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Sample records for primary care provider

  1. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  2. Midwives as primary care providers for women.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Barger, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Midwives certified by the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB) are prepared to provide primary care to women from menarche across the lifespan and to well newborns to 28 days using consultation, collaboration, and referral to other providers as needed. The scope of midwifery in the United States did not always include primary care for women, although imprecise definitions of primary care make this difficult to study. The expansion of the scope of practice occurred in response to population needs and research on nurse-midwifery practice patterns. The scope of practice of midwifery is tied to educational standards through the regulation and licensure at the state level. Although the current scope of practice includes primary care for women, many certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives are unable to practice to the full extent of their education due to state-level licensure restrictions. We discuss the addition of primary care to midwifery and the current state of AMCB-certified midwives as primary care providers for women.

  3. Effective communication with primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication requires direct interaction between the hospitalist and the primary care provider using a standardized method of information exchange with the opportunity to ask questions and assign accountability for follow-up roles. The discharge summary is part of the process but does not provide the important aspects of handoff, such as closed loop communication and role assignments. Hospital discharge is a significant safety risk for patients, with more than half of discharged patients experiencing at least one error. Hospitalist and primary care providers need to collaborate to develop a standardized system to communicate about shared patients that meets handoff requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurologists as primary palliative care providers

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Maisha T.; Holloway, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of review: To present current knowledge and recommendations regarding communication tasks and practice approaches for neurologists as they practice primary palliative care, including discussing serious news, managing symptoms, aligning treatment with patient preferences, introducing hospice/terminal care, and using the multiprofessional approach. Recent findings: Neurologists receive little formal palliative care training yet often need to discuss prognosis in serious illness, manage intractable symptoms in chronic progressive disease, and alleviate suffering for patients and their families. Because patients with neurologic disorders often have major cognitive impairment, physical impairment, or both, with an uncertain prognosis, their palliative care needs are particularly challenging and they remain largely uncharacterized and often unmanaged. Summary: We provide an overview of neuropalliative care as a fundamental skill set for all neurologists. PMID:26918202

  5. Primary Care Providers and a System Problem

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Sullivan, Donald; Ganzini, Linda; Slatore, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning is implemented, an increasing number of people will be diagnosed with pulmonary nodules. Primary care clinicians care for the vast majority of these patients, but their experiences with communication and managing distress in this population are not well understood. METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews of 15 primary care providers (PCPs) at two academic medical centers who care for patients with pulmonary nodules. We used qualitative description analysis, focusing on clinicians’ information exchange and other communication behaviors. RESULTS: Most PCPs believed they had inadequate information to counsel patients regarding lung nodules, although this information is desired. PCPs were concerned patients could “fall through the cracks” but did not have access to a reliable system to ensure follow-up adherence. They were limited by time, knowledge, and resources in providing the preferred level of care. Most PCPs did not discuss the specific risk a nodule was lung cancer, in part because they did not have ready access to this information. PCPs believed most patients did not have substantial distress as a result of nodule detection. Most PCPs did not include patients when making decisions about the follow-up plan. CONCLUSIONS: PCPs often lack systemic resources to optimize patient-centered approaches when discussing incidental pulmonary nodules with patients. With the advent of lung cancer screening, pulmonologists can assist primary care colleagues by providing accurate information to counsel patients and assisting in managing conversations about the risk of cancer. Pulmonologists should support efforts to implement reliable systems to ensure adherence to follow-up. PMID:25790082

  6. Genetic education for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Rideout, Andrea L.; Wilson, Brenda J.; Allanson, Judith MD; Blaine, Sean M.; Esplen, Mary Jane; Farrell, Sandra A.; Graham, Gail E.; MacKenzie, Jennifer; Meschino, Wendy; Miller, Fiona; Prakash, Preeti; Shuman, Cheryl; Summers, Anne; Taylor, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To increase primary care providers’ awareness and use of genetic services; increase their knowledge of genetic issues; increase their confidence in core genetic competencies; change their attitudes toward genetic testing for hereditary diseases; and increase their confidence as primary care genetic resources. DESIGN Participants completed a workshop and 3 questionnaires: a baseline questionnaire, a survey that provided immediate feedback on the workshop itself, and a follow-up questionnaire 6 months later. SETTING Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Primary care providers suggested by deans of nursing, midwifery, family medicine, and obstetric programs, as well as coordinators of nurse practitioner programs, in Ontario and by the Ontario College of Family Physicians. INTERVENTION A complex educational intervention was developed, including an interactive workshop and PowerPoint educational modules on genetic topics for participants’ use (available at www.mtsinai.on.ca/FamMedGen/). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Awareness and use of genetic services, knowledge of genetics, confidence in core clinical genetic skills, attitudes toward genetic testing, and teaching activities related to genetics. RESULTS The workshop was attended by 29 participants; of those, 21 completed the baseline questionnaire and the 6-month follow-up questionnaire. There was no significant change found in awareness or reported use of genetic services. There was significant improvement in self-assessed knowledge of (P = .001) and confidence in (P = .005) skills related to adult-onset genetic disorders. There were significant increases in confidence in many core genetic competencies, including assessing risk of hereditary disorders (P = .033), deciding who should be offered referral for genetic counseling (P = .003), discussing prenatal testing options (P = .034), discussing benefits, risks, and limitations of genetic testing (P = .033), and describing what to expect at a genetic counseling session

  7. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  8. Fibromyalgia: management strategies for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L M; Gebke, K B; Choy, E H S

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic disorder defined by widespread pain, often accompanied by fatigue and sleep disturbance, affects up to one in 20 patients in primary care. Although most patients with FM are managed in primary care, diagnosis and treatment continue to present a challenge, and patients are often referred to specialists. Furthermore, the lack of a clear patient pathway often results in patients being passed from specialist to specialist, exhaustive investigations, prescription of multiple drugs to treat different symptoms, delays in diagnosis, increased disability and increased healthcare resource utilisation. We will discuss the current and evolving understanding of FM, and recommend improvements in the management and treatment of FM, highlighting the role of the primary care physician, and the place of the medical home in FM management. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of FM by searching PubMed and references from relevant articles, and selected articles on the basis of quality, relevance to the illness and importance in illustrating current management pathways and the potential for future improvements. The implementation of a framework for chronic pain management in primary care would limit unnecessary, time-consuming, and costly tests, reduce diagnostic delay and improve patient outcomes. The patient-centred medical home (PCMH), a management framework that has been successfully implemented in other chronic diseases, might improve the care of patients with FM in primary care, by bringing together a team of professionals with a range of skills and training. Although there remain several barriers to overcome, implementation of a PCMH would allow patients with FM, like those with other chronic conditions, to be successfully managed in the primary care setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Organization of primary care practice for providing energy balance care.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Clauser, Steven B; Liu, Benmei; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Huang, Terry T-K; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2014-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) may not adequately counsel or monitor patients regarding diet, physical activity, and weight control (i.e., provide energy balance care). We assessed the organization of PCPs' practices for providing this care. The study design was a nationally representative survey conducted in 2008. The study setting was U.S. primary care practices. A total of 1740 PCPs completed two sequential questionnaires (response rate, 55.5%). The study measured PCPs' reports of practice resources, and the frequency of body mass index assessment, counseling, referral for further evaluation/management, and monitoring of patients for energy balance care. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression modeling were used. More than 80% of PCPs reported having information resources on diet, physical activity, or weight control available in waiting/exam rooms, but fewer billed (45%), used reminder systems (<30%), or received incentive payments (3%) for energy balance care. A total of 26% reported regularly assessing body mass index and always/often providing counseling as well as tracking patients for progress related to energy balance. In multivariate analyses, PCPs in practices with full electronic health records or those that bill for energy balance care provided this care more often and more comprehensively. There were strong specialty differences, with pediatricians more likely (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.51) and obstetrician/gynecologists less likely (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.44) than others to provide energy balance care. PCPs' practices are not well organized for providing energy balance care. Further research is needed to understand PCP care-related specialty differences.

  10. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  11. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  12. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  13. Collaborative communication between psychologists and primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Philip

    2009-03-01

    Psychologists frequently collaborate in the care of patients managed in primary care. Communication with a patient's primary care team is important to ensure coordination and continuity of care. The communication is far from seamless. Although The Health Information Privacy and Portability Act (HIPPA) is designed to promote sharing of clinical information while protecting patient confidentiality, unique problems arise when mental health records are included. Mental health records are subject to different regulations to protect the patient's confidentiality. Thus, what is communicated and how it will be accomplished are challenges. Further, psychologists and primary care providers often view documentation differently, resulting in different styles of documenting that may also impede coordinated care. Increasingly, health care systems are moving toward electronic medical records, creating greater opportunities for an integrated record. Improved communication through the record can keep other providers abreast of the mental health care being provided as well as suggestions they can use to reinforce the mental health care treatment plan.

  14. Nurse practitioner workforce: a substantial supply of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Lucero, Robert; Rauch, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    For about 5 decades, nurse practitioners (NPs) have been utilized to deliver primary care, traditionally in underserved areas or to vulnerable populations. However, over the years, this workforce has experienced a steady growth and has expanded its reach to provide primary care in diverse settings. An additional 32 million patients will have access to primary care with full implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It is unlikely that the scarce supply of primary care physicians will be able to properly meet the demand and the health care needs of the nation. NPs face challenges but practice, policy, and research recommendations for better utilizing NPs in primary care can mediate the workforce shortages and meet the demand for care.

  15. Primary Care Providers' HIV Prevention Practices Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tracy; Teaster, Pamela B.; Thornton, Alice; Watkins, John F.; Alexander, Linda; Zanjani, Faika

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore primary care providers' HIV prevention practices for older adults. Primary care providers' perceptions and awareness were explored to understand factors that affect their provision of HIV prevention materials and HIV screening for older adults. Design and Method Data were collected through 24 semistructured interviews with primary care providers (i.e., physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) who see patients older than 50 years. Results Results reveal facilitators and barriers of HIV prevention for older adults among primary care providers and understanding of providers' HIV prevention practices and behaviors. Individual, patient, institutional, and societal factors influenced HIV prevention practices among participants, for example, provider training and work experience, lack of time, discomfort in discussing HIV/AIDS with older adults, stigma, and ageism were contributing factors. Furthermore, factors specific to primary and secondary HIV prevention were identified, for instance, the presence of sexually transmitted infections influenced providers' secondary prevention practices. Implications HIV disease, while preventable, is increasing among older adults. These findings inform future research and interventions aimed at increasing HIV prevention practices in primary care settings for patients older than 50. PMID:25736425

  16. Barriers and facilitators of adolescent behavioral health in primary care: Perceptions of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Bitar, George W; Springer, Paul; Gee, Robert; Graff, Chad; Schydlower, Manuel

    2009-12-01

    Several major policy reports describe the central role of primary care in improving the delivery of behavioral health care services to children and adolescents. Although primary care providers are uniquely positioned to provide these services, numerous obstacles hinder the integration of these services, including time, clinic management and organization issues, training, and resources. Although many of these obstacles have been described in the literature, few studies have investigated these issues from the first-person perspective of front-line providers. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to provide an in-depth description of primary care providers' attitudes and perceptions of adolescent behavioral health care across a diversity of primary care settings (i.e., Federally Qualified Health Center [FQHC], FQHC-Look Alike, school-based, military). Sixteen focus groups were conducted at 5 primary care clinics. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the focus group data. Obstacles to integration are presented as well as strategies to overcome these challenges, using training and education, working groups, and community collaboratives.

  17. Chinese primary care providers and motivating factors on performance.

    PubMed

    Hung, Li-Mei; Shi, Leiyu; Wang, Haipeng; Nie, Xiaoyu; Meng, Qingyue

    2013-10-01

    China launched its new health care reform in 2009. One of its goals is to improve primary care system and strengthen primary care workforce. Although it has been studied internationally, motivating factors for primary care workforce have not been examined in China. To provide an overview of major performance motivating factors for primary care providers (PCPs) in China and examine associations between these factors and individual and practice setting characteristics. Data for the study were from the 2011 China Primary Care Workforce Survey that provides the most current assessment of community-based PCPs. Outcome measures were scores indicating performance improvement due to 11 factors. Covariates representing personal and practice characteristics included age, gender, education, location, types of providers and specialties. Outcomes were compared by PCP category and urban/rural setting. Associations were assessed using logistic regressions. The most important motivating factors for PCPs to improve performance were professional development, training opportunities, living environment, benefits, working conditions and income. There were greater needs for improvement in rural than urban settings, especially in living environment. Types of PCPs were associated with needs for improvement in different factors. There were more needs from nurses and village doctors. A new and comprehensive incentive mechanism could be designed and implemented in China, which (i) focuses on more professional development opportunities, enhanced training programs and better compensation and benefits and (ii) targets PCPs practicing in different settings.

  18. The role of primary care providers in managing falls.

    PubMed

    Demons, Jamehl L; Duncan, Pamela W

    2014-01-01

    Falls threaten the ability of older adults to live independently in the community. Fortunately, national and state organizations have created tools that allow primary care providers to easily assess fall risk, and small changes in practice patterns can provide patients with the resources necessary to prevent falls, thus helping to reverse a costly, deadly epidemic.

  19. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  20. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  1. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  2. Primary Care Providers' Views regarding Assessing and Treating Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ryan D.; Rudd, M. David; Bryan, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) usually do not explore patient suicidality during routine visits. Factors that predict PCP attitudes toward the assessment and treatment of suicidality were examined via an online survey of 195 practicing PCPs affiliated with medical schools in the United States. PCPs who perceived themselves as competent to work with…

  3. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  4. Adequately Addressing Pediatric Obesity: Challenges Faced by Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Shreve, Marilou; Scott, Allison; Vowell Johnson, Kelly

    2017-07-01

    To assess the challenges primary care providers encounter when providing counseling for pediatric patients identified as obese. A survey assessed the current challenges and barriers to the screening and treatment of pediatric obesity for providers in northwest Arkansas who provide care to families. The survey consisted of 15 Likert scale questions and 4 open-ended questions. Time, resources, comfort, and cultural issues were reported by providers as the biggest barriers in screening and the treatment of pediatric obesity. All providers reported lack of time as a barrier to providing the care needed for obese children. Cultural barriers of both the provider and client were identified as factors, which negatively affect the care and treatment of obese children. Primary care providers continue to experience challenges when addressing pediatric obesity. In this study, a lack of adequate time to address obesity was identified as the most significant current barrier and may likely be tied to physician resources. Although reimbursement for obesity is increasing, the level of reimbursement does not support the time or the resources needed to treat patients. Many providers reported their patients' cultural view of obesity influenced how they counsel their patients. Increasing providers' knowledge concerning differences in how weight is viewed or valued may assist them in the assessment and care of obese pediatric patients. The challenges identified in previous research continue to limit providers when addressing obesity. Although progress has been made regarding knowledge of guidelines, continuing effort is needed to tackle the remaining challenges. This will allow for earlier identification and intervention, resulting in improved outcomes in pediatric obesity.

  5. Health Care Disparities and Diabetes Care: Practical Considerations for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard O.; Beech, Bettina M.; Miller, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    IN BRIEF Disparities in diabetes care are prevalent in the United States. This article provides an overview of these disparities and discusses both potential causes and efforts to address them to date. The authors focus the discussion on aspects relevant to the patient-provider dyad and provide practical considerations for the primary care provider’s role in helping to diminish and eliminate disparities in diabetes care. PMID:21289869

  6. Providing primary health care with non-physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C

    1984-04-01

    The definition of primary health care is basically the same, but the wide variety of concepts as to the form and type of worker required is largely due to variations in economic, demographic, socio-cultural and political factors. Whatever form it takes, in many parts of the developing world, it is increasingly clear that primary health care must be provided by non-physicians. The reasons for this trend are compelling, yet it is surprisingly opposed by the medical profession in many a developing country. Nonetheless, numerous field trials are being conducted in a variety of situations in several countries around the world. Non-physician primary health care workers vary from medical assistants and nurse practitioners to aide-level workers called village mobilizers, village volunteers, village aides and a variety of other names. The functions, limitations and training of such workers will need to be defined, so that an optimal combination of skills, knowledge and attitudes best suited to produce the desired effect on local health problems may be attained. The supervision of such workers by the physician and other health professionals will need to be developed in the spirit of the health team. An example of the use of non-physicians in providing primary health care in Sarawak is outlined.

  7. Trends in diabetes treatment patterns among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Decker, Sandra L; Burt, Catharine W; Sisk, Jane E

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, logit models tested for trends in the probability that visits by adult diabetes patients to their primary care providers included recommended treatment measures, such as a prescription for an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or an angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB), blood pressure measurement, and diet/nutrition or exercise counseling. Results indicated that the probability that visits included prescription of an ACE or ARB and blood pressure measurement increased significantly over the 1997-2005 period, while the probability that visits documented provision of exercise counseling rose since 2001.

  8. Educating primary care providers about HIV disease: multidisciplinary interactive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Macher, A; Goosby, E; Barker, L; Volberding, P; Goldschmidt, R; Balano, K B; Williams, A; Hoenig, L; Gould, B; Daniels, E

    1994-01-01

    As HIV-related prophylactic and therapeutic research findings continue to evolve, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the Public Health Service has created multidisciplinary mechanisms to disseminate new treatment options and educate primary care providers at rural and urban sites throughout our nation's health care system. HRSA has implemented (a) the International State-of-the-Art HIV Clinical Conference Call Series, (b) the national network of AIDS Education and Training Centers, (c) the nationwide HIV Telephone Consultation Service, and (d) the Clinical Issues Subcommittee of the HRSA AIDS Advisory Committee. These collaborative and comprehensive efforts at HIV information dissemination target physicians, nurses, physician assistants, dentists, clinical pharmacists, mental health care providers, case managers, and allied health professionals. The sites where they provide care include public health clinics; county, State and Federal correctional facilities; private practice offices; community and academic hospitals; military and Veterans Administration facilities; hemophilia centers; schools of medicine, nursing, and dentistry; departments of health; chronic care facilities; visiting nurse and home care agencies; health maintenance organizations; and Indian Health Service clinics and hospitals.

  9. A Framework for Fibromyalgia Management for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Lesley M.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Dunegan, L. Jean; Turk, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder commonly associated with comorbid symptoms, including fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. As in the management of other chronic medical disorders, the approach for fibromyalgia management follows core principles of comprehensive assessment, education, goal setting, multimodal treatment including pharmacological (eg, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran) and nonpharmacological therapies (eg, physical activity, behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, education), and regular education and monitoring of treatment response and progress. Based on these core management principles, this review presents a framework for primary care providers through which they can develop a patient-centered treatment program for patients with fibromyalgia. This proactive and systematic treatment approach encourages ongoing education and patient self-management and is designed for use in the primary care setting. PMID:22560527

  10. A framework for fibromyalgia management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J; Dunegan, L Jean; Turk, Dennis C

    2012-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder commonly associated with comorbid symptoms, including fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. As in the management of other chronic medical disorders, the approach for fibromyalgia management follows core principles of comprehensive assessment, education, goal setting, multimodal treatment including pharmacological (eg, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran) and nonpharmacological therapies (eg, physical activity, behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, education), and regular education and monitoring of treatment response and progress. Based on these core management principles, this review presents a framework for primary care providers through which they can develop a patient-centered treatment program for patients with fibromyalgia. This proactive and systematic treatment approach encourages ongoing education and patient self-management and is designed for use in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A need for otolaryngology education among primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Amanda; Sardesai, Maya G.; Meyer, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Otolaryngic disorders are very common in primary care, comprising 20–50% of presenting complaints to a primary care provider. There is limited otolaryngology training in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education for primary care. Continuing medical education may be the next opportunity to train our primary care providers (PCPs). The objective of this study was to assess the otolaryngology knowledge of a group of PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. Methods PCPs enrolled in an otolaryngology update course completed a web-based anonymous survey on demographics and a pre-course knowledge test. This test was composed of 12 multiple choice questions with five options each. At the end of the course, they were asked to evaluate the usefulness of the course for their clinical practice. Results Thirty seven (74%) PCPs completed the survey. Mean knowledge test score out of a maximum score of 12 was 4.0±1.7 (33.3±14.0%). Sorted by area of specialty, the mean scores out of a maximum score of 12 were: family medicine 4.6±2.1 (38.3±17.3%), pediatric medicine 4.2±0.8 (35.0±7.0%), other (e.g., dentistry, emergency medicine) 4.2±2.0 (34.6±17.0%), and adult medicine 3.9±2.1 (32.3±17.5%). Ninety one percent of respondents would attend the course again. Conclusion There is a low level of otolaryngology knowledge among PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. There is a need for otolaryngology education among PCPs. PMID:22754276

  12. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  13. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  14. Use of placebo interventions among Swiss primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Fässler, Margrit; Gnädinger, Markus; Rosemann, Thomas; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2009-08-10

    Placebo interventions can have meaningful effects for patients. However, little is known about the circumstances of their use in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate to what extent and in which way Swiss primary care providers use placebo interventions. Furthermore we explored their ideas about the ethical and legal issues involved. 599 questionnaires were sent to general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians in private practice in the Canton of Zurich in Switzerland. To allow for subgroup analysis GPs in urban, suburban, and rural areas as well as paediatricians were selected in an even ratio. 233 questionnaires were completed (response rate 47%). 28% of participants reported that they never used placebo interventions. More participants used impure placebos therapeutically than pure placebos (57% versus 17%, McNemar's chi(2) = 78, p < 0.001). There is not one clear main reason for placebo prescription. Placebo use was communicated to patients mostly as being "a drug or a therapy" (64%). The most frequently chosen ethical premise was that they "can be used as long as the physician and the patient work together in partnership" (60% for pure and 75% for impure placebos, McNemar's chi(2) = 12, p < 0.001). A considerable number of participants (11-38%) were indecisive about statements regarding the ethical and legal legitimacy of using placebos. The data obtained from Swiss primary care providers reflect a broad variety of views about placebo interventions as well as a widespread uncertainty regarding their legitimacy. Primary care providers seem to preferentially use impure as compared to pure placebos in their daily practice. An intense debate is required on appropriate standards regarding the clinical use of placebo interventions among medical professionals.

  15. Use of placebo interventions among Swiss primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Fässler, Margrit; Gnädinger, Markus; Rosemann, Thomas; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2009-01-01

    Background Placebo interventions can have meaningful effects for patients. However, little is known about the circumstances of their use in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate to what extent and in which way Swiss primary care providers use placebo interventions. Furthermore we explored their ideas about the ethical and legal issues involved. Methods 599 questionnaires were sent to general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians in private practice in the Canton of Zurich in Switzerland. To allow for subgroup analysis GPs in urban, suburban, and rural areas as well as paediatricians were selected in an even ratio. Results 233 questionnaires were completed (response rate 47%). 28% of participants reported that they never used placebo interventions. More participants used impure placebos therapeutically than pure placebos (57% versus 17%, McNemar's χ2 = 78, p < 0.001). There is not one clear main reason for placebo prescription. Placebo use was communicated to patients mostly as being "a drug or a therapy" (64%). The most frequently chosen ethical premise was that they "can be used as long as the physician and the patient work together in partnership" (60% for pure and 75% for impure placebos, McNemar's χ2 = 12, p < 0.001). A considerable number of participants (11–38%) were indecisive about statements regarding the ethical and legal legitimacy of using placebos. Conclusion The data obtained from Swiss primary care providers reflect a broad variety of views about placebo interventions as well as a widespread uncertainty regarding their legitimacy. Primary care providers seem to preferentially use impure as compared to pure placebos in their daily practice. An intense debate is required on appropriate standards regarding the clinical use of placebo interventions among medical professionals. PMID:19664267

  16. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    PubMed

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  17. Providing whole-person care: integrating behavioral health into primary care.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jan Sweet

    2015-01-01

    Integrated primary care in a patient-centered medical home is the best way to invite patients to engage in better self-care, to move from provider-based care to team-based care, and to address whole-person needs. However, primary care-whether rural or urban, public or private-cannot become the default mental health system for North Carolinians with severe mental illness.

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  19. Consumer satisfaction with primary care provider choice and associated trust

    PubMed Central

    Chu-Weininger, Ming Ying L; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2006-01-01

    Background Development of managed care, characterized by limited provider choice, is believed to undermine trust. Provider choice has been identified as strongly associated with physician trust. Stakeholders in a competitive healthcare market have competing agendas related to choice. The purpose of this study is to analyze variables associated with consumer's satisfaction that they have enough choice when selecting their primary care provider (PCP), and to analyze the importance of these variables on provider trust. Methods A 1999 randomized national cross-sectional telephone survey conducted of United States residential households, who had a telephone, had seen a medical professional at least twice in the past two years, and aged ≥ 20 years was selected for secondary data analyses. Among 1,117 households interviewed, 564 were selected as the final sample. Subjects responded to a core set of questions related to provider trust, and a subset of questions related to trust in the insurer. A previously developed conceptual framework was adopted. Linear and logistic regressions were performed based on this framework. Results Results affirmed 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' was significantly (p < .001) associated with provider trust. 'PCP's care being extremely effective' was strongly associated with 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' and 'provider trust'. Having sought a second opinion(s) was associated with lower trust. 'Spoke to the PCP outside the medical office,' 'satisfaction with the insurer' and 'insurer charges less if PCP within network' were all variables associated with 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' (all p < .05). Conclusion This study confirmed the association of 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' with provider trust. Results affirmed 'enough PCP choice' was a strong predictor of provider trust. 'Second opinion on PCP' may indicate distrust in the provider. Data such as 'trust in providers in general' and 'the role of

  20. Primary care providers' willingness to see unaccompanied adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bravender, Terrill; Price, C Nicole; English, Abigail

    2004-01-01

    To describe primary care practitioners' office policies and willingness to provide medical care for unaccompanied adolescents aged 11-17 years. A unique 32-item survey was mailed in June and July, 2001 to 1979 office-based pediatricians and family practitioners randomly selected from the American Medical Association's physician database. The survey included questions regarding demographic information, number of adolescents seen in the practice, office policies regarding adolescents alone in the clinic, and 5-point Likert scales regarding their willingness to see patients in various situations, as well as to see patients in 12 brief clinical scenarios. Predictors of the willingness to see adolescents alone were identified and entered into binomial logistic regression models. Specific policies included on the surveys were coded into groups. Survey responses (n = 710) represented a 36% response rate. This sample included 288 family practitioners and 368 pediatricians; 43.3% of physicians reported having a specific policy regarding seeing adolescents without their parents present. Family practitioners were more likely than pediatricians to report having such a policy (51.3% vs. 38.2%, p =.001,), yet pediatricians reported a higher percentage of adolescents in their practices than family practitioners (22.6% vs. 12.4%, p <.0005). Not having a policy was an independent predictor of "often" or "always" seeing an adolescent alone for routine health maintenance (OR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.91-4.24) and urgent care visits (OR = 3.01, 95% CI 1.90-4.77). Specific policies varied, and many physicians assessed each case on an individual basis. Specific policies are associated with a decreased willingness of physicians to see adolescents who are unaccompanied by a parent. Carefully developed clinic policies that are consistent with legal guidelines should be implemented in order to maximize adolescents' abilities to access care.

  1. PAIR UP for primary care excellence: perspectives from a primary healthcare provider in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Singapore is facing an increasing noncommunicable disease burden due to its ageing population. Singapore’s primary healthcare services, provided by both polyclinic physicians and private general practitioners, are available to the public at differential fees for service. The resultant disproportionate patient loads lead to dissatisfaction for both healthcare providers and consumers. This article describes the ‘PAIR UP’ approach as a potential endeavour to facilitate primary care physicians (PCPs) in public and private sectors to collaborate to deliver enhanced primary care in Singapore. PAIR UP is an acronym referring to Policy, Academic development, Integration of healthcare information system, Research in primary care, Utility and safety evaluation, and Practice transformation. The current healthcare landscape is favourable to test out this multipronged approach. PCPs in both sectors can ride on it and work together synergistically to provide quality primary care in Singapore. PMID:24664374

  2. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  3. Opinion & Special Articles: neurologist: specialized primary care provider vs consultant.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Schwindt, Mitchel; Alshareef, Bashar N; Tepper, Deborah; Mays, Maryann

    2013-07-02

    As per the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) current proposal, many specialties including neurology are not eligible for the increase in Medicare reimbursements that will be allocated to other cognitive specialties, such as the 7% increase for family physicians, 5% for internists, and 4% for geriatric specialists.(1,2) Other specialties such as anesthesiology, radiology, and cardiology are scheduled for a 3%-4% decrease in reimbursement in order to pay for the increases outlined above. Current estimates show that neurologists provide a significant amount of primary care for complex patients and yet these services are not eligible for increased payments. It is estimated that up to 60% of neurologists' services to these complex patients are ineligible for increased payments.(3.)

  4. Primary Care Provider Perspectives on Electronic Medication Refill History.

    PubMed

    Comer, Dominique; Mearns, Elizabeth; Olivere, Lindsey; Elliott, Daniel J

    Improvements in health information technology have made aggregate multipayer pharmacy claims data increasingly available through the electronic health record (EHR). The objective of this study was to assess the current awareness, utilization, and impact of pharmacy history data available in the EHR on primary care provider (PCP) decision making. A 14-question survey was distributed to all PCPs in a large medical practice. Of the 55/72 responding PCPs, 47 (85.5%) were aware of the EHR medication history function, and 36 (65.5%) had used it previously. Respondents indicated the medication history could be most useful when considering prescribing a narcotic (33/36, 92%) and when addressing nonadherence concerns (28/35, 80%). Barriers included delays in data loading and the time pressures of clinical practice. Access to aggregate multipayer pharmacy history data has the potential to affect medication reconciliation, yet future implementation should focus on making these data complete and easily available in routine practice.

  5. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  6. Physician-targeted financial incentives and primary care physicians' self-reported ability to provide high-quality primary care.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jong-Deuk; Xirasagar, Sudha; Stoskopf, Carleen H; Seidman, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    High-quality primary care is envisaged as the centerpiece of the emerging health care delivery system under the Affordable Care Act. Reengineering the US health care system into a primary care-driven model will require widespread, rapid changes in the management and organization of primary care physicians (PCPs). Financial incentives to influence physician behavior have been attempted with various approaches, without empirical evidence of their effectiveness in improving care quality. This study examines the above research question adjusting for the patient-centeredness of the practice climate, a major contextual factor affecting PCPs' ability to provide high-quality care. Secondary data on a sample of salaried PCPs (n = 1733) from the nation-wide Community Tracking Study Physician Survey 2004-2005 were subject to generalized multinomial logit modeling to examine associations between financial incentives and PCPs' self-reported ability to provide quality care. After adjusting for patient-centered medical home (PCMH)-consistent practice environment, financial incentive aligned with care quality/care content is positively associated with PCPs' ability to provide high-quality care. An encouraging finding was that financial incentives aligned with clinic productivity/profitability do not to impede high-quality care in a PCMH practice environment. Financial incentives targeted to care quality or content indicators may facilitate rapid transformation of the health system to a primary care-driven system. The study provides empirical evidence of the utility of practically deployable financial incentives to facilitate high-quality primary care.

  7. Care coordination and provider stress in primary care management of high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Okunogbe, Adeyemi; Meredith, Lisa S; Chang, Evelyn T; Simon, Alissa; Stockdale, Susan E; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2017-10-02

    Care coordination is a critical component of managing high-risk patients, who tend to have complex and multiple medical and psychosocial problems and are typically at high risk for increased hospitalization and incur high health care expenditures. Primary care models such as the patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are designed to improve care coordination and reduce care fragmentation. However, little is known about how the burden of care coordination for high-risk patients influences PCMH team members' stress. To evaluate the relationship between provider stress and care coordination time in high-risk patient care and whether availability of help is associated with reduced stress. Multivariable regression analysis of a cross-sectional survey of PCMH primary care providers (PCPs) and nurses. A total of 164 PCPs and 272 nurses in primary care practices at five geographically diverse Veteran Health Administration (VA) medical center health systems. The main outcome variable was provider stress due to high-risk patient care. Independent variables were the reported proportion of high-risk patients in PCP/nurse patient panels, time spent coordinating care for these patients, and provider satisfaction with help received in caring for them. The response rate was 44%. Spending more than 8 h per week coordinating care was significantly associated with a 0.21-point increase in reported provider stress compared to spending 8 h or less per week (95% CI: 0.04-0.39; p = 0.015). The magnitude of the association between stress and care coordination time was diminished when provider satisfaction with help received was included in the model. Perceived provider stress from care of high-risk patients may arise from challenges related to coordinating their care. Our findings suggest that the perception of receiving help for high-risk patient care may be valuable in reducing provider stress.

  8. Private ownership of primary care providers associated with patient perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaolin; Yin, Jia; Wong, Samuel Y.S.; Griffiths, Sian M.; Zou, Guanyang; Shi, Leiyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ownership of primary care providers varies in different cities in China. Shanghai represented the full public ownership model of primary providers; Shenzhen had public-owned but private-operated providers; and Hong Kong represented the full private ownership. The study aims to assess the association of primary care ownership and patient perceived quality of care in 3 Chinese megacities. We conducted multistage stratified random surveys in 2013 in the 3 cities. Quality scores of primary care were measured using the validated primary care assessment tools. Multivariate linear regression models were used to compare quality scores after controlling potential confounders of patient demographic, socioeconomic, and healthcare utilization factors. Overall, 797 primary care users in Shanghai, 802 in Shenzhen, and 1325 in Hong Kong participated in the study. The mean total quality scores were reported the highest in Shanghai (28.39), followed by Shenzhen (25.82) and then Hong Kong (25.21) (P < 0.001). Shanghai participants reported the highest scores for 1st contact accessibility, coordination of information, comprehensiveness of service availability, and culture competence, while Hong Kong participants reported the lowest for these domains (P < 0.001). Hong Kong participants from rich households reported higher total scores than those from poor households (P < 0.05); however, this was not found in Shanghai and Shenzhen. The study suggests that private primary care ownership may be associated with lower quality and less equitable care distribution. In China, it suggests that it may be beneficial to promote public-owned and nonprofit providers. Promoting privatization in primary care may be at the cost of quality and equity of primary care. PMID:28072718

  9. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative in nature and based in tertiary health institutions. At primary health care level, there is either absence of, or fragmented health services. Aims The aim of this paper was to explore health providers' views about mental health integration into primary health care. Methods A mixed methods, structured survey was conducted of 111 health service providers in primary health care centres, drawn from one urban setting (Lusaka) and one rural setting (Mumbwa). Results There is strong support for integrating mental health into primary health care from care providers, as a way of facilitating early detection and intervention for mental health problems. Participants believed that this would contribute to the reduction of stigma and the promotion of human rights for people with mental health problems. However, health providers felt they require basic training in order to enhance their knowledge and skills in providing health care to people with mental health problems. Recommendations It is recommended that health care providers should be provided with basic training in mental health in order to enhance their knowledge and skills to enable them provide mental health care to patients seeking help at primary health care level. Conclusion Integrating mental health services into primary health care is critical to improving and promoting the mental health of the population in Zambia. PMID:20653981

  10. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Home Diabetes Telemedicine Care in the IDEATel Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L. Thomas; Morin, Philip C.; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. Purpose: To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in…

  11. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Home Diabetes Telemedicine Care in the IDEATel Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L. Thomas; Morin, Philip C.; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. Purpose: To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in…

  12. Provider workload and quality of care in primary care settings: moderating role of relational climate.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Benzer, Justin K; Young, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly under pressure to do more with fewer resources. We examined the effect of workload on patients' experiences of quality of care, measured through approximately 44,000 patient experience surveys in a sample of 222 primary care clinics in the Veterans Health Administration. We tested the extent to which relational climate, a measure of teamwork, moderated the relationship between workload and patient ratings of quality of care. Our outcome measures included patient complaints, time spent with provider, and overall visit quality. Workload was negatively associated with patients' quality of care ratings and relational climate moderated the relation between workload and quality of care ratings. Patients seen in clinics with higher workload and greater relational climate reported better care compared with patients in clinics with higher workload but lower relational climate. Findings highlight the importance of relational climate as an important teamwork factor when managing and developing clinic policies, practices, and procedures in resource-constrained settings.

  13. The STI and HIV testing practices of primary care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Mitchell; Solorio, M. Rosa

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV testing practices of primary care providers (PCPs) practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. PCPs were identified by matching ZIP codes of physician directories with ZIP codes of Los Angeles County areas that have a population that is > 50% Hispanic (N = 191). PCPs were mailed a survey that assessed their frequencies for asking patients about sexual history, offering STI and safe sex advice, total number of HIV tests ordered in the past six months and their perceived barriers to STI counseling. The survey response rate was 45% (N = 85). RESULTS: Although 73% of PCPs took sexual histories from patients regularly (daily-to-weekly), only 41% offered STI or safe sex advice regularly. PCPs who were white were less likely than those who were Hispanic/Asian/African American/other to take sexual histories from their patients regularly (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The total number of HIV tests ordered for patients by PCPs at their practice locations in the past six months were: none (6%), 1-10 tests (27%), 11-20 tests (24%) and > 20 tests (36%). Thirty-six percent of PCPs reported > or = 1 positive HIV test in the past six months. PCPs' perceived barriers to STI counseling included patient's young age (< 16 years), language and presence of patient's relative/partner in consultation room at time of visit. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a need for interventions with PCPs practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities to improve their STI and HIV practice patterns. PMID:17393950

  14. Meaningful use care coordination criteria: Perceived barriers and benefits among primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Genna R

    2016-01-01

    Background Stage 2 and proposed Stage 3 meaningful use criteria ask providers to support patient care coordination by electronically generating, exchanging, and reconciling key information during patient care transitions. Methods A stratified random sample of primary care practices in Michigan (n = 328) that had already met Stage 1 meaningful use criteria was surveyed, in order to identify the anticipated barriers to meeting these criteria as well as the expected impact on patient care coordination from doing so. Results The top three barriers, as identified by >65% of the primary care providers surveyed, were difficulty sending and receiving patient information electronically, a lack of provider and practice staff time, and the complex workflow changes required. Despite these barriers, primary care providers expressed strong agreement that meeting the proposed Stage 3 care coordination criteria would improve their patients’ treatment and ensure they know about their patients’ visits to other providers. Conclusion The survey results suggest the need to enhance policy approaches and organizational strategies to address the key barriers identified by providers and practices in order to realize important care coordination benefits. PMID:26567327

  15. Meaningful use care coordination criteria: Perceived barriers and benefits among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Genna R; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Stage 2 and proposed Stage 3 meaningful use criteria ask providers to support patient care coordination by electronically generating, exchanging, and reconciling key information during patient care transitions. A stratified random sample of primary care practices in Michigan (n = 328) that had already met Stage 1 meaningful use criteria was surveyed, in order to identify the anticipated barriers to meeting these criteria as well as the expected impact on patient care coordination from doing so. The top three barriers, as identified by >65% of the primary care providers surveyed, were difficulty sending and receiving patient information electronically, a lack of provider and practice staff time, and the complex workflow changes required. Despite these barriers, primary care providers expressed strong agreement that meeting the proposed Stage 3 care coordination criteria would improve their patients' treatment and ensure they know about their patients' visits to other providers. The survey results suggest the need to enhance policy approaches and organizational strategies to address the key barriers identified by providers and practices in order to realize important care coordination benefits. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bibhav; Tenpa, Jasmine; Thapa, Poshan; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Ekstrand, Maria

    2016-09-19

    Globally, access to mental healthcare is often lacking in rural, low-resource settings. Mental healthcare services integration in primary care settings is a key intervention to address this gap. A common strategy includes embedding mental healthcare workers on-site, and receiving consultation from an off-site psychiatrist. Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal. We asked participants about their concerns and recommendations for an integrated mental healthcare delivery program. They were also asked about current practices in seeking referral for patients with mental illness. We collected data using structured notes and analyzed the data by template coding to develop themes around concerns and recommendations for an integrated program. Participants noted that the current referral system included sending patients to the nearest psychiatrist who is 14 h away. Participants did not think this was effective, and stated that integrating mental health into the existing primary care setting would be ideal. Their major concerns about a proposed program included workplace hierarchies between mental healthcare workers and other clinicians, impact of staff turnover on patients, reliability of an off-site consultant psychiatrist, and ability of on-site primary care providers to screen patients and follow recommendations from an off-site psychiatrist. Their suggestions included training a few existing primary care providers as dedicated mental healthcare workers, recruiting both senior and junior mental healthcare workers to ensure retention, recruiting academic psychiatrists for reliability, and training all primary care providers to appropriately screen for mental illness and follow recommendations from the psychiatrist. Primary care providers in rural Nepal reported the failure of the current system of referral, which

  17. Primary care managers' perceptions of their capability in providing care planning to patients with complex needs.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Lena Gunvor; Bäck-Pettersson, Siv; Kylén, Sven; Marklund, Bertil; Carlström, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate primary care managers' perceptions of their capability in providing care planning to patients with complex needs. Care planning is defined as a process where the patient, family and health professionals engage in dialogue about the patient's care needs and plan care interventions together. Semi-structured interviews with 18 primary care managers in western Sweden were conducted using Westrin's theoretical cooperation model. Data were analysed using a qualitative deductive method. Results reveal that the managers' approach to care planning was dominated by non-cooperation and separation. The managers were permeated by uncertainty about the meaning of the task of care planning as such. They did not seem to be familiar with the national legislation stipulating that every healthcare provider must meet patients' need for care interventions and participate in the care planning. To accomplish care planning, the process needs to cross - and overcome - both professional and organisational boundaries. There is also a need for incentives to develop working methods that promote local cooperation in order to facilitate optimal care for patients with complex needs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Interventions to improve care coordination between primary healthcare and oncology care providers: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tomasone, Jennifer R; Brouwers, Melissa C; Vukmirovic, Marija; Grunfeld, Eva; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Urquhart, Robin; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Coordination of patient care between primary care and oncology care providers is vital to care quality and outcomes across the cancer continuum, yet it is known to be challenging. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate current or new models of care and/or interventions aimed at improving coordination between primary care and oncology care providers for patients with adult breast and/or colorectal cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination were searched for existing English language studies published between January 2000 and 15 May 2015. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies were included if they evaluated a specific model/intervention that was designed to improve care coordination between primary care and oncology care providers, for any stage of the cancer continuum, for patients with adult breast and/or colorectal cancer. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Twenty-two studies (5 systematic reviews, 6 RCTs and 11 non-randomised studies) were included and varied with respect to the targeted phase of the cancer continuum, type of model or intervention tested, and outcome measures. The majority of studies showed no statistically significant changes in any patient, provider or system outcomes. Owing to conceptual and methodological limitations in this field, the review is unable to provide specific conclusions about the most effective or preferred model/intervention to improve care coordination. Imprecise results that lack generalisability and definitiveness provide limited evidence to base the development of future interventions and policies. Trial registration number CRD42015025006. PMID:27843639

  19. Caring for Children with Medical Complexity: Perspectives of Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Foster, Carolyn C; Mangione-Smith, Rita; Simon, Tamara D

    2017-03-01

    To describe typical care experiences and key barriers and facilitators to caring for children with medical complexity (CMC) from the perspective of community primary care providers (PCPs). PCPs participating in a randomized controlled trial of a care-coordination intervention for CMC were sent a 1-time cross-sectional survey that asked PCPs to (1) describe their experiences with caring for CMC; (2) identify key barriers affecting their ability to care for CMC; and (3) prioritize facilitators enhancing their ability to provide care coordination for CMC. PCP and practice demographics also were collected. One hundred thirteen of 155 PCPs sent the survey responded fully (completion rate = 73%). PCPs endorsed that medical characteristics such as polypharmacy (88%), multiorgan system involvement (84%), and rare/unfamiliar diagnoses (83%) negatively affected care. Caregivers with high needs (88%), limited time with patients and caregivers (81%), and having a large number of specialists involved in care (79%) were also frequently cited. Most commonly endorsed strategies to improve care coordination included more time with patients/caregivers (84%), summative action plans (83%), and facilitated communication (eg, e-mail, phone meetings) with specialists (83%). Community PCPs prioritized more time with patients and their families, better communication with specialists, and summative action plans to improve care coordination for this vulnerable population. Although this study evaluated perceptions rather than actual performance, it provides insights to improve understanding of which barriers and facilitators ideally might be targeted first for care delivery redesign. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effectiveness of a Brief Asthma Education Intervention for Child Care Providers and Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2016-01-01

    Limited information exists about management of asthma in child care settings and primary school classrooms. The goal of this study was to evaluate a brief asthma management intervention for child care providers and primary school teachers. Child care providers and primary school teachers were recruited to participate in two 3-h workshops on asthma…

  1. The Effectiveness of a Brief Asthma Education Intervention for Child Care Providers and Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2016-01-01

    Limited information exists about management of asthma in child care settings and primary school classrooms. The goal of this study was to evaluate a brief asthma management intervention for child care providers and primary school teachers. Child care providers and primary school teachers were recruited to participate in two 3-h workshops on asthma…

  2. Shared care involving cancer specialists and primary care providers - What do cancer survivors want?

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Koczwara, Bogda

    2017-10-01

    Cancer survivors are living longer, prompting greater focus on managing cancer as a chronic condition. Shared care between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists, involving explicit partnership in how care is communicated, could ensure effective transitions between services. However, little is known about cancer patients' and survivors' preferences regarding shared care. To explore Australian cancer survivors' views on shared care: what cancer survivors need from shared care; enablers and barriers to advancing shared care; and what successful shared care looks like. Community forum held in Adelaide, Australia, in 2015 with 21 participants: 11 cancer survivors, 2 family caregivers, and 8 clinicians and researchers (members of PC4-Primary Care Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Group). Qualitative data from group discussion of the objectives. Participants stressed that successful shared care required patients being at the centre, ensuring accurate communication, ownership, and access to their medical records. PCPs were perceived to lack skills and confidence to lead complex cancer care. Patients expressed burden in being responsible for navigating information sharing and communication processes between health professionals and services. Effective shared care should include: shared electronic health records, key individuals as care coordinators; case conferences; shared decision making; preparing patients for self-management; building general practitioners' skills; and measuring outcomes. There was clear support for shared care but a lack of good examples to help guide it for this population. Recognizing cancer as a chronic condition requires a shift in how care is provided to these patients. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Enhancing the primary care team to provide redesigned care: the roles of practice facilitators and care managers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin Fries; Machta, Rachel M; Meyers, David S; Genevro, Janice; Peikes, Deborah N

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care require multiple supports. Two potential members of the primary care team-practice facilitator and care manager-can play important but distinct roles in redesigning and improving care delivery. Facilitators, also known as quality improvement coaches, assist practices with coordinating their quality improvement activities and help build capacity for those activities-reflecting a systems-level approach to improving quality, safety, and implementation of evidence-based practices. Care managers provide direct patient care by coordinating care and helping patients navigate the system, improving access for patients, and communicating across the care team. These complementary roles aim to help primary care practices deliver coordinated, accessible, comprehensive, and patient-centered care.

  4. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Design Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Setting Southeastern Ontario. Participants Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Main outcome measures Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Results Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. Conclusion There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions. PMID:26889509

  5. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-11-01

    To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Southeastern Ontario. Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions.

  6. Improving Chinese primary care providers' recruitment and retention: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Song, Kuimeng; Scott, Anthony; Sivey, Peter; Meng, Qingyue

    2015-02-01

    Local primary care facilities in China struggle to recruit and retain doctors and nurses. Implementing policies to address this issue requires detailed knowledge of the preferences of primary care workers. The aim of this study is to find out which job attributes affect Chinese primary care providers' choice of job and whether there are any differences in these job preferences between doctors and nurses. A discrete choice experiment was used to analyse the job preferences of 517 primary care providers, including 282 doctors and 235 nurses. Chinese primary care providers in Community Health Organizations (CHOs) considered monetary factors and non-monetary factors when choosing a job. Doctors' and nurses' preferences over job attributes were similar. Though income was important, Chinese primary care providers had strongest preferences for sufficient welfare benefits, sufficient essential equipment and respect from the community. Younger primary care providers were more likely to value training and career development opportunities. In order to retain skilled primary care providers to work in CHOs, policymakers in China need to improve primary care providers' income, benefits and working conditions to fulfil their basic needs. Policymakers also need to invest in CHOs' infrastructure and strengthen training programmes for primary care providers in order to raise the community's confidence in the services provided by CHOs. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  7. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? You should first make a list of ...

  8. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? Here are some ways to find a ...

  9. The Mental Health Education Gap among Primary Care Providers in Rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bibhav; Hirachan, Soniya; Mandel, Jeffery S; van Dyke, Craig

    2016-08-01

    In low- and middle-income countries, the majority of individuals with mental illness go untreated largely because of a severe shortage of mental health professionals. Global initiatives to close the mental health treatment gap focus on primary care providers delivering this care. For this to be effective, primary care providers require the skills to assess, diagnose, and treat patients with mental illness. To assess primary care providers' training and experience in caring for mental health patients, the authors conducted five focus groups at three isolated district hospitals in rural Nepal where there was no access to mental health professionals. Primary care providers reported limited training, lack of knowledge and skills, and discomfort in delivering mental health care. To address the mental health education gap, primary care providers in Nepal, and perhaps other low- and middle-income countries, require more training during both undergraduate and graduate medical education.

  10. Finding the Primary Care Providers in the Specialist-Dominant Primary Care Setting of Korea: A Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Yong; Eun, Sang Jun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to identify private clinics that have a potential to perform the role of primary care providers (PCPs) in a primary care setting in Korea where private specialists are dominant. Methods The 2013 National Patient Sample claim data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service in Korea was used. Two-step cluster analysis was performed using characteristics of private clinics, and patient and utilization characteristics of 27,797 private clinics. External validation of clusters was performed by assessing the association among clusters and outcomes of care provided by private clinics. Stability of clusters was cross-validated using discriminant analysis. Results The result classified more than a half of private clinics into a potential PCP cluster. These were private clinics with specialties considered to be those of primary care physicians and were more likely to be located in non-metropolitan areas than specialized PCPs were. Compared to specialized PCPs, they had a higher percentage of pediatric and geriatric patients, patients with greater disease severity, a higher percentage of patients with complex comorbidities or with simple or minor disease groups, a higher number of patients and visits, and the same or higher quality of primary care. The most important factor in explaining variations between PCP clusters was the number of simple or minor disease groups per patient. Conclusion This study identified potential PCPs and suggested the identifying criteria for PCPs. It will provide useful information for formulation of a primary care strengthening policy to policy makers in Korea as well as other countries with similar specialist-dominant primary care settings. PMID:27560181

  11. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: Patient Response to a Primary Care Provider Communication Training.

    PubMed

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2016-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders and health outcomes; yet there is little training of primary care providers about trauma's effects, and how to better interact with trauma survivors. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), to evaluate its feasibility and preliminary efficacy. We randomized four primary care sites to training or wait-list conditions; PCPs at wait-list sites were trained after reassessment. Primary care providers (PCPs) were Family Medicine residents (n = 17; 2 sites) or community physicians (n = 13; 2 sites). Outcomes reported here comprised a survey of 400 actual patients seen by the PCPs in the study. Patients, mostly minority, completed surveys before or after their provider received training. Patients rated PCPs significantly higher after training on a scale encompassing partnership issues. Breakdowns showed lower partnership scores for those with trauma or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future studies will need to include more specific trauma-related outcomes. Nevertheless, this training is a promising initial approach to teaching trauma-informed communication skills to PCPs.

  12. Evaluating primary care providers' views on survivorship care plans generated by an electronic health record system.

    PubMed

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Sesto, Mary E; Hahn, David L; Buhr, Kevin A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Sosman, James M; Andreason, Molly J; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2015-05-01

    Survivorship care plans for cancer survivors may facilitate provider-to-provider communication. Primary care provider (PCP) perspectives on care plan provision and use are limited, especially when care plans are generated by an electronic health record (EHR) system. We sought to examine PCPs' perspectives regarding EHR-generated care plans. PCPs (N = 160) who were members of the Wisconsin Research and Education Network listserv received a sample 10-page plan (WREN cohort). PCPs (n = 81) who had or were currently seeing survivors enrolled onto one of our survivorship clinical trials received a copy of the survivor's personalized care plan (University of Wisconsin [UW] cohort). Both cohorts received a survey after reviewing the plan. All plans were generated within an EHR. Forty-six and 26 PCPs participated in the WREN and UW cohorts, respectively. PCPs regarded EHR-generated plans as useful in coordinating care (88%), understanding treatments (94%), understanding treatment adverse effects (89%), and supporting clinical decisions (82%). Few felt using EHR-generated plans would disrupt clinic workflow (14%) or take too much time (11%). Most (89%) preferred receiving the plan via EHR. PCPs reported consistent provision (81%) and standard location in the medical record (89%) as key factors facilitating their use of survivorship care plans. Important facilitators of care plan use included a more abbreviated plan, ideally one to three pages (32%), and/or a plan specifically tailored to PCP use (57%). Plans were viewed as useful for coordinating care and making clinical decisions. However, PCPs desired shorter, clinician-oriented plans, accessible within an EHR and delivered and located in a standardized manner. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Evaluating Primary Care Providers' Views on Survivorship Care Plans Generated by an Electronic Health Record System

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Sesto, Mary E.; Hahn, David L.; Buhr, Kevin A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Sosman, James M.; Andreason, Molly J.; Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Tevaarwerk, Amye J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Survivorship care plans for cancer survivors may facilitate provider-to-provider communication. Primary care provider (PCP) perspectives on care plan provision and use are limited, especially when care plans are generated by an electronic health record (EHR) system. We sought to examine PCPs' perspectives regarding EHR-generated care plans. Methods: PCPs (N = 160) who were members of the Wisconsin Research and Education Network listserv received a sample 10-page plan (WREN cohort). PCPs (n = 81) who had or were currently seeing survivors enrolled onto one of our survivorship clinical trials received a copy of the survivor's personalized care plan (University of Wisconsin [UW] cohort). Both cohorts received a survey after reviewing the plan. All plans were generated within an EHR. Results: Forty-six and 26 PCPs participated in the WREN and UW cohorts, respectively. PCPs regarded EHR-generated plans as useful in coordinating care (88%), understanding treatments (94%), understanding treatment adverse effects (89%), and supporting clinical decisions (82%). Few felt using EHR-generated plans would disrupt clinic workflow (14%) or take too much time (11%). Most (89%) preferred receiving the plan via EHR. PCPs reported consistent provision (81%) and standard location in the medical record (89%) as key factors facilitating their use of survivorship care plans. Important facilitators of care plan use included a more abbreviated plan, ideally one to three pages (32%), and/or a plan specifically tailored to PCP use (57%). Conclusion: Plans were viewed as useful for coordinating care and making clinical decisions. However, PCPs desired shorter, clinician-oriented plans, accessible within an EHR and delivered and located in a standardized manner. PMID:25804989

  14. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  15. Metabolism and biochemical effects of nicotine for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Metz, Christine N; Gregersen, Peter K; Malhotra, Anil K

    2004-11-01

    Nicotine is a colorless and volatile liquid alkaloid naturally occurring in the leaves and stems of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana rustica. Nicotine, the primary component of tobacco, is responsible for both tobacco product addiction (with chronic exposure) and the odor associated with tobacco. In addition to cigarettes, nicotine is found in chewing gum, transdermal patches, nasal spray, and sublingual tablets. Following its inhalation and absorption, nicotine and its metabolic products exert diverse physiologic and pharmacologic effects. This article covers the absorption and metabolism of nicotine, nicotine toxicity, pharmacologic effects of nicotine, nicotine-drug interactions, and the use of nicotine for the treatment of disease.

  16. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  17. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  18. Costs of accountable care organization participation for primary care providers: early stage results.

    PubMed

    Hofler, Richard A; Ortiz, Judith

    2016-07-28

    Little is known about the impact of joining an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) on primary care provider organization's costs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether joining an ACO is associated with an increase in a Rural Health Clinic's (RHC's) cost per visit. The analyses focused on cost per visit in 2012 and 2013 for RHCs that joined an ACO in 2012 and cost per visit in 2013 for RHCs that joined an ACO in 2013. The RHCs were located in nine states. Data were obtained from Medicare Cost Reports. The analysis was conducted taking a treatment effects approach where the treatment is joining an ACO. Propensity-score matching was employed to provide multiple single and pooled estimates of the average treatment effect on the treated. Four-hundred thirty four to 544 RHCs (depending on the type of analysis and the variables used) were used in the several analyses. Seven of the RHCs joined an ACO in 2012 and 14 joined an ACO in 2013. The mean cost per visit for RHCs that did not join an ACO rose 4.40 % from 2011 to 2012 whereas the mean cost per visit for RHCs that joined an ACO rose by triple: 13.5 %. All of the pooled estimates of the average treatment effect on the treated from the propensity-score matching showed that joining an ACO was associated with higher mean cost per visit. The range of the estimated mean cost per visit differences was $17.19 (p value = 0.00) to $25.19 (p value = 0.00). This study is one of the first to describe the cost of ACO participation from the perspective of primary care provider organizations. It appears that for at least one type of primary care provider - the RHC - there are substantial costs associated with ACO participation during the first two years.

  19. Providers' Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators to Connecting Women Veterans to Alcohol-Related Care From Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Traci H; Lewis, Eleanor T; Cucciare, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    Unhealthy drinking is relatively common among women U.S. military Veterans. Primary care is often the setting where patients first come into contact with the health care system, and providers in this setting play a critical role in connecting unhealthy drinkers to appropriate care. Little is known about primary care providers' perspectives on factors that affect whether women Veterans presenting to primary care with unhealthy drinking connect to alcohol-related care. Understanding factors that affect whether patients connect to alcohol-related care may improve providers' ability to support women Veterans with unhealthy drinking get needed care. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with 14 providers from two Veterans Administration Women's Health primary care clinics, including nurses, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants, and physicians, and colocated mental health providers. The interviews were transcribed, and themes pertaining to providers' perspectives on barriers and facilitators to connecting women Veterans' with unhealthy drinking to alcohol-related care were identified through template analysis. Primary care providers perceived numerous provider- and clinic-level factors as relevant to their ability to connect women Veterans to alcohol-related care. Barriers providers described were insufficient care resources, provider prioritization of alcohol-related care, insufficient knowledge of care options or the referral process among providers, time constraints during routine clinical visits, and the referral process for alcohol-related care. They also described resources available in primary care, primary care provider behaviors, and initiatives at the Veterans Administration as helpful. Although primary care providers are gatekeepers to specialty treatment services, ongoing education, and colocated mental health staff could help reduce barriers to these services, ultimately improving health outcomes for women Veterans and others with

  20. What Should Primary Care Providers Know About the Changes in DSM-5?

    PubMed

    Kronish, Ian M; Shah, Ravi N; Moise, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly involved in the management of patients with mental disorders, particularly as integrated models of care emerge. The recent publication of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) represents a shift in the classification of several mental disorders commonly encountered by primary care providers. With the advent of ICD-10 and the movement toward diagnostic specificity, it is crucial that primary care providers understand the rationale behind these changes. This paper provides an overview of the changes in the classification of mental disorders in DSM-5, a description of how these changes relate to frequently used screening tools in the primary care setting, and a critique of how these changes will affect mental health practice from a primary care perspective.

  1. Health Care Resource Utilization for Outpatient Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Care Delivery Among Advanced Practice Providers and Physician Providers in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Virani, Salim S; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Deswal, Anita; Nasir, Khurram; Rajan, Suja S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A

    2017-10-10

    Although effectiveness of diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) care delivery between physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) has been shown to be comparable, health care resource utilization between these 2 provider types in primary care is unknown. This study compared health care resource utilization between patients with diabetes or CVD receiving care from APPs or physicians. Diabetes (n = 1,022,588) or CVD (n = 1,187,035) patients with a primary care visit between October 2013 and September 2014 in 130 Veterans Affairs facilities were identified. Using hierarchical regression adjusting for covariates including patient illness burden, the authors compared number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) tests among diabetes patients, and number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and cardiac stress tests among CVD patients receiving care from physicians and APPs. Physicians had significantly larger patient panels compared with APPs. In adjusted analyses, diabetes patients receiving care from APPs received fewer primary and specialty care visits and a greater number of lipid panels and HbA1c tests compared with patients receiving care from physicians. CVD patients receiving care from APPs received more frequent lipid testing and fewer primary and specialty care visits compared with those receiving care from physicians, with no differences in the number of stress tests. Most of these differences, although statistically significant, were numerically small. Health care resource utilization among diabetes or CVD patients receiving care from APPs or physicians appears comparable, although physicians work with larger patient panels.

  2. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E.; Asch, David A.; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Primary care provider (PCP) turnover is common and can disrupt patient continuity of care. Little is known about the effect of PCP turnover on patient care experience and quality of care. OBJECTIVE To measure the effect of PCP turnover on patient experiences of care and ambulatory care quality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational, retrospective cohort study of a nationwide sample of primary care patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We included all patients enrolled in primary care at the VHA between 2010 and 2012 included in 1 of 2 national data sets used to measure our outcome variables: 326 374 patients in the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP; used to measure patient experience of care) associated with 8441 PCPs and 184 501 patients in the External Peer Review Program (EPRP; used to measure ambulatory care quality) associated with 6973 PCPs. EXPOSURES Whether a patient experienced PCP turnover, defined as a patient whose provider (physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) had left the VHA (ie, had no patient encounters for 12 months). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Five patient care experience measures (from SHEP) and 11 measures of quality of ambulatory care (from EPRP). RESULTS Nine percent of patients experienced a PCP turnover in our study sample. Primary care provider turnover was associated with a worse rating in each domain of patient care experience. Turnover was associated with a reduced likelihood of having a positive rating of their personal physician of 68.2% vs 74.6% (adjusted percentage point difference, −5.3; 95% CI, −6.0 to −4.7) and a reduced likelihood of getting care quickly of 36.5% vs 38.5% (adjusted percentage point difference, −1.1; 95% CI, −2.1 to −0.1). In contrast, PCP turnover was not associated with lower quality of ambulatory care except for a lower likelihood of controlling blood pressure of 78.7% vs 80.4% (adjusted percentage point difference, −1.44; 95

  3. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E; Asch, David A; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M

    2015-07-01

    Primary care provider (PCP) turnover is common and can disrupt patient continuity of care. Little is known about the effect of PCP turnover on patient care experience and quality of care. To measure the effect of PCP turnover on patient experiences of care and ambulatory care quality. Observational, retrospective cohort study of a nationwide sample of primary care patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We included all patients enrolled in primary care at the VHA between 2010 and 2012 included in 1 of 2 national data sets used to measure our outcome variables: 326,374 patients in the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP; used to measure patient experience of care) associated with 8441 PCPs and 184,501 patients in the External Peer Review Program (EPRP; used to measure ambulatory care quality) associated with 6973 PCPs. Whether a patient experienced PCP turnover, defined as a patient whose provider (physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) had left the VHA (ie, had no patient encounters for 12 months). Five patient care experience measures (from SHEP) and 11 measures of quality of ambulatory care (from EPRP). Nine percent of patients experienced a PCP turnover in our study sample. Primary care provider turnover was associated with a worse rating in each domain of patient care experience. Turnover was associated with a reduced likelihood of having a positive rating of their personal physician of 68.2% vs 74.6% (adjusted percentage point difference, -5.3; 95% CI, -6.0 to -4.7) and a reduced likelihood of getting care quickly of 36.5% vs 38.5% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.1; 95% CI, -2.1 to -0.1). In contrast, PCP turnover was not associated with lower quality of ambulatory care except for a lower likelihood of controlling blood pressure of 78.7% vs 80.4% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.44; 95% CI, -2.2 to -0.7). In 9 measures of ambulatory care quality, the difference between patients who experienced no

  4. Developmental Surveillance and Screening Practices by Pediatric Primary Care Providers: Implications for Early Intervention Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sallie; Qureshi, Rubab; Caldwell, Barbara Ann; Echevarria, Mercedes; Dubbs, William B.; Sullivan, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a survey approach to investigate current developmental surveillance and developmental screening practices by pediatric primary care providers in a diverse New Jersey county. A total of 217 providers were contacted with a final sample size of 57 pediatric primary care respondents from 13 different municipalities. Most providers…

  5. Developmental Surveillance and Screening Practices by Pediatric Primary Care Providers: Implications for Early Intervention Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sallie; Qureshi, Rubab; Caldwell, Barbara Ann; Echevarria, Mercedes; Dubbs, William B.; Sullivan, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a survey approach to investigate current developmental surveillance and developmental screening practices by pediatric primary care providers in a diverse New Jersey county. A total of 217 providers were contacted with a final sample size of 57 pediatric primary care respondents from 13 different municipalities. Most providers…

  6. Patients' and providers' perspectives on bibliotherapy in primary care.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Grainne; Hevey, David; Martin, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Bibliotherapy is a form of self-administered treatment in which structured materials provide a means to alleviate distress. Although the treatment has evidence of effectiveness, evaluations of bibliotherapy have typically focused on outcomes, and the perspectives of both the client and the service provider have been understudied. In the present study, eleven users of a bibliotherapy scheme were interviewed regarding their experiences of bibliotherapy. In addition, five referring practitioners to the scheme were also interviewed. Thematic analyses revealed three super-ordinate themes in the transcripts: participants' personal experiences of the bibliotherapy scheme factors that facilitate change and the influence of the professionals involved. The implications of these findings for bibliotherapy schemes are considered.

  7. Trauma-informed medical care: CME communication training for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2015-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and health care costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; wait-list groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were family medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13, 83% family medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient centeredness than did the delayed PCPs, with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient centeredness from before to after training. This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans.

  8. Do primary care providers who speak Chinese improve access to mental health care of Chinese immigrants?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice W; Kazanjian, Arminée

    2009-01-01

    Background The utilization of health care providers who share the language and culture of their patients has been advocated as a strategy to improve access to the mental health care of immigrants. This study examines the relationship between patients receiving primary care from health care providers who speak Chinese and the rate of mental health diagnosis and consultation among Chinese immigrants in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods The study analyzed 3 linked administrative databases: an immigration database, BC’s health databases and BC’s physician register. The study population consisted of more than 270 000 recent Chinese immigrants to BC, with sex and age-matched comparison subjects. We calculated the odds ratios (ORs) of being diagnosed with common mental health conditions and the rate ratios (RRs) of mental health visits per year of health plan registration, by proportion of general care received from Chinese-speaking physicians; this was done using logistic regression and generalized linear models, adjusting for sex, age and time registered in the health plan. Results Among Chinese immigrants, a higher proportion of care received from Chinese-speaking general practitioners (GPs) was associated with a lower probability of being diagnosed with neurotic disorders (OR = 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80–0.95), drug dependence (OR = 0.22; 95% CI 0.14–0.35), adjustment reaction (OR = 0.39; 95% CI 0.33–0.46) and depressive disorder not elsewhere classified (OR = 0.47; 95% CI 0.42–0.52), as well as a lower rate of mental health service utilization (RR = 0.65%; 95% CI 0.61–0.69). Among the comparison group, a higher proportion of primary care received from Chinese-speaking GPs was associated with a lower probability of being diagnosed with affective psychoses (OR = 0.53; 95% CI 0.47–0.59), neurotic disorders (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.47–0.51), drug dependence (OR = 0.28; 95% CI 0.24–0.32), acute reaction to stress

  9. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics.

  10. The effect of financial incentives on the quality of health care provided by primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Scott, Anthony; Sivey, Peter; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Willenberg, Lisa; Naccarella, Lucio; Furler, John; Young, Doris

    2011-09-07

    The use of blended payment schemes in primary care, including the use of financial incentives to directly reward 'performance' and 'quality' is increasing in a number of countries. There are many examples in the US, and the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QoF) for general practitioners (GPs) in the UK is an example of a major system-wide reform. Despite the popularity of these schemes, there is currently little rigorous evidence of their success in improving the quality of primary health care, or of whether such an approach is cost-effective relative to other ways to improve the quality of care. The aim of this review is to examine the effect of changes in the method and level of payment on the quality of care provided by primary care physicians (PCPs) and to identify:i) the different types of financial incentives that have improved quality;ii) the characteristics of patient populations for whom quality of care has been improved by financial incentives; andiii) the characteristics of PCPs who have responded to financial incentives. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, HealthSTAR, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychLIT, and ECONLIT. Searches of Internet-based economics and health economics working paper collections were also conducted. Finally, studies were identified through the reference lists of retrieved articles, websites of key organisations, and from direct contact with key authors in the field. Articles were included if they were published from 2000 to August 2009. Randomised controlled trials (RCT), controlled before and after studies (CBA), and interrupted time series analyses (ITS) evaluating the impact of different financial interventions on the quality of care delivered by primary healthcare physicians (PCPs). Quality of care was defined as patient reported outcome

  11. Developing a CKD Registry in Primary Care: Provider Attitudes and Input

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Dannielle; Dohan, Daniel; Handley, Margaret A.; Powe, Neil R.; Tuot, Delphine S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Chronic disease registries have been successful at promoting delivery of guideline-concordant primary care for diabetes and hypertension but not for chronic kidney disease (CKD). To understand whether a registry could be designed to improve CKD management in primary care, we explored primary care provider (PCP) attitudes about the benefits (or lack thereof) of a CKD registry compared to other chronic diseases and the key facilitators of successfully implementing a CKD registry in safety-net primary care. Study Design: Semistructured interview study. Setting & Participants. We conducted and recorded semi-structured, one-hour interviews with medical directors and quality improvement champions from safety-net adult primary care clinics in San Francisco. Analytic Approach. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach until thematic saturation was achieved. Results. Twenty primary care providers were interviewed. Four themes relevant to the development of a successful CKD registry for safety-net primary care were identified: (1) provider beliefs that a CKD registry could aid in the delivery of team-based, high-quality CKD care; (2) clinic workflow re-design and staffing are key facilitators to successful implementation of a CKD registry; (3) unique complexities of CKD, such as varying etiologies, may limit the use of a CKD registry by non-physicians; and (4) a CKD registry is aligned with current primary care priorities and health care delivery strategies. Limitations. Small sample size and reliance on clinician leaders within one health care delivery system. Conclusions. A CKD registry directed at the entire health care team, with the functionality to track, standardize and enhance CKD care through decision support, has potential to improve the management of CKD in safety-net primary care settings. These data directly informed the development of a CKD registry in these settings in San Francisco. PMID:24295612

  12. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: A CME Communication Training for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bonnie L.; Saunders, Pamela A.; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and healthcare costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. METHODS: We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; waitlist groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were Family Medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13; 83% Family Medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington DC metropolitan area. RESULTS: Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient-centeredness than did the delayed PCPs (p < .09), with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient-centeredness pre to post training, p < .01, Cohen’s D = .61. CONCLUSIONS: This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans. PMID:25646872

  13. What the Primary Care Provider Needs to Know for Limb Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Street, Tiffany K.

    2012-01-01

    Primary care providers are often the first providers to evaluate a patient for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Understanding the various presentations of PAD symptoms can prevent the disease from progressing to critical limb ischemia and eventual limb loss. This article provided the primary care provider with information needed to prevent limb loss and promote limb salvage, including risk factor management, clinical presentation, physical exam findings, and treatment options. PMID:23342193

  14. Primary care providers' perspectives on online weight-loss programs: a big wish list.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kevin O; Stuckey, Heather L; Chen, Monica C; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Forjuoh, Samuel N; Poger, Jennifer M; McTigue, Kathleen M; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2012-01-19

    Integrating online weight-loss programs into the primary care setting could yield substantial public health benefit. Little is known about primary care providers' perspectives on online weight-loss programs. To assess primary care providers' perspectives on online weight-loss programs. We conducted focus group discussions with providers in family medicine, internal medicine, and combined internal medicine/pediatrics in Texas and Pennsylvania, USA. Open-ended questions addressed their experience with and attitudes toward online weight-loss programs; useful characteristics of existing online weight-loss programs; barriers to referring patients to online weight-loss programs; and preferred characteristics of an ideal online weight-loss program. Transcripts were analyzed with the grounded theory approach to identify major themes. A total of 44 primary care providers participated in 9 focus groups. The mean age was 45 (SD 9) years. Providers had limited experience with structured online weight-loss programs and were uncertain about their safety and efficacy. They thought motivated, younger patients would be more likely than others to respond to an online weight-loss program. According to primary care providers, an ideal online weight-loss program would provide-at no cost to the patient-a structured curriculum addressing motivation, psychological issues, and problem solving; tools for tracking diet, exercise, and weight loss; and peer support monitored by experts. Primary care providers were interested in receiving reports about patients from the online weight-loss programs, but were concerned about the time required to review and act on the reports. Primary care providers have high expectations for how online weight-loss programs should deliver services to patients and fit into the clinical workflow. Efforts to integrate online weight-loss programs into the primary care setting should address efficacy and safety of online weight-loss programs in clinic-based populations

  15. Comparative effectiveness of outpatient cardiovascular disease and diabetes care delivery between advanced practice providers and physician providers in primary care: Implications for care under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Virani, Salim S; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Chan, Winston J; Frazier, Lorraine; Nasir, Khurram; S Rajan, Suja; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to compare quality of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) care between advanced practice providers (APPs) and physicians in a primary care setting. We identified diabetes (n=1,022,588) and CVD (n=1,187,035) patients receiving primary care between October 2013 and September 2014 in 130 Veterans Affairs facilities. We compared glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c <7%) in diabetic patients, blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg in diabetic or CVD patients, cholesterol control (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol<100 mg/dL, receiving a statin) in diabetic or CVD patients, and those receiving a β-blocker (with history of myocardial infarction in the last 2 years) among patients receiving care from physicians and APPs. We also compared the proportion meeting composite measure (glycemic, BP, and cholesterol control in diabetic patients; BP, cholesterol control, and receipt of β-blocker among eligible CVD patients). Diabetic patients receiving care from APPs were statistically more likely to have glycemic (50% vs 51.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.06 [1.05-1.08]) and BP control (77.5% vs 78.4%, OR 1.04 [1.03-1.06]), whereas patients receiving care from physicians were more likely to have cholesterol control (receipt of statin 68% vs 66.5%, OR 0.94 [0.93-0.95]) in adjusted models, although these differences are not clinically significant. Similar results were seen in CVD patients. Few patients met the composite measure (27.1% and 27.6% of diabetic and 54.0% and 54.8% of CVD patients receiving care from physicians and APPs, respectively). Diabetes and CVD care quality was comparable between physicians and APPs with clinically insignificant differences. Regardless of provider type, there is a need to improve performance on eligible measures in diabetes or CVD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The relationship of primary care providers to dental practitioners in rural and remote Australia.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2017-08-01

    Rural residents have poorer oral health and more limited access to dental services than their city counterparts. In rural communities, health care professionals often work in an extended capacity due to the needs of the community and health workforce shortages in these areas. Improved links and greater collaboration between resident rural primary care and dental practitioners could help improve oral health service provision such that interventions are both timely, effective and lead to appropriate follow-up and referral. This study examined the impact oral health problems had on primary health care providers; how primary care networks could be more effectively utilised to improve the provision of oral health services to rural communities; and identified strategies that could be implemented to improve oral health. Case studies of 14 rural communities across three Australian states. Between 2013 and 2016, 105 primary and 12 dental care providers were recruited and interviewed. Qualitative data were analysed in Nvivo 10 using thematic analysis. Quantitative data were subject to descriptive analysis using SPSSv20. Rural residents presented to primary care providers with a range of oral health problems from "everyday" to "10 per month". Management by primary care providers commonly included short-term pain relief, antibiotics, and advice that the patient see a dentist. The communication between non-dental primary care providers and visiting or regional dental practitioners was limited. Participants described a range of strategies that could contribute to better oral health and oral health oral services in their communities. Rural oral health could be improved by building oral health capacity of non-dental care providers; investing in oral health promotion and prevention activities; introducing more flexible service delivery practices to meet the dental needs of both public and private patients; and establishing more effective communication and referral pathways between

  17. Primary care providers' perceptions of home diabetes telemedicine care in the IDEATel project.

    PubMed

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L Thomas; Morin, Philip C; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2007-01-01

    Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in federally designated medically underserved areas of upstate New York, primarily those in rural areas and small towns with limited access to primary care. A longitudinal phone survey was completed by 116 PCPs with patients with diabetes in the treatment arm of the trial, and conducted 12 and 24 months after a PCP's first patient was randomized to the home telemedicine arm of the trial. The 36-item survey included measures of acceptability (to PCPs, time required), impact (on patient knowledge, confidence, perceived health outcomes), and communication. Six open-ended questions were analyzed qualitatively. The quantitative data indicated positive responses in terms of acceptability of the telemedicine intervention to the PCPs and of the impact on the PCPs' patients. This was most evident in issues critical to good control of diabetes: patient knowledge, ability to manage diabetes, confidence, and compliance in managing diabetes. Key qualitative themes, on the positive end, were more patient control and motivation, helpfulness of having extra patient data, and involvement of nurses and dieticians. Negative themes were excessive paperwork and duplication taking more PCP time, and conflicting advice and management decisions from the telemedicine team, some without informing the PCP but none involving medications. Telemedicine was reported to be a positive experience for predominantly rural PCPs and their Medicare-eligible patients from medically underserved areas; several inefficiencies need to be refined.

  18. Training the Primary Care Internist to Provide Care in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, John A.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot program at the University of California, Davis, that incorporated skilled nursing facility training into the required curriculum of their primary care internal medicine residency is described. The goal was to increase the residents' knowledge in the care of geriatric patients. (MLW)

  19. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Kuschner, Ware G; Reddy, Sunayana; Mehrotra, Nidhi; Paintal, Harman S

    2011-02-01

    PRIMARY CARE PROVIDERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF TWO NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN NICOTINE ADDICTION AND SMOKING CESSATION: 1) the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e-) cigarette; and 2) new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as "thirdhand smoke". The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room. Counseling patients about the hazards of thirdhand smoke may provide additional motivation to quit smoking.

  20. Providing care to transgender persons: a clinical approach to primary care, hormones, and HIV management.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Transgender (TG) persons have had historically difficult interactions with health care providers, leading to limited care and risks for a broad spectrum of health problems. This is of particular concern for TG persons with or at risk for HIV infection. This article discusses care providers' roles in establishing TG-friendly clinical care sites; conducting appropriate and thorough physical examinations for TG patients; managing hormones, especially in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy; and engaging TG persons in education about prevention and treatment of HIV.

  1. Primary care professionals providing non-urgent care in hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Jaspreet K; Flodgren, Gerd; Perera, Rafael; Rowe, Brian H; Shepperd, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries emergency departments (EDs) are facing an increase in demand for services, long-waits and severe crowding. One response to mitigate overcrowding has been to provide primary care services alongside or within hospital EDs for patients with non-urgent problems. It is not known, however, how this impacts the quality of patient care, the utilisation of hospital resources, or if it is cost-effective. Objectives To assess the effects of locating primary care professionals in the hospital ED to provide care for patients with non-urgent health problems, compared with care provided by regular Emergency Physicians (EPs), Search methods We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialized register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane library, 2011, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to March 21 2012); EMBASE (1980 to April 28 2011); CINAHL (1980 to April 28 2011); PsychINFO (1967 to April 28 2011); Sociological Abstracts (1952 to April 28 2011); ASSIA (1987 to April 28 2011); SSSCI (1945 to April 28 2011); HMIC (1979 to April 28 2011), sources of unpublished literature, reference lists of included papers and relevant systematic reviews. We contacted experts in the field for any published or unpublished studies, and hand searched ED conference abstracts from the last three years. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, non-randomised studies, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies that evaluated the effectiveness of introducing primary care professionals to hospital EDs to attend to non-urgent patients, as compared to the care provided by regular EPs. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias for each included study. We contacted authors of included studies to obtain additional data. Dichotomous outcomes are presented as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and continuous

  2. Inequitable access: provider characteristics and reimbursement policies of primary care office sites in Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Alice R; Baisch, Mary Jo

    2010-10-01

    Availability of primary physician care is a key determinant of health care access. While inequities in access can be related to individual and health care system characteristics, this study focused on the organizational characteristics of the health care system and examined the availability and accessibility of primary care physician offices in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The study design was a secondary analysis of data extracted from a database of information about physician offices established for case management purposes. Analyzed data related to provider characteristics--geographic distribution, types of practice, hours of practice, and acceptance of new patients--and reimbursement policies. Results indicated there were barriers to primary care access in Milwaukee. Although the majority of physicians accepted new patients, most providers were available only during standard business hours, were located outside the center city, and limited acceptance of patients who were on Medicaid or had no health insurance. Access improves when there is a medical home and a single clinician coordinating patient health care. This is the role of primary care, and this study supports the need for expanded availability of primary care practitioners.

  3. Comorbid condition care quality in cancer survivors: role of primary care and specialty providers and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Claire F; Frick, Kevin D; Herbert, Robert J; Blackford, Amanda L; Neville, Bridget A; Lemke, Klaus W; Carducci, Michael A; Wolff, Antonio C; Earle, Craig C

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate provider specialty, care coordination, and cancer survivors' comorbid condition care. This retrospective cross-sectional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare study included cancer survivors diagnosed in 2004, 2-3 years post-cancer diagnosis, in fee-for-service Medicare. We examined (1) provider specialties (primary care providers (PCPs), oncology specialists, other specialists) visited post-hospitalization, (2) role of provider specialties in chronic and acute condition management, and (3) an ambulatory care coordination measure. Outcome measures covered (1) visits post-hospitalization for nine conditions, (2) chronic disease management (lipid profile, diabetic eye exam, diabetic monitoring), and (3) acute condition management (electrocardiogram (EKG) for congestive heart failure (CHF), imaging for CHF, EKG for transient ischemic attack, cholecystectomy, hip fracture repair). Among 8661 cancer survivors, patients were more likely to visit PCPs than oncologists or other specialists following hospitalizations for 8/9 conditions. Patients visiting a PCP (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 1/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting a nother specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 2/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting an oncology specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care on 2/3 chronic indicators and less likely to receive recommended care on 1/5 acute indicators. Patients at greatest risk for poor coordination were more likely to receive appropriate care on 4/6 indicators. PCPs are central to cancer survivors' non-cancer comorbid condition care quality. Implications for Cancer Survivors PCP involvement in cancer survivors' care should be promoted.

  4. Using the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to identify practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Beehler, Gregory P; Funderburk, Jennifer S; King, Paul R; Wade, Michael; Possemato, Kyle

    2015-12-01

    Primary care-mental health integration (PC-MHI) is growing in popularity. To determine program success, it is essential to know if PC-MHI services are being delivered as intended. The investigation examines responses to the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to explore PC-MHI provider practice patterns. Latent class analysis was used to identify clusters of PC-MHI providers based on their self-report of adherence on the PPAQ. Analysis revealed five provider clusters with varying levels of adherence to PC-MHI model components. Across clusters, adherence was typically lowest in relation to collaboration with other primary care staff. Clusters also differed significantly in regard to provider educational background and psychotherapy approach, level of clinic integration, and previous PC-MHI training. The PPAQ can be used to identify PC-MHI provider practice patterns that have relevance for future clinical effectiveness studies, development of provider training, and quality improvement initiatives.

  5. African-American parents' trust in their child's primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Horn, Ivor B; Mitchell, Stephanie J; Wang, Jichuan; Joseph, Jill G; Wissow, Lawrence S

    2012-01-01

    Patients' trust in their primary care providers has important implications in terms of health outcomes and, among minority patients, mitigating racial health disparities. This study aims to identify family, provider, and health care setting characteristics that predict African American parents' trust in their child's primary care provider and whether provider partnership-building communication style explains this association. Data were collected via retrospective telephone interviews completed 2 weeks after a child's health care visit to 1 of 7 pediatric primary care clinics in Washington, DC (3 community health centers, 3 private practices, and 1 hospital-based clinic). Four hundred twenty-five self-identified African American parents of children 0 to 5 years of age participated. Parents completed several standard survey instruments about trust and provider communication style as well as demographic questionnaires about their family and their child's provider. A step-wise linear regression revealed significant independent effects of having a previous relationship with the provider and seeing a provider in a community health center (CHC) on higher trust. There was also evidence of mediation by provider communication style, suggesting that parents who take their child to a CHC report greater trust in their child's provider because they have higher perceptions of provider partnership building. African American parents' trust in their child's provider may be enhanced by continuity of care and greater use of a partnership-building communication style by providers. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical management for Hirschsprung disease: A review for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Holly L; Rizzolo, Denise; Austin, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Primary care providers may encounter infants and children with Hirschsprung disease, a congenital colonic defect. Although primarily a surgical problem, the disease requires extensive supportive care and a multidisciplinary approach that often extends beyond surgical correction. This article reviews the management of Hirschsprung disease.

  7. Primary care provider interventions for the delayed disclosure of adolescent sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Jessica E

    2005-01-01

    Acute sexual assault is a serious and underreported crime with the potential for causing grave physical and emotional harm to its victim. As a result of developmental and psychological factors, the adolescent victim may delay the disclosure of such an assault and therefore experience detrimental, acute, and long-term effects. By understanding the reasons for delayed disclosure and integrating this with currently established guidelines for acutely assaulted patients, primary care providers can better tailor the care they provide when faced with the delayed disclosure of adolescent sexual assault. Furthermore, based on this review, it becomes clear that standardized protocols are necessary to more efficiently care for these patients. Recommendations are provided to allow tailoring of primary care provider's interventions based on established protocols and new understandings when caring for adolescents who delay the disclosure of their sexual assault.

  8. Importance of healthcare utilization and multimorbidity level in choosing a primary care provider in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Midlöv, Patrik; Halling, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To study the associations between active choice of primary care provider and healthcare utilization, multimorbidity, age, and sex, comparing data from primary care and all healthcare in a Swedish population. Design. Descriptive cross-sectional study using descriptive analyses including t-test, correlations, and logistic regression modelling in four separate models. Setting and subjects. The population (151 731) and all healthcare in Blekinge in 2007. Main outcome measure. Actively or passively listed in primary care, registered on 31 December 2007. Results. Number of consultations (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.30–1.32), multimorbidity level (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.67–1.70), age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.03–1.03), and sex (OR for men 0.67, 95% CI 0.65–0.68) were all associated with registered active listing in primary care. Active listing was more strongly associated with number of consultations and multimorbidity level using primary care data (OR 2.11, 95% CI 2.08–2.15 and OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.11–2.17, respectively) than using data from all healthcare. Number of consultations and multimorbidity level were correlated and had similar associations with active listing in primary care. Modelling number of consultations, multimorbidity level, age, and sex gave four separate models with about 70% explanatory power for active listing in primary care. Combining number of consultations and multimorbidity did not improve the models. Conclusions. Number of consultations and multimorbidity level were associated with active listing in primary care. These factors were also associated with each other differently in primary care than in all healthcare. More complex models including non-health-related individual characteristics and healthcare-related factors are needed to increase explanatory power. PMID:24939741

  9. Mental Health Services in Rural China: A Qualitative Study of Primary Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenyu; Huang, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Faqin; Abdullah, Abu S; Nie, Guanghui; Feng, Qiming; Wei, Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the challenges that primary health care providers faced in the process of delivering mental healthcare and assess their attitudes towards patients with mental health problems. In-depth interviews were conducted among 42 primary health care providers in two counties of Guangxi province, China. All interviews were audio-recorded and analyzed thematically. Primary health care providers in both counties faced the same difficulties: lack of professional knowledge, fear of patients' attack, more extra work, and less subsidies. However, most of primary health care providers (30/42) were still willing to do mental healthcare management. All the interviewees considered that communication skills with patients and their family members, proper attitude (without discrimination), and the professional knowledge of mental health are required. There are still several participants (15/42) who showed negative attitude toward mental disorders. Nearly all the respondents (39/42) emphasized the importance of increasing their income or subsidies by the government. This qualitative study provides insights into mental health services in rural communities of Guangxi and identified issues that could be considered in engaging primary health care providers in the management of mental disorders.

  10. Education of patients with chronic kidney disease at the interface of primary care providers and nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Wright Nunes, Julie A

    2013-07-01

    Patient education is promoted as an integral part of effective kidney disease management. Programs and tools are available for providers and patients to support patient CKD education in primary care and nephrology. Challenges to providing patient education across practice settings include patients' lack of awareness of CKD as a medical entity, physician perceptions of their own lack of skill and ability to educate patients, differences in how primary care and nephrology physicians perceive collaborative care, and shortage of staff and time to support educational efforts. In addition, there is little research available to guide evidence-based practices for implementing early patient CKD education interventions across medical disciplines. Development and testing of patient education programs using early CKD multidisciplinary care, educational websites, and phone-based applications are all areas of growing research. More work is needed to provide evidence and support that physicians and other health professionals need to ensure a seamless patient education experience across the continuum of care.

  11. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  12. Predictors of relational continuity in primary care: patient, provider and practice factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuity is a fundamental tenet of primary care, and highly valued by patients; it may also improve patient outcomes and lower cost of health care. It is thus important to investigate factors that predict higher continuity. However, to date, little is known about the factors that contribute to continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyse practice, provider and patient predictors of continuity of care in a large sample of primary care practices in Ontario, Canada. Another goal was to assess whether there was a difference in the continuity of care provided by different models of primary care. Methods This study is part of the larger a cross-sectional study of 137 primary care practices, their providers and patients. Several performance measures were evaluated; this paper focuses on relational continuity. Four items from the Primary Care Assessment Tool were used to assess relational continuity from the patient’s perspective. Results Multilevel modeling revealed several patient factors that predicted continuity. Older patients and those with chronic disease reported higher continuity, while those who lived in rural areas, had higher education, poorer mental health status, no regular provider, and who were employed reported lower continuity. Providers with more years since graduation had higher patient-reported continuity. Several practice factors predicted lower continuity: number of MDs, nurses, opening on weekends, and having 24 hours a week or less on-call. Analyses that compared continuity across models showed that, in general, Health Service Organizations had better continuity than other models, even when adjusting for patient demographics. Conclusions Some patients with greater health needs experience greater continuity of care. However, the lower continuity reported by those with mental health issues and those who live in rural areas is concerning. Furthermore, our finding that smaller practices have higher continuity suggests that

  13. Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Thomas B.; White, Mary C.; Caraballo, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an update on lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) and its implications for primary care providers. One of the unique features of lung cancer screening is the potential complexity in patient management if an LDCT scan reveals a small pulmonary nodule. Additional tests, consultation with multiple specialists, and follow-up evaluations may be needed to evaluate whether lung cancer is present. Primary care providers should know the resources available in their communities for lung cancer screening with LDCT and smoking cessation, and the key points to be addressed in informed and shared decision-making discussions with patients. PMID:24830610

  14. A situational analysis of training for behaviour change counselling for primary care providers, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Malan, Zelra; Mash, Bob; Everett-Murphy, Katherine

    2015-03-18

    Non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet) are a major contributor to primary care morbidity and the burden of disease. The need for healthcare-provider training in evidence-based lifestyle interventions has been acknowledged by the National Department of Health. However, local studies suggest that counselling on lifestyle modification from healthcare providers is inadequate and this may, in part, be attributable to a lack of training. This study aimed to assess the current training courses for primary healthcare providers in the Western Cape. Stellenbosch University and University of Cape Town. Qualitative interviews were conducted with six key informants (trainers of primary care nurses and registrars in family medicine) and two focus groups (nine nurses and eight doctors) from both Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town. Trainers lack confidence in the effectiveness of behaviour change counselling and in current approaches to training. Current training is limited by time constraints and is not integrated throughout the curriculum--there is a focus on theory rather than modelling and practice, as well as a lack of both formative and summative assessment. Implementation of training is limited by a lack of patient education materials, poor continuity of care and record keeping, conflicting lifestyle messages and an unsupportive organisational culture. Revising the approach to current training is necessary in order to improve primary care providers' behaviour change counselling skills. Primary care facilities need to create a more conducive environment that is supportive of behaviour change counselling.

  15. Analysis of an electronic consultation program at an academic medical centre: Primary care provider questions, specialist responses, and primary care provider actions.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Katherine; Catschegn, Sereina; Cruz, Marisa; Gleason, Nathaniel; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Electronic consultations (eConsults) increase access to specialty care, but little is known about the types of questions primary care providers (PCPs) ask through eConsults, and how they respond to specialist recommendations. Methods This is a retrospective descriptive analysis of the first 200 eConsults completed in the UCSF eConsult program. Participating PCPs were from eight adult primary care sites at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), USA. Medicine subspecialties participating were Cardiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/hepatology, Hematology, Infectious diseases, Nephrology, Pulmonary medicine, Rheumatology, and Sleep medicine. We categorized eConsult questions into "diagnosis," "treatment," and/or "monitoring." We performed medical record reviews to determine the percentage of specialist recommendations PCPs implemented, and the proportion of patients with a specialist visit in the same specialty as the eConsult, emergency department visit, or hospital admission during the subsequent six months. Results PCP questions related to diagnosis in 71% of cases, treatment in 46%, and monitoring in 21%. Specialist responses related to diagnosis in 76% of cases, treatment in 64%, and monitoring in 40%. PCPs ordered 79% of all recommended laboratory tests, 86% of recommended imaging tests and procedures, 65% of recommended new medications, and 73% of recommended medication changes. In the six months after the eConsult, 14% of patients had a specialist visit within the UCSF system in the same specialty as the eConsult. Discussion eConsults provide guidance to PCPs across the spectrum of patient care. PCPs implement specialists' recommendations in the large majority of cases, and few patients subsequently require in-person specialty care related to the reason for the eConsult.

  16. Please break the silence: Parents' views on communication between pediatric primary care and mental health providers.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carolyn A; Ford, Julian D; Ward-Zimmerman, Barbara; Foster, Dana

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of parents' preferences regarding the sharing of information between their children's primary care and mental health providers. Fifty-five parents with a child who was actively engaged in mental health treatment completed an anonymous survey while accompanying their child to either a primary care or mental health clinic appointment. This brief measure elicited parents' experiences with and preferences for treatment coordination across their children's primary care and mental health providers, with a focus on communication practices. Parents consistently described communication among their children's primary care and mental health providers as important, yet frequently reported that such communication was not currently taking place. Further, parents reported that they were often called upon to act as "communication bridges" between professionals caring for their children. Implications for the collaborative pediatric and mental health care of children as well as recommendations for improving communication between mental health and pediatric providers are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. [Technical efficiency assessment of public primary care providers in the Basque Country (Spain), 2010-2013].

    PubMed

    Cordero, José Manuel; Nuño-Solinís, Roberto; Orueta, Juan F; Polo, Cristina; Del Río-Cámara, Mario; Alonso-Morán, Edurne

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the technical efficiency of primary care units operating in the Basque Health Service during the period 2010-2013, corresponding to the implementation of a care integration strategy by health authorities. This study included 11 of the 12 primary care units in the Basque Health Service during the period 2010-2013. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) was used to assess the technical efficiency of the units. In particular, we applied the extension DEA windows to analyse all units as if they were in a single period (33 observations) as well as a conditional model, which allowed incorporation of the effect of the characteristics of the population covered. The outputs considered were a quality index based on fulfilment of different requirements related to primary care delivery and the rate of avoidable hospitalizations (treated as an undesirable output). The inputs used were the number of physicians, the number of nurses and the costs of prescriptions. The morbidity index was included as an exogenous variable. The results showed that the efficiency of all the units improved during the study period. However, this improvement was not greater in the units incorporated in the integrated healthcare organisation. In a context of global transformation of care delivery in the Basque country in the study period, primary care units increased their efficiency. However, this effect was not larger in vertically integrated primary care providers. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents: A Training Priority for Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Hetler, Joel; Edwall, Glenace; Wright, Catherine; Edwards, Anne; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers were surveyed to determine how prepared they feel to address nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, their interest in training on NSSI, and factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI when providing health supervision. Participants included family medicine physicians ("n" = 260), pediatricians…

  19. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents: A Training Priority for Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Hetler, Joel; Edwall, Glenace; Wright, Catherine; Edwards, Anne; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers were surveyed to determine how prepared they feel to address nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, their interest in training on NSSI, and factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI when providing health supervision. Participants included family medicine physicians ("n" = 260), pediatricians…

  20. Providers' Perspectives on Challenges to Contraceptive Counseling in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Melanie A.; Borrero, Sonya; Santucci, Aimee; Schwarz, Eleanor B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although three quarters of reproductive-age women see a health provider annually, less than half receive recommended contraceptive counseling services. We sought to explore providers' perspectives on the challenges to contraceptive counseling in primary care clinics to develop strategies to improve counseling services. Methods A qualitative, focus group (n = 8) study was conducted in November and December 2007; 48 of 90 providers practicing in four primary care clinics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center participated. Providers included physicians, nurses, and pharmacists working in these clinics' multidisciplinary teams. Discussions explored perceived barriers to the provision of counseling services. All groups were audiorecorded, transcribed, and entered into Atlas.Ti, a qualitative data management software. The data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach to content analysis. Results Perceived patient, provider, and health system barriers to contraceptive counseling were identified. Perceived patient barriers included infrequent sexual activity, familiarity with a limited number of methods, desire for pregnancy despite medical contraindications, and religious beliefs. Provider barriers included lack of knowledge, training, and comfort; assumptions about patient pregnancy risk; negative beliefs about contraceptive methods; reliance on patients to initiate discussions; and limited communication between primary care providers (PCPs) and subspecialists. Health system barriers included limited time and competing medical priorities. Conclusions PCPs vary widely in their knowledge, perceived competence, and comfort in providing contraceptive counseling. General efforts to improve integration of contraceptive counseling into primary care services in addition to electronic reminders and efficient delivery of contraceptive information are needed. PMID:20420508

  1. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A

    2015-10-01

    To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Retrospective cohort study. Primary care in communities. Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94-1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98-1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84-0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79-0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21-1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48-1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67-2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01-1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline-concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus Care Provided by Nurse Practitioners vs Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Chen, Nai-Wei; Lwin, Kyaw K.; Baillargeon, Jacques; Raji, Mukaila A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare processes and cost of care of older adults with diabetes mellitus cared for by nurse practitioners (NPs) with processes and cost of those cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Primary care in communities. Participants Individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 2009 who received all their primary care from NPs or PCPs were selected from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 64,354). Measurements Propensity score matching within each state was used to compare these two cohorts with regard to rate of eye examinations, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) testing, nephropathy monitoring, specialist consultation, and Medicare costs. The two groups were also compared regarding medication adherence and use of statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (for individuals with a diagnosis of hypertension), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Results Nurse practitioners and PCPs had similar rates of LDL-C testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94–1.09) and nephropathy monitoring (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.98–1.03), but NPs had lower rates of eye examinations (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84– 0.93) and HbA1C testing (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79– 0.98). NPs were more likely to have consulted cardiologists (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21–1.37), endocrinologists (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.48–1.82), and nephrologists (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.67–2.17) and more likely to have prescribed PIMs (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01–1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in adjusted Medicare spending between the two groups (P = .56). Conclusion Nurse practitioners were similar to PCPs or slightly lower in their rates of diabetes mellitus guideline–concordant care. NPs used specialist consultations more often but had similar overall costs of care to PCPs. PMID:26480967

  3. Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Training: Systematic Development and Implementation in a Large Medical System.

    PubMed

    Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Corso, Meghan L; Nielsen, Matthew K; Corso, Kent A; Polizzi, Nicholas C; Earles, Jay E

    2016-09-01

    The expansion of integrated, collaborative, behavioral health services in primary care requires a trained behavioral health workforce with specific competencies to deliver effective, evidence-informed, team-based care. Most behavioral health providers do not have training or experience working as primary care behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and require structured training to function effectively in this role. This article discusses one such training program developed to meet the needs of a large healthcare system initiating widespread implementation of the primary care behavioral health model of service delivery. It details the Department of Defense's experience in developing its extensive BHC training program, including challenges of addressing personnel selection and hiring issues, selecting a model for training, developing and implementing a phased training curriculum, and improving the training over time to address identified gaps. Future directions for training improvements and lessons learned in a large healthcare system are discussed.

  4. Readying the workforce: evaluation of VHA's comprehensive women's health primary care provider initiative.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Natalya C; Haskell, Sally; Hayes, Patricia M; Balasubramanian, Vidhya; Torgal, Anupama; Ananth, Lakshmi; Saechao, Fay; Iqbal, Samina; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Frayne, Susan M

    2015-04-01

    Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care providers (PCPs) often see few women, making it challenging to maintain proficiency in women's health (WH). Therefore, VHA in 2010 established Designated WH Providers, who would maintain proficiency in comprehensive WH care and be preferentially assigned women patients. To evaluate early implementation of this national policy. At each VHA health care system (N=140), the Women Veterans Program Manager completed a Fiscal Year 2012 workforce capacity assessment (response rate, 100%), representing the first time the national Designated WH Provider workforce had been identified. Assessment data were linked to administrative data. Of all VHA PCPs, 23% were Designated WH Providers; 100% of health care systems and 83% of community clinics had at least 1 Designated WH Provider. On average, women veterans comprised 19% (SD=27%) of the patients Designated WH Providers saw in primary care, versus 5% (SD=7%) for Other PCPs (P<0.001). For women veterans using primary care (N=313,033), new patients were less likely to see a Designated WH Provider than established women veteran patients (52% vs. 64%; P<0.001). VHA has achieved its goal of a Designated WH Provider in every health care system, and is approaching its goal of a Designated WH Provider at every hospital/community clinic. Designated WH Providers see more women than do Other PCPs. However, as the volume of women patients remains low for many providers, attention to alternative approaches to maintaining proficiency may prove necessary, and barriers to assigning new women patients to Designated WH Providers merit attention.

  5. Concussion management for the adolescent patient: an algorithm for primary-care providers.

    PubMed

    Kostyun, Regina O; Hafeez, Imran

    2012-09-01

    A sharp increase in the number of diagnosed concussions has been observed for the traditional adultathlete, as well as the young recreational athlete. An enhancing awareness and growing concern has been noted for the potentially larger number of concussions that go undiagnosed and the unknown capability for long-term complications associated with this injury. This increase in concussion awareness has appropriately led to an enhanced utilization of the health-care system for concussion evaluation and management. As is always the case in the practice of medicine, it is important for healthcare providers, from all points of entry in the healthcare system, to provide consistent management for the best outcomes for any disease process. Millions of sport-related concussions occur each year in the United States, placing a large demand on the healthcare system. Utilization of appropriate and congruent treatment plans during the medical discourse when transferring care of patients between providers is paramount. In the co-management model of care, subspecialists lend expertise to assist primary-care providers (PCPs) in gaining the core competencies necessary to provide appropriate levels of care for certain conditions. Increased use of co-management could make the health-care system more efficient and collaborative, leading to: increased access for patients, lower overall costs, and improved quality of care and health outcomes. Co-management allows patients and families to have access to the expert knowledge of subspecialist while receiving more of their care from their PCP, increasing their comfort and making treatment more convenient. The intent of this paper is to distribute an algorithm created by a multidisciplinary group of medical providers to provide a rational approach, congruent with the standard of care, for the primary-care provider to institute an individualized stepwise progression.

  6. Engaging primary care physicians in quality improvement: lessons from a payer-provider partnership.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Christy Harris; Cohen, Genna R; Erb, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    A health insurer in Michigan, through its Physician Group Incentive Program, engaged providers across the state in a collection of financially incentivized initiatives to transform primary care and improve quality. We investigated physicians' and other program stakeholders' perceptions of the program through semistructured interviews with more than 80 individuals. We found that activities across five areas contributed to successful provider engagement: (1) developing a vision of improving primary care, (2) deliberately fostering practice-practice partnerships, (3) using existing infrastructure, (4) leveraging resources and market share, and (5) managing program trade-offs. Our research highlights effective strategies for engaging primary care physicians in program design and implementation processes and creating learning communities to support quality improvement and practice change.

  7. Primary care providers' knowledge, beliefs and treatment practices for gout: results of a physician questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Leslie R; Mazor, Kathleen M; Negron, Amarie; Ogarek, Jessica; Firneno, Cassandra; Yood, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    We sought to examine primary care providers' gout knowledge and reported treatment patterns in comparison with current treatment recommendations. We conducted a national survey of a random sample of US primary care physicians to assess their treatment of acute, intercritical and tophaceous gout using published European and American gout treatment recommendations and guidelines as a gold standard. There were 838 respondents (response rate of 41%), most of whom worked in private practice (63%) with >16 years experience (52%). Inappropriate dosing of medications in the setting of renal disease and lack of prophylaxis when initiating urate-lowering therapy (ULT) accounted for much of the lack of compliance with treatment recommendations. Specifically for acute podagra, 53% reported avoidance of anti-inflammatory drugs in the setting of renal insufficiency, use of colchicine at a dose of ≤2.4 mg/day and no initiation of a ULT during an acute attack. For intercritical gout in the setting of renal disease, 3% would provide care consistent with the recommendations, including initiating a ULT at the appropriate dose with dosing titration to a serum urate level of ≤6 mg/dl and providing prophylaxis. For tophaceous gout, 17% reported care consistent with the recommendations, including ULT use with dosing titration to a serum urate level of ≤6 mg/dl and prophylaxis. Only half of primary care providers reported optimal treatment practices for the management of acute gout and <20% for intercritical or tophaceous gout, suggesting that care deficiencies are common.

  8. Team dynamics, clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between primary care providers: A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Song, Hummy; Ryan, Molly; Tendulkar, Shalini; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Frolkis, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Chien, Alyna T; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care is essential for delivering high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care. Despite considerable research about the effects of team-based care on patient outcomes, few studies have examined how team dynamics relate to provider outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among team dynamics, primary care provider (PCP) clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between PCPs in 18 Harvard-affiliated primary care practices participating in Harvard's Academic Innovations Collaborative. First, we administered a cross-sectional survey to all 548 PCPs (267 attending clinicians, 281 resident physicians) working at participating practices; 65% responded. We assessed the relationship of team dynamics with PCPs' clinical work satisfaction and perception of patient care coordination between PCPs, respectively, and the potential mediating effect of patient care coordination on the relationship between team dynamics and work satisfaction. In addition, we embedded a qualitative evaluation within the quantitative evaluation to achieve a convergent mixed methods design to help us better understand our findings and illuminate relationships among key variables. Better team dynamics were positively associated with clinical work satisfaction and quality of patient care coordination between PCPs. Coordination partially mediated the relationship between team dynamics and satisfaction for attending clinicians, suggesting that higher satisfaction depends, in part, on better teamwork, yielding more coordinated patient care. We found no mediating effects for resident physicians. Qualitative results suggest that sources of satisfaction from positive team dynamics for PCPs may be most relevant to attending clinicians. Improving primary care team dynamics could improve clinical work satisfaction among PCPs and patient care coordination between PCPs. In addition to improving outcomes that directly concern health care providers, efforts to

  9. Caring for Alaska Native prostate cancer survivors in primary care: a survey of Alaska Tribal Health System providers.

    PubMed

    Tilburt, Jon C; Kelley, Stacy; DeCourtney, Christine A; Humeniuk, Katherine M; Latini, Jerilyn; Kim, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the constraints of optimizing health care for prostate cancer survivors in Alaska primary care. To describe the experiences and attitudes of primary care providers within the Alaska Tribal Health System (ATHS) regarding the care of prostate cancer survivors. In late October 2011, we emailed a 22-item electronic survey to 268 ATHS primary care providers regarding the frequency of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) monitoring for a hypothetical prostate cancer survivor; who should be responsible for the patient's life-long prostate cancer surveillance; who should support the patient's emotional and medical needs as a survivor; and providers' level of comfort addressing recurrence monitoring, erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, androgen deprivation therapy, and emotional needs. We used simple logistic regression to examine the association between provider characteristics and their responses to the survivorship survey items. Of 221 individuals who were successfully contacted, a total of 114 responded (52% response rate). Most ATHS providers indicated they would order a PSA test every 12 months (69%) and believed that, ideally, the hypothetical patient's primary care provider should be responsible for his life-long prostate cancer surveillance (60%). Most providers reported feeling either "moderately" or "very" comfortable addressing topics such as prostate cancer recurrence (59%), erectile dysfunction (64%), urinary incontinence (63%), and emotional needs (61%) with prostate cancer survivors. These results varied somewhat by provider characteristics including female sex, years in practice, and the number of prostate cancer survivors seen in their practice. These data suggest that most primary care providers in Alaska are poised to assume the care of prostate cancer survivors locally. However, we also found that large minorities of providers do not feel confident in their ability to manage common issues in prostate cancer survivorship

  10. Web-Based SBIRT Skills Training for Health Professional Students and Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, T. Bradley; Wilhelm, Susan E.; Rossie, Karen M.; Metcalf, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed and assessed 2 innovative, case-based, interactive training programs on substance abuse, one for health professional students on alcohol and one for primary care providers on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Both programs build skills in substance abuse SBIRT. Real-world effectiveness…

  11. Peril of the pox. Are primary care providers aware of varicella vaccination guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Persaude, Darshini; Teape-Humphrey, Lorna; Adelstein, Raquel; Domb, Sharon; Jaakkimainen, Liisa

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether physicians providing primary care in Ontario were aware of guidelines published by Health Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI), their opinions about the varicella vaccine, and factors that influence use of the vaccine. METHODS: A questionnaire examining awareness, knowledge, and perceived barriers to using varicella vaccine was developed and mailed to a random sample of 500 family physicians and 400 pediatricians practising in Ontario. RESULTS: To the 900 questionnaires mailed, 284 family physicians (56.9%) and 232 pediatricians (59.2%) responded. Fifty-six percent of family physicians and 95.4% of pediatricians providing primary care were aware of the Health Canada guidelines. Physicians who were aware of the Health Canada guidelines were more knowledgeable about the vaccine and were more likely to recommend it. Both groups of physicians identified cost (not covered by the government), problems with storage and handling, and concerns about long-term immunity as barriers to use of the vaccine. CONCLUSION: While awareness of the guidelines was associated with better knowledge of and following recommendations for the vaccine, Health Canada guidelines were not widely distributed to all primary care providers. One way to encourage incorporation of varicella vaccine guidelines into practice would be to improve dissemination of the guidelines to all primary care providers. PMID:11889891

  12. Web-Based SBIRT Skills Training for Health Professional Students and Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, T. Bradley; Wilhelm, Susan E.; Rossie, Karen M.; Metcalf, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed and assessed 2 innovative, case-based, interactive training programs on substance abuse, one for health professional students on alcohol and one for primary care providers on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Both programs build skills in substance abuse SBIRT. Real-world effectiveness…

  13. A retrospective study on how primary care providers manage specialists’ recommendations after an e-consultation

    PubMed Central

    Pecina, Jennifer L; Frank, Jennifer M; North, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: E-consultations are asynchronous text-based consultations between providers which can facilitate patient access to timely specialty care. In contrast to traditional face-to-face consults, conveying and completing recommendations of the specialist is the responsibility of the referring provider. This presents a new workflow for primary care providers who have multiple options (face-to-face, telephone, letter, secure message) to communicate the e-consultation recommendations. This study examines how primary care providers are managing this new workflow. Methods: We performed a retrospective random sampling of e-consultations with individual medical record review and classified e-consultations by type of recommendation, how recommendations were communicated to patients, and whether recommendations were carried out. Results: We randomly selected 220 e-consultations in 13 different specialties for review. In all, 85% of e-consultations contained recommendations for referring providers. Recommendations on medication(s) were most common (35%) followed by recommendations on ordering laboratory tests (29%). In all, 25% of the time e-consultants gave multiple possible courses of action for referring providers to choose from. Patient notification of recommendations was found for 192 (87%) of e-consultations with providers performing the notification 63% of the time and nursing staff performing the notification 37% of the time. The communication back to the patients included communication via nurse telephone calls (37%), provider telephone calls (23%), secure messages (24%), face-to-face visits (11%), and by written correspondence (5%). Discussion: Managing recommendations from e-consultations results in a new workflow for primary care providers. Healthcare institutions that utilize e-consults should be aware of this new workflow. Further study is needed to determine best practices for this task that is now increasing in primary care. PMID:28348734

  14. Organization Complexity and Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Quality Improvement Culture Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; Canamucio, Anne; Lempa, Michele; Yano, Elizabeth M; Long, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how aspects of quality improvement (QI) culture changed during the introduction of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient-centered medical home initiative and how they were influenced by existing organizational factors, including VHA facility complexity and practice location. A voluntary survey, measuring primary care providers' (PCPs') perspectives on QI culture at their primary care clinics, was administered in 2010 and 2012. Participants were 320 PCPs from hospital- and community-based primary care practices in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio. PCPs in community-based outpatient clinics reported an improvement in established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation from 2010 to 2012. However, their peers in hospital-based clinics did not report any significant improvements in QI culture. In both years, compared with high-complexity facilities, medium- and low-complexity facilities had better scores on the scales assessing established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation.

  15. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers). Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider) interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection), based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and secondary outcomes are the

  16. Performance of new alternative providers of primary care services in England: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Felix; Laverty, Anthony A; Pape, Utz; Ratneswaren, Anenta; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Health system reforms in England are opening broad areas of clinical practice to new providers of care. As part of these reforms, new entrants--including private companies--have been allowed into the primary care market under 'alternative provider of medical services' contracting mechanisms since 2004. The characteristics and performance of general practices working under new alternative provider contracts are not well described. We sought to compare the quality of care provided by new entrant providers to that provided by the traditional model of general practice. Open cohort study of English general practices. We used linear regression in cross-sectional and time series analyses, adjusting for practice and population characteristics, to compare quality in practices using alternative provider contracts to traditional practices. We created regression models using practice fixed effects to estimate the impact of practices changing to the new contract type. The English National Health Service. All general practices open from 2008/2009 to 2012/2013. Seventeen established quality indicators--covering clinical effectiveness, efficiency, access and patient experience. In total, 4.1% (347 of 8300) of general practices in England were run by alternative contract providers. These practices tended to be smaller, and serve younger, more diverse and more deprived populations than traditional providers. Practices run by alternative providers performed worse than traditional providers on 15 of 17 indicators after adjusting for practice and population characteristics (p < 0.01 for all). Switching to a new alternative provider contract did not result in improved performance. The introduction of new alternative providers to deliver primary care services in England has not led to improvements in quality and may have resulted in worse care. Regulators should ensure that new entrants to clinical provider markets are performing to adequate standards and at least as well as

  17. Performance of new alternative providers of primary care services in England: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Felix; Laverty, Anthony A; Pape, Utz; Ratneswaren, Anenta; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Health system reforms in England are opening broad areas of clinical practice to new providers of care. As part of these reforms, new entrants – including private companies – have been allowed into the primary care market under ‘alternative provider of medical services’ contracting mechanisms since 2004. The characteristics and performance of general practices working under new alternative provider contracts are not well described. We sought to compare the quality of care provided by new entrant providers to that provided by the traditional model of general practice. Design Open cohort study of English general practices. We used linear regression in cross-sectional and time series analyses, adjusting for practice and population characteristics, to compare quality in practices using alternative provider contracts to traditional practices. We created regression models using practice fixed effects to estimate the impact of practices changing to the new contract type. Setting The English National Health Service. Participants All general practices open from 2008/2009 to 2012/2013. Main outcome measures Seventeen established quality indicators – covering clinical effectiveness, efficiency, access and patient experience. Results In total, 4.1% (347 of 8300) of general practices in England were run by alternative contract providers. These practices tended to be smaller, and serve younger, more diverse and more deprived populations than traditional providers. Practices run by alternative providers performed worse than traditional providers on 15 of 17 indicators after adjusting for practice and population characteristics (p < 0.01 for all). Switching to a new alternative provider contract did not result in improved performance. Conclusions The introduction of new alternative providers to deliver primary care services in England has not led to improvements in quality and may have resulted in worse care. Regulators should ensure that new

  18. Role of the primary care provider in the diagnosis and management of heartburn.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Pamela R

    2010-04-01

    Heartburn affects an estimated 42% of the US population. Often, patients are able to recognize symptoms and self-treat heartburn; however, patients with more persistent and/or troublesome symptoms should be evaluated by a physician or other healthcare provider. This review focuses on the role of the primary care provider in the diagnosis and treatment of heartburn. A search was conducted on PubMed (to November 2009) and articles relevant to the management of heartburn by a primary care provider topic were selected. Diagnostic tools, such as endoscopy, and ambulatory pH monitoring, are recommended for advanced assessment of patients with frequent heartburn to avert misdiagnosis and to identify complications of reflux disease. Over-the-counter and prescription treatments for frequent heartburn symptoms include antacids, histamine(2)-receptor antagonists (H(2)RAs), antacid/H(2)RA combinations, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Among these, PPIs represent the mainstay of acute and maintenance treatment regimens in reflux disorders and are more effective than H(2)RAs for long-term use due to the development of tolerance to the latter therapy. While once-daily PPI therapy may be sufficient in most patients, a few may require twice-daily PPI therapy to alleviate their symptoms. This review is limited by its relatively narrow focus on articles cited in PubMed. The primary care provider is ideally situated to advise patients on the best treatment option for their condition and to provide follow-up care if required.

  19. Provider and interpreter preferences among Somali women in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Odunukan, Olufunso W; Abdulai, Raolat M; Hagi Salaad, Misbil F; Lahr, Brian D; Flynn, Priscilla M; Wieland, Mark L

    2015-04-01

    Somali people are among the largest refugee populations to resettle in North America and Europe over the past 2 decades, and health disparities are well documented, including barriers to effective navigation of primary health care systems. Patient-provider gender discordance has been described as a barrier to health-seeking behaviors and effective communication by Somali women in past qualitative work. The objective of this study was to elucidate provider and interpreter preferences during clinical encounters according to gender and race among Somali women in the United States. Fifty Somali women empanelled to a large primary care practice completed pictorial surveys to elucidate preferences of Somali women for providers of different genders and race for different components of the clinical examination using a Likert-type scale. We found that Somali women generally preferred a female provider for conducting the physical examination, particularly for the pelvic, breast, and abdominal examinations. Likewise, Somali women strongly preferred female interpreters to be present during the physical examination. There was no stated preference for patient-provider racial concordance. These findings have implications for structural health care changes aimed at delivering culturally sensitive and effective primary care to Somali patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Perceptions of Obesity Treatment Options Among Healthcare Providers and Low-Income Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Betty M; Kennedy, Kathleen B; Sarpong, Daniel F; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is a key component of medical care delivery and has a role to play in reducing obesity in the United States. The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes and perceptions about obesity in low-income primary care patients and to identify preferences for weight management interventions from the patient and healthcare provider perspectives. A convenience sample of 28 patients and 6 healthcare providers from across the state of Louisiana participated in 1 of 5 structured focus groups. Demographic information was collected from both the patients and healthcare providers using survey instruments. Patients and healthcare providers were more similar than dissimilar in their perceptions of obesity in that both groups selected referral to a nutritionist, use of medication, and prescribed exercise as the top 3 strategies that would have the greatest impact on losing weight. Referral to a nutritionist was selected as the easiest strategy to implement. Receiving feedback from both patients and healthcare providers gives researchers the opportunity to acquire useful knowledge that may be beneficial in designing and conducting interventions suitable for patients desiring to lose weight, especially those in primary care settings.

  1. Continuing professional development in HIV chronic disease management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Helen; Yip, Benita; Chau, William; Nóhpal De La Rosa, Adriana; Hall, David; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio; Guillemi, Silvia

    2014-12-09

    Abstract Primary care providers need continuing professional development (CPD) in order to improve their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with chronic conditions. We developed an intensive modular CPD program in the chronic disease management of HIV for primary care providers. The program combines self-directed learning, interactive tutorials with experts, small group discussions, case studies, clinical training, one-on-one mentoring and individualized learning objectives. We trained 27 family physicians and 7 nurse practitioners between 2011 and 2013. The trainees reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. There was a 136.76% increase in the number of distinct HIV-positive patients receiving HIV-related medication refills that were prescribed by the trainees.

  2. Primary Care Tasks Associated with Provider Burnout: Findings from a Veterans Health Administration Survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Linda Y; Rose, Danielle E; Soban, Lynn M; Stockdale, Susan E; Meredith, Lisa S; Edwards, Samuel T; Helfrich, Christian D; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2017-09-25

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a primary care delivery model predicated on shared responsibility for patient care among members of an interprofessional team. Effective task sharing may reduce burnout among primary care providers (PCPs). However, little is known about the extent to which PCPs share these responsibilities, and which, if any, of the primary care tasks performed independently by the PCPs (vs. shared with the team) are particularly associated with PCP burnout. A better understanding of the relationship between these tasks and their effects on PCP burnout may help guide focused efforts aimed at reducing burnout. To investigate (1) the extent to which PCPs share responsibility for 14 discrete primary care tasks with other team members, and (2) which, if any, of the primary care tasks performed by the PCPs (without reliance on team members) are associated with PCP burnout. Secondary data analysis of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) survey data from two time periods. 327 providers from 23 VA primary care practices within one VHA regional network. The dependent variable was PCP report of burnout. Independent variables included PCP report of the extent to which they performed 14 discrete primary care tasks without reliance on team members; team functioning; and PCP-, clinic-, and system-level variables. In adjusted models, PCP reports of intervening on patient lifestyle factors and educating patients about disease-specific self-care activities, without reliance on their teams, were significantly associated with burnout (intervening on lifestyle: b = 4.11, 95% CI = 0.39, 7.83, p = 0.03; educating patients: b = 3.83, 95% CI = 0.33, 7.32, p = 0.03). Performing behavioral counseling and self-management education tasks without relying on other team members for assistance was associated with PCP burnout. Expanding the roles of nurses and other healthcare professionals to assume responsibility for these tasks may ease PCP burden and

  3. Prehospital management of evolving critical illness by the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Kerri A; Hosseinnezhad, Alireza; Ullah, Ashfaq; Vinagre, Yuka-Marie; Baker, Stephen P; Lilly, Craig M

    2013-10-01

    The factors that limit primary care providers (PCPs) from intervening for adults with evolving, acute, severe illness are less understood than the increasing frequency of management by acute care providers. Rates of prehospital patient management by a PCP and of communication with acute care teams were measured in a multicenter, cross-sectional, descriptive study conducted in all four of the adult medical ICUs of the three hospitals in central Massachusetts that provide tertiary care. Rates were measured for 390 critical care encounters, using a validated instrument to abstract the medical record and conduct telephone interviews. PCPs implemented prehospital management for eight episodes of acute illness among 300 encounters. Infrequent prehospital management by PCPs was attributed to their lack of awareness of the patient's evolving acute illness. Only 21% of PCPs were aware of the acute illness before their patient was admitted to an ICU, and 33% were not aware that their patient was in an ICU. Rates of PCP involvement were not appreciably different among provider groups or by patient age, sex, insurance status, hospital, ICU, or ICU staffing model. We identified lack of PCP awareness of patients' acute illness and high rates of PCP referral to acute care providers as the most frequent barriers to prehospital management of evolving acute illness. These findings suggest that implementing processes that encourage early patient-PCP communication and increase rates of prehospital management of infections and acute exacerbations of chronic diseases could reduce use of acute care services.

  4. Role of primary care providers in dengue prevention and control in the community.

    PubMed

    Ang, K T; Rohani, I; Look, C H

    2010-03-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health threat in Malaysia, especially in the highly urbanized states of Selangor and the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur. It is believed that many seek treatment at the primary care clinics and are not admitted. This study aims at establishing the fact that primary care practitioners, as the first point of patient contacts, play a crucial role in advising patients suspected of having dengue to take early preventive measures to break the chain of dengue transmission. A total of 236 patients admitted to two government hospitals for suspected dengue fever were interviewed using a structured questionnaire over a one week period in December 2008. It was found that 83.9% of the patients had sought treatment at a Primary Care (PC) facility before admission to the hospital, with 68.7% of them seeking treatment on two or more occasions. The mean time period for seeking treatment at primary care clinic was one and a half (1.4) days of fever, compared to almost five (4.9) days for admission. The majority of patients (96-98%) reported that primary care practitioners had not given them any advice on preventive measures to be taken even though 51.9% of the patients had been told they could be having dengue fever. This study showed the need for primary care providers to be more involved in the control and prevention of dengue in the community, as these patients were seen very early in their illness compared to when they were admitted.

  5. Primary care provider concerns about management of chronic pain in community clinic populations.

    PubMed

    Upshur, Carole C; Luckmann, Roger S; Savageau, Judith A

    2006-06-01

    Chronic pain is a common patient complaint in primary care, yet providers and patients are often dissatisfied with treatment processes and outcomes. To assess provider satisfaction with their training for and current management of chronic pain in community clinic settings. To identify perceived problems with delivering chronic pain treatment and issues with opioid prescribing for chronic pain. Mailed survey to primary care providers (PCPs) at 8 community clinics. Respondents (N=111) included attendings, residents, and nurse practioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs). They reported 37.5% of adult appointments in a typical week involved patients with chronic pain complaints. They attributed problems with pain care and opioid prescribing more often to patient-related factors such as lack of self-management, and potential for abuse of medication than to provider or practice system factors. Nevertheless, respondents reported inadequate training for, and low satisfaction with, delivering chronic pain treatment. A substantial proportion of adult primary care appointments involve patients with chronic pain complains. Dissatisfaction with training and substantial concerns about patient self-management and about opioid prescribing suggest areas for improving medical education and postgraduate training. Emphasis on patient-centered approaches to chronic pain management, including skills for assessing risk of opioid abuse and addiction, is required.

  6. Primary Care Provider Concerns about Management of Chronic Pain in Community Clinic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Upshur, Carole C; Luckmann, Roger S; Savageau, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic pain is a common patient complaint in primary care, yet providers and patients are often dissatisfied with treatment processes and outcomes. OBJECTIVE To assess provider satisfaction with their training for and current management of chronic pain in community clinic settings. To identify perceived problems with delivering chronic pain treatment and issues with opioid prescribing for chronic pain. DESIGN Mailed survey to primary care providers (PCPs) at 8 community clinics. RESULTS Respondents (N =111) included attendings, residents, and nurse practioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs). They reported 37.5% of adult appointments in a typical week involved patients with chronic pain complaints. They attributed problems with pain care and opioid prescribing more often to patient-related factors such as lack of self-management, and potential for abuse of medication than to provider or practice system factors. Nevertheless, respondents reported inadequate training for, and low satisfaction with, delivering chronic pain treatment. CONCLUSIONS A substantial proportion of adult primary care appointments involve patients with chronic pain complains. Dissatisfaction with training and substantial concerns about patient self-management and about opioid prescribing suggest areas for improving medical education and postgraduate training. Emphasis on patient-centered approaches to chronic pain management, including skills for assessing risk of opioid abuse and addiction, is required. PMID:16808752

  7. Job Satisfaction of Primary Health-Care Providers (Public Sector) in Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Khan, Abdul Majeed; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Job satisfaction is determined by a discrepancy between what one wants in a job and what one has in a job. The core components of information necessary for what satisfies and motivates the health work force in our country are missing at policy level. Therefore present study will help us to know the factors for job satisfaction among primary health care providers in public sector. Materials and Methods: Present study is descriptive in nature conducted in public sector dispensaries/primary urban health centers in Delhi among health care providers. Pretested structured questionnaire was administered to 227 health care providers. Data was analyzed using SPSS and relevant statistical test were applied. Results: Analysis of study reveals that ANMs are more satisfied than MOs, Pharmacist and Lab assistants/Lab technicians; and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Age and education level of health care providers don’t show any significant difference in job satisfaction. All the health care providers are dissatisfied from the training policies and practices, salaries and opportunities for career growth in the organization. Majority of variables studied for job satisfaction have low scores. Five factor were identified concerned with job satisfaction in factor analysis. Conclusion: Job satisfaction is poor for all the four groups of health care providers in dispensaries/primary urban health centers and it is not possible to assign a single factor as a sole determinant of dissatisfaction in the job. Therefore it is recommended that appropriate changes are required at the policy as well as at the dispensary/PUHC level to keep the health work force motivated under public sector in Delhi. PMID:24479088

  8. The range and diversity of providers' viewpoints towards the Iraqi primary health care system: an exploration using Q-methodology.

    PubMed

    Shabila, Nazar P; Al-Tawil, Namir G; Al-Hadithi, Tariq S; Sondorp, Egbert

    2013-03-21

    The increasingly recognized need for reorganizing the primary health care services in Iraq calls for a comprehensive assessment of the system to better understand its problems and needs for development. As part of such comprehensive assessment and due to the important role of primary health care providers in adopting any change, we ought to explore the range and diversity of viewpoints of primary health care providers towards the Iraqi primary health care system. This explorative study was carried out in Erbil governorate, Iraq from May to July 2011. Data were collected from primary health care providers using Q-methodology to elicit subjective viewpoints and identify shared patterns among individuals. Forty primary health care providers representing eight primary health care centers sorted 41 statements reflecting different aspects of the Iraqi primary health care system into a distribution on a scale of nine from "disagree most" to "agree most". By-person factor analysis was used to derive latent viewpoints through centroid factor extraction and varimax rotation of factors. Analysis of the participants' Q-sorts resulted in four distinct viewpoints among primary health care providers toward the current primary health care system. One factor emphasized positive aspects of the current primary health care system that is content with the current primary health care system. The other three factors highlighted the negative aspects and they included (i) professionally-centered viewpoint, (ii) comprehensive perception and problem-based solutions and (iii) critical to leadership/governance aspects of the system. This study revealed diverse viewpoints of primary health care providers toward the current Iraqi primary health care system and recognized the particular issues related to each viewpoint. The findings can contribute to a better understanding of health policy makers and primary health care managers concerning the problems facing the primary health care system that

  9. Barriers to providing nutrition counseling cited by physicians: a survey of primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, Kathryn M; Rickett, Katherine

    2010-10-01

    In a 1995 pivotal study, Kushner described the attitudes, practice behaviors, and barriers to the delivery of nutrition counseling by primary care physicians. This article recognized nutrition and dietary counseling as key components in the delivery of preventive services by primary care physicians. Kushner called for a multifaceted approach to change physicians' counseling practices. The prevailing belief today is that little has changed. Healthy People 2010 and the U.S. Preventive Task Force identify the need for physicians to address nutrition with patients. The 2010 objective was to increase to 75% the proportion of office visits that included ordering or providing diet counseling for patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or hypertension. At the midcourse review, the proportion actually declined from 42% to 40%. Primary care physicians continue to believe that providing nutrition counseling is within their realm of responsibility. Yet the gap remains between the proportion of patients who physicians believe would benefit from nutrition counseling and those who receive it from their primary care physician or are referred to dietitians and other healthcare professionals. The barriers cited in recent years continue to be those listed by Kushner: lack of time and compensation and, to a lesser extent, lack of knowledge and resources. The 2010 Surgeon General's Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation and First Lady Obama's "Let's Move Campaign" spotlight the need for counseling adults and children on diet and physical activity.

  10. Burnout and its Influencing Factors among Primary Health Care Providers in the North East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohammad; Khosravi, Ahmad; Eghtesadi, Ahmad Reza; Sadeghi, Zakieh; Abedi, Ghasem; Ranjbar, Mansour; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Burnout is a popular research topics in service providing jobs, including the health care field. This study aimed at assessing the level of job burnout and to consider the important antecedents which might be related to job burnout among primary health care providers in Iran. Methods The participants in this applied cross-sectional study which was conducted in 2013 were 548 primary health care providers who were randomly selected from among those working in Shahroud, Sabzevar, Neishabour, Bojnord (provinces located in the north east of Iran). Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was administered to the participants and the collected data were analyzed using SPSS through chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression model. Results The burnout mean score among the participants was 54.1 ± 27.2 and the mean scores of burnout components i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were 15.5 ± 13.6, 3.7 ± 5.4 and 35.5 ± 13.5 respectively. In terms of levels of burnout, 64.2% of the participants showed low levels (n = 352), 18.4% average levels (n = 101) and 17.3% high levels (n = 95). A significant relationship was observed between burnout, job resources and interest in job (p ≤ 0.05). However, no significant relationship was observed between burnout and the place (university) of working, age, satisfaction with income, experience, gender, level of education, marital status, housing status, having a second job and place of residence (p ≥0.05). Conclusion Lack of personal accomplishment was highly prevalent among the participating primary health care providers. Lack of career advancement and job transfer opportunities may play a role in the burnout of primary health care providers. Therefore, paying attention to this aspect may help to reduce burnout and even increase job engagement. PMID:27930726

  11. Burnout and its Influencing Factors among Primary Health Care Providers in the North East of Iran.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohammad; Khosravi, Ahmad; Eghtesadi, Ahmad Reza; Sadeghi, Zakieh; Abedi, Ghasem; Ranjbar, Mansour; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Burnout is a popular research topics in service providing jobs, including the health care field. This study aimed at assessing the level of job burnout and to consider the important antecedents which might be related to job burnout among primary health care providers in Iran. The participants in this applied cross-sectional study which was conducted in 2013 were 548 primary health care providers who were randomly selected from among those working in Shahroud, Sabzevar, Neishabour, Bojnord (provinces located in the north east of Iran). Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was administered to the participants and the collected data were analyzed using SPSS through chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression model. The burnout mean score among the participants was 54.1 ± 27.2 and the mean scores of burnout components i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were 15.5 ± 13.6, 3.7 ± 5.4 and 35.5 ± 13.5 respectively. In terms of levels of burnout, 64.2% of the participants showed low levels (n = 352), 18.4% average levels (n = 101) and 17.3% high levels (n = 95). A significant relationship was observed between burnout, job resources and interest in job (p ≤ 0.05). However, no significant relationship was observed between burnout and the place (university) of working, age, satisfaction with income, experience, gender, level of education, marital status, housing status, having a second job and place of residence (p ≥0.05). Lack of personal accomplishment was highly prevalent among the participating primary health care providers. Lack of career advancement and job transfer opportunities may play a role in the burnout of primary health care providers. Therefore, paying attention to this aspect may help to reduce burnout and even increase job engagement.

  12. A situational analysis of training for behaviour change counselling for primary care providers, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Everett-Murphy, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet) are a major contributor to primary care morbidity and the burden of disease. The need for healthcare-provider training in evidence-based lifestyle interventions has been acknowledged by the National Department of Health. However, local studies suggest that counselling on lifestyle modification from healthcare providers is inadequate and this may, in part, be attributable to a lack of training. Aim This study aimed to assess the current training courses for primary healthcare providers in the Western Cape. Setting Stellenbosch University and University of Cape Town. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with six key informants (trainers of primary care nurses and registrars in family medicine) and two focus groups (nine nurses and eight doctors) from both Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town. Results Trainers lack confidence in the effectiveness of behaviour change counselling and in current approaches to training. Current training is limited by time constraints and is not integrated throughout the curriculum – there is a focus on theory rather than modelling and practice, as well as a lack of both formative and summative assessment. Implementation of training is limited by a lack of patient education materials, poor continuity of care and record keeping, conflicting lifestyle messages and an unsupportive organisational culture. Conclusion Revising the approach to current training is necessary in order to improve primary care providers’ behaviour change counselling skills. Primary care facilities need to create a more conducive environment that is supportive of behaviour change counselling. PMID:26245589

  13. The quality of metabolic newborn screening specialty care services: results of a survey of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carolyn Stady; Bentler, Kristi; Vanderburg, Nancy; Berry, Susan A

    2012-10-01

    Since 2001, approximately 500 children with inborn errors of metabolism (IBEM) have been identified through the Minnesota newborn screening program. The vast majority of them receive specialty care at the Pediatric Metabolism Clinic or the Phenylketonuria (PKU) Clinic at the University of Minnesota. In order to determine provider satisfaction with the quality of services at those clinics, we surveyed primary care physicians, certified nurse practitioners and a certified physician assistant, collectively referred to in this article as primary care providers, who referred patients with IBEM to one of the clinics. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of metabolic team specialty services for children with IBEM; identify strategies to ensure coordinated and comprehensive care for children with IBEM; improve metabolic specialty care and connection to services for children with IBEM and their families; and gather data to inform newborn screening programming through the Minnesota Department of Health. Responses revealed a high level of overall satisfaction with the referral processes, 2) the quality of verbal communications and written reports, 3) feedback to the primary care team and 4) the management plans for addressing the needs of children with IBEM within the primary care setting. Improvement in communication about emergency planning for children with IBEM is clinics as a result of the survey findings.

  14. Web-based SBIRT skills training for health professional students and primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Tanner, T Bradley; Wilhelm, Susan E; Rossie, Karen M; Metcalf, Mary P

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed and assessed 2 innovative, case-based, interactive training programs on substance abuse, one for health professional students on alcohol and one for primary care providers on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Both programs build skills in substance abuse SBIRT. Real-world effectiveness trials involving medical students (n = 10) and nursing students (n = 60) were completed; trials involving primary care providers (n = 65) are in progress during 2011. Medical students and nursing students had similarly low baseline scores on assessments that benefited from training: knowledge, confidence, and clinical performance measured via an online standardized patient case and encounter note all improved post-training. Preliminary results indicate that practicing providers improved on knowledge, attitude, and brief intervention skill performance after a similar training. Results suggest that SBIRT skills can be improved with this model for case-based interactive training programs, and thus, that this training has the potential to impact patient outcomes.

  15. Challenges and Strategies in Providing Home Based Primary Care for Refugees in the US.

    PubMed

    Febles, C; Nies, M A; Fanning, K; Tavernier, S S

    2016-08-18

    The recent crisis in the Middle East has prompted the exodus of millions of refugees from the region who are at present seeking shelter across Europe and in the United States. Among the most immediate needs of refugees upon arrival in a host country is health care, and it is one of the most sustained interactions they experience. Home visits are a common form of primary care for refugees. The authors review the literature to identify themes related to challenges and strategies for providing home based primary care to refugees. The literature review was performed by searching cross-disciplinary databases utilizing Onesearch, but focusing primarily on results produced through CINAHL, EBSCOHOST, and Pub Med databases. To maximize the number of studies included, there was no time frame placed upon publication dates of articles within the search. A total of 55 articles were included in this paper.

  16. Vaccine knowledge and practices of primary care providers of exempt vs. vaccinated children.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Daniel A; Pan, William K Y; Omer, Saad B; Navar, Ann Marie; Orenstein, Walter; Marcuse, Edgar K; Taylor, James; deHart, M Patricia; Stokley, Shannon; Carter, Terrell; Halsey, Neal A

    2008-01-01

    Compare vaccine knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary care providers for fully vaccinated children and children who are exempt from school immunization requirements. We conducted a mailed survey of parent-identified primary care providers from four states to measure perceived risks and benefits of vaccination and other key immunization beliefs. Frequencies of responses were stratified by type of provider, identified by exempt versus vaccinated children. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for responses by provider type. 551 surveys were completed (84.3% response rate). Providers for exempt children had similar attitudes to providers for non-exempt children. However, there were statistically significant increased concerns among providers for exempt children regarding vaccine safety and lack of perceived individual and community benefits for vaccines compared to other providers. The great majority of providers for exempt children had similar attitudes about vaccine safety, effectiveness and benefits as providers of non-exempt children. Although providers for exempt children were more likely to believe that multiple vaccines weaken a child's immune system and were concerned about vaccine safety and less likely to consider vaccines were beneficial, a substantial proportion of providers of both exempt and vaccinated children have concerns about vaccine safety and believe that CDC underestimates the frequency of vaccine side effects. Effective continuing education of providers about the risks and benefits of immunization and including in vaccine recommendations more information on pre and post licensing vaccine safety evaluations may help address these concerns.

  17. Views of Dental Providers on Primary Care Coordination at Chairside: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, Mary E.; Birenz, Shirley; Gomes, Danni; Golembeski, Cynthia A.; Greenblatt, Ariel Port; Shelley, Donna; Russell, Stefanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a need for research to facilitate the widespread implementation, dissemination, and sustained utilization of evidence-based primary care screening, monitoring, and care coordination guidelines, thereby increasing the impact of dental hygienists’ actions on patients’ oral and general health. The aims of this formative study are to: (1) explore dental hygienists’ and dentists’ perspectives regarding the integration of primary care activities into routine dental care; and (2) assess the needs of dental hygienists and dentists regarding primary care coordination activities and use of information technology to obtain clinical information at chairside. Methods This qualitative study recruited ten hygienists and six dentists from ten New York City area dental offices with diverse patient mixes and volumes. A New York University faculty hygienist conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews, which were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of multilevel coding based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, resulting in emergent themes with accompanying categories. Results The dental hygienists and dentists interviewed as part of this study fail to use evidence-based guidelines to screen their patients for primary care sensitive conditions. Overwhelmingly, dental providers believe that tobacco use and poor diet contribute to oral disease, and report using electronic devices at chairside to obtain web-based health information. Conclusion Dental hygienists are well positioned to help facilitate greater integration of oral and general health care. Challenges include lack of evidence-based knowledge, coordination between dental hygienists and dentists, and systems-level support, with opportunities for improvement based upon a theory-driven framework. PMID:27340183

  18. Rheumatologist and Primary Care Management of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Patient and Provider Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Christie M; Roberts, Tonya J; Hansen, Karen E; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Gilmore, Andrea; Maxcy, Courtney; Bowers, Barbara J

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients often lack CVD preventive care. We examined CVD preventive care processes from RA patient and provider perspectives to develop a process map for identifying targets for future interventions to improve CVD preventive care. Thirty-one participants (15 patients, 7 rheumatologists, and 9 primary care physicians [PCPs]) participated in interviews that were coded using NVivo software and analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Patients and providers reported that receipt of preventive care depends upon identifying and acting on risk factors, although most noted that both processes rarely occurred. Engagement in these processes was influenced by various provider-, system-, visit-, and patient-related conditions, such as patient activation or patients' knowledge about their risk. While nearly half of patients and PCPs were unaware of RA-CVD risk, all rheumatologists were aware of risk. Rheumatologists reported not systematically identifying risk factors, or, if identified, they described communicating about CVD risk factors via clinic notes to PCPs instead of acting directly due to perceived role boundaries. PCPs suggested that scheduling PCP visits could improve CVD risk management, and all participants viewed comanagement positively. Findings from this study illustrate important gaps and opportunities to support identifying and acting on CVD risk factors in RA patients from the provider, system, visit, and patient levels. Future work should investigate professional role support through improved guidelines, patient activation, and system-based RA-CVD preventive care strategies. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Medical provider attitudes about behavioral health consultants in integrated primary care: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Torrence, Nicole D; Mueller, Anne E; Ilem, Allison A; Renn, Brenna N; DeSantis, Brian; Segal, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    Integrated behavioral health increases service utilization and treatment success, particularly with high-risk populations. This study assessed medical personnel's attitudes and perceptions of behavioral health clinicians (BHCs) in primary care using a brief self-report measure. A 6-item survey was given to medical providers (n = 45) from a health care system that includes integrated behavioral health services. Survey items assessed providers' attitudes and perceptions about BHCs. Attitudes about behavioral health were largely favorable. For all items, 73.3% to 100% of participants endorsed strongly agree or agree. Chi-square analyses revealed that those who interacted more frequently with BHCs were more comfortable discussing behavioral health issues with their patients, χ²(6, n = 45) = 13.43, p < .05, and that physicians believe that BHCs help patients effectively address their behavioral health problems, χ²(2, n = 45) = 6.36, p < .05. Age, gender, and health center in which the providers worked were not significantly related to any survey items. Medical providers surveyed believe that BHCs are valuable members of integrated health care, improving their abilities to provide care and to address their patients' physical and behavioral health problems. Although these preliminary results are promising, the setting surveyed has well-integrated behavioral health care services and thus might not be representative of other settings without such integration. Future studies should address medical providers' opinions of BHCs in a variety of settings with larger samples.

  20. Integrating Behavioral Health into Pediatric Primary Care: Implications for Provider Time and Cost.

    PubMed

    Gouge, Natasha; Polaha, Jodi; Rogers, Rachel; Harden, Amy

    2016-12-01

    Integrating a behavioral health consultant (BHC) into primary care is associated with improved patient outcomes, fewer medical visits, and increased provider satisfaction; however, few studies have evaluated the feasibility of this model from an operations perspective. Specifically, time and cost have been identified as barriers to implementation. Our study aimed to examine time spent, patient volume, and revenue generated during days when the on-site BHC was available compared with days when the consultant was not. Data were collected across a 10-day period when a BHC provided services and 10 days when she was not available. Data included time stamps of patient direct care; providers' direct reports of problems raised; and a review of medical and administrative records, including billing codes and reimbursement. This study took place in a rural, stand-alone private pediatric primary care practice. The participants were five pediatric primary care providers (PCPs; two doctors of medicine, 1 doctor of osteopathy, 2 nurse practitioners) and two supervised doctoral students in psychology (BHCs). Pediatric patients (N = 668) and their parents also participated. On days when a BHC was present, medical providers spent 2 fewer minutes on average for every patient seen, saw 42% more patients, and collected $1142 more revenue than on days when no consultant was present. The time savings demonstrated on days when the consultant was available point to the efficiency and potential financial viability of this model. These results have important implications for the feasibility of hiring behavioral health professionals in a fee-for-service system. They have equally useful implications for the utility of moving to a bundled system of care in which collaborative practice is valued.

  1. Primary care providers' acceptance of health information exchange utilizing IHE XDS.

    PubMed

    Haarbrandt, Birger; Schwartze, Jonas; Gusew, Nathalie; Seidel, Christoph; Haux, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    We assessed primary care providers' perception of a health information exchange system (HIE) based on IHE XDS. The HIE will be part of a regional health network in the metropolitan area of Braunschweig, Lower Saxony, Germany. An application enabling access to medical documents in an XDS Affinity Domain was developed. We examined usability and factors related to user acceptance. User perception was probed using system usability scale (SUS) and semi-structured interviews. The evaluation was performed on 7 participants. The SUS showed an above average usability with a median score of 77.5. During interviews, participants submitted suggestions for additional features and improvement of usability. Poor integration of functionality into existing workflows was most frequently criticized. While usability was well perceived by primary care providers, challenges remain in adoption of XDS based IHE. To speed up document access in time-critical domains, we suggest use of complementary methods, enabling directed communication flows.

  2. Psychological assistance provided to patients diagnosed with depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    Motta, Cibele Cunha Lima da; Moré, Carmen Leontina Ojeda Ocampo; Nunes, Carlos Henrique Sancineto da Silva

    2017-03-01

    The scope of this research was to understand the assistance provided by psychologists to patients diagnosed with depression in the municipal health care network. In this study, the phenomenon is examined from its broader perspective, taking the psychosocial dimensions of health into account. A group of 22 psychologists participated in this study of a qualitative nature. Data collection began with participant in-field observation of the institutional context followed by semi-structured interviews. Grounded theory methodology was used to analyze information, thereby facilitating its integration and categorization.The results revealed that in the primary care network the treatment of depression is essentially restricted to its biological aspect; the choice of individual psychotherapy as the main form of treatment refers to traditional practices of psychological care for depression; the use of institutional and community methods as part of the therapeutic approach suggests mental health interventions that address the psychosocial dimension. The findings indicate that transcending the traditional models of care for patients with depression and the construction of forms of treatment using psychosocial resources are ongoing, indicating that comprehensive care needs to be further consolidated in primary care.

  3. The Lake Clinic - providing primary care to isolated floating villages on the Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Merali, H S; Morgan, J F; Uk, S; Phlan, S; Wang, L T; Korng, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the most isolated areas in South-East Asia is the Tonle Sap Lake region in Cambodia. Scattered throughout the lake are remote fishing villages that are geographically isolated from the rest of the country. Receiving health care at a clinic or hospital often involves a full day of travel from the Tonle Sap Lake region, which is unaffordable for the vast majority of residents. The Lake Clinic (TLC) is a non-government organization established in 2007. In 2008, a ship was built that was designed for transport of a medical team and supplies to provide primary care to the fishing villages. Initially the project started with one team serving seven villages. TLC has since expanded to two full teams serving 19 villages. TLC provides adult and pediatric primary care, vaccinations, dental services, eyecare services, antenatal care and health education free of charge. From 2008 to 2012, there were a total of 13 160 pediatric visits and 17 722 adult visits. In addition to these services, 739 patients received dental care, 346 patients received eye care, there were 1239 antenatal visits, 116 family planning visits, and 1600 patients received health education. In total, 130 patients were referred to hospitals or health centers for a higher level of care. A total of 6627 immunizations were provided. The most common pediatric illness was upper respiratory infection (44.4%), and the most common adult illness observed was gastritis (20.6%). Despite the challenges, TLC has been able to achieve a significant goal: to provide primary care medical services to a remote area of Cambodia where no medical services were previously available. TLC strives to strengthen healthcare delivery with the goal to provide the best possible care in the region. New partnerships have allowed laboratory capacity and a formalized hospital referral system for pediatric patients beginning in 2014. A new boat, which completed construction in December 2013 and is now fully operational, has allowed the

  4. Competencies and Training Guidelines for Behavioral Health Providers in Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Wanjiku F M; Williamson, Ariel A; Mautone, Jennifer A; Robins, Paul M; Benton, Tami D

    2017-10-01

    This article focuses on the cross-discipline training competencies needed for preparing behavioral health providers to implement integrated primary care services. After a review of current competencies in the disciplines of child and adolescent psychiatry, psychology, and social work, cross-cutting competencies for integrated training purposes are identified. These competencies are comprehensive and broad and can be modified for use in varied settings and training programs. An existing and successful integrated care training model, currently implemented at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, is described. This model and the training competencies are discussed in the context of recommendations for future work and training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Contracting with private providers for primary care services: evidence from urban China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the role of the private sector in health service delivery, including primary care and population health services. China’s recent health reforms call for non-discrimination against private providers and emphasize strengthening primary care, but formal contracting-out initiatives remain few, and the associated empirical evidence is very limited. This paper presents a case study of contracting with private providers for urban primary and preventive health services in Shandong Province, China. The case study draws on three primary sources of data: administrative records; a household survey of over 1600 community residents in Weifang and City Y; and a provider survey of over 1000 staff at community health stations (CHS) in both Weifang and City Y. We supplement the quantitative data with one-on-one, in-depth interviews with key informants, including local officials in charge of public health and government finance. We find significant differences in patient mix: Residents in the communities served by private community health stations are of lower socioeconomic status (more likely to be uninsured and to report poor health), compared to residents in communities served by a government-owned CHS. Analysis of a household survey of 1013 residents shows that they are more willing to do a routine health exam at their neighborhood CHS if they are of low socioeconomic status (as measured either by education or income). Government and private community health stations in Weifang did not statistically differ in their performance on contracted dimensions, after controlling for size and other CHS characteristics. In contrast, the comparison City Y had lower performance and a large gap between public and private providers. We discuss why these patterns arose and what policymakers and residents considered to be the main issues and concerns regarding primary care services. PMID:23327666

  6. Strategizing EHR use to achieve patient-centered care in exam rooms: a qualitative study on primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Ashfaq, Shazia; Bell, Kristin; Calvitti, Alan; Farber, Neil J; Gabuzda, Mark T; Gray, Barbara; Liu, Lin; Rick, Steven; Street, Richard L; Zheng, Kai; Zuest, Danielle; Agha, Zia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHRs) have great potential to improve quality of care. However, their use may diminish “patient-centeredness” in exam rooms by distracting the healthcare provider from focusing on direct patient interaction. The authors conducted a qualitative interview study to understand the magnitude of this issue, and the strategies that primary care providers devised to mitigate the unintended adverse effect associated with EHR use. Methods and Materials Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 healthcare providers at 4 Veterans Affairs (VAs) outpatient primary care clinics in San Diego County. Data analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach. Results The results show that providers face demands from both patients and the EHR system. To cope with these demands, and to provide patient-centered care, providers attempt to perform EHR work outside of patient encounters and create templates to streamline documentation work. Providers also attempt to use the EHR to engage patients, establish patient buy-in for EHR use, and multitask between communicating with patients and using the EHR. Discussion and Conclusion This study has uncovered the challenges that primary care providers face in integrating the EHR into their work practice, and the strategies they use to overcome these challenges in order to maintain patient-centered care. These findings illuminate the importance of developing “best” practices to improve patient-centered care in today’s highly “wired” health environment. These findings also show that more user-centered EHR design is needed to improve system usability. PMID:26568605

  7. The nephrologist as a primary care provider for the hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nina; Dahl, Naomi V; Kapoian, Toros; Sherman, Richard A; Walker, John A

    2005-01-01

    The role of nephrologists as de facto primary care providers (PCP) for dialysis patients is of increasing interest. We sought to determine the proportion of patients who rely on nephrologists for primary care and to identify demographic variables associated with this primary care responsibility. We reviewed the charts of 158 patients receiving hemodialysis at a suburban, freestanding, teaching hospital affiliated outpatient unit from December 1999 through January 2001. In addition, each patient was interviewed and completed a survey. Non-nephrologists were considered to be a patient's PCP if there was chart, survey or interview evidence of such a relationship. Of the 158 patients, only 56 patients had a PCP. The nephrologist thus was the de facto PCP in 65% of hemodialysis patients, a responsibility that was 3.3-fold more likely for patients not enrolled in a health maintenance organization (HMO) or managed care organization (MCO). In the non-HMO/MCO group, patients with a PCP had been on dialysis for less time than those without a PCP [2.7 vs. 4.6 years (P=0.0006)]. Only 32% of patients on dialysis <1 year had nephrologists as de facto PCP vs. 71% of those on dialysis more than 1 year (P=0.0002). This association between time on dialysis and de facto use of nephrologists as PCP was not accounted for by the shorter time on dialysis of HMO/MCO enrollees. The extent to which the nephrologist fulfills the often unsought role as PCP needs further investigation.

  8. The primary care prescribing psychologist model: medical provider ratings of the safety, impact and utility of prescribing psychology in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Shearer, David S; Harmon, S Cory; Seavey, Brian M; Tiu, Alvin Y

    2012-12-01

    Family medicine providers at a large family medicine clinic were surveyed regarding their impression of the impact, utility and safety of the Primary Care Prescribing Psychologist (PCPP) model in which a prescribing psychologist is embedded in a primary care clinic. This article describes the model and provides indications of its strengths and weaknesses as reported by medical providers who have utilized the model for the past 2 years. A brief history of prescribing psychology and the challenges surrounding granting psychologists the authority to prescribe psychotropic medication is summarized. Results indicate family medicine providers agree that having a prescribing psychologist embedded in the family medicine clinic is helpful to their practice, safe for patients, convenient for providers and for patients, and improves patient care. Potential benefits of integrating prescribing psychology into primary care are considered and directions for future research are discussed.

  9. Nurse practitioners as primary care providers with their own patient panels and organizational structures: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang; Norful, Allison A

    2017-05-25

    Health care systems globally are facing challenges of meeting the growing demand for primary care services due to a shortage of primary care physicians. Policy makers and administrators are searching for solutions to increase the primary care capacity. The effective utilization of nurse practitioners (NPs) has been proposed as a solution. However, organizations utilize NPs in variable capacities. In some settings, NPs serve as primary care providers delivering ongoing continuous care to their patients, referred to as patient panels, whereas in other settings they deliver episodic care. Little is known about why organizations deploy NPs differently. Investigate the NP role in care delivery-primary care providers with the own patient panels or delivering episodic care-within their organizations and understand how work environments affect their role. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from primary care NPs. The study was conducted in one state in the United States (Massachusetts). Data from 163 primary care organizations was obtained, which employed between one to 12 NPs. 807 NPs recruited from the Massachusetts Provider Database received mail surveys; 314 completed and returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 40%. The survey contained measures of NP role in care delivery and work environment. NP role was measured by an item asking NPs to report if they deliver ongoing continuous care to their patient panel or if they do not have patient panel. The work environment was measured with the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ). The multilevel Cox regression models investigated the influence of organization-level work environment on NP role in care delivery. About 45% of NPs served as primary care providers with their own patient panel. Organization-level Independent Practice and Support subscale, an NP-PCOCQ subscale, had a significant positive effect on NP role (risk ratio=2.33; 95% CI: 1

  10. Enhancing provider knowledge and patient screening for palliative care needs in chronic multimorbid patients receiving home-based primary care.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Tracy; Manu, Erika; Vitale, Caroline A

    2015-02-01

    This article describes a pilot model to increase palliative care (PC) knowledge and collaboration among providers and to systematically identify chronic multimorbid home care patients who would benefit from focused discussion of potential PC needs. Thirty health care providers from a home-based primary care team attended interdisciplinary trainings. The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) tool was used to trigger discussions of potential palliative needs at team rounds for patients who scored below a cutoff point on the tool. Palliative Performance Scale implementation added little burden on nurses and triggered a discussion in 51 flagged patients. The tool successfully identified 75% of patients who died or were discharged. Screening was systematic and consistent and resulted in targeted discussions about PC needs without generating additional burden on our PC consult service. This model shows promise for enhancing collaborative patient care and access to PC.

  11. Primary Care Providers' Perspectives on Screening Older Adult Patients for Food Insecurity.

    PubMed

    Pooler, Jennifer A; Hoffman, Vanessa A; Karva, Fata J

    2017-08-02

    Food insecurity has been associated with poor health and health outcomes among older adults, yet food assistance resources are available and underutilized. Routine screening and referral for food insecurity in primary care is one avenue to connect food-insecure older adults with available resources. This qualitative study aims to better understand the beliefs of primary care providers (PCPs) about food security screening and referrals in a primary care setting and perceived barriers to implementation. PCPs (n = 16) who have older adult patients but do not routinely screen for food insecurity were interviewed by phone. PCPs recognize the importance of food security for older patients and discuss nutrition and food access with patients under certain circumstances. Concerns emerged with regard to implementing a systematic screening and referral process: limited time to meet with patients, a lack of resources for addressing food insecurity, and prioritizing food insecurity at both the health system and the patient levels. Despite perceived challenges, PCPs are receptive to the idea of systematically screening and referring patients to external resources for food assistance and support. Barriers could be addressed by health systems prioritizing food insecurity as a health concern and public and private payers providing reimbursement for screening.

  12. Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rebecca S; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact. PMID:24600282

  13. Survivorship after allogeneic transplantation-management recommendations for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Tichelli, André; Rovó, Alicia

    2015-03-01

    Prognosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has greatly improved. Therefore, long-term survivorship becomes an important issue. A number of malignant and nonmalignant late effects can cause substantial morbidity, with considerable impact on health and quality of life. The main factors responsible for late effects after HSCT are total body irradiation-based conditioning and chronic graft-versus-host disease and its treatment. The knowledge on late effects serves as guidance for surveillance and management decision. Aftercare includes screening and counseling for prevention and treatment of late complications. The care of HSCT recipients tends with time to be transferred from the transplant center back to the primary care provider, who might not be however familiar with the unique needs of long-term survivors. A broad expertise is needed for the post-transplant management; therefore, transplant centers together with primary care providers should ensure complementary care delivery. Standardized follow-up guidelines on late effects represent the best tool to guaranty good management of long-term survivors. Distribution, broad promotion, and applications of these guidelines are therefore needed.

  14. Influence of provider mix and regulation on primary care services supplied to US patients.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael R; Polsky, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Access to medical care and how it differs for various patients remain key policy issues. While existing work has examined clinic structure's influence on productivity, less research has explored the link between provider mix and access for different patient types - which also correspond to different service prices. We exploit experimental data from a large field study spanning 10 US states where trained audit callers were randomly assigned an insurance status and then contacted primary care physician practices seeking new patient appointments. We find clinics with more non-physician clinicians are associated with better access for Medicaid patients and lower prices for office visits; however, these relationships are only found in states granting full practice autonomy to these providers. Substituting more non-physician labor in primary care settings may facilitate greater appointment availability for Medicaid patients, but this likely rests on a favorable policy environment. Relaxing regulations for non-physicians may be an important initiative as US health reforms continue and also relevant to other countries coping with greater demands for medical care and related financial strain.

  15. Patient, Provider, and Combined Interventions for Managing Osteoarthritis in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kelli D; Oddone, Eugene Z; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Chatterjee, Ranee; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Yancy, William S; Datta, Santanu K; Corsino, Leonor; Dolor, Rowena J

    2017-03-21

    A single-site study showed that a combined patient and provider intervention improved outcomes for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but it did not assess separate effects of the interventions. To examine whether patient-based, provider-based, and patient-provider interventions improve osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized trial with assignment to patient, provider, and patient-provider interventions or usual care. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01435109). 10 Duke University Health System community-based primary care clinics. 537 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved electronic delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to providers. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total score at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire). Linear mixed models assessed the difference in improvement among groups. No difference was observed in WOMAC score changes from baseline to 12 months in the patient (-1.5 [95% CI, -5.1 to 2.0]; P = 0.40), provider (2.5 [CI, -0.9 to 5.9]; P = 0.152), or patient-provider (-0.7 [CI, -4.2 to 2.8]; P = 0.69) intervention groups compared with usual care. All groups had improvements in WOMAC scores at 12 months (range, -3.7 to -7.7). In addition, no differences were seen in objective physical function or depressive symptoms at 12 months in any of the intervention groups compared with usual care. The study involved 1 health care network. Data on provider referrals were not collected. Contrary to a previous study of a combined patient and provider intervention for osteoarthritis in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center, this study found no statistically

  16. Smartphones Enable Teledermatology in South Dakota: An Overview and Primer for Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Gaster, Emily E; Chabra, Indy; Burrish, Gene F

    2015-10-01

    Timely access to specialty care by dermatologists is a significant problem in South Dakota. This is especially germane to patients in rural areas, the elderly, and those with socioeconomic barriers. Implementation of a modality utilizing smartphone technology called mobile teledermatology (MTD) should improve access to dermatologic care. MTD provides location- and time-independent dermatologic care and is currently being used successfully across the U.S. MTD has the potential to benefit both patients and providers in South Dakota; however, barriers to its implementation currently exist. Expanding insurance coverage and reimbursement for teledermatology, facilitating multi-state telemedicine licensure, and educating primary care providers and patients about teledermatology would facilitate widespread utilization of teledermatology in South Dakota. Current legislation addressing licensure may soon come to fruition, making it easier for dermatologists to practice teledermatology across state lines. In addition to pay-for-service, Medicaid is currently the only insurer in South Dakota that reimburses for store-and-forward teledermatology. We propose MTD as an apt solution for enabling prompt access to dermatologic care in South Dakota and emphasize the need for greater insurance coverage, improved licensure policy, and user education to fully realize the benefits of this technology for our patients.

  17. Perception and practice of malaria prophylaxis in pregnancy among primary health care providers in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fawole, A O; Onyeaso, N C

    2008-04-01

    Pregnant women and their unborn babies are especially vulnerable to malaria. Malaria infection during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of maternal anaemia, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, low birth weight and neonatal death. To assess knowledge and practice of malaria prophylaxis during pregnancy among primary health care providers in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria. Participants were randomly selected from primary health centres and private health facilities in two local governments within Ibadan municipality. All cadres of health professionals in the selected health facilities were interviewed using a semi-structured self -administered questionnaire. Two hundred and eighty-seven participants selected from 42 primary healthcare facilities comprising of 48 (16.7%) CHEWs, 133 (46.3%) auxiliary nurses, 84 (29.3%) trained nurses and 22 (7.7%) medical doctors completed the questionnaires. Healthcare providers in private health facilities formed the bulk (80.5%) of respondents. Respondents' knowledge of malaria prevention strategies was generally poor across all professional cadres. Only 40 (13.9%) respondents had correct knowledge of WHO strategies. Awareness of IPT was significantly higher among respondents from public health facilities compared with private health facilities--93.0% versus 80.9% (p < 0.05) One hundred and fifty-six (54.4%) respondents knew the correct drug, dosage and timing of IPT. Only forty-six (16.0%) respondents were aware that at least three doses of IPT were required for HIV patients. Pyrimethamine was significantly more commonly prescribed in private health facilities compared with public health facilities (p < 0.05) Chloroquine was still commonly prescribed by respondents in public and private health facilities. The use of insecticide treated nets was recommended by 77.4% of respondents. Knowledge about current malaria prevention strategies during pregnancy is poor among health care providers at the primary level of care. Efforts

  18. Comparing the Cost of Care Provided to Medicare Beneficiaries Assigned to Primary Care Nurse Practitioners and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Perloff, Jennifer; DesRoches, Catherine M; Buerhaus, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to assess the cost of services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by nurse practitioners (NPs) billing under their own National Provider Identification number as compared to primary care physicians (PCMDs). Medicare Part A (inpatient) and Part B (office visit) claims for 2009-2010. Retrospective cohort design using propensity score weighted regression. Beneficiaries cared for by a random sample of NPs and primary care physicians. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, geography, comorbidities, and the propensity to see an NP, Medicare evaluation and management payments for beneficiaries assigned to an NP were $207, or 29 percent, less than PCMD assigned beneficiaries. The same pattern was observed for inpatient and total office visit paid amounts, with 11 and 18 percent less for NP assigned beneficiaries, respectively. Results are similar for the work component of relative value units as well. This study provides new evidence of the lower cost of care for beneficiaries managed by NPs, as compared to those managed by PCMDs across inpatient and office-based settings. Results suggest that increasing access to NP primary care will not increase costs for the Medicare program and may be cost saving. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  19. Perspectives of Champlain BASE Specialist Physicians: Their Motivation, Experiences and Recommendations for Providing eConsultations to Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Keely, Erin; Drosinis, Paul; Afkham, Amir; Liddy, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Electronic consultation can improve access to specialist care. However, specialists have been identified as less likely to adopt electronic solutions in clinical settings. We conducted an online survey to explore the perspectives of specialists who use the Champlain BASE eConsult service in Eastern Ontario, Canada. Specialists were asked their opinions on experience with the service, their current consult/referral practices, recommendations for change and expansion of the service, and compensation models. We tabulated descriptive statistics from the multiple choice and Likert scale responses and performed a content analysis with an emergent code strategy for open-text responses. Specialists (n=34, 77% response rate) agreed that the Champlain BASE eConsult service is a feasible way to improve access to specialist care (94%), improves communication between specialists and primary care providers (PCPs) (94%), has educational value for PCPs (91%), and is user friendly (82%). A majority of specialists (88%) felt the service should be expanded provincially and 67% felt it should allow specialist-to-specialist consultation. 88% of specialists agreed that the current compensation process is best. This study provides an in-depth look at the perspective of the specialist physicians who use the Champlain BASE eConsult service. Specialists stated specific recommendations for change that will allow us to ensure the service remains sustainable.

  20. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: An Essential Guide for Pediatric Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Allen, Suzanne; Barlow, Erin

    2017-04-01

    Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods are 20% more effective than traditional contraceptives and are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology as first-line contraception for adolescent girls. Large studies show that LARC use reduces unintended pregnancies, increases user satisfaction, and prolongs duration of use. This article prepares the primary care provider (PCP) with knowledge on safety, efficacy, eligibility, confidentiality, anticipatory guidance, how to find a LARC provider, and guidance on common side effects so the PCP can confidently counsel adolescent patients on LARC methods.

  1. Coverage and quality of antenatal care provided at primary health care facilities in the 'Punjab' province of 'Pakistan'.

    PubMed

    Majrooh, Muhammad Ashraf; Hasnain, Seema; Akram, Javaid; Siddiqui, Arif; Memon, Zahid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Antenatal care is a very important component of maternal health services. It provides the opportunity to learn about risks associated with pregnancy and guides to plan the place of deliveries thereby preventing maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In 'Pakistan' antenatal services to rural population are being provided through a network of primary health care facilities designated as 'Basic Health Units and Rural Health Centers. Pakistan is a developing country, consisting of four provinces and federally administered areas. Each province is administratively subdivided in to 'Divisions' and 'Districts'. By population 'Punjab' is the largest province of Pakistan having 36 districts. This study was conducted to assess the coverage and quality antenatal care in the primary health care facilities in 'Punjab' province of 'Pakistan'. Quantitative and Qualitative methods were used to collect data. Using multistage sampling technique nine out of thirty six districts were selected and 19 primary health care facilities of public sector (seventeen Basic Health Units and two Rural Health Centers were randomly selected from each district. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with clients, providers and health managers. The overall enrollment for antenatal checkup was 55.9% and drop out was 32.9% in subsequent visits. The quality of services regarding assessment, treatment and counseling was extremely poor. The reasons for low coverage and quality were the distant location of facilities, deficiency of facility resources, indifferent attitude and non availability of the staff. Moreover, lack of client awareness about importance of antenatal care and self empowerment for decision making to seek care were also responsible for low coverage. The coverage and quality of the antenatal care services in 'Punjab' are extremely compromised. Only half of the expected pregnancies are enrolled and out of those 1/3 drop out in follow-up visits.

  2. Adapting an effective primary care provider STD/HIV prevention training programme.

    PubMed

    Rabin, D L

    1998-04-01

    Sexually acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to be the major source of HIV infection in the USA. Preventing sexual transmission of HIV can be accomplished through patient behaviour change. Such behaviour change can also decrease risk of other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unwanted pregnancies, both far more common problems than HIV infection. Primary care physicians and other providers can increase patients' safe sex practices by conducting effective sexual risk assessment (RA) and risk reduction (RR) counselling, but physicians both infrequently and incompletely do sexual RA and RR. A programme was developed to improve primary care physicians' prevention practice using Simulated Patient Instructors (SPIs) and mailed educational materials. Programme evaluations showed improved sexual RA and RR practice both by self-report as well as by observation by Simulated Patient Evaluators (SPEs). This paper briefly reviews these findings and then presents adaptations made to improve the programme's content, decrease its cost and increase its availability for training many other care providers. Evaluation of the adapted programme indicates that content and training methods are highly regarded by a diverse array of trainees. To disseminate the modified programme beyond the local area, a Train-the-Trainer programme and manual have been developed, including discussion of recruiting, training and using SPIs for sexual risk reduction. Wider use of this training, as well as more effective and more readily available STD/HIV prevention training, are needed to attain national goals of provider clinical prevention practice.

  3. Demystifying Infant Mental Health: What the Primary Care Provider Needs to Know

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Tanika E.; Condon, Eileen; Price, Rosemary M.; Finch, Bennie Kelly; Sadler, Lois S.; Ordway, Monica Roosa

    2015-01-01

    Infant mental health is an interdisciplinary professional field of inquiry, practice, and policy that is concerned with alleviating suffering and enhancing the social and emotional competence of young children. The focus of this field of practice is supporting the relationships between infants and toddlers and their primary caregivers to ensure healthy social and emotional development. Notably, the connection between early life experiences and lifelong health has been well established in the scientific literature. Without appropriate regulation from a supportive caregiver, exposure to extreme stressors in early childhood can result in wide-ranging physiological disruptions, including alterations to the developing brain and immune, metabolic, and cardiovascular systems. As part of this interdisciplinary team, pediatric primary care clinicians are in a unique position to incorporate infant mental health practice tenets during their frequent office visits with infants and toddlers. This article provides pediatric primary care clinicians with an overview of infant mental health practice and suggestions for the conscious promotion of positive early relationships as an integral component of well-child care. PMID:26559134

  4. Awareness, Interest, and Preferences of Primary Care Providers in Using Point-of-Care Cancer Screening Technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chloe S; Vanture, Sarah; Cho, Margaret; Klapperich, Catherine M; Wang, Catharine; Huang, Franklin W

    2016-01-01

    Well-developed point-of-care (POC) cancer screening tools have the potential to provide better cancer care to patients in both developed and developing countries. However, new medical technology will not be adopted by medical providers unless it addresses a population's existing needs and end-users' preferences. The goals of our study were to assess primary care providers' level of awareness, interest, and preferences in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice and to provide guidelines to biomedical engineers for future POC technology development. A total of 350 primary care providers completed a one-time self-administered online survey, which took approximately 10 minutes to complete. A $50 Amazon gift card was given as an honorarium for the first 100 respondents to encourage participation. The description of POC cancer screening technology was provided in the beginning of the survey to ensure all participants had a basic understanding of what constitutes POC technology. More than half of the participants (57%) stated that they heard of the term "POC technology" for the first time when they took the survey. However, almost all of the participants (97%) stated they were either "very interested" (68%) or "somewhat interested" (29%) in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice. Demographic characteristics such as the length of being in the practice of medicine, the percentage of patients on Medicaid, and the average number of patients per day were not shown to be associated with the level of interest in using POC. These data show that there is a great interest in POC cancer screening technology utilization among this population of primary care providers and vast room for future investigations to further understand the interest and preferences in using POC cancer technology in practice. Ensuring that the benefits of new technology outweigh the costs will maximize the likelihood it will be used by medical providers and patients.

  5. Communication Challenges: A Qualitative Look at the Relationship Between Pediatric Hospitalists and Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Solan, Lauren G; Sherman, Susan N; DeBlasio, Dominick; Simmons, Jeffrey M

    2016-07-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) and hospitalists endorse the importance of effective communication yet studies illustrate critical communication problems between these 2 provider types. Our objective was to develop deeper insight into the dimensions of and underlying reasons for communication issues and determine ways to improve communication and remove barriers by eliciting the perspectives of pediatric PCPs and hospitalists. Using qualitative methods, 2 sets of focus groups were held: 1) mix of local PCPs serving diverse populations, and 2) hospitalists from a free-standing, pediatric institution. The open-ended, semistructured question guides included questions about communication experiences, patient care responsibilities, and suggestions for improvement. Using inductive thematic analysis, investigators coded the transcripts, and resolved differences through consensus. Six PCP (n = 27) and 3 hospitalist (n = 15) focus groups were held. Fifty-six percent of PCPs and 14% of hospitalists had been practicing for >10 years. Five major themes were identified: problematic aspects of communication, perceptions of provider roles, push-pull, postdischarge responsibilities/care, and proposed solutions. Aspects of communication included specific problem areas with verbal and written communication. Perceptions of provider roles highlighted the issue of PCPs feeling devalued. Push-pull described conflicting expectations about a counterpart's role and responsibilities. Postdischarge responsibilities/care addressed unclear responsibilities related to patient follow-up. Proposed solutions were suggested for ways to improve communication. Deficiencies in communication hinder successful collaboration and can cause tension between providers in inpatient and outpatient settings. Understanding specific issues that contribute to poor communication like perceptions about provider roles is critical to improving relationships and facilitating combined efforts to improve patient care

  6. Assessment of Biases Against Latinos and African Americans Among Primary Care Providers and Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Havranek, Edward P.; Price, David W.; Hanratty, Rebecca; Fairclough, Diane L.; Farley, Tillman; Hirsh, Holen K.; Steiner, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed implicit and explicit bias against both Latinos and African Americans among experienced primary care providers (PCPs) and community members (CMs) in the same geographic area. Methods. Two hundred ten PCPs and 190 CMs from 3 health care organizations in the Denver, Colorado, metropolitan area completed Implicit Association Tests and self-report measures of implicit and explicit bias, respectively. Results. With a 60% participation rate, the PCPs demonstrated substantial implicit bias against both Latinos and African Americans, but this was no different from CMs. Explicit bias was largely absent in both groups. Adjustment for background characteristics showed the PCPs had slightly weaker ethnic/racial bias than CMs. Conclusions. This research provided the first evidence of implicit bias against Latinos in health care, as well as confirming previous findings of implicit bias against African Americans. Lack of substantive differences in bias between the experienced PCPs and CMs suggested a wider societal problem. At the same time, the wide range of implicit bias suggested that bias in health care is neither uniform nor inevitable, and important lessons might be learned from providers who do not exhibit bias. PMID:23153155

  7. Awareness, Interest, and Preferences of Primary Care Providers in Using Point-of-Care Cancer Screening Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chloe S.; Vanture, Sarah; Cho, Margaret; Klapperich, Catherine M.; Wang, Catharine; Huang, Franklin W.

    2016-01-01

    Well-developed point-of-care (POC) cancer screening tools have the potential to provide better cancer care to patients in both developed and developing countries. However, new medical technology will not be adopted by medical providers unless it addresses a population’s existing needs and end-users’ preferences. The goals of our study were to assess primary care providers’ level of awareness, interest, and preferences in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice and to provide guidelines to biomedical engineers for future POC technology development. A total of 350 primary care providers completed a one-time self-administered online survey, which took approximately 10 minutes to complete. A $50 Amazon gift card was given as an honorarium for the first 100 respondents to encourage participation. The description of POC cancer screening technology was provided in the beginning of the survey to ensure all participants had a basic understanding of what constitutes POC technology. More than half of the participants (57%) stated that they heard of the term “POC technology” for the first time when they took the survey. However, almost all of the participants (97%) stated they were either “very interested” (68%) or “somewhat interested” (29%) in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice. Demographic characteristics such as the length of being in the practice of medicine, the percentage of patients on Medicaid, and the average number of patients per day were not shown to be associated with the level of interest in using POC. These data show that there is a great interest in POC cancer screening technology utilization among this population of primary care providers and vast room for future investigations to further understand the interest and preferences in using POC cancer technology in practice. Ensuring that the benefits of new technology outweigh the costs will maximize the likelihood it will be used by medical providers and

  8. Contraceptive counseling among pediatric primary care providers in Western Pennsylvania: A survey-based study

    PubMed Central

    Papas, Beth Ann; Shaikh, Nader; Watson, Katherine; Sucato, Gina S

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Data suggest that adolescents in the United States receive inadequate contraceptive counseling. This study sought to determine factors affecting pediatricians’ discussion of contraception with adolescent patients, with a specific focus on long-acting reversible contraception—implantable contraception and intrauterine devices. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was sent via email to a convenience sample of pediatric residents and pediatric primary care providers in Western Pennsylvania. Self-reported contraceptive counseling and prescribing practices in response to clinical vignettes were assessed. Results: Of potential participants (287), 88 (31%) responded. Younger providers and providers who had received contraceptive training were significantly more likely to discuss long-acting reversible contraception methods. Discussion of contraceptive methods also varied by both the age and the sexual history of the patient. Conclusion: Variation in contraceptive counseling potentially results in missed opportunities to counsel about and provide the most effective contraceptive methods. More uniform, universal provider training might alleviate some of these inconsistencies. PMID:28959447

  9. Primary care residents' characteristics and motives for providing differential medical treatment of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Elva M.; Pollak, Kathryn I.; Costanzo, Philip; McNeilly, Maya; Myers, Evan

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer screening rates in the United States are sub-optimal. Physician factors likely contribute to these lower rates. Previous studies provide inconclusive evidence about the association between physician characteristics and the likelihood of addressing cervical cancer. This report assesses potential mechanisms that explain why certain providers do not address cervical cancer screening. METHODS: One hundred primary care residents from various specialties were asked to indicate the preventive topics they would address with a hypothetical white female in her early 20s, who was portrayed as living a "high risk" lifestyle, and visiting her provider only for acute care reasons. RESULTS: Among the provider characteristics assessed, only residents' ethnicity was associated with the likelihood of and time spent addressing cervical cancer screening. In particular, Asian-American residents were least likely to address cervical cancer, while African-American residents were most likely. A mediation analyses revealed that perceived barriers for addressing cervical cancer accounted for this difference. CONCLUSIONS: Study results suggest that there may be cultural factors among health care providers that may account for differential referral and treatment practices. Findings from this study may help identify factors that explain why cervical cancer screening rates are not higher. PMID:12911255

  10. Providing primary health care through integrated microfinance and health services in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Kimberley H; Leatherman, Sheila

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous burdens of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in middle-income countries. The poor are at particular risk, with lower access to health care and higher rates of avoidable mortality. Integrating health-related services with microfinance has been shown to improve health knowledge, behaviors, and access to appropriate health care. However, limited evidence is available on effects of fully integrating clinical health service delivery alongside microfinance services through large scale and sustained long-term programs. Using a conceptual model of health services access, we examine supply- and demand-side factors in a microfinance client population receiving integrated services. We conduct a case study using data from 2010 to 2012 of the design of a universal screening program and primary care services provided in conjunction with microfinance loans by Pro Mujer, a women's development organization in Latin America. The program operates in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru. We analyze descriptive reports and administrative data for measures related to improving access to primary health services and management of chronic diseases. We find provision of preventive care is substantial, with an average of 13% of Pro Mujer clients being screened for cervical cancer each year, 21% receiving breast exams, 16% having a blood glucose measurement, 39% receiving a blood pressure measurement, and 46% having their body mass index calculated. This population, with more than half of those screened being overweight or obese and 9% of those screened having elevated glucose measures, has major risk factors for diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease without intervention. The components of the Pro Mujer health program address four dimensions of healthcare access: geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, and acceptability. Significant progress has been made to meet basic

  11. Burnout: Interpreting the Perception of Iranian Primary Rural Health Care Providers from Working and Organizational Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Health care providers in the rural centers offer the primary health services in the form of proficiencies and professions to the most required target population in the health system. These services are provided in certain condition and population with a verity of limitations. This study aimed to describe and interpret the experiences of the employees from their own working condition in the rural health centers. Methods: The present study conducted in a qualitative research approach and content analysis method through individual and group interviews with 26 employed primary health care providers (including 7 family physicians, 7 midwives, and 12 health workers) in the rural health centers in Isfahan in 2009. Sampling was done using purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as constant comparative basis. Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; “instability and frequent changes”, “involved in laws and regulations”, “pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower”, “helplessness in performing the tasks and duties”, “sense of identity threat and low self-concept”, and “deprivation of professional development”. The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called “burnout”. Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community. PMID:22826774

  12. Incarcerated women and depression: a primer for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Tracy D

    2004-01-01

    Although women represent an increasing number of state prison inmates, they are studied less than their male counterparts are. Incarcerated women have higher rates of depression than both community samples and incarcerated men. The diagnosis and treatment of depression in incarcerated women is complicated by the presence of substance abuse, psychosocial stressors, medical problems, and personality disorders. This article focuses on the role of the community-based primary care provider in assessing, diagnosing, and treating the depressed female offender confined in state prisons.

  13. [Implementation of nurse demand managment in primary health care service providers in Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Brugués Brugués, Alba; Cubells Asensio, Irene; Flores Mateo, Gemma

    2017-04-14

    To describe and analyse the implementaction of nurse demand managment (NDM) among health care providers in Catalonia from 2005 to 2014. Cross sectional survey. Participants All service providers in Catalonia (n=37). Main measurements Interviews with nurse manager of each health care provides about ht barriers and facilitators concerning NDM. Facilitators and barriers were classified into 3 types: (i)health professional (competence, attitudes, motivation for change and individual characteristics); (ii)social context (patients and companions), and (iii)system related factors (organization and structure, economic incentives). Of the 37 providers, 26 (70.3%) have implemented the Demand Management Nurse (NDM). The main barriers identified are the nurse prescriptin regulation, lack of knowledge and skills of nurses, and the lack of protocols at the start of implantation. Among the facilitators are the specific training of professionals, a higher ratio of nurses to doctors, consensus circuits with all professionals and linking the implementation of NDM to economic incentives. NDM is consolidated in Catalonia. However, the NDM should be included in the curricula of nursing degree and continuing education programs in primary care teams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulation model for tracheotomy education for primary health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Dorton, LeighAnne H; Lintzenich, Catherine Rees; Evans, Adele K

    2014-01-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the competency of health-care providers managing patients with tracheotomies, and assess the need for, and efficacy of, a multidisciplinary educational program incorporating patient simulation. The prospective observational study included 87 subjects who manage patients with tracheotomies within a tertiary-care hospital. The subjects completed self-assessment questionnaires and objective multiple-choice tests before and after attending a comprehensive educational course using patient simulation. The outcome measurements included pre-course and post-course questionnaire and test scores, as well as observational data collected during recorded patient simulation sessions. Before the education and simulation, the subjects reported an average comfort level of 3.3 on a 5-point Likert scale across 10 categories in the questionnaire, which improved to 4.4 after the training (p < 0.0001). The subjects' mean scores improved from 56% on the pre-course test to 91% on the post-course test (p < 0.0001). The specific deficiencies observed during patient simulation scenarios included unfamiliarity with different tracheotomy tube types, misunderstanding of speaking valve physiology, and delayed recognition and treatment of a plugged or dislodged tracheotomy tube. There is a significant need for improved tracheotomy education among primary health-care providers. Incorporating patient simulation into a comprehensive tracheotomy educational program was effective in improving provider confidence, increasing provider knowledge, and teaching the skills necessary for managing patients with a tracheotomy.

  15. Consumer Perceptions of Interactions With Primary Care Providers After Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomic Testing.

    PubMed

    van der Wouden, Cathelijne H; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; Ruffin, Mack T; Roberts, J Scott; Green, Robert C

    2016-04-19

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) personal genomic testing (PGT) allows individuals to learn about their genetic makeup without going through a physician, but some consumers share their results with their primary care provider (PCP). To describe the characteristics and perceptions of DTC PGT consumers who discuss their results with their PCP. Longitudinal, prospective cohort study. Online survey before and 6 months after results. DTC PGT consumers. Consumer satisfaction with the DTC PGT experience; whether and, if so, how many results could be used to improve health; how many results were not understood; and beliefs about the PCP's understanding of genetics. Participants were asked with whom they had discussed their results. Genetic reports were linked to survey responses. Among 1026 respondents, 63% planned to share their results with a PCP. At 6-month follow-up, 27% reported having done so, and 8% reported sharing with another health care provider only. Common reasons for not sharing results with a health care provider were that the results were not important enough (40%) or that the participant did not have time to do so (37%). Among participants who discussed results with their PCP, 35% were very satisfied with the encounter, and 18% were not at all satisfied. Frequently identified themes in participant descriptions of these encounters were actionability of the results or use in care (32%), PCP engagement or interest (25%), and lack of PCP engagement or interest (22%). Participants may not be representative of all DTC PGT consumers. A comprehensive picture of DTC PGT consumers who shared their results with a health care provider is presented. The proportion that shares results is expected to increase with time after testing as consumers find opportunities for discussion at later appointments or if results become relevant as medical needs evolve. National Institutes of Health.

  16. Engaging the citizenship of the homeless-a qualitative study of specialist primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Mills, Emma D; Burton, Christopher D; Matheson, Catriona

    2015-08-01

    Homeless patients have complex health needs. They also often describe difficulty accessing and maintaining access to clinical services. Although engagement with health care has been explored from the patient perspective, little is known about how health care professionals conceptualize, assess and promote engagement with health care among homeless persons. To examine how health professionals working in services for homeless persons view their patients' engagement with health care and explore how these views influence their practice. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with health professionals who had experience working with homeless patients. Purposive sampling aimed to cover a range of location, practice type and duration of professional experience. Thematic analysis was undertaken on interview transcripts. Thirteen interviews were conducted. Four themes were explored relating to engagement of homeless persons with health care: (i) systematic barriers to engagement; (ii) difficulties engaging with professionals; (iii) system approaches to facilitate engagement and (iv) relationship approaches to facilitate engagement. In addition, a fifth theme emerged relating to the interaction between practices and networks of homeless persons in which practices were perceived as a key resource for a citizenship of the homeless. Primary care practices providing services for homeless people aim to promote engagement with health care by maximizing flexibility and fostering relationships between patients and the clinical team. In doing so they produce a paradox, whereby they function as a key hub within a citizenship of homeless persons while simultaneously aiming to help people move out of homelessness into a more settled state. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO.

    PubMed

    Shook, Lisa M; Farrell, Christina B; Kalinyak, Karen A; Nelson, Stephen C; Hardesty, Brandon M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Saving, Kay L; Whitten-Shurney, Wanda J; Panepinto, Julie A; Ware, Russell E; Crosby, Lori E

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs) who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM) is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO(®) methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care.

  18. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO

    PubMed Central

    Shook, Lisa M.; Farrell, Christina B.; Kalinyak, Karen A.; Nelson, Stephen C.; Hardesty, Brandon M.; Rampersad, Angeli G.; Saving, Kay L.; Whitten-Shurney, Wanda J.; Panepinto, Julie A.; Ware, Russell E.; Crosby, Lori E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs) who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM) is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO® methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care. PMID:27887664

  19. Integration of mental health resources in a primary care setting leads to increased provider satisfaction and patient access.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Kristin S; Ridgeway, Jennifer L; Hathaway, Julie C; Egginton, Jason S; Kaderlik, Angela B; Katzelnick, David J

    2013-01-01

    This evaluation assessed the opinions and experiences of primary care providers and their support staff before and after implementation of expanded on-site mental health services and related system changes in a primary care clinic. Individual semistructured interviews, which contained a combination of open-ended questions and rating scales, were used to elicit opinions about mental health services before on-site system and resource changes occurred and repeated following changes that were intended to improve access to on-site mental health care. In the first set of interviews, prior to expanding mental health services, primary care providers and support staff were generally dissatisfied with the availability and scheduling of on-site mental health care. Patients were often referred outside the primary care clinic for mental health treatment, to the detriment of communication and coordinated care. Follow-up interviews conducted after expansion of mental health services, scheduling refinements and other system changes revealed improved provider satisfaction in treatment access and coordination of care. Providers appreciated immediate and on-site social worker availability to triage mental health needs and help access care, and on-site treatment was viewed as important for remaining informed about patient care the primary care providers are not delivering directly. Expanding integrated mental health services resulted in increased staff and provider satisfaction. Our evaluation identified key components of satisfaction, including on-site collaboration and assistance triaging patient needs. The sustainability of integrated models of care requires additional study. © 2013.

  20. The policy context of patient centered medical homes: perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Cohen, Genna R; Wise, Christopher G; Green, Lee A

    2013-01-01

    Interest in the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model has increased significantly in recent years. Despite this attention, information is limited regarding the influence of policy context on implementation of the PCMH model. Using comparative, qualitative data, we identify several key policy impediments to PCMH implementation, and propose practical guidelines for addressing these issues. Qualitative, semi-structured in-person interviews with representatives of physician organizations and primary care practices pursuing PCMH. Practitioners and staff at 16 physician practices in Michigan, as well as key leaders of physician organizations. We identified five primary policy issues cited by physicians and physician organization leaders as most impactful on their efforts to adopt PCMH: misalignment of current reimbursement schemes, administrative burden, conflicting criteria for PCMH designation, workforce policy issues, and uncertainty of health care reform. These policies were largely seen as barriers to their ability to implement PCMH. Providers' motivation to embrace PCMH, and their level of confidence regarding the results of such change, are greatly influenced by their perception of the external environment and the control they believe they have over this environment. Having policies in place that shape the path to PCMH in a manner that makes it as easy as possible for providers to accomplish the desired changes could well make the difference in whether successful transformation is achieved.

  1. A rapid evidence-based service by librarians provided information to answer primary care clinical questions.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Jessie; Hogg, William; Rader, Tamara; Salzwedel, Doug; Worster, Danielle; Cogo, Elise; Rowan, Margo

    2010-03-01

    A librarian consultation service was offered to 88 primary care clinicians during office hours. This included a streamlined evidence-based process to answer questions in fewer than 20 min. This included a contact centre accessed through a Web-based platform and using hand-held devices and computers with Web access. Librarians were given technical training in evidence-based medicine, including how to summarise evidence. To describe the process and lessons learned from developing and operating a rapid response librarian consultation service for primary care clinicians. Evaluation included librarian interviews and a clinician exit satisfaction survey. Clinicians were positive about its impact on their clinical practice and decision making. The project revealed some important 'lessons learned' in the clinical use of hand-held devices, knowledge translation and training for clinicians and librarians. The Just-in-Time Librarian Consultation Service showed that it was possible to provide evidence-based answers to clinical questions in 15 min or less. The project overcame a number of barriers using innovative solutions. There are many opportunities to build on this experience for future joint projects of librarians and healthcare providers.

  2. Providing specialty consultant expertise to primary care: an expanding spectrum of modalities.

    PubMed

    Kirsh, Susan R; Ho, P Michael; Aron, David C

    2014-10-01

    In most models of health care delivery, the bulk of services are provided in primary care and there is frequent request for the input of specialty consultants. A critical issue for current and future health care systems is the effective and efficient delivery of specialist expertise for clinicians and patients. Input on a patient's care from specialty consultants usually requires a face-to-face visit between the patient and the consultant. New and complementary models of knowledge sharing have emerged. We describe a framework assessment of a spectrum of knowledge-sharing methods in the context of a patient-centered medical home. This framework is based on our experience in the Veterans Health Administration and a purposive review of the literature. These newer modes of specialty consultation include electronic consultation, secure text messaging, telemedicine of various types, and population preemptive consults. In addition to describing these modes of consultation, our framework points to several important areas in which further research is needed to optimize effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Strengths of primary healthcare regarding care provided for chronic kidney disease 1

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Elaine Amaral; Costa, Mônica Barros; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; Bastos, Rita Maria Rodrigues; Vanelli, Chislene Pereira; Leite, Christiane Chaves Augusto; Caminhas, Márcio Santos; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the structure and results obtained by the "Chronic Renal Patients Care Program" in a Brazilian city. Method: epidemiological, cross-sectional study conducted in 14 PHC units and a secondary center from 2010 to 2013. The Donabedian Model was the methodological framework used. A total of 14 physicians, 13 supervisors, and 11 community health agents from primary healthcare were interviewed for the assessment of structure and process and 1,534 medical files from primary healthcare and 282 from secondary care were consulted to assess outcomes. Results: most units lacked sufficient offices for physicians and nurses to provide consultations, had incomplete staffing, and most professionals had not received proper qualification to provide care for chronic renal disease. Physicians from PHC units classified as capable more frequently referred patients to the secondary care service in the early stages of chronic renal disease (stage 3B) when compared to physicians of units considered not capable (58% vs. 36%) (p=0.049). Capable PHC units also more frequently presented stabilized glomerular filtration rates (51%) when compared to partially capable units (36%) and not capable units (44%) (p=0.046). Conclusion: patients cared for by primary healthcare units that scored higher in structure and process criteria presented better clinical outcomes. Objective: to identify the coping strategies of family members of patients with mental disorders and relate them to family member sociodemographic variables and to the patient's clinical variables. Method: this was a descriptive study conducted at a psychiatric hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo, with 40 family members of hospitalized patients over the age of 18, and who followed the patient before and during hospitalization. We used tools to characterize the subjects and the Folkman and Lazarus Inventory of Coping Strategies. Results: the coping strategies most often used by family members

  4. Primary Care Providers' Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectations for Childhood Obesity Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Eliana M.; Campbell, Marci K.; Tate, Deborah F.; Cai, Jianwen; Ammerman, Alice S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary care providers have a role in the prevention and management of childhood obesity. We explored the relationship of providers' self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and practice level support with childhood obesity counseling frequency. Methods Providers (n=123) completed a survey that assessed their self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and reported obesity counseling frequency. A practice level assessment tool was used to characterize the practices. We analyzed data using frequencies and proportional odds modeling. Results Providers were confident or very confident (78.5–93.5%) in their ability to counsel about healthy eating, physical activity, and weight and agreed or strongly agreed (64.2–86.2%) that their counseling would result in actual changes. Providers with higher outcome expectations were more likely [odds ratio (OR)=3.4] to report providing obesity counseling. Female providers were more likely to report counseling about obesity (OR=2.3) than males. Providers in practices with resources for healthy eating and physical activity reported higher levels of self-efficacy and counseling frequency. Conclusions In our study, providers were confident in their ability to provide obesity counseling and expected changes from their efforts, suggesting that future studies should build on the high level of outcome expectations as well as self-efficacy. The gender difference found regarding obesity counseling may need further exploration. PMID:23635310

  5. Primary care providers' self-efficacy and outcome expectations for childhood obesity counseling.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Lisa M; Perrin, Eliana M; Campbell, Marci K; Tate, Deborah F; Cai, Jianwen; Ammerman, Alice S

    2013-06-01

    Primary care providers have a role in the prevention and management of childhood obesity. We explored the relationship of providers' self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and practice level support with childhood obesity counseling frequency. Providers (n=123) completed a survey that assessed their self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and reported obesity counseling frequency. A practice level assessment tool was used to characterize the practices. We analyzed data using frequencies and proportional odds modeling. Providers were confident or very confident (78.5-93.5%) in their ability to counsel about healthy eating, physical activity, and weight and agreed or strongly agreed (64.2-86.2%) that their counseling would result in actual changes. Providers with higher outcome expectations were more likely [odds ratio (OR)=3.4] to report providing obesity counseling. Female providers were more likely to report counseling about obesity (OR=2.3) than males. Providers in practices with resources for healthy eating and physical activity reported higher levels of self-efficacy and counseling frequency. In our study, providers were confident in their ability to provide obesity counseling and expected changes from their efforts, suggesting that future studies should build on the high level of outcome expectations as well as self-efficacy. The gender difference found regarding obesity counseling may need further exploration.

  6. Readability assessment of patient-provider electronic messages in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Jacob B; Tieu, Lina; Lyles, Courtney; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of limited health literacy among patients threatens the success of secure electronic messaging between patients from diverse populations and their providers. The purpose of this study is to generate hypotheses about the readability of patient and provider electronic messages. We collected 31 patient-provider e-mail exchanges (n = 119 total messages) from a safety-net primary care clinic. We compared the messages' mean word count and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Levels (FKGLs), calculated the frequency of provider messages below an FKGL = 8, and assessed readability concordance between patients' and providers' messages. Patients used more words in their initial e-mails compared to providers, but the FKGLs were similar, and 68% of provider messages were written below an FKGL = 8. Of 31 exchanges, 9 (29%) contained at least one patient message with an FKGL > 3 grade levels lower than the corresponding provider message(s). Our study demonstrates that most providers are able to respond to patient electronic messages with a matching reading level. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Public Health Detailing of Primary Care Providers: New York City’s Experience, 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    Short, Leslie; Wedemeyer, Laura; Bredow, Victoria Lowerson; Sacks, Rachel; Larson, Kelly; Levy, Joslyn; Silver, Lynn D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of the Public Health Detailing Program in helping primary care providers and their staff to improve patient care on public health challenges. Methods. We analyzed reported changes in clinical practice or behavior by examining providers’ retention and implementation of recommendations for campaigns. Results. During each campaign, 170 to 443 providers and 136 to 221 sites were reached. Among assessed providers who indicated changes in their practice behavior, the following statistically significant increases occurred from baseline to follow-up. Reported screening for clinical preventive services increased, including routinely screening for intimate partner violence (14%–42%). Clinical management increased, such as prescribing longer-lasting supplies of medicine (29%–42%). Lifestyle modification and behavior change, such as recommending increased physical activity to patients with high cholesterol levels, rose from 52% to 73%. Self-management goal setting with patients increased, such as using a clinical checkbook to track hemoglobin A1c goals (28% to 43%). Conclusions. Data suggest that public health detailing can be effective for linking public health agencies and their recommendations to providers and influencing reported changes in clinical practice behavior. PMID:22690970

  8. Dementia with lewy bodies: diagnosis and management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Melanie; Mahajan, Aman; Handa, Kamna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to aid primary care providers in distinguishing dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from Alzheimer's disease and from Parkinson's disease with dementia. Differentiating these entities has important treatment implications. A PubMed search was undertaken using the keywords Lewy body dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and Lewy body disease. There were no date restrictions. Only articles in the English language were reviewed. References of selected articles were reviewed for additional sources. Initially, 2,967 articles were retrieved. All 3 authors participated in data selection and extraction. Articles were further selected for content specific to epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, treatment, and prognosis. For articles with repetitive information, the most current article was used. This resulted in a total of 62 articles included in the review. Dementia with Lewy bodies is the second leading cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The core symptoms of DLB, including cognitive fluctuations, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism, may not always be present as a triad, and clinicians may be unaware of associated symptoms. Thus, this diagnosis is frequently missed by primary care providers. Often, DLB is misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or a primary psychiatric illness. Treatments for DLB include cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists. Antipsychotics should be avoided or used with caution. Dementia with Lewy bodies is an often missed diagnosis. Symptoms are often attributed to other disorders. A high clinical suspicion is helpful in accurate diagnosis, and presence of any of the core symptoms should initiate clinical suspicion of DLB. Distinguishing DLB from other disorders has important treatment implications.

  9. Dementia With Lewy Bodies: Diagnosis and Management for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aman; Handa, Kamna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review is to aid primary care providers in distinguishing dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from Alzheimer's disease and from Parkinson's disease with dementia. Differentiating these entities has important treatment implications. Data Sources: A PubMed search was undertaken using the keywords Lewy body dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and Lewy body disease. There were no date restrictions. Only articles in the English language were reviewed. References of selected articles were reviewed for additional sources. Data Selection and Extraction: Initially, 2,967 articles were retrieved. All 3 authors participated in data selection and extraction. Articles were further selected for content specific to epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, treatment, and prognosis. For articles with repetitive information, the most current article was used. This resulted in a total of 62 articles included in the review. Data Synthesis: Dementia with Lewy bodies is the second leading cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The core symptoms of DLB, including cognitive fluctuations, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism, may not always be present as a triad, and clinicians may be unaware of associated symptoms. Thus, this diagnosis is frequently missed by primary care providers. Often, DLB is misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or a primary psychiatric illness. Treatments for DLB include cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists. Antipsychotics should be avoided or used with caution. Conclusions: Dementia with Lewy bodies is an often missed diagnosis. Symptoms are often attributed to other disorders. A high clinical suspicion is helpful in accurate diagnosis, and presence of any of the core symptoms should initiate clinical suspicion of DLB. Distinguishing DLB from other disorders has important treatment implications. PMID:22295275

  10. A Framework for Developing a Curriculum Regarding Autism Spectrum Disorders for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Lillystone, David; Dossetor, David; Wilkinson, Helen; Kefford, Carolyn; Eastwood, John; Liaw, Siaw Teng

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) has increased and varies across age groups. Thus there is an increasing need for educational opportunities for General Practitioners (GPs) and other Primary Care providers to help in early identification and referral to specialist services. An earlier survey of GPs in New South Wales (Australia) demonstrated two broad domains for educational activities: (1) a general knowledge (important for early identification and referral) and (2) surveillance (important for ongoing management). Aim To seek further evidence to these domains and synthesize the important contents for educational programs for GPs. Materials and Methods We conducted a (1) Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) on our original survey data and (2) systematic review of the literature to identify important educational topics, using a life cycle approach. Results CFA and literature review support theoretical framework of two domains. Alerts and red flags for ASDs, knowledge of simple surveillance tools, communication of diagnosis with parents, referral pathways particularly to speech pathologists before a formal diagnosis is confirmed, and appreciation of vulnerabilities for identifying supports were important in the general knowledge domain, while supporting the families through transition points such as from pre-school to school entry, secondary school and adolescence, role of psychopharmacology such as medications for sleep issues, and for common co-morbidities of anxiety were important in the surveillance dimension. Conclusion GP supervisors and medical and nursing educators can use findings from this paper for developing structured learning activities for training primary health care workforce regarding ASD’s. PMID:26557583

  11. Effectiveness of counseling provided by primary care doctors and nurses in increasing glaucoma screening rates.

    PubMed

    Rezner, Witold; Rezner, Anna; Dutkiewicz, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. An effective screening that can prevent glaucoma-related blindness largely depends on successful recruitment. This study was to assess the effectiveness of one-on-one counseling carried out by primary care doctors and nurses to increase glaucoma screening rates. Material and Methods. The study, carried out in an urban primary care center, involved 308 persons aged 35-87 years who were assigned to a doctor's, nurse's, or control group (N = 109, 110, and 89, resp.). Interventions by doctors and nurses included a brief one-on-one counseling session, while only a screening history was taken from controls. The number of people in each group with a positive screening status was assessed by telephone interview three months after the visit. Results. The percentage of persons in the nurse's counseling group who claimed being subjected to screening was more than four times higher than in the control group (20.9% versus 4.5%, P = 0.002). The doctor's interventions resulted in almost a tripled screening rate as compared to the control group (12.8% versus 4.5%, P = 0.052). There was no significant difference between screening rates in doctor's and nurse's groups (P = 0.212). Conclusions. In the studied population, counseling provided by nurses proved to be an efficacious method to encourage patients to undergo glaucoma screening.

  12. Effectiveness of Counseling Provided by Primary Care Doctors and Nurses in Increasing Glaucoma Screening Rates

    PubMed Central

    Rezner, Anna; Dutkiewicz, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. An effective screening that can prevent glaucoma-related blindness largely depends on successful recruitment. This study was to assess the effectiveness of one-on-one counseling carried out by primary care doctors and nurses to increase glaucoma screening rates. Material and Methods. The study, carried out in an urban primary care center, involved 308 persons aged 35–87 years who were assigned to a doctor's, nurse's, or control group (N = 109, 110, and 89, resp.). Interventions by doctors and nurses included a brief one-on-one counseling session, while only a screening history was taken from controls. The number of people in each group with a positive screening status was assessed by telephone interview three months after the visit. Results. The percentage of persons in the nurse's counseling group who claimed being subjected to screening was more than four times higher than in the control group (20.9% versus 4.5%, P = 0.002). The doctor's interventions resulted in almost a tripled screening rate as compared to the control group (12.8% versus 4.5%, P = 0.052). There was no significant difference between screening rates in doctor's and nurse's groups (P = 0.212). Conclusions. In the studied population, counseling provided by nurses proved to be an efficacious method to encourage patients to undergo glaucoma screening. PMID:25386358

  13. Update on age-appropriate preventive measures and screening for Canadian primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tawnya; Bouchard, Manon; Mavriplis, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To summarize the best available age-appropriate, evidence-based guidelines for prevention and screening in Canadian adults. Quality of evidence The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommendations are the primary source of information, supplemented by relevant US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations when a Canadian task force guideline was unavailable or outdated. Leading national disease-specific or specialty-specific organizations’ guidelines were also reviewed to ensure the most up-to-date evidence was included. Main message Recommended screening maneuvers by age and sex are presented in a summary table highlighting the quality of evidence supporting these recommendations. An example of a template for use with electronic medical records or paper-based charts is presented. Conclusion Whether primary care providers use a dedicated preventive health visit or opportunistic preventive counseling and screening in their patient encounters, this summary of evidence-based recommendations can help maximize efficiency and prevent important omissions and unnecessary screening. PMID:26884526

  14. Unanswered clinical questions: a survey of specialists and primary care providers*

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Bridget; Shenoy, Anant M.; Blanchard, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Objective With the myriad of cases presented to clinicians every day at our integrated academic health system, clinical questions are bound to arise. Clinicians need to recognize these knowledge gaps and act on them. However, for many reasons, clinicians might not seek answers to these questions. Our goal was to investigate the rationale and process behind these unanswered clinical questions. Subsequently, we explored the use of biomedical information resources among specialists and primary care providers and identified ways to promote more informed clinical decision making. Methods We conducted a survey to assess how practitioners identify and respond to information gaps, their background knowledge of search tools and strategies, and their usage of and comfort level with technology. Results Most of the 292 respondents encountered clinical questions at least a few times per week. While the vast majority often or always pursued answers, time was the biggest barrier for not following through on questions. Most respondents did not have any formal training in searching databases, were unaware of many digital resources, and indicated a need for resources and services that could be provided at the point of care. Conclusions While the reasons for unanswered clinical questions varied, thoughtful review of the responses suggested that a combination of educational strategies, embedded librarian services, and technology applications could help providers pursue answers to their clinical questions, enhance patient safety, and contribute to patient-based, self-directed learning. PMID:28096740

  15. Using an established telehealth model to train urban primary care providers on hypertension management.

    PubMed

    Masi, Christopher; Hamlish, Tamara; Davis, Andrew; Bordenave, Kristine; Brown, Stephen; Perea, Brenda; Aduana, Glen; Wolfe, Marcus; Bakris, George; Johnson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a videoconference-based telehealth network can increase hypertension management knowledge and self-assessed competency among primary care providers (PCPs) working in urban Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). We created a telehealth network among 6 urban FQHCs and our institution to support a 12-session educational program designed to teach state-of-the-art hypertension management. Each 1-hour session included a brief lecture by a university-based hypertension specialist, case presentations by PCPs, and interactive discussions among the specialist and PCPs. Twelve PCPs (9 intervention and 3 controls) were surveyed at baseline and immediately following the curriculum. The mean number of correct answers on the 26-item hypertension knowledge questionnaire increased in the intervention group (13.11 [standard deviation (SD)]=3.06) to 17.44 [SD=1.59], P<.01) but not among controls (14.33 [SD=3.21] to 13.00 [SD=3.46], P=.06). Similarly, the mean score on a 7-item hypertension management self-assessed competency scale increased in the intervention group (4.68 [SD=0.94] to 5.41 [SD=0.89], P<.01) but not among controls (5.28 [SD=0.43] to 5.62 [SD=0.67], P=.64). This model holds promise for enhancing hypertension care provided by urban FQHC providers.

  16. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is

  17. Primary care provider perceptions and use of a novel medication reconciliation technology.

    PubMed

    Lesselroth, Blake J; Holahan, Patricia J; Adams, Kathleen; Sullivan, Zhen Z; Church, Victoria L; Woods, Susan; Felder, Robert; Adams, Shawn; Dorr, David A

    2011-01-01

    Although medication reconciliation (MR) can reduce medication discrepancies, it is challenging to operationalise. Consequently, we developed a health information technology (HIT) to collect a patient medication history and make it available to the primary care (PC) provider. We deployed a self-service kiosk in a PC clinic that permits patients to indicate a medication adherence history. Patient responses are immediately viewable in the legacy electronic health record. This paper describes a survey developed to assess PC provider perceptions of our HIT and HIT implementation effectiveness. We developed and administered a survey to all PC providers to assess technology implementation effectiveness. The survey included scales measuring (1) user attitudes towards MR, (2) perceptions of our HIT and (3) the local organisational climate for implementation. We also assessed the consistency and quality of tool use. Nearly 90% of PC providers responded to the survey and 58% indicated that they were familiar with the technology and had seen the tool output. Most providers believed that MR represented an important safety intervention, although 43% did not believe that they had the necessary resources to manage discrepancies. Composite scale scores for the 58% of respondents familiar with the HIT indicate that the majority favoured our tool over usual care. However, composite scale scores suggest that the climate for implementation at our facility was suboptimal. Overall, the quality and consistency of tool use among providers was very heterogeneous. A patient self-service kiosk offers an efficient mechanism to collect a medication adherence history; provider survey responses indicate that they appreciated and used the MR kiosk output. Nonetheless, opportunities exist to improve data displays and embed decision support to facilitate discrepancy management.

  18. Web-based PTSD training for primary care providers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Kristin W; Koenig, Christopher J; McCamish, Nicole; Choucroun, Gerard; Tarasovsky, Gary; Bertenthal, Daniel; Seal, Karen H

    2014-05-01

    Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms frequently present to primary care providers (PCPs) and are reluctant to seek out or accept referrals to specialty mental health care. Most PCPs have not been trained to assess for and manage symptoms of PTSD. Web-based programs are increasingly used for medical education, but there are no published evaluations of online PTSD trainings for PCPs. We developed a 70-min Web-based training that focused on military-related PTSD for PCPs practicing in Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, but was applicable to PCPs treating veterans and other trauma-exposed patients outside VA settings. The training consisted of four modules: (1) Detection and Assessment; (2) Comorbid Conditions and Related Problems; (3) Pharmacological Interventions; and (4) Psychotherapeutic Interventions. Clinical vignettes dramatized key training concepts. Seventy-three PCPs completed the training and assessments pre- and posttraining and 30 days later. Paired t tests compared change in PTSD-related knowledge and comfort with PTSD-related skills, and qualitative methods were used to summarize participant feedback. After the training, mean knowledge score improved from 46% to 75% items correct, with sustained improvement at 30 days. Thirty days posttraining, PCPs reported significantly greater comfort regarding PTSD-related skills assessed; 47% reported using training content in their clinical practice. Qualitatively, PCPs appreciated the flexibility of asynchronous, self-paced online modules, but suggested more interactive content. Given the numerous barriers to specialty mental health treatment, coupled with a preference among veterans with PTSD for accessing treatment through primary care, improving PTSD competency among PCPs may help better serve veterans' mental health needs.

  19. Primary care providers' knowledge, practices, and perceived barriers to the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Jordan G; Swietlik, Maggie; Alessandrini, Evaline; Faith, Myles S

    2010-07-01

    This study evaluated primary care providers' (PCPs, pediatricians, and nurse practitioners) knowledge, current practices, and perceived barriers to childhood obesity prevention and treatment, with an emphasis on first-year well-child care visits. A questionnaire was distributed to 192 PCPs in the primary care network at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) addressing (i) knowledge of obesity and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines, (ii) anticipatory guidance practices at well visits regarding nutrition and exercise, and (iii) perceived barriers to childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Eighty pediatricians and seven nurse practitioners responded, and a minority correctly identified the definition (26%) and prevalence (9%) of childhood overweight and AAP guidelines for exercise (39%) and juice consumption (44%). Most PCPs (81%) spent 11-20 min per well visit during the first 2 years, and 79% discussed diet, nutrition, and exercise for > or =3 min. Although >95% of PCPs discussed juice, fruits and vegetables, sippy cups, and finger foods during the first year, over 35% never discussed fast food, TV, or candy, and 55% never discussed exercise. Few rated current resources as adequate to treat or prevent childhood obesity. Over 90% rated the following barriers for obesity prevention and treatment as important or very important: parent is not motivated, child is not motivated, parents are overweight, families often have fast food, watch too much TV, and do not get enough exercise. In conclusion, there is much room to improve PCPs' knowledge of obesity and AAP guidelines. Although PCPs rate fast-food consumption, TV viewing, and lack of exercise as important treatment barriers, many never discussed these topics during the first year.

  20. Increasing confidence and changing behaviors in primary care providers engaged in genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Michael S; Day, Frank C; Fancher, Tonya L; McDermott, Haley; Lehman, Erik; Bell, Robert A; Green, Michael J

    2017-09-13

    Screening and counseling for genetic conditions is an increasingly important part of primary care practice, particularly given the paucity of genetic counselors in the United States. However, primary care physicians (PCPs) often have an inadequate understanding of evidence-based screening; communication approaches that encourage shared decision-making; ethical, legal, and social implication (ELSI) issues related to screening for genetic mutations; and the basics of clinical genetics. This study explored whether an interactive, web-based genetics curriculum directed at PCPs in non-academic primary care settings was superior at changing practice knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors when compared to a traditional educational approach, particularly when discussing common genetic conditions. One hundred twenty one PCPs in California and Pennsylvania physician practices were randomized to either an Intervention Group (IG) or Control Group (CG). IG physicians completed a 6 h interactive web-based curriculum covering communication skills, basics of genetic testing, risk assessment, ELSI issues and practice behaviors. CG physicians were provided with a traditional approach to Continuing Medical Education (CME) (clinical review articles) offering equivalent information. PCPs in the Intervention Group showed greater increases in knowledge compared to the Control Group. Intervention PCPs were also more satisfied with the educational materials, and more confident in their genetics knowledge and skills compared to those receiving traditional CME materials. Intervention PCPs felt that the web-based curriculum covered medical management, genetics, and ELSI issues significantly better than did the Control Group, and in comparison with traditional curricula. The Intervention Group felt the online tools offered several advantages, and engaged in better shared decision making with standardized patients, however, there was no difference in behavior change between groups with regard to

  1. Early Primary Care Provider Follow-up and Readmission After High-Risk Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Benjamin S.; Stone, David H.; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Nolan, Brian; DeMartino, Randall R.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Goodman, David C.; Goodney, Philip P.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Follow-up with a primary care provider (PCP) in addition to the surgical team is routinely recommended to patients discharged after major surgery despite no clear evidence that it improves outcomes. OBJECTIVE To test whether PCP follow-up is associated with lower 30-day readmission rates after open thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) repair and ventral hernia repair (VHR), surgical procedures known to have a high and low risk of readmission, respectively. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a cohort of Medicare beneficiaries discharged to home after open TAA repair (n = 12 679) and VHR (n = 52 807) between 2003 to 2010, we compared 30-day readmission rates between patients seen and not seen by a PCP within 30 days of discharge and across tertiles of regional primary care use. We stratified our analysis by the presence of complications during the surgical (index) admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day readmission rate. RESULTS Overall, 2619 patients (20.6%) undergoing open TAA repair and 4927 patients (9.3%) undergoing VHR were readmitted within 30 days after surgery. Complications occurred in 4649 patients (36.6%) undergoing open TAA repair and 4528 patients (8.6%) undergoing VHR during their surgical admission. Early follow-up with a PCP significantly reduced the risk of readmission among open TAA patients who experienced perioperative complications, from 35.0% (without follow-up) to 20.4% (with follow-up) (P < .001). However, PCP follow-up made no significant difference in patients whose hospital course was uncomplicated (19.4% with follow-up vs 21.9% without follow-up; P = .31). In comparison, early follow-up with a PCP after VHR did not reduce the risk of readmission, regardless of complications. In adjusted regional analyses, undergoing open TAA repair in regions with high compared with low primary care use was associated with an 18% lower likelihood of 30-day readmission (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71–0.96; P = .02), whereas no significant

  2. Effectively Communicating Colorectal Cancer Screening Information to Primary Care Providers: Application for State, Tribe or Territory Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Jennifer; Vanderpool, Robin; McClung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer if it is recommended by a health care provider. Therefore, it is imperative that providers have access to the latest screening guidelines. Purpose: This practice-based project sought to identify Kentucky primary care providers' preferred sources and methods of receiving…

  3. Effectively Communicating Colorectal Cancer Screening Information to Primary Care Providers: Application for State, Tribe or Territory Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Jennifer; Vanderpool, Robin; McClung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer if it is recommended by a health care provider. Therefore, it is imperative that providers have access to the latest screening guidelines. Purpose: This practice-based project sought to identify Kentucky primary care providers' preferred sources and methods of receiving…

  4. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo; Lucatorto, Michelle A; Hawthorne, Kara; Hersh, Janis; Myers, Raquel; Elwy, A Rani; Graham, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP) and the primary care provider (PCP) is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1) what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2) how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively) to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts.

  5. Acceptability to primary care providers of telemedicine in diabetes case management.

    PubMed

    Palmas, Walter; Teresi, Jeanne; Weinstock, Ruth S; Shea, Steven

    2008-01-01

    We studied the perceptions of primary care providers (PCPs) about the telemedicine intervention in a trial of telemedicine for management of diabetes in medically under-served areas of New York State. A survey was mailed to 206 rural and 159 urban PCPs. The response rates were 25% and 22%, respectively. Eighty percent of respondents believed that a diabetes telemedicine case management system would help their practice. An overall satisfaction score (possible range 0-80) suggested good acceptability (mean 66, SD 12). In multiple linear regression, the rural location and younger age of the PCPs were independent predictors of higher satisfaction (both P < 0.01). Within-PCP comparisons showed a higher perceived impact on patients, as compared to impact on PCP practices (P < 0.001). However, the findings should be interpreted with caution due to the low response rates.

  6. On-site mental health workers delivering psychological therapy and psychosocial interventions to patients in primary care: effects on the professional practice of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Elaine F; Bower, Peter J

    2009-01-21

    Mental health problems are common in primary care and mental health workers (MHWs) are increasingly working in this setting delivering psychological therapy and psychosocial interventions to patients. In addition to treating patients directly, the introduction of on-site MHWs represents an organisational change that may lead to changes in the clinical behaviour of primary care providers (PCPs). To assess the effects of on-site MHWs delivering psychological therapy and psychosocial interventions in primary care on the clinical behaviour of primary care providers (PCPs). The following sources were searched in 1998: the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CounselLit, NPCRDC skill-mix in primary care bibliography, and reference lists of articles. Additional searches were conducted in February 2007 using the following sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library). Randomised trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series analyses of MHWs working alongside PCPs in primary care settings. The outcomes included objective measures of PCP behaviours such as consultation rates, prescribing, and referral. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Forty-two studies were included in the review. There was evidence that MHWs caused significant reductions in PCP consultations (standardised mean difference -0.17, 95% CI -0.30 to -0.05), psychotropic prescribing (relative risk 0.67, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.79), prescribing costs (standardised mean difference -0.22, 95% CI -0.38 to -0.07), and rates of mental health referral (relative risk 0.13, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.20) for the patients they were seeing. In controlled before and after studies, the addition of MHWs to a practice did not affect prescribing behaviour towards the wider practice

  7. The role of public health in providing primary care for the medically underserved.

    PubMed Central

    Sundwall, D N; Tavani, C

    1991-01-01

    Strategies designed to meet the health care needs of Americans should include the issues of access as well as financing. And primary care and clinical preventive services should receive as much national attention as acute care and long-term care. The public health system at the Federal, State, and local levels with its mandate to assure conditions in which people can be healthy must also be incorporated into the national debate. Publicly funded infrastructures for delivering primary health care have become a significant element of assuring access at the community level. This paper examines the expanding role of public health in assuring access to the delivery of primary health care and clinical preventive services to vulnerable populations within the larger issue of who should have access to care and how it should be made available. Special attention is paid to the part played by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the Public Health Service, which, in the Federal fiscal year that began on October 1, 1989, administered some $1.8 billion worth of programs for health care of targeted populations and for the support of training in the health professions. PMID:1899936

  8. The Experiences of U.S. Army Primary Care Providers Meeting Sexual Health Care Needs During Post-Vietnam Deployments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    authors hereby certify that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis entitled: The Experiences of U.S. Army Primary Care Providers Meeting...gave either printed materials or talks and maybe both to the soldiers about how to reintegrate with their lives when they got home. Part of that...packages. A lot of those needs were met from home, not through our supply system. They were met by “send me four boxes of tampons ” and that was not

  9. A first aid training course for primary health care providers in Nagorno Karabagh: assessing knowledge retention.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael E; Harutyunyan, Tsovinar L; Dorian, Alina H

    2012-12-01

    Conflict in the South Caucasus' Nagorno Karabagh region has damaged health facilities and disrupted the delivery of services and supplies as well as led to depletion of human and fixed capital and weakened the de facto government's ability to provide training for health care providers. In response to documented medical training deficits, the American University of Armenia organized a first aid training course (FATC) for primary health care providers within the scope of the USAID-funded Humanitarian Assistance Project in Nagorno Karabagh. This paper reports the follow-up assessments conducted to inform policy makers regarding FATC knowledge and skill retention and the potential need for periodic refresher training. Follow-up assessments were conducted six months and 18 months following the FATC to assess the retention of knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices. Eighty-four providers participated in the first follow-up and 210 in the second. The assessment tool contained items addressing the use and quality of the first aid skills, trainee's evaluation of the course, and randomly selected test questions to assess knowledge retention. At both follow-up points, the participants' assessment of the course was positive. More than 85% of the trainees self-assessed their skills as "excellent" or "good" and noted that skills were frequently practiced. Scores of approximately 58% on knowledge tests at both the first and second follow-ups indicated no knowledge decay between the first and second survey waves, but substantial decline from the immediate post-test assessment in the classroom. The trainees assessed the FATC as effective, and the skills covered as important and well utilized. Knowledge retention was modest, but stable. Refresher courses are necessary to reverse the decay of technical knowledge and to ensure proper application in the field.

  10. Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Practices of Diabetes Management During Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mujtaba; Adams, Alexandra; Hossain, Md Anwar; Sutin, David; Han, Benjamin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 3.5 million Muslims in North America. During the holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims are to fast from predawn to after sunset. While there are exemptions for older and sick adults, many adults with diabetes fast during Ramadan. However, there are risks associated with fasting and specific management considerations for patients with diabetes. We evaluated provider practices and knowledge regarding the management of patients with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. A 15-question quality improvement survey based on a literature review and the American Diabetes Association guidelines was developed and offered to providers at the outpatient primary care and geriatric clinics at an inner-city hospital in New York City. Forty-five providers completed the survey. Most respondents did not ask their Muslim patients with diabetes if they were fasting during the previous Ramadan. Knowledge of fasting practices during Ramadan was variable, and most felt uncomfortable managing patients with diabetes during Ramadan. There is room for improvement in educating providers about specific cultural and medical issues regarding fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan.

  11. Electronic Health Record Alert-Related Workload as a Predictor of Burnout in Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Megan E; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-05

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have been shown to increase physician workload. One EHR feature that contributes to increased workload is asynchronous alerts (also known as inbox notifications) related to test results, referral responses, medication refill requests, and messages from physicians and other health care professionals. This alert-related workload results in negative cognitive outcomes, but its effect on affective outcomes, such as burnout, has been understudied. To examine EHR alert-related workload (both objective and subjective) as a predictor of burnout in primary care providers (PCPs), in order to ultimately inform interventions aimed at reducing burnout due to alert workload. A cross-sectional questionnaire and focus group of 16 PCPs at a large medical center in the southern United States. Subjective, but not objective, alert workload was related to two of the three dimensions of burnout, including physical fatigue (p = 0.02) and cognitive weariness (p = 0.04), when controlling for organizational tenure. To reduce alert workload and subsequent burnout, participants indicated a desire to have protected time for alert management, fewer unnecessary alerts, and improvements to the EHR system. Burnout associated with alert workload may be in part due to subjective differences at an individual level, and not solely a function of the objective work environment. This suggests the need for both individual and organizational-level interventions to improve alert workload and subsequent burnout. Additional research should confirm these findings in larger, more representative samples.

  12. The Gene Messenger Impact Project: An Innovative Genetics Continuing Education Strategy for Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Carroll, June C; Grad, Roland; Allanson, Judith E; Pluye, Pierre; Permaul, Joanne A; Pimlott, Nicholas; Wilson, Brenda J

    2016-01-01

    Primary care providers (PCP) will need to be integrally involved in the delivery of genomic medicine. The GenetiKit trial demonstrated effectiveness of a knowledge translation intervention on family physicians' (FP) genetics referral decision-making. Most wanted to continue receiving Gene Messengers (GM), evidence-based summaries of new genetic tests with primary care recommendations. Our objective was to determine the value of GMs as a continuing education (CE) strategy in genomic medicine for FPs. Using a "push" model, we invited 19,060 members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada to participate. Participants read GMs online, receiving 12 emailed topics over 6 months. Participants completed an online Information Assessment Method questionnaire evaluating GMs on four constructs: cognitive impact, relevance, intended use of information for a patient, and expected health benefits. One thousand four hundred two FPs participated, 55% rated at least one GM. Most (73%) indicated their practice would be improved after reading GMs, with referral to genetics ranked highly. Of those who rated a GM relevant, 94% would apply it to at least one patient and 79% would expect health benefits. This method of CE was found useful for genetics by 88% and 94% wanted to continue receiving GMs. FPs found this novel CE strategy, brief individual reflective e-learning, to be valuable for learning about genetics. This method of information delivery may be an especially effective method for CE in genomic medicine where discoveries occur at a rapid pace and lack of knowledge is a barrier to integration of genetic services.

  13. Primary Care Provider and Patient Perspectives on Lung Cancer Screening. A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Kanodra, Neeti M; Pope, Charlene; Halbert, Chanita H; Silvestri, Gerard A; Rice, LaShanta J; Tanner, Nichole T

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for lung cancer screening in high-risk individuals. Preventive healthcare is provided predominantly by primary care providers (PCPs). Successful implementation of a screening program requires acceptance and participation by both providers and patients, with available collaboration with pulmonologists. To identify perceptions of and perspectives on lung cancer screening and implementation among PCPs and eligible veteran patients at high risk for lung cancer. We conducted a qualitative study using grounded theory in which 28 veterans and 13 PCPs completed a questionnaire and participated in focus groups. Sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with NVivo 10 software. Counts and percentages were used to report questionnaire results. While 58% percent of providers were aware of lung cancer screening guidelines, many could not recall the exact patient eligibility criteria. Most patients were willing to undergo LDCT screening and identified smoking as a risk factor for lung cancer, but they did not recall their PCP explaining the reason for the testing. All providers assessed smoking behavior, but only 23% referred active smokers for formal cessation services. Patients volunteered information regarding their hurdles with smoking cessation while discussing risk factors for cancer. PCPs cited time constraints as a reason for lack of appropriate counseling and shared decision making. Both parties were willing to explore modalities and decision aid tools to improve shared decision making; however, while patients were interested in individual risk prediction, few PCPs believed statistical approaches to counseling would confuse patients. While patients and providers are receptive to LDCT screening, efforts are needed to improve guideline knowledge and adherence among providers. System-level interventions are necessary to facilitate time and resources for shared

  14. Experiences of primary care professionals providing healthcare to recently arrived migrants: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmeyer, Antje; Redwood, Sabi; Griffith, Laura; Teladia, Zaheera; Phillimore, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The main objectives of the study were to explore the experiences of primary care professionals providing care to recent migrants in a superdiverse city and to elicit barriers and facilitators to meeting migrants' care needs. This paper focuses on a strong emergent theme: participants' descriptions and understandings of creating a fit between patients and practices. Design An exploratory, qualitative study based on the thematic analysis of semistructured interviews. Setting and participants A purposive sample of 10 practices. We interviewed 6 general practitioners, 5 nurses and 6 administrative staff; those based at the same practice opted to be interviewed together. 10 interviewees were from an ethnic minority background; some discussed their own experiences of migration. Results Creating a fit between patients and practice was complex and could be problematic. Some participants defined this in a positive way (reaching out, creating rapport) while others also focused on ways in which patients did not fit in, for example, different expectations or lack of medical records. A small but vocal minority put the responsibility to fit in on to migrant patients. Some participants believed that practice staff and patients sharing a language could contribute to achieving a fit but others outlined the disadvantages of over-reliance on language concordance. A clearly articulated, team-based strategy to create bridges between practice and patients was often seen as preferable. Conclusions Although participants agreed that a fit between patients and practice was desirable, some aimed to adapt to the needs of recently arrived migrants, while others thought that it was the responsibility of migrants to adapt to practice needs; a few viewed migrant patients as a burden to the system. Practices wishing to improve fit might consider developing strategies such as introducing link workers and other ‘bridging’ people; however, they could also aim to foster a general stance

  15. Primary Care Provider Perceptions of Colorectal Cancer Screening Barriers: Implications for Designing Quality Improvement Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Potvien, Aaron; Kim, David H.; Pfau, Patrick R.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims. Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is underutilized. Increasing CRC screening rates requires interventions targeting multiple barriers at each level of the healthcare organization (patient, provider, and system). We examined groups of primary care providers (PCPs) based on perceptions of screening barriers and the relationship to CRC screening rates to inform approaches for conducting barrier assessments prior to designing and implementing quality improvement interventions. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study linking EHR and survey data. PCPs with complete survey responses for questions addressing CRC screening barriers were included (N = 166 PCPs; 39,430 patients eligible for CRC screening). Cluster analysis identified groups of PCPs. Multivariate logistic regression estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for predictors of membership in one of the PCP groups. Results. We found two distinct groups: (1) PCPs identifying multiple barriers to CRC screening at patient, provider, and system levels (N = 75) and (2) PCPs identifying no major barriers to screening (N = 91). PCPs in the top half of CRC screening performance were more likely to identify multiple barriers than the bottom performers (OR, 4.14; 95% CI, 2.43–7.08). Conclusions. High-performing PCPs can more effectively identify CRC screening barriers. Targeting high-performers when conducting a barrier assessment is a novel approach to assist in designing quality improvement interventions for CRC screening. PMID:28163715

  16. Primary Care Provider Perceptions of Colorectal Cancer Screening Barriers: Implications for Designing Quality Improvement Interventions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Pickhardt, Perry J; Schumacher, Jessica R; Potvien, Aaron; Kim, David H; Pfau, Patrick R; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Smith, Maureen A

    2017-01-01

    Aims. Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is underutilized. Increasing CRC screening rates requires interventions targeting multiple barriers at each level of the healthcare organization (patient, provider, and system). We examined groups of primary care providers (PCPs) based on perceptions of screening barriers and the relationship to CRC screening rates to inform approaches for conducting barrier assessments prior to designing and implementing quality improvement interventions. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study linking EHR and survey data. PCPs with complete survey responses for questions addressing CRC screening barriers were included (N = 166 PCPs; 39,430 patients eligible for CRC screening). Cluster analysis identified groups of PCPs. Multivariate logistic regression estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for predictors of membership in one of the PCP groups. Results. We found two distinct groups: (1) PCPs identifying multiple barriers to CRC screening at patient, provider, and system levels (N = 75) and (2) PCPs identifying no major barriers to screening (N = 91). PCPs in the top half of CRC screening performance were more likely to identify multiple barriers than the bottom performers (OR, 4.14; 95% CI, 2.43-7.08). Conclusions. High-performing PCPs can more effectively identify CRC screening barriers. Targeting high-performers when conducting a barrier assessment is a novel approach to assist in designing quality improvement interventions for CRC screening.

  17. Association of Communication Between Hospital-based Physicians and Primary Care Providers with Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schnipper, Jeffrey L.; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Kaboli, Peter J.; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Gonzales, David V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Zhang, James X.; Meltzer, David O.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Patients admitted to general medicine inpatient services are increasingly cared for by hospital-based physicians rather than their primary care providers (PCPs). This separation of hospital and ambulatory care may result in important care discontinuities after discharge. We sought to determine whether communication between hospital-based physicians and PCPs influences patient outcomes. METHODS We approached consecutive patients admitted to general medicine services at six US academic centers from July 2001 to June 2003. A random sample of the PCPs for consented patients was contacted 2 weeks after patient discharge and surveyed about communication with the hospital medical team. Responses were linked with the 30-day composite patient outcomes of mortality, hospital readmission, and emergency department (ED) visits obtained through follow-up telephone survey and National Death Index search. We used hierarchical multi-variable logistic regression to model whether communication with the patient’s PCP was associated with the 30-day composite outcome. RESULTS A total of 1,772 PCPs for 2,336 patients were surveyed with 908 PCPs responses and complete patient follow-up available for 1,078 patients. The PCPs for 834 patients (77%) were aware that their patient had been admitted to the hospital. Of these, direct communication between PCPs and inpatient physicians took place for 194 patients (23%), and a discharge summary was available within 2 weeks of discharge for 347 patients (42%). Within 30 days of discharge, 233 (22%) patients died, were readmitted to the hospital, or visited an ED. In adjusted analyses, no relationship was seen between the composite outcome and direct physician communication (adjusted odds ratio 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.56 – 1.34), the presence of a discharge summary (0.84, 95% CI 0.57–1.22), or PCP awareness of the index hospitalization (1.08, 95% CI 0.73–1.59). CONCLUSION Analysis of communication between PCPs

  18. Perspectives of College Students and Their Primary Health Care Providers on Substance Abuse Screening and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Julie A.; Johnson, Rhonda M.; Gotz, Nina K.; Wayment, Heidi A.; Elwell, Kristan

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a needs assessment among students and health-care providers of a southwestern university health center with the goal of developing health-care -provider training addressing substance-abuse screening and intervention. They collected data from focus groups of undergraduate students and structured interviews and questionnaires…

  19. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-06-19

    Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to identify strategies that could improve collaboration between these disciplines from the perspective of dental participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2013 and 2015 with visiting, local and regional dental practitioners (n = 12) who had provided dental services to patients from eight rural and remote Queensland communities that did not have a resident dentist. Participants were purposely recruited through a snow ball sampling technique. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis with the assistance of QSR Nvivo v.10. Four major themes emerged from the data: (1) Communication between dental practitioners and rural primary care providers; (2) Relationships between dental and primary care providers; (3) Maintenance of professional dualism; (4) Strategies to improve interprofessional relationships (with subthemes: face to face meetings; utilisation of technology; oral health training for primary care providers; and having a community based oral health contact person). Participants observed that there was a lack of communication between the dental providers who saw patients from these rural communities and the primary care providers who worked in each community. This was attributed to poor communication, the high turnover of staff and the siloed behaviours of some practitioners. Visiting dental practitioners were likely to have stronger professional relationships with hospital nursing, administrative and allied health care staff who were often long term

  20. Understanding integrated mental health care in "real-world" primary care settings: What matters to health care providers and clients for evaluation and improvement?

    PubMed

    Ion, Allyson; Sunderji, Nadiya; Jansz, Gwen; Ghavam-Rassoul, Abbas

    2017-09-01

    The integration of mental health specialists into primary care has been widely advocated to deliver evidence-based mental health care to a defined population while improving access, clinical outcomes, and cost efficiency. Integrated care has been infrequently and inconsistently translated into real-world settings; as a result, the key individual components of effective integrated care remain unclear. This article reports findings from a qualitative study that explored provider and client experiences of integrated care. We conducted in-depth interviews with integrated care providers (n = 13) and clients (n = 9) to understand their perspectives and experiences of integrated care including recommended areas for quality measurement and improvement. The authors used qualitative content and reflexive thematic analytic approaches to synthesize the interview data. Clients and integrated care providers agreed regarding the overarching concepts of the what, how, and why of integrated care including co-location of care; continuity of care; team composition and functioning; client centeredness; and comprehensive care for individuals and populations. Providers and clients proposed a number of dimensions that could be the focus for quality measurement and evaluation, illuminating what is needed for successful context-sensitive spreading and scaling of integrated care interventions. With a mounting gap between the empirical support for integrated care approaches and the implementation of these models, there is a need to clarify the aims of integrated care and the key ingredients required for widespread implementation outside of research settings. This study has important implications for future integrated care research, and health care provider and client engagement in the quality movement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Pediatric primary care providers' perspectives regarding hospital discharge communication: a mixed methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Leyenaar, JoAnna K; Bergert, Lora; Mallory, Leah A; Engel, Richard; Rassbach, Caroline; Shen, Mark; Woehrlen, Tess; Cooperberg, David; Coghlin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Effective communication between inpatient and outpatient providers may mitigate risks of adverse events associated with hospital discharge. However, there is an absence of pediatric literature defining effective discharge communication strategies at both freestanding children's hospitals and general hospitals. The objectives of this study were to assess associations between pediatric primary care providers' (PCPs) reported receipt of discharge communication and referral hospital type, and to describe PCPs' perspectives regarding effective discharge communication and areas for improvement. We administered a questionnaire to PCPs referring to 16 pediatric hospital medicine programs nationally. Multivariable models were developed to assess associations between referral hospital type and receipt and completeness of discharge communication. Open-ended questions asked respondents to describe effective strategies and areas requiring improvement regarding discharge communication. Conventional qualitative content analysis was performed to identify emergent themes. Responses were received from 201 PCPs, for a response rate of 63%. Although there were no differences between referral hospital type and PCP-reported receipt of discharge communication (relative risk 1.61, 95% confidence interval 0.97-2.67), PCPs referring to general hospitals more frequently reported completeness of discharge communication relative to those referring to freestanding children's hospitals (relative risk 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.26-2.51). Analysis of free text responses yielded 4 major themes: 1) structured discharge communication, 2) direct personal communication, 3) reliability and timeliness of communication, and 4) communication for effective postdischarge care. This study highlights potential differences in the experiences of PCPs referring to general hospitals and freestanding children's hospitals, and presents valuable contextual data for future quality improvement initiatives

  2. Improving Deployment-Related Primary Care Provider Assessments of PTSD and Mental Health Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Improve Military Mental Health Screening. Oral presentation to the American Psychological Association Annual Meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii. Douglas, S...Brown, J., Zachary, C., et al. (2008). Improving child and parent mental health in primary care: a cluster-randomized trial of communication skills...treatments. It has been suggested that greater confidence in effective treatment could reduce the stigma associated with mental health disorders

  3. Effects of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Primary Care Providers on Antibiotic Selection, United States

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rebecca M.; Albert, Alison P.; Johnson, Darcia D.; Hicks, Lauri A.

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate selection of antibiotic drugs is critical to optimize treatment of infections and limit the spread of antibiotic resistance. To better inform public health efforts to improve prescribing of antibiotic drugs, we conducted in-depth interviews with 36 primary care providers in the United States (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to explore knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices regarding antibiotic drug resistance and antibiotic drug selection for common infections. Participants were generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection for common infections, but did not always comply with them. Reasons for nonadherence included the belief that nonrecommended agents are more likely to cure an infection, concern for patient or parent satisfaction, and fear of infectious complications. Providers inconsistently defined broad- and narrow-spectrum antibiotic agents. There was widespread concern for antibiotic resistance; however, it was not commonly considered when selecting therapy. Strategies to encourage use of first-line agents are needed in addition to limiting unnecessary prescribing of antibiotic drugs. PMID:25418868

  4. Effects of knowledge, attitudes, and practices of primary care providers on antibiotic selection, United States.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Guillermo V; Roberts, Rebecca M; Albert, Alison P; Johnson, Darcia D; Hicks, Lauri A

    2014-12-01

    Appropriate selection of antibiotic drugs is critical to optimize treatment of infections and limit the spread of antibiotic resistance. To better inform public health efforts to improve prescribing of antibiotic drugs, we conducted in-depth interviews with 36 primary care providers in the United States (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to explore knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices regarding antibiotic drug resistance and antibiotic drug selection for common infections. Participants were generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection for common infections, but did not always comply with them. Reasons for nonadherence included the belief that nonrecommended agents are more likely to cure an infection, concern for patient or parent satisfaction, and fear of infectious complications. Providers inconsistently defined broad- and narrow-spectrum antibiotic agents. There was widespread concern for antibiotic resistance; however, it was not commonly considered when selecting therapy. Strategies to encourage use of first-line agents are needed in addition to limiting unnecessary prescribing of antibiotic drugs.

  5. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  6. HPV vaccine attitudes and practices among primary care providers in Appalachian Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Huey, Nicole L; Clark, Allison D; Kluhsman, Brenda C; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in Appalachia exceeds the national rate; rural Appalachian women are at especially high risk. We assessed the attitudes and practices related to human papillomavirus vaccination among providers in primary care practices in a contiguous 5-county area of Appalachian Pennsylvania. In December 2006 and May 2007, all family medicine, pediatric, and gynecology practices (n = 65) in the study area were surveyed by 2 faxed survey instruments. Of the 65 practices, 55 completed the first survey instrument. Of these 55, 44 offered the vaccine to their patients. Forty of the 44 practices offered it to girls and women aged 9 to 26 years, and 11 were willing to accept referrals from other practices for vaccination. The average reported charge for each of the 3 required injections was $150. Of the 55 practices that responded to the first survey instrument, 49 responded to the second survey instrument, 46 of which recommended the vaccine to their patients. The prevalence of offering the vaccine against human papillomavirus was high in this area of Appalachian Pennsylvania. Future interventions may focus on community education because the vaccine is available from most providers.

  7. Current perspectives on psychological insulin resistance: primary care provider and patient views.

    PubMed

    Krall, Jodi; Gabbay, Robert; Zickmund, Susan; Hamm, Megan E; Williams, Kelly R; Siminerio, Linda

    2015-04-01

    Psychological insulin resistance (PIR) refers to reluctance of providers to prescribe and patients to take insulin. Processes and tools have been developed to address PIR. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine current understanding and opinions of insulin therapy of primary care providers (PCPs) and patients with type 2 diabetes (both naive to insulin and insulin users). Providers (n=23 PCPs) and patients (n=96) participated in 1:1 interviews and 12 racially/ethnically diverse focus groups, respectively, conducted by trained qualitative researchers using pilot-tested scripts. Participants examined insulin devices and needles while specific questions were asked about insulin therapy. Recorded sessions were transcribed and analyzed. Salient themes related to injection resistance, patient adherence, health system barriers, and education emerged during the sessions. Provider knowledge about insulin injection devices and approaches varied and was often limited, particularly regarding needle sizes, which influenced prescribing practices and patient education. Other barriers included limited time and personnel. However, PCPs placed priority on continuing education on devices, needles, insulin adjustment, educational approaches, and cost. Patient focus groups revealed a strong desire for knowledge on injection logistics, particularly by insulin users who felt that they had received inadequate education. Most patients had limited experience with tools like shorter needles but would consider injecting if presented. Those who had self-injection experience were more willing to accept insulin. Cost concerns and need for information were frequently reported. Findings reveal that programs and tools designed to address problems associated with PIR have yet to be fully realized.

  8. Use of rapid point-of-care tests by primary health care providers in India: findings from a community-based survey.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, S; Sagili, K; Chadha, S S; Pai, M

    2014-12-21

    In a cross-sectional survey conducted in 45 districts of India, we assessed 1) use of any rapid point-of-care (POC) tests by primary health care providers, and 2) their willingness to use POC tests for tuberculosis (TB) in future. A total of 767 primary health care providers, including private and public sector practitioners, health workers and chemists, were interviewed. A quarter of the primary health care providers reported using POC tests, with pregnancy tests being the most common. Nearly half of the respondents expressed willingness to use POC tests for TB, provided the test was available free or at low cost (

  9. Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of regular and contractual primary health care providers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Mehra, Anu; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Motivated and committed employees deliver better health care, which results in better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction. To assess the Organizational Commitment and Intrinsic Motivation of Primary Health Care Providers (HCPs) in New Delhi, India. Study was conducted in 2013 on a sample of 333 HCPs who were selected using multistage stage random sampling technique. The sample includes medical officers, auxiliary nurses and midwives, and pharmacists and laboratory technicians/assistants among regular and contractual staff. Data were collected using the pretested structured questionnaire for organization commitment (OC), job satisfiers, and intrinsic job motivation. Analysis was done by using SPSS version 18 and appropriate statistical tests were applied. The mean score for OC for entire regular staff is 1.6 ± 0.39 and contractual staff is 1.3 ± 0.45 which has statistically significant difference (t = 5.57; P = 0.00). In both regular and contractual staff, none of them show high emotional attachment with the organization and does not feel part of the family in the organization. Contractual staff does not feel proud to work in a present organization for rest of their career. Intrinsic motivation is high in both regular and contractual groups but intergroup difference is significant (t = 2.38; P < 0.05). Contractual staff has more dissatisfier than regular, and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of contractual staff are lesser than the permanent staff. Appropriate changes are required in the predictors of organizational commitment and factors responsible for satisfaction in the organization to keep the contractual human resource motivated and committed to the organization.

  10. Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of regular and contractual primary health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Mehra, Anu; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Background: Motivated and committed employees deliver better health care, which results in better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction. Objective: To assess the Organizational Commitment and Intrinsic Motivation of Primary Health Care Providers (HCPs) in New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted in 2013 on a sample of 333 HCPs who were selected using multistage stage random sampling technique. The sample includes medical officers, auxiliary nurses and midwives, and pharmacists and laboratory technicians/assistants among regular and contractual staff. Data were collected using the pretested structured questionnaire for organization commitment (OC), job satisfiers, and intrinsic job motivation. Analysis was done by using SPSS version 18 and appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results: The mean score for OC for entire regular staff is 1.6 ± 0.39 and contractual staff is 1.3 ± 0.45 which has statistically significant difference (t = 5.57; P = 0.00). In both regular and contractual staff, none of them show high emotional attachment with the organization and does not feel part of the family in the organization. Contractual staff does not feel proud to work in a present organization for rest of their career. Intrinsic motivation is high in both regular and contractual groups but intergroup difference is significant (t = 2.38; P < 0.05). Contractual staff has more dissatisfier than regular, and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of contractual staff are lesser than the permanent staff. Appropriate changes are required in the predictors of organizational commitment and factors responsible for satisfaction in the organization to keep the contractual human resource motivated and committed to the organization. PMID:27453851

  11. Development and initial validation of primary care provider mental illness management and team-based care self-efficacy scales.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Danielle F; Crane, Lori A; Leister, Erin; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Ludman, Evette; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Kline, Danielle M; Smith, Meredith; deGruy, Frank V; Nease, Donald E; Dickinson, L Miriam

    Develop and validate self-efficacy scales for primary care provider (PCP) mental illness management and team-based care participation. We developed three self-efficacy scales: team-based care (TBC), mental illness management (MIM), and chronic medical illness (CMI). We developed the scales using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory as a guide. The survey instrument included items from previously validated scales on team-based care and mental illness management. We administered a mail survey to 900 randomly selected Colorado physicians. We conducted exploratory principal factor analysis with oblique rotation. We constructed self-efficacy scales and calculated standardized Cronbach's alpha coefficients to test internal consistency. We calculated correlation coefficients between the MIM and TBC scales and previously validated measures related to each scale to evaluate convergent validity. We tested correlations between the TBC and the measures expected to correlate with the MIM scale and vice versa to evaluate discriminant validity. PCPs (n=402, response rate=49%) from diverse practice settings completed surveys. Items grouped into factors as expected. Cronbach's alphas were 0.94, 0.88, and 0.83 for TBC, MIM, and CMI scales respectively. In convergent validity testing, the TBC scale was correlated as predicted with scales assessing communications strategies, attitudes toward teams, and other teamwork indicators (r=0.25 to 0.40, all statistically significant). Likewise, the MIM scale was significantly correlated with several items about knowledge and experience managing mental illness (r=0.24 to 41, all statistically significant). As expected in discriminant validity testing, the TBC scale had only very weak correlations with the mental illness knowledge and experience managing mental illness items (r=0.03 to 0.12). Likewise, the MIM scale was only weakly correlated with measures of team-based care (r=0.09 to.17). This validation study of MIM and TBC self-efficacy scales

  12. The provider perspective: investigating the effect of the Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome (ePRO) mobile application and portal on primary care provider workflow.

    PubMed

    Hans, Parminder K; Gray, Carolyn Steele; Gill, Ashlinder; Tiessen, James

    2017-09-13

    Aim This qualitative study investigates how the Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome (ePRO) mobile application and portal system, designed to capture patient-reported measures to support self-management, affected primary care provider workflows. The Canadian health system is facing an ageing population that is living with chronic disease. Disruptive innovations like mobile health technologies can help to support health system transformation needed to better meet the multifaceted needs of the complex care patient. However, there are challenges with implementing these technologies in primary care settings, in particular the effect on primary care provider workflows. Over a six-week period interdisciplinary primary care providers (n=6) and their complex care patients (n=12), used the ePRO mobile application and portal to collaboratively goal-set, manage care plans, and support self-management using patient-reported measures. Secondary thematic analysis of focus groups, training sessions, and issue tracker reports captured user experiences at a Toronto area Family Health Team from October 2014 to January 2015. Findings Key issues raised by providers included: liability concerns associated with remote monitoring, increased documentation activities due to a lack of interoperability between the app and the electronic patient record, increased provider anxiety with regard to the potential for the app to disrupt and infringe upon appointment time, and increased demands for patient engagement. Primary care providers reported the app helped to focus care plans and to begin a collaborative conversation on goal-setting. However, throughout our investigation we found a high level of provider resistance evidenced by consistent attempts to shift the app towards fitting with existing workflows rather than adapting much of their behaviour. As health systems seek innovative and disruptive models to better serve this complex patient population, provider change resistance will need to

  13. Early onset scoliosis: what the primary care provider needs to know and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Larson, Natalie

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of the primary care provider in the detection of and referral for early onset scoliosis. An overview of scoliosis including etiology, natural history, guidelines for physical examination, current practice for scoliosis screening, and available treatments will be discussed. PubMed, OVID Medline, Psychinfo. Search terms: juvenile scoliosis, childhood onset scoliosis, early onset scoliosis, idiopathic scoliosis, and infantile scoliosis. Scoliosis is classified depending on the magnitude, location, direction, and cause of the curve, and can lead to a variety of health effects if not treated. The greater the scoliosis curve and the earlier it presents, the more likely it may affect thoracic growth, inhibit cardiopulmonary function, and cause psychosocial distress. Routine scoliosis screening should be incorporated into each healthcare maintenance visit beginning in infancy and continue into adolescence until the child reaches skeletal maturity. Curves with a scoliometer reading greater than 5° should be referred, and conservative treatment should be considered for curves that surpass 20°. If scoliosis is detected early, it may be possible to stabilize the curve from progressing and even prevent thoracic deformity and secondary complications from occurring. 2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Subjective memory complaints and concurrent memory performance in older patients of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Snitz, Beth E; Morrow, Lisa A; Rodriguez, Eric G; Huber, Kimberly A; Saxton, Judith A

    2008-11-01

    Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are known to be inconsistently related to current memory impairment in older adults but this association has not been well investigated in primary care provider (PCP) settings. To characterize the complexity of the relationship between SMCs and objective memory in older outpatients of PCPs, we collected neuropsychological, subjective memory, depression and medical chart data from outpatients aged 65 and older, without documented dementia diagnoses, in eleven PCP offices in and around the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. Results indicated that self-estimates of current memory ability were most strongly associated with objective memory performance; in contrast, perception of worsening memory over the past year showed no association; and specific memory-related activities were only weakly associated. Women were more likely than men to show inconsistency between SMCs and objective memory performance. Only two of the 11 most significantly memory-impaired participants endorsed SMCs and only four had PCP chart documentation of memory problems. Eliciting SMCs in non-demented older adults can be of clinical value in a PCP setting, but significant limitations of patient self-report in more memory-impaired patients underscore the need to develop brief, objective indicators of memory impairment for PCP office use when there is suspicion of decline.

  15. Knowledge and perceptions on toxoplasmosis among pregnant women and nurses who provide prenatal in primary care.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Jayra Adrianna da Silva; Corrêa, Rita da Graça Carvalhal Frazão; Aquino, Dorlene Maria Cardoso de; Coutinho, Nair Portela Silva; Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto da; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2017-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an infection that affects almost a third of the world population. In adults, it is often asymptomatic, although having important manifestation in children- infected by placental transmission. The prenatal is an important moment, requiring actions in women's care during pregnancy, in order to prevent diseases that could compromise the mother and the child's life. This is a descriptive study of qualitative approach aimed to understand the perception of nurses and pregnant women about toxoplasmosis during primary - prenatal care. The study was conducted in five selected primary health care units, in the municipality of São Luis - MA. The sample consisted of 15 nurses working in nursing consultation and 15 pregnant women attended in prenatal care. For data collection, a semi-structured questionnaire and an interview guide covering issues related to knowledge and conduct on toxoplasmosis were used. For analysis, the content analysis technique was used. The answers were transcribed, organized and grouped thematically, where the following categories emerged: knowledge about examination requests; knowledge about toxoplasmosis; guidance during prenatal consultation; knowledge of nurses about the avidity test; procedures and guidelines on reagent cases. Pregnant women showed unawareness about toxoplasmosis and its effects. Nurses, although having basic knowledge about the subject, showed little applicability regarding pregnant women's guidance. The nurse plays an important role in educational activities regarding pregnant women, contributing to the quality of prenatal care. Pregnant women were shown to have some knowledge about toxoplasmosis, although they said they did not have assurance about prevention.

  16. Primary-care providers' perceived barriers to integration of genetics services: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mikat-Stevens, Natalie A; Larson, Ingrid A; Tarini, Beth A

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to systematically review the literature to identify primary-care providers' perceived barriers against provision of genetics services. We systematically searched PubMed and ERIC using key and Boolean term combinations for articles published from 2001 to 2012 that met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Specific barriers were identified and aggregated into categories based on topic similarity. These categories were then grouped into themes. Of the 4,174 citations identified by the search, 38 publications met inclusion criteria. There were 311 unique barriers that were classified into 38 categories across 4 themes: knowledge and skills; ethical, legal, and social implications; health-care systems; and scientific evidence. Barriers most frequently mentioned by primary-care providers included a lack of knowledge about genetics and genetic risk assessment, concern for patient anxiety, a lack of access to genetics, and a lack of time. Although studies reported that primary-care providers perceive genetics as being important, barriers to the integration of genetics medicine into routine patient care were identified. The promotion of practical guidelines, point-of-care risk assessment tools, tailored educational tools, and other systems-level strategies will assist primary-care providers in providing genetics services for their patients.

  17. Understanding the drivers of interprofessional collaborative practice among HIV primary care providers and case managers in HIV care programmes.

    PubMed

    Mavronicolas, Heather A; Laraque, Fabienne; Shankar, Arti; Campbell, Claudia

    2017-05-01

    Care coordination programmes are an important aspect of HIV management whose success depends largely on HIV primary care provider (PCP) and case manager collaboration. Factors influencing collaboration among HIV PCPs and case managers remain to be studied. The study objective was to test an existing theoretical model of interprofessional collaborative practice and determine which factors play the most important role in facilitating collaboration. A self-administered, anonymous mail survey was sent to HIV PCPs and case managers in New York City. An adapted survey instrument elicited information on demographic, contextual, and perceived social exchange (trustworthiness, role specification, and relationship initiation) characteristics. The dependent variable, perceived interprofessional practice, was constructed from a validated scale. A sequential block wise regression model specifying variable entry order examined the relative importance of each group of factors and of individual variables. The analysis showed that social exchange factors were the dominant drivers of collaboration. Relationship initiation was the most important predictor of interprofessional collaboration. Additional influential factors included organisational leadership support of collaboration, practice settings, and frequency of interprofessional meetings. Addressing factors influencing collaboration among providers will help public health programmes optimally design their structural, hiring, and training strategies to foster effective social exchanges and promote collaborative working relationships.

  18. Prenatal genetic counseling for hemoglobinopathy carriers: a comparison of primary providers of prenatal care and professional genetic counselors.

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, P T; Loader, S; Sutera, C J; Kozyra, A

    1995-01-01

    Health personnel trained in medical genetics are insufficient to meet the demand for genetic services. Methods must be found to enable primary care providers to offer commonly needed genetic services themselves. In our recently reported community-wide prenatal screening program for hemoglobinopathies, 36% of women detected to have a hemoglobinopathy did not come to a tertiary center for counseling and thus may have not benefited from testing. To determine whether the efficiency of the program could be increased if counseling were provided by the prenatal care provider (obstetrician or family practitioner), we developed a pilot training program on the basis of our experience in offering such services and enlisted 68% of regional prenatal care providers to participate. The proportion of patients detected to have a hemoglobinopathy who received counseling was similar in the primary and tertiary provider groups: 59% versus 50%, respectively, for sickle trait, and 69% versus 66%, respectively, for beta-thalassemia trait. Knowledge after counseling was also similar for the primary and tertiary provider groups: 64% versus 66% (mean % correct), respectively, for sickle trait, and 79% versus 78%, respectively, for beta-thalassemia trait. However, the two provider groups significantly differed with regard to whether or not the patient had her partner tested. For sickle trait, it was 25% for the primary providers but 49% for the tertiary providers (P < .001). For beta-thalassemia trait, it was 47% for the primary providers but 78% for the tertiary providers (P < .001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7887433

  19. Prenatal genetic counseling for hemoglobinopathy carriers: a comparison of primary providers of prenatal care and professional genetic counselors.

    PubMed

    Rowley, P T; Loader, S; Sutera, C J; Kozyra, A

    1995-03-01

    Health personnel trained in medical genetics are insufficient to meet the demand for genetic services. Methods must be found to enable primary care providers to offer commonly needed genetic services themselves. In our recently reported community-wide prenatal screening program for hemoglobinopathies, 36% of women detected to have a hemoglobinopathy did not come to a tertiary center for counseling and thus may have not benefited from testing. To determine whether the efficiency of the program could be increased if counseling were provided by the prenatal care provider (obstetrician or family practitioner), we developed a pilot training program on the basis of our experience in offering such services and enlisted 68% of regional prenatal care providers to participate. The proportion of patients detected to have a hemoglobinopathy who received counseling was similar in the primary and tertiary provider groups: 59% versus 50%, respectively, for sickle trait, and 69% versus 66%, respectively, for beta-thalassemia trait. Knowledge after counseling was also similar for the primary and tertiary provider groups: 64% versus 66% (mean % correct), respectively, for sickle trait, and 79% versus 78%, respectively, for beta-thalassemia trait. However, the two provider groups significantly differed with regard to whether or not the patient had her partner tested. For sickle trait, it was 25% for the primary providers but 49% for the tertiary providers (P < .001). For beta-thalassemia trait, it was 47% for the primary providers but 78% for the tertiary providers (P < .001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Training Primary Care Providers in the Use of Motivational Interviewing for Youth Behavior Change.

    PubMed

    Vallabhan, Monique K; Kong, Alberta S; Jimenez, Elizabeth Yakes; Summers, Linda C; DeBlieck, Conni J; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2017-08-01

    Adolescent obesity is a global epidemic. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a promising strategy to address adolescent obesity risk behaviors. However, primary care providers (PCPs) tend to express discomfort with learning and adopting MI practices and with addressing patient weight issues. PCP proficiency in using MI to discuss body mass index, health screening results, and nutrition and physical activity behaviors after receiving training and coaching from an MI expert and practicing the technique was evaluated. We hypothesized that comfort with MI would increase consistently over time. Self-assessment surveys in MI proficiency were administered to PCPs after every youth participant MI session. MI comfort as determined by proficiency was categorized into low, medium, and high comfort according to survey Likert scale responses. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's exact tests. Two hundred twenty-seven youth were seen for MI-based discussions by 4 PCPs. Two hundred twenty-six surveys had complete data for analysis. As anticipated, overall PCPs reported significantly more comfort with MI from the first to the final MI session over a 2- to 3-month period (p< .001). Comfort scores did not increase linearly over time for all PCPs. Despite standard training practices, overall MI proficiency as measured by comfort scores varied by PCP (p< .01). This type of MI training program should be considered for clinical nurses and nurse practitioners during their nursing education training to facilitate their ability to consistently and effectively support youth behavior change for conditions such as obesity (ClinicalTrials.gov Number NCT02502383).

  1. The role of pediatric primary care providers in parental smoking cessation: assessing and motivating parents to quit.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kerry Rose; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2007-01-01

    Children and adolescents who are exposed to smokers in their household are 3 times more likely to initiate smoking themselves (Winickoff, Berkowitz, et al., 2005). If successful in getting parents to quit smoking, pediatric providers will have helped parents and their families improve quality of life standards in a variety of ways, including adding 7 years to the parent's life and eliminating the majority of second-hand smoke exposure in children. The purpose of this clinical article is three-fold; (1) to discuss the role of pediatric primary care providers in parental smoking cessation, (2) to discuss the obstacles faced by parents in smoking cessation and how the primary care provider can help them to surmount them, and (3) to discuss the obstacles faced by pediatric primary care providers in assisting parent smoking cessation and options to surmount them.

  2. Beliefs, Knowledge, Implementation, and Integration of Evidence-Based Practice Among Primary Health Care Providers: Protocol for a Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipa; Salvi, Mireille; Verloo, Henk

    2017-08-01

    The adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted because it is widely recognized for improving the quality and safety of health care for patients, and reducing avoidable costs. Providers of primary care face numerous challenges to ensuring the effectiveness of their daily practices. Primary health care is defined as: the entry level into a health care services system, providing a first point of contact for all new needs and problems; patient-focused (not disease-oriented) care over time; care for all but the most uncommon or unusual conditions; and coordination or integration of care, regardless of where or by whom that care is delivered. Primary health care is the principal means by which to approach the main goal of any health care services system: optimization of health status. This review aims to scope publications examining beliefs, knowledge, implementation, and integration of EBPs among primary health care providers (HCPs). We will conduct a systematic scoping review of published articles in the following electronic databases, from their start dates until March 31, 2017: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) via PubMed (from 1946), Embase (from 1947), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1937), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from 1992), PsycINFO (from 1806), Web of Science (from 1900), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) database (from 1998), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE; from 1996), Trip medical database (from 1997), and relevant professional scientific journals (from their start dates). We will use the predefined search terms of, "evidence-based practice" and, "primary health care" combined with other terms, such as, "beliefs", "knowledge", "implementation", and "integration". We will also conduct a hand search of the bibliographies of all relevant articles and a search for unpublished studies using Google Scholar, ProQuest, Mednar, and World

  3. Beliefs, Knowledge, Implementation, and Integration of Evidence-Based Practice Among Primary Health Care Providers: Protocol for a Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Mireille; Verloo, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Background The adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted because it is widely recognized for improving the quality and safety of health care for patients, and reducing avoidable costs. Providers of primary care face numerous challenges to ensuring the effectiveness of their daily practices. Primary health care is defined as: the entry level into a health care services system, providing a first point of contact for all new needs and problems; patient-focused (not disease-oriented) care over time; care for all but the most uncommon or unusual conditions; and coordination or integration of care, regardless of where or by whom that care is delivered. Primary health care is the principal means by which to approach the main goal of any health care services system: optimization of health status. Objective This review aims to scope publications examining beliefs, knowledge, implementation, and integration of EBPs among primary health care providers (HCPs). Methods We will conduct a systematic scoping review of published articles in the following electronic databases, from their start dates until March 31, 2017: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) via PubMed (from 1946), Embase (from 1947), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1937), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from 1992), PsycINFO (from 1806), Web of Science (from 1900), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) database (from 1998), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE; from 1996), Trip medical database (from 1997), and relevant professional scientific journals (from their start dates). We will use the predefined search terms of, “evidence-based practice” and, “primary health care” combined with other terms, such as, “beliefs”, “knowledge”, “implementation”, and “integration”. We will also conduct a hand search of the bibliographies of all relevant articles and a search for unpublished

  4. The limits of market-based reforms in the NHS: the case of alternative providers in primary care.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Anna; Checkland, Kath; McDermott, Imelda; Harrison, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Historically, primary medical care in the UK has been delivered by general practitioners who are independent contractors, operating under a contract, which until 2004 was subject to little performance management. In keeping with the wider political impetus to introduce markets and competition into the NHS, reforms were introduced to allow new providers to bid for contracts to provide primary care services in England. These contracts known as 'Alternative Provider Medical Services', were encouraged by two centrally-driven rounds of procurement (2007/8 and 2008/9). This research investigated the commissioning and operation of such Alternative Providers of Primary Care (APPCs). Two qualitative case studies were undertaken in purposively sampled English Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) and their associated APPCs over 14 months (2009-10). We observed 65 hours of meetings, conducted 23 interviews with PCT and practice staff, and gathered relevant associated documentation. We found that the procurement and contracting process was costly and time-consuming. Extensive local consultation was undertaken, and there was considerable opposition in some areas. Many APPCs struggled to build up their patient list sizes, whilst over-performing on walk-in contracts. Contracting for APPCs was 'transactional', in marked contrast to the 'relational' contracting usually found in the NHS, with APPCs subject to tight performance management. These complicated and costly processes contrast to those experienced by traditionally owned GP partnerships. However, managers reported that the perception of competition had led existing practices to improve their services. The Coalition Government elected in 2010 is committed to 'Any Qualified Provider' of secondary care, and some commentators argue that this should also be applied to primary care. Our research suggests that, if this is to happen, a debate is needed about the operation of a market in primary care provision, including the trade-offs between

  5. Strengths of primary healthcare regarding care provided for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Paula, Elaine Amaral de; Costa, Mônica Barros; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; Bastos, Rita Maria Rodrigues; Vanelli, Chislene Pereira; Leite, Christiane Chaves Augusto; Caminhas, Márcio Santos; Paula, Rogério Baumgratz de

    2016-09-09

    to assess the structure and results obtained by the "Chronic Renal Patients Care Program" in a Brazilian city. epidemiological, cross-sectional study conducted in 14 PHC units and a secondary center from 2010 to 2013. The Donabedian Model was the methodological framework used. A total of 14 physicians, 13 supervisors, and 11 community health agents from primary healthcare were interviewed for the assessment of structure and process and 1,534 medical files from primary healthcare and 282 from secondary care were consulted to assess outcomes. most units lacked sufficient offices for physicians and nurses to provide consultations, had incomplete staffing, and most professionals had not received proper qualification to provide care for chronic renal disease. Physicians from PHC units classified as capable more frequently referred patients to the secondary care service in the early stages of chronic renal disease (stage 3B) when compared to physicians of units considered not capable (58% vs. 36%) (p=0.049). Capable PHC units also more frequently presented stabilized glomerular filtration rates (51%) when compared to partially capable units (36%) and not capable units (44%) (p=0.046). patients cared for by primary healthcare units that scored higher in structure and process criteria presented better clinical outcomes. to identify the coping strategies of family members of patients with mental disorders and relate them to family member sociodemographic variables and to the patient's clinical variables. this was a descriptive study conducted at a psychiatric hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo, with 40 family members of hospitalized patients over the age of 18, and who followed the patient before and during hospitalization. We used tools to characterize the subjects and the Folkman and Lazarus Inventory of Coping Strategies. the coping strategies most often used by family members were social support and problem solving. Mothers and fathers used more

  6. Benefits of an asthma education program provided at primary care sites on asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Boulay, Marie-Ève; Gauthier, Guylaine; Battisti, Livia; Chabot, Valérie; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Villeneuve, Denis; Côté, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Although it is a key-recommendation of all recent asthma guidelines, self-management education is still insufficiently offered in primary care settings. To demonstrate the benefits of an educational program offered at the site of primary care (Family Medicine Clinics- FMC) by trained asthma educators on patient outcomes and healthcare use. This was a one-year pre-post intervention study. Patients with a diagnosis of mild to moderate asthma were enrolled from six FMC. After an initial encounter by the educator, an assessment of educational needs and a spirometry were done, followed by 3 follow-up visits at 4-6 weeks, 4-6 months and one year. Expiratory flows, asthma control criteria, knowledge about asthma, adherence to medication and healthcare and medication use were assessed at each visit. Data from 124 asthma patients (41M/83F), aged 55 ± 18 years, were analyzed. After initiating the intervention, there was a progressive increase in asthma knowledge and an improvement in medication adherence. The number of unscheduled visits for respiratory problems went from 137 to 33 (P < 0.0001), the number of antibiotic treatments from 112 to 33 (P = 0.0002) and the number of oral corticosteroids treatments from 26 to 8 (NS). Marked improvements were observed in regard to inhaler technique and provision of a written action plan. This study shows that an educational intervention applied at the site of primary care can result in significant improvements in patient asthma outcomes and reduce unscheduled visits and inappropriate use of medications such as antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness of primary health care providers to provide oral health services to children in Niagara, Ontario: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sonica; Figueiredo, Rafael; Dupuis, Sandy; Skellet, Rachel; Wincott, Tara; Dyer, Carolyn; Feller, Andrea; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Background: Most children are exposed to medical, but not dental, care at an early age, making primary health care providers an important player in the reduction of tooth decay. The goal of this research was to understand the feasibility of using primary health care providers in promoting oral health by assessing their knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness in this regard. Methods: Using the Dillman method, a mail-in cross-sectional survey was conducted among all family physicians and pediatricians in the Niagara region of Ontario who have primary contact with children. A descriptive analysis was performed. Results: Close to 70% (181/265) of providers responded. More than 90% know that untreated tooth decay could affect the general health of a child. More than 80% examine the oral cavity for more than 50% of their child patients. However, more than 50% are not aware that white spots or lines on the tooth surface are the first signs of tooth decay. Lack of clinical time was the top reason for not performing oral disease prevention measures. Interpretation: Overall, survey responses show a positive attitude and willingness to engage in the oral health of children. To capitalize on this, there is a need to identify mechanisms of providing preventive oral health care services by primary health care providers; including improving their knowledge of oral health and addressing other potential barriers. PMID:28401141

  8. New York City's Child Health Clinics: Providing Quality Primary Care to Children in Low-Income and Immigrant Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.

    A study was conducted to determine whether the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is fulfilling dual public health and primary care missions of its Child Health Clinics, which provide services to 78,000 New York City children every year. Among the services provided by Child Health Clinics are health examinations for school and…

  9. Development of a Fall Prevention Survey to Determine Educational Needs for Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, B. Josea; Ganz, David A.; Vivrette, Rebecca L.; Harker, Judith O.; Josephson, Karen R.; Saliba, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Quality indicators are standardized measures of health care quality. We designed a survey to assess how knowledge, attitude, and organizational practices might affect healthcare provider behaviors in meeting quality indicators for fall prevention to plan curricula for a continuing educational intervention. The survey was pilot tested in the…

  10. Email Between Patient and Provider: Assessing the Attitudes and Perspectives of 624 Primary Health Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Seth, Puneet; Abu-Abed, Mohamed Ismail; Kapoor, Vikram; Nicholson, Kathryn; Agarwal, Gina

    2016-12-22

    Email between patients and their health care providers can serve as a continuous and collaborative forum to improve access to care, enhance convenience of communication, reduce administrative costs and missed appointments, and improve satisfaction with the patient-provider relationship. The main objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of patients aged 16 years and older toward receiving email communication for health-related purposes from an academic inner-city family health team in Southern Ontario. In addition to exploring the proportion of patients with a functioning email address and interest in email communication with their health care provider, we also examined patient-level predictors of interest in email communication. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered, 1-page survey of attitudes toward electronic communication for health purposes. Participants were recruited from attending patients at the McMaster Family Practice in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. These patients were aged 16 years and older and were approached consecutively to complete the self-administered survey (N=624). Descriptive analyses were conducted using the Pearson chi-square test to examine correlations between variables. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine statistically significant predictors of interest in email communication (yes or no). The majority of respondents (73.2%, 457/624) reported that they would be willing to have their health care provider (from the McMaster Family Practice) contact them via email to communicate health-related information. Those respondents who checked their personal email more frequently were less likely to want to engage in this electronic communication. Among respondents who check their email less frequently (fewer than every 3 days), 46% (37/81) preferred to communicate with the McMaster Family Practice via email. Online applications, including email, are emerging as a viable avenue for patient

  11. Email Between Patient and Provider: Assessing the Attitudes and Perspectives of 624 Primary Health Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Email between patients and their health care providers can serve as a continuous and collaborative forum to improve access to care, enhance convenience of communication, reduce administrative costs and missed appointments, and improve satisfaction with the patient-provider relationship. Objective The main objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of patients aged 16 years and older toward receiving email communication for health-related purposes from an academic inner-city family health team in Southern Ontario. In addition to exploring the proportion of patients with a functioning email address and interest in email communication with their health care provider, we also examined patient-level predictors of interest in email communication. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered, 1-page survey of attitudes toward electronic communication for health purposes. Participants were recruited from attending patients at the McMaster Family Practice in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. These patients were aged 16 years and older and were approached consecutively to complete the self-administered survey (N=624). Descriptive analyses were conducted using the Pearson chi-square test to examine correlations between variables. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine statistically significant predictors of interest in email communication (yes or no). Results The majority of respondents (73.2%, 457/624) reported that they would be willing to have their health care provider (from the McMaster Family Practice) contact them via email to communicate health-related information. Those respondents who checked their personal email more frequently were less likely to want to engage in this electronic communication. Among respondents who check their email less frequently (fewer than every 3 days), 46% (37/81) preferred to communicate with the McMaster Family Practice via email. Conclusions Online applications, including

  12. Development and validation of the Medical Home Care Coordination Survey for assessing care coordination in the primary care setting from the patient and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zlateva, Ianita; Anderson, Daren; Coman, Emil; Khatri, Khushbu; Tian, Terrence; Fifield, Judith

    2015-06-07

    .8). Patients experience the ultimate output of care coordination services, but primary healthcare staff members are best primed to perceive many of the structural elements of care coordination. The proactive measurement and monitoring of the core domains from both perspectives provides a richer body of information for the continuous improvement of care coordination services. The MHCCS shows promise as a valid and reliable assessment of these CC efforts.

  13. Patient perceptions in New Mexico about doctors of chiropractic functioning as primary care providers with limited prescriptive authority.

    PubMed

    Lehman, James J; Suozzi, Paul J; Simmons, George R; Jegtvig, Shereen K

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine chiropractic patients' perceptions of chiropractors serving as primary care providers and having a limited prescriptive authority. Four doctors of chiropractic in Albuquerque and Santa Fe, NM, participated in surveying their patients during the summer of 2008. The chiropractors distributed the questionnaires consecutively to chiropractic patients. Patients answered questions regarding their perceptions of their chiropractors, use of chiropractic care, and medications for pain. The participating chiropractors collected the completed patient questionnaires and mailed them to the primary investigator. The chiropractic providers collected 275 chiropractic patient questionnaires. The number of patient questionnaires collected by each of the 4 participating chiropractors ranged from 35 to 100. The patients primarily sought care for the management and treatment of pain (98.5%), and 57.5% considered that their chiropractors were "primary care providers." Eighty-five percent preferred that their chiropractor be qualified to prescribe medications and provide hands-on treatment, whereas 97.5% perceived their chiropractors to be chiropractic physicians. This small group of chiropractic patients from 4 offices in New Mexico perceived that their doctors of chiropractic were physicians and primary care providers, and 85% preferred that their chiropractor treat patients with limited prescriptive authority when appropriately trained. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The limits of market-based reforms in the NHS: the case of alternative providers in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Historically, primary medical care in the UK has been delivered by general practitioners who are independent contractors, operating under a contract, which until 2004 was subject to little performance management. In keeping with the wider political impetus to introduce markets and competition into the NHS, reforms were introduced to allow new providers to bid for contracts to provide primary care services in England. These contracts known as ‘Alternative Provider Medical Services’, were encouraged by two centrally-driven rounds of procurement (2007/8 and 2008/9). This research investigated the commissioning and operation of such Alternative Providers of Primary Care (APPCs). Methods Two qualitative case studies were undertaken in purposively sampled English Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) and their associated APPCs over 14 months (2009-10). We observed 65 hours of meetings, conducted 23 interviews with PCT and practice staff, and gathered relevant associated documentation. Results and conclusions We found that the procurement and contracting process was costly and time-consuming. Extensive local consultation was undertaken, and there was considerable opposition in some areas. Many APPCs struggled to build up their patient list sizes, whilst over-performing on walk-in contracts. Contracting for APPCs was ‘transactional’, in marked contrast to the ‘relational’ contracting usually found in the NHS, with APPCs subject to tight performance management. These complicated and costly processes contrast to those experienced by traditionally owned GP partnerships. However, managers reported that the perception of competition had led existing practices to improve their services. The Coalition Government elected in 2010 is committed to ‘Any Qualified Provider’ of secondary care, and some commentators argue that this should also be applied to primary care. Our research suggests that, if this is to happen, a debate is needed about the operation of a market

  15. Characteristics of primary care providers who adopted the hospitalist model from 2001 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Boonyasai, Romsai T; Lin, Yu-Li; Brotman, Daniel J; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of primary care providers (PCPs) who use hospitalists are unknown. Retrospective study using 100% Texas Medicare claims from 2001 through 2009. Descriptive statistics characterized proportion of PCPs using hospitalists over time. Trajectory analysis and multilevel models of 1172 PCPs with ≥20 inpatients in every study year characterized how PCPs adopted the hospitalist model and PCP factors associated with this transition. Hospitalist use increased between 2001 and 2009. PCPs who adopted the hospitalist model transitioned rapidly. In multilevel models, hospitalist use was associated with US training (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-1.73 in 2007-2009), family medicine specialty (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.25-1.70 in 2007-2009), and having high outpatient volumes (OR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.44 in 2007-2009). Over time, relative hospitalist use decreased among female PCPs (OR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.46-2.50 in 2001-2003; OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.15-1.95 in 2007-2009), those in urban locations (OR: 3.34, 95% CI: 2.72-4.09 in 2001-2003; OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.82-2.71 in 2007-2009), and those with higher inpatient volumes (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.95-1.18 in 2001-2003; OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.51-0.60 in 2007-2009). Longest-practicing PCPs were more likely to transition in the early 2000s, but this effect disappeared by the end of the study period (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.06-1.72 in 2001-2003; OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.73-1.17 in 2007-2009). PCPs with practice panels dominated by patients who were white, male, or had comorbidities are more likely to use hospitalists. PCP characteristics are associated with hospitalist use. The association between PCP characteristics and hospitalist use has evolved over time. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers relevant to the management of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Findholt, Nancy E; Davis, Melinda M; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-08-01

    To explore the perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers in relation to implementing the American Medical Association Expert Committee recommendations for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 rural primary care providers in Oregon. Transcribed interviews were thematically coded. Barriers to addressing childhood obesity fell into 5 categories: barriers related to the practice (time constraints, lack of reimbursement, few opportunities to detect obesity), the clinician (limited knowledge), the family/patient (family lifestyle and lack of parent motivation to change, low family income and lack of health insurance, sensitivity of the issue), the community (lack of pediatric subspecialists and multidisciplinary/tertiary care services, few community resources), and the broader sociocultural environment (sociocultural influences, high prevalence of childhood obesity). There were very few clinic and community resources to assist clinicians in addressing weight issues. Clinicians had received little previous training relevant to childhood obesity, and they expressed an interest in several topics. Rural primary care providers face extensive barriers in relation to implementing recommended practices for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. Particularly problematic is the lack of local and regional resources. Employing nurses to provide case management and behavior counseling, group visits, and telehealth and other technological communications are strategies that could improve the management of childhood obesity in rural primary care settings. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  17. Promoting the Shared-Care Model for Adolescent and Young Adults With Cancer: Optimizing Referrals and Care Coordination With Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, Karen E; Kircher, Sheetal; Altman, Jessica; Rademaker, Alfred; Salsman, John M; Didwania, Aarati; O'Brien, Bridget; Patel, Alpa C; Sanford, Stacy D

    2017-01-01

    The "shared-care model" for patients with cancer involves care coordination between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncologists, with the goal of optimizing survivorship care. However, a high proportion of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors do not have a PCP. Study objectives were to increase the percentage of AYAs with a PCP documented in the electronic medical record (EMR) via the use of a best practice advisory (BPA) or "stopgap" intervention; to increase communication between providers by the number of routed clinic notes; and to assess oncology providers' attitudes/beliefs about the model and intervention. Data were collected for the 6 months before implementation of the BPA to determine the percentage of AYAs with a PCP and the number of notes routed to providers (time point 1 [T1]). The same data were collected at time point 2 (T2) after the BPA had been implemented for 6 months. Oncology providers participated in an education video module and an online survey at T1 and a survey at T2. At T1, 47.1% of 756 AYAs had a documented PCP in the EMR. At T2, the percentage increased to 55.1% (P<.002). The number of routed notes did not change significantly from T1 to T2. Providers that completed the intervention survey agreed/strongly agreed that the shared-care model is a desirable model of care (T1 = 86%; T2 = 93%) and that a BPA is useful for facilitating PCP referrals (T1 = 76%; T2 = 39%). This BPA is feasible for increasing the percentage of AYAs with a PCP documented in the EMR and could potentially lead to increased PCP referral and communication among providers for the benefit of long-term survivorship care. Providers generally agree with the shared-care model; however, the BPA implementation requires modification. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  18. Private ownership of primary care providers associated with patient perceived quality of care: A comparative cross-sectional survey in three big Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaolin; Yin, Jia; Wong, Samuel Y S; Griffiths, Sian M; Zou, Guanyang; Shi, Leiyu

    2017-01-01

    Ownership of primary care providers varies in different cities in China. Shanghai represented the full public ownership model of primary providers; Shenzhen had public-owned but private-operated providers; and Hong Kong represented the full private ownership. The study aims to assess the association of primary care ownership and patient perceived quality of care in 3 Chinese megacities.We conducted multistage stratified random surveys in 2013 in the 3 cities. Quality scores of primary care were measured using the validated primary care assessment tools. Multivariate linear regression models were used to compare quality scores after controlling potential confounders of patient demographic, socioeconomic, and healthcare utilization factors.Overall, 797 primary care users in Shanghai, 802 in Shenzhen, and 1325 in Hong Kong participated in the study. The mean total quality scores were reported the highest in Shanghai (28.39), followed by Shenzhen (25.82) and then Hong Kong (25.21) (P < 0.001). Shanghai participants reported the highest scores for 1st contact accessibility, coordination of information, comprehensiveness of service availability, and culture competence, while Hong Kong participants reported the lowest for these domains (P < 0.001). Hong Kong participants from rich households reported higher total scores than those from poor households (P < 0.05); however, this was not found in Shanghai and Shenzhen.The study suggests that private primary care ownership may be associated with lower quality and less equitable care distribution. In China, it suggests that it may be beneficial to promote public-owned and nonprofit providers. Promoting privatization in primary care may be at the cost of quality and equity of primary care.

  19. Balancing confidentiality and the information provided to families of patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Carceles, M; Pereniguez, J; Osuna, E; Luna, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to describe family doctors' attitudes to confidentiality and providing patient information to relatives as well as their justifications for sharing information. Method: A descriptive postal questionnaire was self-administered by family doctors. Results: Of 227 doctors, 95.1% provided information to a patient's family and over a third (35%) disclosed information to others without prior patient consent. Conclusions: The findings reveal that family doctors should pay more attention to their patients' rights to information, privacy, and confidentiality, and reflect very carefully on the fine balance between this and the occasional need for the support and collaboration of family members in delivery of care. Emphasis should be placed on ethics and legal problems during undergraduate education and in-service training of doctors. PMID:16131555

  20. Improving Deployment-Related Primary Care Provider Assessments of PTSD and Mental Health Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    questionnaire . Arch Womens Ment Health, 10(6), 277‐283.  Davis, D. (1998). Does CME work? An analysis of the effect of educational activities on physician...Thom, D., & MaCurdy, T. (1997). Effects of a self‐administered previsit  questionnaire  to  enhance awareness of patients’ concerns in primary care. J...Murphy, F. M. (2003). Post‐Traumatic Stress  Disorder and  Chronic  Fatigue Syndrome‐like Illness among Gulf War Veterans: A Population‐ based Survey

  1. Access to primary health care for Australian young people: service provider perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Melissa; Bernard, Diana; Booth, Michael; Quine, Susan; Alperstein, Garth; Usherwood, Tim; Bennett, David

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To adequately address the complex health needs of young people, their access to services, and the quality of services received, must be improved. AIMS: To explore the barriers to service provision for young people and to identify the training needs of primary healthcare service providers in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. DESIGN OF STUDY: A cross-sectional, qualitative study of the perspectives of a range of health service providers. SETTING: A range of primary healthcare organisations across NSW. METHODS: Samples of general practitioners (GPs), youth health workers, youth health coordinators, and community health centre staff were drawn from urban and rural clusters across NSW. Focus groups and interviews were used to identify barriers to service provision and the training needs of service providers. Data were tape recorded, transcribed, and analysed. RESULTS: Barriers to service provision among GPs and community health centre staff included inadequate time, flexibility, skills, and confidence in working with young people, and poor linkages with other relevant services. Training needs included better knowledge of and skills in adolescent health requirements, working with adolescents, and working with other services. Barriers to service provision for youth health workers and coordinators included lack of financial resources and infrastructure. There were few linkages between groups of service providers. CONCLUSION: Models of service provision that allow stronger linkages between service providers, sufficient time for consultation with young people, adequate training and support of health professionals, and flexibility of service provision, including outreach, should be explored and evaluated. PMID:14960219

  2. Impact of primary care provider knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer clinical trials: implications for referral, education and advocacy.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Margo; D'Agostino, Thomas A; Blakeney, Natasha; Weiss, Elisa S; Binz-Scharf, Maria C; Golant, Mitch; Bylund, Carma L

    2015-03-01

    Primary Care Providers (PCPs) can be instrumental in helping to prepare patients for referral to cancer treatment. It has been suggested that PCPs can have an important impact on priming patients about the possibility of receiving care within a cancer treatment clinical trial (CCT). However, little is understood about how to effectively engage primary care providers in educating patients about trials. Data were collected as part of two qualitative research projects about primary care providers' role in referral to treatment and to CCTs. Participants were 27 PCPs who agreed to take part in qualitative face-to-face or telephone interviews and serve predominantly underserved, minority populations. Interviews identified a number of factors influencing referral to oncologists, including patients' insurance coverage, location and proximity to treatment facilities, and the strength of ongoing relationships with and/or previous experience with a specialist. PCPs overwhelmingly expressed disinterest in discussing any treatment options, including CCTs. Misconceptions about quality of care received through trials were also common, presenting a deterrent to discussion. PCPs need targeted, evidence-based educational interventions to appropriately address their concerns about cancer clinical trials, enhance provider communication skills, and alter patient referral behavior. Steps must also be taken to strengthen communication between oncologists and referring PCPs.

  3. Patient satisfaction between primary care providers and hospitals: a cross-sectional survey in Jilin province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinghua; Wang, Pingping; Kong, Xuan; Liang, Hailun; Zhang, Xiumin; Shi, Leiyu

    2016-06-01

    To assess patient satisfaction with outpatient and inpatient care between primary care providers and secondary/tertiary hospitals, and to examine its association with socio-demographic characteristics and type of institution, based on self-reported survey data. Cross-sectional survey. Healthcare facilities within Jilin province, China. In total, 993 outpatients and 925 inpatients aged ≥15 years old were recruited. Patient satisfaction with the care experience. Patient satisfaction with outpatient and inpatient care was significantly associated with type of healthcare delivery setting in Jilin, China. Seeking outpatient care from community health centers (CHCs) was significantly associated with a higher ratio of patient satisfaction. Patients of county and tertiary hospitals complained about long-waiting times, bad attitudes of health workers, high expense of treatment, and their overall satisfaction towards outpatient care was lower. In the terms of inpatient care, patients were more satisfied with treatment expense in CHCs compared with county hospitals. CHCs and hospitals face different challenges regarding patient satisfaction. Further healthcare reform in China need to adopt more measures (e.g. increasing quality of primary care, setting up a referral medical system etc.) to improve patient satisfaction. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  4. Primary Care Integration of Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Services: A Primer for Providers and Case Report of Local Implementation.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Anthony Ps; Takesue, Cori L; Medeiros, Jared Hn; Duran, Aileen A; Humphry, Joseph W; Lunsford, Ryan M; Shaw, Diana V; Fukuda, Michael H; Hishinuma, Earl S

    2017-06-01

    Mental health conditions are common, disabling, potentially life-threatening, and costly; however, they are mostly treatable with early detection and intervention. Unfortunately, mental healthcare is in significantly short supply both nationally and locally, and particularly in small, rural, and relatively isolated communities. This article provides physicians and other health practitioners with a primer on the basic rationale and principles of integrating behavioral healthcare - particularly psychiatric specialty care - in primary care settings, including effective use of teleconferencing. Referring to a local-based example, this paper describes the programmatic components (universal screening, telephone availability, mutually educational team rounds, as-needed consultations, etc) that operationalize and facilitate successful primary care integration, and illustrates how these elements are applied to population segments with differing needs for behavioral healthcare involvement. Lastly, the article discusses the potential value of primary care integration in promoting quality, accessibility, and provider retention; discusses how new developments in healthcare financing could enhance the sustainability of primary care integration models; and summarizes lessons learned.

  5. Primary Care Integration of Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Services: A Primer for Providers and Case Report of Local Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Takesue, Cori L; Medeiros, Jared HN; Duran, Aileen A; Humphry, Joseph W; Lunsford, Ryan M; Shaw, Diana V; Fukuda, Michael H; Hishinuma, Earl S

    2017-01-01

    Mental health conditions are common, disabling, potentially life-threatening, and costly; however, they are mostly treatable with early detection and intervention. Unfortunately, mental healthcare is in significantly short supply both nationally and locally, and particularly in small, rural, and relatively isolated communities. This article provides physicians and other health practitioners with a primer on the basic rationale and principles of integrating behavioral healthcare — particularly psychiatric specialty care — in primary care settings, including effective use of teleconferencing. Referring to a local-based example, this paper describes the programmatic components (universal screening, telephone availability, mutually educational team rounds, as-needed consultations, etc) that operationalize and facilitate successful primary care integration, and illustrates how these elements are applied to population segments with differing needs for behavioral healthcare involvement. Lastly, the article discusses the potential value of primary care integration in promoting quality, accessibility, and provider retention; discusses how new developments in healthcare financing could enhance the sustainability of primary care integration models; and summarizes lessons learned. PMID:28607831

  6. Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites.

  7. The Collaborative Payer Provider Model Enhances Primary Care, Producing Triple Aim Plus One Outcomes: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Thomas; Olsen, Lisa; Zimmerman, Deborah

    2017-08-27

    Rising health care costs are threatening the fiscal solvency of patients, employers, payers, and governments. The Collaborative Payer Provider Model (CPPM) addresses this challenge by reinventing the role of the payer into a full-service collaborative ally of the physician. From 2010 through 2014, a Medicare Advantage plan prospectively deployed the CPPM, averaging 30,561 members with costs that were 73.6% of fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare (p < 0.001). The health plan was not part of an integrated delivery system. After allocating $80 per member per month (PMPM) for primary care costs, the health plan had medical cost ratios averaging 75.1% before surplus distribution. Member benefits were the best in the market. The health plan was rated 4.5 Stars by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for years 1-4, and 5 Stars in study year 5 for quality, patient experience, access to care, and care process metrics. Primary care and specialist satisfaction were significantly better than national benchmarks. Savings resulted from shifts in spending from inpatient to outpatient settings, and from specialists to primary care physicians when appropriate. The CPPM is a scalable model that enables a win-win-win system for patients, providers, and payers.

  8. Development of a training programme for primary care providers to counsel patients with risky lifestyle behaviours in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Everett-Murphy, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Background We are facing a global epidemic of non-communicable disease (NCDs), which has been linked with four risky lifestyle behaviours. It is recommended that primary care providers (PCPs) provide individual brief behaviour change counselling (BBCC) as part of everyday primary care, however currently training is required to build capacity. Local training programmes are not sufficient to achieve competence. Aim This study aimed to redesign the current training for PCPs in South Africa, around a new model for BBCC that would offer a standardised approach to addressing patients’ risky lifestyle behaviours. Setting The study population included clinical nurse practitioners and primary care doctors in the Western Cape Province. Methods The analyse, design, develop, implement and evaluate (ADDIE) model provided a systematic approach to the analysis of learning needs, the design and development of the training programme, its implementation and initial evaluation. Results This study designed a new training programme for PCPs in BBCC, which was based on a conceptual model that combined the 5As (ask, alert, assess, assist and arrange) with a guiding style derived from motivational interviewing. The programme was developed as an eight-hour training programme that combined theory, modelling and simulated practice with feedback, for either clinical nurse practitioners or primary care doctors. Conclusion This was the first attempt at developing and implementing a best practice BBCC training programme in our context, targeting a variety of PCPs, and addressing different risk factors. PMID:26245608

  9. HIV Primary Care Providers – Screening, Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors related to Alcohol Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chander, Geetanjali; Monroe, Anne K.; Crane, Heidi M.; Hutton, Heidi E.; Saag, Michael S.; Cropsey, Karen; Eron, Joseph J.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; Geng, Elvin; Mathews, William Christopher; Boswell, Stephen; Rodriquez, Benigno; Ellison, Megan; Kitahata, Mari M.; Moore, Richard D.; McCaul, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol has particularly harmful health effects in HIV-infected patients; therefore, HIV clinics are an important setting for integration of brief alcohol intervention and alcohol pharmacotherapy to improve patient outcomes. Current practices of alcohol screening, counseling, and prescription of pharmacotherapy by HIV providers are unknown. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of HIV providers from 8 HIV clinical sites across the United States. Surveys queried knowledge and use of alcohol screening, brief advice, counseling and pharmacotherapy, confidence and willingness to prescribe pharmacotherapy and barriers to their use of alcohol pharmacotherapy. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine provider factors associated with confidence and willingness to prescribe pharmacotherapy. Results Providers (N=158) were predominantly female (58%) and Caucasian (73%); almost half were infectious disease physicians and 31% had been in practice 10–20 years. Most providers (95%) reported always or usually screening for alcohol use, although only 10% reported using a formal screening tool. Over two-thirds never or rarely treated alcohol-dependent patients with pharmacotherapy themselves. Most (71%) referred alcohol-dependent patients for treatment. Knowledge regarding alcohol pharmacotherapy was low. The major barrier to prescribing pharmacotherapy was insufficient training on use of pharmacotherapy. Provider confidence ratings were positively correlated with their practice patterns. Conclusions HIV providers reported high rates of screening for alcohol use, though few used a formal screening tool. Most providers referred alcohol dependent patients to outside resources for treatment. Few reported prescribing alcohol pharmacotherapy. Increased training alcohol pharmacotherapy may increase confidence in prescribing and use of these medications in HIV care settings. PMID:26857898

  10. AHRQ prevention quality indicators to assess the quality of primary care of local providers: a pilot study from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Flacco, Maria Elena; De Vito, Corrado; Arcà, Silvia; Carle, Flavia; Capasso, Lorenzo; Marzuillo, Carolina; Muraglia, Angelo; Samani, Fabio; Villari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Outside the USA, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) prevention quality indicators (PQIs) have been used to compare the quality of primary care services only at a national or regional level. However, in several national health systems, primary care is not directly managed by the regions but is in charge of smaller territorial entities. We evaluated whether PQIs might be used to compare the performance of local providers such as Italian local health authorities (LHAs) and health districts. Methods: We analysed the hospital discharge abstracts of 44 LHAs (and 11 health districts) of five Italian regions (including ≈18 million residents) in 2008–10. Age-standardized PQI rates were computed following AHRQ specifications. Potential predictors were investigated using multilevel modelling. Results: We analysed 11 470 722 hospitalizations. The overall rates of preventable hospitalizations (composite PQI 90) were 1012, 889 and 988 (×100 000 inhabitants) in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Composite PQIs were able to differentiate LHAs and health districts and showed small variation in the performance ranking over years. Conclusion: Although further research is required, our findings support the use of composite PQIs to evaluate the performance of relatively small primary health care providers (50 000–60 000 enrollees) in countries with universal health care coverage. Achieving high precision may be crucial for a structured quality assessment system to align hospitalization rate indicators with measures of other contexts of care (cost, clinical management, satisfaction/experience) that are typically computed at a local level. PMID:24367065

  11. Behind-the-scenes of patient-centered care: content analysis of electronic messaging among primary care clinic providers and staff.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Renée A; Deppen, Stephen A; Figaro, M Kathleen; Gregg, William M; Jirjis, Jim N; Rothman, Russell L; Johnston, Philip E; Miller, Randolph A; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-12-01

    Transitions to patient-centered health care, the increasing complexity of care, and growth in self-management have all increased the frequency and intensity of clinical services provided outside office settings and between visits. Understanding how electronic messaging, which is often used to coordinate care, affects care is crucial. A taxonomy for codifying clinical text messages into standardized categories could facilitate content analysis of work performed or enhanced via electronic messaging. To codify electronic messages exchanged among the primary care providers and the staff managing diabetes patients at an academic medical center. Retrospective analysis of 27,061 electronic messages exchanged among 578 providers and staff caring for a cohort of 639 adult primary care patients with diabetes between April 1, 2003 and October 31, 2003. Providers and staff using locally developed electronic messaging in an academic medical center's adult primary care clinic. Raw data included clinical text message content, message ID, thread ID, and user ID. Derived measures included user job classification, 35 flags codifying message content, and a taxonomy grouping the flags. Messages contained diverse content: communications with patients, families, and other providers (47.2%), diagnoses (25.4%), documentation (33%), logistics and support functions (29.6%), medications (32.9%), and treatments (28.9%). All messages could be classified; 59.5% of messages addressed 2 or more content areas. Systematic content analysis of provider and staff electronic messages yields specific insight regarding clinical and administrative work carried out via electronic messaging.

  12. Association between women veterans' experiences with VA outpatient health care and designation as a women's health provider in primary care clinics.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Lori A; Trentalange, Mark; Murphy, Terrence E; Brandt, Cynthia; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Maisel, Natalya C; Wright, Steven M; Gaetano, Vera S; Allore, Heather; Skanderson, Melissa; Reyes-Harvey, Evelyn; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rose, Danielle; Haskell, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Women veterans comprise a small percentage of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users. Prior research on women veterans' experiences with primary care has focused on VA site differences and not individual provider characteristics. In 2010, the VA established policy requiring the provision of comprehensive women's health care by designated women's health providers (DWHPs). Little is known about the quality of health care delivered by DWHPs and women veterans' experience with care from these providers. Secondary data were obtained from the VA Survey of Healthcare Experience of Patients (SHEP) using the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) patient-centered medical home (PCMH) survey from March 2012 through February 2013, a survey designed to measure patient experience with care and the DWHPs Assessment of Workforce Capacity that discerns between DWHPs versus non-DWHPs. Of the 28,994 surveys mailed to women veterans, 24,789 were seen by primary care providers and 8,151 women responded to the survey (response rate, 32%). A total of 3,147 providers were evaluated by the SHEP-CAHPS-PCMH survey (40%; n = 1,267 were DWHPs). In a multivariable model, patients seen by DWHPs (relative risk, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04) reported higher overall experiences with care compared with patients seen by non-DWHPs. The main finding is that women veterans' overall experiences with outpatient health care are slightly better for those receiving care from DWHPs compared with those receiving care from non-DWHPs. Our findings have important policy implications for how to continue to improve women veterans' experiences. Our work provides support to increase access to DWHPs at VA primary care clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The impact of patient and provider factors on depression screening of american Indian and alaska native people in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Denise A; Muller, Clemma J; Smith, Julia J; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Manson, Spero M

    2012-04-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends routine depression screening in primary care, yet regular screening does not occur in most health systems serving Alaska Native and American Indian people. The authors examined factors associated with administration of depression screening among Alaska Native and American Indian people in a large urban clinic. Medical records of 18 625 Alaska Native and American Indian adults were examined 1 year after implementation of a depression screening initiative. Multilevel logistic regression models examined associations between patient and provider factors and administration of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Forty-seven percent of patients were screened. Women were more likely than men to be screened (50% vs 43%, P < .001). Increased screening odds were associated with older age, increased service use, and chronic disease (P < .001) but not with substance abuse disorders or prior antidepressant dispensation. Women previously diagnosed with depression had higher odds of screening (P = .002). Men seen by male providers had higher odds of screening than did men seen by female providers (P = .040). Screening rates peaked among providers with 2 to 5 years of employment with the clinic. Cross-sectional analysis of medical record data was of unknown reliability; there were limited sociodemographic data. Even with significant organizational support for annual depression screening, primary care providers systematically missed men and patients with infrequent primary care visits. Outreach to male patients and additional supports for primary care providers, especially in the first years of practice, may improve screening and treatment for depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people.

  14. Association of State-Level Restrictions in Nurse Practitioner Scope of Practice With the Quality of Primary Care Provided to Medicare Beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Perloff, Jennifer; Clarke, Sean; DesRoches, Catherine M; O'Reilly-Jacob, Monica; Buerhaus, Peter

    2017-09-01

    State scope of practice (SoP) laws impose significant restrictions on the services that a nurse practitioner (NP) may provide in some states, yet evidence about SoP limitations on the quality of primary care is very limited. This study uses six different classifications of state regulations and bivariate and multivariate analyses to compare beneficiaries attributed to primary care nurse practitioners and primary care physicians in 2013 testing two hypotheses: (1) chronic disease management, cancer screening, preventable hospitalizations, and adverse outcomes of care provided by primary care nurse practitioners are better in reduced and restricted practice states compared to states without restrictions and (2) by decreasing access to care, SoP restrictions negatively affect the quality of primary care. Results show a lack of consistent association between quality of primary care provided by NPs and state SoP restrictions. State regulations restricting NP SoP do not improve the quality of care.

  15. Entry-Level Competencies Required of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners Providing HIV Specialty Care: A National Practice Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Relf, Michael V; Harmon, James L

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only 30% of HIV-infected persons are diagnosed, engaged in care, provided antiretroviral therapy, and virologically suppressed. Competent HIV care providers are needed to achieve optimal clinical outcomes for all people living with HIV, but 69% of Ryan White Clinics in the United States report difficulty recruiting HIV clinicians, and one in three current HIV specialty physicians are expected to retire in the next decade. Nurse practitioners who specialize in HIV and have caseloads with large numbers of HIV-infected patients have care outcomes that are equal to or better than that provided by physicians, especially generalist non-HIV specialist physicians. We designed a national practice validation study to help prepare the next generation of primary care nurse practitioners who desire to specialize in HIV. This manuscript reports the results of the national study and identifies entry-level competencies for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners specializing in HIV.

  16. Acculturation differences in communicating information about child mental health between Latino parents and primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Lê Cook, Benjamin; Brown, Jonathan D; Loder, Stephen; Wissow, Larry

    2014-12-01

    Significant Latino-white disparities in youth mental health care access and quality exist yet little is known about Latino parents' communication with providers about youth mental health and the role of acculturation in influencing this communication. We estimated regression models to assess the association between time in the US and the number of psychosocial issues discussed with the medical assistant (MA) and doctor, adjusting for child and parent mental health and sociodemographics. Other proxies of acculturation were also investigated including measures of Spanish and English language proficiency and nativity. Parent's length of time in the US was positively associated with their communication of: their child's psychosocial problems with their child's MA, stress in their own life with their child's MA, and their child's school problems with their child's doctor. These differences were especially apparent for parents living in the US for >10 years. Parent-child language discordance, parent and child nativity were also significantly associated with communication of psychosocial problems. Greater provider and MA awareness of variation in resistance to communicating psychosocial issues could improve communication, and improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of youth mental illness.

  17. Acculturation Differences in Communicating Information about Child Mental Health Between Latino Parents and Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Lê Cook, Benjamin; Brown, Jonathan D.; Loder, Stephen; Wissow, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Background Significant Latino-white disparities in youth mental health care access and quality exist yet little is known about Latino parents’ communication with providers about youth mental health and the role of acculturation in influencing this communication. Methods We estimated regression models to assess the association between time in the U.S. and the number of psychosocial issues discussed with the medical assistant (MA) and doctor, adjusting for child and parent mental health and sociodemographics. Other proxies of acculturation were also investigated including measures of Spanish and English language proficiency and nativity. Results Parent’s length of time in the U.S. was positively associated with their communication of: their child’s psychosocial problems with their child’s MA, stress in their own life with their child’s MA, and their child’s school problems with their child’s doctor. These differences were especially apparent for parents living in the U.S. for greater than ten years. Parent-child language discordance, parent and child nativity were also significantly associated with communication of psychosocial problems. Discussion Greater provider and MA awareness of variation in resistance to communicating psychosocial issues could improve communication, and improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of youth mental illness. PMID:24705736

  18. Guideline for referral of patients with suspected lung cancer by family physicians and other primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, M. Elisabeth; Young, Sheila-Mae; Vella, Emily T.; Ash, Marla; Bansal, Praveen; Robinson, Andrew; Skrastins, Roland; Ung, Yee; Zeldin, Robert; Levitt, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this guideline is to assist FPs and other primary care providers with recognizing features that should raise their suspicions about the presence of lung cancer in their patients. Composition of the committee Committee members were selected from among the regional primary care leads from the Cancer Care Ontario Provincial Primary Care and Cancer Network and from among the members of the Cancer Care Ontario Lung Cancer Disease Site Group. Methods This guideline was developed through systematic review of the evidence base, synthesis of the evidence, and formal external review involving Canadian stakeholders to validate the relevance of recommendations. Report Evidence-based guidelines were developed to improve the management of patients presenting with clinical features of lung cancer within the Canadian context. Conclusion Earlier identification and referral of patients with lung cancer might ultimately help improve lung cancer morbidity and mortality. These guidelines might also be of value for informing the development of lung cancer diagnostic programs and for helping policy makers to ensure appropriate resources are in place. PMID:25122814

  19. Guideline for referral of patients with suspected prostate cancer by family physicians and other primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sheila-Mae; Bansal, Praveen; Vella, Emily T.; Finelli, Antonio; Levitt, Cheryl; Loblaw, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this guideline is to assist FPs and other primary care providers with recognizing features that should raise their suspicion about the presence of prostate cancer in their patients. Composition of the committee Committee members were selected from among the regional primary care leads from the Cancer Care Ontario Provincial Primary Care and Cancer Network and from among the members of the Cancer Care Ontario Genitourinary Cancer Disease Site Group. Methods This guideline was developed through systematic review of the evidence base, synthesis of the evidence, and formal external review involving Canadian stakeholders to validate the relevance of recommendations. Report Evidence-based guidelines were developed to improve the management of patients presenting with clinical features of prostate cancer within the Canadian context. Conclusion These guidelines might lead to more timely and appropriate referrals and might also be of value for informing the development of prostate cancer diagnostic programs and for helping policy makers to ensure appropriate resources are in place. PMID:25756141

  20. Primary Care-Mental Health Integration in the VA Health System: Associations Between Provider Staffing and Quality of Depression Care.

    PubMed

    Levine, Debra S; McCarthy, John F; Cornwell, Brittany; Brockmann, Laurie; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2017-05-01

    The study examined whether staffing of Primary Care-Mental Health Integration (PCMHI) services in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system is related to quality of depression care. Site surveys and administrative data from 349 VA facilities for fiscal year 2013 were used to calculate PCMHI staffing (full-time equivalents) per 10,000 primary care patients and discipline-specific staffing proportions for PCMHI psychologists, social workers, nurses, and psychiatric medication prescribers. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted at the facility level and assessed associations between PCMHI staffing ratios and the following indicators of depression treatment in the three months following a new episode of depression: any antidepressant receipt, adequacy of antidepressant receipt, any psychotherapy receipt, and psychotherapy engagement (three or more visits). Higher facility PCMHI staffing ratios were associated with a greater percentage of patients who received any psychotherapy treatment (B=1.16, p<.01) and who engaged in psychotherapy (B=.39, p<.01). When analyses controlled for total PCMHI staffing, the proportion of social workers as part of PCMHI was positively correlated with the percentage of patients with adequate antidepressant treatment continuation (B=3.16, p=.03). The proportion of nurses in PCMHI was negatively associated with the percentage of patients with engagement in psychotherapy (B=-2.83, p=.02). PCMHI programs with greater overall staffing ratios demonstrated better performance on indicators of psychotherapy for depression but not on indicators of antidepressant treatment. Further investigation is needed to determine whether differences in discipline-specific staffing play a causal role in driving associated differences in receipt of treatment.

  1. A Survey of Primary Care Provider Attitudes and Behaviors Regarding Treatment of Adult Depression: What Changes After a Collaborative Care Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Upshur, Carole; Weinreb, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess primary care provider (PCP) attitudes and self-reported behavior with regard to identifying and managing depression in adult patients before and after a chronic disease/collaborative care intervention. Method: A self-administered cross-sectional survey was conducted in 6 targeted practices among 39 family practice physicians, family nurse practitioners, and residents before and after implementation of a depression in primary care project. In this project, the sites received tools and training in depression screening and guideline-concordant treatment, facilitated referral services for patients to access mental health providers, psychiatric phone consultation, patient education materials, and services of a depression care manager. The project was conducted from June 2003 through June 2006. Results: Comparison of responses prior to and after the intervention showed that significantly or nearly significantly larger proportions of PCPs endorsed the importance of depression as a patient presenting problem (p = .000), increased provision of supportive counseling (p = .13), more often identified counseling or therapy as effective (p = .07), and more often referred patients to mental health services (p = .001). PCPs also reduced their perception that treating depression is time consuming (p = .000). Conclusions: After a chronic disease/collaborative care approach to depression treatment in primary care was implemented, PCP attitudes and behaviors about depression treatment were significantly modified. More guideline-concordant care, and increased collaboration with mental health services, was reported. Implications for future primary care depression intervention activities and research are discussed. PMID:18615167

  2. Extending Our Understanding of Burnout and Its Associated Factors: Providers and Staff in Primary Care Clinics.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, William M; Fernstrom, Karl M; Galos, Dylan L; Britt, Heather R

    2016-09-01

    Burnout has been identified as an occupational hazard in the helping professions for many years and is often overlooked, as health-care systems strive to improve cost and quality. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS) are tools for assessing burnout prevalence and its associated factors. We describe how we used them in outpatient clinics to assess burnout for multiple job types. Traditional statistical techniques and seemingly unrelated regression were used to describe the sample and evaluate the association between work life domains and burnout. Of 838 eligible participants, 467 (55.7%) were included for analysis. Burnout prevalence varied across three job categories: providers (37.5%), clinical assistants (24.6%), and other staff (28.0%). It was not related to age, gender, or years of tenure but was lower in part-time workers (24.6%) than in full-time workers (33.9%). Analysis of the AWS subscales identified organizational correlates of burnout. Accurately identifying and defining the operative system factors associated with burnout will make it possible to create successful interventions. Using the MBI and the AWS together can highlight the relationship between system work experiences and burnout.

  3. Reasons Military Patients with Primary Care Access Leave an Emergency Department Waiting Room Before Seeing a Provider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Reasons Military Patients With Primary Care Access Leave an Emergency Department Waiting Room Before Seeing a Provider Shawn M. Varney, MD, Toni E...the severity of their illness, meaning that they were ill enough to require medical attention during that visit. Fernandes et al reported that most...2004;97: 729 733. 9. Fernandes CM, Price A, Christenson JM. Does reduced length of stay decrease the number of emergency department patients who leave

  4. Relationship between provider type and the attainment of treatment goals in primary care.

    PubMed

    Federman, Daniel G; Krishnamurthy, Raj; Kancir, Sue; Goulet, Joseph; Justice, Amy

    2005-09-01

    To determine the relationship between provider type (eg, resident, mid-level practitioner, attending physician) and attainment of clinical goals with respect to the treatment of dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Using electronic medical records, we identified all patients seen in the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Health Care System in a 6-month period with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code corresponding to a diagnosis of coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension. We recorded the most recent low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level for patients with diabetes or coronary artery disease, glycosylated hemoglobin level for patients with diabetes, and blood pressure for patients with hypertension. We then examined the relationship between these measures and provider type. After controlling for patient age and practice site, no significant differences were noted between attending physicians and residents in attaining treatment goals for dyslipidemia (odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-1.38) or diabetes (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.82-1.33). However, attending physicians were significantly more likely to attain blood pressure goals than were residents (59% vs 54%, P = .002; OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.08-1.39). Controlling for additional patient characteristics did not alter the findings. Internal medicine residents may quickly develop expertise in managing dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus. Residents in our sample, however, were less likely than attending physicians to reach goal blood pressure for patients with hypertension. Educational efforts aimed at house staff to improve the treatment of hypertension are warranted.

  5. Primary mental health care in rural Punjab, Pakistan: providers, and user perspectives of the effectiveness of treatments.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Ilyas; Mujtaba, Muhammad; Chaudhry, Haroon; Jenkins, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    Neuro-psychiatric disorders are associated with a considerable burden of disease, not only globally, but also in low- and middle-income countries. Epidemiological information about treatment of these disorders is required to help formulate treatment and prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to describe different types of mental health care providers, and examine patients' knowledge of the treatments and their views about its effectiveness in rural Punjab, Pakistan. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of attenders at a 1-day psychiatric consultation clinic in rural Punjab, Pakistan. Patients sought help from five different types of providers and were treated with physical, psychotherapeutic and spiritual treatments. Most recognised psychiatric problems as treatable. There was a discrepancy between belief and knowledge of the treatment of mental disorders; most had a very basic understanding of treatment. They reported general practitioner (GP) treatments as more effective (56%) compared to other practitioners (20%). We argue that treatments given by primary mental health care providers need to be standardised. A systematic appraisal of the theoretical rationale of the mental health treatments prescribed in primary care settings is required in low-income countries like Pakistan. This will help ensure standardisation of care especially regarding spiritual/psychological therapies so that in future valid inferences can be made about their effectiveness in populations. Further work should include improving mental health literacy with special reference to treatments available for mental health problems.

  6. Provider responses to patients controlling access to their electronic health records: a prospective cohort study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tierney, William M; Alpert, Sheri A; Byrket, Amy; Caine, Kelly; Leventhal, Jeremy C; Meslin, Eric M; Schwartz, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Applying Fair Information Practice principles to electronic health records (EHRs) requires allowing patient control over who views their data. We designed a program that captures patients' preferences for provider access to an urban health system's EHR. Patients could allow or restrict providers' access to all data (diagnoses, medications, test results, reports, etc.) or only highly sensitive data (sexually transmitted infections, HIV/AIDS, drugs/alcohol, mental or reproductive health). Except for information in free-text reports, we redacted EHR data shown to providers according to patients' preferences. Providers could "break the glass" to display redacted information. We prospectively studied this system in one primary care clinic, noting redactions and when users "broke the glass," and surveyed providers about their experiences and opinions. Eight of nine eligible clinic physicians and all 23 clinic staff participated. All 105 patients who enrolled completed the preference program. Providers did not know which of their patients were enrolled, nor their preferences for accessing their EHRs. During the 6-month prospective study, 92 study patients (88 %) returned 261 times, during which providers viewed their EHRs 126 times (48 %). Providers "broke the glass" 102 times, 92 times for patients not in the study and ten times for six returning study patients, all of whom had restricted EHR access. Providers "broke the glass" for six (14 %) of 43 returning study patients with redacted data vs. zero among 49 study patients without redactions (p = 0.01). Although 54 % of providers agreed that patients should have control over who sees their EHR information, 58 % believed restricting EHR access could harm provider-patient relationships and 71 % felt quality of care would suffer. Patients frequently preferred restricting provider access to their EHRs. Providers infrequently overrode patients' preferences to view hidden data. Providers believed that restricting EHR access

  7. Assessing capacity and disease burden in a virtual network of New York City primary care providers following Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Sebek, Kimberly; Jacobson, Laura; Wang, Jason; Newton-Dame, Remle; Singer, Jesse

    2014-08-01

    Urban contexts introduce unique challenges that must be addressed to ensure that areas of high population density can function when disasters occur. The ability to generate useful data to guide decision-making is critical in this context. Widespread adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems in recent years has created electronic data sources and networks that may play an important role in public health surveillance efforts, including in post-disaster situations. The Primary Care Information Project (PCIP) at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has partnered with local clinicians to establish an electronic data system, and this network provides infrastructure to support primary care surveillance activities in New York City. After Hurricane Sandy, PCIP generated several sets of data to contribute to the city's efforts to assess the impact of the storm, including daily connectivity data to establish practice operations, data to examine patterns of primary care utilization in severely affected and less affected areas, and data on the frequency of respiratory infection diagnosis in the primary care setting. Daily patient visit data from three heavily affected neighborhoods showed the health department where primary care capacity was most affected in the weeks following Sandy. Overall transmission data showed that practices in less affected areas were quicker to return to normal reporting patterns, while those in more affected areas did not resume normal data transmissions for a few months. Rates of bronchitis increased after Sandy compared to the two prior years; while this was most likely attributable to a more severe flu season, it demonstrates the capacity of primary care networks to pick up on these types of post-emergency trends. Hurricane Sandy was the first disaster situation where PCIP was asked to assess public health impact, generating information that could contribute to aid and recovery efforts. This experience allowed us to

  8. Evaluation of a partnership between primary and secondary care providing an accessible Level 1 sexual health service in the community.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Carmel; Johnston, Jillian; Carey, Fiona

    2014-09-01

    Summary Comprehensive testing for asymptomatic sexually transmitted infections in Northern Ireland has traditionally been provided by genitourinary medicine clinics. As patient demand for services has increased while budgets have remained limited, there has been increasing difficulty in accommodating this demand. In May 2013, the newly commissioned specialist Sexual Health service in the South Eastern Trust sought to pilot a new model of care working alongside a GP partnership of 12 practices. A training programme to enable GPs and practice nurses to deliver Level 1 sexual health care to heterosexual patients aged >16 years, in accordance with the standards of BASHH, was developed. A comprehensive care pathway and dedicated community health advisor supported this new model with close liaison between primary and secondary care. Testing for Chlamydia, gonorrhoea, HIV and syphilis was offered. The aims of the pilot were achieved, namely to provide accessible, cost-effective sexual health care within a framework of robust clinical governance. Furthermore, it uncovered a high positivity rate for Chlamydia, especially in young men attending their general practice, and demonstrated a high level of patient satisfaction. Moreover the capacity of secondary care to deliver Levels 2 and 3 services was increased.

  9. Achutha Menon Centre Diabetes Risk Score: A Type 2 Diabetes Screening Tool for Primary Health Care Providers in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Sathish, Thirunavukkarasu; Kannan, Srinivasan; Sarma, P. Sankara; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu Raman

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to develop a diabetes risk score for primary care providers in rural India. They used the baseline data of 451 participants (15-64 years) of a cohort study in a rural area of Kerala, India. The new risk score with age, family history of diabetes, and waist circumference identified 40.8% for confirmatory testing, had a sensitivity of 81.0%, specificity of 68.4%, positive predictive value of 37.0%, and negative predictive value of 94.0% for an optimal cutoff ≥4 with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.812 (95% confidence interval = 0.765-0.860). The new risk score with 3 simple, easy-to-measure, less time-consuming, and less expensive variables could be suitable for use in primary care settings of rural India. PMID:22865719

  10. AHRQ prevention quality indicators to assess the quality of primary care of local providers: a pilot study from Italy.

    PubMed

    Manzoli, Lamberto; Flacco, Maria Elena; De Vito, Corrado; Arcà, Silvia; Carle, Flavia; Capasso, Lorenzo; Marzuillo, Carolina; Muraglia, Angelo; Samani, Fabio; Villari, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    Outside the USA, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) prevention quality indicators (PQIs) have been used to compare the quality of primary care services only at a national or regional level. However, in several national health systems, primary care is not directly managed by the regions but is in charge of smaller territorial entities. We evaluated whether PQIs might be used to compare the performance of local providers such as Italian local health authorities (LHAs) and health districts. We analysed the hospital discharge abstracts of 44 LHAs (and 11 health districts) of five Italian regions (including ≈18 million residents) in 2008-10. Age-standardized PQI rates were computed following AHRQ specifications. Potential predictors were investigated using multilevel modelling. We analysed 11 470 722 hospitalizations. The overall rates of preventable hospitalizations (composite PQI 90) were 1012, 889 and 988 (×100 000 inhabitants) in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Composite PQIs were able to differentiate LHAs and health districts and showed small variation in the performance ranking over years. Although further research is required, our findings support the use of composite PQIs to evaluate the performance of relatively small primary health care providers (50 000-60 000 enrollees) in countries with universal health care coverage. Achieving high precision may be crucial for a structured quality assessment system to align hospitalization rate indicators with measures of other contexts of care (cost, clinical management, satisfaction/experience) that are typically computed at a local level. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  11. Health Care Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Chochinov, Harvey M; McClement, Susan E; Hack, Thomas F; McKeen, Nancy A; Rach, Amanda M; Gagnon, Pierre; Sinclair, Shane; Taylor-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients who are facing life-threatening and life-limiting cancer almost invariably experience psychological distress. Responding effectively requires therapeutic sensitivity and skill. In this study, we examined therapeutic effectiveness within the setting of cancer-related distress with the objective of understanding its constituent parts. METHODS Seventy-eight experienced psychosocial oncology clinicians from 24 health care centers across Canada were invited to participate in 3 focus groups each. In total, 29 focus groups were held over 2 years, during which clinicians articulated the therapeutic factors deemed most helpful in mitigating patient psychosocial distress. The content of each focus group was summarized into major themes and was reviewed with participants to confirm their accuracy. Upon completion of the focus groups, workshops were held in various centers, eliciting participant feedback on an empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness based on the qualitative analysis of focus group data. RESULTS Three primary, interrelated therapeutic domains emerged from the data, forming a model of optimal therapeutic effectiveness: 1) personal growth and self-care (domain A), 2) therapeutic approaches (domain B), and 3) creation of a safe space (domain C). Areas of domain overlap were identified and labeled accordingly: domain AB, therapeutic humility; domain BC, therapeutic pacing; and domain AC, therapeutic presence. CONCLUSIONS This empirical model provides detailed insights regarding the elements and pedagogy of effective communication and psychosocial care for patients who are experiencing cancer-related distress. [See editorial on pages 000–000, this issue.] Cancer 2013. © 2013 American Cancer Society. PMID:23341092

  12. Usability and perceived usefulness of Personal Health Records for preventive health care: a case study focusing on patients' and primary care providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ant Ozok, A; Wu, Huijuan; Garrido, Melissa; Pronovost, Peter J; Gurses, Ayse P

    2014-05-01

    Personal Health Records (PHR) are electronic applications for individuals to access, manage and share their health information in a secure environment. The goal of this study was to evaluate the usefulness and usability of a Web-based PHR technology aimed at improving preventive care, from both the patients' and primary care providers' perspectives. We conducted a multi-method descriptive study that included direct observations, concurrent think-aloud, surveys, interviews and focus groups in a suburban primary care clinic. Patients found the tailored health recommendations useful and the PHR easy to understand and use. They also reported asking useful health-related questions to their physicians because of using the system. Generally, care providers were interested in using the system due to its useful content and impact on patient activation. Future successful systems should be better integrated with hospital records; put more emphasis on system security; and offer more tailored health information based on comprehensive health databases.

  13. Anticipatory guidance for children and adolescents with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): practice points for primary health care providers.

    PubMed

    Hanlon-Dearman, Ana; Green, Courtney R; Andrew, Gail; LeBlanc, Nicole; Cook, Jocelynn L

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term that describes the range of effects that can occur in an individual who was prenatally exposed to alcohol and includes an array of complex neurodevelopmental and physical findings. To give primary healthcare providers (PHCP) evidence-based recommendations for supporting and managing the symptoms of FASD after patients have received a diagnosis. MethodsPrimary health recommendations for the management of children and adolescents with FASD were developed based on expert clinical judgment and supported by evidence-based research, where appropriate. The format was adapted from other health supervision practice guidelines as developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical practice "Points" for the PHCP are highlighted. A reference table of anticipatory recommendations by age is presented. In most cases, the initial screening and referral for diagnosis will be made by the PHCP, and they will be responsible for ongoing management. It is anticipated that these recommendations will provide the PHCP with evidence to support the longitudinal health care of children and adolescents with FASD and their families as they transition throughout all developmental stages. There is a pressing need for the involvement of PHCP in the active care of children and adolescents with FASD and their families over the lifespan. PHCP are trained in screening, prevention, and management of health needs, and are in the position to coordinate sub-specialty referrals as needed. Engaging PHCP will provide a truly integrated care system for individuals with FASD and their families.

  14. Quality of Care Provided by Physician’s Extenders in Air Force Primary Medicine Clinics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    45S MAL INGERIN-, 0 23 HERNIA INGUINAL FEMORAL UMBILICAL 456 FEVER OF UNRNOI SN ORIGIN 0 90 OTHER 646 PAIN I0 GENITO URINARY SYSTEM ISEE ALSO SECTION...the-job training, and who then deliver care by strict adherence to printed algorithms as part of the so-called Automated Military Outpatient System...SECTION 1II 3 󈧑 214 284 2%4 ESOPHAGITIS GASTRITIS INDIGESTION 46’ 484 FOREIGN U Y IDEFINITI OR POSSIBIEMHIATAL HERNIA 277219 ULCER DISEASE STOMACH OR

  15. From new nurse practitioner to primary care provider: bridging the transition through FQHC-based residency training.

    PubMed

    Flinter, Margaret

    2011-11-28

    Community Health Center, Inc. (CHCI), a multi-site, federally qualified, health center (FQHC) in Connecticut, implemented a one-year-residency program for new nurse practitioners (NPs) in 2007. This residency program is specifically designed for family nurse practitioners intending to practice as primary care providers in federally qualified health centers. These centers comprise the nation's largest safety net setting; they are commonly referred to as community health centers. Supported in part by the Health Resources Service Administration, health centers are private nonprofit or public organizations serving populations with limited access to healthcare. They are located in designated, high need communities; governed by patient-majority boards of directors; and provide comprehensive, primary healthcare services. The author begins by reviewing the background and context for a nurse practitioner residency program, the importance of NP residency programs, and the recruitment and selection of NP residents. She explains how the residents are trained to a model of care and the content of care. She furthers the discussion by addressing program evaluation and outcomes and costs. Implications for national health policy, clinical practice, and nursing and areas for further research are presented. This article is timely in light of recent recommendations in the Institute of Medicine's 2010 report on the future of nursing recommending the development of residency programs for new, advanced practice registered nurses.

  16. Improving Deployment-Related Primary Care Provider Assessments of PTSD and Mental Health Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    conversations, possible sites were narrowed down to include Fort Campbell, Fort Carson , Fort Hood, and Fort Stewart, all of which are under either the...the Western and Southern RMCs after receipt of IRB approval from MRMC. Fort Campbell, Fort Stewart, and Fort Carson were selected based upon number...175 175 AM: Training 175 175 175 PM: 70 Fort Stewart (9 providers) 310 310 AM: 130 310 310 PM: Training Fort Carson (4 providers

  17. Assessing health-care providers' readiness for reporting quality and patient safety indicators at primary health-care centres in Lebanon: a national cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Saleh, Shadi; Natafgi, Nabil

    2015-05-22

    Successful endorsement of quality indicators hinges on the readiness and acceptability of care providers for those measures. This paper aims to assess the readiness of care providers in the primary health-care sector in Lebanon for the implementation of quality and patient safety indicators. A cross-sectional survey methodology was utilized to gather information from 943 clinical care providers working at 123 primary health-care centres in Lebanon. The questionnaire included two sections: the first assessed four readiness dimensions (appropriateness, management support, efficacy, and personal valence) of clinical providers to use quality and safety indicators using the Readiness for Organization Change (ROC) scale, and the second section assessed the safety attitude at the primary care centre utilizing the Agency of Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ)-Ambulatory version. Although two thirds (66%) of respondents indicated readiness for implementation of quality and patient safety indicators in their centres, there appear to be differences by professional group. Physicians displayed the lowest scores on all readiness dimensions except for personal valence which was the lowest among nurses (60%). In contrast, allied health professionals displayed the highest scores across all readiness dimensions. Generally, respondents reflected a positive safety attitude climate in the centres. Yet, there remain a few areas of concern related to punitive culture (only 12.8% agree that staff should not be punished for reported errors/incidents), continuity of care (41.1% believe in the negative consequences of lack in continuity of care process), and resources (48.1% believe that the medical equipment they have are adequate). Providers with the highest SAQ score had 2.7, 1.7, 7 and 2.4 times the odds to report a higher readiness on the appropriateness, efficacy, management and personal valence ROC subscales, respectively (P value <0.01). Nurses

  18. Attitudes and Beliefs of Primary Care Providers in New Mexico About Lung Cancer Screening Using Low-Dose Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Richard M.; Sussman, Andrew L.; Getrich, Christina M.; Rhyne, Robert L.; Crowell, Richard E.; Taylor, Kathryn L.; Reifler, Ellen J.; Wescott, Pamela H.; Murrietta, Ambroshia M.; Saeed, Ali I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction On the basis of results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), national guidelines now recommend using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) to screen high-risk smokers for lung cancer. Our study objective was to characterize the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of primary care providers about implementing LDCT screening. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with primary care providers practicing in New Mexico clinics for underserved minority populations. The interviews, conducted from February through September 2014, focused on providers’ tobacco cessation efforts, lung cancer screening practices, perceptions of NLST and screening guidelines, and attitudes about informed decision making for cancer screening. Investigators iteratively reviewed transcripts to create a coding structure. Results We reached thematic saturation after interviewing 10 providers practicing in 6 urban and 4 rural settings; 8 practiced at federally qualified health centers. All 10 providers promoted smoking cessation, some screened with chest x-rays, and none screened with LDCT. Not all were aware of NLST results or current guideline recommendations. Providers viewed study results skeptically, particularly the 95% false-positive rate, the need to screen 320 patients to prevent 1 lung cancer death, and the small proportion of minority participants. Providers were uncertain whether New Mexico had the necessary infrastructure to support high-quality screening, and worried about access barriers and financial burdens for rural, underinsured populations. Providers noted the complexity of discussing benefits and harms of screening and surveillance with their patient population. Conclusion Providers have several concerns about the feasibility and appropriateness of implementing LDCT screening. Effective lung cancer screening programs will need to educate providers and patients to support informed decision making and to ensure that high-quality screening can be

  19. Androgenetic alopecia (male pattern hair loss) in the United States: what treatments should primary care providers recommend?

    PubMed

    Chin, Evelyn Y

    2013-08-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), or male pattern hair loss, affects up to 96% of Caucasian men. Characterized by gradual thinning and eventual loss of hair along frontotemporal, parietal, and vertex areas of the scalp, AGA is associated with low self-esteem, depression, and dissatisfaction with body appearance. In this systematic review of the literature, six primary research studies conducted in the United States are evaluated for their clinical application to primary care provider practice. Topical minoxidil 2%-5% 1 mL twice daily or finasteride 1 mg daily are recommended as first line treatments, followed by the use of Food and Drug Administration-cleared HairMax LaserComb® in patients who do not respond to first line modalities. Further research in novel and established treatments is recommended, along with an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for practitioners in the United States. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  20. Novel Application of a Reverse Triage Protocol Providing Increased Access to Care in an Outpatient, Primary Care Clinic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sacino, Amanda N.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Nowicki, Kamil W.; Carek, Peter J.; Wegman, Martin P.; Listhaus, Alyson; Gibney, Joseph M.; Chang, Ku-Lang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES As the number of patients with access to care increases, outpatient clinics will need to implement innovative strategies to maintain or enhance clinic efficiency. One viable alternative involves reverse triage. METHODS A reverse triage protocol was implemented during a student-run free clinic. Each patient's chief complaint(s) were obtained at the beginning of the clinic session and ranked by increasing complexity. “Complexity” was defined as the subjective amount of time required to provide a full, thorough evaluation of a patient. Less complex cases were prioritized first since they could be expedited through clinic processing and allow for more time and resources to be dedicated to complex cases. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize and summarize the data obtained. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square. A time series analysis of the outcome versus centered time in weeks was also conducted. RESULTS The average number of patients seen per clinic session increased by 35% (9.5 versus 12.8) from pre-implementation of the reverse triage protocol to 6 months after the implementation of the protocol. CONCLUSIONS The implementation of a reverse triage in an outpatient setting significantly increased clinic efficiency as noted by a significant increase in the number of patients seen during a clinic session. PMID:26950786

  1. Beliefs and communication practices regarding cognitive functioning among consumers and primary care providers in the United States, 2009.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Daniela B; Rose, India D; Anderson, Lynda A; Hunter, Rebecca; Bryant, Lucinda L; Wu, Bei; Deokar, Angela J; Tseng, Winston

    2013-04-18

    Limited research has examined primary care providers' communication with patients about maintaining cognitive functioning. Our study's objective was to compare the perceptions of consumers and primary care providers related to beliefs and communication practices about lifestyle behaviors beneficial for overall health and for maintaining cognitive functioning. In 2009, we submitted 10 questions to Porter Novelli's HealthStyles survey and 6 questions to their DocStyles survey. We compared consumers' (n = 4,728) and providers' (n = 1,250) beliefs, practices, and information sources related to maintaining health and cognitive functioning. We made comparisons using nonparametric statistics. Approximately 76% of consumers considered their health to be good or very good; 73.4% were concerned or very concerned about the possibility that their memory may worsen with age. Women were significantly more concerned than men, and white consumers were more concerned than black and Hispanic consumers. Consumers reported they believed that intellectual stimulation (86.6%), physical activity (82.6%), and healthful diet (82.5%) prevented or delayed cognitive impairment. Providers reported advising patients to reduce cognitive impairment risk through physical activity (85.9%), intellectual stimulation (80.3%), and social involvement (67.4%). Few consumers (7.8%) reported receiving this information from providers but reported learning about strategies to maintain memory, primarily from television (50.1%), magazines (44.1%), and newspapers (33.7%). Providers reported advising patients about how to reduce risks of cognitive impairment. Consumers reported receiving this information from other sources. Findings suggest a need to examine and assess media messages and to better understand patient-provider communication about cognitive functioning.

  2. National integration of mental health providers in VA home-based primary care: an innovative model for mental health care delivery with older adults.

    PubMed

    Karlin, Bradley E; Karel, Michele J

    2014-10-01

    To promote mental health (MH) service access and quality for veterans with complex and chronic medical, social, and behavioral conditions, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has integrated a full-time MH provider into each VA home-based primary care (HBPC) team. The goal of the current evaluation is to examine the nature and extent to which MH care processes and practices have been integrated into HBPC nationally. Separate surveys assessing the integration of a wide range of MH care practices and HBPC team processes were sent to MH providers and program directors in each HBPC program in 2010. A total of 132 MH providers representing 119 HBPC programs, and 112 program directors completed the surveys. The most common clinical issues addressed by MH providers were depression, coping with illness and disability, anxiety, caregiver/family stress, and cognitive evaluation. Other team members typically conducted initial MH screenings, with MH providers' time focusing on cases with identified needs. Approximately 40% of MH providers' time was devoted to direct clinical care. Significant time was also spent on team activities, driving, and charting. Integration of MH services into HBPC is feasible and facilitates service access for a vulnerable population. Mental health care delivery in HPBC generally involves a high degree of interdisciplinary practice. Mental health integration into HBPC may serve as a model for other systems interested in promoting MH care delivery among homebound and other older individuals. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2013.

  3. Screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management of hepatitis C: a novel, comprehensive, online resource center for primary care providers and specialists.

    PubMed

    Lebovics, Edward; Czobor, Klara

    2014-11-01

    Current initiatives focusing on hepatitis C (HCV) screening and diagnosis, together with the advent of oral interferon (IFN)-free treatment regimens have prompted Elsevier Multimedia Publishing and the American Journal of Medicine (AJM) to develop a novel, comprehensive, online Resource Center dedicated to providing both primary care providers and specialists with the latest information on the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management of HCV. To date, only 25% of infected patients have been diagnosed and only 5% cured. With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Prevention Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation of one-time screening for all individuals born between 1945 and 1965, and the availability of safe and effective therapy, it is anticipated that primary care providers and community practices will become increasingly responsible for the screening, diagnosis, and management of infected patients, as well as providing access to care by specialists when needed. The AJM Hepatitis C Resource Center site will have two major channels; one channel tailored to specifically address the needs of internal medicine physicians and other primary care providers, and one channel tailored to address the needs of specialists including hepatologists, gastroenterologists, and infectious disease specialists. Systematic surveys of these clinician audiences are being conducted by Elsevier to assess educational gaps, and ensure that the content of each channel of the Resource Center satisfies the needs of the intended audiences. In a recent Elsevier survey of primary care physicians (PCPs) who had screened and/or participated in the care of patients with HCV within 6 months of participating in the survey, 60% of PCPs stated that they were not very confident or only somewhat confident about screening patients for chronic HCV infection. A recent Elsevier survey of specialists revealed low levels of satisfaction with the treatment options available in

  4. The role of primary care providers in patient activation and engagement in self-management: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carmen; Greene, Jessica; Hibbard, Judith; Overton, Valerie

    2016-03-11

    The increasing burden of chronic illness highlights the importance of self-care and shifts from hierarchical and patriarchal models to partnerships. Primary care providers (PCPs) play an important role in supporting patients in self-management, enabling activation and supporting chronic care. We explored the extent to which PCPs' beliefs about the importance of the patients' role relate to the frequency in which they report engaging in collaborative and partnership-building behaviors with patients. PCPs' beliefs were measured using the Clinician Support for Patient Activation Measure (CS-PAM). We also assessed whether PCPs' CS-PAM scores were positively associated with changes in their patients' Patient Activation Measure (PAM) scores. Participants included 181 PCPs from a single accountable care organization in Minnesota who completed an online survey. We conducted bivariate analyses and multivariate regression models to examine relationships between CS-PAM and PCP self-management support behaviors and changes in level of patient activation. PCPs with high CS-PAM scores were much more likely to engage in supportive self-management and patient behavior change approaches, such as involving the patient in agenda-setting, problem-solving, and collaboratively setting behavioral goals, than were PCPs with low CS-PAM scores. More positive PCPs' belief in the patients' role in self-management was positively correlated with improvements in their patients' level of patient activation. More positive PCP beliefs about the patients' role in self-management was strongly related to PCP behaviors geared towards increasing patient activation.

  5. The primary care provider (PCP)-cancer specialist relationship: A systematic review and mixed-methods meta-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dossett, Lesly A; Hudson, Janella N; Morris, Arden M; Lee, M Catherine; Roetzheim, Richard G; Fetters, Michael D; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2017-03-01

    Although they are critical to models of coordinated care, the relationship and communication between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists throughout the cancer continuum are poorly understood. By using predefined search terms, the authors conducted a systematic review of the literature in 3 databases to examine the relationship and communication between PCPs and cancer specialists. Among 301 articles identified, 35 met all inclusion criteria and were reviewed in-depth. Findings from qualitative, quantitative, and disaggregated mixed-methods studies were integrated using meta-synthesis. Six themes were identified and incorporated into a preliminary conceptual model of the PCP-cancer specialist relationship: 1) poor and delayed communication between PCPs and cancer specialists, 2) cancer specialists' endorsement of a specialist-based model of care, 3) PCPs' belief that they play an important role in the cancer continuum, 4) PCPs' willingness to participate in the cancer continuum, 5) cancer specialists' and PCPs' uncertainty regarding the PCP's oncology knowledge/experience, and 6) discrepancies between PCPs and cancer specialists regarding roles. These data indicate a pervasive need for improved communication, delineation, and coordination of responsibilities between PCPs and cancer specialists. Future interventions aimed at these deficiencies may improve patient and physician satisfaction and cancer care coordination. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:156-169. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Developing a framework of service convenience in health care: An exploratory study for a primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Tuzovic, Sven; Kuppelwieser, Volker

    2016-01-01

    From retail health clinics and online appointment scheduling to (mobile) kiosks that enable patient check-in and automate the collection of copays and open balances, convenience has become an important topic in the health care sector over the last few years. While service convenience has also gained much interest in academia, one common limitation is that authors have adopted a "goods-centered" perspective focusing primarily on retail settings. Results of this exploratory study reveal that health care service convenience encompasses seven different dimensions: decision, access, scheduling, registration and check-in, transaction, care delivery, and postconsultation convenience. Implications and future research suggestions are discussed.

  7. A survey of management of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction by pediatric primary health care providers in Spain.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; Palencia-Ercilla, Teresa; Ferreira, Livia Mendoza; Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Zornoff, Denise C M; Khandekar, Rajiv; Schellini, Silvana A

    2017-06-26

    To survey the management of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO) by pediatric primary health care providers in Spain. This was a descriptive study using a web-based questionnaire to evaluate the perceptions of the members of the Pediatric Primary Care Society in Castilla-León, Spain (APAPCYL), regarding management of CNLDO. The questionnaire contained 14 direct questions and was sent by e-mail to all the pediatricians. All the responses were analyzed by the frequency of occurrence and percentages. Ninety physicians responded to the questionnaire. Massage 2 or 3 times a day was the initial treatment advised by 60.47% of pediatricians. Nearly half of the pediatricians recommended continuing massage until symptoms resolved. Fewer than 50% of children required referral to an ophthalmologist. Reasons for an ophthalmic consult included persistence of symptoms among 87.21% of pediatricians and parental/guardian request among 10.5% of pediatricians. According to 45.6% of pediatricians, their knowledge about CNLDO is limited, and 92.2% would like to receive further training on CNLDO. Massage was the main initial treatment for managing CNLDO among pediatricians. The outcomes of this survey indicated that massage fails in fewer than 50% of patients and an ophthalmic referral is required for these cases.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of IVR-Based Alcohol Brief Intervention to Promote Patient-Provider Communication in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Rose, Gail L; Badger, Gary J; Skelly, Joan M; Ferraro, Tonya A; MacLean, Charles D; Helzer, John E

    2016-09-01

    Brief interventions for unhealthy drinking in primary care settings are efficacious, but underutilized. Efforts to improve rates of brief intervention though provider education and office systems redesign have had limited impact. Our novel brief intervention uses interactive voice response (IVR) to provide information and advice directly to unhealthy drinkers before a physician office visit, with the goals of stimulating in-office dialogue about drinking and decreasing unhealthy drinking. This automated approach is potentially scalable for wide application. We aimed to examine the effect of a pre-visit IVR-delivered brief alcohol intervention (IVR-BI) on patient-provider discussions of alcohol during the visit. This was a parallel group randomized controlled trial with two treatment arms: 1) IVR-BI or 2) usual care (no IVR-BI). In all, 1,567 patients were recruited from eight university medical center-affiliated internal medicine and family medicine clinics. IVR-BI is a brief alcohol intervention delivered by automated telephone. It has four components, based on the intervention steps outlined in the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism guidelines for clinicians: 1) ask about alcohol use, 2) assess for alcohol use disorders, 3) advise patient to cut down or quit drinking, and 4) follow up at subsequent visits. Outcomes were patient reported: patient-provider discussion of alcohol during the visit; patient initiation of the discussion; and provider's recommendation about the patient's alcohol use. Patients randomized to IVR-BI were more likely to have reported discussing alcohol with their provider (52 % vs. 44 %, p = 0.003), bringing up the topic themselves (20 % vs. 12 %, p < 0.001), and receiving a recommendation (20 % vs. 14 %, p < 0.001). Other predictors of outcome included baseline consumption, education, age, and alcohol use disorder diagnosis. Providing automated brief interventions to patients prior to a primary care visit

  9. Should Dental Schools Train Dentists to Routinely Provide Limited Preventive Primary Medical Care? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Dentists Should Be Trained to Routinely Provide Limited Preventive Primary Care and Viewpoint 2: Dentists Should Be Trained in Primary Care Medicine to Enable Comprehensive Patient Management Within Their Scope of Practice.

    PubMed

    Giddon, Donald B; Donoff, R Bruce; Edwards, Paul C; Goldblatt, Lawrence I

    2017-05-01

    This Point/Counterpoint acknowledges the transformation of dental practice from a predominantly technically based profession with primary emphasis on restoration of the tooth and its supporting structures to that of a more medically based specialty focusing on the oral and maxillofacial complex. While both viewpoints accept the importance of this transformation, they differ on the ultimate desired outcome and how changes should be implemented during training of dentists as oral health professionals. Viewpoint 1 argues that, in response to a shortage of both primary care providers and access to affordable oral health care, dentists need to be able and willing to provide limited preventive primary care (LPPC), and dental educators should develop and implement training models to prepare them. Among changes proposed are consideration of three types of practitioners: oral physicians with sufficient training to provide LPPC; dentists with excellent technical proficiency but minimal medical and surgical training; and mid-level providers to provide simple restorative and uncomplicated surgical care. Viewpoint 2 argues that the objective of dentists' education in primary care medicine is to help them safely and effectively provide all aspects of oral health care, including appropriate preventive medical care, that already fall within their scope of knowledge and practice. Dental educators should encourage students to use this knowledge to take full ownership of non-tooth-related pathologic conditions of the oral and maxillofacial complex not currently managed in the dental setting, but encouraging graduates to expand into non-dental LPPC outside the recognized scope of practice will only further exacerbate fragmentation of care.

  10. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    PubMed

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation.

  11. Communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working within patients' homes: an analysis of process data from CAPABLE.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick D; Boyd, Cynthia; Bellantoni, Julia; Roth, Jill; Becker, Kathleen L; Savage, Jessica; Nkimbeng, Manka; Szanton, Sarah L

    2016-02-01

    To examine themes of communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working in private residences; to assess which methods of communication elicit fruitful responses to nurses' concerns. Lack of effective communication between home health care nurses and primary care providers contributes to clinical errors, inefficient care delivery and decreased patient safety. Few studies have described best practices related to frequency, methods and reasons for communication between community-based nurses and primary care providers. Secondary analysis of process data from 'Community Aging in Place: Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE)'. Independent reviewers analysed nurse documentation of communication (phone calls, letters and client coaching) initiated for 70 patients and analysed 45 letters to primary care providers to identify common concerns and recommendations raised by CAPABLE nurses. Primary care providers responded to 86% of phone calls, 56% of letters and 50% of client coaching efforts. Primary care providers addressed 86% of concerns communicated by phone, 34% of concerns communicated by letter and 41% of client-raised concerns. Nurses' letters addressed five key concerns: medication safety, pain, change in activities of daily living, fall safety and mental health. In letters, CAPABLE nurses recommended 58 interventions: medication change; referral to a specialist; patient education; and further diagnostic evaluation. Effective communication between home-based nurses and primary care providers enhances care coordination and improves outcomes for home-dwelling elders. Various methods of contact show promise for addressing specific communication needs. Nurses practicing within patients' homes can improve care coordination by using phone calls to address minor matters and written letters for detailed communication. Future research should explore implementation of Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendation in home care to promote

  12. Using patient-driven computers to provide cost-effective prevention in primary care: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Anthony P; Frankish, C James

    2003-03-01

    This paper initially presents a rationale for the cost-effectiveness of using patient-driven computers in primary care services. It specifically defines the concepts of prevention and primary care, prior to outlining the advantages of promoting the implementation of prevention practices in primary care. It argues that greater use of computer technology represents one means of cost-effectively optimizing the integration of prevention into routine primary care, and identifies an apparent disjuncture between the potential of computers and the limited success with which attempts to integrate them into routine primary care services have been met, as evidenced in the published international literature. Among several possible explanations for this disjuncture, such as a possible lack of precision with which computers identify at-risk patients, perceived high costs associated with computers and physicians' concerns about the inflexibility and the more impersonal nature of computer interactions, is the apparent failure of researchers to utilize well designed and empirically tested models in the planning, implementation and evaluation of computerized care. An outline for such an approach, utilizing the Precede-Proceed model of health promotion planning and the Diffusion of Innovations theory, is presented.

  13. Primary Care and Hepatology Provider-Perceived Barriers to and Facilitators of Hepatitis C Treatment Candidacy and Adherence.

    PubMed

    Rogal, Shari S; McCarthy, Rory; Reid, Andrea; Rodriguez, Keri L; Calgaro, Linda; Patel, Krupa; Daley, Molly; Jonassaint, Naudia L; Zickmund, Susan L

    2017-08-01

    Provider perceptions regarding barriers to and facilitators of hepatitis C (HCV) treatment initiation and adherence have not been fully evaluated in the interferon-free treatment era. New treatments have provided opportunities for non-specialists to treat HCV, underscoring the importance of understanding primary care provider (PCP) and specialist perspectives. Based on qualitative sampling principles, 12 PCPs and 12 hepatology providers (HPs) from the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System completed audio-recorded semi-structured interviews. Qualitative analysts coded perceived barriers and facilitators from the interviews with 100% double coding. Codes were thematized and analyzed using Atlas.ti. Key barriers to treatment described by HPs and PCPs included patients' substance use disorders, mental health, transportation availability, history of non-adherence, and concern about side effects. PCPs also focused on medication cost as a system-based barrier. The main facilitators of treatment initiation and adherence described by both HPs and PCPs were provider education and encouragement. HPs focused almost exclusively on provider-based facilitators, while PCPs noted patient-based facilitators including past adherence, media exposure to information about HCV medications, a desire to clear the virus, and positive feedback regarding treatment response. Providers generally focused on perceived patient-level barriers to HCV treatment initiation and adherence, as well as provider-level facilitators; PCPs additionally noted patient preferences and system-level issues that guide decision making regarding treatment initiation. While HPs focused almost exclusively on provider-level facilitators, PCPs additionally focused on patient-level facilitators of treatment. These data provide novel insights and suggest focusing on patient, provider, and system-level strategies to further improve HCV treatment initiation and adherence.

  14. Projecting the Impact of the Affordable Care Act Provisions on Accessibility and Availability of Primary Care Providers for the Adult Population in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Monica; Harati, Pravara; Serban, Nicoleta

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate how met need for accessibility and availability of primary care among nonelderly individuals in Georgia will be affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) over the next 10 years. We used a stock-and-flow model to predict the number of available visits from 2013 to 2025, regression models to project needed visits, and an optimization model to estimate met need. The outputs of these models were used to estimate unmet need and the availability and accessibility of primary care. Our findings showed that the number of primary care providers will increase by 9.2% to 11.7% by 2025 and that the number of needed visits will increase by 20%. Under Medicaid expansion, the percentage of met need will increase from 67% to 80%. Accessibility will improve by 20% under expansion, and availability will decrease by 13% to 19% under expansion. The ACAs' provisions will reduce unmet need and positively affect accessibility while reducing availability in some communities. Increased need because of a larger Medicaid population under Medicaid expansion will not be a significant burden on the privately insured population.

  15. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines and asthma management practices among inner-city pediatric primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Deepa; Shetty, Ashita; Neugebauer, Richard; Harijith, Anantha

    2006-03-01

    Most surveys of pediatric outpatient asthma management obtain information from parents and caregivers. Studies based on surveys of primary health-care providers are sparse. Suboptimal outpatient management may play a role in the high hospitalization rates among inner-city asthmatic children. Asthma management practices were compared between hospital-based and community-based primary care providers (PCPs). Adherence to National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) guidelines was evaluated, along with practices not clearly defined in the guidelines such as use of oral cough medicines and albuterol suspension. An 8-point questionnaire was administered to 48 community-based and 32 hospital-based PCPs practicing in inner-city neighborhoods. The questionnaire addressed three "positive" practices (classification of asthma severity, use of asthma action plan, and use of a spacer) and three "negative" practices (use of cough syrup, use of albuterol suspension, and preferential use of leukotriene modifiers instead of inhaled corticosteroids as the first line of preventive therapy). Response options were as follows: never, rarely, sometimes, and always, scored from 0 to 3. The two physician groups were compared on score means for the positive and negative practices using a t test with statistical significance set at p < 0.05. Overall, the rate of adherence to the positive practices was high, with no significant difference between the two groups. Negative practices, while present in both the groups, were reported significantly more often by the community-based group, particularly the use of cough suppressants and albuterol suspension. Greater emphasis is needed to increase the awareness among PCPs of the NHLBI guideline recommendations, as suboptimal outpatient asthma management may contribute to the disproportionately higher hospitalization rates among inner-city asthmatic children. Clarification on the use of potentially harmful medications and those of doubtful value

  16. Closing the Feedback Loop: An Interactive Voice Response System to Provide Follow-up and Feedback in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Willig, James H.; Krawitz, Marc; Panjamapirom, Anantachai; Ray, Midge N.; Nevin, Christa R.; English, Thomas M.; Cohen, Mark P.; Berner, Eta S.

    2013-01-01

    In primary care settings, follow-up regarding the outcome of acute outpatient visits is largely absent. We sought to develop an automated interactive voice response system (IVRS) for patient follow-up with feedback to providers capable of interfacing with multiple pre-existing electronic medical records (EMRs). A system was designed to extract data from EMRs, integrate with the IVRS, call patients for follow-up, and provide a feedback report to providers. Challenges during the development process were analyzed and summarized. The components of the technological solution and details of its implementation are reported. Lessons learned include: (1) Modular utilization of system components is often needed to adapt to specific clinic workflow and patient population needs (2) Understanding the local telephony environment greatly impacts development and is critical to success, and (3) Ample time for development of the IVRS questionnaire (mapping all branching paths) and speech recognition tuning (sensitivity, use of barge-in tuning, use of “known voice”) is needed. With proper attention to design and development, modular follow-up and feedback systems can be integrated into existing EMR systems providing the benefits of IVRS follow-up to patients and providers across diverse practice settings. PMID:23340825

  17. Primary care provider practices and beliefs related to cervical cancer screening with the HPV test in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Roland, K.B.; Benard, V.B.; Greek, A.; Hawkins, N.A.; Manninen, D.; Saraiya, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cervical cancer screening using the human papillomavirus (HPV) test and Pap test together (co-testing) is an option for average-risk women ≥30 years of age. With normal co-test results, screening intervals can be extended. The study objective is to assess primary care provider practices, beliefs, facilitators and barriers to using the co-test and extending screening intervals among low-income women. Method Data were collected from 98 providers in 15 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinics in Illinois between August 2009 and March 2010 using a cross-sectional survey. Results 39% of providers reported using the co-test, and 25% would recommend a three-year screening interval for women with normal co-test results. Providers perceived greater encouragement for co-testing than for extending screening intervals with a normal co-test result. Barriers to extending screening intervals included concerns about patients not returning annually for other screening tests (77%), patient concerns about missing cancer (62%), and liability (52%). Conclusion Among FQHC providers in Illinois, few administered the co-test for screening and recommended appropriate intervals, possibly due to concerns over loss to follow-up and liability. Education regarding harms of too-frequent screening and false positives may be necessary to balance barriers to extending screening intervals. PMID:23628517

  18. Teaching primary care obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith B.; Jordan, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences and recommendations for recruitment of family physicians who practise and teach primary care obstetrics. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Setting Six primary care obstetrics groups in Edmonton, Alta, that were involved in teaching family medicine residents in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Alberta. Participants Twelve family physicians who practised obstetrics in groups. All participants were women, which was reasonably representative of primary care obstetrics providers in Edmonton. Methods Each participant underwent an in-depth interview. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The investigators independently reviewed the transcripts and then analyzed the transcripts together in an iterative and interpretive manner. Main findings Themes identified in this study include lack of confidence in teaching, challenges of having learners, benefits of having learners, and recommendations for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. While participants described insecurity and challenges related to teaching, they also identified positive aspects, and offered suggestions for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. Conclusion Despite describing poor confidence as teachers and having challenges with learners, the participants identified positive experiences that sustained their interest in teaching. Supporting these teachers and recruiting more such role models is important to encourage family medicine learners to enter careers such as primary care obstetrics. PMID:24627402

  19. [Satisfaction of patients with oncological diseases--an assessment of the key sectors in patient care: primary care physicians, specialist physicians, hospitals and health insurance providers].

    PubMed

    Degen, C; Möller, D; Schlechter, C

    2014-04-01

    The following study examines the influencing factors on the satisfaction of oncological patients with their primary care physician, specialist physician, hospital and health insurance provider. Individual patient satisfaction with cross-sectoral collaboration is examined based on the satisfaction with these sectors. 12 specialist practices from 8 federal states participated in the patient survey. Altogether, 516 patients took part during the investigation period 2011-2012. The results were evaluated by multiple regression analysis. The results show that patients are content with cross-sectoral collaboration if they are satisfied with their health insurance and the specialist physician. With regard to satisfaction with the primary care physician and the specialist physician, trust is perceived to be the most important influencing factor. For hospitals, the most significant influencing factor is interest in and time for patients. Regarding health insurance, providing the patients with information leads to a greater degree of satisfaction. Psychosocial factors are of key importance for the patient's perceptions of satisfaction with the different sectors. This contains for instance factors like to 'putting confidence in physicians' or 'talking about patients' fears'. The sectors considered in this study should therefore give more consideration to these factors during patient care. A health insurance provider can take on the role of a competent point of contact, providing quality-assured information in the context of oncological diseases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Effectiveness of physical therapists serving as primary care musculoskeletal providers as compared to family practice providers in a deployed combat location: a retrospective medical chart review.

    PubMed

    McGill, Troy

    2013-10-01

    A medical records review to compare efficiency and effectiveness of a physical therapist (PT) functioning as a musculoskeletal primary care provider (PCP) compared to family practice (FP) physicians functioning as musculoskeletal PCP. (1) Use of medication/imaging studies will be significantly less with a PT as PCP compared to FP as PCP. (2) Return-to-duty (RTD) rate will show significant increases when patients with musculoskeletal conditions are seen by PT as compared to FP. One PT practicing in a deployed combat location collected data on patients that presented directly to the PT clinic or FP clinic for care of musculoskeletal complaints. Treatment patterns of two Air Force physicians were accessed regarding patients with musculoskeletal conditions. Fifty-four patients were randomly selected for the PT group and 95 patients for FP group. AHLTA was searched for cases reported from June 2009 to January 2010. Data regarding age, gender, medication, imaging use, and return to duty (RTD) rate were collected. Of the study population, 126 (84%) were males, 23 (16%) were females (age range: 19-54, mean 29). RTD rate was 50% greater for PT. Rate of medication and imaging use for PT was 24% and 11%, whereas FP was 90% and 82%, respectively (p < 0.01). Using PT as the musculoskeletal PCP was shown to be an effective and efficient practice model to assess and treat patients with musculoskeletal complaints. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome a Diagnosis of Exclusion?: A Survey of Primary Care Providers, Gastroenterologists, and IBS Experts

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Farid, Mary; Esrailian, Eric; Talley, Jennifer; Chang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Guidelines emphasize that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not a diagnosis of exclusion and encourage clinicians to make a positive diagnosis using the Rome criteria alone. Yet many clinicians are concerned about overlooking alternative diagnoses. We measured beliefs about whether IBS is a diagnosis of exclusion, and measured testing proclivity between IBS experts and community providers. METHODS We developed a survey to measure decision-making in two standardized patients with Rome III-positive IBS, including IBS with diarrhea (D-IBS) and IBS with constipation (C-IBS). The survey elicited provider knowledge and beliefs about IBS, including testing proclivity and beliefs regarding IBS as a diagnosis of exclusion. We surveyed nurse practitioners, primary care physicians, community gastroenterologists, and IBS experts. RESULTS Experts were less likely than nonexperts to endorse IBS as a diagnosis of exclusion (8 vs. 72%; P < 0.0001). In the D-IBS vignette, experts were more likely to make a positive diagnosis of IBS (67 vs. 38%; P < 0.001), to perform fewer tests (2.0 vs. 4.1; P < 0.01), and to expend less money on testing (US$297 vs. $658; P < 0.01). Providers who believed IBS is a diagnosis of exclusion ordered 1.6 more tests and consumed $364 more than others (P < 0.0001). Experts only rated celiac sprue screening and complete blood count as appropriate in D-IBS; nonexperts rated most tests as appropriate. Parallel results were found in the C-IBS vignette. CONCLUSIONS Most community providers believe IBS is a diagnosis of exclusion; this belief is associated with increased resource use. Experts comply more closely with guidelines to diagnose IBS with minimal testing. This disconnect suggests that better implementation of guidelines is warranted to minimize variation and improve cost-effectiveness of care. PMID:20197761

  2. What should primary care providers know about pediatric skin conditions? A modified Delphi technique for curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Dana F; Boscardin, Christy K; Frieden, Ilona J; Mathes, Erin F D

    2014-10-01

    There is limited access to pediatric dermatology in the United States, resulting in inadequate education and patient care. This Delphi study aimed to identify important objectives for a pediatric dermatology curriculum for general practitioners. A modified, 2-round Delphi technique was used to develop consensus on objectives developed by expert pediatric dermatologists. A panel of 20 experts (pediatric dermatologists, family practitioners, and general pediatricians) rated objectives using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Items with group medians 4.0 or greater with at least 70% agreement reached consensus. In round 1, the expert panel rated 231 objectives from 16 categories for inclusion in an online curriculum. In round 2, experts were given group feedback and rated 235 objectives. A total of 170 items met consensus. Generally, objectives surrounding common conditions including acne, molluscum, warts, atopic dermatitis, and newborn skin met consensus whereas objectives on rare growths, birthmarks, and inherited conditions failed to meet consensus. The Delphi panel consisted of US-based physicians, most in urban areas with a dedicated pediatric specialist at their institution. The accepted objectives encompass management of common conditions and referral of potentially dangerous diseases and can be used to develop a pediatric dermatology curriculum for primary care providers. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Case Management with a Diabetes Team Using Home Telemedicine: Acceptance of Treatment Recommendations by Primary Care Providers in IDEATel.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Robert E; Wang, Dongliang; Huang, Danning; Palmas, Walter; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2015-12-01

    The Informatics for Diabetes Education and Telemedicine (IDEATel) project demonstrated that a telemedicine intervention can improve glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure control. The focus of the current study was to evaluate factors associated with primary care providers' (PCPs') decision on whether to follow recommendations from the remote diabetes team in Upstate New York. In the intervention group, diabetes educators videoconferenced with patients monthly to download and review glucose and blood pressure readings, diabetes-related issues, and laboratory data. These were reviewed with an endocrinologist, and recommendations to change therapy were sent to the PCPs. At annual visits, participants completed the Diabetes Symptom Checklist-Type 2 symptom severity score and Impact of Telemedicine surveys. Factors that increase the acceptance rate of IDEATel recommendations included longer time in the study (p=0.0052), changing medication dose as opposed to starting or stopping a medication (p<0.0001), adjusting glucose-lowering agents compared with antihypertensive or antilipid medications (p<0.0001), higher total Diabetes Symptom Checklist-Type 2 symptom severity score (p=0.045), greater number of glucose readings submitted by participants (p=0.014), and high score on surveys measuring impact of telemedicine on patient's knowledge, adherence, and satisfaction (p=0.0023). Recommendations for change in glycemic control medications, delivered remotely by a diabetes team to PCPs, were better accepted over time. Results support the use of a team-based telemedicine program to help PCPs improve diabetes care.

  4. Patient and primary care provider attitudes and adherence towards lung cancer screening at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Duong, Duy K; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Cheng, Iona; Naemi, Harris; Moy, Lisa M; Haile, Robert; Singh, Baldeep; Leung, Ann; Hsing, Ann; Nair, Viswam S

    2017-06-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening is an evidence-based, guideline recommended, and Medicare approved test but uptake requires further study. We therefore conducted patient and provider surveys to elucidate factors associated with utilization. Patients referred for LDCT at an academic medical center were questioned about their attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs on lung cancer screening. Adherent patients were defined as those who met screening eligibility criteria and completed a LDCT. Referring primary care providers within this same medical system were surveyed in parallel about their practice patterns, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about screening. Eighty patients responded (36%), 48 of whom were adherent. Among responders, non-Hispanic patients (p = 0.04) were more adherent. Adherent respondents believed that CT technology is accurate and early detection is useful, and they trusted their providers. A majority of non-adherent patients (79%) self-reported an intention to obtain a LDCT in the future. Of 36 of 87 (41%) responding providers, only 31% knew the correct lung cancer screening eligibility criteria, which led to a 37% inappropriate referral rate from 2013 to 2015. Yet, 75% had initiated lung cancer screening discussions, 64% thought screening was at least moderately effective, and 82% were interested in learning more of the 33 providers responding to these questions. Overall, patients were motivated and providers engaged to screen for lung cancer by LDCT. Non-adherent patient "procrastinators" were motivated to undergo screening in the future. Additional follow through on non-adherence may enhance screening uptake, and raising awareness for screening eligibility through provider education may reduce inappropriate referrals.

  5. Teen pregnancy prevention on a LARC: an update on long-acting reversible contraception for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Nancy A; Gray, Susan H; Burke, Pamela J

    2012-08-01

    This update will highlight recent research and recommendations on long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) in the teen population, in order to make primary care providers more comfortable counseling on these methods in the medical home. LARC methods, which include intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal hormonal implants, are used by only a small minority of sexually active teens, despite their endorsement by professional organizations as effective and well tolerated birth control options in this population. Recent studies show a lack of knowledge about LARC methods among young women, as well as persistent misconceptions among providers regarding who is eligible for LARC use. Existing trials of small numbers of adolescents generally show enthusiasm for its use among teens who are educated about LARC, high satisfaction rates among users of subdermal implants and IUDs, as well as varying pregnancy and continuation rates. The existing research on LARC shows promise for these methods in the teen population. However, larger trials are needed to establish accurate data on satisfaction, continuation, and failure rates, as well as to explore other barriers to use. Medical home providers should stay informed of research on LARC in order to improve contraceptive counseling to young women.

  6. Health Information System in Primary Health Care: The Challenges and Barriers from Local Providers' Perspective of an Area in Iran.

    PubMed

    Yazdi-Feyzabadi, Vahid; Emami, Mozhgan; Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Health information system (HIS) has been utilized for collecting, processing, storing, and transferring the required information for planning and decision-making at different levels of health sector to provide quality services. In this study, in order to provide high-quality HIS, primary health care (PHC) providers' perspective on current challenges and barriers were investigated. This study was carried out with a qualitative approach using semi-structured audiotaped focus group discussions (FGDs). One FGD was conducted with 13 Behvarz and health technicians as front-line workers and the other with 16 personnel including physicians, statisticians, and health professionals working in health centers of the PHC network in KUMS. The discussions were transcribed and then analyzed using the framework analysis method. The identified organizational challenges were categorized into two groups: HIS structure and the current model of PHC in urban areas. Furthermore, the structural challenges were classified into HIS management structure (information systems resources, including human, supplies, and organizational rules) and information process. The HIS works effectively and efficiently when there are a consistency and integrity between the human, supplies, and process aspects. Hence, multifaceted interventions including strengthening the organizational culture to use the information in decisions, eliminating infrastructural obstacles, appointing qualified staff and more investment for service delivery at urban areas are the most fundamental requirements of high-quality HIS in PHC.

  7. Health-care providers' perception of knowledge, skills and preparedness for disaster management in primary health-care centres in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, N M; Ibaid, A H Abu

    2015-12-13

    This survey in primary health-care centres in north Jordan aimed to assess health-care providers' perceptions of their knowledge, skills and preparedness for disaster management. A multistage random sample was used to recruit nurses and physicians from 57 health centres. A total of 207 participants completed the Arabic version of the Disaster Preparedness Evaluation Tool. Participants perceived themselves as having moderate preparation for disaster management [mean score 74.9 (SD 21.6)], moderate knowledge [mean 49.9 (SD 12.3)] and moderate to weak skills in disaster management [mean 35.3 (SD 12.7)]. Significant differences were revealed in participants' perceptions of their disaster preparedness, knowledge and skills according to their sex, specialty and exposure to a real disaster situation. Further education and training courses are needed to enhance providers' preparedness for disaster management in Jordan.

  8. Between modern and traditional values: Informal mental health help-seeking attitudes according to Israeli Arab women, primary care patients and their providers.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Liat; Karkabi, Khaled; Bleichman, Igor; Fleischmann, Silvia; Goldfracht, Margalit

    2015-06-01

    Israeli Arab women under-utilize mental health services. The present study evaluated the use of alternative services for dealing with depression and anxiety among Israeli Arab women and primary care providers. Four focus groups with primary care patients and two focus groups with primary care providers were conducted. Constant comparisons were employed in order to identify major themes related to informal help-seeking behaviors. Three informal help-seeking behaviors were identified: (a) social support, divided into extended family and neighbors versus nuclear family and close friends; (b) religiosity, divided into inner, direct practices and beliefs versus externally mediated ones; and (c) self-help techniques, such as engagement in activities and distancing oneself from the situation. Both social support and religiosity were viewed with ambivalence by primary care patients and providers. The findings suggest that the Arab population in Israel might be lacking informal sources of support at times of mental health needs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Primary care for refugees.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Barbara

    2011-02-15

    Over the past decade, at least 600,000 refugees from more than 60 different countries have been resettled in the United States. The personal history of a refugee is often marked by physical and emotional trauma. Although refugees come from many different countries and cultures, their shared pattern of experiences allows for some generalizations to be made about their health care needs and challenges. Before being accepted for resettlement in the United States, all refugees must pass an overseas medical screening examination, the purpose of which is to identify conditions that could result in ineligibility for admission to the United States. Primary care physicians have the opportunity to care for members of this unique population once they resettle. Refugees present to primary care physicians with a variety of health problems, including musculoskeletal and pain issues, mental and social health problems, infectious diseases, and longstanding undiagnosed chronic illnesses. Important infectious diseases to consider in the symptomatic patient include tuberculosis, parasites, and malaria. Health maintenance and immunizations should also be addressed. Language barriers, cross-cultural medicine issues, and low levels of health literacy provide additional challenges to caring for this population. The purpose of this article is to provide primary care physicians with a guide to some of the common issues that arise when caring for refugee patients.

  10. Low-dose CT Lung Cancer Screening Practices and Attitudes Among Primary Care Providers at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Petty, W. Jeffrey; Tooze, Janet A.; Miller, David Philip; Chiles, Caroline; Miller, Antonius A.; Bellinger, Christina; Weaver, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening reduces lung cancer-specific and overall mortality. We sought to assess lung cancer screening practices and attitudes among primary care providers (PCPs) in the era of new LDCT screening guidelines. Methods In 2013, we surveyed PCPs at an academic medical center (60% response) and assessed: lung cancer screening use, perceived screening effectiveness, knowledge of screening guidelines, perceived barriers to LDCT use, and interest in LDCT screening education. Results Few PCPs (n=212) reported ordering lung cancer screening: chest x-ray (21%), LDCT (12%), and sputum cytology (3%). Only 47% of providers knew three or more of six guideline components for LDCT screening; 24% did not know any guideline components. In multiple logistic regression analysis, providers who knew three or more guideline components were more likely to order LDCT (OR 7.1, 95% CI 2.0-25.6). Many providers (30%) were unsure of the effectiveness of LDCT. Mammography, colonoscopy, and Pap smear were rated more frequently as effective in reducing cancer mortality compared to LDCT (all p-values < 0.0001). Common perceived barriers included patient cost (86.9% major or minor barrier), harm from false positives (82.7%), patients’ lack of awareness (81.3%), risk of incidental findings (81.3%), and insurance coverage (80.1%). Conclusions LDCT lung cancer screening is currently an uncommon practice at an academic medical center. PCPs report ordering chest x-ray, a non-recommended screening test, more often than LDCT. PCPs had a limited understanding of lung cancer screening guidelines and LDCT effectiveness. Provider educational interventions are needed to facilitate shared-decision making with patients. PMID:25613118

  11. “Someone’s got to do it” – Primary care providers (PCPs) describe caring for rural women with mental health problems

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Gonzalez, Maria C.; McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S.; Weisman, Carol S.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Perry, Amanda N.; Chuang, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about how primary care providers (PCPs) approach mental health care for low-income rural women. We developed a qualitative research study to explore the attitudes and practices of PCPs regarding the care of mood and anxiety disorders in rural women. Method We conducted semi-structured interviews with 19 family physicians, internists, and obstetrician-gynecologists (OBGYNs) in office-based practices in rural central Pennsylvania. Using thematic analysis, investigators developed a coding scheme. Questions focused on 1) screening and diagnosis of mental health conditions, 2) barriers to treatment among rural women, 3) management of mental illnesses in rural women, and 4) ideas to improve care for this population. Results PCP responses reflected these themes: 1) PCPs identify mental illnesses through several mechanisms including routine screening, indicator-based assessment, and self-identification by the patient; 2) Rural culture and social ecology are significant barriers to women in need of mental healthcare; 3) Mental healthcare resource limitations in rural communities lead PCPs to seek creative solutions to care for rural women with mental illnesses; 4) To improve mental healthcare in rural communities, both social norms and resource limitations must be addressed Conclusion Our findings can inform future interventions to improve women’s mental healthcare in rural communities. Ideas include promoting generalist education in mental healthcare, and expanding access to consultative networks. In addition, community programs to reduce the stigma of mental illnesses in rural communities may promote healthcare seeking and receptiveness to treatment. PMID:25632302

  12. Primary Care Providers' Opening of Time-Sensitive Alerts Sent to Commercial Electronic Health Record InBaskets.

    PubMed

    Cutrona, Sarah L; Fouayzi, Hassan; Burns, Laura; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Mazor, Kathleen M; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Garber, Lawrence; Sundaresan, Devi; Houston, Thomas K; Field, Terry S

    2017-08-14

    Time-sensitive alerts are among the many types of clinical notifications delivered to physicians' secure InBaskets within commercial electronic health records (EHRs). A delayed alert review can impact patient safety and compromise care. To characterize factors associated with opening of non-interruptive time-sensitive alerts delivered into primary care provider (PCP) InBaskets. We analyzed data for 799 automated alerts. Alerts highlighted actionable medication concerns for older patients post-hospital discharge (2010-2011). These were study-generated alerts sent 3 days post-discharge to InBaskets for 75 PCPs across a multisite healthcare system, and represent a subset of all urgent InBasket notifications. Using EHR access and audit logs to track alert opening, we performed bivariate and multivariate analyses calculating associations between patient characteristics, provider characteristics, contextual factors at the time of alert delivery (number of InBasket notifications, weekday), and alert opening within 24 h. At the time of alert delivery, the PCPs had a median of 69 InBasket notifications and had received a median of 379.8 notifications (IQR 295.0, 492.0) over the prior 7 days. Of the 799 alerts, 47.1% were opened within 24 h. Patients with longer hospital stays (>4 days) were marginally more likely to have alerts opened (OR 1.48 [95% CI 1.00-2.19]). Alerts delivered to PCPs whose InBaskets had a higher number of notifications at the time of alert delivery were significantly less likely to be opened within 24 h (top quartile >157 notifications: OR 0.34 [95% CI 0.18-0.61]; reference bottom quartile ≤42). Alerts delivered on Saturdays were also less likely to be opened within 24 h (OR 0.18 [CI 0.08-0.39]). The number of total InBasket notifications and weekend delivery may impact the opening of time-sensitive EHR alerts. Further study is needed to support safe and effective approaches to care team management of InBasket notifications.

  13. Primary care development zones.

    PubMed

    Beardshaw, V; Gordon, P; Plamping, D

    1993-01-30

    Most commentators on the Tomlinson report have agreed with its emphasis on improving primary and community care. The three elements of such a strategy are a remedial programme to bring primary care up to national standards, a programme to provide such services to people with non-standard needs such as mobile Londoners, ethnic minorities, and homeless people, and the development of an expanded model of primary care. No one model will be appropriate across all of London. The process should start with an audit of existing resources and services within each community, together with an analysis of needs. From this would develop a local programme with specific plans for investment in premises, staffing, training, and management. New contractual mechanisms may be needed to attract practitioners, improve their premises, secure out of hours services, and provide medical cover for community beds. There should also be incentives for closer working between primary and secondary services. No developments on the scale needed for London have been carried out in primary care within the lifetime of the NHS--but their success will be critical to the calibre of health services for Londoners into the next century.

  14. Transsexual primary care.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Christopher O

    2010-08-01

    Transsexual presentations in primary care stress mainstream health care physical resources, institutional organization, and the cultural flexibility of providers and interdisciplinary staff. This article describes the ethical landscape, examines gender identity culture, and considers gender reassignment physiology. Nurse practitioners are challenged to advocate for this population. Sources for the discussion derive from published institutional guidelines, institutional and civic policies, web-based information in the public domain, and professional journal articles. Advocacy for cultural sensitivity, institutional policy change,and professional integrity will determine healthcare quality for this population. Advocacy for cultural awareness and institutional change has begun in larger institutions and metropolitan areas, but is necessary across primary care settings. Caring for transsexuals requires knowledge of anatomical reassignments, hormonal therapy effects, and cultural sensitivities particular to the gender identity community. Healthcare screening and physical exam modifications for these presentations require forethought and appropriate adjustments.

  15. Frequency of high-quality communication behaviors used by primary care providers of heterozygous infants after newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Michael H.; Christopher, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the quality of communication likely to be experienced by parents when being first informed about how newborn screening identified heterozygous “carrier” status for cystic fibrosis or sickle cell disease. Methods Primary care providers (PCPs) of infants found to have carrier status were telephoned over a 48-month period, and asked to rehearse with a standardized patient how they would inform the infants’ parent(s). 214 rehearsal transcripts were abstracted using explicit criteria methods to measure the frequency of five categories of high-quality communication behaviors. Results Overall, PCPs used large amounts of jargon and failed to use high quality communication behaviors. On average, PCPs used 18.6 total jargon words (8.7 unique words), but explained 2.4 jargon words. The most frequent assessment of understanding was the close-ended version, although it was only seen in 129 of 214 transcripts. The most common organizing behavior was importance emphasis (121/214). Precautionary empathy was rare; the most frequent behavior was “instruction about emotion” (33/214). Conclusions The limited use of high-quality communication behaviors in rehearsals raises concern about parental understanding, decision-making, and psychosocial outcomes after newborn screening. Practice Implications Measurement of specific behaviors may help PCPs to improve communication, and thereby improve the patient experience. PMID:23194821

  16. Frequency of high-quality communication behaviors used by primary care providers of heterozygous infants after newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael H; Christopher, Stephanie A

    2013-02-01

    To examine the quality of communication likely to be experienced by parents when being first informed about how newborn screening identified heterozygous "carrier" status for cystic fibrosis or sickle cell disease. Primary care providers (PCPs) of infants found to have carrier status were telephoned over a 48-month period, and asked to rehearse with a standardized patient how they would inform the infants' parent(s). 214 rehearsal transcripts were abstracted using explicit criteria methods to measure the frequency of five categories of high-quality communication behaviors. Overall, PCPs used large amounts of jargon and failed to use high quality communication behaviors. On average, PCPs used 18.6 total jargon words (8.7 unique words), but explained 2.4 jargon words. The most frequent assessment of understanding was the close-ended version, although it was only seen in 129 of 214 transcripts. The most common organizing behavior was importance emphasis (121/214). Precautionary empathy was rare; the most frequent behavior was "instruction about emotion" (33/214). The limited use of high-quality communication behaviors in rehearsals raises concern about parental understanding, decision-making, and psychosocial outcomes after newborn screening. Measurement of specific behaviors may help PCPs to improve communication, and thereby improve the patient experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness of policy to provide breastfeeding groups (BIG) for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers in primary care: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Britten, Jane; Prescott, Gordon J; Tappin, David; Ludbrook, Anne; Godden, David J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a policy to provide breastfeeding groups for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial with prospective mixed method embedded case studies to evaluate implementation processes. Setting Primary care in Scotland. Participants Pregnant women, breastfeeding mothers, and babies registered with 14 of 66 eligible clusters of general practices (localities) in Scotland that routinely collect breastfeeding outcome data. Intervention Localities set up new breastfeeding groups to provide population coverage; control localities did not change group activity. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: any breast feeding at 6-8 weeks from routinely collected data for two pre-trial years and two trial years. Secondary outcomes: any breast feeding at birth, 5-7 days, and 8-9 months; maternal satisfaction. Results Between 1 February 2005 and 31 January 2007, 9747 birth records existed for intervention localities and 9111 for control localities. The number of breastfeeding groups increased from 10 to 27 in intervention localities, where 1310 women attended, and remained at 10 groups in control localities. No significant differences in breastfeeding outcomes were found. Any breast feeding at 6-8 weeks declined from 27% to 26% in intervention localities and increased from 29% to 30% in control localities (P=0.08, adjusted for pre-trial rate). Any breast feeding at 6-8 weeks increased from 38% to 39% in localities not participating in the trial. Women who attended breastfeeding groups were older (P<0.001) than women initiating breast feeding who did not attend and had higher income (P=0.02) than women in the control localities who attended postnatal groups. The locality cost was £13 400 (€14 410; $20 144) a year. Conclusion A policy for providing breastfeeding groups in relatively deprived areas of Scotland did not improve breastfeeding rates at 6-8 weeks. The costs of

  18. Public purchasers contracting external primary care providers in Central America for better responsiveness, efficiency of health care and public governance: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Macq, Jean; Martiny, Patrick; Villalobos, Luis Bernardo; Solis, Alejandro; Miranda, Jose; Mendez, Hilda Cecilia; Collins, Charles

    2008-09-01

    Several national health systems in Latin America initiated health reforms to counter widespread criticisms of low equity and efficiency. For public purchasing agencies, these reforms often consisted in contracting external providers for primary care provision. This paper intends to clarify both the complex and intertwined issues characterizing such contracting as well as health system performances within the context of four Central American countries. It results from a European Commission financed project lead between 2002 and 2005, involving participants from Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Salvador, United Kingdom, Netherlands and Belgium, whose aim was to promote exchanges between these participants. The findings presented in this paper are the results of a two stage process: (a) the design of an initial analytical framework, built upon findings from the literature, interlinking characteristics of contractual relation with health systems performances criteria and (b) the use of that framework in four case studies to identify cross-cutting issues. This paper reinforces two pivotal findings: (a) contracting requires not only technical, but also political choices and (b) it cannot be considered as a mechanical process. The unpredictability of its evolution requires a flexible and reactive approach. This should be better assimilated by national and international organizations involved in health services provision, so as to progressively come out of dogmatic approaches in deciding to initiate contractual relation with external providers for primary care provision.

  19. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Kapur, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically relevant short- and long-term benefits for low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, chronic neck pain, and headache. The integration of acupuncture into a primary care setting also appears to be cost-effective. Furthermore, the practice of acupuncture in primary care involves rigorous training, financial discipline, and art of communication. When it is done correctly, acupuncture proves to be beneficial for both patients and providers. PMID:20189001

  20. An Analysis of Primary Care Provider Productivity in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-08

    Medical Clinic 14 (TMC 14). Primary care providers in the DFCM include Family Practice (FP), Physician Assistant (PA) Family Nurse Practitioner ( FNP ...Provider Skill Set PROTYP The DFCM provider skill sets are Family Practice (FP), Physician Assistant (PA) Family Nurse Practitioner ( FNP ), Pediatrics...in the Equation B Exp(B) Sig. FP -0.030 0.971 0.843 FNP 0.165 1.179 0.402 Primary Care Provider Productivity 37 Table 15 (continued) B Exp(B) Sig. ED

  1. Determining Navy Primary Care Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    GMOs and UMOs) and flight surgeons, but not the interns and residents. The implicit assumption we made was that, for purposes of providing care to...than half of all of its providers being counted as providing primary care. This high value is attributable mainly to the large numbers of GMOs , UMOs...being either GMOs or contract civilians. The Navy couldn’t rely on only active-duty clinicians to provide primary care under the HMO system. The Navy

  2. Incentivizing primary care providers to innovate: building medical homes in the post-Katrina New Orleans safety net.

    PubMed

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Schmidt, Laura A; Wu, Kevin J; Wiley, James

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate safety-net clinics' responses to a novel community-wide Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) financial incentive program in post-Katrina New Orleans. Between June 2008 and June 2010, we studied 50 primary care clinics in New Orleans receiving federal funds to expand services and improve care delivery. Multiwave, longitudinal, observational study of a local safety-net primary care system. Clinic-level data from a semiannual survey of clinic leaders (89.3 percent response rate), augmented by administrative records. Overall, 62 percent of the clinics responded to financial incentives by achieving PCMH recognition from the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA). Higher patient volume, higher baseline PCMH scores, and type of ownership were significant predictors of achieving NCQA recognition. The steepest increase in adoption of PCMH processes occurred among clinics achieving the highest, Level 3, NCQA recognition. Following NCQA recognition, 88.9 percent stabilized or increased their use of PCMH processes, although several specific PCMH processes had very low rates of adoption overall. Findings demonstrate that widespread PCMH implementation is possible in a safety-net environment when external financial incentives are aligned with the goal of practice innovation. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Provider Network Development under the Department of Defense Coordinated Care Program: A Methodology for Primary Care Network Development and Its Implementation in the San Antonio Service Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    require contractor 78 SPCALTY OUANTITY Allergy -Immunology 3 Family Practice 9 Dermatology 3 Gastroenterology 3 Gynecology 1 Home Health Care 16 Internal...the age segmented service area population, a rough estimate of the number of primary care ( GMO , PA, NP, Flight Medicine & Family Practice) and pediatric...composition 94 The HMO clinic will be comprised of the following specialties: Family Practice physicians, GMOs , Imv role mmUBm ol m - M - MANAlM l CARE

  4. Shared Medical Appointments: A Promising Innovation to Improve Patient Engagement and Ease the Primary Care Provider Shortage.

    PubMed

    Stults, Cheryl D; McCuistion, Mary H; Frosch, Dominick L; Hung, Dorothy Y; Cheng, Peter H; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act has extended coverage for uninsured and underinsured Americans, but it could exacerbate existing problems of access to primary care. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are one way to improve access and increase practice productivity, but few studies have examined the patient's perspective on participation in SMAs. To understand patient experiences, 5 focus group sessions were conducted with a total of 30 people in the San Francisco Bay Area. The sessions revealed that most participants felt that they received numerous tangible and intangible benefits from SMAs, particularly enhanced engagement with other patients and physicians, learning, and motivation for health behavior change. Most importantly, participants noted changes in the power dynamic during SMA visits as they increasingly saw themselves empowered to impart information to the physician. Although SMAs improve access, engagement with physicians and other patients, and knowledge of patients' health, they also help to ease the workload for physicians.

  5. Evaluation of the Effect of Decision Support on the Efficiency of Primary Care Providers in the Outpatient Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Ronald A.; Decker, Lindsay K.; Cha, Stephen S.; Greenes, Robert A.; Liu, Hongfang; Chaudhry, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical decision support (CDS) for primary care has been shown to improve delivery of preventive services. However, there is little evidence for efficiency of physicians due to CDS assistance. In this article, we report a pilot study for measuring the impact of CDS on the time spent by physicians for deciding on preventive services and chronic disease management. Methods: We randomly selected 30 patients from a primary care practice, and assigned them to 10 physicians. The physicians were requested to perform chart review to decide on preventive services and chronic disease management for the assigned patients. The patients assignment was done in a randomized crossover design, such that each patient received 2 sets of recommendations—one from a physician with CDS assistance and the other from a different physician without CDS assistance. We compared the physician recommendations made using CDS assistance, with the recommendations made without CDS assistance. Results: The physicians required an average of 1 minute 44 seconds, when they were they had access to the decision support system and 5 minutes when they were unassisted. Hence the CDS assistance resulted in an estimated saving of 3 minutes 16 seconds (65%) of the physicians’ time, which was statistically significant (P < .0001). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of recommendations. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CDS assistance significantly reduced the time spent by physicians for deciding on preventive services and chronic disease management. The result needs to be confirmed by performing similar studies at other institutions. PMID:25155103

  6. Evaluation of the effect of decision support on the efficiency of primary care providers in the outpatient practice.

    PubMed

    Wagholikar, Kavishwar B; Hankey, Ronald A; Decker, Lindsay K; Cha, Stephen S; Greenes, Robert A; Liu, Hongfang; Chaudhry, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) for primary care has been shown to improve delivery of preventive services. However, there is little evidence for efficiency of physicians due to CDS assistance. In this article, we report a pilot study for measuring the impact of CDS on the time spent by physicians for deciding on preventive services and chronic disease management. We randomly selected 30 patients from a primary care practice, and assigned them to 10 physicians. The physicians were requested to perform chart review to decide on preventive services and chronic disease management for the assigned patients. The patients assignment was done in a randomized crossover design, such that each patient received 2 sets of recommendations-one from a physician with CDS assistance and the other from a different physician without CDS assistance. We compared the physician recommendations made using CDS assistance, with the recommendations made without CDS assistance. The physicians required an average of 1 minute 44 seconds, when they were they had access to the decision support system and 5 minutes when they were unassisted. Hence the CDS assistance resulted in an estimated saving of 3 minutes 16 seconds (65%) of the physicians' time, which was statistically significant (P < .0001). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of recommendations. Our findings suggest that CDS assistance significantly reduced the time spent by physicians for deciding on preventive services and chronic disease management. The result needs to be confirmed by performing similar studies at other institutions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model

    PubMed Central

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation. PMID:26951592

  8. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  9. Association between Women Veterans’ Experiences with VA Outpatient Healthcare and Designation as a Women’s Health Provider in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Lori A.; Trentalange, Mark; Murphy, Terrence E.; Brandt, Cynthia; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Maisel, Natalya C.; Wright, Steven M.; Gaetano, Vera S.; Allore, Heather; Skanderson, Melissa; Reyes-Harvey, Evelyn; Yano, Elizabeth M.; Rose, Danielle; Haskell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Women Veterans comprise a small percentage of VA healthcare users. Prior research on women Veterans’ experiences with primary care has focused on VA site differences and not individual provider characteristics. In 2010, the VA established policy requiring the provision of comprehensive women’s healthcare by designated women’s health providers (DWHPs). Little is known about the quality of healthcare delivered by DWHPs and women Veterans’ experience with care from these providers. Methods Secondary data were obtained from the VA Survey of Healthcare Experience of Patients (SHEP) using the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) patient-centered medical home (PCMH) survey from March 2012 through February 2013, a survey designed to measure patient experience with care and the DWHPs Assessment of Workforce Capacity (DAWC) that discerns between DWHPs versus non-DWHPs. Findings Of the 28,994 surveys mailed to women Veterans, 24,789 were seen by primary care providers and 8,151 women responded to the survey (response rate 32%). A total of 3,147 providers were evaluated by the SHEP-CAHPS-PCMH survey (40%; n=1,267 were DWHPs). In a multivariable model, patients seen by DWHPs (RR=1.02 95% CI=1.01−1.04) reported higher overall experiences with care compared to patients seen by non-DWHPs. Conclusions The main finding is that women Veterans’ overall experiences with outpatient healthcare are slightly better for those receiving care from DWHPs compared to those receiving care from non-DWHPs. Our findings have important policy implications for how to continue to improve women Veterans’ experiences. Our work provides support to increase access to DWHPs at VA primary care clinics. PMID:25442706

  10. Spirometry in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  11. Primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kitai, A

    1986-07-01

    Development of primary care in Japan in still relatively unorganized and unstructured. As mentioned above, the author describes some strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese primary care system. In addressing the weaknesses the following suggestions are offered for the Japanese primary care delivery system: Increase the number of emergency rooms for all day, especially on holidays and at night. Introduce an appointment system. Introduce an open system of hospitals. Coordinate with public hospitals and primary care clinics. Organize the referral system between private practitioners and community hospitals. Increase the number of paramedical staff. Strengthen group practice among primary care physicians. Increase the establishment of departments of primary care practice with government financial incentives to medical schools and teaching hospitals. Develop a more active and direct teaching role for primary care practice or family practice at undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Improve and maintain present health insurance payment method, shifting from quantity of care to quality and continuity of care. Introduce formal continuing education. Introduce formal training programs of primary care and strengthen ambulatory care teaching programs.

  12. [Primary care in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first European Union countries that saw the opportunity in the free movement of professionals. First offers for jobs were managed in 2000. Since then, a large number of professionals have taken the opportunity of a decent job and have moved from Spain to Sweden. The Swedish health care model belongs to the group of national health systems. The right to health care is linked to legal citizenship. Health is financed through regional taxes, but there is a compulsory co-payment regardless of the financial situation of the patient. The provision of health care is decentralised at a regional level, and there is a mixture of private and public medical centres. Primary care is similar to that in Spain. Health professionals work as a team with a division of tasks. Like in Spain, waiting lists and coordination between primary and specialised care are a great problem. Patients may register with any public or private primary care centre and hospital provider within their region. Access to diagnostic tests and specialists are restricted to those selected by specialists. Doctors are salaried and their job and salary depend on their experience, professional abilities and regional needs. Medicine is curative. General practitioners are the gateway to the system, but they do not act as gatekeeper. Hospitals offer a number of training post, and the access is through an interview. Continuing medical education is encouraged and financed by the health centre in order to increase its revenues. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. A descriptive qualitative study of the roles of family members in older men's depression treatment from the perspectives of older men and primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Ladson; Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Unützer, Jürgen; Dwight-Johnson, Megan; Park, Mijung; Barker, Judith C

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the roles of family members in older men's depression treatment from the perspectives of older men and primary care physicians (PCPs). Cross-sectional, descriptive qualitative study conducted from 2008-2011 in primary care clinics in an academic medical center and a safety-net county teaching hospital in California's Central Valley. Participants in this study were the following: (1) 77 age ≥ 60, noninstitutionalized men with a 1-year history of clinical depression and/or depression treatment who were identified through screening in primary care clinics and (2) a convenience sample of 15 PCPs from the same recruitment sites. Semi-structured and in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted and audiotaped then transcribed and analyzed thematically. Treatment-promoting roles of family included providing an emotionally supportive home environment, promoting depression self-management and facilitating communication about depression during primary care visits. Treatment-impeding roles of family included triggering or worsening men's depression, hindering depression care during primary care visits, discouraging depression treatment and being unavailable to assist men with their depression care. Overall, more than 90% of the men and the PCPs described one or more treatment-promoting roles of family and over 75% of men and PCPs described one or more treatment-impeding roles of family. Families play important roles in older men's depression treatment with the potential to promote as well as impede care. Interventions and services need to carefully assess the ongoing roles and attitudes of family members and to tailor treatment approaches to build on the positive aspects and mitigate the negative aspects of family support. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A descriptive qualitative study of the roles of family members in older men’s depression treatment from the perspectives of older men and primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Ladson; Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Unutzer, Jurgen; Dwight-Johnson, Megan; Park, Mijung; Barker, Judith C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the roles of family members in older men’s depression treatment from the perspectives of older men and primary care physicians (PCPs). METHODS Cross-sectional, descriptive qualitative study conducted from 2008–2011 in primary care clinics in an academic medical center and a safety-net county teaching hospital in California’s Central Valley. Participants in this study were 1) 77 age ≥ 60, non-institutionalized men with a one-year history of clinical depression and/or depression treatment who were identified through screening in primary care clinics and 2) a convenience sample of 15 PCPs from same recruitment sites. Semi-structured, in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted and audiotaped, then transcribed and analyzed thematically. RESULTS Treatment-promoting roles of family included providing an emotionally supportive home environment, promoting depression self-management and facilitating communication about depression during primary care visits. Treatment impeding roles of family included triggering or worsening men’s depression, hindering depression care during primary care visits, discouraging depression treatment and being unavailable to assist men with their depression care. Overall, more than 90% of the men and the PCPs described one or more treatment-promoting roles of family and over 75% of men and PCPs described one or more treatment-impeding roles of family. CONCLUSIONS Families play important roles in older men’s depression treatment with the potential to promote as well as impede care. Interventions and services need to carefully assess the ongoing roles and attitudes of family members and to tailor treatment approaches to build on the positive aspects and mitigate the negative aspects of family support. PMID:25131709

  15. Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Danielle H; Mahoney, David; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Investigation for a possible anxiety disorder should be considered in patients with multiple or persistent anxiety symptoms or multiple somatic complaints without a clear somatic etiology. The ideal treatment for anxiety disorders is a combination of pharmacologic and behavioral strategies. As primary care health care evolves, it is expected that the management of mental health disorders (including anxiety disorders) will largely occur in the context of collaborative care models in which patients and primary care clinicians are assisted by trained case managers who help facilitate a more comprehensive, holistic treatment plan between primary care and mental health providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Differences in Readiness between Rural Hospitals and Primary Care Providers for Telemedicine Adoption and Implementation: Findings from a Statewide Telemedicine Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Amy Brock; Probst, Janice C.; Shah, Kyle; Chen, Zhimin; Garr, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Published advantages of and challenges with telemedicine led us to examine the scope of telemedicine adoption, implementation readiness, and barriers in a southern state where adoption has been historically low. We hypothesized that rural hospitals and primary care providers (RPCPs) differ on adoption, readiness, and implementation…

  17. Differences in Readiness between Rural Hospitals and Primary Care Providers for Telemedicine Adoption and Implementation: Findings from a Statewide Telemedicine Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Amy Brock; Probst, Janice C.; Shah, Kyle; Chen, Zhimin; Garr, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Published advantages of and challenges with telemedicine led us to examine the scope of telemedicine adoption, implementation readiness, and barriers in a southern state where adoption has been historically low. We hypothesized that rural hospitals and primary care providers (RPCPs) differ on adoption, readiness, and implementation…

  18. Impact of the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention on adherence to national obesity clinical practice guidelines in a primary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Emily R.; Theeke, Laurie A.; Mallow, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Obesity is significantly underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care settings. The purpose of this clinical practice change project was to increase provider adherence to national clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity in adults. Methods Based upon the National Institutes of Health guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity, a clinical change project was implemented. Guided by the theory of planned behaviour, the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention includes education sessions, additional provider resources for patient education, a provider reminder system and provider feedback. Results Primary care providers did not significantly increase on documentation of diagnosis and planned management of obesity for patients with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30. Medical assistants increased recording of height, weight and BMI in the patient record by 13%, which was significant. Conclusions Documentation of accurate BMI should lead to diagnosis of appropriate weight category and subsequent care planning. Future studies will examine barriers to adherence to clinical practice guidelines for obesity. Interventions are needed that include inter-professional team members and may be more successful if delivered separately from routine primary care visits. PMID:25558956

  19. Impact of the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention on adherence to national obesity clinical practice guidelines in a primary care centre.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Emily R; Theeke, Laurie A; Mallow, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is significantly underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care settings. The purpose of this clinical practice change project was to increase provider adherence to national clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity in adults. Based upon the National Institutes of Health guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity, a clinical change project was implemented. Guided by the theory of planned behaviour, the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention includes education sessions, additional provider resources for patient education, a provider reminder system and provider feedback. Primary care providers did not significantly increase on documentation of diagnosis and planned management of obesity for patients with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30. Medical assistants increased recording of height, weight and BMI in the patient record by 13%, which was significant. Documentation of accurate BMI should lead to diagnosis of appropriate weight category and subsequent care planning. Future studies will examine barriers to adherence to clinical practice guidelines for obesity. Interventions are needed that include inter-professional team members and may be more successful if delivered separately from routine primary care visits. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Mental health in primary human immunodeficiency virus care in South Africa: a study of provider knowledge, attitudes, and practice.

    PubMed

    Mall, Sumaya; Sorsdahl, Katherine; Struthers, Helen; Joska, John A

    2013-03-01

    The role of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome care providers in detecting mental disorders in their patients is important to strengthen retention in antiretroviral care programs as well as adherence to treatment. A convenience sample of 66 HIV service providers were asked to participate in the study before attending a workshop. Two vignettes portraying HIV patients with depression and substance use (specifically problematic alcohol use) were presented to respondents to investigate their mental health literacy and attitudes toward mental disorders. Results indicated that 50% of respondents recognized depression (57% of professionals and 39% of nonprofessionals) and 37% recognized mental illness (28% of professionals and 31% of nonprofessionals). Psychosocial stress was reported more frequently than medical etiologies as a possible cause of mental disorders. Seeking help from a health professional in the form of psychotherapy was often endorsed as an effective treatment option. Further effort is required to educate HIV service providers about the psychobiological underpinnings of psychiatric disorders and effective treatments.

  1. Obesity care strategies in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Sawyer, Alexis; Batey, Sue; Maloney, Michelle; Wall, Tim; Hines, Valerie; Robles, Kattia; Sontag, Debbie; Haverkamp, Karen Susan; Lopez, Susan; Binns, Helen J

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated pediatric obesity clinics for internal referrals developed at 5 primary care offices. Clinics developed site-specific strategies: 1 group approach and 4 clinics providing individualized care only. Clinicians reported patient/family motivation as an important referral consideration and compliance as the greatest challenge and perceive clinics to have provided some help.

  2. Does capitation payment under national health insurance affect subscribers' trust in their primary care provider? a cross-sectional survey of insurance subscribers in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Andoh-Adjei, Francis-Xavier; Cornelissen, Dennis; Asante, Felix Ankomah; Spaan, Ernst; van der Velden, Koos

    2016-08-24

    Ghana introduced capitation payment for primary care in 2012 with the view to containing escalating claims expenditure. This shift in provider payment method raised issues about its potential impact on patient-provider trust relationship and insured-patients' trust in the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme. This paper presents findings of a study that explored insured-patients' perception about, and attitude towards capitation payment in Ghana; and determined whether capitation payment affect insured-patients' trust in their preferred primary care provider and the National Health Insurance Scheme in general. We adopted a survey design for the study. We administered closed-ended questionnaires to collect data from insurance card-bearing members aged 18 years and above. We performed both descriptive statistics to determine proportions of observations relating to the variables of interest and chi-square test statistics to determine differences within gender and setting. Sixty-nine per cent (69 %) out of 344 of respondents selected hospital level of care as their primary care provider. The two most important motivations for the choice of a provider were proximity in terms of geographical access (40 %) and perceived quality of care (38 %). Eighty-eight per cent (88 %) rated their trust in their provider as (very) high. Eighty-two per cent (82 %) actively selected their providers. Eighty-eight per cent (88 %) had no intention to switch provider. A majority (91 %) would renew their membership when it expires. Female respondents (91 %; n = 281) were more likely to renew their membership than males (87 %; n = 63). Notwithstanding capitation payment experience, 81 % of respondents would recommend to their peers to enrol with the NHIS with rural dwellers (87 %; n = 156) being more likely to do so than urban dwellers (76 %; n = 188). Almost all respondents (92 %) rated the NHIS as (very) good. Health Insurance subscribers in Ghana have high

  3. PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF OLDER PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS WHO PROVIDE A BUCCAL SWAB FOR APOE TESTING AND BANKING OF GENETIC MATERIAL: THE SPECTRUM STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, Hillary R.; Wittink, Marsha N.; Merz, Jon F.; Straton, Joseph B.; Cronholm, Peter F.; Rabins, Peter V.; Gallo, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the personal characteristics and reasons associated with providing a buccal swab for APOE genetic testing in a primary care study. METHODS The study sample consisted of 342 adults aged 65 years and older recruited from primary care settings. RESULTS In all, 88% of patients agreed to provide a DNA sample for APOE genotyping and 78% of persons providing a sample agreed to banking of the DNA. Persons aged 80 years and older and African-Americans were less likely to participate in APOE genotyping. Concern about confidentiality was the most common reason for not wanting to provide a DNA sample or to have DNA banked. CONCLUSION We found stronger relationships between sociodemographic variables of age and ethnicity with participation in genetic testing than we did between level of educational attainment, gender, function, cognition, and affect. PMID:15692195

  4. The 2016 proposal for the reorganisation of urgent care provision in Belgium: A political struggle to co-locate primary care providers and emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Van den Heede, Koen; Quentin, Wilm; Dubois, Cécile; Devriese, Stephan; Van de Voorde, Carine

    2017-04-01

    Internationally the number of emergency department (ED) visits is on the rise while evidence suggests that a substantial proportion of these patients do not require emergency care but primary care. This paper presents the Belgian 2016 proposal for the reorganisation of urgent care provision and places it into its political context. The proposal focused on re-designing patient flow aiming to reduce inappropriate ED visits by improving guidance of patients through the system. Initially policymakers envisaged, as cornerstone of the reform, to roll-out as standard model the co-location of primary care centres and EDs. Yet, this was substantially toned down in the final policy decisions mainly because GPs strongly opposed this model (because of increased workload and loss of autonomy, hospital-centrism, etc.). In fact, the final compromise assures a great degree of autonomy for GPs in organising out-of-hours care. Therefore, improvements will depend on future developments in the field and continuous monitoring of (un-)intended effects is certainly indicated. This policy process makes clear how important it is to involve all relevant stakeholders as early as possible in the development of a reform proposal to take into account their concerns, to illustrate the benefits of the reform and ultimately to gain buy-in for the reform.

  5. Epigenetics and primary care.

    PubMed

    Wright, Robert; Saul, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Epigenetics, the study of functionally relevant chemical modifications to DNA that do not involve a change in the DNA nucleotide sequence, is at the interface between research and clinical medicine. Research on epigenetic marks, which regulate gene expression independently of the underlying genetic code, has dramatically changed our understanding of the interplay between genes and the environment. This interplay alters human biology and developmental trajectories, and can lead to programmed human disease years after the environmental exposure. In addition, epigenetic marks are potentially heritable. In this article, we discuss the underlying concepts of epigenetics and address its current and potential applicability for primary care providers.

  6. Primary care research ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R; Murphy, E; Crosland, A

    1995-01-01

    Research activity in primary care is increasing rapidly, and raises a range of specific ethical issues. Many of these relate to the involvement of individuals in the community who are not seeking medical care and to the impact of research participation on relationships between general practitioners and their patients. The ethical issues pertinent to a range of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in primary care are identified and considered. PMID:8554844

  7. Alternative scenarios: harnessing mid-level providers and evidence-based practice in primary dental care in England through operational research.

    PubMed

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Radford, David R; Harper, Paul R; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2015-09-15

    In primary care dentistry, strategies to reconfigure the traditional boundaries of various dental professional groups by task sharing and role substitution have been encouraged in order to meet changing oral health needs. The aim of this research was to investigate the potential for skill mix use in primary dental care in England based on the undergraduate training experience in a primary care team training centre for dentists and mid-level dental providers. An operational research model and four alternative scenarios to test the potential for skill mix use in primary care in England were developed, informed by the model of care at a primary dental care training centre in the south of England, professional policy including scope of practice and contemporary evidence-based preventative practice. The model was developed in Excel and drew on published national timings and salary costs. The scenarios included the following: "No Skill Mix", "Minimal Direct Access", "More Prevention" and "Maximum Delegation". The scenario outputs comprised clinical time, workforce numbers and salary costs required for state-funded primary dental care in England. The operational research model suggested that 73% of clinical time in England's state-funded primary dental care in 2011/12 was spent on tasks that may be delegated to dental care professionals (DCPs), and 45- to 54-year-old patients received the most clinical time overall. Using estimated National Health Service (NHS) clinical working patterns, the model suggested alternative NHS workforce numbers and salary costs to meet the dental demand based on each developed scenario. For scenario 1:"No Skill Mix", the dentist-only scenario, 81% of the dentists currently registered in England would be required to participate. In scenario 2: "Minimal Direct Access", where 70% of examinations were delegated and the primary care training centre delegation patterns for other treatments were practised, 40% of registered dentists and eight times

  8. The Midpeninsula Health Service: action research using small primary care groups to provide evidence-based medicine that empowers patients while continuously improving quality and lowering costs.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Harold I; Rund, Douglas A; Hopkins, Joseph R

    2002-04-01

    A Joint Planning Committee Report was issued in 1974 exploring how Stanford University might itself provide primary care to students, faculty, employees and their dependents at low cost. The report called for the creation of a health maintenance organization owned by its subscribers in affiliation with Stanford Medical Center. However, because the report was dismissed by the dean of the School of Medicine as being unworkable, the Midpeninsula Health Service (MHS) began operating as an unaffiliated, nonprofit health plan in downtown Palo Alto in January 1976. The MHS's planning, early operation, move to the Stanford campus, financial viability and ultimate fate are examined as an example of action research in health care. Source documents were examined by the authors, a founding MHS board member and its two inaugural medical directors, in compiling a 30-year organizational history. The MHS was remarkably prescient in its early use of small primary care groups that included midlevel practitioners, the principles of evidence-based medicine, the participation of patients in self-care activities, and a commitment to the continuous monitoring and improvement of quality. Imputed annualized costs of care were 30% lower than contemporary fee-for-service care and 20% lower than that of Kaiser, with no discernible difference in health outcomes. Action research methods can be useful in identifying and testing potential solutions to vexing problems in health care delivery.

  9. Trends and patterns in antibiotic prescribing among out-of-hours primary care providers in England, 2010-14.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Michael; Agbebiyi, Adeola; Ashiru-Oredope, Diane; Hopkins, Susan

    2017-09-18

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat, increasing morbidity and mortality. In England, publicly funded clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) commission out-of-hours (OOH) primary care services outside daytime hours. OOH consultations represent 1% of in-hours general practice (GP) consultations. Antibiotic prescriptions increased 32% in non-GP community services between 2010 and 2013. We describe OOH antibiotic prescribing patterns and trends between 2010 and 2014. We: estimated the proportion of CCGs with OOH data available; described and compared antibiotic prescribing by volume of prescribed items, seasonality and trends in GP and OOH, using linear regression; and compared the proportion of broad-spectrum to total antibiotic prescriptions in OOHs with their respective CCGs in terms of seasonality and trends, using binomial regression. Data were available for 143 of 211 (68%) CCGs. OOH antibiotic prescription volume represented 4.5%-5.4% of GP prescription volume and was stable over time ( P  =   0.37). The proportion of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescriptions increased in OOH when it increased in the CCG they operated in (regression coefficient 0.98; 95% CI 0.96-0.99). Compared with GP, the proportion of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescriptions in OOH was higher but decreased both in GP and OOH (-0.57%, 95% CI - 0.54% to - 0.6% and -0.76%, 95% CI - 0.59% to - 0.93% per year, respectively). OOH proportionally prescribed more antibiotics than GPs although we could not comment on prescribing appropriateness. OOH prescribing volume was stable over time, and followed GP seasonal patterns. OOH antibiotic prescribing reflected the CCGs they operated in but with relatively more broad-spectrum antibiotics than in-hours GP. Understanding factors influencing prescribing in OOH will enable the development of tailored interventions promoting optimal prescribing in this setting.

  10. [Primary care in Ireland].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-03-27

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of performance coaching for enhancing rates of smoking cessation treatment delivery by primary care providers: Study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Sophia; Pipe, Andrew L; Reid, Robert D; Tulloch, Heather; Mullen, Kerri-Anne; Assi, Roxane; Cole, Adam G; Wells, George

    2015-11-01

    Smoking cessation is one of the most powerful preventive interventions available to primary care providers. Rates of tobacco treatment delivery in primary care settings, however, remain sub-optimal. This paper reports on rationale, design, and protocol for a matched-paired, cluster-randomized controlled trial to compare the incremental effectiveness of performance coaching on physician delivery of smoking cessation assistance when delivered as part of a practice-level intervention for smoking cessation (the Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation; OMSC). Outcome measures included frequency of provider smoking cessation treatment delivery, patient quit attempts, and 7-day point prevalence abstinence measured at 6 months, and changes in provider attitudes and beliefs related to smoking cessation treatment delivery. Primary care clinics were randomly assigned, using a matched paired design, to one of two treatment conditions: OMSC Group or OMSC+Performance Coaching Group. All practices were supported with implementing the OMSC. Half of the practices also received a 1.5 hour, skills-based, coaching session to address barriers encountered in the delivery of smoking cessation treatments and individualized performance feedback reports. All providers, and a cross sectional sample of patients from their practices, were surveyed before and after the implementation of the intervention. Multi-level modeling was used to compare intervention groups. If shown to be effective, the study will lead to an improved understanding of how to best assist clinicians to enhance the delivery of smoking cessation practice and will provide evidence to guide the design of smoking cessation interventions in primary care. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01603524. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Economic evaluation of interventions delivered by primary care providers to improve neurodevelopment in children aged under 5 years: protocol for a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Edmond, Karen M; Strobel, Natalie A; McAuley, Kimberley; Geelhoed, Elizabeth; Hurt, Lisa

    2017-03-21

    Frequently cited benefit-cost ratios suggest that interventions to improve neurodevelopment have high economic returns when implemented during pregnancy and early childhood. However, there are many challenges when primary care providers implement these interventions at scale, and it is unclear how many research studies or programmes have examined cost-effectiveness and which methods were used. There are no current scoping or systematic reviews which have assessed economic evaluations of interventions delivered by primary care providers to improve child neurodevelopment. The aim of this review is to describe the economic evaluations of interventions delivered by primary care providers to improve neurodevelopment in children aged 0-4 years. Specific subgroup analyses will include income level of country (high, middle and low); population type (universal vs targeted); time period when intervention was implemented (antenatal vs infancy [0-11 months] vs early childhood [12-59 months]); and setting (research study vs programmes evaluation at scale). All study designs will be included. The primary outcomes of interest are cost per neurodevelopmental or cognitive health gain in children aged 0-4 years. All measures of cost, neurodevelopment or cognitive function that have been previously validated as an appropriate test in this domain will be included. Databases such as MEDLINE (OVID), PsycINFO (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), CINAHL, Cochrane Library (including CENTRAL, DARE, HTA and NHS EED), Paediatric Economic Database Evaluation (PEDE) and WHO databases and reference lists of papers will be searched for relevant articles. Five phases will be followed: identifying the research question, identifying relevant studies, study selection, charting data and collating, summarising and reporting results. We will present cost and effectiveness data descriptively. This review appears to be the first to be conducted in this area. The findings will be an important resource for future

  13. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  14. Assessing clinical support and inter-professional interactions among front-line primary care providers in remote communities in northern Canada: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephanie K.; Young, T. Kue

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care in remote communities in northern Canada is delivered primarily by nurses who receive clinical support from physicians in regional centres and the patient transportation system. To improve continuity, quality and access to care in remote northern communities, it is important to understand the perspectives of front-line providers and the complex challenges they face. Objective To design and implement a survey of primary care providers to identify issues relating to inter-professional communication, clinical support and patient evacuation. Methods In collaboration with the territorial government and regional health authority partners, we developed a 21-item self-administered questionnaire survey, which could be completed online. The survey was sent to 218 physicians and nurses who were employed in the Northwest Territories (NWT) at the time of the survey and were involved in sending patients out of the community and/or receiving patients. The survey also contained an open-ended question at the end seeking comments regarding primary health care. Results The overall low response rate of 39% among nurses and 19% among physicians threatens the validity of the quantitative results. The majority of providers were satisfied with their ability to communicate with other providers in a timely manner, their freedom to make clinical decisions and their overall experience practicing in the NWT. The patient transfer system appears to work from both the sender and receiver perspectives. However, a common theme reported by nurses was that physicians providing clinical advice, especially short-term locums, were not familiar with the local situation, whilst physicians at the receiving end remarked that the clinical information provided to them often lacked clarity. Conclusions Important lessons were learnt from the pilot study, especially in better engagement of providers in planning and dissemination. The questionnaire design and the online method of delivery

  15. Costs and difficulties of recruiting patients to provide e-health support: pilot study in one primary care trust.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ray B; O'Connor, Anita; Brelsford, Jade; Parsons, Neil; Skirton, Heather

    2012-03-29

    Better use of e-health services by patients could improve outcomes and reduce costs but there are concerns about inequalities of access. Previous research in outpatients suggested that anonymous personal email support may help patients with long term conditions to use e-health, but recruiting earlier in their 'journey' may benefit patients more. This pilot study explored the feasibility and cost of recruiting patients for an e-health intervention in one primary care trust. The sample comprised 46 practices with total patient population of 250,000. We approached all practices using various methods, seeking collaboration to recruit patients via methods agreed with each practice. A detailed research diary was kept of time spent recruiting practices and patients. Researcher time was used to estimate costs. Patients who consented to participate were offered email support for their use of the Internet for health. Eighteen practices agreed to take part; we recruited 27 patients, most (23/27) from five practices. Practices agreed to recruit patients for an e-health intervention via waiting room leaflets (16), posters (16), practice nurses (15), doctors giving patients leaflets (5), a study website link (7), inclusion in planned mailshots (2), and a special mailshot to patients selected from practice computers (1). After low recruitment response we also recruited directly in five practices through research assistants giving leaflets to patients in waiting rooms. Ten practices recruited no patients. Those practices that were more difficult to recruit were less likely to recruit patients. Leaving leaflets for practice staff to distribute and placing posters in the practice were not effective in recruiting patients. Leaflets handed out by practice nurses and website links were more successful. The practice with lowest costs per patient recruited (£70) used a special mailshot to selected patients. Recruitment via general practice was not successful and was therefore expensive

  16. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... care is choosing your provider. Who can you go to for prenatal care? You can choose who ... baby if your provider’s not available when you go into labor? What hospital or birthing center does ...

  17. Assessing knowledge of the patient bill of rights in central Saudi Arabia: a survey of primary health care providers and recipients.

    PubMed

    Alghanim, Saad Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the implementation of the patient bill of rights (PBR) in Saudi Arabia. Therefore, this study was conducted to explore to what extent health care recipients and providers know about the bill and its implementation. A cross-sectional survey conducted on health care professionals and patients at Primary Health Care Centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during July 2010. The study employed a self-administered questionnaire to collect data from 500 patients (aged 18 years or older) and 500 health care providers (physicians and nurses) in primary health care (PHC) centers in Riyadh. Data was collected on the respondents' knowledge of the existence and contents of the bill, the extent to which the bill is implemented, and the obstacles that may hinder bill implementation. The data was analyzed and presented in a descriptive fashion. More than three quarters of patients and one third of PHC providers did not know about the existence of the bill. Among those who knew about its existence, about three quarters of patients and almost half of PHC providers had little (or very little) knowledge about the bill contents. In general, patients scored lower means of perception than PHC staff about the implementation of the bill's aspects. PHC staff reported several obstacles that may hinder the implementation of the PBR in Saudi Arabia. Patients and health care providers lack necessary knowledge about the PBR. More dissemination of information about the bill, taking into account the particularities of the Saudi population is needed. Future research is required to establish measures that are effective in ensuring that patients rights are ensured.

  18. Pediatric primary care as a component of systems of care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jonathan D

    2010-02-01

    Systems of care should be defined in a manner that includes primary care. The current definition of systems of care shares several attributes with the definition of primary care: both are defined as community-based services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, and family focused. However, systems of care is defined as serving only children and youth with serious emotional disturbance and their families and does not fully embrace the concept of primary prevention. Although similarities in the definitions of primary care and systems of care may provide a theoretical foundation for including primary care within the systems of care framework, a definition of systems of care that incorporates the idea of prevention and takes into account the broad population served in primary care would provide communities with a definition that can be used to further the work of integrating primary care into systems of care.

  19. The challenges of developing an instrument to assess health provider motivation at primary care level in rural Burkina Faso, Ghana and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Prytherch, Helen; Leshabari, Melkidezek T.; Wiskow, Christiane; Aninanya, Gifty A.; Kakoko, Deodatus C.V.; Kagoné, Moubassira; Burghardt, Juliane; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Marx, Michael; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Background The quality of health care depends on the competence and motivation of the health workers that provide it. In the West, several tools exist to measure worker motivation, and some have been applied to the health sector. However, none have been validated for use in sub-Saharan Africa. The complexity of such tools has also led to concerns about their application at primary care level. Objective To develop a common instrument to monitor any changes in maternal and neonatal health (MNH) care provider motivation resulting from the introduction of pilot interventions in rural, primary level facilities in Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Tanzania. Design Initially, a conceptual framework was developed. Based upon this, a literature review and preliminary qualitative research, an English-language instrument was developed and validated in an iterative process with experts from the three countries involved. The instrument was then piloted in Ghana. Reliability testing and exploratory factor analysis were used to produce a final, parsimonious version. Results and discussion This paper describes the actual process of developing the instrument. Consequently, the concepts and items that did not perform well psychometrically at pre-test are first presented and discussed. The final version of the instrument, which comprises 42 items for self-assessment and eight for peer-assessment, is then shown. This is followed by a presentation and discussion of the findings from first use of the instrument with MNH providers from 12 rural, primary level facilities in each of the three countries. Conclusions It is possible to undertake work of this nature at primary health care level, particularly if the instruments are kept as straightforward as possible and well introduced. However, their development requires very lengthy preparatory periods. The effort needed to adapt such instruments for use in different countries within the region of sub-Saharan Africa should not be underestimated. PMID

  20. The challenges of developing an instrument to assess health provider motivation at primary care level in rural Burkina Faso, Ghana and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Prytherch, Helen; Leshabari, Melkidezek T; Wiskow, Christiane; Aninanya, Gifty A; Kakoko, Deodatus C V; Kagoné, Moubassira; Burghardt, Juliane; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Marx, Michael; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2012-10-01

    The quality of health care depends on the competence and motivation of the health workers that provide it. In the West, several tools exist to measure worker motivation, and some have been applied to the health sector. However, none have been validated for use in sub-Saharan Africa. The complexity of such tools has also led to concerns about their application at primary care level. To develop a common instrument to monitor any changes in maternal and neonatal health (MNH) care provider motivation resulting from the introduction of pilot interventions in rural, primary level facilities in Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Tanzania. Initially, a conceptual framework was developed. Based upon this, a literature review and preliminary qualitative research, an English-language instrument was developed and validated in an iterative process with experts from the three countries involved. The instrument was then piloted in Ghana. Reliability testing and exploratory factor analysis were used to produce a final, parsimonious version. This paper describes the actual process of developing the instrument. Consequently, the concepts and items that did not perform well psychometrically at pre-test are first presented and discussed. The final version of the instrument, which comprises 42 items for self-assessment and eight for peer-assessment, is then shown. This is followed by a presentation and discussion of the findings from first use of the instrument with MNH providers from 12 rural, primary level facilities in each of the three countries. It is possible to undertake work of this nature at primary health care level, particularly if the instruments are kept as straightforward as possible and well introduced. However, their development requires very lengthy preparatory periods. The effort needed to adapt such instruments for use in different countries within the region of sub-Saharan Africa should not be underestimated.

  1. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Primary care in Italy].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-05-25

    Italy is not a country where Spanish doctors emigrate, as there is an over-supply of health care professionals. The Italian Servizio Sanitario Nazionale has some differences compared to the Spanish National Health System. The Servizio Sanitario Nazionale is financed by national and regional taxes and co-payments. There are taxes earmarked for health, and Primary Care receives 50% of the total funds. Italian citizens and residents in Italy have the right to free health cover. However, there are co-payments for laboratory and imaging tests, pharmaceuticals, specialist ambulatory services, and emergencies. Co-payments vary in the different regions. The provision of services is regional, and thus fragmentation and major inequities are the norm. Doctors in Primary Care are self-employed and from 2000 onwards, there are incentives to work in multidisciplinary teams. Salary is regulated by a national contract and it is the sum of per-capita payments and extra resources for specific activities. Responsibilities are similar to those of Spanish professionals. However, medical care is more personal. Relationships between Primary Care and specialised care depend on the doctors' relationships. Primary Care doctors are gatekeepers for specialised care, except for gynaecology, obstetrics and paediatrics. Specialised training is compulsory in order to work as general practitioner. The Italian Health Care System is a national health system like the Spanish one. However, health care professionals are self-employed, and there are co-payments. In spite of co-payments, Italians have one of the highest average life expectancy, and they support a universal and publicly funded health-care system. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Mehus, Christopher J.; Hawkins, J. David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C.; Metzler, Carol W.; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V. Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2017-01-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are: (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings. PMID:27498167

  4. Primary care training in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Masahiro J

    2003-06-01

    Primary care training during and after conflicts is one of the most challenging health care issues but is often neglected compared to emergency medical care. Recently, family medicine has been increasingly used as a model strategy to reconstruct primary care delivery systems in communities torn by conflicts. The lessons learned through providing primary pediatric care training in Kosovo, in two periods, both shortly before the NATO air strike and after the war in Kosovo, are shared in this paper. The training program was organized and provided in collaboration with the Kosovar nongovernmental organization, Mother Teresa Society, and Kinderberg International in support of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees as a pilot program. This paper provides a narrative description of training experiences that focused on practical bedside training and morale support throughout these two periods. Based on our evaluation, providing morale support at the field level to encourage the health care providers' motivation for learning and collegial support while suffering physical difficulties was beneficial. International primary care organizations should maintain collegial dialogue to support indigenization of family medicine, a process that adapts the principles of family medicine into their own needs in their communities.

  5. Improving Access to Primary Care for a Growing Latino Population: The Role of Safety Net Providers in the Rural Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blewett, Lynn A.; Casey, Michelle; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2004-01-01

    Many rural Midwestern communities are experiencing rapid growth in Latino populations with low rates of health insurance coverage, limited financial resources, language and cultural differences, and special health care needs. We report on 2-day site visits conducted in 2001 and 2002 in 3 communities (Marshalltown, Iowa; Great Bend, Kansas; and…

  6. Quantitative comparisons of urgent care service providers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Gayle L; Prybutok, Victor R; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop, validate, and use a survey instrument to measure and compare the perceived quality of three types of US urgent care (UC) service providers: hospital emergency rooms, urgent care centres (UCC), and primary care physician offices. This study develops, validates, and uses a survey instrument to measure/compare differences in perceived service quality among three types of UC service providers. Six dimensions measured the components of service quality: tangibles, professionalism, interaction, accessibility, efficiency, and technical quality. Primary care physicians' offices scored higher for service quality and perceived value, followed by UCC. Hospital emergency rooms scored lower in both quality and perceived value. No significant difference was identified between UCC and primary care physicians across all the perspectives, except for interactions. The homogenous nature of the sample population (college students), and the fact that the respondents were recruited from a single university limits the generalizability of the findings. The patient's choice of a health care provider influences not only the continuity of the care that he or she receives, but compliance with a medical regime, and the evolution of the health care landscape. This work contributes to the understanding of how to provide cost effective and efficient UC services. This study developed and validated a survey instrument to measure/compare six dimensions of service quality for three types of UC service providers. The authors provide valuable data for UC service providers seeking to improve patient perceptions of service quality.

  7. Raising awareness of carrier testing for hereditary haemoglobinopathies in high-risk ethnic groups in the Netherlands: a pilot study among the general public and primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Stephanie S; de Lange-de Klerk, Elly SM; Rijmen, Frank; Cornel, Martina C; de Kinderen, Marja; Plass, Anne Marie C

    2009-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands no formal recommendations exist concerning preconceptional or antenatal testing for carriership of hereditary haemoglobinopathies. Those at highest risk may be unaware of the possibility of carrier screening. While universal newborn screening has recently been introduced, neither preconceptional nor antenatal carrier testing is routinely offered by health care services to the general public. A municipal health service and a foundation for public information on medical genetics undertook a pilot project with the aim of increasing knowledge and encouraging informed choice. Two groups were targeted: members of the public from ethnic groups at increased risk, and primary health care providers. This study examines the effectiveness of culturally specific 'infotainment' to inform high-risk ethnic groups about their increased risk for haemoglobinopathies. In addition, the study explores attitudes and intentions of primary care providers towards haemoglobinopathy carrier testing of their patients from high-risk ethnic groups. Methods Informational sessions tailored to the public or professionals were organised in Amsterdam, and evaluated for their effect. Psychological parameters were measured using structured questionnaires based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Results The pre-test/post-test questionnaire showed that members of the public gained understanding of inheritance and carriership of haemoglobinopathies from the "infotainment" session (p < 0.01). Perceived behavioural control, i.e. the feeling that they could actually get tested if they wanted to, increased in the targeted age group of 18-45 years (N = 41; p < 0.05). 191 surveys were collected from general practitioners or midwives. Their attitude towards the education programme for high-risk ethnic groups was positive, yet they did not show strong intention to effectuate carrier testing of their patients on the basis of ethnicity. The main factor which explained their (lack of

  8. Raising awareness of carrier testing for hereditary haemoglobinopathies in high-risk ethnic groups in the Netherlands: a pilot study among the general public and primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Stephanie S; de Lange-de Klerk, Elly Sm; Rijmen, Frank; Cornel, Martina C; de Kinderen, Marja; Plass, Anne Marie C

    2009-09-15

    In the Netherlands no formal recommendations exist concerning preconceptional or antenatal testing for carriership of hereditary haemoglobinopathies. Those at highest risk may be unaware of the possibility of carrier screening. While universal newborn screening has recently been introduced, neither preconceptional nor antenatal carrier testing is routinely offered by health care services to the general public. A municipal health service and a foundation for public information on medical genetics undertook a pilot project with the aim of increasing knowledge and encouraging informed choice. Two groups were targeted: members of the public from ethnic groups at increased risk, and primary health care providers. This study examines the effectiveness of culturally specific 'infotainment' to inform high-risk ethnic groups about their increased risk for haemoglobinopathies. In addition, the study explores attitudes and intentions of primary care providers towards haemoglobinopathy carrier testing of their patients from high-risk ethnic groups. Informational sessions tailored to the public or professionals were organised in Amsterdam, and evaluated for their effect. Psychological parameters were measured using structured questionnaires based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The pre-test/post-test questionnaire showed that members of the public gained understanding of inheritance and carriership of haemoglobinopathies from the "infotainment" session (p < 0.01). Perceived behavioural control, i.e. the feeling that they could actually get tested if they wanted to, increased in the targeted age group of 18-45 years (N = 41; p < 0.05). 191 surveys were collected from general practitioners or midwives. Their attitude towards the education programme for high-risk ethnic groups was positive, yet they did not show strong intention to effectuate carrier testing of their patients on the basis of ethnicity. The main factor which explained their (lack of) intention was social norm

  9. Sustained partnership in primary care.

    PubMed

    Leopold, N; Cooper, J; Clancy, C

    1996-02-01

    In 1994, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened the Committee on the Future of Primary Care to provide a clearer understanding of the essential and desirable attributes of primary care. Perhaps the committee's most striking addition to the IOM's 1978 definition was the concept that primary care includes a sustained partnership with patients. Development of the partnership is considered an explicit responsibility of the primary care clinician. Although there is an extensive and growing body of literature on the effects of clinician-patient communication on outcomes such as patient satisfaction, adherence, symptom abatement, and physiological measures of health status, the impact of a sustained partnership in a clinician-patient relationship remains largely unstudied. There is also no consensus regarding either the definition or achievement of a sustained partnership. This paper reviews selected relevant literature and proposes a theoretical basis for assessing the existence, antecedents, and outcomes of sustained partnerships between clinicians and patients. At a time when there is increased discussion and clarification of optimal clinician and patient roles in a rapidly evolving health care delivery system, we believe this mode can provide guidance to clinicians and provider organizations seeking to improve the quality of primary care.

  10. Barriers and facilitating factors among lay health workers and primary care providers to promote children's oral health in Chon Buri Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vichayanrat, Tippanart; Steckler, Allan; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2013-03-01

    This study explored the barriers and facilitating factors among lay health workers (LHWs) and primary care providers (PCPs) in implementing a multi-level program to promote children's oral health care in a rural Thai community. Twelve focus groups and 11 in-depth interviews were conducted with LHWs and PCPs who implemented the program from January 2008 to January 2009. The findings showed that the PCPs encountered the constraints of time and human resources, lack of ownership, and problem of coordination with the district hospital. The barriers among LHWs during home visits were related to their assumption of caregiver's knowledge, some conflicting beliefs, and limited counseling skills. The facilitating factors were the training program, caregivers' positive feedback, and available resources such as brochures and toothbrushes. The PCPs identified LHWs as the main facilitators of the program and indicated that policy should be developed for better integrating oral health services in local health Centers. This study provides a better understanding of the barriers and facilitating factors to promote children's oral health in rural Thai communities. While the barriers to integrating oral health activities to primary care are complex, the use of LHWs to promote the children's oral health was feasible and should be supported.

  11. Care for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Sharon Brown; Kanze, David Mitchell

    2016-03-01

    Pretravel care for the health care provider begins with an inventory, including the destination, length of stay, logistical arrangements, type of lodging, food and water supply, team members, personal medical needs, and the needs of the community to be treated. This inventory should be created and processed well in advance of the planned medical excursion. The key thing to remember in one's planning is to be a health care provider during one's global health care travel and not to become a patient oneself. This article will help demonstrate the medical requirements and recommendations for such planning.

  12. Physician substitution by mid-level providers in primary healthcare for older people and long-term care facilities: protocol for a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Lovink, Marleen H; Persoon, Anke; van Vught, Anneke J A H; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Laurant, Miranda G H

    2015-12-01

    This protocol describes a systematic review that evaluates the effects of physician substitution by mid-level providers (nurse practitioners, physician assistants or nurses) in primary healthcare for older people and long-term care facilities. The secondary aim is to describe facilitators and barriers to the implementation of physician substitution in these settings. Healthcare for older people is undergoing major changes, due to population ageing and reforms that shift care to the community. Besides, relatively few medical students are pursuing careers in healthcare for older people. Innovative solutions are needed to guarantee the quality of healthcare and to contain costs. A solution might be shifting care from physicians to mid-level providers. To date, no systematic review on this topic exits to guide policymaking. A quantitative systematic literature review using Cochrane methods. The following databases will be searched for original research studies that quantitatively compare care provided by a physician to the same care provided by a mid-level provider: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, CENTRAL and Web of Science. Study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal will be conducted independently by two reviewers. Data synthesis will consist of a qualitative analysis of the data. Funding of the review was confirmed in August 2013 by the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport of the Netherlands. This review will contribute to the knowledge on effects of physician substitution in healthcare for older people and factors that influence the outcomes. This knowledge will guide professionals and policy administrators in their decisions to optimize healthcare for older people. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Provider practices in the primary care behavioral health (PCBH) model: an initial examination in the Veterans Health Administration and United States Air Force.

    PubMed

    Funderburk, Jennifer S; Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Walsh, Christine O; Maisto, Stephen A

    2013-12-01

    The goals of this study were to identify characteristics of both behavioral health providers (BHPs) and the patients seen in a primary care behavioral health (PCBH) model of service delivery using prospective data obtained from BHPs. A secondary objective was to explore similarities and differences between these variables within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and United States Air Force (USAF) primary care clinics. A total of 159 VHA and 23 USAF BHPs, representing almost every state in the United States, completed the study, yielding data from 403 patient appointments. BHPs completed a web-based questionnaire that assessed BHP and setting characteristics, and a separate questionnaire after each patient seen on one day of clinical service. Data demonstrated that there are many similarities between the VHA and USAF BHPs and practices. Both systems tend to use well-trained psychologists as BHPs, had systems that support the BHP being in close proximity to the primary care providers, and have seamless operational elements (i.e., shared record, one waiting room, same-day appointments, and administrative support for BHPs). Comorbid anxiety and depression was the most common presenting problem in both systems, but overall rates were higher in VHA clinics, and patients were significantly more likely to meet diagnostic criteria for mental health conditions. This study provides the first systematic, prospective examination of BHPs and practices within a PCBH model of service delivery in two large health systems with well over 5 years of experience with behavioral health integration. Many elements of the PCBH model were implemented in a manner consistent with the model, although some variability exists within both settings. These data can help guide future implementation and training efforts.

  14. The Adoption of Roles by Primary Care Providers during Implementation of the New Chronic Disease Guidelines in Urban Mongolia: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Chimeddamba, Oyun; Ayton, Darshini; Bazarragchaa, Nansalmaa; Dorjsuren, Bayarsaikhan; Peeters, Anna; Joyce, Catherine

    2016-04-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: In 2011, new chronic disease guidelines were introduced across Mongolia. No formal advice was provided regarding role delineation. This study aimed to analyse the roles that different primary care providers adopted, and the variations in these, in the implementation of the guidelines in urban Mongolia; (2) METHODS: Ten group interviews with nurses and ten individual interviews each with practice doctors and practice directors were conducted. Data was analysed using a thematic approach based on the identified themes relevant to role delineation; (3) RESULTS: There was some variability and flexibility in role delineation. Factors involving teamwork, task rotation and practice flexibility facilitated well the guideline implementation. However, factors including expectations and decision making, nursing shortage, and training gaps adversely influenced in the roles and responsibilities. Some role confusion and dissatisfaction was identified, often associated with a lack of training or staff turnover; (4) CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that adequate ongoing training is required to maximize the range of roles particular provider types, especially primary care nurses, are competent to perform. Ensuring that role delineation is specified in guidelines could remove confusion and enhance implementation of such guidelines.

  15. The Adoption of Roles by Primary Care Providers during Implementation of the New Chronic Disease Guidelines in Urban Mongolia: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Chimeddamba, Oyun; Ayton, Darshini; Bazarragchaa, Nansalmaa; Dorjsuren, Bayarsaikhan; Peeters, Anna; Joyce, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: In 2011, new chronic disease guidelines were introduced across Mongolia. No formal advice was provided regarding role delineation. This study aimed to analyse the roles that different primary care providers adopted, and the variations in these, in the implementation of the guidelines in urban Mongolia; (2) Methods: Ten group interviews with nurses and ten individual interviews each with practice doctors and practice directors were conducted. Data was analysed using a thematic approach based on the identified themes relevant to role delineation; (3) Results: There was some variability and flexibility in role delineation. Factors involving teamwork, task rotation and practice flexibility facilitated well the guideline implementation. However, factors including expectations and decision making, nursing shortage, and training gaps adversely influenced in the roles and responsibilities. Some role confusion and dissatisfaction was identified, often associated with a lack of training or staff turnover; (4) Conclusions: Findings suggest that adequate ongoing training is required to maximize the range of roles particular provider types, especially primary care nurses, are competent to perform. Ensuring that role delineation is specified in guidelines could remove confusion and enhance implementation of such guidelines. PMID:27070630

  16. Anxiety disorders in primary care.

    PubMed

    Combs, Heidi; Markman, Jesse

    2014-09-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric condition presenting to primary care practitioners. Yet they can be easily overlooked or misdiagnosed. Patients that struggle with anxiety disorders are more likely to seek treatment from primary care providers than mental health specialists. Given the costs in terms of debilitation and associated financial burden, and increased risk of suicide, the identification and successful treatment of anxiety is imperative. By means of clinical acumen and the use of screening tools, the provider can develop expertise in recognition and effective treatment of anxiety disorders.

  17. Primary health care models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowled