for practitioners to successfully incorporate the patient-centered practices patients are demanding. Finally, a research agenda is outlined that encourages evaluation of the model proposed.

  10. Involvement of Ayurvedic practitioners in oral health care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brar, Bhupinder S; Norman, Robert G; Dasanayake, Ananda P

    2012-10-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient medical science originating in India, also is practiced in the United States. The authors conducted a study primarily to explore the involvement of Ayurvedic practitioners in treating oral diseases. Eighty-five practitioners participated in this cross-sectional survey. The authors obtained self-reported data on demographics of the practitioners, the general and oral health conditions they treated, and the treatment modalities used. They performed descriptive statistical and logistic regression analyses by using statistical software. Participants predominantly were female and white or non-Hispanic, as well as part-time practitioners. Their educational backgrounds ranged from a 5½-year bachelor's degree in Ayurveda to short-term training. Of the 60 respondents who answered the question about treating oral diseases, 25 (42 percent) reported that they did so. Conditions treated were related to oral malodor, gingival or periodontal disease and toothache. Ayurvedic treatments administered for these conditions primarily were preventive in nature. Ayurvedic practitioners in the United States treat a variety of oral diseases by using predominantly preventive traditional care. Ayurvedic practitioners of Asian origin and those who practiced for a longer duration were more likely to report that they treated oral diseases. Larger, population-based studies are needed to understand more fully the current role of Ayurvedic practitioners in oral health care. Ayurvedic treatment modalities aimed at oral diseases need to be evaluated through rigorous randomized controlled trials for safety and effectiveness. Patients with limited or no access to oral health care might seek Ayurvedic treatment, and those who have access to conventional oral health care might wish to complement it with Ayurvedic treatment. Practitioners can incorporate preventive Ayurvedic treatments, which are based mainly on natural products, into overall preventive care regimens, if proven safe

  11. Effectiveness of dementia follow-up care by memory clinics or general practitioners: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Melis, René J F; Van Der Aa, Geert C H M; Golüke-Willemse, Gertie A M; De Leest, Benoit J M; Van Raak, Frank H J M; Schölzel-Dorenbos, Carla J M; Verheijen, Desiree C M; Verhey, Frans R J; Visser, Marieke C; Wolfs, Claire A; Adang, Eddy M M; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of post-diagnosis dementia treatment and coordination of care by memory clinics compared with general practitioners. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine memory clinics and 159 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Participants 175 patients with a new diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers. Interventions Usual care provided by memory clinic or general practitioner. Main outcome measures Caregiver rated quality of life of the patient measured with the quality of life in Alzheimer’s disease instrument and self perceived burden of the informal caregiver measured with the sense of competence questionnaire (intention to treat analysis). Results The quality of life of the patients in the memory clinic group was 0.5 (95% confidence interval −0.7 to 1.6) points higher than in the general practitioner group. Caregivers’ burden was 2.4 (−5.8 to 1.0) points lower in the memory clinic group than in the general practitioner group. Conclusion No evidence was found that memory clinics were more effective than general practitioners with regard to post-diagnosis treatment and coordination care for patients with dementia. Without further evidence on the effectiveness of these modalities, other arguments, such as cost minimisation, patients’ preferences, or regional health service planning, can determine which type of dementia care is offered. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00554047. PMID:22589500

  12. Primary health care is viable.

    PubMed

    Segall, M

    1987-01-01

    'Selective primary health care' and other recent vertical health strategies have been justified on the grounds that the broad primary health care (PHC) approach cannot be afforded by developing countries in the present constrained economic circumstances. This judgement is too sweeping. A simulated case example is presented, starting with baseline health expenditure data that are representative of the situation in many developing countries. It is assumed that real economic growth occurs and that government funding of health care is allowed to grow in parallel. Two annual growth rates are considered: 2 and 5 per cent. Two restrictive conditions are applied: none of the main health services is subjected to absolute cuts; and, additional funds from existing or new sources of finance are not considered. It is shown that, even with slow growth rates, substantial increases in the funding of priority (rural and PHC) services can be achieved if the growth in expenditures of lower-priority services is curtailed. Also, savings from improved health service efficiency can be channelled to priority services. The message is that the PHC approach is viable even with slow economic growth. What is required is the technical capacity to identify and plan resource flows in the health sector, and the political will to effect resource allocations according to PHC priorities. A strategic policy like PHC should not be 'adjusted' out of effective existence because of reversible economic problems. Rather, actions should be taken to reverse the adverse economic environment. International health-related agencies should continue to support countries to develop national health systems based on PHC, and should campaign for reforms in the world economy to create at least the minimum economic conditions necessary for PHC implementation.

  13. When Do Primary Care Physicians Retire? Implications for Workforce Projections.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Stephen M; Rayburn, William F; Liaw, Winston R

    2016-07-01

    Retirement of primary care physicians is a matter of increasing concern in light of physician shortages. The joint purposes of this investigation were to identify the ages when the majority of primary care physicians retire and to compare this with the retirement ages of practitioners in other specialties. This descriptive study was based on AMA Physician Masterfile data from the most recent 5 years (2010-2014). We also compared 2008 Masterfile data with data from the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System to calculate an adjustment for upward bias in retirement ages when using the Masterfile alone. The main analysis defined retirement as leaving clinical practice. The primary outcome was construction of a retirement curve. Secondary outcomes involved comparisons of retirement interquartile ranges (IQRs) by sex and practice location across specialties. The 2014 Masterfile included 77,987 clinically active primary care physicians between ages 55 and 80 years. The median age of retirement from clinical activity of all primary care physicians who retired in the period from 2010 to 2014 was 64.9 years, (IQR, 61.4-68.3); the median age of retirement from any activity was 66.1 years (IQR, 62.6-69.5). However measured, retirement ages were generally similar across primary care specialties. Females had a median retirement about 1 year earlier than males. There were no substantive differences in retirement ages between rural and urban primary care physicians. Primary care physicians in our data tended to retire in their mid-60s. Relatively small differences across sex, practice location, and time suggest that changes in the composition of the primary care workforce will not have a remarkable impact on overall retirement rates in the near future. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  14. The relationship between primary health care organization and quality of diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Spigt, Mark; Stefens, Caroline; Passage, Danique; Van Amelsvoort, Ludovic; Zwietering, Paul

    2009-12-01

    Despite many quality improvement trials, diabetes care often remains suboptimal. Few studies in a primary care setting have investigated the 'real life' association between organizational differences and quality of diabetes care. Observational study among ten health care centres with a total of 45 general practitioners (GP). We investigated health care organization and related this to quality of care in a total of 1849 electronic patient records. There were large differences among health care centres in the percentage of patients receiving optimal care (range: 8-67%). The odds to receive good quality of care was higher if the health care centre had a diabetes education program (OR: 4.3; CI: 3.4-5.4), when yearly medical check-ups were done by both the GP and nurse practitioner (NP) (OR: 5.5; CI: 4.2-7.3), planned that after the patient visited the NP the patient is discussed with the GP (OR: 1.8; CI: 1.6-2.0), and had structured follow-up measures for compliance to check-ups (OR: 0.7; CI: 0.5-0.9 and OR: 0.59; CI: 0.5-0.7 for respectively one and two active measures compared to three active measures). Also in real life, quality of care for type 2 diabetic patients is related to health care organization.

  15. Family practitioners' remuneration and patterns of care--does social class matter?

    PubMed

    Donner-Banzhoff, N; Kreienbrock, L; Katic, M; Baum, E

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine whether medical care patterns and/or outcomes for patients under a prepaid system differ from those under fee-for-service according to social class. An effect of this kind was suggested by the investigators reporting on the RAND Health Insurance Experiment (RAND HIE). We performed a cross-sectional study in family practice in Germany (fee-for-service) and the UK (predominantly capitation i.e. prospective payment). 778 attending patients aged 18 and above were included. Indicators of care, relating mainly to cardiovascular prevention, were collected by patient interview and questionnaire, doctor's questionnaire, analysis of records, and blood pressure (BP) measurement. Multiple linear and logistic regression models with these indicators as dependent variables were calculated to examine possible interactions between social class and system of payment. Social class as a main effect was related to diastolic BP, BP measurement frequency, and the number of non-pharmacological interventions to lower BP. The data on the process and the outcome of primary care from British and German family practice do not show any significant interaction between system of family practitioners' remuneration and patients' social class. We were unable to reproduce the effect postulated by the RAND HIE investigators.

  16. Pediatric Primary Care as a Component of Systems of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of…

  17. Pediatric Primary Care as a Component of Systems of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of…

  18. Quality indicators for primary care mental health services

    PubMed Central

    Shield, T; Campbell, S; Rogers, A; Worrall, A; Chew-Graham, C; Gask, L

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To identify a generic set of face valid quality indicators for primary care mental health services which reflect a multi-stakeholder perspective and can be used for facilitating quality improvement. Design: Modified two-round postal Delphi questionnaire. Setting: Geographical spread across Great Britain. Participants: One hundred and fifteen panellists representing 11 different stakeholder groups within primary care mental health services (clinical psychologist, health and social care commissioner, community psychiatric nurse, counsellor, general practitioner, practice nurse/district nurse/health visitor, psychiatrist, social worker, carer, patient and voluntary organisations). Main outcome measures: Face validity (median rating of 8 or 9 on a nine point scale with agreement by all panels) for assessing quality of care. Results: A maximum of 334 indicators were rated by panels in the second round; 26% were rated valid by all panels. These indicators were categorised into 21 aspects of care, 11 relating to general practices and 10 relating to health authorities or primary care groups/trusts. There was variation in the total number of indicators rated valid across the different panels. Overall, GPs rated the lowest number of indicators as valid (41%, n=138) and carers rated the highest number valid (91%, n=304). Conclusions: The quality indicators represent consensus among key stakeholder groups in defining quality of care within primary care mental health services. These indicators could provide a guide for primary care organisations embarking on quality improvement initiatives in mental health care when addressing national targets and standards relating to primary care set out in the National Service Framework for Mental Health for England. Although many of the indicators relate to parochial issues in UK service delivery, the methodology used in the development of the indicators could be applied in other settings to produce locally relevant indicators

  19. Attracting and retaining nurses in primary care.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Vari; Andrews, Sarah; Sidhu, Rajinder; Peacock, Richard

    2006-06-01

    There is increasing demand for nurses to work in primary care. This is driven in part by the need to retain current levels but also by the modernisation plans for primary care services, which require new roles for nurses, new ways of working and more nurses in primary care settings. While campaigns for increased recruitment of hospital nurses and doctors has been largely successful in recent years, primary care has still to see the impact. This article reports on a Department of Health (England) funded project that aimed to identify strategies and exemplars to assist primary care trusts (PCTs) and the workforce development confederations (WDCs) in strategic health authorities in attracting and retaining nurses to primary care at registered nurse level. It reports on the range of initiatives identified, the perceived benefits and challenges. It concludes by proposing a strategic model for planning for the recruitment and retention of primary care nurses.

  20. General practitioners' use and experiences of palliative care services: a survey in south east England

    PubMed Central

    Bajwah, Sabrina; Higginson, Irene J

    2008-01-01

    Background The role of the General Practitioner (GP) is central to community palliative care. Good liaison between the different professionals involved in a patient's care is extremely important in palliative care patients. In cases where GPs have previously been dissatisfied with palliative services, this may be seen as a barrier to referral when caring for other patients. The aim of this survey is to investigate the use and previous experiences of GPs of two palliative care services, with particular emphasis on barriers to referral and to explore issues surrounding the GP's role in caring for palliative patients. Methods Design: Descriptive postal survey of use and experience of palliative care services with particular emphasis on barriers to referral. Setting: One Primary Care Trust (PCT), south London, England, population 298,500. Subjects: 180 GPs in the PCT, which is served by two hospice services (A&B). Results An overall questionnaire response rate of 77% (138) was obtained, with 69% (124) used in analysis. Over 90% of GPs were satisfied with the palliative care services over the preceding two years. Two areas of possible improvement emerged; communication and prescribing practices. GPs identified some patients that they had not referred, most commonly when patients or carers were reluctant to accept help, or when other support was deemed sufficient. Over half of the GPs felt there were areas where improvement could be made; with clarification of the rules and responsibilities of the multi disciplinary team being the most common. The majority of GPs were working, and want to work with, the specialist services as part of an extended team. However, a greater number of GPs want to hand over care to the specialist services than are currently doing so. Conclusion A large number of GPs were happy with the service provision of the palliative care services in this area. They suggested that 3 out of 4 terminally ill patients needed specialist input. Views of

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' standard of care: responsibilities to patients and parents.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Joan; Harrison, Christine; Asadi, Leyla; Cohen, Michael H; Vohra, Sunita

    2011-11-01

    In this article we explain (1) the standard of care that health care providers must meet and (2) how these principles apply to complementary and alternative medicine practitioners. The scenario describes a 14-year-old boy who is experiencing back pain and whose chiropractor performed spinal manipulation but did not recognize or take steps to rule out serious underlying disease-in this case, testicular cancer--either initially or when the patient's condition continued to deteriorate despite treatment. We use chiropractic care for a patient with a sore back as an example, because back pain is such a common problem and chiropracty is a common treatment chosen by both adult and pediatric patients. The scenario illustrates the responsibilities that complementary and alternative medicine practitioners owe patients/parents, the potential for liability when deficient care harms patients, and the importance of ample formal pediatric training for practitioners who treat pediatric patients.

  2. Demystifying the role of nurse practitioners in hospice: nurse practitioners as an integral part of the hospice plan of care.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Beginning January 1, 2011, as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act healthcare-reform law that was signed in March 2010, Medicare requires that all patients entering their third or later hospice benefit period must have a face-to-face encounter with a hospice physician or nurse practitioner (NP) to validate hospice eligibility. Medicare has allowed NPs to function as a patient's hospice attending physician since 2003, but they may not certify or recertify a patient's terminal illness or function in the role of the hospice physician in the hospice interdisciplinary team. The allowance of Medicare for the NP to complete the hospice face-to-face encounter allows a greater role for a NP in the realm of hospice care.

  3. How to strengthen primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratyush

    2016-01-01

    Realization of health care as primary objective is necessary to strengthen primary health care (PHC). There is a need to build financial viable and sustainable PHC based on rational principles to fulfill the goals of providing quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis and also ensuring fiscal prudence. Health-care leadership, innovations in primary care, family medicine specialists, and effective and accountable health governance are the key steps toward our goal. PMID:28217580

  4. Geriatric Foot Care: A Model Educational Program for Mid-Level Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Patricia K.; Krissak, Ruth; Caruso, Frank; Teasdall, Robert

    2002-01-01

    An educational program on geriatric foot care was completed by 59 nurse practitioners, 12 physicians' assistants, and 1 physician. The 3 1/2 day program included interactive sessions, observation, and hands-on patient care. Posttest results and 6-month follow-up showed significant knowledge increases and incorporation of learning into practice.…

  5. Primary Palliative Care for the General Internist: Integrating Goals of Care Discussions into the Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ahia, Chad L.; Blais, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary palliative care consists of the palliative care competencies required of all primary care clinicians. Included in these competencies is the ability to assist patients and their families in establishing appropriate goals of care. Goals of care help patients and their families understand the patient's illness and its trajectory and facilitate medical care decisions consistent with the patient's values and goals. General internists and family medicine physicians in primary care are central to getting patients to articulate their goals of care and to have these documented in the medical record. Case Report Here we present the case of a 71-year-old male patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, congestive heart failure, and newly diagnosed Alzheimer dementia to model pertinent end-of-life care communication and discuss practical tips on how to incorporate it into practice. Conclusion General internists and family medicine practitioners in primary care are central to eliciting patients' goals of care and achieving optimal end-of-life outcomes for their patients. PMID:25598737

  6. Primary palliative care for the general internist: integrating goals of care discussions into the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Ahia, Chad L; Blais, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Primary palliative care consists of the palliative care competencies required of all primary care clinicians. Included in these competencies is the ability to assist patients and their families in establishing appropriate goals of care. Goals of care help patients and their families understand the patient's illness and its trajectory and facilitate medical care decisions consistent with the patient's values and goals. General internists and family medicine physicians in primary care are central to getting patients to articulate their goals of care and to have these documented in the medical record. Here we present the case of a 71-year-old male patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, congestive heart failure, and newly diagnosed Alzheimer dementia to model pertinent end-of-life care communication and discuss practical tips on how to incorporate it into practice. General internists and family medicine practitioners in primary care are central to eliciting patients' goals of care and achieving optimal end-of-life outcomes for their patients.

  7. Primary Care Providers' HIV Prevention Practices Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tracy; Teaster, Pamela B.; Thornton, Alice; Watkins, John F.; Alexander, Linda; Zanjani, Faika

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore primary care providers' HIV prevention practices for older adults. Primary care providers' perceptions and awareness were explored to understand factors that affect their provision of HIV prevention materials and HIV screening for older adults. Design and Method Data were collected through 24 semistructured interviews with primary care providers (i.e., physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) who see patients older than 50 years. Results Results reveal facilitators and barriers of HIV prevention for older adults among primary care providers and understanding of providers' HIV prevention practices and behaviors. Individual, patient, institutional, and societal factors influenced HIV prevention practices among participants, for example, provider training and work experience, lack of time, discomfort in discussing HIV/AIDS with older adults, stigma, and ageism were contributing factors. Furthermore, factors specific to primary and secondary HIV prevention were identified, for instance, the presence of sexually transmitted infections influenced providers' secondary prevention practices. Implications HIV disease, while preventable, is increasing among older adults. These findings inform future research and interventions aimed at increasing HIV prevention practices in primary care settings for patients older than 50. PMID:25736425

  8. General Practitioners' and patients' perceptions towards stratified care: a theory informed investigation.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Benjamin; Bartlam, Bernadette; Foster, Nadine E; Hill, Jonathan C; Cooper, Vince; Protheroe, Joanne

    2016-08-31

    Stratified primary care involves changing General Practitioners' (GPs) clinical behaviour in treating patients, away from the current stepped care approach to instead identifying early treatment options that are matched to patients' risk of persistent disabling pain. This article explores the perspectives of UK-ba