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Sample records for primary fractionated stereotactic

  1. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8-54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10-75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  2. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Candish, Charles; McKenzie, Michael . E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G.; Ma, Roy; Lee, Richard; Vollans, Emily; Robar, James; Gete, Ermias; Martin, Monty

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Maluccio, Mary; Kwo, Paul; Tector, A. Joseph; Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

  4. Effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Karin; Nowak, Peter; Pan, Connie de; Marijnissen, Johannes P.; Paridaens, Dion A.; Levendag, Peter; Luyten, Gre P.M. . E-mail: g.p.m.luyten@erasmusmc.nl

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To study the effectiveness and acute side effects of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (fSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2003, 38 patients (21 male, 17 female) were included in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial (mean follow-up of 25 months). A total dose of 50 Gy was given in 5 consecutive days. A blinking light and a camera (to monitor the position of the diseased eye) were fixed to a noninvasive relocatable stereotactic frame. Primary end points were local control, best corrected visual acuity, and toxicity at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Results: After 3 months (38 patients), the local control was 100%; after 12 months (32 patients) and 24 months (15 patients), no recurrences were seen. The best corrected visual acuity declined from a mean of 0.21 at diagnosis to 0.06 2 years after therapy. The acute side effects after 3 months were as follows: conjunctival symptoms (10), loss of lashes or hair (6), visual symptoms (5), fatigue (5), dry eye (1), cataract (1), and pain (4). One eye was enucleated at 2 months after fSRT. Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrate that fSRT is an effective and safe treatment modality for uveal melanoma with an excellent local control and mild acute side effects. The follow-up should be prolonged to study both long-term local control and late toxicity.

  5. Cushing's disease: a single centre's experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P J; Williams, J R; Smee, R I

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is hypercortisolaemia secondary to an adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting pituitary adenoma. Primary management is almost always surgical, with limited effective medical interventions available. Adjuvant therapy in the form of radiation is gaining popularity, with the bulk of the literature related to the Gamma Knife. We present the results from our own institution using the linear accelerator (LINAC) since 1990. Thirty-six patients who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), one patient who underwent fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and for the purposes of comparison, 13 patients who had undergone conventional radiotherapy prior to 1990, were included in the analysis. Serum cortisol levels improved in nine of 36 (25%) SRS patients and 24 hour urinary free cortisol levels improved in 13 of 36 patients (36.1%). Tumour volume control was excellent in the SRS group with deterioration in only one patient (3%). The patient who underwent FSRT had a highly aggressive tumour refractory to radiation.

  6. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series.

  7. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Frank; Doerr, Stefan; Wilhelm, Helmut; Becker, Gerd; Bamberg, Michael; Classen, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  8. Clinical commissioning of Laitinen Stereoadapter for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, G A; Gebert, J A; Fuery, J J

    1998-01-01

    The Laitinen Stereoadapter 5000 from Sandstroem Trade and Technology was acceptance tested and commissioned for clinical use in a Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Program at our facility. The frame was implemented to function as a localization device for target delineation rather than as an immobilization device. The frame is of non-invasive nature utilizing ear plugs and a nasion bridge adapter as the connecting points with the patient's head. The reproducibility of the head frame position with respect to external skull reference points was tested. CT and MRI imaging studies were performed on a patient phantom with the stereoadapter in place. The target was delineated and target coordinates were calculated for two implanted targets. The phantom was positioned according to the target coordinates on a Siemens MXE Linear Accelerator by aid of the target positioning lasers. Radiographic port film images were taken with the circular fields typically used in stereotactic radiosurgery. A complete treatment isodose plan was performed and dosimetric accuracy was tested by positioning a small volume ionization chamber at the center of the target volume in the head phantom. The results of these tests were found to be clinically acceptable. PMID:9863732

  9. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma: The McGill University Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Wassia, Rolina; Dal Pra, Alan; Shun, Kitty; Shaban, Ahmed; Corriveau, Christine; Edelstein, Chaim; Deschenes, Jean; Ruo, Russel; Patrocinio, Horacio; Cury, Fabio L.B.; DeBlois, Francois; Shenouda, George

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients diagnosed with juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma and treated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy between April 2003 and December 2009. Patients with small to medium sized lesions (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study classification) located within 2 mm of the optic disc were included. The prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy in 10 fractions. The primary endpoints included local control, enucleation-free survival, and complication rates. Results: The median follow-up was 29 months (range, 1-77 months). There were 31 males and 29 females, with a median age of 69 years (range, 30-92 years). Eighty-four percent of the patients had medium sized lesions, and 16% of patients had small sized lesions. There were four cases of local progression (8%) and three enucleations (6%). Actuarial local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 93% and 86%, respectively. Actuarial enucleation-free survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 94% and 84%, respectively. Actuarial complication rates at 2 and 5 years were 33% and 88%, respectively, for radiation-induced retinopathy; 9.3% and 46.9%, respectively, for dry eye; 12% and 53%, respectively, for cataract; 30% and 90%, respectively, for visual loss [Snellen acuity (decimal equivalent), <0.1]; 11% and 54%, respectively, for optic neuropathy; and 18% and 38%, respectively, for neovascular glaucoma. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy using 60 Gy in 10 fractions is safe and has an acceptable toxicity profile. It has been shown to be an effective noninvasive treatment for juxtapapillary choroidal melanomas.

  10. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Roed, Henrik; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  11. [FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY: A GAME CHANGER FOR NEUROSURGERY].

    PubMed

    Nissim, Ouzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The article by Dr. Cohen-Inbar published in this issue of Harefuah is a timely review that brings to the general medical community the recent important developments in the field of radiosurgery--the evolution of multi-session radiosurgery [or "FSR", standing for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation]. Radiosurgery and FSR continue to have a tremendous impact on modern neurosurgery. Sharing sub-millimetric accuracy in radiation delivery made possible by real-time-imaging positioning, frameless single and multisession radiosurgery have become two faces of a therapeutic technique with wide application in the field of intracranial pathology. Blending dose fractionation with delivery precision, FSR is a hybrid tool that can be implemented safely and effectively for practically any intra-cranial pathology without restrictions of volume or location. Dr. Cohen Inbar reviews the available data regarding doses, fractionation schemes, and results for the different pathologies in which FSR is being increasingly applied. FSR, as single-dose radiosurgery since the late 1980s, has changed the practice of neurosurgery. Radical microsorgical tumor removal at any cost in demanding intracranial locations has been replaced by upfront conservative volume-reduction surgery, leaving the more complicated part of those tumors to safer elimination by precise irradiation in single or multiple sessions. In Israel, further to the first unit operative since 1993 at the Sheba Medical Center, 3 new active LINAC based treatment sites have been added in recent years, with facilities either planned or under construction in the remaining major medical centers with neurosurgical and radiotherapy resources. They are evidence of the central role this modality has captured in the management of intracranial pathology. PMID:27526561

  12. Fractionated Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases: A Retrospective, Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Meen; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is widely used for brain metastases but has been relatively contraindicated for large lesions (>3 cm). In the present study, we analyzed the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery to treat metastatic brain tumors for which surgical resection were not considered as the primary treatment option. Methods and Materials Thirty-six patients, forty cases were treated with Gamma Knife-based fractionated SRS for three to four consecutive days with the same Leksell frame on their heads. The mean gross tumor volume was 18.3 cm³, and the median dose was 8 Gy at 50% isodose line with 3 fractions for three consecutive days (range, 5 to 11 Gy and 2 to 4 fractions for 2 to 4 consecutive days). Survival rates and prognostic factors were analyzed. Results The overall survival rate at one and two years was 66.7 and 33.1%, respectively. The median survival time was 16.2 months, and the local control rate was 90%. RTOG toxicity grade 1 was observed in 3 (8.3%) patients, grade 2 in 1 (2.7%) patient and grade 3 in 1 (2.7%) patient respectively. Radiation necrosis was developed in 1 (2.7%) patient. KPS scores and control of primary disease resulted in significant differences in survival. Conclusions Our findings suggest that consecutive hypofractionated Gamma Knife SRS could be applied to large metastatic brain tumors with effective tumor control and low toxicity rates. PMID:27661613

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Lung Cancer at a Dose of 50 Gy Total in Five Fractions to the Periphery of the Planning Target Volume Calculated Using a Superposition Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Takeda, Toshiaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. Conclusions: The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.

  14. Long-Term Outcomes of Vestibular Schwannomas Treated With Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Sumit; Batra, Sachin; Carson, Kathryn; Shuck, John; Kharkar, Siddharth; Gandhi, Rahul; Jackson, Juan; Wemmer, Jan; Terezakis, Stephanie; Shokek, Ori; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We assessed clinical outcome and long-term tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for unilateral schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2007, 496 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD); 385 patients had radiologic follow-up that met the inclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was treatment failure. Secondary endpoints were radiologic progression and clinical outcome. Logistic regression analysis assessed the association of age, race, tumor side, sex, and pretreatment symptoms. Results: In 11 patients (3%) treatment failed, and they required salvage (microsurgical) treatment. Radiologic progression was observed in 116 patients (30.0%), including 35 patients (9%) in whom the treatment volume more than doubled during the follow-up period, although none required surgical resection. Tumors with baseline volumes of less than 1 cm{sup 3} were 18.02 times more likely to progress than those with tumor volumes of 1 cm{sup 3} or greater (odds ratio, 18.02; 95% confidence interval, 4.25-76.32). Treatment-induced neurologic morbidity included 8 patients (1.6%) with new facial weakness, 12 patients (2.8%) with new trigeminal paresthesias, 4 patients (0.9%) with hydrocephalus (1 communicating and 3 obstructive), and 2 patients (0.5%) with possibly radiation-induced neoplasia. Conclusions: Although the rate of treatment failure is low (3%), careful follow-up shows that radiologic progression occurs frequently. When reporting outcome, the 'no salvage surgery needed' and 'no additional treatment needed' criteria for treatment success need to be complemented by the radiologic data.

  15. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma): Predicting the Risk of Hydrocephalus;Vestibular schwannoma; Hydrocephalus; Fractionated; Stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Ceri; Micallef, Caroline; Gonsalves, Adam; Wharram, Bev; Ashley, Sue; Brada, Michael

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and predictive factors for the development of hydrocephalus in patients with acoustic neuromas (AN) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seventy-two patients with AN were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 (45-50 Gy in 25-30 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks). The pretreatment MRI scan was assessed for tumor characteristics and anatomic distortion independently of subsequent outcome and correlated with the risk of hydrocephalus. Results: At a median follow-up of 49 months (range, 1-120 months), 5-year event-free survival was 95%. Eight patients (11%) developed hydrocephalus within 19 months of radiotherapy, which was successfully treated. On univariate analysis, pretreatment factors predictive of hydrocephalus were maximum diameter (p = 0.005), proximity to midline (p = 0.009), displacement of the fourth ventricle (p = 0.02), partial effacement of the fourth ventricle (p < 0.001), contact with the medulla (p = 0.005), and more brainstem structures (p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for fourth ventricular effacement, no other variables remained independently associated with hydrocephalus formation. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy results in excellent tumor control of AN, albeit with a risk of developing hydrocephalus. Patients at high risk, identified as those with larger tumors with partial effacement of the fourth ventricle before treatment, should be monitored more closely during follow-up. It would also be preferable to offer treatment to patients with progressive AN while the risk of hydrocephalus is low, before the development of marked distortion of fourth ventricle before tumor diameter significantly exceeds 2 cm.

  16. Early manifestation of communicating hydrocephalus after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for aggressive giant atypical prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Ohe, Naoyuki; Iwama, Toru; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Aggressive giant invasive pituitary adenomas refractory to standard surgical or medical treatment remain a genuine challenge. In addition, communicating hydrocephalus (CH) attributed to malabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) developing after radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas has not been previously reported. Herein, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male presenting with a giant atypical prolactinoma refractory to previous therapies, including pharmacotherapy and repetitive surgery. He underwent image-guided fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in 28 fractions, resulting in early manifestation of CH associated with undisputed, both radiological and hormonal response. He recovered well after a shunt placement, with otherwise favorable consequences such as sustained tumor regression, decreasing prolactin level, and retained visual function for a 22-month follow-up. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy would provide a viable treatment alternative for these refractory cases, while caution should be exercised regarding the possibility of iatrogenic CH.

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Gamma knife - discharge; Cyberknife - discharge; Stereotactic radiotherapy - discharge; Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy- discharge; Cyclotrons- discharge; Linear accelerator- discharge; Lineacs - discharge; Proton beam radiosurgery - discharge

  18. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  19. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  20. Five-Year Outcomes of High-Dose Single-Fraction Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Moussazadeh, Nelson; Lis, Eric; Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Kahn, Sweena; Svoboda, Marek; DiStefano, Natalie M.; McLaughlin, Lily; Bilsky, Mark H.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Laufer, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize local tumor control and toxicity risk in very long-term survivors (>5 years) after high-dose spinal image guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered as single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Previously published spinal SRS outcome analyses have included a heterogeneous population of cancer patients, mostly with short survival. This is the first study reporting the long-term tumor control and toxicity profiles after high-dose single-fraction spinal SRS. Methods and Materials: The study population included all patients treated from June 2004 to July 2009 with single-fraction spinal SRS (dose 24 Gy) who had survived at least 5 years after treatment. The endpoints examined included disease progression, surgical or radiation retreatment, in-field fracture development, and radiation-associated toxicity, scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control and fracture development were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 278 patients, 31 (11.1%), with 36 segments treated for spinal tumors, survived at least 5 years after treatment and were followed up radiographically and clinically for a median of 6.1 years (maximum 102 months). The histopathologic findings for the 5-year survivors included radiation-resistant metastases in 58%, radiation-sensitive metastases in 22%, and primary bone tumors in 19%. In this selected cohort, 3 treatment failures occurred at a median of 48.6 months, including 2 recurrences in the radiation field and 1 patient with demonstrated progression at the treatment margins. Ten lesions (27.8%) were associated with acute grade 1 cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. Delayed toxicity ≥3 months after treatment included 8 cases (22.2%) of mild neuropathy, 2 (5.6%) of gastrointestinal discomfort, 8 (22.2%) of dermatitides, and 3 (8.3%) of myalgias/myositis. Thirteen

  1. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez Romero, Alejandra Wunderink, Wouter; Os, Rob M. van; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to March 2007, a total of 28 patients not suitable for other local treatments and with Karnofsky performance status of at least 80% were entered in a Phase I-II study of SBRT for liver tumors. Quality of life was a secondary end point. Two generic quality of life instruments were investigated, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EuroQoL-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), in addition to a disease-specific questionnaire, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C-30). Points of measurement were directly before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Mean scores and SDs were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using paired-samples t-test and Student t-test. Results: The calculated EQ-5D index, EQ-5D VAS and QLQ C-30 global health status showed that mean quality of life of the patient group was not significantly influenced by treatment with SBRT; if anything, a tendency toward improvement was found. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy combines a high local control rate, by delivering a high dose per fraction, with no significant change in quality of life. Multicenter studies including larger numbers of patients are recommended and under development.

  2. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy as Reirradiation for Locally Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Kwang-Won; Jang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Min-Sik; Sun, Dong-Il; Kim, Bum-Soo; Jung, So-Lyoung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Yoo, Eun-Jung; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Jang, Hong-Seok; Chung, Su-Mi; Kim, Yeon-Sil

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We report early preliminary experience with CyberKnife radiosurgery (RS) as salvage treatment for locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and August 2006, 36 patients (44 sites) were treated with CyberKnife RS as reirradiation for locally recurrent HNC. Treatment sites were as follows: nasopharynx (8), maxillary sinus (8), neck lymph nodes (8), skull base (7), nasal cavity (4), retropharyngeal lymph nodes (3), orbit (2), and others (4). Total doses administered were 18-40 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions to the 65%-85% isodose line for 3-5 consecutive days. Previous external radiation dose ranged from 39.6 to 134.4 Gy (median, 70.2 Gy). Gross tumor volume ranged from 0.2 to 114.9 cm{sup 3} (median, 22.6 cm{sup 3}). Median follow-up was 17.3 months. Results: Thirty-five of 44 sites were evaluated for response. Fifteen (42.9%) sites achieved complete response, 13 sites (37.1%) achieved a partial response, 3 (8.6%) sites maintained stable disease, and 4 sites (11.4%) showed tumor progression. Grade III acute complications were noted in 13 patients. Late complications were observed in three patients (1 bone necrosis, 2 soft tissue necrosis) during follow-up. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective treatment modality as a salvage treatment with good short-term local control. The early overall response rate is encouraging. However, more experience and a longer follow-up are necessary to determine the role of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery as a salvage treatment of locally recurrent HNC and to define long-term complications.

  3. Single Fraction Versus Fractionated Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannoma: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Collen, Christine; Ampe, Ben; Gevaert, Thierry; Moens, Maarten; Linthout, Nadine; De Ridder, Mark; Verellen, Dirk; D'Haens, Jean; Storme, Guy

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare outcomes for patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated in a single institution with linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred and nineteen patients (SRS = 78, SRT = 41) were treated. For both SRS and SRT, beam shaping is performed by a mini-multileaf collimator. For SRS, a median single dose of 12.5 Gy (range, 11-14 Gy), prescribed to the 80% isodose line encompassing the target, was applied. Of the 42 SRT treatments, 32 treatments consisted of 10 fractions of 3-4 Gy, and 10 patients received 25 sessions of 2 Gy, prescribed to the 100% with the 95% isodose line encompassing the planning target volume. Mean largest tumor diameter was 16.6 mm in the SRS and 24.6 mm in the SRT group. Local tumor control, cranial nerve toxicity, and preservation of useful hearing were recorded. Any new treatment-induced cranial nerve neuropathy was scored as a complication. Results: Median follow-up was 62 months (range, 6-136 months), 5 patients progressed, resulting in an overall 5-year local tumor control of 95%. The overall 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 88% and facial nerve neuropathy was statistically significantly higher after SRS, after prior surgery, for larger tumors, and in Koos Grade {>=}3. The overall 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability was 96%, not significantly influenced by any of the risk factors. The overall 4-year probability of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson score 1 or 2) was 68%, not significantly different between SRS or SRT (59% vs. 82%, p = 0.089, log rank). Conclusion: Linac-based RT results in good local control and acceptable clinical outcome in small to medium-sized vestibular schwannomas (VSs). Radiosurgery for large VSs (Koos Grade {>=}3) remains a challenge because of increased facial nerve neuropathy.

  4. Long-term results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy as third-line treatment in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Alpha M; Colin, Philippe; Litre, Claude F; Diallo, Mamadou M; Decoudier, Bénédicte; Bertoin, Florence; Higel, Brigitte; Patey, Martine; Rousseaux, Pascal; Delemer, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of acromegaly is based on surgery, drugs, and radiotherapy as a third-line option. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) is a new technique with a need for long-term evaluation. The purpose of the study was to evaluate long-term results of FSRT in acromegaly. Overall, 34 patients [sex ratio 1.12, age 45 (5-65) years] with a pituitary adenoma of 24.5 (9-76) mm including 20 invasive tumors were treated by radiotherapy in fractionated stereotactic conditions delivering 50 gy in 27 sessions. Baseline growth hormone (GH) and IGF1 levels were 18 (±14.5) and 632.6 (±339) µg/L, respectively. Indications of FSRT were failure of surgery and drug treatments (n = 30) or contraindication/refusal of surgery (n = 4). Hormonal control was defined by normal age- and sex-adjusted IGF1. Remission was defined by hormonal control after withdrawal of drugs for a minimum of three consecutive months. Data were analyzed in SPSS software with a significance level at p < 0.05. After a mean follow-up of 152 months, hormonal control was achieved in 33 patients (97 %) with withdrawal of drugs in 13 patients (38.2 %) without any recurrence. Factors found to be significantly associated to remission in a multivariate Cox regression were lower baseline hormone levels (GH and IGF1) and smaller tumor size. Tumor control was achieved in all patients. Acquired hypopituitarism after radiotherapy was the main side effect reported with a rate of 39 %. FSRT seems to be an effective and well tolerated third-line treatment of acromegaly, particularly adapted to macro adenomas treatment.

  5. Experience in fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy boost for newly diagnosed nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Tsai, S.-T.; Wang, M.-S.; Wu, Y.-H.; Hsueh, W.-T.; Yang, M.-W.; Yeh, I-C.; Lin, J.-C. . E-mail: jclin@vghtc.gov.tw

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is the most effective treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost for NPC. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with newly diagnosed, nonmetastatic NPC were treated with conventional radiotherapy 64.8-68.4 Gy followed by fractionated SBRT boost 12-15 Gy between January 2002 and July 2004. Most patients (72%) presented with Stage III-IV disease. Fifty-two patients also received cisplatin-based concurrent (38) or neoadjuvant (14) chemotherapy. The major endpoints were local control, overall survival, and complications. Results: All patients finished the planned dose of radiotherapy. After a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 22-54), 15 patients developed tumor recurrences-3 in the nasopharynx, 4 in the neck, 5 in distant sites, 1 in both nasopharynx and neck, 2 in the neck and a distant site. The 3-year actuarial rate of local control was 93.1%, regional control 91.4%, freedom from distant metastasis 90.3%, and overall survival 84.9%, respectively. There were no Grade 4 acute or chronic radiation-related complications. Conclusions: Fractionated SBRT boost for NPC is technically feasible and provides good local control without any severe complications.

  6. Preliminary Results of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy After Cyst Drainage for Craniopharyngioma in Adults

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesaka, Naoto; Mikami, Ryuji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Nogi, Sachika; Tajima, Yu; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Wada, Jun; Miki, Tamotsu; Haraoka, Jou; Okubo, Mitsuru; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for craniopharyngioma. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2005, 16 patients with craniopharyngioma were referred to Tokyo Medical University Hospital. They received FSRT alone after histologic confirmation by needle biopsy and underwent cyst drainage via endoscopy. The median prescription dose fraction was 30 Gy in six fractions. All patients except 1 were followed up until December 2009 or death. Results: The median follow-up period was 52 months (range, 4-117 months). Of the 17 patients, 3 experienced recurrence 4 to 71 months after FSRT. The 3-year local control rate was 82.4%. One patient died of thyroid cancer, and the 3-year survival rate was 94.1%. Eight patients had improved visual fields at a median of 2.5 months after FSRT, but hormonal functions did not improve in any patient. Conclusions: FSRT after cyst drainage seems to be safe and effective for patients with craniopharyngiomas, and it may be a safe alternative to surgery.

  7. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: A Study of 100 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Litre, Claude Fabien Colin, Philippe; Noudel, Remy; Peruzzi, Philippe; Bazin, Arnaud; Sherpereel, Bernard; Bernard, Marie Helene; Rousseaux, Pascal

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: We discuss our experiences with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2006, we monitored 100 patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus meningiomas; 84 female and 16 male patients were included. The mean patient age was 56 years. The most common symptoms were a reduction in visual acuity (57%), diplopia (50%), exophthalmy (30%), and trigeminal neuralgia (34%). Surgery was initially performed on 26 patients. All patients were treated with FSR. A total of 45 Gy was administered to the lesion, with 5 fractions of 1.8 Gy completed each week. Patient treatment was performed using a Varian Clinac linear accelerator used for cranial treatments and a micro-multileaf collimator. Results: No side effects were reported. Mean follow-up period was 33 months, with 20% of patients undergoing follow-up evaluation of more than 4 years later. The tumor control rate at 3 years was 94%. Three patients required microsurgical intervention because FSR proved ineffective. In terms of functional symptoms, an 81% improvement was observed in patients suffering from exophthalmy, with 46% of these patients being restored to full health. A 52% improvement was observed in diplopia, together with a 67% improvement in visual acuity and a 50% improvement in type V neuropathy. Conclusions: FSR facilitates tumor control, either as an initial treatment option or in combination with microsurgery. In addition to being a safe procedure with few side effects, FSR offers the significant benefit of superior functional outcomes.

  8. Planned Two-Fraction Proton Beam Stereotactic Radiosurgery for High-Risk Inoperable Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Chapman, Paul H.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Rowell, Alison; Daartz, Juliane; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patients with high-risk cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), based on eloquent brain location or large size, who underwent planned two-fraction proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2009, 59 patients with high-risk cerebral AVMs received two-fraction PSRS. Median nidus volume was 23 cc (range, 1.4-58.1 cc), 70% of cases had nidus volume {>=}14 cc, and 34% were in critical locations (brainstem, basal ganglia). Median AVM score based on age, AVM size, and location was 3.19 (range, 0.9-6.9). Many patients had prior surgery or embolization (40%) or prior PSRS (12%). The most common prescription was 16 Gy radiobiologic equivalent (RBE) in two fractions, prescribed to the 90% isodose. Results: At a median follow-up of 56.1 months, 9 patients (15%) had total and 20 patients (34%) had partial obliteration. Patients with total obliteration received higher total dose than those with partial or no obliteration (mean dose, 17.6 vs. 15.5 Gy (RBE), p = 0.01). Median time to total obliteration was 62 months (range, 23-109 months), and 5-year actuarial rate of partial or total obliteration was 33%. Five-year actuarial rate of hemorrhage was 22% (95% confidence interval, 12.5%-36.8%) and 14% (n = 8) suffered fatal hemorrhage. Lesions with higher AVM scores were more likely to hemorrhage (p = 0.024) and less responsive to radiation (p = 0.026). The most common complication was Grade 1 headache acutely (14%) and long term (12%). One patient developed a Grade 2 generalized seizure disorder, and two had mild neurologic deficits. Conclusions: High-risk AVMs can be safely treated with two-fraction PSRS, although total obliteration rate is low and patients remain at risk for future hemorrhage. Future studies should include higher doses or a multistaged PSRS approach for lesions more resistant to obliteration with radiation.

  9. Radiobiology of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: what are the optimal fractionation schedules?

    PubMed Central

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Miyakawa, Akifumi; Otsuka, Shinya; Iwata, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    In hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), high doses per fraction are usually used and the dose delivery pattern is different from that of conventional radiation. The daily dose is usually given intermittently over a longer time compared with conventional radiotherapy. During prolonged radiation delivery, sublethal damage repair takes place, leading to the decreased effect of radiation. In in vivo tumors, however, this decrease in effect may be counterbalanced by rapid reoxygenation. Another issue related to hypofractionated SRT is the mathematical model for dose evaluation and conversion. The linear–quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) have been suggested to be incorrect when used for hypofractionation. The LQ model overestimates the effect of high fractional doses of radiation. BED is particularly incorrect when used for tumor responses in vivo, since it does not take reoxygenation into account. Correction of the errors, estimated at 5–20%, associated with the use of BED is necessary when it is used for SRT. High fractional doses have been reported to exhibit effects against tumor vasculature and enhance host immunity, leading to increased antitumor effects. This may be an interesting topic that should be further investigated. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is more problematic in hypofractionated SRT, so trials of hypoxia-targeted agents are encouraged in the future. In this review, the radiobiological characteristics of hypofractionated SRT are summarized, and based on the considerations, we would like to recommend 60 Gy in eight fractions delivered three times a week for lung tumors larger than 2 cm in diameter. PMID:27006380

  10. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables

    PubMed Central

    Ayan, Ahmet S.; Mo, Xiaokui; Williams, Terence M.; Mayr, Nina A.; Grecula, John C.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Xu-Welliver, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning. Methods and Materials Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules) treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45–54 Gy in 3–5 fractions) in the year of 2011–2012. Spearman's (ρ) correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR) and q-values were reported. Results All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV) for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029). The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV) as well as internal target volumes (ITV) (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively) and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID) in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049). The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122). Conclusions We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID), and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained

  11. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Neil M.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Kim, Yongbok; Xia Ping

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12-55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3-9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain than

  12. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Reirradiation of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Keith R.; Lominska, Christopher E.; Deeken, John F.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an appealing treatment option after previous radiotherapy because of its precision, conformality, and reduced treatment duration. We report our experience with reirradiation using fractionated SRS for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2008, 65 patients received SRS to the oropharynx (n = 13), hypopharynx (n = 8), nasopharynx (n = 7), paranasal sinus (n = 7), neck (n = 7), and other sites (n = 23). Thirty-eight patients were treated definitively and 27 patients with metastatic disease and/or untreated local disease were treated palliatively. Nine patients underwent complete macroscopic resection before SRS. Thirty-three patients received concurrent chemoradiation. The median initial radiation dose was 67 Gy, and the median reirradiation SRS dose was 30 Gy (21-35 Gy) in 2-5 fractions. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 16 months. Fifty-six patients were evaluable for response: 30 (54%) had complete, 15 (27%) had partial, and 11 (20%) had no response. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 12 months. For definitively treated patients, the 2-year OS and locoregional control (LRC) rates were 41% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that higher total dose, surgical resection, and nasopharynx site were significantly associated with improved LRC; surgical resection and nonsquamous histology were associated with improved OS. Seven patients (11%) experienced severe reirradiation-related toxicity, including one treatment-attributed death. Conclusion: SRS reirradiation for head-and-neck cancer is feasible. This study demonstrates encouraging response rates with acceptable toxicity. Fractionated SRS reirradiation with concurrent chemotherapy in select patients warrants further study.

  13. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  14. Real-time 3D-surface-guided head refixation useful for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong; Liu Dezhi; Yin Gongjie; Zhuang Ping; Geng, Jason

    2006-02-15

    Accurate and precise head refixation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has been achieved through alignment of real-time 3D-surface images with a reference surface image. The reference surface image is either a 3D optical surface image taken at simulation with the desired treatment position, or a CT/MRI-surface rendering in the treatment plan with corrections for patient motion during CT/MRI scans and partial volume effects. The real-time 3D surface images are rapidly captured by using a 3D video camera mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. Any facial expression such as mouth opening that affects surface shape and location can be avoided using a new facial monitoring technique. The image artifacts on the real-time surface can generally be removed by setting a threshold of jumps at the neighboring points while preserving detailed features of the surface of interest. Such a real-time surface image, registered in the treatment machine coordinate system, provides a reliable representation of the patient head position during the treatment. A fast automatic alignment between the real-time surface and the reference surface using a modified iterative-closest-point method leads to an efficient and robust surface-guided target refixation. Experimental and clinical results demonstrate the excellent efficacy of <2 min set-up time, the desired accuracy and precision of <1 mm in isocenter shifts, and <1 deg. in rotation.

  15. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy boost for gynecologic tumors: An alternative to brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Molla, Meritxell; Escude, Lluis D.; Nouet, Philippe; Popowski, Youri D.Sc.; Hidalgo, Alberto; Rouzaud, Michel; Linero, Dolores; Miralbell, Raymond . E-mail: Raymond.Miralbell@hcuge.ch

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: A brachytherapy (BT) boost to the vaginal vault is considered standard treatment for many endometrial or cervical cancers. We aimed to challenge this treatment standard by using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a linac-based micromultileaf collimator technique. Methods and Materials: Since January 2002, 16 patients with either endometrial (9) or cervical (7) cancer have been treated with a final boost to the areas at higher risk for relapse. In 14 patients, the target volume included the vaginal vault, the upper vagina, the parametria, or (if not operated) the uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]). In 2 patients with local relapse, the CTV was the tumor in the vaginal stump. Margins of 6-10 mm were added to the CTV to define the planning target volume (PTV). Hypofractionated dynamic-arc or intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques were used. Postoperative treatment was delivered in 12 patients (2 x 7 Gy to the PTV with a 4-7-day interval between fractions). In the 4 nonoperated patients, a dose of 4 Gy/fraction in 5 fractions with 2 to 3 days' interval was delivered. Patients were immobilized in a customized vacuum body cast and optimally repositioned with an infrared-guided system developed for extracranial SRT. To further optimize daily repositioning and target immobilization, an inflated rectal balloon was used during each treatment fraction. In 10 patients, CT resimulation was performed before the last boost fraction to assess for repositioning reproducibility via CT-to-CT registration and to estimate PTV safety margins around the CTV. Finally, a comparative treatment planning study between BT and SRT was performed in 2 patients with an operated endometrial Stage I cancer. Results: No patient developed severe acute urinary or low-intestinal toxicity. No patient developed urinary late effects (>6 months). One patient with a vaginal relapse previously irradiated to the pelvic region presented with Grade 3 rectal bleeding 18 months after retreatment

  16. Comparison of linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and tomotherapy treatment plans for intra-cranial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Bo Shim; Suk, Lee; Sam, Ju Cho; Sang, Hoon Lee; Juree, Kim; Kwang, Hwan Cho; Chul, Kee Min; Hyun Do, Huh; Rena, Lee; Dae, Sik Yang; Young, Je Park; Won, Seob Yoon; Chul, Yong Kim; Soo, Il Kwon

    2010-11-01

    This study compares and analyzes stereotactic radiotherapy using tomotherapy and linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of intra-cranial tumors, according to some cases. In this study, linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and tomotherapy treatment were administered to five patients diagnosed with intra-cranial cancer in which the dose of 18-20 Gy was applied on 3-5 separate occasions. The tumor dosing was decided by evaluating the inhomogeneous index (II) and conformity index (CI). Also, the radiation-sensitive tissue was evaluated using low dose factors V1, V2, V3, V4, V5, and V10, as well as the non-irradiation ratio volume (NIV). The values of the II for each prescription dose in the linac-based non-coplanar radiotherapy plan and tomotherapy treatment plan were (0.125±0.113) and (0.090±0.180), respectively, and the values of the CI were (0.899±0.149) and (0.917±0.114), respectively. The low dose areas, V1, V2, V3, V4, V5, and V10, in radiation-sensitive tissues in the linac-based non-coplanar radiotherapy plan fell into the ranges 0.3%-95.6%, 0.1%-87.6%, 0.1%-78.8%, 38.8%-69.9%, 26.6%-65.2%, and 4.2%-39.7%, respectively, and the tomotherapy treatment plan had ranges of 13.6%-100%, 3.5%-100%, 0.4%-94.9%, 0.2%-82.2%, 0.1%-78.5%, and 0.3%-46.3%, respectively. Regarding the NIV for each organ, it is possible to obtain similar values except for the irradiation area of the brain stem. The percentages of NIV 10%, NIV20%, and NIV30%for the brain stem in each patient were 15%-99.8%, 33.4%-100%, and 39.8%-100%, respectively, in the fractionated stereotactic treatment plan and 44.2%-96.5%, 77.7%-99.8%, and 87.8%-100%, respectively, in the tomotherapy treatment plan. In order to achieve higher-quality treatment of intra-cranial tumors, treatment plans should be tailored according to the isodose target volume, inhomogeneous index, conformity index, position of the tumor upon fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery, and radiation

  17. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade {>=}3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher's exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade {>=}3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm{sup 3} (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm{sup 3} (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm{sup 3} (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm{sup 3}. One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade {>=}4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade {>=}3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation

  18. Intensity modulated radiation therapy or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for infratentorial ependymoma in children: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Weber, Damien C; Zilli, Thomas; Do, Hans Peter; Nouet, Philippe; Gumy Pause, Fabienne; Pause, Fabienne Gumy; Pica, Alessia

    2011-04-01

    This study was to evaluate the treatment dosimetry, efficacy and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of infratentorial ependymoma. Between 1999 and 2007, seven children (median age, 3.1 years) with infratentorial ependymoma were planned with either IMRT (3 patients) or SFRT (4 patients), the latter after conventional posterior fossa irradiation. Two children underwent gross total resection. Median prescribed dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 55.8-60). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 4.8 years (range, 1.3-8). IMRT (median dose, 59.4 Gy) and FSRT (median dose, 55.8 Gy) achieved similar optimal target coverage. Percentages of maximum doses delivered to the cochleae (59.5 vs 85.0% Gy; P = 0.05) were significantly inferior with IMRT, when compared to FSRT planning. Percentages of maximum doses administered to the pituitary gland (38.2 vs 20.1%; P = 0.05) and optic chiasm (38.1 vs 14.1%; P = 0.001) were, however, significantly higher with IMRT, when compared to FSRT planning. No recurrences were observed at the last follow-up. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 87.5 and 100%, respectively. No grade >1 acute toxicity was observed. Two patients presented late adverse events (grade 2 hypoacousia) during follow-up, without cognitive impairment. IMRT or FSRT for infratentorial ependymomas is effective and associated with a tolerable toxicity level. Both treatment techniques were able to capitalize their intrinsic conformal ability to deliver high-dose radiation. Larger series of patients treated with these two modalities will be necessary to more fully evaluate these delivery techniques.

  19. SU-F-BRF-12: Investigating Dosimetric Effects of Inter-Fraction Deformation in Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Yan, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We studied dosimetric effects of inter-fraction deformation in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), in order to investigate the necessity of adaptive re-planning for lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Six lung cancer patients with different treatment fractions were retrospectively investigated. All the patients were immobilized and localized with a stereotactic body frame and were treated under cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance at each fraction. We calculated the actual delivered dose of the treatment plan using the up-to-date patient geometry of each fraction, and compared the dose with the intended plan dose to investigate the dosimetric effects of the inter-fraction deformation. Deformable registration was carried out between the treatment planning CT and the CBCT of each fraction to obtain deformed planning CT for more accurate dose calculations of the delivered dose. The extent of the inter-fraction deformation was also evaluated by calculating the dice similarity coefficient between the delineated structures on the planning CT and those on the deformed planning CT. Results: The average dice coefficients for PTV, spinal cord, esophagus were 0.87, 0.83 and 0.69, respectively. The volume of PTV covered by prescription dose was decreased by 23.78% on average for all fractions and all patients. For spinal cord and esophagus, the volumes covered by the constraint dose were increased by 4.57% and 3.83%. The maximum dose was also increased by 4.11% for spinal cord and 4.29% for esophagus. Conclusion: Due to inter-fraction deformation, large deterioration was found in both PTV coverage and OAR sparing, which demonstrated the needs for adaptive re-planning of lung SBRT cases to improve target coverage while reducing radiation dose to nearby normal tissues.

  20. Report on a randomized trial comparing two forms of immobilization of the head for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Greg; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Downes, Beverly; Bogner, Joachim; Hyslop, Terry; Galvin, James; Evans, James; Curran, Walter Jr.; Andrews, David

    2009-01-15

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires accurate and reproducible immobilization of the patient's head. This randomized study compared the efficacy of two commonly used forms of immobilization used for SRT. Two routinely used methods of immobilization, which differ in their approach to reproduce the head position from day to day, are the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame and the BrainLab thermoplastic mask. The GTC frame fixates on the patient's upper dentition and thus is in direct mechanical contact with the cranium. The BrainLab mask is a two-part masking system custom fitted to the front and back of the patient's head. After patients signed an IRB-approved informed consent form, eligible patients were randomized to either GTC frame or mask for their course of SRT. Patients were treated as per standard procedure; however, prior to each treatment a set of digital kilovolt images (ExacTrac, BrainLabAB, Germany) was taken. These images were fused with reference digitally reconstructed radiographs obtained from treatment planning CT to yield lateral, longitudinal, and vertical deviations of isocenter and head rotations about respective axes. The primary end point of the study was to compare the two systems with respect to mean and standard deviations using the distance to isocenter measure. A total of 84 patients were enrolled (69 patients evaluable with detailed positioning data). A mixed-effect linear regression and two-tiled t test were used to compare the distance measure for both the systems. There was a statistically significant (p<0.001) difference between mean distances for these systems, suggesting that the GTC frame was more accurate. The mean 3D displacement and standard deviations were 3.17+1.95 mm for mask and 2.00+1.04 mm for frame. Both immobilization techniques were highly effective, but the GTC frame was more accurate. To optimize the accuracy of SRT, daily kilovolt image guidance is recommended with either immobilization system.

  1. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma: Long-term experience and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie . E-mail: stefanie_milker-zabel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Zabel, Angelika; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze our long-term experience and prognostic factors after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with benign or atypical intracranial meningioma. Methods and materials: Between January 1985 and December 2001, 317 patients with a median age of 55.7 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. The tumor distribution was World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 in 48.3%, WHO Grade 2 in 8.2%, and unknown in 43.5%. Of the 317 patients, 97 underwent RT as their primary treatment, 79 underwent postoperative RT (subtotal resection in 38 and biopsy only in 41), and 141 were treated for recurrent disease. The median target volume was 33.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.0-412.6 cm{sup 3}). The median total dose was 57.6 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction five times weekly. Results: The median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 1.2-14.3 years). The overall local tumor control rate was 93.1% (295 of 317). Of the 317 patients, 72 had a partial response on CT/MRI and 223 (70.4%) remained stable. At a median of 4.5 years after FSRT, 22 patients (6.9%) had local tumor progression on MRI. Local tumor failure was significantly greater in patients with WHO Grade 2 meningioma (p < 0.002) than in patients with WHO Grade 1 or unknown histologic features. Patients treated for recurrent meningioma showed a trend toward decreased progression-free survival compared with patients treated with primary therapy, after biopsy, or after subtotal resection (p < 0.06). Patients with a tumor volume >60 cm{sup 3} had a recurrence rate of 15.5% vs. 4.3% for those with a tumor volume of {<=}60 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001). In 42.9% of the patients, preexisting neurologic deficits improved. Worsening of preexisting neurologic symptoms occurred in 8.2%. Eight patients developed new clinical symptoms, such as reduced vision, trigeminal neuralgia, and intermittent tinnitus located at the side of the irradiated meningioma after FSRT. Conclusion: These data have demonstrated that FSRT is an

  2. SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, M; Maurer, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for optic nerve tumors can potentially use planning target volume (PTV) expansions as small as 1–5 mm. However, the motion of the intraorbital segment of the optic nerve has not been studied. Methods: A subject with a right optic nerve sheath meningioma underwent CT simulation in three fixed gaze positions: right, left, and fixed forward at a marker. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs-at-risk (OAR) were contoured on all three scans. An IMRT plan using 10 static non-coplanar fields to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions was designed to treat the fixed-forward gazing GTV with a 1 mm PTV, then resulting coverage was evaluated for the GTV in the three positions. As an alternative, the composite structures were computed to generate the internal target volume (ITV), 1 mm expansion free-gazing PTV, and planning organat-risk volumes (PRVs) for free-gazing treatment. A comparable IMRT plan was created for the free-gazing PTV. Results: If the patient were treated using the fixed forward gaze plan looking straight, right, and left, the V100% for the GTV was 100.0%, 33.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. The volumes of the PTVs for fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.79 and 2.21 cc, respectively, increasing the PTV by a factor of 2.6. The V100% for the fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.85 cc and 2.8 cc, respectively increasing the treated volume by a factor of 3.3. Conclusion: Fixed gaze treatment appears to provide greater organ sparing than free-gazing. However unanticipated intrafraction right or left gaze can produce a geometric miss. Further study of optic nerve motion appears to be warranted in areas such as intrafraction optical confirmation of fixed gaze and optimized gaze directions to minimize lens and other normal organ dose in cranial radiotherapy.

  3. Single-Fraction Proton Beam Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.; Chapman, Paul H.; Kim, Daniel; Niemierko, Andrzej; Bussière, Marc R.; Stringham, Alison; Daartz, Juliane; Ogilvy, Christopher; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To evaluate the obliteration rate and potential adverse effects of single-fraction proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS) in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2010, 248 consecutive patients with 254 cerebral AVMs received single-fraction PSRS at our institution. The median AVM nidus volume was 3.5 cc (range, 0.1-28.1 cc), 23% of AVMs were in critical/deep locations (basal ganglia, thalamus, or brainstem), and the most common prescription dose was 15 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to assess factors associated with obliteration and hemorrhage. Results: At a median follow-up time of 35 months (range, 6-198 months), 64.6% of AVMs were obliterated. The median time to total obliteration was 31 months (range, 6-127 months), and the 5-year and 10-year cumulative incidence of total obliteration was 70% and 91%, respectively. On univariable analysis, smaller target volume (hazard ratio [HR] 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.86-0.93, P<.0001), smaller treatment volume (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.90-0.96, P<.0001), higher prescription dose (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07-1.26, P=.001), and higher maximum dose (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.05-1.23, P=.002) were associated with total obliteration. Deep/critical location was also associated with decreased likelihood of obliteration (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-0.98, P=.04). On multivariable analysis, critical location (adjusted HR [AHR] 0.42, 95% CI 0.27-0.65, P<.001) and smaller target volume (AHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97, P=.02) remained associated with total obliteration. Posttreatment hemorrhage occurred in 13 cases (5-year cumulative incidence of 7%), all among patients with less than total obliteration, and 3 of these events were fatal. The most common complication was seizure, controlled with medications, both acutely (8%) and in the long term (9.1%). Conclusions: The current series is the largest

  4. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy and LINAC Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma-Report About Both Stereotactic Methods From a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Christine; Fauser, Claudius; Mueller, Axel; Astner, Sabrina T.; Jacob, Vesna; Lumenta, Christianto; Meyer, Bernhard; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFR) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in a group of patients treated at the same institution. Methods and Materials: Between May 1997 and June 2007, 115 consecutive cases of VS were treated in our department. The SFR group (47 patients), including larger tumors (maximum diameter >1.5 cm), received a total dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The RS group (68 patients, maximum diameter <1.5 cm) received a total dose of 12 Gy at the 100% isodose. Evaluation included serial imaging tests (magnetic resonance imaging) and neurologic and functional hearing examinations. Results: The tumor control rate was 97.9% in the SFR group for a mean follow-up time of 32.1 months and 98.5% in the RS group for a mean follow-up time of 30.1 months. Hearing function was preserved after RS in 85% of the patients and after SFR in 79%. Facial and trigeminal nerve function remained mostly unaffected after SFR. After RS, new trigeminal neuropathy occurred in 9 of 68 patients (13%). Conclusions: A high tumor control rate and low number of side effects are registered after SFR and RS of VS. These results confirm that considering tumor diameter, both RS and SFR are good treatment modalities for VS.

  5. Re-irradiation with hypo-fractionated stereotactic robotic radiotherapy for salvage in adult patients with brainstem glioma

    PubMed Central

    Susheela, Sridhar P; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Muzumder, Sandeep; Mallarajapatna, Govindarajan; Kallur, Kumar; Basavalingaiah, Ajaikumar S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Brainstem glioma (BSG) is often treated with definitive irradiation. However, subsequent progression and death occur as a rule rather than the exception, after varying periods of control. The outlook of patients with post-irradiation progression is dismal, and most of these patients are treated with supportive care alone. Despite the obvious risks with an area as critical as the brainstem, it is a possibility to encounter situations wherein the patients (themselves or their associates) ask for re-irradiation, with the hope of a few extra months of life. The risk of radiation-induced brainstem toxicity may be justifiable under the strict assumption that the patients stand a chance of benefiting from re-irradiation but still may not live long enough to manifest brainstem toxicity. Methods Five adult BSG patients were treated with re-irradiation using robotic-arm stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) between September 2009 and July 2012, primarily at the request of the concerned patient parties. Re-irradiation doses ranged from 16 to 25 Gray (Gy) delivered by robotic arm stereotactic irradiation in 2–5 fractions. Results Four out of five patients enjoyed a prolongation of survival in the order of months (three, five, six, and 14 months), which was very significant given that all patients had severe neurological compromise and poor performance status prior to re-irradiation. One patient has survived 36 months after re-irradiation and thus has lived long enough to manifest late radiation-induced brainstem toxicity. Conclusion Despite the obvious risks of brainstem toxicity associated with the use of re-irradiation for BSG, the use of fractionated stereotactic re-irradiation seems to offers prospects of additional periods of local control and augments duration of life. PMID:24171050

  6. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of <=13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (<=13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of <=13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of <=13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  7. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Primary Kidney Cancer: A 3-Dimensional Conformal Technique Associated With Low Rates of Early Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Thompson, Ann; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Kolsky, Michal Schneider; Devereux, Thomas; Lim, Andrew; Siva, Shankar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe our 3-dimensional conformal planning approaches and report early toxicities with stereotactic body radiation therapy for the management of primary renal cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of a phase 1 trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary inoperable renal cell carcinoma. A dose of 42 Gy/3 fractions was prescribed to targets ≥5 cm, whereas for <5 cm 26 Gy/1 fraction was used. All patients underwent a planning 4-dimensional CT to generate a planning target volume (PTV) from a 5-mm isotropic expansion of the internal target volume. Planning required a minimum of 8 fields prescribing to the minimum isodose surrounding the PTV. Intermediate dose spillage at 50% of the prescription dose (R50%) was measured to describe the dose gradient. Early toxicity (<6 months) was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (v4.0). Results: From July 2012 to August 2013 a total of 20 patients (median age, 77 years) were recruited into a prospective clinical trial. Eleven patients underwent fractionated treatment and 9 patients a single fraction. For PTV targets <100 cm{sup 3} the median number of beams used was 8 (2 noncoplanar) to achieve an average R50% of 3.7. For PTV targets >100 cm{sup 3} the median beam number used was 10 (4 noncoplanar) for an average R50% value of 4.3. The R50% was inversely proportional to decreasing PTV volume (r=−0.62, P=.003) and increasing total beams used (r=−0.51, P=.022). Twelve of 20 patients (60%) suffered grade ≤2 early toxicity, whereas 8 of 20 patients (40%) were asymptomatic. Nausea, chest wall pain, and fatigue were the most common toxicities reported. Conclusion: A 3-dimensional conformal planning technique of 8-10 beams can be used to deliver highly tolerable stereotactic ablation to primary kidney targets with minimal early toxicities. Ongoing follow-up is currently in place to assess long-term toxicities and cancer control.

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for the treatment of medically inoperable primary renal cell carcinoma: Current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Swaminath, Anand; Chu, William

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is steadily rising due to an aging population and more frequent imaging of the abdomen for other medical conditions. While surgery remains the standard of care treatment for localized disease, many patients are unfit due to their advanced age and medical comorbidities. In these patients, an active surveillance strategy or ablative therapies, including radiofrequency/microwave ablation or cryotherapy, can be offered. Such options have limitations particularly with fast growing, or larger tumors. A promising ablative therapy option to consider is stereo-tactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). SBRT refers to high dose, focally ablative radiation delivered in a short time (3–5 fractions), and is safe and effective in many other cancer sites, including lung, liver and spine. SBRT offers potential advantages in the primary kidney cancer setting due to its ablative dosing (overcoming the notion of “radio-resistance”), short treatment duration (important in an elderly population), low toxicity profile (enabling SBRT to treat larger RCCs than other ablative modalities), and non-invasiveness. To date, there is limited long-term prospective data on the outcomes of SBRT in primary RCC. However, early evidence is intriguing with respect to excellent local control and low toxicity; however, most studies vary in terms of technique and radiation dosing used. Well-designed prospective cohort studies with clearly defined and standardized techniques, dosing, follow-up, and integration of quality of life outcomes will be essential to further establish the role of SBRT in management of inoperable, localized RCC. PMID:26316914

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of VMAT and helical tomotherapy dose distributions for lung stereotactic treatments with intra-fraction motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belec, J.; Clark, B. G.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to calculate realistic dose distributions that include the continuous deformation of organs and continuous motion of machine using 4D Monte Carlo methods for both volumetric modulated arc therapy and helical tomotherapy treatments. As part of a previous study, we presented a method to perform position-probability-sampled Monte Carlo dose calculations in the BEAMnrc and DOSXZYnrc user codes of EGSnrc. In this study, the DOSXYZnrc user code was further modified to account for the continuous intra-fraction deformation of the patient geometry. We implemented in the user code a method to update the transport grid densities as a function of time and map the energy deposited in the time dependent transport grid back to a reference grid. We provide information on the measurements performed to validate the implementation of this method and present an example of the application of the method for lung stereotactic treatments with intra-fraction motion. The results show that breathing motion is properly addressed with the internal target volume method for the cases studied.

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors: From technological evolution to improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Méndez Romero, Alejandra; de Man, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Technical developments allowed stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to deliver effective doses of irradiation with high precision in a small number of fractions. This paper reviews the role of SBRT for liver metastases, hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma, paying special attention to patient eligibility and treatment outcomes regarding local control, toxicity and quality of life. As well as discussing specific issues of these different tumors, such as the presence of underlying liver cirrhosis and the impact on toxicity, it outlines the limitations of SBRT and future areas of development and research. PMID:27644908

  11. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: A method to evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties using radiochromic films

    SciTech Connect

    Coscia, Gianluca; Vaccara, Elena; Corvisiero, Roberta; Cavazzani, Paolo; Ruggieri, Filippo Grillo; Taccini, Gianni

    2009-07-15

    In the authors' hospital, stereotactic radiotherapy treatments are performed with a Varian Clinac 600C equipped with a BrainLAB m3 micro-multileaf-collimator generally using the dynamic conformal arc technique. Patient immobilization during the treatment is achieved with a fixation mask supplied by BrainLAB, made with two reinforced thermoplastic sheets fitting the patient's head. With this work the authors propose a method to evaluate treatment geometric accuracy and, consequently, to determine the amount of the margin to keep in the CTV-PTV expansion during the treatment planning. The reproducibility of the isocenter position was tested by simulating a complete treatment on the anthropomorphic phantom Alderson Rando, inserting in between two phantom slices a high sensitivity Gafchromic EBT film, properly prepared and calibrated, and repeating several treatment sessions, each time removing the fixing mask and replacing the film inside the phantom. The comparison between the dose distributions measured on films and computed by TPS, after a precise image registration procedure performed by a commercial piece of software (FILMQA, 3cognition LLC (Division of ISP), Wayne, NJ), allowed the authors to measure the repositioning errors, obtaining about 0.5 mm in case of central spherical PTV and about 1.5 mm in case of peripheral irregular PTV. Moreover, an evaluation of the errors in the registration procedure was performed, giving negligible values with respect to the quantities to be measured. The above intrinsic two-dimensional estimate of treatment accuracy has to be increased for the error in the third dimension, but the 2 mm margin the authors generally use for the CTV-PTV expansion seems adequate anyway. Using the same EBT films, a dosimetric verification of the treatment planning system was done. Measured dose values are larger or smaller than the nominal ones depending on geometric irradiation conditions, but, in the authors' experimental conditions, always

  12. Fractionated Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2016-01-01

    An 18-year-old left-handed male harbored intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) underwent fractionated gamma knife surgery (GKS) instead of open surgery, considering the mental retardation and diffuse cerebral dysfunction. GKS treatment parameters were: target volume, 8.8 cm3; total marginal dose, 24 Gy in 3 fractionations at the 50% isodose line. The patient has been free from seizures since 9 months after GKS, with notable improvement in cognitive outcome. Fractionated GKS could be considered as a safe tool for seizure control and neuropsychological improvement in patients with MTLE. PMID:27122996

  13. Measurement of repositioning accuracy during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial tumors using noninvasive fixation of BrainLAB radiotherapy equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Takeo . E-mail: taketaka@saitama-med.ac.jp; Nishimura, Keiichiro; Hondo, Mikito; Okada, Takenori; Osada, Hisato; Honda, Norinari

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: A noninvasive fixation mask device is used for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in our hospital. Fractionated SRT is useful because it results in less damage to normal tissues, for which the positioning accuracy of the removable noninvasive fixation device is important. We examined the repositioning accuracy of a BrainLAB removable noninvasive fixation device on the coordinates of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 13 patients who had undergone head SRT. The removable noninvasive fixation mask device used was a noninvasive fixation device for the BrainLAB system. The accuracy of the irradiation apparatus was evaluated using Winston-Lutz test film, and the repositioning accuracy of the fixation device was examined using differences in the distance on the X, Y, and Z coordinates between the treatment planning and repositioning times determined by comparing the relative coordinates. The evaluation was performed using the relative coordinates of the standard and test points. Results: The accuracy of the irradiation center with the apparatus was within 0.5 mm. In the 13 patients, the difference in the distance between the treatment planning and repositioning procedures ranged from 0.1 to 2.080 mm, and an accuracy of within 2 mm was obtained in 84.6% of the patients using the fixation device. Conclusion: The BrainLAB noninvasive SRT fixation device was considered useful for routine treatment with high accuracy.

  14. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  15. Outcomes and Toxicity for Hypofractionated and Single-Fraction Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Sarcomas Metastasizing to the Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Folkert, Michael R.; Bilsky, Mark H.; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Oh, Jung Hun; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Laufer, Ilya; Tap, William D.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation treatment (20-40 Gy in 5-20 fractions, 2-5 Gy per fraction) for sarcoma metastatic to the spine provides subtherapeutic doses, resulting in poor durable local control (LC) (50%-77% at 1 year). Hypofractionated (HF) and/or single-fraction (SF) image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (IG-SRS) may provide a more effective means of managing these lesions. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven high-grade sarcoma metastatic to the spine treated with HF and SF IG-SRS were included. LC and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the use of Kaplan-Meier statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the use of Cox regression with competing-risks analysis; all confidence intervals are 95%. Toxicities were assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: From May 2005 to November 11, 2012, 88 patients with 120 discrete metastases received HF (3-6 fractions; median dose, 28.5 Gy; n=52, 43.3%) or SF IG-SRS (median dose, 24 Gy; n=68, 56.7%). The median follow-up time was 12.3 months. At 12 months, LC was 87.9% (confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-94.5%), OS was 60.6% (CI, 49.6%-71.6%), and median survival was 16.9 months. SF IG-SRS demonstrated superior LC to HF IG-SRS (12-month LC of 90.8% [CI, 83%-98.6%] vs 84.1% [CI, 72.9%-95.3%] P=.007) and retained significance on multivariate analysis (P=.030, hazard ratio 0.345; CI, 0.132-0.901]. Treatment was well tolerated, with 1% acute grade 3 toxicity, 4.5% chronic grade 3 toxicity, and no grade >3 toxicities. Conclusions: In the largest series of metastatic sarcoma to the spine to date, IG-SRS provides excellent LC in the setting of an aggressive disease with low radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis. Single-fraction IG-SRS is associated with the highest rates of LC with minimal toxicity.

  16. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy plus bevacizumab after response to bevacizumab plus irinotecan as a rescue treatment for high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Moreno, Antonio José; García-Gómez, Raquel; Albert-Antequera, María; Almendros-Blanco, Piedad; De Las Peñas-Bataller, Ramón; González-Vidal, Verónica; López-Torrecilla, José Luis; Ferrer-Albiach, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the possibility of implementing a new scheme of rescue treatment after relapse or progression of high-grade glioma (HGG) treated at the first-line with bevacizumab and irinotecan (BVZ+CPT11), evaluating the response and toxicity of associating BVZ and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (BVZ+FSRT). Materials and methods We retrospectively analysed data from 59 patients with relapse of HGG. Nine patients with HGG relapse after treatment using the Stupp protocol that were treated with BVZ+CPT11 for progression between July 2007 and August 2012, after which the response was assessed according to the Revised Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria. BVZ was administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg and FSRT up to a prescribed dose of 30 Gy, 500 cGy per fraction, three days a week. The median follow-up was 38 months. Results The treatment was well-tolerated by all patients. The response after nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3–6 months was progression in two patients, stable disease in four, and three patients had a partial response. The median overall survival (OS) from diagnosis until death or the last control was 36.8 months. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10.8 months. The results from tumour sub-group analysis indicated that the PFS was not statistically significant although it seemed that it was higher in grade-III. The OS was higher in grade-III gliomas. Conclusions The combination of BVZ+FSRT as a second-line HGG relapse rescue treatment is well-tolerated and seems to offer promising results. We believe that multi-centre prospective studies are needed to determine the long-term efficacy and toxicity of this therapeutic approach. PMID:25949228

  17. Outcomes of Risk-Adapted Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J. Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, S.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: High local control rates can be achieved using stereotactic radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but reports have suggested that toxicity may be of concern. We evaluated early clinical outcomes of 'risk-adapted' fractionation schemes in patients treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: Of 206 patients with Stage I NSCLC, 81% were unfit to undergo surgery and the rest refused surgery. Pathologic confirmation of malignancy was obtained in 31% of patients. All other patients had new or growing 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography positive lesions with radiologic characteristics of malignancy. Planning four-dimensional computed tomography scans were performed and fractionation schemes used (3 x 20 Gy, 5 x 12 Gy, and 8 x 7.5 Gy) were determined by T stage and risk of normal tissue toxicity. Results: Median overall survival was 34 months, with 1- and 2-year survivals of 81% and 64%, respectively. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 1 and 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively, and DFS correlated with T stage (p = 0.002). Local failure was observed in 7 patients (3%). The crude regional failure rate was 9%; isolated regional recurrence was observed in 4%. The distant progression-free survival at 1 and 2 years was 85% and 77%, respectively. SRT was well tolerated and severe late toxicity was observed in less than 3% of patients. Conclusions: SRT is well tolerated in patients with extensive comorbidity with high local control rates and minimal toxicity. Early outcomes are not inferior to those reported for conventional radiotherapy. In view of patient convenience, such risk-adapted SRT schedules should be considered treatment of choice in patients presenting with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC.

  18. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  19. Long-Term Outcomes of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Pituitary Adenomas at the BC Cancer Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Julian O.; Ma, Roy; Akagami, Ryojo; McKenzie, Michael; Johnson, Michelle; Gete, Ermias; Nichol, Alan

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term disease control and toxicity outcomes of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with pituitary adenomas treated at the BC Cancer Agency. Methods and Materials: To ensure a minimum of 5 years of clinical follow-up, this study identified a cohort of 76 patients treated consecutively with FSRT between 1998 and 2007 for pituitary adenomas: 71% (54/76) had nonfunctioning and 29% (22/76) had functioning adenomas (15 adrenocorticotrophic hormone-secreting, 5 growth hormone-secreting, and 2 prolactin-secreting). Surgery was used before FSRT in 96% (73/76) of patients. A median isocenter dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered in 28 fractions, with 100% of the planning target volume covered by the 90% isodose. Patients were followed up clinically by endocrinologists, ophthalmologists, and radiation oncologists. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess tumor response. Results: With a median follow-up time of 6.8 years (range, 0.6 - 13.1 years), the 7-year progression-free survival was 97.1% and disease-specific survival was 100%. Of the 2 patients with tumor progression, both had disease control after salvage surgery. Of the 22 patients with functioning adenomas, 50% (11/22) had complete and 9% (2/22) had partial responses after FSRT. Of the patients with normal pituitary function at baseline, 48% (14/29) experienced 1 or more hormone deficiencies after FSRT. Although 79% (60/76) of optic chiasms were at least partially within the planning target volumes, no patient experienced radiation-induced optic neuropathy. No patient experienced radionecrosis. No secondary malignancy occurred during follow-up. Conclusion: In this study of long-term follow-up of patients treated for pituitary adenomas, FSRT was safe and effective.

  20. A planning study investigating dual-gated volumetric arc stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Supple, Jeremy; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    This is a planning study investigating the dosimetric advantages of gated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the end-exhale and end-inhale breathing phases for patients undergoing stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma. VMAT plans were developed from the end-inhale (VMATinh) and the end-exhale (VMATexh) phases of the breathing cycle as well as a VMAT plan and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plan based on an internal target volume (ITV) (VMATitv). An additional VMAT plan was created by giving the respective gated VMAT plan a 50% weighting and summing the inhale and exhale plans together to create a summed gated plan. Dose to organs at risk (OARs) as well as comparison of intermediate and low-dose conformity was evaluated. There was no difference in the volume of healthy tissue receiving the prescribed dose for the planned target volume (PTV) (CI100%) for all the VMAT plans; however, the mean volume of healthy tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose for the PTV (CI50%) values were 4.7 (± 0.2), 4.6 (± 0.2), and 4.7 (± 0.6) for the VMATitv, VMATinh, and VMATexh plans, respectively. The VMAT plans based on the exhale and inhale breathing phases showed a 4.8% and 2.4% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel, respectively, compared with that of the ITV-based VMAT plan. The summed gated VMAT plans showed a 6.2% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel compared with that of the VMAT plans based on the ITV. Additionally, when compared with the inhale and the exhale VMAT plans, a 4% and 1.5%, respectively, reduction was observed. Gating VMAT was able to reduce the amount of prescribed, intermediate, and integral dose to healthy tissue when compared with VMAT plans based on an ITV. When summing the inhale and exhale plans together, dose to healthy tissue and OARs was optimized. However, gating VMAT plans would take longer to treat and is a factor that needs to be considered.

  1. A planning study investigating dual-gated volumetric arc stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Supple, Jeremy; Siva, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    This is a planning study investigating the dosimetric advantages of gated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the end-exhale and end-inhale breathing phases for patients undergoing stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma. VMAT plans were developed from the end-inhale (VMATinh) and the end-exhale (VMATexh) phases of the breathing cycle as well as a VMAT plan and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plan based on an internal target volume (ITV) (VMATitv). An additional VMAT plan was created by giving the respective gated VMAT plan a 50% weighting and summing the inhale and exhale plans together to create a summed gated plan. Dose to organs at risk (OARs) as well as comparison of intermediate and low-dose conformity was evaluated. There was no difference in the volume of healthy tissue receiving the prescribed dose for the planned target volume (PTV) (CI100%) for all the VMAT plans; however, the mean volume of healthy tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose for the PTV (CI50%) values were 4.7 (± 0.2), 4.6 (± 0.2), and 4.7 (± 0.6) for the VMATitv, VMATinh, and VMATexh plans, respectively. The VMAT plans based on the exhale and inhale breathing phases showed a 4.8% and 2.4% reduction in dose to 30cm(3) of the small bowel, respectively, compared with that of the ITV-based VMAT plan. The summed gated VMAT plans showed a 6.2% reduction in dose to 30cm(3) of the small bowel compared with that of the VMAT plans based on the ITV. Additionally, when compared with the inhale and the exhale VMAT plans, a 4% and 1.5%, respectively, reduction was observed. Gating VMAT was able to reduce the amount of prescribed, intermediate, and integral dose to healthy tissue when compared with VMAT plans based on an ITV. When summing the inhale and exhale plans together, dose to healthy tissue and OARs was optimized. However, gating VMAT plans would take longer to treat and is a factor that needs to be considered.

  2. A Feasibility Study of a Tilted Head Position in Helical Tomotherapy for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Intracranial Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoonsun; Yoon, Hong In; Ha, Jin Sook; Kim, Seijoon; Lee, Ik Jae

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we evaluated the feasibility of placing patients in a tilted head position as part of routine clinical practice for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of intracranial tumors using helical tomotherapy (HT), by assessing its dosimetric benefit and setup accuracy. We reviewed treatment plans of four cases that were to receive FSRT for brain lesions in normal and head-tilted positions. These patients underwent two computed tomography (CT) scans: first in the normal supine position and then in the supine position with the head tilted at a 458 angle. Two separate HT plans for each position were generated in these four patients, using the same planning parameters. Plans were compared for target conformity and dose homogeneity. Maximum and average doses to critical organs, including normal brain, brain stem, optic chiasm, optic nerves, and the eyes, were considered. To evaluate setup accuracy, patient movement during treatment was assessed by post-treatment megavoltage CT scans. Both HT plans achieved similar conformal and homogeneous dose coverage to the target. Head-tilted HT delivered lower average and maximum doses to critical organs in the cases where the tumor was located on the same plane with critical organs, particularly when they were not directly attached. Placement in the head-tilted position without a mouthpiece allowed for increased patient movement during treatment, while use of a mouthpiece reduced patient movement to even less than that observed for normal setup in the supine position. This pilot study showed that placement in a tilted head position for FSRT of intracranial tumors using HT may be of clinical use, but depends on the tumor location.

  3. Primary Student Teachers' Perspectives of the Teaching of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastürk, Savas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate primary student teachers' perspectives of the teaching of fractions, i.e. their PCK of fractions. The research design used for the study was a descriptive survey method. As data collection instrument, we conducted a questionnaire composing of 14 open and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire was…

  4. Radiobiological modeling analysis of the optimal fraction scheme in patients with peripheral non-small cell lung cancer undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bao-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Pei-Xian; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Li, De-Rui; Chen, Chuang-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the optimal fraction scheme (FS) in patients with small peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with the 4 × 12 Gy scheme as the reference. CT simulation data for sixteen patients diagnosed with primary NSCLC or metastatic tumor with a single peripheral lesion ≤3 cm were used in this study. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed based on ten different FS of 1 × 25 Gy, 1 × 30 Gy, 1 × 34 Gy, 3 × 15 Gy, 3 × 18 Gy, 3 × 20 Gy, 4 × 12 Gy, 5 × 12 Gy, 6 × 10 Gy and 10 × 7 Gy. Five different radiobiological models were employed to predict the tumor control probability (TCP) value. Three other models were utilized to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) value to the lung and the modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) value to the chest wall (CW). The 1 × 30 Gy regimen is recommended to achieve 4.2% higher TCP and slightly higher NTCP and mEUD values to the lung and CW compared with the 4 × 12 Gy schedule, respectively. This regimen also greatly shortens the treatment duration. However, the 3 × 15 Gy schedule is suggested in patients where the lung-to-tumor volume ratio is small or where the tumor is adjacent to the CW. PMID:26657569

  5. Three independent one-dimensional margins for single-fraction frameless stereotactic radiosurgery brain cases using CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chan, Maria F.; Burman, Chandra; Song, Yulin; Zhang, Mutian

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Setting a proper margin is crucial for not only delivering the required radiation dose to a target volume, but also reducing the unnecessary radiation to the adjacent organs at risk. This study investigated the independent one-dimensional symmetric and asymmetric margins between the clinical target volume (CTV) and the planning target volume (PTV) for linac-based single-fraction frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).Methods: The authors assumed a Dirac delta function for the systematic error of a specific machine and a Gaussian function for the residual setup errors. Margin formulas were then derived in details to arrive at a suitable CTV-to-PTV margin for single-fraction frameless SRS. Such a margin ensured that the CTV would receive the prescribed dose in 95% of the patients. To validate our margin formalism, the authors retrospectively analyzed nine patients who were previously treated with noncoplanar conformal beams. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used in the patient setup. The isocenter shifts between the CBCT and linac were measured for a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator for three months. For each plan, the authors shifted the isocenter of the plan in each direction by ±3 mm simultaneously to simulate the worst setup scenario. Subsequently, the asymptotic behavior of the CTV V{sub 80%} for each patient was studied as the setup error approached the CTV-PTV margin.Results: The authors found that the proper margin for single-fraction frameless SRS cases with brain cancer was about 3 mm for the machine investigated in this study. The isocenter shifts between the CBCT and the linac remained almost constant over a period of three months for this specific machine. This confirmed our assumption that the machine systematic error distribution could be approximated as a delta function. This definition is especially relevant to a single-fraction treatment. The prescribed dose coverage for all the patients investigated was 96.1%± 5.5% with an

  6. Hippocampal Dosimetry Predicts Neurocognitive Function Impairment After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Benign or Low-Grade Adult Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Hermann, Bruce P.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the association between hippocampal dose and long-term neurocognitive function (NCF) impairment for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients with benign or low-grade adult brain tumors were treated with FSRT per institutional practice. No attempt was made to spare the hippocampus. NCF testing was conducted at baseline and 18 months follow-up, on a prospective clinical trial. Regression-based standardized z scores were calculated by using similar healthy control individuals evaluated at the same test-retest interval. NCF impairment was defined as a z score {<=}-1.5. After delineation of the bilateral hippocampi according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring atlas, dose-volume histograms were generated for the left and right hippocampi and for the composite pair. Biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}) assuming an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2 Gy were computed. Fisher's exact test and binary logistic regression were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Dose-response data were fit to a nonlinear model. Results: Of 29 patients enrolled in this trial, 18 completed both baseline and 18-month NCF testing. An EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi >7.3 Gy was associated with impairment in Wechsler Memory Scale-III Word List (WMS-WL) delayed recall (odds ratio [OR] 19.3; p = 0.043). The association between WMS-WL delayed recall and EQD{sub 2} to 100% of the bilateral hippocampi >0.0 Gy trended to significance (OR 14.8; p = 0.068). Conclusion: EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi greater than 7.3 Gy is associated with long-term impairment in list-learning delayed recall after FSRT for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors. Given that modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques can reduce the dose to the bilateral hippocampi below this dosimetric threshold, patients

  7. Hippocampal Dosimetry Predicts Neurocognitive Function Impairment After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Benign or Low-Grade Adult Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Hermann, Bruce P.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the association between hippocampal dose and long-term neurocognitive function (NCF) impairment for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients with benign or low-grade adult brain tumors were treated with FSRT per institutional practice. No attempt was made to spare the hippocampus. NCF testing was conducted at baseline and 18 months follow-up, on a prospective clinical trial. Regression-based standardized z scores were calculated by using similar healthy control individuals evaluated at the same test-retest interval. NCF impairment was defined as a z score {<=}-1.5. After delineation of the bilateral hippocampi according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring atlas, dose-volume histograms were generated for the left and right hippocampi and for the composite pair. Biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}) assuming an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2 Gy were computed. Fisher's exact test and binary logistic regression were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Dose-response data were fit to a nonlinear model. Results: Of 29 patients enrolled in this trial, 18 completed both baseline and 18-month NCF testing. An EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi >7.3 Gy was associated with impairment in Wechsler Memory Scale-III Word List (WMS-WL) delayed recall (odds ratio [OR] 19.3; p = 0.043). The association between WMS-WL delayed recall and EQD{sub 2} to 100% of the bilateral hippocampi >0.0 Gy trended to significance (OR 14.8; p = 0.068). Conclusion: EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi greater than 7.3 Gy is associated with long-term impairment in list-learning delayed recall after FSRT for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors. Given that modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques can reduce the dose to the bilateral hippocampi below this dosimetric threshold, patients

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with or without surgery for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kirichenko, Alexander; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David; Kudithipudi, Vijay; Tom, Kusum; Khan, Akhtar; Abrams, Peter; Szramowski, Molly; Oliva, Jose; Monga, Dulabh; Raj, Moses; Thai, Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We report single center experience on the outcome and toxicity of SBRT alone or in combination with surgery for inoperable primary and metastatic liver tumors between 2007 and 2014. Patients and methods Patients with 1–4 hepatic lesions and tumor diameter ≤9 cm received SBRT at 46.8Gy ± 3.7 in 4–6 fractions. The primary end point was local control with at least 6 months of radiographic followup, and secondary end points were toxicity and survival. Results Eighty-seven assessable patients (114 lesions) completed liver SBRT for hepatoma (39) or isolated metastases (48) with a median followup of 20.3 months (range 1.9–64.1). Fourteen patients underwent liver transplant with SBRT as a bridging treatment or for tumor downsizing. Eight patients completed hepatic resections in combination with planned SBRT for unresectable tumors. Two-year local control was 96% for hepatoma and 93.8% for metastases; it was 100% for lesions ≤4 cm. Two-year overall survival was 82.3% (hepatoma) and 64.3% (metastases). No incidence of grade >2 treatment toxicity was observed. Conclusion In this retrospective analysis we demonstrate that liver SBRT alone or in combination with surgery is safe and effective for the treatment of isolated inoperable hepatic malignancies and provides excellent local control rates. PMID:26776856

  9. Milk fat and primary fractions obtained by dry fractionation 1. Chemical composition and crystallisation properties.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christelle; Bourgaux, Claudie; Lesieur, Pierre; Riaublanc, Alain; Ollivon, Michel

    2006-10-01

    The chemical composition and crystallisation properties of milk fat and its primary fractions, obtained by dry fractionation at 21 degrees C, were investigated. The solid fraction (stearin) and the liquid fraction (olein) displayed a different triacylglycerol (TG) composition. Stearin fraction was enriched in long-chain fatty acids, whereas olein fraction was enriched in short-chain and unsaturated fatty acids. Crystallisation properties of milk fat, and both the stearin and olein fractions were studied on cooling at |dT/dt|=1 degrees C min(-1) by differential scanning calorimetry and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) at small and wide angles. Two main types of crystals corresponding to double chain length structures were characterised in the stearin fraction: alpha 2L(1) (47.5 Angstrom) and beta' 2L(2) (41.7 Angstrom). A triple chain length structure was formed in the olein fraction: alpha 3L (72.1 Angstrom). Crystallization of milk fat showed the formation of two 2L (47.3 and 41.6 Angstrom) and one 3L (72.1 Angstrom) lamellar structures with an hexagonal packing (alpha form). A schematic representation of the 3L packing of olein fraction was proposed to explain how a wide diversity of TG can accommodate to form a lamellar structure with a thickness of 72 Angstrom. Furthermore, the sharpness of the small-angle XRD lines associated to the alpha form was explained by the formation of liquid crystals of smectic type.

  10. SU-E-T-563: Multi-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Extend System of Gamma Knife: Treatment Verification Using Indigenously Designed Patient Simulating Multipurpose Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Bisht, R; Kale, S; Gopishankar, N; Rath, G; Julka, P; Agarwal, D; Singh, M; Garg, A; Kumar, P; Thulkar, S; Sharma, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of the study is to evaluate mechanical and radiological accuracy of multi-fraction regimen and validate Gamma knife based fractionation using newly developed patient simulating multipurpose phantom. Methods: A patient simulating phantom was designed to verify fractionated treatments with extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife however it could be used to validate other radiotherapy procedures as well. The phantom has options to insert various density material plugs and mini CT/MR distortion phantoms to analyze the quality of stereotactic imaging. An additional thorax part designed to predict surface doses at various organ sites. The phantom was positioned using vacuum head cushion and patient control unit for imaging and treatment. The repositioning check tool (RCT) was used to predict phantom positioning under ES assembly. The phantom with special inserts for film in axial, coronal and sagittal plane were scanned with X-Ray CT and the acquired images were transferred to treatment planning system (LGP 10.1). The focal precession test was performed with 4mm collimator and an experimental plan of four 16mm collimator shots was prepared for treatment verification of multi-fraction regimen. The prescription dose of 5Gy per fraction was delivered in four fractions. Each fraction was analyzed using EBT3 films scanned with EPSON 10000XL Scanner. Results: The measurement of 38 RCT points showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.28mm. The mean deviation of 0.28% and 0.31 % were calculated as CT and MR image distortion respectively. The radiological focus accuracy test showed its deviation from mechanical center point of 0.22mm. The profile measurement showed close agreement between TPS planned and film measured dose. At tolerance criteria of 1%/1mm gamma index analysis showed a pass rate of > 95%. Conclusion: Our results show that the newly developed multipurpose patient simulating phantom is highly suitable for the verification of fractionated stereotactic

  11. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in five daily fractions for post-operative surgical cavities in brain metastases patients with and without prior whole brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Omair, Ameen; Soliman, Hany; Xu, Wei; Karotki, Aliaksandr; Mainprize, Todd; Phan, Nicolas; Das, Sunit; Keith, Julia; Yeung, Robert; Perry, James; Tsao, May; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-12-01

    Our purpose was to report efficacy of hypofractionated cavity stereotactic radiotherapy (HCSRT) in patients with and without prior whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). 32 surgical cavities in 30 patients (20 patients/21 cavities had no prior WBRT and 10 patients/11 cavities had prior WBRT) were treated with image-guided linac stereotactic radiotherapy. 7 of the 10 prior WBRT patients had "resistant" local disease given prior surgery, post-operative WBRT and a re-operation, followed by salvage HCSRT. The clinical target volume was the post-surgical cavity, and a 2-mm margin applied as planning target volume. The median total dose was 30 Gy (range: 25-37.5 Gy) in 5 fractions. In the no prior and prior WBRT cohorts, the median follow-up was 9.7 months (range: 3.0-23.6) and 15.3 months (range: 2.9-39.7), the median survival was 23.6 months and 39.7 months, and the 1-year cavity local recurrence progression- free survival (LRFS) was 79 and 100%, respectively. At 18 months the LRFS dropped to 29% in the prior WBRT cohort. Grade 3 radiation necrosis occurred in 3 prior WBRT patients. We report favorable outcomes with HCSRT, and well selected patients with prior WBRT and "resistant" disease may have an extended survival favoring aggressive salvage HCSRT at a moderate risk of radiation necrosis. PMID:23617283

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of the feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary lung cancer with lobe-specific selective elective nodal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Tetsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kitahara, Tadashi; Akiba, Takeshi; Nagao, Ryuta; Fukuzawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    More than 10% of all patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary lung cancer develop regional lymph node recurrence. We evaluated the dosimetric feasibility of SBRT with lobe-specific selective elective nodal irradiation (ENI) on dose-volume histograms. A total of 21 patients were treated with SBRT for Stage I primary lung cancer between January 2010 and June 2012 at our institution. The extents of lobe-specific selective ENI fields were determined with reference to prior surgical reports. The ENI fields included lymph node stations (LNS) 3 + 4 + 11 for the right upper lobe tumors, LNS 7 + 11 for the right middle or lower lobe tumors, LNS 5 + 11 for the left upper lobe tumors, and LNS 7 + 11 for the left lower lobe tumors. A composite plan was generated by combining the ENI plan and the SBRT plan and recalculating for biologically equivalent doses of 2 Gy per fraction, using a linear quadratic model. The V20 of the lung, D(1cm3) of the spinal cord, D(1cm3) and D(10cm3) of the esophagus and D(10cm3) of the tracheobronchial wall were evaluated. Of the 21 patients, nine patients (43%) could not fulfill the dose constraints. In all these patients, the distance between the planning target volume (PTV) of ENI (PTVeni) and the PTV of SBRT (PTVsrt) was ≤2.0 cm. Of the three patients who developed regional metastasis, two patients had isolated lymph node failure, and the lymph node metastasis was included within the ENI field. When the distance between the PTVeni and PTVsrt is >2.0 cm, SBRT with selective ENI may therefore dosimetrically feasible.

  13. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  14. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Primary Lung Cancer and Other Targets: Results of Consultant Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yasushi; Wulf, Joern; Lax, Ingmar; Timmerman, Robert; Zimmermann, Frank; Stojkovski, Igor; Jeremic, Branislav

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and identify both advantages and disadvantages of its use in developing countries, a meeting composed of consultants of the International Atomic Energy Agency was held in Vienna in November 2006. Owing to continuous developments in the field, the meeting was extended by subsequent discussions and correspondence (2007-2010), which led to the summary presented here. The advantages and disadvantages of SBRT expected to be encountered in developing countries were identified. The definitions, typical treatment courses, and clinical results were presented. Thereafter, minimal methodology/technology requirements for SBRT were evaluated. Finally, characteristics of SBRT for developing countries were recommended. Patients for SBRT should be carefully selected, because single high-dose radiotherapy may cause serious complications in some serial organs at risk. Clinical experiences have been reported in some populations of lung cancer, lung oligometastases, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer. Despite the disadvantages expected to be experienced in developing countries, SBRT using fewer fractions may be useful in selected patients with various extracranial cancers with favorable outcome and low toxicity.

  15. Stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy of the prostate (SHARP), 33.5 Gy in five fractions for localized disease: First clinical trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Berit L. . E-mail: ronblm@vmmc.org; Hsi, R. Alex; Pham, Huong T.; Fowler, Jack F.; Esagui, Laura C.; Corman, John

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy (SHARP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I/II trial of SHARP performed for localized prostate cancer using 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions, calculated to be biologically equivalent to 78 Gy in 2 Gy fractions ({alpha}/{beta} ratio of 1.5 Gy). Noncoplanar conformal fields and daily stereotactic localization of implanted fiducials were used for treatment. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated by American Urologic Association (AUA) score and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and self-reported sexual function were recorded at specified follow-up intervals. Results: The study includes 40 patients. The median follow-up is 41 months (range, 21-60 months). Acute toxicity Grade 1-2 was 48.5% (GU) and 39% (GI); 1 acute Grade 3 GU toxicity. Late Grade 1-2 toxicity was 45% (GU) and 37% (GI). No late Grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported. Twenty-six patients reported potency before therapy; 6 (23%) have developed impotence. Median time to PSA nadir was 18 months with the majority of nadirs less than 1.0 ng/mL. The actuarial 48-month biochemical freedom from relapse is 70% for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition and 90% by the alternative nadir + 2 ng/mL failure definition. Conclusions: SHARP for localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal acute or late toxicity. Dose escalation should be possible.

  16. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Local Failure After Primary Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, Jason W.D. Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Djemil, Toufik; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Local failure after definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is uncommon. We report the safety and efficacy of SBRT for salvage of local failure after previous SBRT with a biologically effective dose (BED) of ≥100 Gy{sub 10}. Methods and Materials: Using an institutional review board–approved lung SBRT registry, we identified all patients initially treated for early-stage NSCLC between August 2004 and January 2012 who received salvage SBRT for isolated local failure. Failure was defined radiographically and confirmed histologically unless contraindicated. All patients were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system using ExacTrac for image guidance, and received a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} for each SBRT course. Tumor motion control involved a Bodyfix vacuum system for immobilization along with abdominal compression. Results: Of 436 patients treated from August 2004 through January 2012, we identified 22 patients with isolated local failure, 10 of whom received SBRT for salvage. The median length of follow-up was 13.8 months from salvage SBRT (range 5.3-43.5 months). Median tumor size was 3.4 cm (range 1.7-4.8 cm). Two of the 10 lesions were “central” by proximity to the mediastinum, but were outside the zone of the proximal bronchial tree. Since completing salvage, 3 patients are alive and without evidence of disease. A fourth patient died of medical comorbidities without recurrence 13.0 months after salvage SBRT. Two patients developed distant disease only. Four patients had local failure. Toxicity included grade 1-2 fatigue (3 patients) and grade 1-2 chest wall pain (5 patients). There was no grade 3-5 toxicity. Conclusions: Repeat SBRT with a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} after local failure in patients with early-stage medically inoperable NSCLC was well tolerated in this series and may represent a viable salvage strategy in select patients with peripheral tumors ≤5 cm.

  17. Minimal Inter-Fractional Fiducial Migration during Image-Guided Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using SuperLock Nitinol Coil Fiducial Markers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yi; Bazan, Jose G.; Sekhon, Ashley; Haglund, Karl; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Williams, Terence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of patients with lung cancer or lung metastasis who are medically unfit to undergo resection. In order to improve accuracy and confidence in targeting tumors, many centers rely on fiducial implantation. We evaluated the migration of a novel fiducial marker specifically designed for lung tissue implanted via electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB). Methods We retrospectively quantified the individual and group migrations of SuperLock nitinol coil fiducials for 15 patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), in order to evaluate the reliability of using these fiducials as a target surrogate for cases where tumors cannot be clearly delineated on cone beam CTs (CBCTs). For each fraction, we compared the individual and group migrations of the fiducials between the planning CT and the acquired CBCT. The group migration was defined as the distance between the centroids of the fiducial group and GTV. Results A total of 16 lung targets were included in our study for these 15 patients (one patient with two targets). Of 55 fiducials placed, we observed a 100% retention rate. The mean individual migration was 1.87 mm (range, 0.63–5.25 mm) with a standard deviation of 1.26 mm. The mean group migration was 1.94 mm (range, 0.03–6.19 mm) with a standard deviation of 1.45 mm. Overall, there was minimal change in the relative locations of the markers with respect to each other, as well as to the target. Conclusions We found that the SuperLock nitinol coil fiducial marker positions are stable throughout the radiation treatment, and can be used as a reliable surrogate to target, and to avoid geometric misses during gated treatments. PMID:26158847

  18. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Combination With Gefitinib in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schwer, Amanda L.; Damek, Denise M.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Lillehei, Kevin; Stuhr, Kelly; Chen Changhu

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with gefitinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had pathologically proved recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma. Patients started gefitinib (250 mg/day) 7 days before SRS and continued for 1 year or until disease progression. SRS was delivered in three fractions over 3 days. The planning target volume (PTV) was the T1-weighted MRI postcontrast enhancing lesion + 2 mm. The first cohort received an SRS dose of 18 Gy, and subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to the maximum dose of 36 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was any Grade 3 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2 of 6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Characteristics of the 15 patients enrolled were: 9 men, 6 women; median age, 47 years (range, 23-65 years); 11 glioblastoma, 4 AA; median prior RT dose, 60 Gy (range, 54-61.2 Gy); median interval since RT, 12 months (range, 3-57 months); median PTV, 41 cc (range, 12-151 cc). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range, 2-28 months). Median time on gefitinib was 5 months (range, 2-12 months). No patient experienced a DLT, and the SRS dose was escalated from 18 to 36 Gy. Grade 1-2 gefitinib-related dermatitis and diarrhea were common (10 and 7 patients, respectively). Conclusion: Fractionated SRS to a dose of 36 Gy in three fractions is well tolerated with gefitinib at daily dose of 250 mg. Further studies of SRS and novel molecular targeted agents are warranted in this challenging clinical setting.

  19. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Kristin J; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the most aggressive of all human cancers. GBM tumors are highly infiltrative and relatively resistant to conventional therapies. Aggressive management of GBM using a combination of surgical resection, followed by fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival; however, GBM tumors recur in the majority of patients and the disease is most often fatal. There is a need to develop new treatment regimens and technological innovations to improve the overall survival of GBM patients. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GBM has been explored and is controversial. SRS utilizes highly precise radiation techniques to allow dose escalation and delivery of ablative radiation doses to the tumor while minimizing dose to the adjacent normal structures. In some studies, SRS with concurrent chemotherapy has shown improved local control with acceptable toxicities in select GBM patients. However, because GBM is a highly infiltrative disease, skeptics argue that local therapies, such as SRS, do not improve overall survival. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding SRS in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM, to describe SRS techniques, potential eligible SRS candidates, and treatment-related toxicities. In addition, this article will propose promising areas for future research for SRS in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26848407

  20. Symptomatic Outcomes in Relation to Tumor Expansion After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: Single-Institutional Long-Term Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Hidefumi; Onodera, Shunsuke; Takeichi, Norihito; Onimaru, Rikiya; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The effect of transient tumor expansion after conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) on the symptomatic outcomes is not well-known. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 201 consecutive patients who received SRT for vestibular schwannoma. A conventional fractionation schedule was applied in 194 patients (97%), and 142 (71%) received a total dose of 50 Gy. The median follow-up time was 72 months. Results: The maximum diameter was 9 mm or less in 13 patients, 10-19 mm in 79 patients, 20-29 mm in 87 patients, and 30 mm or greater in 22 patients. At presentation, tumor size of 20 mm or greater was significantly associated with loss of serviceable hearing and trigeminal neuropathy. After SRT, tumor expansion was observed in 42 patients (21%). By tumor size, tumor expansion was observed in 0%, 11.4%, 25.6%, and 50% of patients with tumors of 9 mm or less, 10-19 mm, 20-29 mm, and 30 mm or greater, respectively, in diameter. The tumor expansion was significantly associated with an increased risk of hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement (P=.004), loss of serviceable hearing (P=.0064), and worsening of facial (P<.0001) and trigeminal nerve (P<.0001) functions. Spontaneous tumor shrinkage was observed in 29 of those 42 patients, mostly within 2 years after the expansion, and the majority of the worsened symptoms except for hearing resolved once the tumor had shrunk. As a result, salvage surgical resection for symptomatic relief was required in only 5% of patients. Conclusions: Fractionated SRT could be safely applied even for medium- to large-sized ({>=}20 mm) tumors. However, greater knowledge of the risks and consequences, including transient symptomatic worsening, and the time span of expansion will be required for the follow-up of patients after SRT to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.

  1. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  2. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  3. SU-E-T-132: Dosimetric Impact of Positioning Errors in Hypo-Fractionated Cranial Radiation Therapy Using Frameless Stereotactic BrainLAB System

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, V; Jin, H; Ali, I; Ahmad, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine dosimetric impact of positioning errors in the stereotactic hypo-fractionated treatment of intracranial lesions using 3Dtransaltional and 3D-rotational corrections (6D) frameless BrainLAB ExacTrac X-Ray system. Methods: 20 cranial lesions, treated in 3 or 5 fractions, were selected. An infrared (IR) optical positioning system was employed for initial patient setup followed by stereoscopic kV X-ray radiographs for position verification. 6D-translational and rotational shifts were determined to correct patient position. If these shifts were above tolerance (0.7 mm translational and 1° rotational), corrections were applied and another set of X-rays was taken to verify patient position. Dosimetric impact (D95, Dmin, Dmax, and Dmean of planning target volume (PTV) compared to original plans) of positioning errors for initial IR setup (XC: Xray Correction) and post-correction (XV: X-ray Verification) was determined in a treatment planning system using a method proposed by Yue et al. (Med. Phys. 33, 21-31 (2006)) with 3D-translational errors only and 6D-translational and rotational errors. Results: Absolute mean translational errors (±standard deviation) for total 92 fractions (XC/XV) were 0.79±0.88/0.19±0.15 mm (lateral), 1.66±1.71/0.18 ±0.16 mm (longitudinal), 1.95±1.18/0.15±0.14 mm (vertical) and rotational errors were 0.61±0.47/0.17±0.15° (pitch), 0.55±0.49/0.16±0.24° (roll), and 0.68±0.73/0.16±0.15° (yaw). The average changes (loss of coverage) in D95, Dmin, Dmax, and Dmean were 4.5±7.3/0.1±0.2%, 17.8±22.5/1.1±2.5%, 0.4±1.4/0.1±0.3%, and 0.9±1.7/0.0±0.1% using 6Dshifts and 3.1±5.5/0.0±0.1%, 14.2±20.3/0.8±1.7%, 0.0±1.2/0.1±0.3%, and 0.7±1.4/0.0±0.1% using 3D-translational shifts only. The setup corrections (XC-XV) improved the PTV coverage by 4.4±7.3% (D95) and 16.7±23.5% (Dmin) using 6D adjustment. Strong correlations were observed between translation errors and deviations in dose coverage for XC. Conclusion

  4. Tumor Shrinkage Assessed by Volumetric MRI in Long-Term Follow-Up After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Christine; Theodorou, Marilena; Poullos, Nektarios; Jacob, Vesna; Astner, Sabrina T.; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of residual or recurrent nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Methods and Materials: We assessed exact tumor volume shrinkage in 16 patients with NFPA after FSRT. All patients had previously undergone surgery. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and median 63 months (range, 28-100 months) after FSRT. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6-mm slice thickness without gap (3D MRI). Results: Mean tumor size of all 16 pituitary adenomas before treatment was 7.4 mL (3.3-18.9 mL). We found shrinkage of the treated pituitary adenoma in all patients. Within a median follow-up of 63 months (28-100 months) an absolute mean volume reduction of 3.8 mL (0.9-12.4 mL) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared with the volume before radiotherapy was 51% (22%-95%). Shrinkage measured by 3D MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. A strong negative correlation between the initial tumor volume and the absolute volume reduction after FSRT was found. There was no correlation between tumor size reduction and patient age, sex, or number of previous surgeries. Conclusions: By using 3D MRI in all patients undergoing FSRT of an NFPA, tumor shrinkage is detected. Our data demonstrate that volumetric assessment based on 3D MRI adds additional information to routinely used radiological response measurements. After FSRT a mean relative size reduction of 51% can be expected within 5 years.

  5. Alpha/Beta Ratio for Normal Lung Tissue as Estimated From Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body and Conventionally Fractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Scheenstra, Alize E.H.; Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Belderbos, José S.A.; Damen, Eugène M.F.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the α/β ratio for which the dose-dependent lung perfusion reductions for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CFRT) are biologically equivalent. Methods and Materials: The relations between local dose and perfusion reduction 4 months after treatment in lung cancer patients treated with SBRT and CFRT were scaled according to the linear-quadratic model using α/β ratios from 0 Gy to ∞ Gy. To test for which α/β ratio both treatments have equal biological effect, a 5-parameter logistic model was optimized for both dose–effect relationships simultaneously. Beside the α/β ratio, the other 4 parameters were d{sub 50}, the steepness parameter k, and 2 parameters (M{sub SBRT} and M{sub CFRT}) representing the maximal perfusion reduction at high doses for SBRT and CFRT, respectively. Results: The optimal fitted model resulted in an α/β ratio of 1.3 Gy (0.5-2.1 Gy), M{sub SBRT} = 42.6% (40.4%-44.9%), M{sub CFRT} = 66.9% (61.6%-72.1%), d{sub 50} = 35.4 Gy (31.5-9.2 Gy), and k = 2.0 (1.7-2.3). Conclusions: An equal reduction of lung perfusion in lung cancer was observed in SBRT and CFRT if local doses were converted by the linear-quadratic model with an α/β ratio equal to 1.3 Gy (0.5-2.1 Gy)

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with oligometastases from colorectal cancer: risk-adapted dose prescription with a maximum dose of 83–100 Gy in five fractions

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Tsurugai, Yuichiro; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the local control of pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with moderate prescription dose was relatively worse. We investigated the treatment outcomes and toxicities of patients with oligometastases from CRC treated by SBRT using risk-adapted, very high- and convergent-dose regimens. Among patients referred for SBRT from August 2011 to January 2015, those patients were extracted who had liver or pulmonary metastases from CRC, and they were treated with a total dose of 50–60 Gy in five fractions prescribed to the 60% isodose line of the maximum dose covering the surface of the planning target volume. Concurrent administration of chemotherapy was not admitted during SBRT, while neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy was allowed. A total of 21 patients (12 liver, 9 lung) with 28 oligometastases were evaluated. The median follow-up duration was 27.5 months (range: 6.5–43.3 months). Four patients were treated with SBRT as a series of initial treatments, and 17 patients were treated after recurrent oligometastases. The local control rates at 1 and 2 years from the start of SBRT were 100%. The disease-free and actuarial overall survival rates were 62% and 55%, and 79% and 79%, respectively. No severe toxicities (≥grade 3) occurred during follow-up. The outcomes following high-dose SBRT were excellent. This treatment can provide an alternative to the surgical resection of oligometastases from CRC. Prospective studies are needed to validate the effectiveness of SBRT. PMID:26983981

  7. Feasibility study of stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripheral lung tumors with a maximum dose of 100 Gy in five fractions and a heterogeneous dose distribution in the planning target volume.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Aoki, Yousuke; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shuichi; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated toxicity and outcomes for patients with peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in a dose-escalation and dose-convergence study. A total of 15 patients were enrolled. SBRT was performed with 60 Gy in 5 fractions (fr.) prescribed to the 60% isodose line of maximum dose, which was 100 Gy in 5 fr., covering the planning target volume (PTV) surface (60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose)) using dynamic conformal multiple arc therapy (DCMAT). The primary endpoint was radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ Grade 2 within 6 months. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Using dose-volumetric analysis, the trial regimen of 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) was compared with our institutional conventional regimen of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose). The enrolled consecutive patients had either a solitary peripheral tumor or two ipsilateral tumors. The median follow-up duration was 22.0 (12.0-27.0) months. After 6 months post-SBRT, the respective number of RP Grade 0, 1 and 2 cases was 5, 9 and 1. In the Grade 2 RP patient, the image showed an organizing pneumonia pattern at 6.0 months post-SBRT. No other toxicity was found. At last follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence of the treated tumors. The target volumes of 60 Gy/ 5 fr. - (60%-isodose) were irradiated with a significantly higher dose than those of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose), while the former dosimetric parameters of normal lung were almost equivalent to the latter. SBRT with 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) using DCMAT allowed the delivery of very high and convergent doses to peripheral lung tumors with feasibility in the acute and subacute phases. Further follow-up is required to assess for late toxicity.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hayeon; Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  9. A Retrospective Review of CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Adrenal Tumors (Primary and Metastatic): Winthrop University Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Amishi; Rai, Hema; Haas, Jonathan; Witten, Matthew; Blacksburg, Seth; Schneider, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland is a common site of cancer metastasis. Surgery remains a mainstay of treatment for solitary adrenal metastasis. For patients who cannot undergo surgery, radiation is an alternative option. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an ablative treatment option allowing larger doses to be delivered over a shorter period of time. In this study, we report on our experience with the use of SBRT to treat adrenal metastases using CyberKnife technology. We retrospectively reviewed the Winthrop University radiation oncology data base to identify 14 patients for whom SBRT was administered to treat malignant adrenal disease. Of the factors examined, the biological equivalent dose (BED) of radiation delivered was found to be the most important predictor of local adrenal tumor control. We conclude that CyberKnife-based SBRT is a safe, non-invasive modality that has broadened the therapeutic options for the treatment of isolated adrenal metastases. PMID:26347852

  10. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Mara W.; Kato, Catherine M.; Carson, Kelly M.P.; Matsunaga, Nathan M.; Arao, Robert F.; Doss, Emily J.; McCracken, Charles L.; Meng, Lu Z.; Chen, Yiyi; Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin; Tanyi, James A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  11. Net primary production of forests: a constant fraction of gross primary production?

    PubMed

    Waring, R. H.; Landsberg, J. J.; Williams, M.

    1998-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made in our ability to model and measure annual gross primary production (GPP) by terrestrial vegetation. But challenges remain in estimating maintenance respiration (R(m)) and net primary production (NPP). To search for possible common relationships, we assembled annual carbon budgets from six evergreen and one deciduous forest in Oregon, USA, three pine plantations in New South Wales, Australia, a deciduous forest in Massachusetts, USA, and a Nothofagus forest on the South Island of New Zealand. At all 12 sites, a standard procedure was followed to estimate annual NPP of foliage, branches, stems, and roots, the carbon expended in synthesis of these organs (R(g)), their R(m), and that of previously produced foliage and sapwood in boles, branches, and large roots. In the survey, total NPP ranged from 120 to 1660 g C m(-2) year(-1), whereas the calculated fraction allocated to roots varied from 0.22 to 0.63. Comparative analysis indicated that the total NPP/GPP ratio was conservative (0.47 +/- 0.04 SD). This finding supports the possibility of greatly simplifying forest growth models. The constancy of the NPP/GPP ratio also provides an incentive to renew efforts to understand the environmental factors affecting partitioning of NPP above and belowground.

  12. Stereotactic radiation therapy and radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, C B

    1994-01-01

    In all stereotactic irradiation procedures, a high dose is delivered to a relatively small target volume. Whether fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is preferable (based on a therapeutic ratio) or a radiosurgical method (aiming at the precise and complete destruction of a tissue volume) depends on the definition and composition of the target. The methodologies can be grouped in closed-skull external focussed beam stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy and in stereotactic implantation/injection of radiation sources. Although originally developed to treat functional disorders of the brain, stereotactic radiosurgery has been used most successfully for over 4 decades to treat cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Complete obliteration ranges from 30 to 50% after 1 year are reported. At 2 years the results range from 72 to 90%. Clearly the outcome is influenced by patient selection. In the treatment of acoustic neurinomas follow-up data of larger series of radiosurgery show that the treatment performed under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis becomes comparable with the best microsurgery data. Using multiple isocenters and MR localization tumor growth control is achieved in more than 90% of cases, with hearing preservation of approximately 50%. Pituitary tumors with Cushing's syndrome, acromegaly, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinomas and nonsecreting adenomas have been treated with various stereotactic irradiation methods. Further refinement of both localization techniques, dose distribution and beam manipulation will make radiosurgery an attractive modality because of its noninvasive character and low morbidity. Only a small subgroup of patients with low-grade gliomas are candidates for stereotactic localized irradiation treatment, namely those with circumscribed tumors with only limited spread of tumor cells into the periphery. For this subgroup, which usually comprises not more than 25% of all low-grade gliomas, the results from interstitial radiosurgery compete

  13. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  14. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Louise J; Thompson, Christopher M; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  15. Clinical Assessment Of Stereotactic IGRT: Spinal Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerszten, Peter C. Burton, Steven A.

    2008-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited because of the availability of effective target immobilization devices. Recent advances in stereotactic IGRT have allowed for spinal applications. Large clinical experience with spinal radiosurgery to properly assess clinical outcomes has previously been limited. At our institution, we have developed a successful multidisciplinary spinal radiosurgery program in which 542 spinal lesions (486 malignant and 56 benign lesions) were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 85 years (mean 56 years). Lesion location included 92 cervical, 234 thoracic, 130 lumbar, and 86 sacral. The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell (89 cases), breast (74 cases), and lung (71 cases). The most common benign tumors were neurofibroma (24 cases), schwannoma (13 cases), and meningioma (7 cases). Eighty-nine cervical lesions were treated using skull tracking. Thoracic, lumbar, and sacral tumors were tracked relative to either gold or stainless steel fiducial markers. The maximum intratumoral dose ranged from 12.5 to 30 Gy (mean 20 Gy). Tumor volume ranged from 0.16 to 298 mL (mean 47 mL). Three hundred thirty-seven lesions had received prior external beam irradiation with spinal cord doses precluding further conventional irradiation. The primary indication for radiosurgery was pain in 326 cases, as a primary treatment modality in 70 cases, for tumor radiographic tumor progression in 65 cases, for post-surgical treatment in 38 cases, for progressive neurological deficit in 35 cases, and as a radiation boost in 8 cases. Follow-up period was at least 3 to 49 months. Axial and/or radicular pain improved in 300 of 326 cases (92%). Long-term tumor control was demonstrated in 90% of lesions treated with radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality and in 88% of lesions treated for

  16. Effect of Cuisenaire Rods' Approach on Some Nigeria Primary Pupils' Achievement in Decimal Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurumeh, M. S. C.; Achor, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    This study determined the effect of Cuisenaire Rods' approach on some Nigeria primary pupils' achievement in decimal fractions. Three hypotheses guided the study. A total of 200 Primary six pupils (that is, 6th grade) from randomly selected schools in Makurdi metropolis of Benue State of Nigeria served as the sample for the study. A Mathematics…

  17. Efficacy of stereotactic gamma knife surgery and microvascular decompression in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia: a retrospective study of 220 cases from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zi-Feng; Huang, Qi-Lin; Liu, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A retrospective study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of stereotactic gamma knife surgery (GKS) and microvascular decompression (MVD) in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia (TN) at a single center. The study included the evaluation of clinical outcomes of pain relief and pain recurrence and complications associated with GKS and MVD. Methods The study included 202 patients with primary TN and was conducted between January 2013 and December 2014; about 115 patients were treated with GKS and 87 patients were treated with MVD. TN pain was evaluated using the Barrow Neurological Institute and the visual analog scale scoring systems. Preoperative magnetic resonance tomographic angiography was performed for all patients. Microscope-assisted MVD used the suboccipital retrosigmoid sinus approach. GKS targeted the trigeminal nerve root entry zone with a margin radiation dose of 59.5 Gy, and brainstem dose <12 Gy. Posttreatment follow-up was for 2 years. Results Postoperative Barrow Neurological Institute scores for patients treated with GKS and MVD were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.01). Reduction in postoperative pain following MVD (95.4% patients) was significantly greater than that following GKS (88.7% patients) (P<0.01). Postoperative visual analog scale scores of the MVD group were significantly reduced compared with those of patients treated with GKS at the same postoperative time points (P<0.01). Patients treated with GKS had a significantly increased rate of loss of corneal reflex compared with patients treated with MVD (P=0.002). Conclusion Both GKS and MVD are safe and effective first-line and adjunctive treatment options for patients with TN. The clinical outcomes of pain relief and reduction of pain recurrence were better with MVD. For GKS, this study showed that the optimal radiation therapeutic dose range was 70–90 Gy, but brainstem radiation protection is recommended. PMID:27555796

  18. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  19. Protein and glycoprotein electrophoretic patterns of enriched fractions of primary and secondary granules from guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The postnuclear supernatant fraction of sucrose homogenates of guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) was subjected to differential centrifugation to obtain a total particulate fraction, a particle-free supernatant fraction, highly enriched fractions of primary and secondary granules, and a membrane-rich fraction. The various fractions were solubilized in buffer containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and analyzed for protein and glycoproteincomponents by SDS -polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The major glycoprotein components of the postnuclear supernatant fraction were found mainly associated with the enriched fraction of secondary granules and, to a lesser extent, with the membrane-rich fraction. No major glycoprotein components were visible in the polypeptide electrophoretic patterns of the primary granule fraction or of the particle-free supernate. Attempts at separation of guinea pig granules by zonal sucrose density gradient centrifugation were only partially successful. Data supporting a species difference in this regard between rabbit and guinea pig PMNL granules are presented. PMID:166079

  20. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm

  1. Impact of soil primary size fractions on sorption and desorption of atrazine on organo-mineral fractions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yufen; Liu, Zhongzhen; He, Yan; Li, Yanliang

    2015-03-01

    In the current study, a mechanical dispersion method was employed to separate clay (<2 μm), silt (2-20 μm), and sand (20-50 μm) fraction in six bulk soils. Batch equilibrium method was used to conduct atrazine sorption and desorption experiments on soil organo-mineral fractions with bulk soils and their contrasting size fractions separately. The potential contribution of total organic carbon (TOC) for atrazine retention in different fractions was further investigated. It was found that clay fraction had the highest adsorption but the least desorption capacities for atrazine, while sand fraction had the lowest adsorption but the highest desorption capacities for atrazine. The adsorption percentage of atrazine, as compared with adsorption by the corresponding bulk soils, ranged from 53.6 to 80.5%, 35.7 to 56.4%, and 0.2 to 4.5% on the clay, silt, and sand fractions, respectively. TOC was one of the key factors affecting atrazine retention in soils, with the exact contribution dependent on varying degree of coating with mineral component in different soil size fractions. The current study may be useful to predict the bioavailability of atrazine in different soil size fractions. PMID:25300187

  2. Impact of soil primary size fractions on sorption and desorption of atrazine on organo-mineral fractions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yufen; Liu, Zhongzhen; He, Yan; Li, Yanliang

    2015-03-01

    In the current study, a mechanical dispersion method was employed to separate clay (<2 μm), silt (2-20 μm), and sand (20-50 μm) fraction in six bulk soils. Batch equilibrium method was used to conduct atrazine sorption and desorption experiments on soil organo-mineral fractions with bulk soils and their contrasting size fractions separately. The potential contribution of total organic carbon (TOC) for atrazine retention in different fractions was further investigated. It was found that clay fraction had the highest adsorption but the least desorption capacities for atrazine, while sand fraction had the lowest adsorption but the highest desorption capacities for atrazine. The adsorption percentage of atrazine, as compared with adsorption by the corresponding bulk soils, ranged from 53.6 to 80.5%, 35.7 to 56.4%, and 0.2 to 4.5% on the clay, silt, and sand fractions, respectively. TOC was one of the key factors affecting atrazine retention in soils, with the exact contribution dependent on varying degree of coating with mineral component in different soil size fractions. The current study may be useful to predict the bioavailability of atrazine in different soil size fractions.

  3. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type of breast imaging that uses ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ...

  4. Accuracy of relocation, evaluation of geometric uncertainties and clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial tumors using relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame.

    PubMed

    Das, Saikat; Isiah, Rajesh; Rajesh, B; Ravindran, B Paul; Singh, Rabi Raja; Backianathan, Selvamani; Subhashini, J

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at determination of accuracy of relocation of Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The study aims to quantitatively determine the magnitudes of error in anteroposterior, mediolateral and craniocaudal directions, and determine the margin between clinical target volume to planning target volume based on systematic and random errors. Daily relocation error was measured using depth helmet and measuring probe. Based on the measurements, translational displacements in anteroposterior (z), mediolateral (x), and craniocaudal (y) directions were calculated. Based on the displacements in x, y and z directions, systematic and random error were calculated and three-dimensional radial displacement vector was determined. Systematic and random errors were used to derive CTV to PTV margin. The errors were within ± 2 mm in 99.2% cases in anteroposterior direction (AP), in 99.6% cases in mediolateral direction (ML), and in 97.6% cases in craniocaudal direction (CC). In AP, ML and CC directions, systematic errors were 0.56, 0.38, 0.42 mm and random errors were 1.86, 1.36 and 0.73 mm, respectively. Mean radial displacement was 1.03 mm ± 0.34. CTV to PTV margins calculated by ICRU formula were 1.86, 1.45 and 0.93 mm; by Stroom's formula they were 2.42, 1.74 and 1.35 mm; by van Herk's formula they were 2.7, 1.93 and 1.56 mm (AP, ML and CC directions). Depth helmet with measuring probe provides a clinically viable way for assessing the relocation accuracy of GTC frame. The errors were within ± 2 mm in all directions. Systematic and random errors were more along the anteroposterior axes. According to the ICRU formula, a margin of 2 mm around the tumor seems to be adequate. PMID:21587166

  5. Stereotactic radiosurgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma: a Leksell Gamma Knife Society 2000 debate.

    PubMed

    Linskey, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    By definition, the term "radiosurgery" refers to the delivery of a therapeutic radiation dose in a single fraction, not simply the use of stereotaxy. Multiple-fraction delivery is better termed "stereotactic radiotherapy." There are compelling radiobiological principles supporting the biological superiority of single-fraction radiation for achieving an optimal therapeutic response for the slowly proliferating, late-responding, tissue of a schwannoma. It is axiomatic that complication avoidance requires precise three-dimensional conformality between treatment and tumor volumes. This degree of conformality can only be achieved through complex multiisocenter planning. Alternative radiosurgery devices are generally limited to delivering one to four isocenters in a single treatment session. Although they can reproduce dose plans similar in conformality to early gamma knife dose plans by using a similar number of isocenters, they cannot reproduce the conformality of modern gamma knife plans based on magnetic resonance image--targeted localization and five to 30 isocenters. A disturbing trend is developing in which institutions without nongamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) centers are championing and/or shifting to hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannomas. This trend appears to be driven by a desire to reduce complication rates to compete with modern GKS results by using complex multiisocenter planning. Aggressive advertising and marketing from some of these centers even paradoxically suggests biological superiority of hypofractionation approaches over single-dose radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas. At the same time these centers continue to use the term radiosurgery to describe their hypofractionated radiotherapy approach in an apparent effort to benefit from a GKS "halo effect." It must be reemphasized that as neurosurgeons our primary duty is to achieve permanent tumor control for our patients and not to eliminate complications at the

  6. Methodology of stereotactic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Carapella, C M; Mastrostefano, R; Raus, L; Riccio, A

    1989-01-01

    The great technological improvement in the neurosurgical tools and in the neuroradiological imaging has brought about the diffusion of the stereotactic techniques. They are crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial expanding lesions of small dimensions or located in sites inaccessible to conventional techniques. The Authors describe the most common systems and methodologies for the stereotactic biopsy. They stress the importance of performing serial explorations which can provide evidence of the heterogeneity of the neoplastic lesion and of the infiltration of the brain adjacent to the tumor.

  7. Global Intraurban Intake Fractions for Primary Air Pollutants from Vehicles and Other Distributed Sources

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We model intraurban intake fraction (iF) values for distributed ground-level emissions in all 3646 global cities with more than 100 000 inhabitants, encompassing a total population of 2.0 billion. For conserved primary pollutants, population-weighted median, mean, and interquartile range iF values are 26, 39, and 14–52 ppm, respectively, where 1 ppm signifies 1 g inhaled/t emitted. The global mean urban iF reported here is roughly twice as large as previous estimates for cities in the United States and Europe. Intake fractions vary among cities owing to differences in population size, population density, and meteorology. Sorting by size, population-weighted mean iF values are 65, 35, and 15 ppm, respectively, for cities with populations larger than 3, 0.6–3, and 0.1–0.6 million. The 20 worldwide megacities (each >10 million people) have a population-weighted mean iF of 83 ppm. Mean intraurban iF values are greatest in Asia and lowest in land-rich high-income regions. Country-average iF values vary by a factor of 3 among the 10 nations with the largest urban populations. PMID:22332712

  8. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady state conditions in phosphorus controlled chemostats (N : P = 29, growth rate of μ = 0.2 d-1). 14C incubations were accomplished to determine primary production (PP), comprised by particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C), and the concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO), and of high molecular weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) as major components of ER. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (<0.40 μm, <1000 kDa, <100 kDa and <10 kDa) of DO14C and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady state growth, corresponding to ∼4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size (<10 kDa) fraction of HMW-dCCHO exhibited a similar sugar composition, dominated by high percentages of glucose (74-80 Mol%), the composition of HMW-dCCHO size-classes >10 kDa was significantly different with higher Mol% of arabinose. Mol% of acidic sugars increased and Mol% glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  9. Biological indicators of exposure to total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in a primary aluminium smelter.

    PubMed Central

    Röllin, H B; Theodorou, P; Cantrell, A C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study attempts to define biological indicators of aluminium uptake and excretion in workers exposed to airborne aluminium compounds in a primary aluminium smelter. Also, this study defines the total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in two different potrooms, and correlates their concentrations with biological indicators in this group of workers. METHODS: Air was sampled at defined work sites. Non-destructive and conventional techniques were used to find total and respirable aluminium content of the dust. Blood and urine was collected from 84 volunteers employed at various work stations throughout the smelter and from two different cohorts of controls matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. Aluminium in serum samples and urine specimens was measured by flameless atomic absorption with a PE 4100 ZL spectrometer. RESULTS: The correlation of aluminium concentrations in serum and urine samples with the degree of exposure was assessed for three arbitrary exposure categories; low (0.036 mg Al/m3), medium (0.35 mg Al/m3) and high (1.47 mg Al/m3) as found in different areas of the smelter. At medium and high exposure, the ratio of respirable to total aluminium in the dust samples varied significantly. At high exposure, serum aluminium, although significantly raised, was still within the normal range of an unexposed population. The workers with low exposure excreted aluminium in urine at levels significantly higher than the controls, but still within the normal range of the population. However, potroom workers with medium and high exposure had significantly higher urinary aluminium than the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that only urinary aluminium constitutes a practical index of occupational exposure at or above 0.35 mg Al/m3, and that the respirable fraction of the dust may play a major role in the biological response to exposure to aluminium in a smelter environment. PMID:8758038

  10. Olefin unit primary fractionator on-line Petro-Blast Lancing

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.D.; Rutan, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    Today`s commodity chemicals market forces companies to find innovative ways to extend unit on line operation between turnarounds such that they will remain economically competitive. At the OxyChem Chocolate Bayou facility the Primary Fractionator, quench oil column, fouling defined the length of the run between Olefin Unit turnarounds. Polymer growth on the valve trays restricted vapor flow through the column. This increased the column pressure drop which resulted in severe flooding. The inability to cool the furnace effluent while separating the fuel oil and gasoline components would cause premature shutdowns. Fouling locations were defined using gamma scan techniques and pressure surveys. Nozzles were welded and hot tapped at strategic locations around the column. A high pressure Petro-Blast Lancing technique, inserted through the nozzles, was then used to clean the trays. The operation has extended the unit run length although the column may require additional Petro-Blast Lancing before the next scheduled plant turnaround. If this schedule holds, a two year extension in the unit run length will be realized.

  11. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2015-02-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady-state conditions in phosphorus-controlled chemostats (N:P = 29, growth rate of μ = 0.2 d-1) at present-day and high-CO2 concentrations. 14C incubations were performed to determine primary production (PP), comprised of particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C). Concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO) and high-molecular-weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) were determined by ion chromatography. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (<0.4 μm (DO14C), <0.45 μm (HMW-dCCHO), <1000, <100 and <10 kDa) of DO14CC and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady-state growth, corresponding to ~4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size fraction (<10 kDa) of HMW-dCCHO exhibited a similar sugar composition, dominated by high percentage of glucose (74-80 mol%), the composition of HMW-dCCHO size classes >10 kDa was significantly different, with a higher mol% of arabinose. The mol% of acidic sugars increased and that of glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  12. Frameless Image-Guided Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Clinical Outcomes for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Breneman, John C. Steinmetz, Ryan; Smith, Aaron; Lamba, Michael; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: After preclinical investigations confirming the accuracy of target localization by frameless image-guided radiosurgery, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with brain metastases who underwent frameless radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2006, 53 patients underwent frameless stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator equipped with on-board image guidance for the treatment of 158 brain metastases. The radiation doses were delivered in a single fraction (dose range, 12-22 Gy; median, 18). Patients were followed with magnetic resonance imaging scans at 2-3-month intervals. Progression-free survival was the primary study endpoint. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 weeks (range, 14-112), the overall survival rate was 70% at 6 months, 44% at 1 year, 29% at 18 months, and 16% at 24 months. Local control was achieved in 90% of 168 treated lesions at 6 months, 80% at 12 months, 78% at 18 months, and 78% at 24 months. Local control tended to be improved in lesions treated with {>=}18 Gy and for lesions <0.2 cm{sup 3}. Adverse events occurred in 5 patients (9.6%). No evidence of imaging changes on post-stereotactic radiosurgery scans was found to suggest mistargeting of a radiation isocenter. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes after frameless stereotactic radiosurgery were comparable to those after frame-based radiosurgery techniques. Given its significant advantages in terms of patient comfort, ability to use fractionated treatment regimens, and convenience in scheduling of personnel and equipment resources, frameless radiosurgery will likely become a common technique for intracranial radiosurgery.

  13. Estimating phytoplankton size-fractionated primary production in the northwestern Iberian upwelling: Is mixotrophy relevant in pigmented nanoplankton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiras, F. G.; Espinoza-González, O.; Arbones, B.; Garrido, J. L.; Teixeira, I. G.; Castro, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    Primary production of micro- (PPmicro), nano- (PPnano) and picophytoplankton (PPpico) in the NW Iberian margin were estimated by combining biomarker pigments to derive class-specific chlorophyll concentration and published class-specific photophysiological variables for large oceanic scales (Uitz et al., 2008). The accuracy of this approach was assessed comparing the predicted total primary production (PPp = PPmicro + PPnano + PPpico) with the measured total primary production (PPm). Despite the general agreement, PPp overestimated PPm when mixing in the water column was important. Therefore, the photophysiological variables originally derived from stratified and oligotrophic zones with strong influence of photoacclimation in the water column were re-evaluated to incorporate the particular conditions usually found in coastal upwelling systems, characterized by higher homogenization of the water column and lesser importance of photoacclimation. With this new fractionation we estimated the export capacity (f-ratio = new production) of the microbial plankton community, which can be assimilated to the fraction of primary production due to microphytoplankton. The NW Iberian margin showed f-ratios varying between the highest values recorded for coastal upwelling systems (f > 0.75) and the low values usually found in oligotrophic oceanic areas (f < 0.1). This size-fractionated primary production combined with phytoplankton size-fractionated biomass to obtain turnover rates allowed us to infer the existence of mixotrophy within nanophytoplankton. The occurrence of this type of nutrition was indirectly verified by comparing carbon fixation with estimates of gross primary production based on the metabolic theory of ecology. Realistic values of the photosynthetic quotient (PQ = 1.78 ± 0.17; mol O2 mol C-1) were only obtained when heterotrophic nutrition of nanophytoplankton was considered.

  14. The Confluence of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy and Tumor Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Steven Eric; Timmerman, Robert; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Dörthe; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Mantz, Constantine A.; Wilson, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Stereotactic radiation approaches are gaining more popularity for the treatment of intracranial as well as extracranial tumors in organs such as the liver and lung. Technology, rather than biology, is driving the rapid adoption of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), in the clinic due to advances in precise positioning and targeting. Dramatic improvements in tumor control have been demonstrated; however, our knowledge of normal tissue biology response mechanisms to large fraction sizes is lacking. Herein, we will discuss how SABR can induce cellular expression of MHC I, adhesion molecules, costimulatory molecules, heat shock proteins, inflammatory mediators, immunomodulatory cytokines, and death receptors to enhance antitumor immune responses. PMID:22162711

  15. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are a group of severely impaired eating behaviors, which include three subgroups: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future. PMID:23682343

  16. Nomogram for determination of the primary and secondary. cap alpha. /sub 1/-fraction in pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Shuvalov, V.I.; Mochalov, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the quinoline - insoluble alpha (1) fraction in coal pitch and mechanical properties of the pitch is studied. A nomogram is developed which allows classification of pitches. (KAW)

  17. Stereotactic radiation therapy in arteriovenous malformations and brain tumors using the Fixster system.

    PubMed

    Valentino, V

    1986-01-01

    In brain tumours, stereotactic radiation therapy, performed in a single high dose (SHD) or fractionated (FSR), gives better results than conventional methods. In arteriovenous malformations (AVM), radiosurgery is a well-defined alternative to neurosurgery and embolization, if the malformation is not wider than 3 cm. In large AVMs, a successful combined technique of radiosurgery and FSR has been developed. In a series of 110 patients the experience proved that the atraumatic Greitz-Bergström stereotactic system is appropriate.

  18. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sook; Kim, Wonwoo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eunjin; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Lawrence Chinsoo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS. PMID:26756026

  19. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy: uncertainties and margins].

    PubMed

    Lacornerie, T; Marchesi, V; Reynaert, N

    2014-01-01

    The principles governing stereotactic body radiation therapy are tight margins and large dose gradients around targets. Every step of treatment preparation and delivery must be evaluated before applying this technique in the clinic. Uncertainties remain in each of these steps: delineation, prescription with the biological equivalent dose, treatment planning, patient set-up taking into account movements, the machine accuracy. The calculation of margins to take into account uncertainties differs from conventional radiotherapy because of the delivery of few fractions and large dose gradients around the target. The quest of high accuracy is complicated by the difficulty to reach it and the lack of consensus regarding the prescription. Many schemes dose/number of fractions are described in clinical studies and there are differences in the way describing the delivered doses. While waiting for the ICRU report dedicated to this technique, it seems desirable to use the quantities proposed in ICRU Report 83 (IMRT) to report the dose distribution. PMID:25023588

  20. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Treatment of Adrenal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Sheema; Chen, Yuhchyau; Katz, Alan W.; Muhs, Ann G.; Philip, Abraham; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and outcomes of patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastases to the adrenal glands. Methods and Materials: At University of Rochester, patients have been undergoing SBRT for limited metastases since 2001. We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients who had undergone SBRT for adrenal metastases from various primary sites, including lung (n = 20), liver (n = 3), breast (n = 3), melanoma (n = 1), pancreas (n = 1), head and neck (n = 1), and unknown primary (n = 1). Results: Of the 30 patients, 14 with five or fewer metastatic lesions (including adrenal) underwent SBRT, with the intent of controlling all known sites of metastatic disease, and 16 underwent SBRT for palliation or prophylactic palliation of bulky adrenal metastases. The prescribed dose ranged from 16 Gy in 4 fractions to 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The median dose was 40 Gy. Of the 30 patients, 24 had >3 months of follow-up with serial computed tomography. Of these 24 patients, 1 achieved a complete response, 15 achieved a partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 4 developed progressive disease. No patient developed symptomatic progression of their adrenal metastases. The 1-year survival, local control, and distant control rate was 44%, 55%, and 13%, respectively. No patient developed Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: SBRT for adrenal metastases is well tolerated. Most patients developed widespread metastases shortly after treatment. Local control was poor, although this was a patient population selected for adverse risk factors, such as bulky disease. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of SBRT for oligometastatic adrenal metastases, given the propensity of these patients to develop further disease progression.

  2. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Adrenal Gland Metastases: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, Franco; Livi, Lorenzo; Masciullo, Stefano; Menichelli, Claudia; Masi, Laura; Meattini, Icro; Bonucci, Ivano; Agresti, Benedetta; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Doro, Raffaela

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a retrospective single-institution outcome after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, we treated 48 patients with SBRT for adrenal metastases. The median age of the patient population was 62.7 years (range, 43-77 years). In the majority of patients, the prescription dose was 36 Gy in 3 fractions (70% isodose, 17.14 Gy per fraction at the isocenter). Eight patients were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery and forty patients with multi-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the series of patients was followed up for a median of 16.2 months (range, 3-63 months). At the time of analysis, 20 patients were alive and 28 patients were dead. The 1- and 2-year actuarial overall survival rates were 39.7% and 14.5%, respectively. We recorded 48 distant failures and 2 local failures, with a median interval to local failure of 4.9 months. The actuarial 1-year disease control rate was 9%; the actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rate was 90%. Conclusion: Our retrospective study indicated that SBRT for the treatment of adrenal metastases represents a safe and effective option with a control rate of 90% at 2 years.

  3. Three-Staged Stereotactic Radiotherapy Without Whole Brain Irradiation for Large Metastatic Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Yoshinori Serizawa, Toru; Nagano, Osamu; Matsuda, Shinji; Ono, Junichi; Sato, Makoto; Iwadate, Yasuo; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of staged stereotactic radiotherapy with a 2-week interfraction interval for unresectable brain metastases more than 10 cm{sup 3} in volume. Patients and Methods: Subjects included 43 patients (24 men and 19 women), ranging in age from 41 to 84 years, who had large brain metastases (> 10 cc in volume). Primary tumors were in the colon in 14 patients, lung in 12, breast in 11, and other in 6. The peripheral dose was 10 Gy in three fractions. The interval between fractions was 2 weeks. The mean tumor volume before treatment was 17.6 {+-} 6.3 cm{sup 3} (mean {+-} SD). Mean follow-up interval was 7.8 months. The local tumor control rate, as well as overall, neurological, and qualitative survivals, were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At the time of the second and third fractions, mean tumor volumes were 14.3 {+-} 6.5 (18.8% reduction) and 10.6 {+-} 6.1 cm{sup 3} (39.8% reduction), respectively, showing significant reductions. The median overall survival period was 8.8 months. Neurological and qualitative survivals at 12 months were 81.8% and 76.2%, respectively. Local tumor control rates were 89.8% and 75.9% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence-free and symptomatic edema-free rates at 12 months were 80.7% and 84.4%, respectively. Conclusions: The 2-week interval allowed significant reduction of the treatment volume. Our results suggest staged stereotactic radiotherapy using our protocol to be a possible alternative for treating large brain metastases.

  4. MO-B-18C-01: Proton Therapy II: Proton Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Winey, B; Daartz, J

    2014-06-15

    Proton stereotactic radiotherapy shares fundamental principles with general proton therapy physics, specifically range uncertainties and broad beam measurement techniques. Significant differences emerge when treating with smaller field sizes that suffer lateral disequilibrium and when fractions are reduced. This session will explore the history and scope of proton stereotactic radiotherapy in clinical practice. Uncertainties and treatment planning methods specific to stereotactic treatments will be discussed. The session will include an overview of the physical properties of small proton fields and resulting needs for accurate measurements and modeling of dose distributions for radiosurgery treatment planning. Learning Objectives: Understand the clinical rationale for proton radiosurgery. Understand the similarities and differences from general proton therapy. Understand the similarities and differences from photon stereotactic radiosurgery. Understand the basic physics and clinical physics methods for measuring and commissioning a radiosurgery program.

  5. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    SciTech Connect

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  6. Stereotactic atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Laherty, R W; Kahler, R J; Walker, D G; Tomlinson, F H

    2005-01-01

    Atlantoaxial stabilisation can be performed using a variety of surgical techniques. Developments in spinal instrumentation and stereotactic technology have been incorporated into these procedures. We have recently adopted frameless stereotaxy to assist in such operations. A retrospective study of patients treated by the authors and using frameless stereotaxy from 2001 to 2002 was performed. Each patient underwent pre-operative fine-cut CT in the position of fixation. Using these images, screw trajectory was planned. Stereotaxis and fluoroscopy was utilised during fixation. A post-operative CT was performed. There were nine patients. Bilateral screw placement was achieved in eight. In the remaining case stereotactic planning predicted the single screw fixation. There were no post-operative complications. Post-operative CT showed screw placement corresponding to the planned trajectory in all 17 screws. Stabilisation was achieved in all. Stereotactic atlantoaxial screw fixation is an accessible, safe and accurate method for the management of C1-2 instability. PMID:15639416

  7. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients.

  8. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients. PMID:27614511

  9. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for metastasis to the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Kevin; Song, Andrew; Teh, Bin S; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Mayr, Nina A; Huang, Zhibin; Sohn, Jason; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2012-12-01

    Many primary cancers can metastasize to the adrenal glands. Adrenalectomy via an open or laparoscopic approach is the current definitive treatment, but not all patients are eligible or wish to undergo surgery. There are only limited studies on the use of conventional radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms from adrenal metastasis. However, the advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) - also named stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for primary lung cancer, metastases to the lung, and metastases to the liver - have prompted some investigators to consider the use of SBRT for metastases to the adrenal glands. This review focuses on the emerging data on SBRT of metastasis to the adrenal glands, while also providing a brief discussion of the overall management of adrenal metastasis.

  10. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  11. Phase 2 Multi-institutional Trial Evaluating Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Joseph M; Chang, Daniel T; Goodman, Karyn A; Dholakia, Avani S; Raman, Siva P; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Griffith, Mary E; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pai, Jonathan S; O'Reilly, Eileen; Fisher, George A; Wild, Aaron T; Rosati, Lauren M; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Laheru, Daniel A; Columbo, Laurie A; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Koong, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    Background This phase 2 multi-institutional study was designed to determine whether gemcitabine (GEM) with fractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) results in acceptable late grade 2 to 4 gastrointestinal toxicity when compared with a prior trial of GEM with single-fraction SBRT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods A total of 49 patients with LAPC received up to 3 doses of GEM (1000 mg/m2) followed by a 1-week break and SBRT (33.0 gray [Gy] in 5 fractions). After SBRT, patients continued to receive GEM until disease progression or toxicity. Toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0] and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and pancreatic cancer-specific QLQ-PAN26 module before SBRT and at 4 weeks and 4 months after SBRT. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months (range, 3.9-45.2 months). The median age of the patients was 67 years and 84% had tumors of the pancreatic head. Rates of acute and late (primary endpoint) grade ≥2 gastritis, fistula, enteritis, or ulcer toxicities were 2% and 11%, respectively. QLQ-C30 global quality of life scores remained stable from baseline to after SBRT (67 at baseline, median change of 0 at both follow-ups; P>.05 for both). Patients reported a significant improvement in pancreatic pain (P = .001) 4 weeks after SBRT on the QLQ-PAN26 questionnaire. The median plasma carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was reduced after SBRT (median time after SBRT, 4.2 weeks; 220 U/mL vs 62 U/mL [P<.001]). The median overall survival was 13.9 months (95% confidence interval, 10.2 months-16.7 months). Freedom from local disease progression at 1 year was 78%. Four patients (8%) underwent margin-negative and lymph node-negative surgical resections. Conclusions

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A; Heron, Dwight E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) offers a promising opportunity for cure and/or palliation to patients with recurrent head and neck cancer whose comorbidities, performance status, and history of prior treatment may preclude many other salvage options. Stereotactic body radiation therapy appears to have a favorable response and toxicity profile compared with other nonoperative salvage options for recurrent head and neck cancer. However, the risk of severe toxicity remains, with carotid blowout syndrome a unique concern, although the incidence of this complication may be minimized with alternating-day fractionation. The short overall treatment time and low rates of acute toxicity make SBRT an optimal vehicle to integrate with novel systemic therapies, and several phase II studies have used concurrent cetuximab as a radiosensitizer with SBRT with promising results. Ongoing studies aim to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of SBRT with immune checkpoint inhibitors in recurrent head and neck cancer. PMID:27441751

  13. Improving the appropriateness of sudden arrhythmic death primary prevention by implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction. Point of view

    PubMed Central

    Disertori, Marcello; Gulizia, Michele M.; Casolo, Giancarlo; Delise, Pietro; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Lunati, Maurizio; Mestroni, Luisa; Salerno-Uriarte, Jorge; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the current guidelines for the primary prevention of sudden arrhythmic death, which are based on ejection fraction, do not allow the optimal selection of patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction of ischemic and nonischemic etiology for implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator. Ejection fraction alone is limited in both sensitivity and specificity. An analysis of the risk of sudden arrhythmic death with a combination of multiple tests (ejection fraction associated with one or more arrhythmic risk markers) could partially compensate for these limitations. We propose a polyparametric approach for defining the risk of sudden arrhythmic death using ejection fraction in combination with other clinical and arrhythmic risk markers (i.e. late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance, T-wave alternans, programmed ventricular stimulation, autonomic tone, and genetic testing) that have been validated in nonrandomized trials. In this article, we examine these approaches to identify three subsets of patients who cannot be comprehensively assessed by the current guidelines: patients with ejection fraction of 35% or less and a relatively low risk of sudden arrhythmic death despite the ejection fraction value; patients with ejection fraction of 35% or less and high competitive risk of death due to evolution of heart failure or noncardiac causes; and patients with ejection fraction between 35 and 45% with relatively high risk of sudden arrhythmic death despite the ejection fraction value. PMID:26895401

  14. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Benign Meningioma: Long-Term Outcome in 318 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Henzel, Martin; Surber, Gunar; Hamm, Klaus; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the long-term outcome of stereotactic-based radiation therapy in a large cohort of patients with benign intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2010, 318 patients with histologically confirmed (44.7%; previous surgery) or imaging-defined (55.3%) benign meningiomas were treated with either fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (79.6%), hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (15.4%), or stereotactic radiosurgery (5.0%), depending on tumor size and location. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), prognostic factors, and toxicity were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 50 months (range, 12-167 months). Local control, OS, and CSS at 5 years were 92.9%, 88.7%, and 97.2%, and at 10 years they were 87.5%, 74.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, tumor location (P=.029) and age >66 years (P=.031) were predictors of LC and OS, respectively. Worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms immediately after radiation therapy occurred in up to 2%. Clinically significant acute toxicity (grade 3°) occurred in 3%. Only grade 1-2 late toxicity was observed in 12%, whereas no new neurologic deficits or treatment-related mortality were encountered. Conclusions: Patients with benign meningiomas predominantly treated with standard fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with narrow margins enjoy excellent LC and CSS, with minimal long-term morbidity.

  15. Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma Lijun; Gibbs, Iris; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Soltys, Scott; Weinberg, Vivian; Wong Shun; Chang, Eric; Fowler, Jack; Larson, David A.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric data are reported for five cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to spinal tumors. Analysis per the biologically effective dose (BED) model was performed. Methods and Materials: Five patients with radiation myelopathy were compared to a subset of 19 patients with no radiation myelopathy post-SBRT. In all patients, the thecal sac was contoured to represent the spinal cord, and doses to the maximum point, 0.1-, 1-, 2-, and 5-cc volumes, were analyzed. The mean normalized 2-Gy-equivalent BEDs (nBEDs), calculated using an alpha/beta value of 2 for late toxicity with units Gy 2/2, were compared using the t test and analysis of variance test. Results: Radiation myelopathy was observed at the maximum point with doses of 25.6 Gy in two fractions, 30.9 Gy in three fractions, and 14.8, 13.1, and 10.6 Gy in one fraction. Overall, there was a significant interaction between patient subsets and volume based on the nBED (p = 0.0003). Given individual volumes, a significant difference was observed for the mean maximum point nBED (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The maximum point dose should be respected for spine SBRT. For single-fraction SBRT 10 Gy to a maximum point is safe, and up to five fractions an nBED of 30 to 35 Gy 2/2 to the thecal sac also poses a low risk of radiation myelopathy.

  16. Stereotactic biopsy of cerebral lesions in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, M A; Pell, M F; Brew, B J

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy, mortality and morbidity of CT directed stereotactic biopsy of a cerebral lesion in 32 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected patients between July 1991 and June 1994 who had an atypical presentation for toxoplasmosis or who were failing or intolerant of empirical antitoxoplasmosis treatment was evaluated. An histological diagnosis was able to be made in 85%: progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in 13, primary cerebral lymphoma in 10, toxoplasmosis in 3 and HIV encephalitis in one. Non-specific reactive changes or gliosis were seen in 5 patients. There was no mortality, and morbidity occurred in 2 patients: one intraventricular haemorrhage and one transient third nerve palsy. Correct diagnosis made by image-directed stereotactic biopsy of central nervous system (CNS) disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients may improve outcome, particularly in those diseases where effective treatment strategies already exist and become increasingly available in the future.

  17. Quality of life in patients with primary axillary hyperhidrosis before and after treatment with fractionated microneedle radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Adibi, Neda; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary axillary hyperhidrosis (PAH) is a common condition with a great impact on the patient's quality of life (QOL). It is associated with serious social, emotional, and occupational distress. The aim of this study was to investigate the QOL in patients with PAH before and after treatment with fractionated microneedle radiofrequency (FMR). Materials and Methods: We evaluated 25 patients with severe PAH. Each patient had three sessions of FMR treatment using a novel applicator at 3-week intervals. The study was based on Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) Questionnaires. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after the last session. Results: Our patients included 32% males and 68% females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of subjects was 30.2 ± 6.27 years. The mean ± SD of the DLQI before and after treatment was 12.96 ± 5.93, and 4.29 ± 2.21, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the before and after intervention (P < 0.001). No major, permanent adverse effects were shown. Conclusion: Treatment with FMR can improve the DLQI of patients with PAH. PMID:26622250

  18. Relevance of Biologically Equivalent Dose Values in Outcome Evaluation of Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, Franco Masi, Laura; Bonucci, Ivano; Polli, Caterina; Menichelli, Claudia; Gulisano, Massimo; Pacini, Stefania; Aterini, Stefano; Cavedon, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Different biologically equivalent dose (BED) values associated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of patients with primary and metastatic pulmonary nodules were studied. The BED values were calculated for tumoral tissue and low {alpha}/{beta} ratio, assuming that better local response could be obtained by using stereotactic high-BED treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight patients with T1-T3 N0 non-small-cell lung cancer and 46 patients with metastatic lung nodules were treated with SRT. The BED was calculated for {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 3 and 10. Overall survival (OS) was assessed according to Kaplan-Meier and appraised as a function of three BED levels: low (30-50 Gy), medium (50-70 Gy), and high (70-98 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 10). Results: The OS rates for all 104 patients at 12, 24, and 36 months were 73%, 48.3%, and 35.8%, respectively. Local response greater than 50% for low, medium, and high BED values was observed in 54%, 47%, and 73%, respectively. In the high-BED treated group, OS rates at 12, 24, and 36 months (80.9%, 70%, and 53.6%, respectively) were significantly improved compared with low- (69%, 46.1%, and 30.7%, respectively) and medium-BED (67%, 28%, and 21%, respectively) treated patients. Results are also discussed in terms of BED calculated on {alpha}/{beta} 3 Gy characteristic of the microcapillary bed. No acute toxicity higher than Grade 1 was observed. Conclusions: Radioablation of pulmonary neoplastic nodules may be achieved with SRT delivered by using a high-dose fraction with high BED value.

  19. Fluorescence guidance during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Brucker, David; Ehrhardt, Andre; Fischer, Stefan; Goebel, Werner; Goetz, Marcus; Guenther, Bettina; Hennig, Georg; Herms, Jochen; Irion, Klaus-Martin; Johansson, Ann; Kienast, Yvonne; Kniebuehler, Gesa; Li, Pan; Ruehm, Adrian; Sandner, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    Objective: When a stereotactic biopsy is taken to enable histopathological diagnosis of a suspected brain tumor, it is essential to i) do this safely, that is not injure a major blood vessel and ii) to obtain relevant vital material from the tumor. We are investigating the suitability of Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence for blood vessel recognition and 5- Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence for identification of proliferative brain tumor tissue. Methods: A fiber-optic endoscopic approach was studied to generate and detect both fluorescence signals. PpIX concentrations in brain tumors have been measured by chemical extraction. Preliminary equipment was studied in a mouse model. Results: PpIX-concentrations in glioblastoma tissue showed high inner- and inter-patient variability, but each patient out of 15 with interpretable data showed at least one sample with a PpIX-concentration exceeding 2.4 μmol/l, which is easily detectable by state-of-the-art fiberoptic fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. The imaging fluoroscope with 30,000 pixels resolution could be introduced through a position controlled stereotactic needle. ICG-fluorescence from vessels with diameters >= 0.1 mm can be detected with a contrast of 2-2.5 against surrounding tissue. Conclusion: Fluorescence detection during stereotactic biopsy might increase safety and precision of the procedure significantly.

  20. Single versus multiple session stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastasis: the risk-benefit ratio.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Kristin J; Sahgal, Arjun; Foote, Matthew; Knisely, Jonathan; Gerszten, Peter C; Chao, Samuel T; Suh, John H; Sloan, Andrew E; Chang, Eric L; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2015-01-01

    Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy represents an important advancement in the management of spinal metastases that allows precise delivery of ablative doses of radiation therapy with excellent local control. Although the technique is being increasingly used in clinical practice, the optimal fractionation schedule remains uncertain. In this perspective paper, we review radiobiologic principles that support the use of multiple- versus single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy schedules and clinical data supporting the multiple-fraction approach. Specifically, we suggest that there may be a local control benefit of fractionation, while helping to limit the risk of toxicities such as vertebral body fracture, pain flare and radiation myelopathy. We conclude with future directions and the need for future study on this important topic.

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  2. Treatment of Primary Axillary Hyperhidrosis by Fractional Microneedle Radiofrequency: Is it Still Effective after Long-term Follow-up?

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Saffaei, Ali; Behfar, Shadi; Pourazizi, Mohsen; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid; Bolandnazar, Najmeh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary axillary hyperhidrosis (PAH) is a chronic idiopathic disorder causing major stress in patients. Among the common therapies for PAH, only surgical interventions have proven feasible as a permanent solution. Objective and Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fractional microneedle radiofrequency (FMR) as an alternative permanent treatment for PAH with long-term follow-up. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blind, sham-controlled comparative study. Twenty-five patients with severe PAH were provided three treatments of FMR at 3-week intervals (the treatment group), and a control group was provided the sham treatment. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using the hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS) at baseline and the end of the study, as well as during the 1 year follow-up phase. Results: HDSS demonstrated significant improvement after treatment in the treatment group compared to the sham control. The mean (±standard deviation) of HDSS in the group being treated with radiofrequency was 2.50 (±0.88) after 1 year follow-up, and that of the control group was 3.38 (±0.49; P < 0.001). Follow-up results show that there were 10 patients (41.6%) with no relapse and 11 patients (45.9%) with relapse after 1 year. There was a significant correlation between HDSS changes in relapse and body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Treatment of PAH with FMR is a safe and noninvasive procedure with a positive therapeutic effect on HDSS. It is recommended, however, that sessions of FMR be repeated after 1 year, particularly in overweight patients with high BMIs. Clinical Trial Registration: IRCT2013111915455N1. Level of Evidences: Level II-1. PMID:27057039

  3. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, T.-W.; Wong, Victy Y.W.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To study the treatment outcome in patients with locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with non-metastatic, locally recurrent NPC who were treated with curative intent between 1998 and 2002 were retrospectively analyzed. The International Union Against Cancer T-stage distribution at recurrence (rT) was as follows: rT1-14, rT2-7, rT3-3, and rT4-6. All patients were treated with SRT with a daily fractional dose of 2.5-4.5 Gy (median, 3 Gy) in 8-22 fractions (median, 18 fractions). Total equivalent dose (TED) was calculated by the linear-quadratic formula without a time factor correction. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate, and local failure-free survival (LFFS) rate for the whole group were 40%, 41.4%, and 56.8%, respectively. The 3-year LFFS rates of rT1-2 and rT3-4 diseases were 65% and 66.7%, respectively. Seven of nine patients who received a TED <55 Gy recurred locally compared with 4 of 21 patients who received >=55 Gy. Their corresponding 5-year LFFS rates were 22.2% and 75.8% (p = 0.005). The TED was the only factor significant in affecting the local control on univariate analyses. Conclusion: SRT is an effective treatment for locally recurrent NPC. TED >=55 Gy should be given to secure a higher local control rate. The late complication rates were acceptable for patients with rT1-2 disease. For patients with rT3-4 disease, more works need to be done to further decrease the late complications.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  5. Curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for residual breast cancer liver metastasis after systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kagara, Naofumi; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Ami; Inatome, Junichi; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Kim, Chiwan; Danno, Katsuki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kanoh, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Ohnishi, Tadashi; Tono, Takeshi; Monden, Takushi; Imaoka, Shingi; Kagawa, Kazufumi

    2014-11-01

    Liver metastases from breast cancer are generally treated with systemic therapy such as chemotherapy or hormonotherapy. However, local treatment options such as resection, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and radiotherapy can also be considered to treat oligometastases. We report the case of a 45-year-old female treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) after chemotherapy against a solitary liver metastasis from primary breast cancer. A liver metastasis with diameter of 35 mm developed 3.5 years after surgery for primary breast cancer in 2004. Fourteen courses of triweekly docetaxel treatments considerably decreased the metastatic lesion, but there still remained a tiny lesion radiographically. Chemotherapy was stopped because of the side-effects of docetaxel, and then SBRT was selected for additional treatment, aiming at complete cure of metastasis. X-ray irradiation (52.8 Gy/4 fractions) was applied to the remaining metastatic lesion, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no evidence of residual tumor 4 months after irradiation. Neither regrowth nor recurrences have been found until now, 24 months after SBRT. SBRT for oligometastases of breast cancer may be one of the possible curative-intent options, being less invasive than surgical resection or RFA.

  6. Vertebral Compression Fracture (VCF) After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): Analysis of Predictive Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, Marcelo V.R.; Al-Omair, Ameen; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Letourneau, Daniel; Korol, Renee; Yu, Eugene; Howard, Peter; Lochray, Fiona; Costa, Leodante B. da; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are increasingly observed after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of VCF after spine SBRT and identify clinical and dosimetric factors predictive for VCF. The analysis incorporated the recently described Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) criteria. Methods and Materials: The primary endpoint of this study was the development of a de novo VCF (ie, new endplate fracture or collapse deformity) or fracture progression based on an existing fracture at the site of treatment after SBRT. We retrospectively scored 167 spinal segments in 90 patients treated with spine SBRT according to each of the 6 SINS criteria. We also evaluated the presence of paraspinal extension, prior radiation, various dosimetric parameters including dose per fraction ({>=}20 Gy vs <20 Gy), age, and histology. Results: The median follow-up was 7.4 months. We identified 19 fractures (11%): 12 de novo fractures (63%) and 7 cases of fracture progression (37%). The mean time to fracture after SBRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.5-21.6 months). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that alignment (P=.0003), lytic lesions (P=.007), lung (P=.03) and hepatocellular (P<.0001) primary histologies, and dose per fraction of 20 Gy or greater (P=.004) were significant predictors of VCF. Conclusions: The presence of kyphotic/scoliotic deformity and the presence of lytic tumor were the only predictive factors of VCF based on the original 6 SINS criteria. We also report that patients with lung and hepatocellular tumors and treatment with SBRT of 20 Gy or greater in a single fraction are at a higher risk of VCF.

  7. Stereotactic proton beam therapy for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vernimmen, Frederik J.A.I. . E-mail: fv@sun.ac.za; Slabbert, Jacobus P.; Wilson, Jennifer A.; Fredericks, Shaheeda

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypofractionated stereotactic proton therapy of predominantly large intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by analyzing retrospectively the results from a cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Since 1993, a total of 85 patients with vascular lesions have been treated. Of those, 64 patients fulfilled the criteria of having an arteriovenous malformation and sufficient follow-up. The AVMs were grouped by volume: <14 cc (26 patients) and {>=}14 cc (38 patients). Treatment was delivered with a fixed horizontal 200 MeV proton beam under stereotactic conditions, using a stereophotogrammetric positioning system. The majority of patients were hypofractionated (2 or 3 fractions), and the proton doses are presented as single-fraction equivalent cobalt Gray equivalent doses (SFEcGyE). The overall mean minimum target volume dose was 17.37 SFEcGyE, ranging from 10.38-22.05 SFEcGyE. Results: Analysis by volume group showed obliteration in 67% for volumes <14 cc and 43% for volumes {>=}14 cc. Grade IV acute complications were observed in 3% of patients. Transient delayed effects were seen in 15 patients (23%), becoming permanent in 3 patients. One patient also developed a cyst 8 years after therapy. Conclusions: Stereotactic proton beam therapy applied in a hypofractionated schedule allows for the safe treatment of large AVMs, with acceptable results. It is an alternative to other treatment strategies for large AVMs. AVMs are likely not static entities, but probably undergo vascular remodeling. Factors influencing angiogenesis could play a new role in a form of adjuvant therapy to improve on the radiosurgical results.

  8. Gallotannin-rich Caesalpinia spinosa fraction decreases the primary tumor and factors associated with poor prognosis in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several treatment alternatives are available for primary breast cancer, although those for metastatic disease or inflammation associated with tumor progression are ineffective. Therefore, there is a great need for new therapeutic alternatives capable of generating an immune response against residual tumor cells, thus contributing to eradication of micrometastases and cancer stem cells. The use of complex natural products is an excellent therapeutic alternative widely used by Chinese, Hindu, Egyptian, and ancestral Latin-American Indian populations. Methods The present study evaluated cytotoxic, antitumor, and tumor progression activities of a gallotannin-rich fraction derived from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). The parameters evaluated in vitro were mitochondrial membrane depolarization, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and clonogenic activity. The parameters evaluated in vivo were tumor growth, leukocyte number, metastatic cell number, and cytokine production by flow cytometry. Results The in vitro results showed that the P2Et fraction induced apoptosis with mitochondrial membrane potential loss, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and decreased clonogenic capacity of 4T1 cells. In vivo, the P2Et fraction induced primary tumor reduction in terms of diameter and weight in BALB/c mice transplanted with 4T1 cells and decreased numbers of metastatic cells, mainly in the spleen. Furthermore, decreases in the number of peripheral blood leukocytes (leukemoid reaction) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) serum levels were found, which are events associated with a poor prognosis. The P2Et fraction exerts its activity on the primary tumor, reduces cell migration to distant organs, and decreases IL-6 serum levels, implying tumor microenvironment mechanisms. Conclusions Overall, the P2Et fraction lessens risk factors associated with tumor progression and diminishes primary tumor size, showing

  9. The efficacy of image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy in neurologically symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, R M; Russell, E; Yungbluth, M; Hidvegi, D F; Brody, B A; Dal Canto, M C

    1992-02-01

    A prospective series of 50 neurologically symptomatic human immunodeficiency infected patients with intracranial lesions who underwent image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy is presented. Patients were diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma (14 patients), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (14 patients), toxoplasmosis (13 patients), human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (3 patients), infarction (2 patients), and 1 patient each with metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, cryptococcoma, and atypical mycobacterial infection. Two of the patients with toxoplasmosis had a second intracranial abnormality. Two biopsies resulted in either descriptive diagnosis only or were nondiagnostic; the definitive diagnostic efficacy of image-guided stereotactic biopsy was thus 96%. No deaths were incurred as a result of biopsy. Four intraoperative or postoperative hemorrhages occurred; in only 1 patient was there a residual neurological deficit related to the surgery. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy may thus be considered both safe and effective in this patient population.

  10. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery for non-functioning and secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is frequently employed in patients with residual or recurrent pituitary adenoma with excellent rates of tumor control and remission of hormonal hypersecretion. Advances in RT have improved with the use of stereotactic techniques either as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), all aiming to improve the dose distribution to the tumor while reducing the amount of normal brain receiving significant doses of radiation. We provide an overview of the recent published literature on the long-term efficacy and adverse effects of stereotactic irradiation in nonfunctioning and secreting pituitary adenomas. Both techniques are associated with excellent clinical outcomes; however, advantages and drawbacks of each of these techniques in terms of local control, hormonal excess normalization, and radiation-induced toxicity remain a matter of debate. In clinical practice, single-fraction SRS may represent a convenient approach to patients with small and medium-sized pituitary adenoma away at least 2 mm from the optic chiasm, whereas FSRT is preferred over SRS for lesions >2.5-3 cm in size and/or involving the anterior optic pathway. PMID:27330422

  11. A Pilot Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy and Sunitinib in Previously Irradiated Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Wuthrick, Evan J.; Curran, Walter J.; Camphausen, Kevin; Lin, Alexander; Glass, Jon; Evans, James; Andrews, David W.; Axelrod, Rita; Shi, Wenyin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Haacke, E. Mark; Hillman, Gilda G.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Angiogenic blockade with irradiation may enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy (RT) through vascular normalization. We sought to determine the safety and toxicity profile of continuous daily-dosed sunitinib when combined with hypofractionated stereotactic RT (fSRT) for recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had malignant high-grade glioma that recurred or progressed after primary surgery and RT. All patients received a minimum of a 10-day course of fSRT, had World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, and a life expectancy of >3 months. During fSRT, sunitinib was administered at 37.5 mg daily. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity, and response was assessed via serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Eleven patients with rHGG were enrolled. The fSRT doses delivered ranged from 30 to 42 Gy in 2.5- to 3.75-Gy fractions. The median follow-up time was 40 months. Common acute toxicities included hematologic disorders, fatigue, hypertension, and elevated liver transaminases. Sunitinib and fSRT were well tolerated. One grade 4 mucositis toxicity occurred, and no grade 4 or 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. One patient had a nearly complete response, and 4 patients had stable disease for >9 months. Two patients (18%) remain alive and progression-free >3 years from enrollment. The 6-month progression-free survival was 45%. Conclusions: Sunitinib at a daily dose of 37.5 mg given concurrently with hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation for rHGG yields acceptable toxicities and an encouraging 6-month progression-free survival.

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Intrahepatic and Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Anand; Dagoglu, Nergiz; Mancias, Joseph; Raven, Kristin; Khwaja, Khalid; Tseng, Jennifer F; Ng, Kimmie; Enzinger, Peter; Miksad, Rebecca; Bullock, Andrea; Evenson, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unresectable intrahepatic and hilar cholangiocarcinomas carry a dismal prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy and conventional external beam radiation and brachytherapy have been used with limited success. We explored the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for these patients. Methods: Patients with unresectable intrahepatic or hilar cholangiocarcinoma or those with positive margins were included in this study. Systemic therapy was used at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The CyberknifeTM stereotactic body radiotherapy system used to treat these patients. Patients were treated with three daily fractions. Clinical and radiological follow-up were performed every three months. Results: 34 patients (16 male and 18 female) with 42 lesions were included in this study. There were 32 unresectable tumors and two patients with resected tumors with positive margins. The median SBRT dose was 30Gy in three fractions. The median follow-up was 38 months (range 8-71 months). The actuarial local control rate was 79%. The median overall survival was 17 months and the median progression free survival was ten months. There were four Grade III toxicities (12%), including duodenal ulceration, cholangitis and liver abscess. Conclusions: SBRT is an effective and reasonably safe local therapy option for unresectable intrahepatic or hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26516357

  13. Radiocarbon dating of magnetic and non magnetic soil fractions as a method to estimate the heterotrophic component of soil respiration in a primary forest of Ghana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiti, T.; Certini, G.; Marzaioli, F.; Valentini, R.

    2012-04-01

    We estimated the heterotrophic component (Rh) of soil respiration in a primary forest of Ghana by radiocarbon dating, a method we already successfully applied in temperate and Mediterranean forests. In this case, given the advanced stage of alteration of tropical soils, which are thus rich in oxides, we implemented the method on soil fractions obtained by High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS), hence based on different degrees of magnetic susceptibility. In particular, we separated an organic pool associated with magnetic minerals (e.g iron oxides) from an organic pool engaged with non-magnetic minerals. This non destructive method of fractionation, often applied to the finest fraction of soil (clay), is here attempted on the bulk fine earth (< 2 mm). We sampled the soil at 0-5, 5-15, 15-10, and 30-50 cm depth intervals, since a previous study in the same site suggested that only the first 50 cm of soil was enriched in bomb carbon (C younger than 1950). The samples of each layer were sieved at 2 mm and further at 0.5 mm ,so as to have two size fractions: 2 to 0.5 mm and <0.5 mm, and both of them were separated into a magnetic and non magnetic fraction. All the specimens were then investigated in terms of mineralogical assemblage (by X-Ray diffrattometry), chemical structure of the organic component (13C NMR spectroscopy), and 14C concentration (AMS) for inferring the mean residence time (MRT) of the organic component in the soil. Radiocarbon concentration was always higher in the finest SOC fractions (<0.5 mm), with the magnetic fraction always showing an higher 14C concentration than the non magnetic one. The magnetic and non magnetic materials of the coarser fraction (0.5-2 mm) showed quite similar 14C concentrations in all of the soil layers investigated. The composition of the organic matter is different in the different fractions and partly explains the differences in MRT, although a major role in preserving the organics from decomposition is probably played

  14. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z. Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens.

  15. Multifunctional T Lymphocytes Generated After Therapy With an Antitumor Gallotanin-Rich Normalized Fraction Are Related to Primary Tumor Size Reduction in a Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Urueña, Claudia; Gomez, Alejandra; Sandoval, Tito; Hernandez, John; Li, Shaoping; Barreto, Alfonso; Fiorentino, Susana

    2015-09-01

    Natural compounds are promising sources for anticancer therapies because of their multifunctional activity and low toxicity. Although the host immune response (IR) is clearly implicated in tumor control, the relationship between natural therapies and IR has not yet been elucidated. The present work evaluates IR induction after treatment with a gallotannin-rich fraction from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). Breast tumor 4T1 cells were used to evaluate antitumor properties and IR activation. Apoptosis and expression of immunogenic cell death (ICD) markers were assessed in vitro, whereas IR and postvaccination tumor evolution were assessed in vivo. P2Et fraction induced apoptotic cell death, displaying phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. ICD markers such as calreticulin, high-mobility group box 1 translocation from nuclei to cytoplasm, and ATP secretion were observed. Primary tumor control was improved by vaccination with P2Et-pretreated 4T1 cells (t-P2Et), yielding long-lasting ex vivo multifunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes (interleukin [IL]-2(+), tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α(+), interferon [IFN]-γ(+)) that secrete IL-2, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ after specific 4T1 cell stimulation. The present study constitutes the first demonstration of a long-lasting antitumor IR induction and primary tumor reduction induced by a complex natural fraction. These data reveal the potential use of this fraction as an adjuvant in breast cancer treatment.

  16. Comparison of left ventricular ejection fraction and inducible ventricular tachycardia in ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated by primary angioplasty versus thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Chong, James J H; Ganesan, Anand N; Eipper, Vicki; Kovoor, Pramesh

    2008-01-15

    Electrophysiologic studies predict the risk for sudden death after myocardial infarction (MI). Although primary angioplasty has become the preferred method of treatment for ST-elevation MI, intravenous thrombolysis remains the first-line treatment in 30% to 70% of cases worldwide. Rates of ventricular tachyarrhythmias may vary according to type of reperfusion treatment. This study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and rates of inducible ventricular tachycardia may be more favorable in treatment with primary angioplasty rather than thrombolysis. Consecutive patients receiving primary angioplasty (n = 225) or thrombolysis (n = 195) for ST-elevation MI were included. The mean LVEF was 48 +/- 12% for the primary angioplasty group and 46 +/- 13% for the thrombolysis group (p = 0.30). The proportion of patients with LVEFs <40% was 30% in the primary angioplasty group and 30% in the thrombolysis group (p = 0.98). Patients with LVEFs <40% underwent electrophysiologic studies. Ventricular tachycardia was inducible in 23 of 66 primary angioplasty patients (34.8%) compared with 21 of 55 (38.1%) thrombolysis patients (p = 0.69). Implantable cardiac defibrillators were inserted in 30 patients, of whom 8 (27%) had appropriate device activations. The mean time from MI to first spontaneous activation was 387 +/- 458 days. In conclusion, patients treated with thrombolysis or primary angioplasty for ST-elevation MIs had similar resultant LVEFs and rates of inducible ventricular tachycardia. There was a surprisingly high rate of spontaneous defibrillator activations, often occurring late after MI. PMID:18178398

  17. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai; Dai Jiazhong; Pan Li; Wang Enmin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  18. Stereotactic Neurosurgical Treatment Options for Craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Trippel, Michael; Nikkhah, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Craniopharyngioma are the most common non-glial tumors in childhood. The results of different studies indicate that radical excision surgery is not an appropriate treatment strategy for childhood craniopharyngioma with hypothalamic involvement. Stereotactic neurosurgery provides save, minimal invasive and cost-efficient options in the treatment of childhood craniopharyngioma. In this review a summary of the contribution of the stereotactic neurosurgery in the interdisciplinary treatment regime of childhood craniopharyngioma will be given and discussed in detail. PMID:22654877

  19. Review of Robotic Technology for Stereotactic Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Faria, Carlos; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Rito, Manuel; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Bicho, Estela

    2015-01-01

    The research of stereotactic apparatus to guide surgical devices began in 1908, yet a major part of today's stereotactic neurosurgeries still rely on stereotactic frames developed almost half a century ago. Robots excel at handling spatial information, and are, thus, obvious candidates in the guidance of instrumentation along precisely planned trajectories. In this review, we introduce the concept of stereotaxy and describe a standard stereotactic neurosurgery. Neurosurgeons' expectations and demands regarding the role of robots as assistive tools are also addressed. We list the most successful robotic systems developed specifically for or capable of executing stereotactic neurosurgery. A critical review is presented for each robotic system, emphasizing the differences between them and detailing positive features and drawbacks. An analysis of the listed robotic system features is also undertaken, in the context of robotic application in stereotactic neurosurgery. Finally, we discuss the current perspective, and future directions of a robotic technology in this field. All robotic systems follow a very similar and structured workflow despite the technical differences that set them apart. No system unequivocally stands out as an absolute best. The trend of technological progress is pointing toward the development of miniaturized cost-effective solutions with more intuitive interfaces. PMID:25955851

  20. Review of Robotic Technology for Stereotactic Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Faria, Carlos; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Rito, Manuel; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Bicho, Estela

    2015-01-01

    The research of stereotactic apparatus to guide surgical devices began in 1908, yet a major part of today's stereotactic neurosurgeries still rely on stereotactic frames developed almost half a century ago. Robots excel at handling spatial information, and are, thus, obvious candidates in the guidance of instrumentation along precisely planned trajectories. In this review, we introduce the concept of stereotaxy and describe a standard stereotactic neurosurgery. Neurosurgeons' expectations and demands regarding the role of robots as assistive tools are also addressed. We list the most successful robotic systems developed specifically for or capable of executing stereotactic neurosurgery. A critical review is presented for each robotic system, emphasizing the differences between them and detailing positive features and drawbacks. An analysis of the listed robotic system features is also undertaken, in the context of robotic application in stereotactic neurosurgery. Finally, we discuss the current perspective, and future directions of a robotic technology in this field. All robotic systems follow a very similar and structured workflow despite the technical differences that set them apart. No system unequivocally stands out as an absolute best. The trend of technological progress is pointing toward the development of miniaturized cost-effective solutions with more intuitive interfaces.

  1. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Thoracic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Balter, Peter A.; Rebueno, Neal; Sharp, Hadley J.; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, the efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients previously given thoracic radiation therapy is not known. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes after SBRT for recurrent disease among patients previously given radiation therapy to the chest. Materials and Methods: A search of medical records for patients treated with SBRT to the thorax after prior fractionated radiation therapy to the chest at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center revealed 36 such cases. The median follow-up time after SBRT was 15 months. The endpoints analyzed were overall survival, local control, and the incidence and severity of treatment-related toxicity. Results: SBRT provided in-field local control for 92% of patients; at 2 years, the actuarial overall survival rate was 59%, and the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 26%, with the primary site of failure being intrathoracic relapse. Fifty percent of patients experienced worsening of dyspnea after SBRT, with 19% requiring oxygen supplementation; 30% of patients experienced chest wall pain and 8% Grade 3 esophagitis. No Grade 4 or 5 toxic effects were noted. Conclusions: SBRT can provide excellent in-field tumor control in patients who have received prior radiation therapy. Toxicity was significant but manageable. The high rate of intrathoracic failure indicates the need for further study to identify patients who would derive the most benefit from SBRT for this purpose.

  3. Opportunities for Radiosensitization in the Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Era.

    PubMed

    Moding, Everett J; Mowery, Yvonne M; Kirsch, David G

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) utilizing a small number of high-dose radiation therapy fractions continues to expand in clinical application. Although many approaches have been proposed to radiosensitize tumors with conventional fractionation, how these radiosensitizers will translate to SBRT remains largely unknown. Here, we review our current understanding of how SBRT eradicates tumors, including the potential contributions of endothelial cell death and immune system activation. In addition, we identify several new opportunities for radiosensitization generated by the move toward high dose per fraction radiation therapy. PMID:27441746

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastases to the Lung: A Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nuyttens, Joost J.; Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C.M.G. van der; Verhoef, Cornelis; Maat, A.; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Holt, Bronno van der; Aerts, Joachim; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a phase 2 study, the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy for oligometastases to the lung in inoperable patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with lung metastases were included in this study if (1) the primary tumor was controlled; (2) patients were ineligible for or refused surgery and chemotherapy; and (3) patients had 5 or fewer metastatic lesions in no more than 2 organs. Large peripheral tumors were treated with a dose of 60 Gy (3 fractions), small peripheral tumors with 30 Gy (1 fraction), central tumors received 60 Gy (5 fractions), and mediastinal tumors or tumors close to the esophagus received 56 Gy (7 fractions). Results: Thirty patients with 57 metastatic lung tumors from various primary cancers were analyzed. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 4-60 months). At 2 years, local control for the 11 central tumors was 100%, for the 23 peripheral tumors treated to 60 Gy it was 91%, and for the 23 tumors treated in a single 30-Gy fraction it was 74% (P=.13). This resulted in an overall local control rate at 1 year of 79%, with a 2-sided 80% confidence interval of 67% to 87%. Because the hypothesized value of 70% lies within the confidence interval, we cannot reject the hypothesis that the true local control rate at 1 year is ≤70%, and therefore we did not achieve the goal of the study: an actuarial local control of the treated lung lesions at 1 year of 90%. The 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. Grade 3 acute toxicity occurred in 5 patients. Three patients complained of chronic grade 3 toxicity, including pain, fatigue, and pneumonitis, and 3 patients had rib fractures. Conclusions: The local control was promising, and the 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. The treatment was well tolerated, even for central lesions.

  5. Differential protection among fractionated blueberry polyphenolic families against DA-, Abeta(42)- and LPS-induced decrements in Ca(2+) buffering in primary hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Joseph, James A; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Brewer, Gregory J; Weikel, Karen A; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Fisher, Derek R

    2010-07-28

    It has been postulated that at least part of the loss of cognitive function in aging may be the result of deficits in Ca(2+) recovery (CAR) and increased oxidative/inflammatory (OX/INF) stress signaling. However, previous research showed that aged animals supplemented with blueberry (BB) extract showed fewer deficits in CAR, as well as motor and cognitive functional deficits. A recent subsequent experiment has shown that DA- or Abeta(42)-induced deficits in CAR in primary hippocampal neuronal cells (HNC) were antagonized by BB extract, and (OX/INF) signaling was reduced. The present experiments assessed the most effective BB polyphenol fraction that could protect against OX/INF-induced deficits in CAR, ROS generation, or viability. HNCs treated with BB extract, BB fractions (e.g., proanthocyanidin, PAC), or control medium were exposed to dopamine (DA, 0.1 mM), amyloid beta (Abeta(42), 25 muM) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 microg/mL). The results indicated that the degree of protection against deficits in CAR varied as a function of the stressor and was generally greater against Abeta(42) and LPS than DA. The whole BB, anthocyanin (ANTH), and PRE-C18 fractions offered the greatest protection, whereas chlorogenic acid offered the lowest protection. Protective capabilities of the various fractions against ROS depended upon the stressor, where the BB extract and the combined PAC (high and low molecular weight) fraction offered the best protection against LPS and Abeta(42) but were less effective against DA-induced ROS. The high and low molecular weight PACs and the ANTH fractions enhanced ROS production regardless of the stressor used, and this reflected increased activation of stress signals (e.g., P38 MAPK). The viability data indicated that the whole BB and combined PAC fraction showed greater protective effects against the stressors than the more fractionated polyphenolic components. Thus, these results suggest that, except for a few instances, the lesser the

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef . E-mail: khamm@erfurt.helios-kliniken.de; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  7. Size-fractionated phytoplankton biomass and primary production in the Gerlache and south Bransfield Straits (Antarctic Peninsula) in Austral summer 1995 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Manuel; Fernandez, Emilio; Serret, Pablo

    From the beginning of December 1995 to the beginning of February of 1996, 29 stations were visited in the area of Bransfield and Gerlache Straits, and Bellingshausen Sea. Size-fractionated chlorophyll and primary production rates (0.2-2, 2-10 and >10 μm), as well as phytoplankton species composition were determined. Primary production experiments were carried out following JGOFS protocols and samples incubated from dawn during 24 h. The study area was divided into three main regions: A— Large diatoms region, Gerlache Strait on both cruises, and shelf break of Bellingshausen Sea area during the cruise FRUELA 95, with high values of primary production and predominance of large (>10 μm) phytosynthetic phytoplankters. Primary production and chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration averaged, respectively, 2.1 g C m -2 d -1 and 165 mg Chl a m -2. Eighty percent of Chl a and 70% of primary production corresponded to cells larger than 10 μm, such as big chain-forming diatoms, the large flagellate Pyramimonas, and colonies of Phaeocystis. B— Cryptophycean region, Bransfield Strait and confluence with Gerlache Strait. Characterised by moderate values of primary production of small size organisms. Mean primary production values were ca. 1.0 g C m -2 d -1 and 62 mg Chl a m -2, and the phytoplankton community was formed essentially by Cryptomonas species. Approximately 80% of Chl a and primary production corresponded to less than 10-μm cells. Within this region, a subarea could be distinguished in the central zone of Bransfield Strait, with low phytoplankton biomass (around 20 mg Chl a m -2) and primary production (ca 0.6 gC m -2 d -1). In this subarea, the phytoplankton community was dominated by free cells of Phaeocystis and Cryptomonas; Sixty-five percent of the Chl a and 80% of primary production corresponded to smaller fractions. C— Region of very low phytoplankton biomass, all Bellingshausen Sea during the FRUELA 96 cruise. Primary production was around 0.2 g C m -2

  8. [Brain radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy of the resection cavity for intracranial metastases: analysis of the literature from four cases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Lefebvre, L; Delpon, G; Thillays, F

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy after resection of brain metastasis is an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy. A high dose per fraction is associated with a risk of radiation necrosis. We present four cases of confirmed histological radiation necrosis. Differentiating recurrent tumour from radiation necrosis in this scenario is challenging. An enhancing area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a "cut bell pepper" appearance may suggest radiation necrosis. Advanced imaging modalities such as perfusion MR imaging and positron emission tomography can be useful. Dosimetric predictors of the occurrence of radiation necrosis after stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy are poorly understood and require prospective studies on larger cohorts.

  9. [Brain radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy of the resection cavity for intracranial metastases: analysis of the literature from four cases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Lefebvre, L; Delpon, G; Thillays, F

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy after resection of brain metastasis is an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy. A high dose per fraction is associated with a risk of radiation necrosis. We present four cases of confirmed histological radiation necrosis. Differentiating recurrent tumour from radiation necrosis in this scenario is challenging. An enhancing area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a "cut bell pepper" appearance may suggest radiation necrosis. Advanced imaging modalities such as perfusion MR imaging and positron emission tomography can be useful. Dosimetric predictors of the occurrence of radiation necrosis after stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy are poorly understood and require prospective studies on larger cohorts. PMID:25573799

  10. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the

  11. Lung stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastases: comparison of oligo-recurrence and sync-oligometastases†

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Niibe, Yuzuru; Yamamoto, Takaya; Katsui, Kuniaki; Jingu, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Susumu; Terahara, Atsuro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Oligometastases can be divided into sync-oligometastases and oligo-recurrence. The difference is whether the primary site is uncontrolled or controlled. The goal of this multicenter study was to evaluate treatment outcomes and factors affecting survival after stereotactic body radiotherapy for pulmonary oligometastases. Methods The information after stereotactic body radiotherapy from January 2004 to April 2014 was retrospectively collected. Ninety-six patients (65 males, 31 females) were enrolled. Ten cases (10%) were sync-oligometastases, 79 cases (82%) were oligo-recurrences and 7 (7%) were unclassified oligometastases with <6 months of disease-free interval. The median disease-free interval between initial therapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy was 24 months. The median calculated biological effective dose was 105.6 Gy. Results The median follow-up period was 32 months for survivors. The 3-year overall survival and relapse-free survival rates were 53% and 32%, respectively. No Grade 5 toxicity occurred. The median overall survival was 23.9 months for sync-oligometastases and 66.6 months for oligo-recurrence (P = 0.0029). On multivariate analysis, sync-oligometastases and multiple oligometastatic tumors were significant unfavorable factors for both overall survival and relapse-free survival. Conclusions In stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic lung tumors, the state of oligo-recurrence has the potential of a significant prognostic factor for survival. PMID:27162324

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery, a potential alternative treatment for pulmonary metastases from osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    YU, WENXI; TANG, LINA; LIN, FENG; LI, DAKE; WANG, JUN; YANG, YAO; SHEN, ZAN

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), such as body gamma knife, was reported to achieve excellent rates of local disease control with limited toxicity in many cases of primary or secondary pulmonary tumor, except osteosarcoma. To confirm the value of SRS in pulmonary metastases from osteosarcoma, we reviewed the experience from our institution (Department of Oncology, Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai) and compared the efficiency of SRS with that of surgical resection. From January 2005 to December 2012, we carried out a retrospective investigation of 58 patients (age, 8–59 years; mean, 25.2 years) who were diagnosed with non-metastatic osteosarcoma of the extremity and later developed pulmonary metastasis during the period of adjuvant chemotherapy or follow-up. Among them, 27 patients were treated by SRS using the body gamma-knife system. A total dose of 50 Gy was delivered at 5 Gy/fraction to the 50% isodose line covering the planning target volume, whereas a total dose of 70 Gy was delivered at 7 Gy/fraction to the gross target volume. The other 31 patients were treated by surgical resection. Two-year progression-free survival rate, two-year survival rate, median time of PRPFS (post-relapse progress-free survival) and PROS (post-relapse overall survival) in SRS group were parallel to that in surgical group. All 27 patients tolerated gamma knife radiosurgery well while only 9 patients had grades 1–2 pneumonitis. We believe SRS, compared with surgical resection, is effective and safe in treating pulmonary metastasis from osteosarcoma, especially for those patients who were medically unfit for a resection or who refused surgery. PMID:24535005

  13. Concurrent Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Bevacizumab in Recurrent Malignant Gliomas: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Alvin R.; Cuneo, Kyle C.; Desjardins, Annick; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Peters, Katherine B.; Allen, Karen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Craciunescu, Oana; Vredenburgh, James J.; Friedman, Henry S.; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Virtually all patients with malignant glioma (MG) eventually recur. This study evaluates the safety of concurrent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and bevacizumab (BVZ), an antiangiogenic agent, in treatment of recurrent MG. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with recurrent MG, treated at initial diagnosis with surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy/temozolomide and then at least 1 salvage chemotherapy regimen, were enrolled in this prospective trial. Lesions <3 cm in diameter were treated in a single fraction, whereas those 3 to 5 cm in diameter received 5 5-Gy fractions. BVZ was administered immediately before SRS and 2 weeks later. Neurocognitive testing (Mini-Mental Status Exam, Trail Making Test A/B), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) quality-of-life assessment, physical exam, and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) were performed immediately before SRS and 1 week and 2 months following completion of SRS. The primary endpoint was central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included survival, quality of life, microvascular properties as measured by DCE-MRI, steroid usage, and performance status. Results: One grade 3 (severe headache) and 2 grade 2 CNS toxicities were observed. No patients experienced grade 4 to 5 toxicity or intracranial hemorrhage. Neurocognition, quality of life, and Karnofsky performance status did not change significantly with treatment. DCE-MRI results suggest a significant decline in tumor perfusion and permeability 1 week after SRS and further decline by 2 months. Conclusions: Treatment of recurrent MG with concurrent SRS and BVZ was not associated with excessive toxicity in this prospective trial. A randomized trial of concurrent SRS/BVZ versus conventional salvage therapy is needed to establish the efficacy of this approach.

  14. Prognostic value of pretreatment circulating neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes on outcomes in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, M.; Sampson, L.R.; Wong, O.; Gay, J.; Le, L.W.; Cho, B.C.J.; Brade, A.; Sun, A.; Bezjak, A.; Hope, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we determined the association of pretreatment circulating neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes with clinical outcomes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (sbrt). Methods All patients with primary lung cancer and with a complete blood count within 3 months of lung sbrt from 2005 to 2012 were included. Overall survival (os) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Factors associated with os were investigated using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Fine–Gray competing risk regression was performed to test the association of the neutrophil:lymphocyte (nlr) and monocyte:lymphocyte (mlr) ratios with two types of failure: disease-related failure and death, and death unrelated to disease. Results Of the 299 sbrt patients identified, 122 were eligible for analysis. The median and range of the nlr and mlr were 3.0 (0.3–22.0) and 0.4 (0.1–1.9) respectively. On multivariable analysis, sex (p = 0.02), T stage (p = 0.04), and nlr (p < 0.01) were associated with os. On multivariable analysis, T stage (p < 0.01) and mlr (p < 0.01) were associated with disease-related failure; mlr (p = 0.03), nlr (p < 0.01), and sbrt dose of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (p = 0.03) and 54 Gy or 60 Gy in 3 fractions (p = 0.02) were associated with disease-unrelated death. Median survival was 4.3 years in the nlr≤3 group (95% confidence interval: 3.5 to not reached) and 2.5 years in the nlr>3 group (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 4.8; p < 0.01). Conclusions In lung sbrt patients, nlr and mlr are independently associated with os and disease-unrelated death. If validated, nlr and mlr could help to identify patients who would benefit most from sbrt. PMID:27536185

  15. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum, Mitochondria, and Mitochondria-Associated Membrane and Detergent Resistant Membrane Fractions from Transfected Cells and from Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Primary Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chad D; Wong, Daniel S; Bozidis, Petros; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2015-09-01

    Increasingly mechanistic virology studies require dependable and sensitive methods for isolating purified organelles containing functional cellular sub-domains. The mitochondrial network is, in part, closely apposed to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) fraction provides direct physical contact between the ER and mitochondria. Characterization of the dual localization and trafficking of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL37 proteins required establishing protocols in which the ER and mitochondria could be reliably separated. Because of its documented role in lipid and ceramide transfer from the ER to mitochondria, a method to purify MAM from infected cells was also developed. Two robust procedures were developed to efficiently isolate mitochondria, ER, and MAM fractions while providing substantial protein yields from HCMV-infected primary fibroblasts and from transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, this unit includes protocols for isolation of detergent resistant membranes from subcellular fractions as well as techniques that allow visualization of the mitochondrial network disruption that occurs in permissively infected cells by their optimal resolution in Percoll gradients.

  16. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum, Mitochondria, and Mitochondria-Associated Membrane and Detergent Resistant Membrane Fractions from Transfected Cells and from Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Primary Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chad D.; Wong, Daniel S.; Bozidis, Petros; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly mechanistic virology studies require dependable and sensitive methods for isolating purified organelles containing functional cellular sub-domains. The mitochondrial network is, in part, closely apposed to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) fraction provides direct physical contact between the ER and mitochondria. Characterization of the dual localization and trafficking of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL37 proteins required establishing protocols in which the ER and mitochondria could be reliably separated. Because of its documented role in lipid and ceramide transfer from the ER to mitochondria, a method to purify MAM from infected cells was also developed. Two robust procedures were developed to efficiently isolate mitochondria, ER, and MAM fractions while providing substantial protein yields from HCMV-infected primary fibroblasts and from transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, this unit includes protocols for isolation of detergent resistant membranes from subcellular fractions as well as techniques that allow visualization of the mitochondria network disruption that occurs in permissively infected cells by their optimal resolution in Percoll gradients. PMID:26331984

  17. Salvage Stereotactic Reirradiation With or Without Cetuximab for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Comet, Benedicte; Kramar, Andrew; Faivre-Pierret, Mathieu; Dewas, Sylvain; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Degardin, Marian; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Lacornerie, Thomas; Lartigau, Eric F.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers (HNC). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. Results of a feasibility study using SBRT with or without cetuximab are reported for reirradiation of recurrent primary HNC. Methods and Materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor, in a previously irradiated area were included. Reirradiation dose was 36 Gy in six fractions of 6 Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the planning target volume. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma received concomitant cetuximab. Results: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 40 patients were prospectively treated for 43 lesions. Median age was 60 and median tumor size was 29 mm. Fifteen patients received concomitant cetuximab and 1 received concomitant cisplatin. Median follow-up was 25.6 months with 34 patients evaluable for tumor response. Median overall survival was 13.6 months and response rate was 79.4% (15 complete and 12 partial responses). Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 4 patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with or without cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC. Treatment is feasible and, with appropriate care to limiting critical structure, acute toxicities are acceptable. A prospective multicenter Phase II trial of SRT and concomitant cetuximab in recurrent HNC squamous cell carcinoma is ongoing.

  18. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yasushi Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Enriched Nuclear Fractions from BK Polyomavirus-Infected Primary Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Justice, Joshua L; Verhalen, Brandy; Kumar, Ranjit; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Imperiale, Michael J; Jiang, Mengxi

    2015-10-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small DNA viruses that are associated with a number of severe human diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The detailed virus-host interactions during lytic polyomavirus infection are not fully understood. Here, we report the first nuclear proteomic study with BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in a primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cell culture system using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) proteomic profiling coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We demonstrated the feasibility of SILAC labeling in these primary cells and subsequently performed reciprocal labeling-infection experiments to identify proteins that are altered by BKPyV infection. Our analyses revealed specific proteins that are significantly up- or down-regulated in the infected nuclear proteome. The genes encoding many of these proteins were not identified in a previous microarray study, suggesting that differential regulation of these proteins may be independent of transcriptional control. Western blotting experiments verified the SILAC proteomic findings. Finally, pathway and network analyses indicated that the host cell DNA damage response signaling and DNA repair pathways are among the cellular processes most affected at the protein level during polyomavirus infection. Our study provides a comprehensive view of the host nuclear proteomic changes during polyomavirus lytic infection and suggests potential novel host factors required for a productive polyomavirus infection.

  20. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Enriched Nuclear Fractions from BK Polyomavirus-infected Primary Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Joshua L.; Verhalen, Brandy; Kumar, Ranjit; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Imperiale, Michael J.; Jiang, Mengxi

    2016-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small DNA viruses that are associated with a number of severe human diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The detailed virus-host interactions during lytic polyomavirus infection are not fully understood. Here we report the first nuclear proteomic study with BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in a primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cell culture system using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) proteomic profiling coupled with LC-MS/MS. We demonstrated the feasibility of SILAC labeling in these primary cells and subsequently performed reciprocal labeling-infection experiments to identify proteins that are altered by BKPyV infection. Our analyses revealed specific proteins that are significantly up- or down-regulated in the infected nuclear proteome. The genes encoding many of these proteins were not identified in a previous microarray study, suggesting that differential regulation of these proteins may be independent of transcriptional control. Western blotting experiments verified the SILAC proteomic findings. Finally, pathway and network analyses indicated that the host cell DNA damage response signaling and DNA repair pathways are among the cellular processes most affected at the protein level during polyomavirus infection. Our study provides a comprehensive view of the host nuclear proteomic changes during polyomavirus lytic infection and suggests potential novel host factors required for a productive polyomavirus infection. PMID:26354146

  1. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >=20, >=30, >=40, >=50, and >=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R{sup 2} = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm{sup 3} was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm{sup 3}, if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for non-resectable tumors of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, K; Einstein, D; Ibarra, RA; Yao, M; Kunos, C; Ellis, R; Brindle, J; Singh, D; Hardacre, J; Zhang, Y; Fabien, J; Brindle, J; Funkhouser, G; Machtay, M; Sanabria, JR

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a potential treatment option for local tumor control of primary malignancies of the pancreas. We report on our experience with SBRT in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma whom were found not to be candidates for surgical resection. Methods The prospective database of the first 20 consecutive patients receiving SBRT for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinomas and a neuroendocrine tumor under an IRB approved protocol was reviewed. Prior to SBRT, cylindrical solid gold fiducial markers were placed within or around the tumor endoscopically (n=13), surgically (n=4), or percutaneously under CT-guidance (n=3) to allow for tracking of tumor during therapy. Mean radiation dose was 25 Gray (range 22–30Gy) delivered over 1–3 fractions. Chemotherapy was given to 68% of patients in various schedules/timing. Results Patients had a mean gross tumor volume of 57.2 cm3 (range 10.1–118 cm3) before SBRT. The mean total gross tumor volume reduction at 3 and 6 months after SBRT were 21 and 38%, respectively (P<0.05). Median follow-up was 14.57 months (range 5–23 months). The overall rate of freedom from local progression at 6 and 12 months were 88 and 65%. The probability of overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 89 and 56%. No patient had a complication related to fiducial markers placement regardless of modality. The rate of radiation induced adverse events was: grade 1–2 (11%) and grade 3 (16%). There were no grade 4/5 adverse events seen. Conclusion Our preliminary results showed SBRT as a safe and likely effective local treatment modality for pancreatic primary malignancy with acceptable rate of adverse events. PMID:21937061

  3. The emerging role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Barbarisi, Manlio; Romanelli, Pantaleo

    2012-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an emerging treatment option offered to patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Radiosurgery is performed as an outpatient procedure and provides a safe and effective non invasive treatment for focal GBM. High energy beams originating from cobalt sources placed into an helmet (Gamma-Knife) or generated by a linear accelerator (LINAC) rotating on a gantry (X-Knife, Novalis) or maneuvered by a robotic arm (CyberKnife) are delivered with submillimetric accuracy to a selected intracranial target. Treatment accuracy is provided by image-guided volumetric CT and MR studies complemented with advanced metabolic neuroimaging techniques such as CT-PET. Radiosurgery is typically used as a salvage treatment in patients with recurrent GBM to avoid further surgical procedures or as a complement to conventional fractionated radiotherapy. This paper reviews the emerging role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of GBM. PMID:22642423

  4. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, W. L.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved.

  5. Image-Guided Stereotactic Spine Radiosurgery on a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiazhu Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno; Sandhu, Ajay; Murphy, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastasis consists of a high radiation dose delivered to the tumor in 1 to 5 fractions. Due to the high radiation dose in a single or fewer treatments, the precision of tumor localization and dose delivery is of great concern. Many groups have published their experiences of spinal radiosurgery with the use of CyberKnife System (Accuray Inc.). In this study, we report in detail our approach to stereotactic spine radiosurgery (SSRS) using a conventional linear accelerator (Varian Trilogy), utilizing the features of kilovolt on-board imaging (kV-OBI) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for image guidance. We present our experience in various aspects of the SSRS procedure, including patient simulation and immobilization, intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) planning and beam selection, portal dosimetry for patient planning quality assurance (QA), and the use of image guidance in tumor localization prior to and during treatment delivery.

  6. Stereotactic body radiation therapy delivery validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, T.; Garcia, L.; Alexander, K.; Schreiner, L. J.; Joshi, C.

    2013-06-01

    This work describes the use of a motion phantom and 1D, 2D, and 3D ion chamber, EBT3 film, electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and FXG gel measurements for dosimetric validation of a stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SBRT) technique in our clinic. Results show good agreement between the measurements and calculated treatment plan dose.

  7. Imaging for Stereotactic Spine Radiotherapy: Clinical Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Zindler, Jaap D.; Sanchez, Esther; Verbakel, Wilko F.; Kuijer, Joost P.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-10-01

    There is growing interest in the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. With the need for accurate target definition and conformal avoidance of critical normal structures, high-quality multimodal imaging has emerged as a key component at each stage of the treatment process. Multidisciplinary collaboration is necessary to optimize imaging protocols and implement imaging advances into routine patient care.

  8. The use of spine stereotactic radiosurgery for oligometastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer C; Tang, Chad; Deegan, Brian J; Allen, Pamela K; Jonasch, Eric; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A; Li, Jing; Tatsui, Claudio E; Rhines, Laurence D; Brown, Paul D; Ghia, Amol J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors investigated the outcomes following spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS) for patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine. METHODS The study was a secondary analysis of 38 of 209 patients enrolled in 2 separate institutional Phase I/II prospective protocols and treated with SSRS between 2002 and 2011. Of these 38 patients, 33 (87%) were treated for a solitary spine metastasis, with no other history of metastatic disease. SSRS was prescribed to 24 Gy in 1 fraction (8%), 18 Gy in 1 fraction (18%), 16 Gy in 1 fraction (11%), 27 Gy in 3 fractions (53%), 30 Gy in 5 fractions (8%), or 20 Gy in 5 fractions (3%). Seventeen patients (45%) received prior conventional external beam radiation therapy. RESULTS The median overall survival (OS) was 75.7 months, and the 2- and 5-year OS rates were 84% and 60%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients who had prior spine surgery and a better Karnofsky Performance Scale score had an improved OS (HR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05-0.52, p < 0.01, and HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13%-0.84%, p = 0.02, respectively), and those who had undergone prior radiation therapy had a worse OS (HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2%-10%, p = 0.02). The 1-, 2-, and 5-year local progression-free survival rates were 85%, 82%, and 78%, respectively. The median time to systemic therapy modification was 41 months. Two patients (5%) experienced late Grade 3-4 toxicity. CONCLUSIONS Patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine treated with SSRS can experience long-term survival and a long time before needing a modification in systemic therapy. In addition, SSRS leads to excellent local control and minimal late toxicity. PMID:27035507

  9. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.

  10. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Badellino, Serena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Guarneri, Alessia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Monagheddu, Chiara; Spadi, Rosella; Ragona, Riccardo; Racca, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials.

  11. A case of severe hemoptysis after stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kana; Tomita, Natsuo; Shimizu, Arisa; Sato, Yozo; Makita, Chiyoko; Kodaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), severe hemoptysis has been reported in several studies. We report here a rare case of hemoptysis after SBRT even though the lung tumor was peripherally located. A lung nodule of a 79-year-old man was accidentally found at the periphery of the left upper lobe. A computed tomography-guided biopsy of this nodule provided confirmation of the diagnosis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The clinical diagnosis was T1bN0M0, stage I primary lung cancer. The patient was treated with SBRT using helical tomotherapy at a dose of 60 Gy in 6 fractions (i.e., BED10 = 120). He obtained a complete response and did not experience recurrence. However, the patient suffered massive hemoptysis 4.5 years after SBRT. As hypervascularity of a left bronchial artery was observed at the left lung in accordance with SBRT field on bronchial arteriography, a bronchial artery embolization (BAE) procedure was performed. The patient has had no episodes of hemoptysis after BAE. Although SBRT for early stage NSCLC is usually safe and efficient, it is necessary to be careful for late-onset bronchial hemorrhage in SBRT, even for a peripheral tumor.

  12. Neovascular Glaucoma After Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma: Histopathologic and Dosimetric Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Bruno F.; Weisbrod, Daniel; Yuecel, Yeni H.; Follwell, Matthew; Krema, Hatem; Heydarian, Mostafa; Xu Wei; Payne, David; McGowan, Hugh; Simpson, Ernest R.; Laperriere, Normand; Sahgal, Arjun

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Enucleation after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma may be required because of tumor progression (TP) or the development of intractable radiation-induced neovascular glaucoma (NVG). We compare pathologic changes and dosimetric findings in those eyes enucleated secondary to NVG as opposed to TP to better understand potential mechanisms. Methods and Materials: Patients with juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma treated with SRT (70 Gy in 5 fractions, alternate days over a total of 10 days) at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, who underwent enucleation between 1998 and 2006 were selected. We correlated dosimetric data based on the patient's original SRT treatment plan with histopathologic findings in the retina, optic nerve head, and anterior chamber. A dedicated ocular pathologist reviewed each case in a blinded fashion. Results: Ten eyes in ten patients were enucleated after SRT. Six were enucleated secondary to NVG and four secondary to because of TP. Aggressive tumor features such as invasion of the sclera and epithelioid cell type were observed predominantly in the TP group. Retinal damage was more predominant in the NVG group, as were findings of radiation-related retinal vascular changes of fibrinoid necrosis and hyalinization. No conclusive radiation-related effects were found in the anterior chamber. The maximum point dose and dose to 0.1 cc were lower for the anterior chamber as compared with the dose to the tumor, retina, and optic nerve head. The mean 0.1-cc doses to the retina were 69.4 Gy and 73.5 Gy and to the anterior chamber were 4.9 Gy and 17.3 Gy for the NVG group and tumor progression group, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that NVG is due to radiation damage to the posterior chamber of the eye rather than primary radiation damage to the anterior segment.

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumours using flattening filter free beam: dosimetric and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report the initial institute experience in terms of dosimetric and technical aspects in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using flattening filter free (FFF) beam in patients with liver lesions. Methods and Materials From October 2010 to September 2011, 55 consecutive patients with 73 primary or metastatic hepatic lesions were treated with SBRT on TrueBeam using FFF beam and RapidArc technique. Clinical target volume (CTV) was defined on multi-phase CT scans, PET/CT, MRI, and 4D-CT. Dose prescription was 75 Gy in 3 fractions to planning target volume (PTV). Constraints for organs at risk were: 700 cc of liver free from the 15 Gy isodose, Dmax < 21 Gy for stomach and duodenum, Dmax < 30 Gy for heart, D0.1 cc < 18 Gy for spinal cord, V15 Gy < 35% for kidneys. The dose was downscaled in cases of not full achievement of dose constraints. Daily cone beam CT (CBCT) was performed. Results Forty-three patients with a single lesion, nine with two lesions and three with three lesions were treated with this protocol. Target and organs at risk objectives were met for all patients. Mean delivery time was 2.8 ± 1.0 min. Pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index of 98.6 ± 0.8%. Mean on-line co-registration shift of the daily CBCT to the simulation CT were: -0.08, 0.05 and -0.02 cm with standard deviations of 0.33, 0.39 and 0.55 cm in, vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions respectively. Conclusions SBRT for liver targets delivered by means of FFF resulted to be feasible with short beam on time. PMID:22296849

  14. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M.; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) distinguishes itself by necessitating more rigid patient immobilization, accounting for respiratory motion, intricate treatment planning, on-board imaging, and reduced number of ablative radiation doses to cancer targets usually refractory to chemotherapy and conventional radiation. Steep SBRT radiation dose drop-off permits narrow 'pencil beam' treatment fields to be used for ablative radiation treatment condensed into 1 to 3 treatments. Treating physicians must appreciate that SBRT comes at a bigger danger of normal tissue injury and chance of geographic tumor miss. Both must be tackled by immobilization of cancer targets and by high-precision treatment delivery. Cancer target immobilization has been achieved through use of indexed customized Styrofoam casts, evacuated bean bags, or body-fix molds with patient-independent abdominal compression.1-3 Intrafraction motion of cancer targets due to breathing now can be reduced by patient-responsive breath hold techniques,4 patient mouthpiece active breathing coordination,5 respiration-correlated computed tomography,6 or image-guided tracking of fiducials implanted within and around a moving tumor.7-9 The Cyberknife system (Accuray [Sunnyvale, CA]) utilizes a radiation linear accelerator mounted on a industrial robotic arm that accurately follows patient respiratory motion by a camera-tracked set of light-emitting diodes (LED) impregnated on a vest fitted to a patient.10 Substantial reductions in radiation therapy margins can be achieved by motion tracking, ultimately rendering a smaller planning target volumes that are irradiated with submillimeter accuracy.11-13 Cancer targets treated by SBRT are irradiated by converging, tightly collimated beams. Resultant radiation dose to cancer target volume histograms have a more pronounced radiation "shoulder" indicating high percentage target coverage and a small high-dose radiation "tail." Thus, increased target conformality comes at the

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) distinguishes itself by necessitating more rigid patient immobilization, accounting for respiratory motion, intricate treatment planning, on-board imaging, and reduced number of ablative radiation doses to cancer targets usually refractory to chemotherapy and conventional radiation. Steep SBRT radiation dose drop-off permits narrow 'pencil beam' treatment fields to be used for ablative radiation treatment condensed into 1 to 3 treatments. Treating physicians must appreciate that SBRT comes at a bigger danger of normal tissue injury and chance of geographic tumor miss. Both must be tackled by immobilization of cancer targets and by high-precision treatment delivery. Cancer target immobilization has been achieved through use of indexed customized Styrofoam casts, evacuated bean bags, or body-fix molds with patient-independent abdominal compression.(1-3) Intrafraction motion of cancer targets due to breathing now can be reduced by patient-responsive breath hold techniques,(4) patient mouthpiece active breathing coordination,(5) respiration-correlated computed tomography,(6) or image-guided tracking of fiducials implanted within and around a moving tumor.(7-9) The Cyberknife system (Accuray [Sunnyvale, CA]) utilizes a radiation linear accelerator mounted on a industrial robotic arm that accurately follows patient respiratory motion by a camera-tracked set of light-emitting diodes (LED) impregnated on a vest fitted to a patient.(10) Substantial reductions in radiation therapy margins can be achieved by motion tracking, ultimately rendering a smaller planning target volumes that are irradiated with submillimeter accuracy.(11-13) Cancer targets treated by SBRT are irradiated by converging, tightly collimated beams. Resultant radiation dose to cancer target volume histograms have a more pronounced radiation "shoulder" indicating high percentage target coverage and a small high-dose radiation "tail." Thus, increased target conformality

  16. Long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (Srs) in patients with acoustic neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. . E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Thilmann, Christoph; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas (AN). Patients and Methods: Between 1990 and 2001, we treated 26 patients with 27 AN with SRS. Two patients suffered from neurofibromatosis type 2. Before SRS, a subtotal or total resection had been performed in 3 and in 5 patients, respectively. For SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy/80% isodose was applied. Results: The overall actuarial 5-year and 10-year tumor control probability in all patients was 91%. Two patients developed tumor progression after SRS at 36 and 48 months. Nineteen patients (73%) were at risk of treatment-related facial nerve toxicity; of these, 1 patient developed a complete facial nerve palsy after SRS (5%). A total of 93% of the lesions treated were at risk of radiation-induced trigeminal neuralgia. Two patients (8%) developed mild dysesthesia of the trigeminal nerve after SRS. The hearing preservation rate in patients with useful hearing before SRS was 55% at 9 years. Conclusion:: Stereotactic radiosurgery results in good local control rates of AN and the risk of cranial nerve toxicities is acceptable. As toxicity is lower with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  17. Best of International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress 2013: stereotactic body radiation therapy. Part II: nonspinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Chang, Eric L; Ryu, Samuel; Chung, Hans; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-09-01

    The 11th biennial International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress represented another historical gathering of professionals in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery. This congress was held on 16-20 June 2013 in Toronto (ON, Canada), and the chairman was Arjun Sahgal, co-chair was Michael Schwartz and president of the society was Jean Regis. The congress attracted 550 attendants from all over the world and over 300 abstracts were presented. Among the abstracts presented, 62 (36 oral) were pertaining to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Exciting new findings were presented by colleagues from North America, Europe and Asia. This short conference scene (part II) provides a summary of the best abstracts on SBRT for nonspinal tumors presented in the congress. A separate conference scene on SBRT for spinal tumors (part I) also appears in this issue of Future Oncology. PMID:23980677

  18. Best of International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress 2013: stereotactic body radiation therapy. Part I: spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Chang, Eric L; Ryu, Samuel; Chung, Hans; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-09-01

    The 11th biennial International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress represented another historical gathering of professionals in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery. This congress was held on 16-20 June 2013 in Toronto (ON, Canada), and the chairman was Arjun Sahgal, the co-chair was Michael Schwartz and president of the society was Jean Regis. The congress attracted 550 attendants from all over the world and over 300 abstracts were presented. Among the abstracts presented, 62 (36 oral) were pertaining to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Exciting new findings were presented by colleagues from North America, Europe and Asia. This short conference scene (part I) provides a summary of the best abstracts on SBRT for spinal tumors presented in the congress. A separate conference scene on SBRT for nonspinal tumors (part II) also appears in this issue of Future Oncology. PMID:23980676

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery of deeply seated low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Barcia, J A; Barcia-Salorio, J L; Ferrer, C; Ferrer, E; Algás, R; Hernández, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of a series of 16 cases of low-grade gliomas in whom radiosurgery was performed. This series started in 1977. All the tumours received a single radiosurgical session (with a mean dose of 21.7 Gy, 5-10 mm. collimator; one patient received two sessions and in another patient two different targets were irradiated in the same session). Prior to radiosurgery, six patients received conventional external fractionated radiotherapy, with two lateral fields of up to 10 x 10 cm. and a mean dose of 55.1 Gy and another six patients with tumours less than 5 cm. in diameter, received stereotactic radiotherapy using four fields of up to 5 x 5 cm. and a mean dose of 53.1 Gy. In both cases, conventional fractionation was used, giving a dose of 1.8 to 2 Gy/day. The tumour disappeared in 8 cases (50%) and shunk or ceased its growth in 5 additional cases (31%). In 3 cases of brainstem gliomas in which the clinical condition was previously very poor there was no evolutional change and the patients eventually died. We conclude that radiosurgery is effective in the treatment of deeply seated low-grade gliomas, where it may become the treatment of choice in the absence of other more definitive choices.

  20. In vivo biological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery: A primate model

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Altschuler, E.M.; Flickinger, J.C.; Wu, A.; Martinez, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Single-fraction, closed skull, small-volume irradiation (radiosurgery) of intact intracranial structures requires accurate knowledge of radiation tolerance. We have developed a baboon model to assess the in vivo destructive radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery. Three baboons received a single-fraction, 150-Gy lesion of the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, or the pons using the 8-mm diameter collimator of the gamma unit. Serial standard neurodiagnostic tests (neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging, stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scan of cerebral blood flow, somatosensory and brain stem evoked potentials, and myelin basic protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid) were compared with preoperative studies. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the development of a lesion at the target site between 45 and 60 days after irradiation. Deterioration of the brain stem evoked potentials preceded imaging changes when the lesion encroached on auditory pathways. Myelin basic protein levels increased subsequent to imaging changes. Postmortem neuropathological examination confirmed a well-demarcated radionecrosis of the target volume. The baboon model appears to be an excellent method to study the in vivo biological effects of radiosurgery.

  1. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  2. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy. PMID:25279616

  3. Modelling the Gross Primary Productivity of West Africa with the Regional Biomass Model RBM+, using optimized 250 m MODIS FPAR and fractional vegetation cover information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machwitz, Miriam; Gessner, Ursula; Conrad, Christopher; Falk, Ulrike; Richters, Jochen; Dech, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Global warming associated with climate change is one of the greatest challenges of today's world. Increasing emissions of the greenhouse gas CO2 are considered as a major contributing factor to global warming. One regulating factor of CO2 exchange between atmosphere and land surface is vegetation. Measurements of land cover changes in combination with modelling the Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) can contribute to determine important sources and sinks of CO2. The aim of this study is to accurately model the GPP for a region in West Africa with a spatial resolution of 250 m, and the differentiation of GPP based on woody and herbaceous vegetation. For this purpose, the Regional Biomass Model (RBM) was applied, which is based on a Light Use Efficiency (LUE) approach. The focus was on the spatial enhancement of the RBM from the original 1000-250 m spatial resolution (RBM+). The adaptation to the 250 m scale included the modification of two main input parameters: (1) the fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) based on the 1000 m MODIS MOD15A2 FPAR product which was downscaled to 250 m using MODIS NDVI time series; (2) the fractional cover of woody and herbaceous vegetation, which was improved by using a multi-scale approach. For validation and regional adjustments of GPP and the input parameters, in situ data from a climate station and eddy covariance measurements were integrated. The results of this approach show that the input parameters could be improved significantly: downscaling considerably reduces data gaps of the original FPAR product and the improved dataset differed less than 5.0% from the original data for cloud free regions. The RMSE of the fractional vegetation cover varied between 5.1 and 12.7%. Modelled GPP showed a slight overestimation in comparison to eddy covariance measurements. The in situ data was exceeded by 8.8% for 2005 and by 2.0% for 2006. The model results were converted to NPP and also agreed well with previous NPP

  4. Manganese accumulation in membrane fractions of primary astrocytes is associated with decreased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake, and is exacerbated by oleic acid and palmitate.

    PubMed

    Fordahl, Steve C; Erikson, Keith M

    2014-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) exposure interferes with GABA uptake; however, the effects of Mn on GABA transport proteins (GATs) have not been identified. We sought to characterize how Mn impairs GAT function in primary rat astrocytes. Astrocytes exposed to Mn (500 μM) had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake despite no change in membrane or cytosolic GAT3 protein levels. Co-treatment with 100 μM oleic or palmitic acids (both known to be elevated in Mn neurotoxicity), exacerbated the Mn-induced decline in (3)H-GABA uptake. Mn accumulation in the membrane fraction of astrocytes was enhanced with fatty acid administration, and was negatively correlated with (3)H-GABA uptake. Furthermore, control cells exposed to Mn only during the experimental uptake had significantly reduced (3)H-GABA uptake, and the addition of GABA (50 μM) blunted cytosolic Mn accumulation. These data indicate that reduced GAT function in astrocytes is influenced by Mn and fatty acids accumulating at or interacting with the plasma membrane.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Feddock, Jonathan; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shelton, Brent J.; Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary; Chen, Li; Rinehart, John; McGarry, Ronald C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (≤5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy × 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy × 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aridgides, Paul; Bogart, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has had a profound impact on the treatment paradigm for medically inoperable patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Local control and survival outcomes from prospective collaborative trials using SBRT have been highly favorable in this challenging patient population. Further study in medically operable patients is ongoing; however, randomized trials to help answer this question have terminated early because of poor accrual. Available prospective and retrospective data are discussed for the use of SBRT with regard to the medically inoperable and operable patient populations, as well as considerations for fractionation, dose, and toxicity. PMID:27427521

  7. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Lukas P; Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE.

  8. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE. PMID:27602266

  9. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Lukas P; Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE. PMID:27602266

  10. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE.

  11. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J.; Neyman, Gennady; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 32: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Peripheral Lung Lesion: Treatment Planning and Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Shuying; Oliver, Michael; Wang, Xiaofang

    2014-08-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), due to its high precision for target localizing, has become widely used to treat tumours at various locations, including the lungs. Lung SBRT program was started at our institution a year ago. Eighteen patients with peripheral lesions up to 3 cm diameter have been treated with 48 Gy in 4 fractions. Based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) simulation, internal target volume (ITV) was delineated to encompass the respiratory motion of the lesion. A margin of 5 mm was then added to create the planning target volume (PTV) for setup uncertainties. There was no expansion from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV). Pinnacle 9.6 was used as the primary treatment planning system. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, with one or two coplanar arcs, generally worked well. For quality assurance (QA), each plan was exported to Eclipse 10 and dose calculation was repeated. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) of the targets and organs at risk (OARs) were then compared between the two treatment planning systems. Winston-Lutz tests were carried out as routine machine QA. Patient-specific QA included ArcCheck measurement with an insert, where an ionization chamber was placed at the centre to measure dose at the isocenter. For the first several patients, and subsequently for the plans with extremely strong modulation, Gafchromic film dosimetry was also employed. For each patient, a mock setup was scheduled prior to treatments. Daily pre- and post-CBCT were acquired for setup and assessment of intra-fractional motion, respectively.

  13. Treatment of arteriovenous malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery employing both magnetic resonance angiography and standard angiography as a database

    SciTech Connect

    Petereit, D.; Mehta, M.; Turski, P.; Levin, A.; Strother, C.; Mistretta, C.; Mackie, R.; Gehring, M.; Kubsad, S.; Kinsella, T. )

    1993-01-15

    Twenty-one arteriovenous malformations were prospectively evaluated using magnetic resonance angiography, compare it to stereotactic angiography, employ magnetic resonance angiography in follow-up, and semiquanitfy flow. A correlative evaluation between flow and response to stereotactic radiosurgery was carried out. Phase contrast angiograms were obtained at flow velocities of 400, 200, 100, 60 and 20 cm/sec. The fractionated velocities provided images that selectively demonstrated the arterial and venous components of the arteriovenous malformations. Qualitative assessment of the velocity within the arteriovenous malformations and the presence of fistulae were also determined by multiple velocity images. In addition, 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiograms were obtained to define the exact size and shape of the nidus. This technique also permitted evaluation of the nidus and feeding arteries for the the presence of low flow aneurysms. Correlation between the two imaging modalities was carried out by subjective and semiquantitative estimation of flow velocity and estimation of nidus size. The following velocity parameters were employed: fast, intermediate, slow, and none. Early analysis suggests that slower flowing arteriovenous malformations may obliterate faster after stereotactic radiosurgery an flow parameters should be employed to predict response. In conclusion, magnetic resonance angiography permits semiquantitative flow velocity assessment and may therefore be superior to stereotactic angiography. An additional advantage of magnetic resonance angiography is the generation of serial transverse images which can replace the conventional CT scan employed for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning. A single diagnostic test may therefore be used for diagnosis, radiosurgical treatment planning, follow-up, and treatment selection by identifying patients likely to respond early to radiosurgical management.

  14. Predictors of Toxicity Associated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Central Hepatobiliary Tract

    SciTech Connect

    Osmundson, Evan C.; Wu, Yufan; Luxton, Gary; Bazan, Jose G.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric predictors of hepatobiliary (HB) toxicity associated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 96 patients treated with SBRT for primary (53%) or metastatic (47%) liver tumors between March 2006 and November 2013. The central HB tract (cHBT) was defined by a 15-mm expansion of the portal vein from the splenic confluence to the first bifurcation of left and right portal veins. Patients were censored for toxicity upon local progression or additional liver-directed therapy. HB toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. To compare different SBRT fractionations, doses were converted to biologically effective doses (BED) by using the standard linear quadratic model α/β = 10 (BED10). Results: Median follow-up was 12.7 months after SBRT. Median BED10 was 85.5 Gy (range: 37.5-151.2). The median number of fractions was 5 (range: 1-5), with 51 patients (53.1%) receiving 5 fractions and 29 patients (30.2%) receiving 3 fractions. In total, there were 23 (24.0%) grade 2+ and 18 (18.8%) grade 3+ HB toxicities. Nondosimetric factors predictive of grade 3+ HB toxicity included cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) histology (P<.0001), primary liver tumor (P=.0087), and biliary stent (P<.0001). Dosimetric parameters most predictive of grade 3+ HB toxicity were volume receiving above BED10 of 72 Gy (V{sub BED10}72) ≥ 21 cm{sup 3} (relative risk [RR]: 11.6, P<.0001), V{sub BED10}66 ≥ 24 cm{sup 3} (RR: 10.5, P<.0001), and mean BED10 (Dmean{sub BED10}) cHBT ≥14 Gy (RR: 9.2, P<.0001), with V{sub BED10}72 and V{sub BED10}66 corresponding to V40 and V37.7 for 5 fractions and V33.8 and V32.0 for 3 fractions, respectively. V{sub BED10}72 ≥ 21 cm{sup 3}, V{sub BED10}66 ≥ 24 cm{sup 3}, and Dmean{sub BED10} cHBT ≥14 Gy were consistently predictive of grade 3+ toxicity on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: V

  15. Upfront Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Pineal Parenchymal Tumors in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Khang, Shin Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pineal parenchymal tumors (PPTs) in adults are rare, and knowledge regarding their optimal management and treatment outcome is limited. Herein, we present the clinical results of our series of PPTs other than pineoblastomas managed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at upfront setting. Methods Between 1997 and 2014, nine consecutive adult patients with the diagnosis of PPTs, either pineocytoma or pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, were treated with SRS. There were 6 men and 3 women. The median age was 39 years (range, 31-53 years). All of the patients presented with symptoms of hydrocephalus. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and biopsy was done for initial management. After histologic diagnosis, patients were treated with Gamma Knife with the mean dose of 13.3 Gy (n=3) or fractionated Cyberknife with 32 Gy (n=6). Results After a mean follow-up of 78.6 months (range, 14-223 months), all patients were alive and all of their tumors were locally controlled except for one instance of cerebrospinal fluid seeding metastasis. On magnetic resonance images, tumor size decreased in all patients, resulting in complete response in 3 patients and partial response in 6. One patient had experienced temporary memory impairment after SRS, which improved spontaneously. Conclusion SRS is effective and safe for PPTs in adults and can be considered as a useful alternative to surgical resection at upfront setting. PMID:26587186

  16. Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery: current status of the initial paradigm shifter.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Yen, Chun-Po; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-09-10

    The concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was first described by Lars Leksell in 1951. It was proposed as a noninvasive alternative to open neurosurgical approaches to manage a variety of conditions. In the following decades, SRS emerged as a unique discipline involving a collegial partnership among neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. SRS relies on the precisely guided delivery of high-dose ionizing radiation to an intracranial target. The focused convergence of multiple beams yields a potent therapeutic effect on the target and a steep dose fall-off to surrounding structures, thereby minimizing the risk of collateral damage. SRS is typically administered in a single session but can be given in as many as five sessions or fractions. By providing an ablative effect noninvasively, SRS has altered the treatment paradigms for benign and malignant intracranial tumors, functional disorders, and vascular malformations. Literature on extensive intracranial radiosurgery has unequivocally demonstrated the favorable benefit-to-risk profile that SRS affords for appropriately selected patients. In a departure from conventional radiotherapeutic strategies, radiosurgical principles have recently been extended to extracranial indications such as lung, spine, and liver tumors. The paradigm shift resulting from radiosurgery continues to alter the landscape of related fields. PMID:25113762

  17. Cranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Current Status of the Initial Paradigm Shifter

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Jason P.; Yen, Chun-Po; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was first described by Lars Leksell in 1951. It was proposed as a noninvasive alternative to open neurosurgical approaches to manage a variety of conditions. In the following decades, SRS emerged as a unique discipline involving a collegial partnership among neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. SRS relies on the precisely guided delivery of high-dose ionizing radiation to an intracranial target. The focused convergence of multiple beams yields a potent therapeutic effect on the target and a steep dose fall-off to surrounding structures, thereby minimizing the risk of collateral damage. SRS is typically administered in a single session but can be given in as many as five sessions or fractions. By providing an ablative effect noninvasively, SRS has altered the treatment paradigms for benign and malignant intracranial tumors, functional disorders, and vascular malformations. Literature on extensive intracranial radiosurgery has unequivocally demonstrated the favorable benefit-to-risk profile that SRS affords for appropriately selected patients. In a departure from conventional radiotherapeutic strategies, radiosurgical principles have recently been extended to extracranial indications such as lung, spine, and liver tumors. The paradigm shift resulting from radiosurgery continues to alter the landscape of related fields. PMID:25113762

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.

  19. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System and Head and Neck Lesions, Using a Conformal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy System (Peacock™ System)

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Mario; Bernardo, Antonio; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Yakoob, Richard; Al-Ghazi, Matthew; Kuo, Jeffrey; Ammirati, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate single-fraction or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of central nervous system (CNS) and head and neck lesions using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a commercially available system (Peacock™, Nomos Corporation, Sewickley, PA). This system allows tomotherapeutic delivery of intensity-modulated radiation, that is, the slice-by-slice treatment of the volume of interest with an intensity-modulated beam, making the delivery of highly conformal radiation to the target possible in both single or multiple fractions mode. During an 18-month period, 43 (21 males and 22 females) patients were treated, using a removable cranial screw-fixation device. Ages ranged from 10 to 77 years (mean, 52.2; median, 53.5). Intra- and extra-axial lesions, including head and neck malignancies and spine metastases, were treated. Clinical target volume ranged from 0.77 to 195 cm3 (mean, 47.8; median, 29.90). The dose distribution was normalized to the maximum and was prescribed, in most cases, at the 80% or 90% isodose line (range, 65 to 96%; median, 85%; mean, 83.4%) and ranged from 14 to 80 Gy (mean, 48; median, 50). The number of fractions ranged from 1 to 40 (mean, 23; median, 25). In all but one patient, 90% of the prescription isodose line covered 100% of the clinical target volume. The heterogeneity index (the ratio between the maximum radiation dose and the prescribed dose) ranged between 1.0 and 1.50, whereas the conformity index (the ratio between the volume encompassed by the prescription isodose line and the clinical target volume) ranged between 1.0 and 4.5. There were no complications related to the radiation treatment. With a median follow-up of 6 months, more than 70% of our patients showed decreased lesion size. Stereotactic IMRT of CNS and head and neck lesions can be delivered safely and accurately. The Peacock system delivers stereotactic radiation in single or multiple fractions and has no volume limitations

  20. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer - dose distribution for VMAT and CyberKnife techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Osewski, Wojciech; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata; Szlag, Marta

    2016-06-01

    New capabilities of biomedical accelerators allow for very precise depositing of the radiation dose and imaging verification during the therapy. In addition, computer algorithms calculating dose distributions are taking into account the increasing number of physical effects. Therefore, administration of high dose fractionation, which is consistent with radiobiology used in oncology, becomes safer and safer. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which is very precise irradiation with high dose fractionation is increasingly widespread use in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. For this purpose different biomedical accelerators are used. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions for two techniques: VMAT and CyberKnife. Statistical analysis was performed for the two groups of patients treated by VMAT technique (25 patients), and CyberKnife technique (15 patients). The analysis shows that the dose distributions are comparable, both in the treated area (prostate) and in the critical organs (rectum, urinary bladder, femoral heads). The results show that stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer can be carried out on CyberKnife accelerator as well as on the classical accelerator with the use of VMAT technique.

  2. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Octogenarians With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Morita, Satoshi; Handa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) for octogenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2012, 109 patients aged ≥80 years with T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SABR: 47 patients had histology-unproven lung cancer; 62 patients had pathologically proven NSCLC. The prescribed doses were either 50 Gy/5 fractions for peripheral tumors or 40 Gy/5 fractions for centrally located tumors. The treatment outcomes, toxicities, and the correlating factors for overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up duration after SABR was 24.2 (range, 3.0-64.6) months. Only limited toxicities were observed, except for 1 grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. The 3-year local, regional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 82.3%, 90.1%, and 76.8%, respectively. The OS and lung cancer-specific survival rates were 53.7% and 70.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that medically inoperable, low body mass index, high T stage, and high C-reactive protein were the predictors for short OS. The OS for the operable octogenarians was significantly better than that for inoperable (P<.01). Conclusions: Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy for octogenarians was feasible, with excellent OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that operability was one of the predictors for OS. For medically operable octogenarians with early-stage NSCLC, SABR should be prospectively compared with resection.

  3. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bazioglou, M; Theodorou, K; Kappas, C

    1999-01-01

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is one of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding high costs of computer-based training systems and database development). PMID:10394345

  4. Dual mode stereotactic localization method and application

    DOEpatents

    Keppel, Cynthia E.; Barbosa, Fernando Jorge; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The invention described herein combines the structural digital X-ray image provided by conventional stereotactic core biopsy instruments with the additional functional metabolic gamma imaging obtained with a dedicated compact gamma imaging mini-camera. Before the procedure, the patient is injected with an appropriate radiopharmaceutical. The radiopharmaceutical uptake distribution within the breast under compression in a conventional examination table expressed by the intensity of gamma emissions is obtained for comparison (co-registration) with the digital mammography (X-ray) image. This dual modality mode of operation greatly increases the functionality of existing stereotactic biopsy devices by yielding a much smaller number of false positives than would be produced using X-ray images alone. The ability to obtain both the X-ray mammographic image and the nuclear-based medicine gamma image using a single device is made possible largely through the use of a novel, small and movable gamma imaging camera that permits its incorporation into the same table or system as that currently utilized to obtain X-ray based mammographic images for localization of lesions.

  5. Frameless stereotactic body radiation therapy for multiple lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Mu, Jinming; Gu, Wendong; Chen, Yuan; Ning, Zhonghua; Jin, Jianxue; Pei, Honglei

    2014-07-08

    Two patients with multiple lung metastases (≥ 5) were treated using frameless stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) on an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator equipped with an interdigitation-capable multileaf collimator and four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D CBCT). The technique and the early clinical outcomes were evaluated. Patient A with five lung metastases and Patient B with seven lung metastases underwent SBRT (48 Gy/8 fractions for Patient A, 42 Gy/7 fractions for Patient B). The treatments were administered using a 6 MV photon beam. The nominal dose rate was 660 MUs/min. Patients were positioned and immobilized using thermoplastic masks and image guidance was done using 4D CBCT. The targets were delineated on the images of the 4D CT, and the positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) images were taken as references. A two-step, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan was designed for each patient. Step 1: the lesions in one lung were irradiated by a 210° arc field; Step 2: the rest of the lesions in the other lung were irradiated by a 120° arc field. Plans were evaluated using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Patients were followed up and adverse events were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 (CTCAE v4.0). The beam-on time of each treatment was less than 10 min. The CI and HI for the two plans were 0.562, 0.0709 and 0.513, 0.0794, respectively. Pulmonary function deteriorated slightly in both patients, and the patient with seven lung lesions was confirmed to have Grade 1 radiation pneumonitis. The technique was fast, accurate, and well tolerated by patients, and the two-step plan is a helpful design in reducing the dose to the lungs.

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Jen, Yee-Min; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Li-Ping; Chen, Chang-Ming; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  7. STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect

    Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

    2005-04-01

    Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

  8. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas: What Happens Long Term?

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Daniel E.; Potter, Andrew E.; Brophy, Brian P.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes for acoustic neuroma treated with low-dose linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) >10 years earlier at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using data collected prospectively at a dedicated SRS clinic. Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and December 2000, 51 patients underwent SRS for acoustic neuroma. For the 44 patients with primary SRS for sporadic (unilateral) lesions, the median age was 63 years, the median of the maximal tumor diameter was 21 mm (range, 11-34), and the marginal dose was 14 Gy for the first 4 patients and 12 Gy for the other 40. Results: The crude tumor control rate was 97.7% (1 patient required salvage surgery for progression at 9.75 years). Only 8 (29%) of 28 patients ultimately retained useful hearing (interaural pure tone average {<=}50 dB). Also, although the Kaplan-Meier estimated rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 38-74%), this decreased to 24% (95% confidence interval, 11-44%) at 10 years. New or worsened V and VII cranial neuropathy occurred in 11% and 2% of patients, respectively; all cases were transient. No case of radiation oncogenesis developed. Conclusions: The long-term follow-up data of low-dose (12-14 Gy) linear accelerator SRS for acoustic neuroma have confirmed excellent tumor control and acceptable cranial neuropathy rates but a continual decrease in hearing preservation out to {>=}10 years.

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. PMID:27261915

  10. Accuracy of Marketing Claims by Providers of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Amol K.; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. Methods: We reviewed the Web sites of all US hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Results: Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Conclusion: Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed. PMID:23633973

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation.

  12. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena. PMID:25166975

  13. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  14. Robotic Stereotactic Radioablation Concomitant With Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Courdi, Adel; Quielle-Roussel, Catherine; Thariat, Juliette; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Robotic stereotactic radioablation (RSR) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors; however, it has never been used for breast tumors and may have a real potential. We conducted a Phase I study, including neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), a two-level dose-escalation study (6.5 Gy x 3 fractions and 7.5 Gy x 3 fractions) using RSR and breast-conserving surgery followed by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: To define toxicity, we performed a dermatologic exam (DE) including clinical examination by two independent observers and technical examination by colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasound. DE was performed before NACT (DE0), at 36 days (DE1), at 56 days (DE2), after the NACT treatment onset, and before surgery (DE3). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. A pathologic examination was also performed. Results: There were two clinical complete responses and four clinical partial responses at D56 and D85. Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. All patients tolerated RSR with no fatigue; 2 patients presented with mild pain after the third fraction of the treatment. There was no significant toxicity measured with ultrasound and dermoscopy tests. Postoperative irradiation (50 Gy) has been delivered without toxicity. Conclusion: The study showed the feasibility of irradiation with RSR combined with chemotherapy and surgery for breast tumors. There was no skin toxicity at a dose of 19.5 Gy or 22.5 Gy delivered in three fractions combined with chemotherapy. Lack of toxicity suggested that the dose could be increased further. Pathologic response was acceptable.

  15. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) for skull-base meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yenice, Kamil M. . E-mail: kyenice@radonc.uchicago.edu; Narayana, Ashwatha; Chang, Jenghwa; Gutin, Philip H.; Amols, Howard I.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential benefits of a micromultileaf collimator ({mu}MLC) -based intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) in skull-base meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with inoperable or recurrent small-volume (1.7-15.5 cc) skull-base meningiomas were treated with IMSRT to 54 Gy in 30 fractions using a {mu}MLC in the dynamic mode. IMSRT plan quality was evaluated in comparison with the conformal stereotactic radiotherapy technique, using the same beam arrangement and static delivery with the {mu}MLC. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and dose-volume histograms for the planning target volume and organs at risk. The conformity and uniformity metrics, as well as normal-tissue complication probabilities, were calculated for the two techniques. Follow-up with MRI and clinical examination was performed at regular intervals. Results: With a mean follow-up of 17 months, local control has been achieved in all cases, and no treatment-related toxicities have been noted. For cavernous sinus tumors overlapping with optic apparatus, IMSRT has improved the dose uniformity within the target on average by 8%, which resulted in a reduction of the estimated chiasm normal-tissue complication probability by up to 65%. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy can be safely delivered to improve the dose distributions in select skull-base meningiomas with an appreciable concomitant dose reduction to involved critical structures. Longer follow-up with a larger patient group is necessary to demonstrate sustained tumor control and low morbidity with IMSRT for small inoperable, recurrent, or subtotally resected meningiomas.

  16. Integration of Functional MRI and White Matter Tractography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Clinical Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Papadakis, Nikolaos; Verigos, Kosmas; Stathochristopoulou, Irene; Antypas, Christos; Lekas, Leonidas; Tzouras, Argyrios; Georgiou, Evangelos; Salvaras, Nikolaos

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of the integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging tractography data into stereotactic radiosurgery clinical practice. Methods and Materials: fMRI and tractography data sets were acquired and fused with corresponding anatomical MR and computed tomography images of patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM), astrocytoma, brain metastasis, or hemangioma and referred for stereotactic radiosurgery. The acquired data sets were imported into a CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery system and used to delineate the target, organs at risk, and nearby functional structures and fiber tracts. Treatment plans with and without the incorporation of the functional structures and the fiber tracts into the optimization process were developed and compared. Results: The nearby functional structures and fiber tracts could receive doses of >50% of the maximum dose if they were excluded from the planning process. In the AVM case, the doses received by the Broadmann-17 structure and the optic tract were reduced to 700 cGy from 1,400 cGy and to 1,200 cGy from 2,000 cGy, respectively, upon inclusion into the optimization process. In the metastasis case, the motor cortex received 850 cGy instead of 1,400 cGy; and in the hemangioma case, the pyramidal tracts received 780 cGy instead of 990 cGy. In the astrocytoma case, the dose to the motor cortex bordering the lesion was reduced to 1,900 cGy from 2,100 cGy, and therefore, the biologically equivalent dose in three fractions was delivered instead. Conclusions: Functional structures and fiber tracts could receive high doses if they were not considered during treatment planning. With the aid of fMRI and tractography images, they can be delineated and spared.

  17. Prospective, Risk-Adapted Strategy of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bral, Samuel; Gevaert, Thierry; Linthout, Nadine; Versmessen, Harijati; Collen, Christine; Engels, Benedikt; Verdries, Douwe; Everaert, Hendrik; Christian, Nicolas; De Ridder, Mark; Storme, Guy

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Validation of a prospective, risk-adapted strategy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with a T1-3N0M0 (American Joint Committee on Cancer 6th edition) NSCLC were accrued. Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group definition, patients were treated to a total dose of 60,Gy in three fractions for peripherally located lesions and four fractions for centrally located lesions. The primary endpoint was toxicity, graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late morbidity scoring system, and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Secondary endpoints were local control and survival. Results: A total of 40 patients were included, 17 with a centrally located lesion. The lung toxicity-free survival estimate at 2 years was 74% and was related to the location (central vs. peripheral) and the size of the target volume. No dose volumetric parameters could predict the occurrence of lung toxicity. One patient died because of treatment-related toxicity. The 1-year and 2-year local progression-free survival estimates were 97% and 84%, respectively, and were related to stage (T1 vs. T2) related (p = 0.006). Local failure was not more frequent for patients treated in four fractions. The 1-year local progression-free survival estimate dropped below 80% for lesions with a diameter of more than 4 cm. Conclusion: The proposed risk-adapted strategy for both centrally and peripherally located lesions showed an acceptable toxicity profile while maintaining excellent local control rates. The correlation between local control and tumor diameter calls for the inclusion of tumor stage as a variable in future study design.

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  19. High-dose MVCT image guidance for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chao, Edward; Lucas, Dan; Flynn, Ryan T.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a potent treatment for early stage primary and limited metastatic disease. Accurate tumor localization is essential to administer SBRT safely and effectively. Tomotherapy combines helical IMRT with onboard megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging and is well suited for SBRT; however, MVCT results in reduced soft tissue contrast and increased image noise compared with kilovoltage CT. The goal of this work was to investigate the use of increased imaging doses on a clinical tomotherapy machine to improve image quality for SBRT image guidance. Methods: Two nonstandard, high-dose imaging modes were created on a tomotherapy machine by increasing the linear accelerator (LINAC) pulse rate from the nominal setting of 80 Hz, to 160 Hz and 300 Hz, respectively. Weighted CT dose indexes (wCTDIs) were measured for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes in a 30 cm solid water phantom using a calibrated A1SL ion chamber. Image quality was assessed from scans of a customized image quality phantom. Metrics evaluated include: contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), high-contrast spatial resolution, image uniformity, and percent image noise. In addition, two patients receiving SBRT were localized using high-dose MVCT scans. Raw detector data collected after each scan were used to reconstruct standard-dose images for comparison. Results: MVCT scans acquired using a pitch of 1.0 resulted in wCTDI values of 2.2, 4.7, and 8.5 cGy for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes respectively. CNR values for both low and high-contrast materials were found to increase with the square root of dose. Axial high-contrast spatial resolution was comparable for all imaging modes at 0.5 lp/mm. Image uniformity was improved and percent noise decreased as the imaging dose increased. Similar improvements in image quality were observed in patient images, with decreases in image noise being the most notable. Conclusions: High-dose imaging modes are made possible on a

  20. Stereotactic Interstitial Radiosurgery With the Photon Radiosurgery System (PRS) for Metastatic Brain Tumors: A Prospective Single-Center Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazis, Georgios; Trippel, Michael; Birg, Walter; Ostertag, Christoph B.; Nikkhah, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and the treatment outcome of tumor patients being treated stereotactically with a miniature X-ray generator (Photon Radiosurgery System, PRS). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with histologically diagnosed cerebral metastases were treated with a single fraction of stereotactic interstitial irradiation (median, 18 Gy). Clinical and neuroimaging evaluation were assessed at 2-, 6-, and 12-week intervals postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Survival, local control, and distant and overall brain freedom from progression were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival was 7.37 months and the actuarial survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 60.0% and 34.3%, respectively. Acute complications on six patients were associated with shorter survival. Local tumor control at the initial stage and at the last follow-up were 82% and 50%. Eighteen patients (53%) developed distant brain metastases after treatment. At 1 year, the local control rate and distant and overall brain freedom from progression were 33.0%, 43.3%, and 14.7%, respectively. A shorter local tumor control was observed by PRS treatment of a recurrent tumor and by irregular tumor configuration. Conclusions: Interstitial radiosurgery with the PRS requires continued investigation. It allows for an immediate and potentially cost-efficient treatment for patients with singular, small (<= 6.36 cm{sup 3}; or <= 2.3 cm) spherical brain metastasis subsequent to a stereotactic biopsy.

  1. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  2. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  3. Frame-Based Immobilization and Targeting for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Bryan C. . E-mail: bryan.murray@utsouthwestern.edu; Forster, Kenneth; Timmerman, Robert

    2007-07-01

    defined by the body frame fiducials. The ability to impose abdominal compression proved to be a simple way to reduce target and tissue motion. SBRT with Stereotactic Body Frame enables comfortable patient immobilization and facilitates repeated registering and re-registering of the patient to the frame. With the body frame, large-dose-per fraction treatment is possible for localized tumor deposits with the aim of attaining a more therapeutic result.

  4. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S. Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was {>=}5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were {<=}2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic ({sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation.

  5. Prediction of AVM obliteration after stereotactic radiotherapy using radiobiological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Lefkopoulos, Dimitrios; Nataf, François; Schlienger, Michel; Karlsson, Bengt; Lax, Ingmar; Kappas, Constantin; Lind, Bengt K.; Brahme, Anders

    2002-07-01

    This study was carried out in order to derive the radiobiological parameters of the dose-response relation for the obliteration of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) following single fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Furthermore, the accuracy by which the linear Poisson model predicts the probability of obliteration and how the haemorrhage history, location and volume of the AVM influence its radiosensitivity are investigated. The study patient material consists of 85 patients who received radiation for AVM therapy. Radiation-induced AVM obliterations were assessed on the basis of post-irradiation angiographies and other radiological findings. For each patient the dose delivered to the clinical target volume and the clinical treatment outcome were available. These data were used in a maximum likelihood analysis to calculate the best estimates of the parameters of the linear Poisson model. The uncertainties of these parameters were also calculated and their individual influence on the dose-response curve was studied. AVM radiosensitivity was assumed to be the same for all the patients. The radiobiological model used was proved suitable for predicting the treatment outcome pattern of the studied patient material. The radiobiological parameters of the model were calculated for different AVM locations, bleeding histories and AVM sizes. The range of parameter variability had considerable effect on the dose-response curve of AVM. The correlation between the dosimetric data and their corresponding clinical effect could be accurately modelled using the linear Poisson model. The derived response parameters can be introduced into the clinical routine with the calculated accuracy assuming the same methodology in target definition and delineation. The known volume dependence of AVM radiosensitivity was confirmed. Moreover, a trend relating AVM location with its radiosensitivity was observed.

  6. Monitor Unit Checking in Heterogeneous Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Patrick D.; Adolfson, Troy; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Saxena, Rishik

    2011-10-01

    Treatment of lung cancer using very-high-dose fractionation in small fields requires well-tested dose modeling, a method for density-averaging compound targets constructed from different parts of the breathing cycle, and monitor unit verification of the heterogeneity-corrected treatment plans. The quality and safety of each procedure are dependent on these factors. We have evaluated the dosimetry of our first 26 stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, including 260 treatment fields, planned with the Pinnacle treatment planning system. All targets were combined from full expiration and inspiration computed tomography scans and planned on the normal respiration scan with 6-MV photons. Combined GTVs (cGTVs) have been density-averaged in different ways for comparison of the effect on total monitor units. In addition, we have compared planned monitor units against hand calculations using 2 classic 1D correction methods: (1) effective attenuation and (2) ratio of Tissue-Maximum Ratios (TMRs) to determine the range of efficacy of simple verification methods over difficult-to-perform measurements. Different methods of density averaging for combined targets have been found to have minimal impact on total dose as evidenced by the range of total monitor units generated for each method. Nondensity-corrected treatment plans for the same fields were found to require about 8% more monitor units on average. Hand calculations, using the effective attenuation method were found to agree with Pinnacle calculations for nonproblematic fields to within {+-}10% for >95% of the fields tested. The ratio of TMRs method was found to be unacceptable. Reasonable choices for density-averaging of cGTVs using full inspiration/expiration scans should not strongly affect the planning dose. Verification of planned monitor units, as a check for problematic fields, can be done for 6-MV fields with simple 1D effective attenuation-corrected hand calculations.

  7. A preplanning method for stereotactic radiosurgery to improve treatment workflow.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Ozturk, Naim; Smith, Brett; Slavin, Konstantin V; Koshy, Matthew; Aydogan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Frame-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) requires fixation of an invasive head ring to ensure accurate targeting. Minimizing waiting time with a fixed head ring is important for patient comfort and satisfaction. We report a practical preplanning solution for the Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system that reduces waiting time by expediting the planning process on treatment day. A water-filled anthropomorphic head phantom was used to acquire a surrogate CT image set for preplanning and fused with patient's MRI, which was obtained before the day of treatment. Once an acceptable preplan was obtained, it was saved as a plan template and the phantom image set was removed from the Brainlab database to prevent any confusion and mix-up of image sets. On the treatment day, the patient's CT and MRI were fused, and the customized beam settings of the preplan template were then applied and optimized. Up to 10-fold of reduction in treatment plan time was demonstrated by bench testing with multiple planners and a variety of cases. Loading the plan template and fine-tuning the preconfigured beam settings took only a small fraction of the preplan time to restore the conformity and dose falloff comparable to those of the preplan. For instance, preplan time was 2 hr for a two-isocenter case, whereas, it took less than 20 min for a less experienced planner to plan it on the day of treat-ment using the preplan method. The SRS preplanning technique implemented in this study for the Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system offers an opportunity to explore possible beam configurations thoroughly, optimize planning parameters, resolve gantry angle clearance issues, and communicate and address challenges with physicians before the treatment day. Preplanning has been proven to improve plan quality and to improve efficiency in our clinic, especially for multiple-isocenter and dosimetrically challenging cases. PMID:27167274

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  9. Limitations of stereotactic biopsy in the initial management of gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R. J.; Fuller, G. N.; Abi-Said, D.; Lang, F. F.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Shi, W. M.; Wildrick, D. M.; Sawaya, R.

    2001-01-01

    Stereotactic biopsy is often performed for diagnostic purposes before treating patients whose imaging studies highly suggest glioma. Indications cited for biopsy include diagnosis and/or the "inoperability" of the tumor. This study questions the routine use of stereotactic biopsy in the initial management of gliomas. At The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, we retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 81 patients whose imaging studies suggested glioma and who underwent stereotactic biopsy followed by craniotomy/resection (within 60 days) between 1993 and 1998. All relevant clinical and imaging information was reviewed, including computerized volumetric analysis of the tumors based on pre- and postoperative MRI. Stereotactic biopsy was performed at institutions other than M. D. Anderson in 78 (96%) of 81 patients. The majority of tumors were located either in eloquent brain (36 of 81 = 44%) or near-eloquent brain (41 of 81 = 51%), and this frequently was the rationale cited for performing stereotactic biopsy. Gross total resection (>95%) was achieved in 46 (57%) of 81 patients, with a median extent of resection of 96% for this series. Diagnoses based on biopsy or resection in the same patient differed in 40 (49%) of 82 cases. This discrepancy was reduced to 30 (38%) of 80 cases when the biopsy slides were reviewed preoperatively by each of three neuropathologists at M. D. Anderson. Major neurologic complications occurred in 10 (12.3%) of 81 surgical patients and 3 (3.7%) of 81 patients undergoing biopsy. Surgical morbidity was probably higher in our series than it would be for glioma patients in general because our patients represent a highly selected subset of glioma patients whose tumors present a technical challenge to remove. Stereotactic biopsy is frequently inaccurate in providing a correct diagnosis and is associated with additional risk and cost. If stereotactic biopsy is performed, expert neuropathology consultation should be sought

  10. Effects of combined sunitinib and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy on bone marrow hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Johnny; Timmins, Jonathan; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Packer, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in deploying stereotactic body radiotherapy in combination with immune therapy for patients with extracranial oligometastases. In addition to angiogenesis inhibition, sunitinib appears to mediate antitumor immunity through effects on circulating monocytic cells. The current study investigated the effects of combined sunitinib and stereotactic radiotherapy on hematopoiesis. As part of a phase I/II clinical trial utilizing concurrent sunitinib (25–50 mg on days 1–28) and image-guided radiation therapy (40–50 Gy in 10 fractions starting on days 8–19) for patients with metastatic cancer, the complete blood count, platelet count and automatic differential were performed pretreatment and on days 8 and 19. On average, sunitinib monotherapy for 7 days resulted in a 33% decrease in monocytes and an 18% decrease in neutrophils (P<0.01 for all). Compared to sunitinib alone, combined sunitinib and radiation resulted in a further decrease in neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets (P<0.05). Following sunitinib and radiation treatment, a greater than average decrease in monocytes (≥200/µl) was associated with a significant increase in progression-free and overall survival times. This exploratory study provides further evidence that monocytes represent a potential biomarker in patients with solid tumors treated with sunitinib.

  11. Effects of combined sunitinib and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy on bone marrow hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Johnny; Timmins, Jonathan; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Packer, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in deploying stereotactic body radiotherapy in combination with immune therapy for patients with extracranial oligometastases. In addition to angiogenesis inhibition, sunitinib appears to mediate antitumor immunity through effects on circulating monocytic cells. The current study investigated the effects of combined sunitinib and stereotactic radiotherapy on hematopoiesis. As part of a phase I/II clinical trial utilizing concurrent sunitinib (25–50 mg on days 1–28) and image-guided radiation therapy (40–50 Gy in 10 fractions starting on days 8–19) for patients with metastatic cancer, the complete blood count, platelet count and automatic differential were performed pretreatment and on days 8 and 19. On average, sunitinib monotherapy for 7 days resulted in a 33% decrease in monocytes and an 18% decrease in neutrophils (P<0.01 for all). Compared to sunitinib alone, combined sunitinib and radiation resulted in a further decrease in neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets (P<0.05). Following sunitinib and radiation treatment, a greater than average decrease in monocytes (≥200/µl) was associated with a significant increase in progression-free and overall survival times. This exploratory study provides further evidence that monocytes represent a potential biomarker in patients with solid tumors treated with sunitinib. PMID:27602153

  12. Calculation of dose profiles in stereotactic synchrotron microplanar beam radiotherapy in a tissue-lung phantom.

    PubMed

    Company, F Z

    2007-03-01

    Synchrotron x-ray beams with high fluence rate and highly collimated may be used in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours. A bundle of converging monochromatic x-ray beams having uniform microscopic thickness i.e. (microplanar beams) are directed to the center of the tumour, delivering lethal dose to the target volume while sparing normal cells. The proposed technique takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which regenerate the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. The sharply dropping lateral dose of a microbeam provides low scattered dose to the off-target interbeam volume. In the target volume the converging bundle of beams are closely spaced, and relatively high primary and secondary electron doses overlap and produce a high dose region between the beams. This higher and lower dose margins in the target volume allows precise targeting. The advantages of stereotactic microbeam radiotherapy will be lost as the dose between microbeams exceeds the tolerance dose of the dose limiting tissues. Therefore, it is essential to optimize the interbeam doses in off-target volume. The lateral and depth doses of 100 keV microplanar beams are investigated for a single beam and an array of converging microplanar beams in a tissue, lung and tissue-lung phantoms. The EGS5 Monte Carlo code is used to calculate dose profiles at different depths and bundles of beams. The maximum dose on the beam axis (peak) and the minimum interbeam dose (valley) are compared at different energies, depths, bundle sizes, heights, widths and beam spacings. The interbeam dose is calculated at different depths and an isodose map of the phantom is obtained. An acceptable energy region is found for tissue and lung microbeam radiotherapy and a stereotactic microbeam radiotherapy model is proposed for a 4 cm diameter and 1 cm thick tumour on the lung phantom.

  13. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  14. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee shall retain a record of each spot-check for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units required...

  15. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee shall retain a record of each spot-check for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units required...

  16. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  17. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  18. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Unilateral Orbital Lymphoma and Orbital Pseudo-Tumors: A Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chino, Kazumi Tanyi, James A.; Stea, Baldassarre

    2009-04-01

    Orbital lymphoma and Grave's ophthalmopathy (GO) are successfully treated with radiation therapy. The lenses are blocked to prevent cataract formation. However, blocking of the lens by traditional methods can be difficult for tumors located anteriorly and extending into the retrobulbar space. We present a series of 3 patients with orbital lymphoma and 1 with GO treated with stereotactic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to spare normal structures, including the lens. Three patients with orbital lymphomas and 1 with unilateral GO were treated with IMRT using a linac with stereotactic capabilities. Avoidance structures included the ipsilateral lens and globe, the contralateral lens and globe, the chiasm, and the brainstem. Two patients with orbital lymphoma were treated with 24 Gy in 12 fractions, and 1 patient was treated with 30.6 Gy in 17 fractions. The patient with GO was treated with 20 Gy in 10 fractions. The dosimetry was analyzed to determine the dose to normal tissues. Patient follow-up varies between 8 and 24 months. The mean minimal dose to the ipsilateral lens was 13.6% of the total dose, the mean maximal dose was 33.5%, and the mean median dose was 19.3%. The mean median dose to the contralateral eye was 1.1% of the total dose. The mean median dose to the chiasm was 14.9% of the total dose. The mean median dose to the brainstem was 1.9% of the total dose. No cataracts or other complications were noted in the 4 patients treated with this technique so far. IMRT gives a more conformal treatment to the orbital contents while sparing normal tissues such as the ipsilateral lens and adjacent critical structures. This should result in fewer complications such as cataracts.

  19. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-Li; Xue, Chao-Fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6-8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64-66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68-70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05). The local failure rate (P<0.05) and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05). The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  20. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05). The local failure rate (P<0.05) and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05). The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  1. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa; Rebueno, Neal C.; Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin A.; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Li, Jing; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  2. Radiogenic Side Effects After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Dieckmann, Karin; Gleiss, Andreas; Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Poetter, Richard

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate side effects of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy for patients with choroidal melanoma. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at the Medical University of Vienna between 1997 and 2007 with a Linac with 6-MV photon beams in five fractions with 10, 12, or 14 Gy per fraction. Examinations for radiogenic side effects were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and then once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Adverse side effects were assessed using slit-lamp examination, funduscopy, gonioscopy, tonometry, and, if necessary, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Evaluations of incidence of side effects are based on an actuarial analysis. Results: One hundred and eighty-nine (89.2%) and 168 (79.2%) of the tumors were within 3 mm of the macula and the optic disc, respectively. The five most common radiotherapy side effects were retinopathy and optic neuropathy (114 cases and 107 cases, respectively), cataract development (87 cases), neovascular glaucoma (46 cases), and corneal epithelium defects (41 cases). In total, 33.6%, 38.5%, 51.2%, 75.5%, and 77.6% of the patients were free of any radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, cataract, neovascular glaucoma, or corneal epithelium defects 5 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusion: In centrally located choroidal melanoma hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy shows a low to moderate rate of adverse long-term side effects comparable with those after proton beam radiotherapy. Future fractionation schemes should seek to further reduce adverse side effects rate while maintaining excellent local tumor control.

  3. Cone Beam CT Image Guidance for Intracranial Stereotactic Treatments: Comparison With a Frame Guided Set-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, Laura Casamassima, Franco; Polli, Caterina; Menichelli, Claudia; Bonucci, Ivano; Cavedon, Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: An analysis is performed of the setup errors measured by a kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) patients immobilized by a thermoplastic mask and a bite-block and positioned using stereotactic coordinates. We evaluated the overall positioning precision and accuracy of the immobilizing and localizing systems. The potential of image-guided radiotherapy to replace stereotactic methods is discussed. Methods and Materials: Fifty-seven patients received brain SRT. After a frame-guided setup, before each fraction (131 fractions), a CBCT was acquired and the detected displacements corrected online. Translational and rotational errors were analyzed calculating overall mean and standard deviation. A separate analysis was performed for bite-block (in conjunction with mask) and for simple thermoplastic mask. Interobserver variability for CBCT three-dimensional registration was assessed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motion were calculated. Results: The mean module of the three-dimensional displacement vector was 3.0 {+-} 1.4 mm. Setup errors for bite block and mask were smaller (2.9 {+-} 1.3 mm) than those for thermoplastic mask alone (3.2 {+-} 1.5 mm), but statistical significance was not reached (p = 0.15). Interobserver variability was negligible. The maximum margin calculated for residual errors and intra fraction motion was small but not negligible (1.57 mm). Conclusions: Considering the detected setup errors, daily image guidance is essential for the efficacy of SRT treatments when mask immobilization is used, and even when a bite-block is used in conjunction. The frame setup is still used as a starting point for the opportunity of rotational corrections. Residual margins after on-line corrections must be evaluated.

  4. Hypofractionated image-guided breath-hold SABR (Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy) of liver metastases – clinical results

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) is a non-invasive therapy option for inoperable liver oligometastases. Outcome and toxicity were retrospectively evaluated in a single-institution patient cohort who had undergone ultrasound-guided breath-hold SABR. Patients and methods 19 patients with liver metastases of various primary tumors consecutively treated with SABR (image-guidance with stereotactic ultrasound in combination with computer-controlled breath-hold) were analysed regarding overall-survival (OS), progression-free-survival (PFS), progression pattern, local control (LC), acute and late toxicity. Results PTV (planning target volume)-size was 108 ± 109cm3 (median 67.4 cm3). BED2 (Biologically effective dose in 2 Gy fraction) was 83.3 ± 26.2 Gy (median 78 Gy). Median follow-up and median OS were 12 months. Actuarial 2-year-OS-rate was 31%. Median PFS was 4 months, actuarial 1-year-PFS-rate was 20%. Site of first progression was predominantly distant. Regression of irradiated lesions was observed in 84% (median time to detection of regression was 2 months). Actuarial 6-month-LC-rate was 92%, 1- and 2-years-LC-rate 57%, respectively. BED2 influenced LC. When a cut-off of BED2 = 78 Gy was used, the higher BED2 values resulted in improved local control with a statistical trend to significance (p = 0.0999). Larger PTV-sizes, inversely correlated with applied dose, resulted in lower local control, also with a trend to significance (p-value = 0.08) when a volume cut-off of 67 cm3 was used. No local relapse was observed at PTV-sizes < 67 cm3 and BED2 > 78 Gy. No acute clinical toxicity > °2 was observed. Late toxicity was also ≤ °2 with the exception of one gastrointestinal bleeding-episode 1 year post-SABR. A statistically significant elevation in the acute phase was observed for alkaline-phosphatase; in the chronic phase for alkaline-phosphatase, bilirubine, cholinesterase and C

  5. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer: achievements and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Takayama, Kenji

    2010-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a new treatment modality where narrow beams from several directions focus on the target while sparing the adjacent normal tissues with high accuracy. This technique basically derived from that of radiosurgery for intracranial lesions allows us to deliver high dose to the target leading to high control of the tumor without causing significant cytotoxicities associated with the treatment. Early-stage non-small cell lung cancers are regarded as most appropriate malignancies for this modality and accordingly have most intensively been investigated. With many encouraging outcomes in retrospective studies, several prospective clinical trials have been started world-wide. Japan Clinical Oncology Group protocol 0403 is a phase II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer including both inoperable and operable patients. The results for operable patients are to be disclosed this year after 3 years of follow-up. It is highly probable that stereotactic body radiation therapy can be a standard treatment modality for inoperable patients for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy for operable patients is expected to be clarified by the outcomes of coming clinical trials. Tremendous advance in stereotactic body radiation therapy is expected when four-dimensional radiation therapy coping with tumor movement is realized. Among several approaches, tumor tracking appears most ideal. The new image-guided radiotherapy system which has the capability of tumor tracking has been developed in Japan.

  6. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for nonmetastatic lung cancer: An analysis of 75 patients treated over 5 years

    SciTech Connect

    Beitler, Jonathan J. . E-mail: jbeitler92@alumni.gsb.columbia.edu; Badine, Edgard A.; El-Sayah, Danny; Makara, Denise; Friscia, Phillip; Silverman, Phillip; Terjanian, Terenig

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may not be medically operable even in patients with surgically resectable disease. For patients who either refuse surgery or are medically inoperable, radiation therapy may be the best therapeutic choice. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) employs external fixation and hypofractionation to deliver a high dose per fraction of radiation to a small target volume. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 75 patients treated over 5 years at Staten Island University Hospital as definitive treatment for NSCLC or presumed NSCLC. Patients received a median of 5 fractions of 8 Gy per fraction over 27 days. Results: Overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year actuarial survivals were 63%, 45%, and 17%. Patients with a gross tumor volume (GTV) less than 65 cm{sup 3} enjoyed a longer median survival (25.7 vs. 9.9 months, p < 0.003), and at 5 years, the actuarial survival for the patients with GTVs less than 65 cm{sup 3} was 24% vs. 0% for those with GTVs larger than 65 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy as delivered was ineffective for curing the patients whose GTVs were larger than 65 cm{sup 3}. SBRT was promising for those with GTVs less than 65 cm{sup 3}.

  7. Reirradiation Human Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma, Lijun; Weinberg, Vivian; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chao, Sam; Chang, Ung-Kyu; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Angelov, Liliyanna; Chang, Eric L.; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Soltys, Scott G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Ryu, Sam; Gerszten, Peter C.; Fowler, Jack; Wong, C. Shun; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed the treatment for patients with spine metastases who initially received conventional external beam radiation (EBRT) and were reirradiated with 1-5 fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) who did or did not subsequently develop radiation myelopathy (RM). Methods and Materials: Spinal cord dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for 5 RM patients (5 spinal segments) and 14 no-RM patients (16 spine segments) were based on thecal sac contours at retreatment. Dose to a point within the thecal sac that receives the maximum dose (P{sub max}), and doses to 0.1-, 1.0-, and 2.0-cc volumes within the thecal sac were reviewed. The biologically effective doses (BED) using {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy for late spinal cord toxicity were calculated and normalized to a 2-Gy equivalent dose (nBED = Gy{sub 2/2}). Results: The initial conventional radiotherapy nBED ranged from {approx}30 to 50 Gy{sub 2/2} (median {approx}40 Gy{sub 2/2}). The SBRT reirradiation thecal sac mean P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 20.0 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.8-29.2), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 67.4 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 51.0-83.9) in the RM group. The mean total P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 62.3 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 50.3-74.3), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 105.8 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 84.3-127.4) in the RM group. The fraction of the total P{sub max} nBED accounted for by the SBRT P{sub max} nBED for the RM patients ranged from 0.54 to 0.78 and that for the no-RM patients ranged from 0.04 to 0.53. Conclusions: SBRT given at least 5 months after conventional palliative radiotherapy with a reirradiation thecal sac P{sub max} nBED of 20-25 Gy{sub 2/2} appears to be safe provided the total P{sub max} nBED does not exceed approximately 70 Gy{sub 2/2}, and the SBRT thecal sac P{sub max} nBED comprises no more than approximately 50% of the total nBED.

  8. A new system for neuronavigation and stereotactic biopsy pantograph stereotactic localization and guidance system.

    PubMed

    Abrishamkar, Saeid; Moin, Houshang; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Hajibabaie, Mahmood; Haghighi, Elham K; Abbasifard, Salman

    2011-07-01

    Everyday, neurosurgeons face the problem of orientation within the brain but the advent of stereotactic surgery and neuronavigation have solved this problem. Frame-based stereotactic systems (FBSS) and neuronavigation systems have their own strengths and priority and pitfalls, which were the main driving force for us to design a new system. This hybrid system comprises three main parts: main frame, monitoring system, and pantograph, which are connected to each other and to the operating table by particular attachments. For using this system, after performing CT SCAN or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) the axial view will be transferred to Liquid Cristal Display (LCD). In the operating room, the head of the patient fixes to the operating table and registration is completed by two arms of pantograph. We made a simulation operation with our system on an occipital cavernous angioma and a frontal oligodendroglioma. The software, which have been used for simulation were as follows; Poser (version-7), Catia (version 5- R18), and 3 Dimension Max (version 2008). The accuracy of this system is approximately two millimeter. The advantages of this system are: easy to use, much less expensive, and compatible with different devices, which may be needed during neurosurgical operation. For countries that do not have the opportunity to have sophisticated technology and neuronavigation system, we believe that our system is a one-stop solution.

  9. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  10. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  11. Comparison of Two RapidArc Delivery Strategies in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Peripheral Lung Cancer with Flattening Filter Free Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Xian; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Kuang, Yu; Chen, Chuang-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the performance of using partial arc (PA) and full arc with avoidance sectors (FAAS) in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung cancer with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods Eighteen patients with primary (T1 or T2) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or lung metastatic were selected for this study. Nine patients with a gross tumor volume (GTV) <= 10 cc were designated as the small tumor group. The other nine patients with a GTV between 10 cc and 44 cc were assigned to the large tumor group. The treatment plans were generated in eighteen patients using PA and FAAS techniques, respectively, and delivered with a Varian TrueBeam Linac. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OARs), monitor unit (MU), out-of-field dose, and delivery time were statistically analyzed. Delta4 and portal dosimetry were employed to evaluate the delivery accuracy. Results For the small tumor group, compared with the PA plans, the FAAS plans significantly achieved a lower MU/fraction, out-of-field dose and a shorter treatment time (p<0.05), but the target dose was slightly higher than that delivered by PA plans (p<0.05). For the large tumor group, the PA plans significantly attained a shorter treatment time (p<0.05), whereas MU/fraction, out-of-field dose and dose to OARs were comparable between the two plans (p>0.05). Furthermore, all plans generated from the eighteen patients achieved a high pass rate in patient-specific quality assurance, with all the gamma indices greater than 97% at the Γ3mm, 3% threshold. Conclusion This study suggests that the FAAS technique is more beneficial for the small tumor patients undergoing lung SBRT with FFF beams because of its higher treatment efficiency and MU reduction. However, for the large tumor patients, the PA technique is recommended due to its higher treatment efficiency. PMID:26131554

  12. Indirect Tumor Cell Death After High-Dose Hypofractionated Irradiation: Implications for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chang W.; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Griffin, Robert J.; Park, Inhwan; Koonce, Nathan A.; Hui, Susanta; Kim, Mi-Sook; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Sperduto, Paul W.; Cho, L. Chinsoo

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reveal the biological mechanisms underlying stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: FSaII fibrosarcomas grown subcutaneously in the hind limbs of C3H mice were irradiated with 10 to 30 Gy of X rays in a single fraction, and the clonogenic cell survival was determined with in vivo–in vitro excision assay immediately or 2 to 5 days after irradiation. The effects of radiation on the intratumor microenvironment were studied using immunohistochemical methods. Results: After cells were irradiated with 15 or 20 Gy, cell survival in FSaII tumors declined for 2 to 3 days and began to recover thereafter in some but not all tumors. After irradiation with 30 Gy, cell survival declined continuously for 5 days. Cell survival in some tumors 5 days after 20 to 30 Gy irradiation was 2 to 3 logs less than that immediately after irradiation. Irradiation with 20 Gy markedly reduced blood perfusion, upregulated HIF-1α, and increased carbonic anhydrase-9 expression, indicating that irradiation increased tumor hypoxia. In addition, expression of VEGF also increased in the tumor tissue after 20 Gy irradiation, probably due to the increase in HIF-1α activity. Conclusions: Irradiation of FSaII tumors with 15 to 30 Gy in a single dose caused dose-dependent secondary cell death, most likely by causing vascular damage accompanied by deterioration of intratumor microenvironment. Such indirect tumor cell death may play a crucial role in the control of human tumors with SBRT and SRS.

  13. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation. PMID:27000514

  14. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation.

  15. Treatment of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Surgery or Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Uzel, Esengül Koçak; Abacıoğlu, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    The management of early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) has improved recently due to advances in surgical and radiation modalities. Minimally-invasive procedures like Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy decreases the morbidity of surgery, while the numerous methods of staging the mediastinum such as endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies are helping to achieve the objectives much more effectively. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) has become the frontrunner as the standard of care in medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients, and has also been branded as tolerable and highly effective. Ongoing researches using SABR are continuously validating the optimal dosing and fractionation schemes, while at the same time instituting its role for both inoperable and operable patients. PMID:25759766

  16. The tolerance of gastrointestinal organs to stereotactic body radiation therapy: what do we know so far?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tarita O.; Hasan, Shaakir; Small, William; Herman, Joseph M.; Lock, Michael; Kim, Edward Y.; Mayr, Nina A.; Teh, Bin S.

    2014-01-01

    As stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for gastrointestinal (GI) gains popularity, there is a need to optimize doses and fractionation to minimize GI toxicity. GI organs that have classically developed radiation-induced toxicity include the liver & biliary system, small bowel, esophagus, and rectum. While the literature quantifies dose restrictions for these organs under standard fractionation, there is limited data regarding toxicity with the ablative dose schedules used in SBRT. We conducted a review of the literature to identify prospective and retrospective studies that detail GI toxicities when SBRT was employed. Based on the literature, the median SBRT dose for abdominal and thoracic tumors ranged from 24 to 60 Gy, at 5 to 25 Gy per fraction. The respective observed frequencies of grade 3 and 4 toxicities for the liver, biliary system, small bowel, and esophagus were variable among different studies. Typically, patients who suffered grade 3 and 4 toxicities were more likely to have had some form of systemic therapy as well. The effect of dose, fractionation, timing, and volume on GI toxicities has been described in the literature but more data is necessary to develop uniform treatment guidelines for SBRT. PMID:24982772

  17. Salvage Reirradiaton With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozyigit, Goekhan; Yazici, Goezde; Dogan, Ali; Yildiz, Ferah; Zorlu, Faruk; Guerkaynak, Murat; Gullu, Ibrahim H.; Hosal, Sefik; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present our results of reirradiation of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer with image-guided, fractionated, frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy technique. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to February 2009, 46 patients were treated using the CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. All patients had recurrent, unresectable, and previously irradiated head-and-neck cancer. The most prominent site was the nasopharynx (32.6%), and the most common histopathology was epidermoid carcinoma. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume identified on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. There were 22 female and 24 male patients. Median age was 53 years (range, 19-87 years). The median tumor dose with stereotactic body radiotherapy was 30 Gy (range, 18-35 Gy) in a median of five (range, one to five) fractions. Results: Of 37 patients whose response to therapy was evaluated, 10 patients (27%) had complete tumor regression, 11 (29.8%) had partial response, and 10 (27%) had stable disease. Ultimate local disease control was achieved in 31 patients (83.8%). The overall survival was 11.93 months in median (ranged, 11.4 - 17.4 months), and the median progression free survival was 10.5 months. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 41% and 46%, respectively. Grade II or greater long-term complications were observed in 6 (13.3%) patients. On follow-up, 8 (17.3%) patients had carotid blow-out syndrome, and 7 (15.2%) patients died of bleeding from carotid arteries. We discovered that this fatal syndrome occurred only in patients with tumor surrounding carotid arteries and carotid arteries receiving all prescribed dose. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an appealing treatment option for patients with recurrent head-and-neck cancer previously treated with radiation to high doses. Good local control with

  18. Evaluation of the peripheral dose in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Di Betta, Erika; Fariselli, Laura; Bergantin, Achille; Locatelli, Federica; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Broggi, Sara; Fumagalli, Maria Luisa

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to compare peripheral doses absorbed during stereotactic treatment of a brain lesion delivered using different devices. These data were used to estimate the risk of stochastic effects. Methods: Treatment plans were created for an anthropomorphic phantom and delivered using a LINAC with stereotactic cones and a multileaf collimator, a CyberKnife system (before and after a supplemental shielding was applied), a TomoTherapy system, and a Gamma Knife unit. For each treatment, 5 Gy were prescribed to the target. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted roughly in the position of the thyroid, sternum, upper lung, lower lung, and gonads. Results: Mean doses ranged from of 4.1 (Gamma Knife) to 62.8 mGy (LINAC with cones) in the thyroid, from 2.3 (TomoTherapy) to 30 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the sternum, from 1.7 (TomoTherapy) to 20 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the upper part of the lungs, from 0.98 (Gamma Knife) to 15 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the lower part of the lungs, and between 0.3 (Gamma Knife) and 10 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the gonads. Conclusions: The peripheral dose absorbed in the sites of interest with a 5 Gy fraction is low. Although the risk of adverse side effects calculated for 20 Gy delivered in 5 Gy fractions is negligible, in the interest of optimum patient radioprotection, further studies are needed to determine the weight of each contributor to the peripheral dose.

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Re-irradiation of Persistent or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, Marco; Minatel, Emilio; Durofil, Elena; Polesel, Jerry; Avanzo, Michele; Baresic, Tania; Bearz, Alessandra; Del Conte, Alessandro; Franchin, Giovanni; Gobitti, Carlo; Rumeileh, Imad Abu; Trovo, Mauro G.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess toxicity and outcome of re-irradiation with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with recurrent or persistent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who were previously treated with radical radiation therapy (50-60 Gy). The secondary endpoint was to investigate whether there are dosimetric parameter predictors of severe radiation toxicity. Methods and Materials: The analysis was conducted in 17 patients with “in-field” recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC, who underwent re-irradiation with SBRT. SBRT consisted of 30 Gy in 5 to 6 fractions; these prescriptions would be equivalent for the tumor to 37.5 to 40 Gy, bringing the total 2-Gy-per-fraction cumulative dose to 87 to 100 Gy, considering the primary radiation therapy treatment. Actuarial analyses and survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and P values were estimated by the log-rank test, starting from the date of completion of SBRT. Dosimetric parameters from the subgroups with and without grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity were compared using a 2-tailed Student t test. Results: The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4-57 months). Only 2 patients had local failure, corresponding to a local control rate of 86% at 1 year. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) rates at 1 and 2 years were 59% and 29%, respectively; the median OS was 19 months. Four patients (23%) experienced grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and 1 patient developed fatal pneumonitis. One patient died of fatal hemoptysis 2 months after the completion of SBRT. Unexpectedly, heart maximum dose, D5 (minimum dose to at least 5% of the heart volume), and D10 were correlated with risk of radiation pneumonitis (P<.05). Conclusions: Re-irradiation with SBRT for recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC achieves excellent results in terms of local control. However, the high rate of severe toxicity reported in our study is of concern.

  20. Dose-Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mutter, Robert W.; Liu Fan; Abreu, Andres; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose-volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40-60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose-absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p < 0.001). CW2cm consistently enabled better prediction of CW toxicity. When a physical dose of 30 Gy was received by more than 70 cm{sup 3} of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW {>=} 70 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  1. Inter- and Intrafraction Variability in Liver Position in Non-Breath-Hold Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Case, Robert B.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Moseley, Douglas J.; Kim, John; Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: The inter- and intrafraction variability of liver position was assessed in patients with liver cancer treated with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 314 CBCT scans obtained in the treatment position immediately before and after each fraction were evaluated from 29 patients undergoing six-fraction, non-breath-hold stereotactic body radiotherapy for unresectable liver cancer. Off-line, the CBCT scans were sorted into 10 bins, according to the phase of respiration. The liver position (relative to the vertebral bodies) was measured using rigid alignment of the exhale CBCT liver with the exhale planning CT liver, following the alignment of the vertebrae. The interfraction liver position change was measured by comparing the pretreatment CBCT scans, and the intrafraction change was measured from the CBCT scans obtained immediately before and after each fraction. Results: The mean amplitude of liver motion for all patients was 1.8 mm (range, 0.1-5.7), 8.0 mm (range, 0.1-18.8), and 4.3 mm (range 0.1-12.1) in the medial-lateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. The mean absolute ML, CC, and AP interfraction changes in liver position were 2.0 mm (90th percentile, 4.2), 3.5 mm (90th percentile, 7.3), and 2.3 mm (90th percentile, 4.7). The mean absolute intrafraction ML, CC, and AP changes were 1.3 mm (90th percentile, 2.9), 1.6 mm (90th percentile, 3.6), and 1.5 mm (90th percentile, 3.1), respectively. The interfraction changes were significantly larger than the intrafraction changes, with a CC systematic error of 2.9 and 1.1 mm, respectively. The intraobserver reproducibility ({sigma}, n = 29 fractions) was 1.3 mm in the ML, 1.4 mm in the CC, and 1.6 mm in the AP direction. Conclusion: Interfraction liver position changes relative to the vertebral bodies are an important source of geometric uncertainty, providing a rationale for

  2. Recursive Partitioning Analysis Index Is Predictive for Overall Survival in Patients Undergoing Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Woody, Neil; Angelov, Lilyana; Soeder, Sherry L.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Rybicki, Lisa A.; Djemil, Toufik; Suh, John H.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To generate a prognostic index using recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) for patients undergoing spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (sSBRT) for spinal metastases (sMet). Methods and Materials: From an institutional review board-approved database, 174 patients were treated for sMet with sSBRT between February 2006 and August 2009. Median dose was 14 Gy (range, 8-24 Gy), typically in a single fraction (range, 1-5). Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to detect any correlation between survival and histology. Histologies were divided into favorable (breast and prostate), radioresistant (renal cell, melanoma and sarcoma), and other (all other histologies). RPA was performed to identify any association of the following variables with overall survival (OS) following sSBRT: histology, gender, age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), control of primary, extraosseous metastases, time from primary diagnosis (TPD), dose of sSBRT ({<=}14 Gy vs. >14 Gy), extent of spine disease (epidural only, bone and epidural, bone only), upfront or salvage treatment, presence of paraspinal extension, and previous surgery. Results: Median follow-up was 8.9 months. Median OS time from sSBRT was 10.7 months. Median OS intervals for favorable histologies were 14 months, 11.2 months for radioresistant histologies, and 7.3 months for other histologies (p = 0.02). RPA analysis resulted in three classes (p < 0.0001). Class 1 was defined as TPD of >30 months and KPS of >70; Class 2 was TPD of >30 months and KPS of {<=}70 or a TPD of {<=}30 months and age <70 years old; Class 3 was TPD of {<=}30 months and age {>=}70 years old. Median OS was 21.1 months for Class 1 (n = 59), 8.7 months for Class 2 (n = 104), and 2.4 months for Class 3 (n = 11). Conclusion: sSBRT patients treated for sMet have a wide variability in OS. We developed an RPA classification system that is predictive of OS. While many patients are treated for palliation of pain or to avoid symptomatic progression, this

  3. Stereotactic Neurosurgery Planning On A PC Based Workstation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terence M.; Clark, John A.; Pike, Gordon; Henri, Christopher J.; Collins, D. L.; Leksell, Dan; Jeppsson, Ola

    1989-05-01

    Stereotactic surgery requires knowledge of cerebral structures derived from more than one image source. We have developed a PC-AT based workstation which accepts patient images, made with the stereotactic frame in place, from CT, MRI and DSA modalities. Reference markers on the frame are identified in the images to establish the coordinate geometry for each modality. Target points may be identified on each image type and trajectories of probe paths to these points defined. Targets identified on one set of images may be transferred automatically to other images of the same patient, in order, for example, to guarantee a vascular free path of approach to a target point deep within the brain. To date several hundred patients have had stereotactic surgery performed on the basis of plans using this system. Procedures included biopsy and aspiration of lesions, implantation of electrodes for the recording of deep EEG signals, and radiosurgical techniques based on the use of a high energy linear accelerator. We present clinical examples of the use of this system in typical stereotactic neurosurgery procedures, address stereoscopic applications, and discuss the results of inter-modality tests to establish the accuracy of the technique.

  4. Transnasal stereotactic surgery of pituitary adenomas concomitant with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Metyolkina, L; Peresedov, V

    1995-01-01

    Since 1960 we have performed stereotactic transsphenoidal cryohypophysectomy in 70 patients with pituitary adenomas, 42 women and 28 men, aged 11-59 years. The dominant clinical syndrome was acromegaly in 50 patients, galactorrhea in 9, amenorrhea in 5, adiposogenital dystrophy in 4 and gigantism with mild endocrine symptomatology in 2 patients. In 67 patients the histological structure of the tumor was established by biopsy (50 patients with eosinophil adenoma, 10 with mixed-type adenoma, 4 with chromophobe adenoma and 3 with basophil adenoma). Somatotropic hormone, human growth hormone, prolactin, ACTH and 17-ketosteroid levels indicated active/inactive adenomas. In 42 cases the adenoma was only intrasellar, which was confirmed by contrast X-ray investigations, CT scanning, angiography and ophthalmological investigation. Transnasal stereotactic cryohypophysectomy was performed in all 70 cases using a stereotactic apparatus especially designed for operations on the pituitary. All patients (except 2) tolerated the operation well. No complications occurred. Vision deteriorated after operation in 1 patient. Thrombosis of the left middle cerebral artery developed in another patient. All the other patients noted improvement directly after operation - rapid diminution of signs of acromegaly and rapid restoration of normal values in hormonal tests. Six patients with continuing growth of the tumor underwent a second operation 1.5-6 years after the first operation. We conclude from our own clinical experience and information from the literature that transnasal stereotactic cryodestruction is highly effective and relatively safe in the management of pituitary adenoma. PMID:8916351

  5. Wholeness and primary and secondary food structure effects on in vitro digestion patterns determine nutritionally distinct carbohydrate fractions in cereal foods.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Monro, John

    2012-12-01

    Starchy foods of differing structure, including bakery products, breakfast cereals, pastas, and pulses were digested in vitro. Bakery products and processed breakfast cereals with little resilient structure yielded large amounts of rapidly available carbohydrate (RAC), less slowly digested starch (SDS) and little inaccessible digestible starch (IDS) (70:22:8%). Partially processed grains, such as rolled oats contained an increased proportion of SDS (55:38:7%). Pastas, being dense starch structures digested more gradually to completion by superficial erosion, yielding approximately equal proportions of RAC and SDS but little IDS (43:52:4%). Pulses, which retained their cellular morphology, digested more linearly yielding a lower proportion of RAC, a larger proportion of SDS and more IDS (9:69:22%). Preservation of native "primary" structure, and use of processing to create "secondary" structure, are both means by which wholeness, in the sense of intactness, can be used to influence carbohydrate digestion to make foods of lower glycaemic impact.

  6. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  7. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yujiao; Zhang, Fan; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  8. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bishawi, Muath; Kim, Bong; Moore, William H.; Bilfinger, Thomas V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and

  9. Dosimetric comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery to intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, B A; Wazer, D E; Engler, M J; Tsai, J S; Ling, M N

    1998-01-01

    To compare the dosimetry achievable with an intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMR) system to that of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for an irregularly shaped moderate size target. A treatment plan was selected from 109 single fraction SRS cases having had multiple non-coplanar arc therapy using a 6 MV linear accelerator fitted with circular tertiary collimators 1.00 to 4.00 cm in diameter at isocenter. The CT scan with delineated regions of interest was then entered into an IMR treatment planning system and optimized dose distributions, using a back projection technique for dynamic multileaf collimator delivery, were generated with a stimulated annealing algorithm. Dose volume histograms (DVH), homogeneity indices (HI), conformity indices (CI), minimum and maximum doses to surrounding highly sensitive intracranial structures, as well as the volume of tissue treated to > 80, 50, and 20% of the prescription dose from the IMR plan were then compared to those from the single isocenter SRS plan used and a hypothetical three isocenter SRS plan. For an irregularly shaped target, the IMR plan produced a HI of 1.08 and CI of 1.50 compared to 1.75 and 4.41, respectively, for the single isocenter SRS plan (SRS1) and 3.33 and 3.43 for the triple isocenter SRS plan (SRS3). The maximum and minimum doses to surrounding critical structures were less with the IMR plan in comparison to both SRS plans. However, the volume of non-target tissue treated to > 80, 50, and 20% of the prescription dose with the IMR plan was 137, 170, and 163%, respectively, of that treated with the SRS1 plan and 85, 100, and 123% of the volume when compared to SRS3 plan. The IMR system provided more conformal target doses than were provided by the single isocenter or three isocenter SRS plans. IMR delivered less dose to critical normal tissues and provided increased homogeneity within the target volume for a moderate size irregularly shaped target, at the cost of a larger penumbra. PMID:9503486

  10. Extrapolation of Normal Tissue Complication Probability for Different Fractionations in Liver Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai An; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: The ability to predict normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is essential for NTCP-based treatment planning. The purpose of this work is to estimate the Lyman NTCP model parameters for liver irradiation from published clinical data of different fractionation regimens. A new expression of normalized total dose (NTD) is proposed to convert NTCP data between different treatment schemes. Method and Materials: The NTCP data of radiation- induced liver disease (RILD) from external beam radiation therapy for primary liver cancer patients were selected for analysis. The data were collected from 4 institutions for tumor sizes in the range of of 8-10 cm. The dose per fraction ranged from 1.5 Gy to 6 Gy. A modified linear-quadratic model with two components corresponding to radiosensitive and radioresistant cells in the normal liver tissue was proposed to understand the new NTD formalism. Results: There are five parameters in the model: TD{sub 50}, m, n, {alpha}/{beta} and f. With two parameters n and {alpha}/{beta} fixed to be 1.0 and 2.0 Gy, respectively, the extracted parameters from the fitting are TD{sub 50}(1) = 40.3 {+-} 8.4Gy, m =0.36 {+-} 0.09, f = 0.156 {+-} 0.074 Gy and TD{sub 50}(1) = 23.9 {+-} 5.3Gy, m = 0.41 {+-} 0.15, f = 0.0 {+-} 0.04 Gy for patients with liver cirrhosis scores of Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B, respectively. The fitting results showed that the liver cirrhosis score significantly affects fractional dose dependence of NTD. Conclusion: The Lyman parameters generated presently and the new form of NTD may be used to predict NTCP for treatment planning of innovative liver irradiation with different fractionations, such as hypofractioned stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  11. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  12. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6-15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5-7 years) and acute and late toxicity (<6% grade 3-4 late toxicities). Other outcomes (eg, overall and cancer-specific mortality) cannot be compared, given the indolent course of low-risk prostate cancer. At this time, neither SBRT device is recommended over the other for all patients; however, gantry-based SBRT machines have the abilities of treating larger volumes with conventional fractionation, shorter treatment time per fraction (~15 minutes for gantry vs ~45 minutes for robotic arm), and the ability to achieve better plans among obese patients (since they are able to use energies >6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway. PMID:27574585

  13. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6–15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5–7 years) and acute and late toxicity (<6% grade 3–4 late toxicities). Other outcomes (eg, overall and cancer-specific mortality) cannot be compared, given the indolent course of low-risk prostate cancer. At this time, neither SBRT device is recommended over the other for all patients; however, gantry-based SBRT machines have the abilities of treating larger volumes with conventional fractionation, shorter treatment time per fraction (~15 minutes for gantry vs ~45 minutes for robotic arm), and the ability to achieve better plans among obese patients (since they are able to use energies >6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway. PMID:27574585

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for small lung tumors in the University of Tokyo Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Takahashi, Wataru; Haga, Akihiro; Kida, Satoshi; Saotome, Naoya; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Our work on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic lung tumors will be described. The eligibility criteria for SBRT, our previous SBRT method, the definition of target volume, heterogeneity correction, the position adjustment using four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) immediately before SBRT, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) method for SBRT, verifying of tumor position within internal target volume (ITV) using in-treatment 4D-CBCT during VMAT-SBRT, shortening of treatment time using flattening-filter-free (FFF) techniques, delivery of 4D dose calculation for lung-VMAT patients using in-treatment CBCT and LINAC log data with agility multileaf collimator, and SBRT method for centrally located lung tumors in our institution will be shown. In our institution, these efforts have been made with the goal of raising the local control rate and decreasing adverse effects after SBRT.

  15. A study of workers' exposures to the inhalable and 'total' aerosol fractions in the primary nickel production industry using mannequins to simulate personal sampling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P J; Vincent, J H

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes a study that was carried out at work sites in the primary nickel production industry to investigate the difference between inhalable and 'total' aerosol exposures by using the mannequin sampling method, and to compare the results with those from an earlier study where actual workers' personal exposures were assessed in the same way. Experiments were carried out at 21 work sites located in mining, milling, smelting, and refining works of two primary nickel production companies. During sampling, mannequins were used to simulate the physical presence of workers and the 'exposures' of these were obtained for strategic positions at selected work sites. The orientations of each mannequin with respect to the wind were rotated through 90 degrees every hour in order to simulate the approximate orientation-averaging corresponding to actual workers. Two samplers were placed side-by-side on each mannequin: the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable aerosol sampler, and the 37-mm plastic cassette widely used as a personal sampler for 'total' aerosol. Each collected sample was analyzed to obtain both overall dust and overall nickel content. A total of 116 such sample pairs were collected. The results show that inhalable aerosol exposure levels-for both overall dust and for total nickel content-were consistently and significantly higher than the corresponding total aerosol exposure levels. Weighted least squares linear regression yielded (inhalable/'total') aerosol ratios ranging from 1.38 to 3.90 and 1.20 to 4.01, respectively, for overall dust and for total nickel content for different work sites. Comparison of these results with those from the earlier study of actual workers' personal exposures were in good agreement for most of the work sites studies. However, the actual intensities of exposure using the mannequin sampling method were consistently lower than those obtained from actual workers' personal sampling in our earlier study. The

  16. A study of workers' exposures to the inhalable and 'total' aerosol fractions in the primary nickel production industry using mannequins to simulate personal sampling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P J; Vincent, J H

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes a study that was carried out at work sites in the primary nickel production industry to investigate the difference between inhalable and 'total' aerosol exposures by using the mannequin sampling method, and to compare the results with those from an earlier study where actual workers' personal exposures were assessed in the same way. Experiments were carried out at 21 work sites located in mining, milling, smelting, and refining works of two primary nickel production companies. During sampling, mannequins were used to simulate the physical presence of workers and the 'exposures' of these were obtained for strategic positions at selected work sites. The orientations of each mannequin with respect to the wind were rotated through 90 degrees every hour in order to simulate the approximate orientation-averaging corresponding to actual workers. Two samplers were placed side-by-side on each mannequin: the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable aerosol sampler, and the 37-mm plastic cassette widely used as a personal sampler for 'total' aerosol. Each collected sample was analyzed to obtain both overall dust and overall nickel content. A total of 116 such sample pairs were collected. The results show that inhalable aerosol exposure levels-for both overall dust and for total nickel content-were consistently and significantly higher than the corresponding total aerosol exposure levels. Weighted least squares linear regression yielded (inhalable/'total') aerosol ratios ranging from 1.38 to 3.90 and 1.20 to 4.01, respectively, for overall dust and for total nickel content for different work sites. Comparison of these results with those from the earlier study of actual workers' personal exposures were in good agreement for most of the work sites studies. However, the actual intensities of exposure using the mannequin sampling method were consistently lower than those obtained from actual workers' personal sampling in our earlier study. The

  17. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets.

    PubMed

    Roa, Dante E; Schiffner, Daniel C; Zhang, Juying; Dietrich, Salam N; Kuo, Jeffrey V; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S A L

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI(RTOG)), homogeneity index (HI(RTOG)), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D(mean) and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D(max) and D(mean). Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times ± SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 ± 7.3, 2.6 ± 1.6, and 3.0 ± 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery of SRS and SBRT to

  18. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    SciTech Connect

    Roa, Dante E.; Schiffner, Daniel C.; Zhang Juying; Dietrich, Salam N.; Kuo, Jeffrey V.; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.A.L.

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI{sub RTOG}), homogeneity index (HI{sub RTOG}), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D{sub mean} and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D{sub max} and D{sub mean}. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times {+-} SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 {+-} 7.3, 2.6 {+-} 1.6, and 3.0 {+-} 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery

  19. Characterization of dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung lesions via Monte Carlo calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassiah, Premavathy

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy is a new form of treatment where hypofractionated (i.e., large dose fractions), conformal doses are delivered to small extracranial target volumes. This technique has proven to be especially effective for treating lung lesions. The inability of most commercially available algorithms/treatment planning systems to accurately account for electron transport in regions of heterogeneous electron density and tissue interfaces make prediction of accurate doses especially challenging for such regions. Monte Carlo which a model based calculation algorithm has proven to be extremely accurate for dose calculation in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous environment. This study attempts to accurately characterize the doses received by static targets located in the lung, as well as critical structures (contra and ipsi -lateral lung, major airways, esophagus and spinal cord) for the serial tomotherapeutic intensity-modulated delivery method used for stereotactic body radiation therapy at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center. PEREGRINERTM (v 1.6. NOMOS) Monte Carlo, doses were compared to the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length predicted values from the CORVUS 5.0 planning system. The Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was first validated in both homogenous and inhomogeneous environments. 77 stereotactic body radiation therapy lung patients previously treated with doses calculated using the Finite Sized Pencil Beam/Effective Path Length, algorithm were then retrieved and recalculated with Monte Carlo. All 77 patients plans were also recalculated without inhomogeneity correction in an attempt to counteract the known overestimation of dose at the periphery of the target by EPL with increased attenuation. The critical structures were delineated in order to standardize the contouring. Both the ipsi-lateral and contra-lateral lungs were contoured. The major airways were contoured from the apex of the lungs (trachea) to 4 cm below

  20. Clinical Outcome of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Abdominal Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Bignardi, Mario; Navarria, Piera; Mancosu, Pietro; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Tozzi, Angelo; Castiglioni, Simona; Carnaghi, Carlo; Tronconi, Maria Chiara; Santoro, Armando; Scorsetti, Marta

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the medium-term clinical outcome of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a series of patients with either a solitary metastasis or oligometastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between January 2006 and June 2009, 19 patients with unresectable nodal metastases in the abdominal retroperitoneal region were treated with SBRT. Of the patients, 11 had a solitary nodal metastasis and 8 had a dominant nodal lesion as part of oligometastatic disease, defined as up to five metastases. The dose prescription was 45 Gy to the clinical target volume in six fractions. The prescription had to be downscaled by 10% to 20% in 6 of 19 cases to keep within dose/volume constraints. The first 11 patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques and the last 8 by volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy. Median follow-up was 1 year. Results: Of 19 patients, 2 had a local progression at the site of SBRT; both also showed concomitant tumor growth at distant sites. The actuarial rate of freedom from local progression was 77.8% {+-} 13.9% at both 12 and 24 months. Eleven patients showed progressive local and/or distant disease at follow-up. The 12- and 24-month progression-free survival rates were 29.5% {+-} 13.4% and 19.7% {+-} 12.0%, respectively. The number of metastases (solitary vs. nonsolitary oligometastases) emerged as the only significant variable affecting progression-free survival (p < 0.0004). Both acute and chronic toxicities were minimal. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastases to abdominal lymph nodes was shown to be feasible with good clinical results in terms of medium-term local control and toxicity rates. Even if most patients eventually show progressive disease at other sites, local control achieved by SBRT may be potentially significant for preserving quality of life and delaying further chemotherapy.

  1. Respiratory Gating during Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Reduces Tumor Position Variability

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Tetsuo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Toya, Ryo; Fukugawa, Yoshiyuki; Toyofuku, Takamasa; Semba, Akiko; Oya, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of respiratory gating on treatment accuracy in lung cancer patients undergoing lung stereotactic body radiotherapy by using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Materials and Methods Our study population consisted of 30 lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (48 Gy/4 fractions/4 to 9 days). Of these, 14 were treated with- (group A) and 16 without gating (group B); typically the patients whose tumors showed three-dimensional respiratory motion ≧5 mm were selected for gating. Tumor respiratory motion was estimated using four-dimensional computed tomography images acquired during treatment simulation. Tumor position variability during all treatment sessions was assessed by measuring the standard deviation (SD) and range of tumor displacement on EPID images. The two groups were compared for tumor respiratory motion and position variability using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The median three-dimensional tumor motion during simulation was greater in group A than group B (9 mm, range 3–30 mm vs. 2 mm, range 0–4 mm; p<0.001). In groups A and B the median SD of the tumor position was 1.1 mm and 0.9 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.24) and 0.7 mm and 0.6 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.89), respectively. The median range of the tumor position was 4.0 mm and 3.0 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.21) and 2.0 mm and 1.5 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.20), respectively. Conclusions Although patients treated with respiratory gating exhibited greater respiratory tumor motion during treatment simulation, tumor position variability in the EPID images was low and comparable to patients treated without gating. This demonstrates the benefit of respiratory gating. PMID:25379729

  2. Nonrandom Intrafraction Target Motions and General Strategy for Correction of Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Hossain, Sabbir; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Huang, Kim; Gottschalk, Alex; Larson, David A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To characterize nonrandom intrafraction target motions for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy and to develop a method of correction via image guidance. The dependence of target motions, as well as the effectiveness of the correction strategy for lesions of different locations within the spine, was analyzed. Methods and Materials: Intrafraction target motions for 64 targets in 64 patients treated with a total of 233 fractions were analyzed. Based on the target location, the cases were divided into three groups, i.e., cervical (n = 20 patients), thoracic (n = 20 patients), or lumbar-sacrum (n = 24 patients) lesions. For each case, time-lag autocorrelation analysis was performed for each degree of freedom of motion that included both translations (x, y, and z shifts) and rotations (roll, yaw, and pitch). A general correction strategy based on periodic interventions was derived to determine the time interval required between two adjacent interventions, to overcome the patient-specific target motions. Results: Nonrandom target motions were detected for 100% of cases regardless of target locations. Cervical spine targets were found to possess the highest incidence of nonrandom target motion compared with thoracic and lumbar-sacral lesions (p < 0.001). The average time needed to maintain the target motion to within 1 mm of translation or 1 deg. of rotational deviation was 5.5 min, 5.9 min, and 7.1 min for cervical, thoracic, and lumbar-sacrum locations, respectively (at 95% confidence level). Conclusions: A high incidence of nonrandom intrafraction target motions was found for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments. Periodic interventions at approximately every 5 minutes or less were needed to overcome such motions.

  3. Excellent Local Control With Stereotactic Radiotherapy Boost After External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Wendy; Loo, Billy W.; Goffinet, Don R.; Chang, Steven D.; Adler, John R.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Fee, Willard E.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine long-term outcomes in patients receiving stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) as a boost after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Eight-two patients received an SRT boost after EBRT between September 1992 and July 2006. Nine patients had T1, 30 had T2, 12 had T3, and 31 had T4 tumors. Sixteen patients had Stage II, 19 had Stage III, and 47 had Stage IV disease. Patients received 66 Gy of EBRT followed by a single-fraction SRT boost of 7-15 Gy, delivered 2-6 weeks after EBRT. Seventy patients also received cisplatin-based chemotherapy delivered concurrently with and adjuvant to radiotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up of 40.7 months (range, 6.5-144.2 months) for living patients, there was only 1 local failure in a patient with a T4 tumor. At 5 years, the freedom from local relapse rate was 98%, freedom from nodal relapse 83%, freedom from distant metastasis 68%, freedom from any relapse 67%, and overall survival 69%. Late toxicity included radiation-related retinopathy in 3, carotid aneurysm in 1, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis in 10 patients, of whom 2 patients were symptomatic with seizures. Of 10 patients with temporal lobe necrosis, 9 had T4 tumors. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiotherapy boost after EBRT provides excellent local control for patients with NPC. Improved target delineation and dose homogeneity of radiation delivery for both EBRT and SRT is important to avoid long-term complications. Better systemic therapies for distant control are needed.

  4. let-7 Overexpression Leads to an Increased Fraction of Cells in G2/M, Direct Down-regulation of Cdc34, and Stabilization of Wee1 Kinase in Primary Fibroblasts*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Legesse-Miller, Aster; Elemento, Olivier; Pfau, Sarah J.; Forman, Joshua J.; Tavazoie, Saeed; Coller, Hilary A.

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs play a critically important role in a wide array of biological processes including those implicated in cancer, neuro-degenerative and metabolic disorders, and viral infection. Although we have begun to understand microRNA biogenesis and function, experimental demonstration of their functional effects and the molecular mechanisms by which they function remains a challenge. Members of the let-7/miR-98 family play a critical role in cell cycle control with respect to differentiation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that exogenous addition of pre-let-7 in primary human fibroblasts results in a decrease in cell number and an increased fraction of cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase. Combining microarray techniques with DNA sequence analysis to identify potential let-7 targets, we discovered 838 genes with a let-7 binding site in their 3′-untranslated region that were down-regulated upon overexpression of let-7b. Among these genes is cdc34, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme of the Skp1/cullin/F-box (SCF) complex. Cdc34 protein levels are strongly down-regulated by let-7 overexpression. Reporter assays demonstrated direct regulation of the cdc34 3′-untranslated region by let-7. We hypothesized that low Cdc34 levels would result in decreased SCF activity, stabilization of the SCF target Wee1, and G2/M accumulation. Consistent with this hypothesis, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of Wee1 reversed the G2/M phenotype induced by let-7 overexpression. We conclude that Cdc34 is a functional target of let-7 and that let-7 induces down-regulation of Cdc34, stabilization of the Wee1 kinase, and an increased fraction of cells in G2/M in primary fibroblasts. PMID:19126550

  5. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region.

  6. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C. Shun; Larson, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  7. Lung Density Changes After Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Quantitative Analysis in 50 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Soernsen de Koste, John van; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Senan, Suresh

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Radiologic lung density changes are observed in more than 50% of patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. We studied the relationship between SBRT dose and posttreatment computed tomography (CT) density changes, a surrogate for lung injury. Methods and Materials: The SBRT fractionation schemes used to treat Stage I lung cancer with RapidArc were three fractions of 18 Gy, five fractions of 11 Gy, or eight fractions of 7.5 Gy, prescribed at the 80% isodose. Follow-up CT scans performed at less than 6 months (n = 50) and between 6 and 9 months (n = 30) after SBRT were reviewed. Posttreatment scans were coregistered with baseline scans using a B-spline deformable registration algorithm. Voxel-Hounsfield unit histograms were created for doses between 0.5 and 50 Gy. Linear mixed effects models were used to assess the effects of SBRT dose on CT density, and the influence of possible confounders was tested. Results: Increased CT density was associated with higher dose, increasing planning target volume size, and increasing time after SBRT (all p < 0.0001). Density increases were apparent in areas receiving >6 Gy, were most prominent in areas receiving >20 Gy, and seemed to plateau above 40 Gy. In regions receiving >36 Gy, the reduction in air-filled fraction of lung after treatment was up to 18%. No increase in CT density was observed in the contralateral lung receiving {>=}3 Gy. Conclusions: A dose-response relationship exists for quantitative CT density changes after SBRT. A threshold of effect is seen at low doses, and a plateau at highest doses.

  8. Stereotactic body radiation therapy of early-stage non-small-cell lung carcinoma: Phase I study

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, Ronald C. . E-mail: rmcgarry@iupui.edu; Papiez, Lech; Williams, Mark; Whitford, Tia; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: A Phase I dose escalation study of stereotactic body radiation therapy to assess toxicity and local control rates for patients with medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients had non-small-cell lung carcinoma, Stage T1a or T1b N0, M0. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame and treated in escalating doses of radiotherapy beginning at 24 Gy total (3 x 8 Gy fractions) using 7-10 beams. Cohorts were dose escalated by 6.0 Gy total with appropriate observation periods. Results: The maximum tolerated dose was not achieved in the T1 stratum (maximum dose = 60 Gy), but within the T2 stratum, the maximum tolerated dose was realized at 72 Gy for tumors larger than 5 cm. Dose-limiting toxicity included predominantly bronchitis, pericardial effusion, hypoxia, and pneumonitis. Local failure occurred in 4/19 T1 and 6/28 T2 patients. Nine local failures occurred at doses {<=}16 Gy and only 1 at higher doses. Local failures occurred between 3 and 31 months from treatment. Within the T1 group, 5 patients had distant or regional recurrence as an isolated event, whereas 3 patients had both distant and regional recurrence. Within the T2 group, 2 patients had solitary regional recurrences, and the 4 patients who failed distantly also failed regionally. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy seems to be a safe, effective means of treating early-stage lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Excellent local control was achieved at higher dose cohorts with apparent dose-limiting toxicities in patients with larger tumors.

  9. Definitive Upfront Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Combined with Image-Guided, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) or IG-IMRT Alone for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Alexander; Wen, Sijin; Monga, Manish; Almubarak, Mohammed; He, Xiaoqing; Rojanasakul, Yon; Tse, William; Remick, Scot C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Image-guided (IG) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) enables maximal tumor margin reduction for the sparing of organs at risk (OARs) when used to treat locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with definitive chemo-radiation. It also allows for the incorporation of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) into the treatment regimen. Here, we describe our initial experience in combining definitive upfront SABR to the primary lesion with chemo-radiation delivered with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT to the remaining regional disease; along with clinical outcome following chemo-radiation with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT alone in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC. Methods The clinical outcome of 29 patients with locally advanced NSCLC who underwent conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT, or definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT combined with chemotherapy (induction, concurrent, or both) was retrospectively reviewed. Results After a median follow up of 23.7 months, the median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 19.8 and 11.3 months, respectively. The 2 year local, regional, and distant control was 60%, 62%, and 38%, respectively. No local failure was observed in 3 patients following SABR + IG-IMRT while 6/26 patients failed locally following IG-IMRT alone. SABR + IG-IMRT was well tolerated. No ≥ grade 3 radiation-related toxicity was observed. Conclusion Definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT in selected patients with locally advanced NSCLC warrants further investigation in future clinical trials, while chemo-radiation with IG-IMRT alone was well tolerated. PMID:27611833

  10. Stereotactic PET atlas of the human brain: Aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Frey, A.; Ishihara, M.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the routine analysis of functional brain images obtained by PET, subjective visual interpretation is often used for anatomic localization. To enhance the accuracy and consistency of the anatomic interpretation, a PET stereotactic atlas and localization approach was designed for functional brain images. The PET atlas was constructed from a high-resolution [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) image set of a normal volunteer (a 41-yr-ld woman). The image set was reoriented stereotactically, according to the intercommissural (anterior and posterior commissures) line and transformed to the standard stereotactic atlas coordinates. Cerebral structures were annotated on the transaxial planes using a proportional grid system and surface-rendered images. The stereotactic localization technique was applied to image sets from patients with Alzheimer`s disease, and areas of functional alteration were localized visually by referring to the PET atlas. Major brain structures were identified on both transaxial planes and surface-rendered images. In the stereotactic system, anatomic correspondence between the PET atlas and stereotactically reoriented individual image sets of patients with Alzheimer`s disease facilitated both indirect and direct localization of the cerebral structures. Because rapid stereotactic alignment methods for PET images are now available for routine use, the PET atlas will serve as an aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images in the stereotactic system. Widespread application of stereotactic localization may be used in functional brain images, not only in the research setting, but also in routine clinical situations. 41 refs., 3 figs.

  11. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units... facility; (3) Viewing and intercom systems; (4) Timer termination; (5) Radiation monitors used to...

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  13. Incidence and Predictive Factors of Pain Flare After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Secondary Analysis of Phase 1/2 Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hubert Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin S.; Chang, Eric L.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a secondary analysis of institutional prospective spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) trials to investigate posttreatment acute pain flare. Methods and Materials: Medical records for enrolled patients were reviewed. Study protocol included baseline and follow-up surveys with pain assessment by Brief Pain Inventory and documentation of pain medications. Patients were considered evaluable for pain flare if clinical note or follow-up survey was completed within 2 weeks of SBRT. Pain flare was defined as a clinical note indicating increased pain at the treated site or survey showing a 2-point increase in worst pain score, a 25% increase in analgesic intake, or the initiation of steroids. Binary logistic regression was used to determine predictive factors for pain flare occurrence. Results: Of the 210 enrolled patients, 195 (93%) were evaluable for pain flare, including 172 (88%) clinically, 135 (69%) by survey, and 112 (57%) by both methods. Of evaluable patients, 61 (31%) had undergone prior surgery, 57 (29%) had received prior radiation, and 34 (17%) took steroids during treatment, mostly for prior conditions. Pain flare was observed in 44 patients (23%). Median time to pain flare was 5 days (range, 0-20 days) after the start of treatment. On multivariate analysis, the only independent factor associated with pain flare was the number of treatment fractions (odds ratio = 0.66, P=.004). Age, sex, performance status, spine location, number of treated vertebrae, prior radiation, prior surgery, primary tumor histology, baseline pain score, and steroid use were not significant. Conclusions: Acute pain flare after spine SBRT is a relatively common event, for which patients should be counseled. Additional study is needed to determine whether prophylactic or symptomatic intervention is preferred.

  14. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45–60 Gy in 5–10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5–54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm3 (range, 0.40–9.27 mg/cm3). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors. PMID:26826198

  15. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45-60 Gy in 5-10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5-54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm(3) (range, 0.40-9.27 mg/cm(3)). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors.

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients with old age or medical comorbidity: a 5-year follow-up of an investigational study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sea-Won; Jang, Hong Seok; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yoon, Sei Chul

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated 5-year follow-up of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with Cyberknife for prostate cancer patients. Forty-five men with prostate adenocarcinoma who received SBRT using Cyberknife from May 2006 to November 2012 were enrolled in this study. They were prostate cancer patients with old age and medical comorbidities who received a total of 36 Gy to the prostate in 5 fractions with either everyday or every other day schedule. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at initial diagnosis and after radiation were traced. Primary endpoints were biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). The definition of biochemical relapse was a PSA level of nadir+2 ng/mL. Progression was defined as biochemically or clinically detected disease and the start of salvage therapy. After median follow-up of 63 months, the 5-year bRFS for all patients was estimated at 89.7%. The 5-year PFS was estimated at 71%. Four cases of biochemical relapse were observed, including two patients who experienced locoregional failure and one patient who had distant metastasis with biochemical relapse. The 5-year OS was estimated at 94.3%. There were five deaths, all of which were unrelated to prostate cancer. There was no grade 3 or higher acute complication. Grade 3 or higher late urinary toxicity was reported in 2 (4.4%) of 45 patients. The 5-year survival and toxicity outcome of SBRT using Cyberknife on prostate cancer patients with old age or comorbidities were favorable and safe in an investigational study.

  17. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45-60 Gy in 5-10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5-54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm(3) (range, 0.40-9.27 mg/cm(3)). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors. PMID:26826198

  18. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Senan, Suresh

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  19. Anti-PD-1 Blockade and Stereotactic Radiation Produce Long-Term Survival in Mice With Intracranial Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; See, Alfred P.; Phallen, Jillian; Jackson, Christopher M.; Belcaid, Zineb; Ruzevick, Jacob; Durham, Nicholas; Meyer, Christian; Harris, Timothy J.; Albesiano, Emilia; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Hammers, Hans-Joerg; Mathios, Dimitris; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry; Tran, Phuoc T.; Pardoll, Drew; Drake, Charles G.; and others

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults, and radiation is one of the main treatment modalities. However, cure rates remain low despite best available therapies. Immunotherapy is a promising modality that could work synergistically with radiation, which has been shown to increase antigen presentation and promote a proinflammatory tumor microenvironment. Programmed-death-1 (PD-1) is a surface receptor expressed on activated and exhausted T cells, which mediate T cell inhibition upon binding with its ligand PD-L1, expressed on many tumor types including human GBMs. We tested the combination of anti-PD-1 immunotherapy with stereotactic radiosurgery in a mouse orthotopic GBM model. Methods and Materials: We performed intracranial implantation of mouse glioma cell line GL261 transfected with luciferase into C57BL/6 mice. Mice were stratified into 4 treatment groups: (1) control; (2) radiation only; (3) anti-PD-1 antibody only; and (4) radiation plus anti-PD-1 antibody. Overall survival was quantified. The mice were killed on day 21 after implantation to assess immunologic parameters in the brain/tumor, cervical lymph nodes, and spleen. Results: Improved survival was demonstrated with combination anti-PD-1 therapy plus radiation compared with either modality alone: median survival was 25 days in the control arm, 27 days in the anti-PD-1 antibody arm, 28 days in the radiation arm, and 53 days in the radiation plus anti-PD-1 therapy arm (P<.05 by log-rank Mantle-Cox). Long-term survival was seen only in the combined treatment arm, with a fraction (15%-40%) of animals alive at day 180+ after treatment. Immunologic data on day 21 after implantation showed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic T cells (CD8+/interferon-γ+/tumor necrosis factor-α+) and decreased regulatory T cells (CD4+/FOXP3) in the combined treatment group compared with the single modality arms. Conclusions: The combination of PD-1 blockade and localized

  20. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  1. An Improved Stereotactic System For CT Aided Neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Glenn, William V., Jr.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Howland, Robert S.

    1982-11-01

    Several computed tomography (CT) aided stereotactic systems have been introduced during the last five years for precise placement of neurosurgical instruments. Using digital CT image data that is transformed to a patient-frame coordinate system surgery can be simulated, planned and executed with sub-millimeter precision. This paper introduces a second generation stereotactic system that improves on speed, image resolution, accuracy and patient comfort of past and current systems. The system described here is designed for surgical procedures conducted entirely in the CT suite. Geometric resolution of this system is presented, test procedures are described and phantom results are discussed. An application to percutaneous knee surgery is briefly mentioned. At this writing patient data is not yet available.

  2. Multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: the NASA smart probe project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Aghevli, A.; Freitas, K.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papsin, R.; Reed, C.; Stassinopoulos, D.

    1999-01-01

    Real-time tissue identification can benefit procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy, functional neurosurgery and brain tumor excision. Optical scattering spectroscopy has been shown to be effective at discriminating cancer from noncancerous conditions in the colon, bladder and breast. The NASA Smart Probe extends the concept of 'optical biopsy' by using neural network techniques to combine the output from 3 microsensors contained within a cannula 2. 7 mm in diameter (i.e. the diameter of a stereotactic brain biopsy needle). Experimental data from 5 rats show the clear differentiation between tissues such as brain, nerve, fat, artery and muscle that can be achieved with optical scattering spectroscopy alone. These data and previous findings with other modalities such as (1) analysis of the image from a fiberoptic neuroendoscope and (2) the output from a microstrain gauge suggest the Smart Probe multiple microsensor technique shows promise for real-time tissue identification in neurosurgical procedures. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors Greater Than 5 cm: Safety and Efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Neil M. Stephans, Kevin L.; Marwaha, Gaurav; Djemil, Toufik; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes of patients with node-negative medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose primary tumors exceeded 5 cm and were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We surveyed our institutional prospective lung SBRT registry to identify treated patients with tumors >5 cm. Treatment outcomes for local control (LC), locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. Mean pretreatment pulmonary function test values were compared to mean posttreatment values. Results: From December 2003 to July 2014, 40 patients met study criteria. Median follow-up was 10.8 months (range: 0.4-70.3 months). Median age was 76 years (range: 56-90 years), median body mass index was 24.3 (range: 17.7-37.2), median Karnofsky performance score was 80 (range: 60-90), and median Charlson comorbidity index score was 2 (range: 0-5). Median forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was 1.41 L (range: 0.47-3.67 L), and median diffusion capacity (DLCO) was 47% of predicted (range: 29%-80%). All patients were staged by fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography staging, and 47.5% underwent mediastinal staging by endobronchial ultrasonography. Median tumor size was 5.6 cm (range: 5.1-10 cm), median SBRT dose was 50 Gy (range: 30-60 Gy) in 5 fractions (range: 3-10 fractions). Eighteen-month LC, LRC, DFS, and OS rates were 91.2%, 64.4%, 34.6%, and 59.7%, respectively. Distant failure was the predominant pattern of failure (32.5%). Three patients (7.5%) experienced grade 3 or higher toxicity. Mean posttreatment FEV1 was not significantly reduced (P=.51), but a statistically significant absolute 6.5% (P=.03) reduction in DLCO was observed. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for medically inoperable node

  4. Fast Arc Delivery for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Vertebral and Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Chin Loon; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams with higher dose rates and faster delivery are now clinically available. The purpose of this planning study was to compare optimized non-FFF and FFF RapidArc plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and to validate the accuracy of fast arc delivery. Methods and Material: Ten patients with peripheral lung tumors and 10 with vertebral metastases were planned using RapidArc with a flattened 6-MV photon beam and a 10-MV FFF beam for fraction doses of 7.5-18 Gy. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OAR), number of monitor units (MU), and beam delivery times were assessed. GafChromic EBT2 film measurements of FFF plans were performed to compare calculated and delivered dose distributions. Results: No major dosimetric differences were seen between the two delivery techniques. For lung SBRT plans, conformity indices and OAR doses were similar, although the average MU required were higher with FFF plans. For vertebral SBRT, FFF plans provided comparable PTV coverage, with no significant differences in OAR doses. Average beam delivery times were reduced by a factor of up to 2.5, with all FFF fractions deliverable within 4 min. Measured FFF plans showed high agreement with calculated plans, with more than 99% of the area within the region of interest fulfilling the acceptance criterion. Conclusion: The higher dose rate of FFF RapidArc reduces delivery times significantly, without compromising plan quality or accuracy of dose delivery.

  5. 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung.

    PubMed

    Chin, E; Loewen, S K; Nichol, A; Otto, K

    2013-02-21

    Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

  6. Bilateral orbital metastases from breast cancer: a case report of successful palliation using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Choi, Sang Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Noh, Woo Chul; Kim, Mi-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Of ophthalmic involvement from metastatic breast cancer, extraocular/intraorbital metastases are extremely rare. External beam radiotherapy has been a mainstay palliation for symptomatic orbital metastases. We present a case of bilateral orbital metastases from breast cancer successfully treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). A 38-year-old woman presented with decreased vision in the right eye for 3 weeks. Eight months previously, she underwent whole-brain radiotherapy for multiple brain metastases from breast cancer. Visual acuity was hand motion, and the eyelid closed incompletely in the affected eye. Computed tomography scans showed a 3-cm extraconal mass in the right orbit. She underwent temporary tarsorrhaphy followed by SRT. A total dose of 39 Gy was delivered to the right orbital mass in three daily fractions. Four months later, her visual function was normal in both eyes and the right orbital mass disappeared. A new lesion was detected in the left orbit. She underwent SRT for the left orbital lesion using the same dose-fractionation schedule. No radiation-related toxicities were observed. She died 19 months after the first SRT. Our case suggests that SRT may be an effective and safe treatment option in patients with orbital metastases from breast cancer. PMID:21999613

  7. Evaluation of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost in the management of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Demiral, S; Beyzadeoglu, M; Uysal, B; Oysul, K; Kahya, Y Elcim; Sager, O; Dincoglan, F; Gamsiz, H; Dirican, B; Surenkok, S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost with multileaf collimator technique after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with endometrial cancer. Consecutive patients with endometrial cancer treated using LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT were enrolled in the study. All patients had undergone surgery including total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy ± pelvic/paraortic lymphadenectomy before RT. Prescribed external pelvic RT dose was 45 Gray (Gy) in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated with SBRT boost after pelvic RT. The prescribed SBRT boost dose to the upper two thirds of the vagina including the vaginal vault was 18 Gy delivered in 3 fractions with 1-week intervals. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v3).Between April 2010 and May 2011, 18 patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer were treated with LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT. At a median follow-up of 24 (8-26) months with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and gynecological examination, local control rate of the study group was 100 % with negligible acute and late toxicity.LINAC-based SBRT boost to the vaginal cuff is a feasible gynecological cancer treatment modality with excellent local control and minimal toxicity that may replace traditional brachytherapy boost in the management of endometrial cancer. PMID:23374003

  8. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm{sup 3}), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose {>=}105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm{sup 3}) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm{sup 3}), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm{sup 3}). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities.

  9. 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, E.; Loewen, S. K.; Nichol, A.; Otto, K.

    2013-02-01

    Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

  10. Estimate of normal tissue damage in treatment planning for stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Benassi, M; Begnozzi, L; Gentile, F P; Chiatti, L; Carpino, S

    1993-10-01

    A personal computer (PC) system was developed to perform treatment planning for radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques of irradiation of the brain may be accomplished with a linear accelerator by performing several non-coplanar arcs of a highly collimated beam focused at a fixed point. The PC system allows the acquisition, reconstruction and the visualization of the target volume from CT or MR images, and then it permits to calculate a three-dimensional (3-D) dose distribution due to small photon beams and to visualize it. The software calculates not only total dose distribution, administered fractionated or in single fraction, but also the NTD2 (normalized total dose) predicted to have a biological effect equivalent to the single irradiation. The choice of the best technique is supported by the dose volume histograms (DVH) calculation and by an estimate of complication probability to the brain normal tissue (NTCP). The algorithm for NTCP calculation is based on two models: the linear quadratic and the logistic. A comparison of three different dose calculations for a typical cerebral target volume is presented to demonstrate the system performances.

  11. Postoperative modified stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Toshihiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Nakagawa, Hidemitsu; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kouichi

    2002-06-01

    To achieve local control of malignant glioma, we designed a postoperative stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator (micro-MLC). The purpose of this study was to clarify the feasibility of this treatment. The treatment was performed in six patients who met the following eligibility criteria: (1) supratentorial tumor, (2) residual tumor volume < or = 40 cm3, and (3) Karnofsky performance status > or = 70. The three planning target volumes (PTVs), which consisted of restricted PTV (RPTV), intermediate PTV (IPTV), and extended PTV (EPTV), defined as the residual tumor plus a 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm margins, respectively, and total dose delivery of 60-68 Gy, 52-60 Gy, and 44-52 Gy to the isocenters of RPTV, IPTV, and EPTV, respectively, in 4 Gy per fraction at five fractions per week, were established. The beam arrangement and the conformal blockade with a micro-MLC for the optimal treatment plan were designed. The treatment plans showed the high dose conformation to EPTV, the appropriate dose gradients in the three PTVs with the high dose homogeneity to RPTV, and the tolerated dose to critical structures. Following the plans, treatment was performed. The clinical findings more than 12 months after the treatment supported its possible use. We conclude that this treatment is feasible at least in selected patients.

  12. Anniversary Paper: the role of medical physicists in developing stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Stanley H; Bova, Frank J; Clark, Brenda; Goetsch, Steven J; Hinson, William H; Leavitt, Dennis D; Schlesinger, David J; Yenice, Kamil M

    2008-09-01

    This article is a tribute to the pioneering medical physicists over the last 50 years who have participated in the research, development, and commercialization of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy utilizing a wide range of technology. The authors have described the evolution of SRS through the eyes of physicists from its beginnings with the Gamma Knife in 1951 to proton and charged particle therapy; modification of commercial linacs to accommodate high precision SRS setups; the multitude of accessories that have enabled fine tuning patients for relocalization, immobilization, and repositioning with submillimeter accuracy; and finally the emerging technology of SBRT. A major theme of the article is the expanding role of the medical physicist from that of advisor to the neurosurgeon to the current role as a primary driver of new technology that has already led to an adaptation of cranial SRS to other sites in the body, including, spine, liver, and lung. SRS continues to be at the forefront of the impetus to provide technological precision for radiation therapy and has demonstrated a host of downstream benefits in improving delivery strategies for conventional therapy as well. While this is not intended to be a comprehensive history, and the authors could not delineate every contribution by all of those working in the pursuit of SRS development, including physicians, engineers, radiobiologists, and the rest of the therapy and dosimetry staff in this important and dynamic radiation therapy modality, it is clear that physicists have had a substantial role in the development of SRS and theyincreasingly play a leading role in furthering SRS technology.

  13. Delivery validation of VMAT stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy at commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, T.; Alexander, K. M.; Jechel, C.; Nasr, A. T.; Joshi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric validation of two volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) plans was completed as part of the commissioning process of this technique in our clinic. Static and dynamic ion chamber, EBT3 film and leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gel measurements were acquired using a motion phantom with appropriate inserts for each dosimeter. The results show good agreement between measured and calculated plan dose.

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update *

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Neves, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Gadia, Rafael; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. PMID:26398758

  15. Monte Carlo verification of gel dosimetry measurements for stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Crowe, S. B.; Dunn, L.; Franich, R. D.; Kenny, J.; Knight, R. T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2012-06-01

    The quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments requires the use of small-field dose measurements that can be experimentally challenging. This study used Monte Carlo simulations to establish that PAGAT dosimetry gel can be used to provide accurate, high-resolution, three-dimensional dose measurements of stereotactic radiotherapy fields. A small cylindrical container (4 cm height, 4.2 cm diameter) was filled with PAGAT gel, placed in the parietal region inside a CIRS head phantom and irradiated with a 12-field stereotactic radiotherapy plan. The resulting three-dimensional dose measurement was read out using an optical CT scanner and compared with the treatment planning prediction of the dose delivered to the gel during the treatment. A BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc simulation of this treatment was completed, to provide a standard against which the accuracy of the gel measurement could be gauged. The three-dimensional dose distributions obtained from Monte Carlo and from the gel measurement were found to be in better agreement with each other than with the dose distribution provided by the treatment planning system's pencil beam calculation. Both sets of data showed close agreement with the treatment planning system's dose distribution through the centre of the irradiated volume and substantial disagreement with the treatment planning system at the penumbrae. The Monte Carlo calculations and gel measurements both indicated that the treated volume was up to 3 mm narrower, with steeper penumbrae and more variable out-of-field dose, than predicted by the treatment planning system. The Monte Carlo simulations allowed the accuracy of the PAGAT gel dosimeter to be verified in this case, allowing PAGAT gel to be utilized in the measurement of dose from stereotactic and other radiotherapy treatments, with greater confidence in the future. Experimental aspects of this work were originally presented at the Engineering and Physical Sciences in Medicine

  16. CyberKnife Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy as an Option of Treatment for Patients With Prostate Cancer Having Oligometastatic Lymph Nodes: Single-Center Study Outcome Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Miszczyk, Leszek; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy on prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Our material consisted of 18 patients with 31 metastatic lymph nodes irradiated between 2011 and 2014 using CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Patients were irradiated using fraction dose varied from 6 to 15 Gy (median 10), to the total dose of 24 to 45 Gy (median 30). Irradiated lymph node size varied from 0.4 to 4.0 cm. In all, 9 patients had single lymph node metastasis and 9 patients had metastases of 2 to 4 lymph nodes. Prostate-specific antigen concentration before radiotherapy varied from 0.01 to 15.58 (mean 6.97; median 4.66). All patients at the time of radiotherapy and follow-up received androgen deprivation therapy. Mann-Whitney U, Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used in statistical analysis. We obtained the following results: after CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, prostate-specific antigen concentration dropped in majority of cases and during the last control varied from 0.00 to 258.00 (median 2.5), and was lower in patients without dissemination to other organs (P = .01). Complete regression was found in 12 lesions, stable disease in 13, and progression in 4. In 7 patients, the dissemination to other organs occurred. Our results allow us to conclude that CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of prostate cancer lymph node oligometastases gives good local control and relatively good prostate-specific antigen response.

  17. Prognostic Value of MR Imaging Texture Analysis in Brain Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oligo-Metastases Undergoing Stereotactic Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tini, Paolo; Biondi, Michelangelo; Sebaste, Lucio; Vanzi, Eleonora; De Otto, Gianmarco; Rubino, Giovanni; Carfagno, Tommaso; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Cerase, Alfonso; Mazzoni, Lorenzo Nicola; Banci Buonamici, Fabrizio; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background  Stereotactic irradiation is widely used in brain oligo-metastases treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) of brain metastases (BM) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods  This study included thirty-eight consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic irradiation, that is, stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) or radiosurgery (SRS), from January 2011 to December 2014 for 1-2 brain BM from NSCLC. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was not delivered. The diagnostic MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images were collected and analyzed with a homemade ImageJ macro, and typical TA parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and uniformity) were evaluated for: brain progression-free survival; modality of brain metastatic progression (local progression or/and new metastases); and overall survival, after SRT/SRS. Results After SRT/SRS 14 patients (36.8%) experienced recurrence in the brain, with a recurrence in the irradiated site (five patients, 13.2%), new metastases (11 patients, 28.9%), local recurrence and new metastases (two patients, 5.25%). Nineteen patients (50%) died of tumor progression or other causes. Entropy and uniformity were significantly associated with local progression, whereas kurtosis was significantly associated with both local progression and new brain metastases. Conclusions  These results appear promising, since the knowledge of factors correlated with the modality of brain progression after stereotactic irradiation of brain oligo-metastatic foci of NSCLC might help in driving the best treatment in these patients (association of SRT/SRS with WBRT? Increase of SRT/SRS dose?). Our preliminary data needs confirmation in large patient series. PMID:27226944

  18. Optical spectroscopy for stereotactic biopsy of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; von Berg, Anna; Fiedler, Sebastian; Goetz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Polzer, Christoph; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Stereotactic biopsy procedure is performed to obtain a tissue sample for diagnosis purposes. Currently, a fiber-based mechano-optical device for stereotactic biopsies of brain tumors is developed. Two different fluorophores are employed to improve the safety and reliability of this procedure: The fluorescence of intravenously applied indocyanine green (ICG) facilitates the recognition of blood vessels and thus helps minimize the risk of cerebral hemorrhages. 5- aminolevulinic-acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence is used to localize vital tumor tissue. ICG fluorescence detection using a 2-fiber probe turned out to be an applicable method to recognize blood vessels about 1.5 mm ahead of the fiber tip during a brain tumor biopsy. Moreover, the suitability of two different PpIX excitation wavelengths regarding practical aspects was investigated: While PpIX excitation in the violet region (at 405 nm) allows for higher sensitivity, red excitation (at 633 nm) is noticeably superior with regard to blood layers obscuring the fluorescence signal. Contact measurements on brain simulating agar phantoms demonstrated that a typical blood coverage of the tumor reduces the PpIX signal to about 75% and nearly 0% for 633 nm and 405 nm excitation, respectively. As a result, 633 nm seems to be the wavelength of choice for PpIX-assisted detection of high-grade gliomas in stereotactic biopsy.

  19. Quality Assurance and Commissioning of an Infrared Marker-Based Patient Positioning System for Frameless Extracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tejpal; Phurailatpam, Reena; Ajay, Mishra; Rajeshri, Pai; Pranshu, Mohindra; Supriya, Chopra

    2007-01-01

    Rapid advancements in imaging technology have led to remarkable improvements in identification and localization of tumors, ushering the era of high-precision techniques in contemporary radiotherapy practice. However, uncertainties in patient set-up and organ motion during a course of fractionated radiotherapy can compromise precision of radiation therapy. Excellent accuracy has been achieved with invasive and non-invasive fixation systems for stereotactic radiotherapy. This report describes the commissioning procedure and Quality Assurance studies done to evaluate the accuracy of isocenter localization by an infrared marker-based positioning system (ExacTrac). The ExacTrac has two infrared cameras that emit and detect infrared rays from reflective markers and construct three-dimensional coordinates of each marker. It detects the difference of the actual isocenter position from the planned isocenter coordinates in three translational (lateral, longitudinal, vertical, or x,y,z axes) and three rotational axes (six degree of freedom). This study performed on a flat and static phantom shows excellent accuracy achieved by the ExacTrac system. The positioning accuracy of ExacTrac (± 1 mm translational displacement and ± 1° rotational errors) can be a valuable tool in implementing frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Nevertheless, it needs to be further evaluated on patients with inherent motion and greater positional uncertainty before being adopted in clinical practice. PMID:23675057

  20. Interfractional Variations of Tumor Centroid Position and Tumor Regression during Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanan; Lu, Yufei; Cheng, Siguo; Guo, Wei; Ye, Ke; Zhao, Huiyun; Zheng, Xiaoli; Li, Dingjie; Wang, Shujuan; Yang, Chengliang; Ge, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine interfractional changes of lung tumor centroid position and tumor regression during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials. 34 patients were treated by SBRT in 4-5 fractions to a median dose of 50 Gy. The CT scans acquired for verification were registered with simulation CT scans. The gross target volume (GTV) was contoured on all verification CT scans and compared to the initial GTV in treatment plan system. Results. The mean (±standard deviation, SD) three-dimension vector shift was 5.2 ± 3.1 mm. The mean (±SD) interfractional variations of tumor centroid position were −0.7 ± 4.5 mm in anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 0.2 ± 3.1 mm in superior-inferior (SI) direction, and 0.4 ± 2.4 mm in right-left (RL) direction. Large interfractional variations (≥5 mm) were observed in 5 fractions (3.3%) in RL direction, 16 fractions (10.5%) in SI direction, and 36 fractions (23.5%) in AP direction. Tumor volume did not decrease significantly during lung SBRT. Conclusions. Small but insignificant tumor volume regression was observed during lung SBRT. While the mean interfractional variations of tumor centroid position were minimal in three directions, variations more than 5 mm account for approximately a third of all, indicating additional margin for PTV, especially in AP direction. PMID:25548770

  1. Tolerance of the Spinal Cord to Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Insights From Hemangioblastomas

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Chang, Steven D.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate spinal cord dose-volume effects, we present a retrospective review of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments for spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Methods and Materials: From November 2001 to July 2008, 27 spinal hemangioblastomas were treated in 19 patients with SRS. Seventeen tumors received a single fraction with a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy). Ten lesions were treated using 18-25 Gy in two to three sessions. Cord volumes receiving 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 Gy and dose to 10, 100, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 mm{sup 3} of cord were determined. Multisession treatments were converted to single-fraction biologically effective dose (SFBED). Results: Single-fraction median cord D{sub max} was 22.7 Gy (range, 17.8-30.9 Gy). Median V10 was 454 mm{sup 3} (range, 226-3543 mm{sup 3}). Median dose to 500 mm{sup 3} cord was 9.5 Gy (range, 5.3-22.5 Gy). Fractionated median SFBED{sub 3} cord D{sub max} was 14.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 12.3-19.4 Gy{sub 3}). Potential toxicities included a Grade 2 unilateral foot drop 5 months after SRS and 2 cases of Grade 1 sensory deficits. The actuarial 3-year local tumor control estimate was 86%. Conclusions: Despite exceeding commonly cited spinal cord dose constraints, SRS for spinal hemangioblastomas is safe and effective. Consistent with animal experiments, these data support a partial-volume tolerance model for the human spinal cord. Because irradiated cord volumes were generally small, application of these data to other clinical scenarios should be made cautiously. Further prospective studies of spinal radiosurgery are needed.

  2. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Leinders, Suzanne M.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Schaart, Dennis; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  3. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Other Stereotactic Techniques for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Shiris Wai Sum; Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung; Kam, Michael Koon Ming; Leung, Sing Fai; Yu, Brian Kwok Hung; Ngai, Dennis Yuen Kan; Wong, Simon Chun Fai; Chan, Anthony Tak Cheung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients can be salvaged by reirradiation with a substantial degree of radiation-related complications. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is widely used in this regard because of its rapid dose falloff and high geometric precision. The aim of this study was to examine whether the newly developed intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) has any dosimetric advantages over three other stereotactic techniques, including circular arc (CARC), static conformal beam (SmMLC), and dynamic conformal arc (mARC), in treating locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images of 32 patients with locally recurrent NPC, previously treated with SRT, were retrieved from the stereotactic planning system for contouring and computing treatment plans. Treatment planning of each patient was performed for the four treatment techniques: CARC, SmMLC, mARC, and IMSRT. The conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) and doses to the organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. Results: All four techniques delivered adequate doses to the PTV. IMSRT, SmMLC, and mARC delivered reasonably conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV (CI <1.47, HI <0.53), but not for CARC (p < 0.05). IMSRT presented with the smallest CI (1.37) and HI (0.40). Among the four techniques, IMSRT spared the greatest number of OARs, namely brainstem, temporal lobes, optic chiasm, and optic nerve, and had the smallest normal tissue volume in the low-dose region. Conclusion: Based on the dosimetric comparison, IMSRT was optimal for locally recurrent NPC by delivering a conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV while sparing OARs.

  4. Gas Chromatography-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry-Based Determination of Isotopologue and Tandem Mass Isotopomer Fractions of Primary Metabolites for (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mairinger, Teresa; Steiger, Matthias; Nocon, Justyna; Mattanovich, Diethard; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    For the first time an analytical work flow based on accurate mass gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOFMS) with chemical ionization for analysis providing a comprehensive picture of (13)C distribution along the primary metabolism is elaborated. The method provides a powerful new toolbox for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis, which is an emerging strategy in metabolic engineering. In this field, stable isotope tracer experiments based on, for example, (13)C are central for providing characteristic patterns of labeled metabolites, which in turn give insights into the regulation of metabolic pathway kinetics. The new method enables the analysis of isotopologue fractions of 42 free intracellular metabolites within biotechnological samples, while tandem mass isotopomer information is also accessible for a large number of analytes. Hence, the method outperforms previous approaches in terms of metabolite coverage, while also providing rich isotopomer information for a significant number of key metabolites. Moreover, the established work flow includes novel evaluation routines correcting for isotope interference of naturally distributed elements, which is crucial following derivatization of metabolites. Method validation in terms of trueness, precision, and limits of detection was performed, showing excellent analytical figures of merit with an overall maximum bias of 5.8%, very high precision for isotopologue and tandem mass isotopomer fractions representing >10% of total abundance, and absolute limits of detection in the femtomole range. The suitability of the developed method is demonstrated on a flux experiment of Pichia pastoris employing two different tracers, i.e., 1,6(13)C2-glucose and uniformly labeled (13)C-glucose. PMID:26513365

  5. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery... § 35.645 Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee authorized to... minimum— (1) Assure proper operation of— (i) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup...

  6. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.645 Section 35.645 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery...

  7. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.645 Section 35.645 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery...

  8. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  9. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Cervical Spinal Intramedullary Metastasis and Multiple Brain Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kawamura, Toshiki; Ohshima, Yukihiko; Takeuchi, Arisa; Mori, Toshie; Ishiguchi, Tuneo

    2016-01-01

    A case of cervical (C) spinal intramedullary metastasis and multiple small brain metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma was presented. Spinal metastasis caused posterior neck and left shoulder pain, dysesthesia in both legs, and motor weakness in both legs and left arm, though the brain metastases were asymptomatic. Both the spinal and brain metastases were successfully treated by frameless stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT)/stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The patient's symptoms were almost entirely relieved within two months. A 76-year-old woman was diagnosed as having a thyroid tumor and lung metastasis by roentgenography and computed tomography. Biopsy of the thyroid tumor extending into the mediastinum revealed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She underwent surgical resection of thyroid with dissection of the mediastinum lymph node area. Internal oral radioisotope therapy was not effective for the multiple small lung metastases. She did well for 15 months, but later developed posterior neck and left shoulder pain and dysesthesia in the right leg and then dysesthesia and motor weakness in both legs. Then she experienced weakness in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed a small cervical spinal intramedullary mass lesion at the level of C6 and C7 on the left side as well as nine small brain lesions. The cervical spinal intramedullary metastatic tumor was treated by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) SRT and the nine small brain metastatic tumors were treated by dynamic conformal arc (DCA) SRS uneventfully. A total dose of 39 Gy (100% dose) was delivered in 13 fractions for the spinal lesion (prescription, D95=95% dose; maximum dose=46.3 Gy). Single fraction SRS of 22 Gy (prescription, D95=100% dose) was performed for each of the nine small brain tumors. The spinal tumor was decreased in size on follow-up MRI two months after SRT. Three of the nine brain lesions had disappeared and six were decreased in size on

  10. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  11. soil organic matter fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osat, Maryam; Heidari, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    Carbon is essential for plant growth, due to its effects on other soil properties like aggregation. Knowledge of dynamics of organic matter in different locations in the soil matrix can provide valuable information which affects carbon sequestration and soil the other soil properties. Extraction of soil organic matter (SOM) fractions has been a long standing approach to elucidating the roles of soil organic matter in soil processes. Several kind fractionation methods are used and all provide information on soil organic matter function. Physical fractionation capture the effects on SOM dynamics of the spatial arrangement of primary and secondary organomineral particles in soil while chemical fractionation can not consider the spatial arrangement but their organic fractions are suitable for advanced chemical characterization. Three method of physical separation of soil have been used, sieving, sedimentation and densitometry. The distribution of organic matter within physical fractions of the soil can be assessed by sieving. Sieving separates soil particles based strictly on size. The study area is located on north central Iran, between 35° 41'- 36° 01' N and 50° 42'- 51° 14' E. Mean annual precipitation about 243.8 mm and mean annual air temperature is about 14.95 °C. The soil moisture and temperature regime vary between aridic-thermic in lower altitudes to xeric-mesic in upper altitudes. More than 36 surface soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected according to land-use map units. After preliminary analyzing of samples 10 samples were selected for further analyses in five size fractions and three different time intervals in September, January and April 2008. Fractionation carried out by dry sieving in five classes, 1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm, 270 μm-0.5mm, 53-270 μm and <53 μm. Organic matter and C/N ratio were determined for all fractions at different time intervals. Chemical fractionation of organic matter also carried out according to Tan (2003), also Mineralogical

  12. Interfraction and Intrafraction Changes in Amplitude of Breathing Motion in Stereotactic Liver Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Case, Robert B.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Sonke, Jan Jakob

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Interfraction and intrafraction changes in amplitude of liver motion were assessed in patients with liver cancer treated with kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 314 CBCTs obtained with the patient in the treatment position immediately before and after each fraction, and 29 planning 4DCTs were evaluated in 29 patients undergoing six-fraction SBRT for unresectable liver cancer, with (n = 15) and without (n = 14) abdominal compression. Offline, the CBCTs were sorted into 10 bins, based on phase of respiration. Liver motion amplitude was measured using liver-to-liver alignment from the end-exhale and end-inhale CBCT and four-dimensional CT reconstructions. Inter- and intrafraction amplitude changes were measured from the difference between the pre-SBRT CBCTs relative to the planning four-dimensional CT, and from the pre-SBRT and post-SBRT CBCTs, respectively. Results: Mean liver motion amplitude for all patients (range) was 1.8 (0.1-7.0), 8.0 (0.1-18.8), and 4.3 (0.1-12.1) mm in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Mean absolute inter- and intrafraction liver motion amplitude changes were 1.0 (ML), 1.7 (CC), and 1.6 (AP) mm and 1.3 (ML), 1.6 (CC), and 1.9 (AP) mm, respectively. No significant correlations were found between intrafraction amplitude change and intrafraction time (range, 4:56-25:37min:sec), and between inter- and intrafraction amplitude changes and liver motion amplitude. Intraobserver reproducibility ({sigma}, n = 29 fractions) was 1.3 (ML), 1.4 (CC), and 1.4 (AP) mm. Conclusions: For the majority of liver SBRT patients, the change in liver motion amplitude was minimal over the treatment course and showed no apparent relationships with the magnitude of liver motion and intrafraction time.

  13. Irradiated Volume as a Predictor of Brain Radionecrosis After Linear Accelerator Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Blonigen, Brian J.; Steinmetz, Ryan D.; Levin, Linda

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between volume of brain irradiated by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and the incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic brain radionecrosis (RN). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed of patients treated with single-fraction SRS for brain metastases at our institution. Patients with at least 6-month imaging follow-up were included and diagnosed with RN according to a combination of criteria, including appearance on serial imaging and histology. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive value of multiple variables, including volume of brain receiving a specific dose (V8 Gy-V18 Gy). Results: Sixty-three patients were reviewed, with a total of 173 lesions. Most patients (63%) had received previous whole-brain irradiation. Mean prescribed SRS dose was 18 Gy. Symptomatic RN was observed in 10% and asymptomatic RN in 4% of lesions treated. Multivariate regression analysis showed V8 Gy-V16 Gy to be most predictive of symptomatic RN (p < 0.0001). Threshold volumes for significant rise in RN rates occurred between the 75th and 90th percentiles, with a midpoint volume of 10.45 cm{sup 3} for V10 Gy and 7.85 cm{sup 3} for V12 Gy. Conclusions: Analysis of patient and treatment variables revealed V8 Gy-V16 Gy to be the best predictors for RN using linear accelerator-based single-fraction SRS for brain metastases. We propose that patients with V10 Gy >10.5 cm{sup 3} or V12 Gy >7.9 cm{sup 3} be considered for hypofractionated rather than single-fraction treatment, to minimize the risk of symptomatic RN.

  14. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Cho, B.C. John; Lee, Young K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. Methods and Materials: From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (P<.01). No radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or cases of myelopathy were observed. Conclusion: A second course of spine SBRT, most often with 30 Gy in 4 fractions, for spinal metastases that failed initial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option.

  15. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Potential to Improve Tumor Control and Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Nguyen, Dan; Heron, Dwight E.; Chen, Allen M.; Lee, Percy; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Vargo, John A.; Low, Daniel A.; Huq, M. Saiful; Tenn, Stephen; Steinberg, Michael L.; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefit of 4π radiation therapy in recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic head-and-neck cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with 29 tumors who were treated using SBRT were included. In recurrent disease (n=26), SBRT was delivered with a median 44 Gy (range, 35-44 Gy) in 5 fractions. Three patients with sinonasal mucosal melanoma, metastatic breast cancer, and primary undifferentiated carcinoma received 35 Gy, 22.5 Gy, and 40 Gy in 5 fractions, respectively. Novel 4π treatment plans were created for each patient to meet the objective that 95% of the planning target volume was covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) and 50% dose spillage volumes were compared against the delivered clinical SBRT plans. Local control (LC), late toxicity, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability were determined. Results: Using 4π plans, mean/maximum doses to all OARs were reduced by 22% to 89%/10% to 86%. With 4π plans, the 50% dose spillage volume was decreased by 33%. Planning target volume prescription dose escalation by 10 Gy and 20 Gy were achieved while keeping doses to OARs significantly improved or unchanged from clinical plans, except for the carotid artery maximum dose at 20-Gy escalation. At a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 1-41 months), crude LC was 52%. The 2-year LC of 39.2% approximated the predicted mean TCP of 42.2%, which increased to 45.9% with 4π plans. For 10-Gy and 20-Gy dose escalation, 4π plans increased TCP from 80.1% and 88.1% to 85.5% and 91.4%, respectively. The 7.4% rate of grade ≥3 late toxicity was comparable to the predicted 5.6% mean normal tissue complication probability for OARs, which was significantly reduced by 4π planning at the prescribed and escalated doses. Conclusions: 4π plans may allow dose escalation with significant and consistent

  16. The treatment of recurrent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Kooy, H.M.; Wen, P.Y.; Fine, H.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Mannarino, E.G.; Tsai, J.S.; Alexander, E. III )

    1990-04-01

    Between May 1986 and August 1989, we treated 18 patients with 21 recurrent or persistent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery using a modified linear accelerator. To be eligible for radiosurgery, patients had to have a performance status of greater than or equal to 70% and have no evidence of systemic disease. All but one patient had received prior radiotherapy, and were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the time of recurrence. Polar lesions were treated only if the patient had undergone and failed previous complete surgical resection (10 patients). Single doses of radiation (900 to 2,500 cGy) were delivered to limited volumes (less than 27 cm3) using a modified 6MV linear accelerator. The most common histology of the metastatic lesion was carcinoma of the lung (seven patients), followed by carcinoma of the breast (four patients), and melanoma (four patients). With median follow-up of 9 months (range, 1 to 39), all tumors have been controlled in the radiosurgery field. Two patients failed in the immediate margin of the treated volume and were subsequently treated with surgery and implantation of 125I to control the disease. Radiographic response was dramatic and rapid in the patients with adenocarcinoma, while slight reduction and stabilization occurred in those patients with melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. The majority of patients improved neurologically following treatment, and were able to be withdrawn from corticosteroid therapy. Complications were limited and transient in nature and no cases of symptomatic radiation necrosis occurred in any patient despite previous exposure to radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and relatively safe treatment for recurrent solitary metastases and is an appealing technique for the initial management of deep-seated lesions as a boost to whole brain radiotherapy.

  17. SU-E-T-624: Quantitative Evaluation of 2D Versus 3D Dosimetry for Stereotactic Volumetric Modulated Arc Delivery Using COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Vikraman, S; Karrthick, K; Rajesh, T; Sambasivaselli, R; Senniandanvar, V; Kataria, T; Manigandan, D; Karthikeyan, N; Muthukumaran, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated arc delivery using COMPASS with 2D array. Methods: Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures of different sites like brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen and spine were taken from Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in Cyberknife. For each patient, linac based VMAT stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v 3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20Gy/fraction.TPS calculated VMAT plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS measured dose and calculated dose based on DVH metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using Multicube. Results: For each site, D{sub 9} {sub 5} was achieved with 100% of prescription dose with maximum 0.05SD. Conformity index (CI) was observed closer to 1.15 in all cases. Maximum deviation of 2.62 % was observed for D{sub 9} {sub 5} when compared TPS versus COMPASS measured. Considerable deviations were observed in head and neck cases compare to other sites. The maximum mean and standard deviation for D{sub 9} {sub 5}, average target dose and average gamma were -0.78±1.72, -1.10±1.373 and 0.39±0.086 respectively. Numbers of pixels passing 2D fluence verification were observed as a mean of 99.36% ±0.455 SD with 3% dose difference and 3mm DTA. For critical organs in head and neck cases, significant dose differences were observed in 3D dosimetry while the target doses were matched well within limit in both 2D and 3D dosimetry. Conclusion: The quantitative evaluations of 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated plans showed the potential of highlighting the delivery errors. This study reveals that COMPASS 3D dosimetry is an effective tool for patient

  18. SU-E-J-240: The Impact On Clinical Dose-Distributions When Using MR-Images Registered with Stereotactic CT-Images in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Benmakhlouf, H; Kraepelien, T; Forander, P; Wangerid, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most Gamma knife treatments are based solely on MR-images. However, for fractionated treatments and to implement TPS dose calculations that require electron densities, CT image data is essential. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric effects of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images in Gamma knife treatments. Methods: Twelve patients treated for vestibular schwannoma with Gamma Knife Perfexion (Elekta Instruments, Sweden) were selected for this study. The prescribed doses (12 Gy to periphery) were delivered based on the conventional approach of using stereotactic MR-images only. These plans were imported into stereotactic CT-images (by registering MR-images with stereotactic CT-images using the Leksell gamma plan registration software). The dose plans, for each patient, are identical in both cases except for potential rotations and translations resulting from the registration. The impact of the registrations was assessed by an algorithm written in Matlab. The algorithm compares the dose-distributions voxel-by-voxel between the two plans, calculates the full dose coverage of the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan, and calculates the minimum dose delivered to the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan. Results: The mean dose difference between the plans was 0.2 Gy to 0.4 Gy (max 4.5 Gy) whereas between 89% and 97% of the target (treated in the conventional approach) received the prescribed dose, by the CT-plan. The minimum dose to the target (treated in the conventional approach) given by the CT-based plan was between 7.9 Gy and 10.7 Gy (compared to 12 Gy in the conventional treatment). Conclusion: The impact of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images has successfully been compared to conventionally delivered dose plans showing significant differences between the two. Although CTimages have been implemented clinically; the effect of the

  19. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for On-Line Image Guidance of Lung Stereotactic Radiotherapy: Localization, Verification, and Intrafraction Tumor Position

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G. . E-mail: Tom.Purdie@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Franks, Kevin; Bezjak, Andrea; Payne, David; Sie, Fanny; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in-room imaging allows accurate inter- and intrafraction target localization in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung tumors. Methods and Materials: Image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy was performed in 28 patients (89 fractions) with medically inoperable Stage T1-T2 non-small-cell lung carcinoma. The targets from the CBCT and planning data set (helical or four-dimensional CT) were matched on-line to determine the couch shift required for target localization. Matching based on the bony anatomy was also performed retrospectively. Verification of target localization was done using either megavoltage portal imaging or CBCT imaging; repeat CBCT imaging was used to assess the intrafraction tumor position. Results: The mean three-dimensional tumor motion for patients with upper lesions (n = 21) and mid-lobe or lower lobe lesions (n = 7) was 4.2 and 6.7 mm, respectively. The mean difference between the target and bony anatomy matching using CBCT was 6.8 mm (SD, 4.9, maximum, 30.3); the difference exceeded 13.9 mm in 10% of the treatment fractions. The mean residual error after target localization using CBCT imaging was 1.9 mm (SD, 1.1, maximum, 4.4). The mean intrafraction tumor deviation was significantly greater (5.3 mm vs. 2.2 mm) when the interval between localization and repeat CBCT imaging (n = 8) exceeded 34 min. Conclusion: In-room volumetric imaging, such as CBCT, is essential for target localization accuracy in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Imaging that relies on bony anatomy as a surrogate of the target may provide erroneous results in both localization and verification.

  20. Vertebral compression fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Sahgal, Arjun; Whyne, Cari M; Ma, Lijun; Larson, David A; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-07-01

    The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastatic spinal tumours is increasing. Serious adverse events for this treatment include vertebral compression fracture (VCF) and radiation myelopathy. Although VCF is a fairly low-risk adverse event (approximately 5% risk) after conventional radiotherapy, crude risk estimates for VCF after spinal SBRT range from 11% to 39%. In this Review, we summarise the evidence and predictive factors for VCF induced by spinal SBRT, review the pathophysiology of VCF in the metastatic spine, and discuss strategies used to prevent and manage this potentially disabling complication. PMID:23816297

  1. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system. PMID:27446527

  2. Technique for Robotic Stereotactic Irradiation of Choroidal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Callejo, Sonia; Roberge, David

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a long history in the organ-sparing management of choroidal melanoma. Joining plaque radiotherapy and proton irradiation, stereotactic robotic photon irradiation is a new tool in the radiation oncologist's armamentarium for ocular tumors. The non-coplanar fields with steep dose gradients are well suited to spare uninvolved retina, anterior chamber, and the optic nerve. In our practice, it is the preferred treatment for melanomas that are non-amenable to standard plaque brachytherapy. Since late 2010, we have treated more than 40 patients with our robotic linear accelerator. This case-based technical note outlines the technique used at the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. PMID:27226942

  3. Technique for Robotic Stereotactic Irradiation of Choroidal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Callejo, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a long history in the organ-sparing management of choroidal melanoma. Joining plaque radiotherapy and proton irradiation, stereotactic robotic photon irradiation is a new tool in the radiation oncologist’s armamentarium for ocular tumors. The non-coplanar fields with steep dose gradients are well suited to spare uninvolved retina, anterior chamber, and the optic nerve. In our practice, it is the preferred treatment for melanomas that are non-amenable to standard plaque brachytherapy. Since late 2010, we have treated more than 40 patients with our robotic linear accelerator. This case-based technical note outlines the technique used at the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. PMID:27226942

  4. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distributions in oligometastatic patients planned for spine stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V.; Liu, M.; Loewen, S.; Kosztyla, R.; Vollans, E.; Lucido, J.; Fong, M.; Vellani, R.; Popescu, I. A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy were evaluated by re-calculating with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo. Six patients with spinal vertebral metastases were planned using volumetric modulated arc therapy. The planning goal was to cover at least 80% of the planning target volume with a prescribed dose of 35 Gy in five fractions. Tissue heterogeneity-corrected AAA dose distributions for the planning target volume and spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume were compared against those obtained from Monte Carlo. The results showed that the AAA overestimated planning target volume coverage with the prescribed dose by up to 13.5% (mean 8.3% +/- 3.2%) when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Maximum dose to spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume calculated with Monte Carlo was consistently smaller than calculated with the treatment planning system and remained under spinal cord dose tolerance. Differences in dose distribution appear to be related to the dosimetric effects of accounting for body composition in Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the treatment planning system assumes that all tissues are water-equivalent in their composition and only differ in their electron density.

  5. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distributions in oligometastatic patients planned for spine stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, V; Liu, M; Loewen, S; Kosztyla, R; Vollans, E; Lucido, J; Fong, M; Vellani, R; Popescu, I A

    2013-10-21

    Dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy were evaluated by re-calculating with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo. Six patients with spinal vertebral metastases were planned using volumetric modulated arc therapy. The planning goal was to cover at least 80% of the planning target volume with a prescribed dose of 35 Gy in five fractions. Tissue heterogeneity-corrected AAA dose distributions for the planning target volume and spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume were compared against those obtained from Monte Carlo. The results showed that the AAA overestimated planning target volume coverage with the prescribed dose by up to 13.5% (mean 8.3% +/- 3.2%) when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Maximum dose to spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume calculated with Monte Carlo was consistently smaller than calculated with the treatment planning system and remained under spinal cord dose tolerance. Differences in dose distribution appear to be related to the dosimetric effects of accounting for body composition in Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the treatment planning system assumes that all tissues are water-equivalent in their composition and only differ in their electron density.

  7. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors. PMID:27004154

  8. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Herman, Tania De La Fuente; Gabrish, Heather; Herman, Terence S; Vlachaki, Maria T; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2010-07-01

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six field beams optimized with tissue heterogeneity corrections to deliver a prescribed dose of 60 Gy in three fractions to at least 95% of the planning target volume, keeping spinal cord dose <10 Gy. The same plans were then regenerated without heterogeneity correction by recalculating previously optimized treatment plans keeping identical beam arrangements, field fluences and monitor units. Compared with heterogeneity corrected plans, the non-corrected plans had lower average minimum, mean, and maximum tumor doses by 13%, 8%, and 6% respectively. The results indicate that tissue heterogeneity is an important determinant of dosimetric optimization of SBRT plans.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the modern management of patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany; Das, Sunit; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established non-invasive ablative therapy for brain metastases. Early clinical trials with SRS proved that tumor control rates are superior to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. As a result, WBRT plus SRS was widely adopted for patients with a limited number of brain metastases (“limited number” customarily means 1-4). Subsequent trials focused on answering whether WBRT upfront was necessary at all. Based on current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses comparing SRS alone to SRS plus WBRT, adjuvant WBRT results in better intracranial control; however, at the expense of neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. These adverse effects of WBRT may also negatively impact on survival in younger patients. Based on the results of these studies, treatment has shifted to SRS alone in patients with a limited number of metastases. Additionally, RCTs are evaluating the role of SRS alone in patients with >4 brain metastases. New developments in SRS include fractionated SRS for large tumors and the integration of SRS with targeted systemic therapies that cross the blood brain barrier and/or stimulate an immune response. We present in this review the current high level evidence and rationale supporting SRS as the standard of care for patients with limited brain metastases, and emerging applications of SRS. PMID:26848525

  10. Assessing small-volume spinal cord dose for repeat spinal stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Kirby, Neil; Korol, Renee; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-12-01

    Spinal cord biologically effective dose (BED) limits are critical to safe spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivery. In particular, when repeating SBRT to the same site, the problem of adding non-uniform BED distributions within small volumes of spinal cord has yet to be solved. We report a probability-based generalized BED (gBED) model to guide repeat spine SBRT treatment planning. The gBED was formulated by considering the sequential damaging probabilities of repeat spine SBRT treatments. Parameters from the standard linear-quadratic model, such as α/β = 2 Gy for the spinal cord, were applied. We tested the model based on SBRT specific spinal cord tolerance using a simulated and ten clinical repeat SBRT cases. The gBED provides a consistent solution for superimposing non-uniform dose distributions from different fractionation schemes, analogous to the BED for uniform dose distributions. Based on ten clinical cases, the gBED was observed to eliminate discrepancies in the cumulative BED of approximately 5% to 20% within small volumes (e.g. 0.1-2.0 cc) of spinal cord, as compared to a conventional calculation method. When assessing spinal cord tolerance for repeat spinal SBRT treatments, caution should be exercised when applying conventional BED calculations for small volumes of spinal cord irradiated, and the gBED potentially provides more conservative and consistently derived dose surrogates to guide safe treatment planning and treatment outcome modeling.

  11. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and immunotherapy combinations: turning the future into systemic therapy?

    PubMed

    Walshaw, Richard C; Honeychurch, Jamie; Illidge, Tim M

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is effective at cytoreducing tumours and until relatively recently the focus in radiobiology has been on the direct effects of RT on the tumour. Increasingly, however, the effect of RT on the tumour vasculature, tumour stroma and immune system are recognized as important to the overall outcome. RT is known to lead to the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD), which can generate tumour-specific immunity. However, systemic immunity leading to "abscopal effects" resulting in tumour shrinkage outside of the RT treatment field is rare, which is thought to be caused by the immunosuppressive nature of the tumour microenvironment. Recent advances in understanding the nature of this immunosuppression and therapeutics targeting immune checkpoints such as programmed death 1 has led to durable clinical responses in a range of cancer types including malignant melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. The effects of RT dose and fraction on the generation of ICD and systemic immunity are largely unknown and are currently under investigation. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) provides an opportunity to deliver single or hypofractionated large doses of RT and potentially increase the amount of ICD and the generation of systemic immunity. Here, we review the interplay of RT and the tumour microenvironment and the rationale for combining SABR with immunomodulatory agents to generate systemic immunity and improve outcomes.

  12. Effect of bite tray impression technique on relocation accuracy in frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Clare E.; Ebert, Martin A.; Barclay, D.; Whittall, David S.; Joseph, David J.; Harper, Chris S.; Spry, Nigel A

    2003-03-31

    A previously developed method for achieving patient relocation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (attachment of an infrared fiducial system to a bite tray) relies on the integrity of a bite tray system that incorporates moulding to the patient's upper dentition. Reproducible and accurate patient positioning requires stability of the bite tray and mould during the full treatment process, both during the time the bite tray is inserted in the patient's mouth, and between separate bite tray insertions. The optimum construction method for a stable reproducible tray has not been sufficiently investigated. We undertook a study to identify factors which might influence the integrity of the hard palate bite tray system. Reprosil Fast Set Putty was used to construct 3 impression conditions; teeth only; teeth and alveolar sulcus; and teeth, alveolar sulcus, and the hard palate. Reproducibility was assessed by volunteers inserting the impressions multiple times and recording the locations of 8 standard reference points. Our results showed the optimal impression technique (i.e., the one that led to the smallest ranges in positional and rotational errors) was that which incorporated the teeth, alveolar sulcus, and hard palate.

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yong Kyun; Lee, Ja Young; Kang, Young Nam; Jang, Ji Sun; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Jung, So-Lyoung; Sung, Soo Yoon; Jo, In Young; Park, Hee Hyun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Chang, Ji Hyun; Lee, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been introduced for small-sized single and oligo-metastases in the brain. The aim of this study is to assess treatment outcome, efficacy, and prognostic variables associated with survival and intracranial recurrence. Materials and Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 123 targets in 64 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SRS between January 2006 and December 2012. Treatment responses were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Overall survival (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival (IPFS) were determined. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months. The median OS and IPFS were 14.1 and 8.9 months, respectively. Fifty-seven patients died during the follow-up period. The 5-year local control rate was achieved in 85% of 108 evaluated targets. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 55% and 28%, respectively. On univariate analysis, primary disease control (p < 0.001), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (0-1 vs. 2; p = 0.002), recursive partitioning analysis class (1 vs. 2; p = 0.001), and age (<65 vs. ≥65 years; p = 0.036) were significant predictive factors for OS. Primary disease control (p = 0.041) and ECOG status (p = 0.017) were the significant prognostic factors for IPFS. Four patients experienced radiation necrosis. Conclusion SRS is a safe and effective local treatment for brain metastases in patients with NSCLC. Uncontrolled primary lung disease and ECOG status were significant predictors of OS and intracranial failure. SRS might be a tailored treatment option along with careful follow-up of the intracranial and primary lung disease status. PMID:26484304

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: What is the Appropriate Patient-Reported Outcome for Clinical Trial Design?

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jennifer Ai-Lian; Chen, Leonard N.; Wang, Hongkun; Cyr, Robyn A.; Bhattasali, Onita; Kim, Joy S.; Moures, Rudy; Yung, Thomas M.; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian Timothy; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H.; Collins, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly utilized as primary treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. Consensus regarding the appropriate patient-reported outcome (PRO) endpoints for clinical trials evaluating radiation modalities for early stage prostate cancer is lacking. To aid in clinical trial design, this study presents PROs over a 36-month period following SBRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods: Between February 2008 and September 2010, 174 hormone-naïve patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35–36.25 Gy SBRT (CyberKnife, Accuray) delivered in 5 fractions. Patients completed the validated Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-26 questionnaire at baseline and all follow-ups. The proportion of patients developing a clinically significant decline in each EPIC domain score was determined. The minimally important difference (MID) was defined as a change of one-half the standard deviation from the baseline. Per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0938, we also examined the patients who experienced a decline in EPIC urinary domain summary score of >2 points (unacceptable toxicity defined as ≥60% of all patients reporting this degree of decline) and EPIC bowel domain summary score of >5 points (unacceptable toxicity defined as >55% of all patients reporting this degree of decline) from baseline to 1 year. Results: A total of 174 patients at a median age of 69 years received SBRT with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant decline (MID for urinary/bowel are 5.5/4.4) in EPIC urinary/bowel domain scores was 34%/30% at 6 months, 40%/32.2% at 12 months, and 32.8%/21.5% at 36 months. The patients reporting a decrease in the EPIC urinary domain summary score of >2 points was 43.2% (CI: 33.7%, 54.6%) at 6 months, 51.6% (CI: 43.4%, 59.7%) at 12 months, and 41.8% (CI: 33.3%, 50.6%) at 36 months. The

  15. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Leung, Ann N.; Popat, Rita; Trakul, Nicholas; Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  16. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  17. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  18. Single- versus Multifraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Outcomes and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Alagappan, Muthuraman; Eyben, Rie von; Kunz, Pamela L.; Fisher, George A.; Ford, James A.; Poultsides, George A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Kamaya, Aya; Cox, Veronica L.; Columbo, Laurie A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We report updated outcomes of single- versus multifraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: We included 167 patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated at our institution from 2002 to 2013, with 1-fraction (45.5% of patient) or 5-fraction (54.5% of patients) SBRT. The majority of patients (87.5%) received chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 7.9 months (range: 0.1-63.6). The 6- and 12-month cumulative incidence rates (CIR) of local recurrence for patients treated with single-fraction SBRT were 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2%-10.4%) and 9.5% (95% CI, 2.7%-16.2%), respectively. The 6- and 12-month CIR with multifraction SBRT were 3.4% (95% CI, 0.0-7.2%) and 11.7% (95% CI, 4.8%-18.6%), respectively. Median survival from diagnosis for all patients was 13.6 months (95% CI, 12.2-15.0 months). The 6- and 12- month survival rates from SBRT for the single-fraction group were 67.0% (95% CI, 57.2%-78.5%) and 30.8% (95% CI, 21.9%-43.6%), respectively. The 6- and 12- month survival rates for the multifraction group were 75.7% (95% CI, 67.2%-85.3%) and 34.9% (95% CI, 26.1%-46.8%), respectively. There were no differences in CIR or survival rates between the single- and multifraction groups. The 6- and 12-month cumulative incidence rates of gastrointestinal toxicity grade ≥3 were 8.1% (95% CI, 1.8%-14.4%) and 12.3% (95% CI, 4.7%-20.0%), respectively, in the single-fraction group, and both were 5.6% (95% CI, 0.8%-10.5%) in the multifraction group. There were significantly fewer instances of toxicity grade ≥2 with multifraction SBRT (P=.005). Local recurrence and toxicity grade ≥2 were independent predictors of worse survival. Conclusions: Multifraction SBRT for pancreatic cancer significantly reduces gastrointestinal toxicity without compromising local control.

  19. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and those derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude

  20. Temporal compartmental dosing effects for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Sahgal, Arjun; Hu, Weigang; Jabbari, Siavash; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Hsu, I.-Chow; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack, III; Ma, Lijun

    2011-12-01

    The rate of dose accumulation within a given area of a target volume tends to vary significantly for non-isocentric delivery systems such as Cyberknife stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this study, we investigated whether intra-target temporal dose distributions produce significant variations in the biological equivalent dose. For the study, time courses of ten patients were reconstructed and calculation of a biologically equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was performed using a formula derived from the linear quadratic model (α/β = 3 for prostate cancer cells). The calculated EUD values obtained for the actual patient treatments were then compared with theoretical EUD values for delivering the same physical dose distribution except that the whole target being irradiated continuously (e.g. large-field ‘dose-bathing’ type of delivery). For all the case, the EUDs for the actual treatment delivery were found to correlate strongly with the EUDs for the large-field delivery: a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.98 was obtained and the average EUD for the actual Cyberknife delivery was somewhat higher (5.0 ± 4.7%) than that for the large-field delivery. However, no statistical significance was detected between the two types of delivery (p = 0.21). We concluded that non-isocentric small-field Cyberknife delivery produced consistent biological dosing that tracked well with the constant-dose-rate, large-field-type delivery for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  1. Stereotactic multibeam radiation therapy system in a PACS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresne, Francoise; Le Gall, G.; Barillot, Christian; Gibaud, Bernard; Manens, Jean-Pierre; Toumoulin, Christine; Lemoine, Didier; Chenal, C.; Scarabin, Jean-Marie

    1991-05-01

    A Multibeam radiation therapy treatment is a non-invasive technique devoted to treat a lesion within the cerebral medium by focusing photon-beams on the same target from a high number of entrance points. We present here a computer assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: (1) an analysis module to define the target volume by using 2D and 3D displays, (2) a planing module to issue a treatment strategy including the dosimetric simulations and (3) a treatment module setting up the parameters to order the robotized treatment system (i.e. chair- framework, radiation unit machine). Another important feature of this system is its connection to the PACS system SIRENE settled in the University hospital of Rennes which makes possible the archiving and the communication of the multimodal images (CT, MRI, Angiography) used by this application. The corporate use of stereotactic methods and the multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes the target definition and the cognition of the structures environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (i.e. the stereotactic frame) guarantees an optimal distribution of the dose computed by an original 3D volumetric algorithm. The robotic approach of the treatment stage has consisted to design a computer driven chair-framework cluster to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter.

  2. Dose Escalated Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy at the Mean Respiratory Position

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of dose probability based planning target volume (PTV) margins for liver cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was compared with standard PTV based on the internal target volume (ITV). Plan robustness was evaluated by accumulating the treatment dose to ensure delivery of the intended plan. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients planned on exhale CT for 27 to 50 Gy in 6 fractions using an ITV-based PTV and treated free-breathing were retrospectively evaluated. Isotoxic, dose escalated plans were created on midposition computed tomography (CT), representing the mean breathing position, using a dose probability PTV. The delivered doses were accumulated using biomechanical deformable registration of the daily cone beam CT based on liver targeting at the exhale or mean breathing position, for the exhale and midposition CT plans, respectively. Results: The dose probability PTVs were on average 38% smaller than the ITV-based PTV, enabling an average ± standard deviation increase in the planned dose to 95% of the PTV of 4.0 ± 2.8 Gy (9 ± 5%) on the midposition CT (P<.01). For both plans, the delivered minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) doses were greater than the planned nominal prescribed dose in all 20 patients and greater than the planned dose to 95% of the PTV in 18 (90%) patients. Nine patients (45%) had 1 or more GTVs with a delivered minimum dose more than 5 Gy higher with the midposition CT plan using dose probability PTV, compared with the delivered dose with the exhale CT plan using ITV-based PTV. Conclusions: For isotoxic liver SBRT planned and delivered at the mean respiratory, reduced dose probability PTV enables a mean escalation of 4 Gy (9%) in 6 fractions over ITV-based PTV. This may potentially improve local control without increasing the risk of tumor underdosing.

  3. Long-term risk of radionecrosis and imaging changes after stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Kohutek, Zachary A; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A; Brennan, Cameron W; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H; Yang, T Jonathan; Rosenblum, Marc K; Ballangrud, Åse; Young, Robert J; Zhang, Zhigang; Beal, Kathryn

    2015-10-01

    Radionecrosis is a well-characterized effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and is occasionally associated with serious neurologic sequelae. Here, we investigated the incidence of and clinical variables associated with the development of radionecrosis and related radiographic changes after SRS for brain metastases in a cohort of patients with long-term follow up. 271 brain metastases treated with single-fraction linear accelerator-based SRS were analyzed. Radionecrosis was diagnosed either pathologically or radiographically. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression was performed to determine the association between radionecrosis and clinical factors available prior to treatment planning. After median follow up of 17.2 months, radionecrosis was observed in 70 (25.8%) lesions, including 47 (17.3%) symptomatic cases. 22 of 70 cases (31.4%) were diagnosed pathologically and 48 (68.6%) were diagnosed radiographically. The actuarial incidence of radionecrosis was 5.2% at 6 months, 17.2% at 12 months and 34.0% at 24 months. On univariate analysis, radionecrosis was associated with maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.55, p < 0.001), prior whole brain radiotherapy (HR 2.21, p = 0.004), prescription dose (HR 0.56, p = 0.02) and histology other than non-small cell lung, breast or melanoma (HR 1.85, p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, only maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.10, p < 0.001) was associated with radionecrosis risk. This data demonstrates that with close imaging follow-up, radionecrosis after single-fraction SRS for brain metastases is not uncommon. Maximum tumor diameter on pre-treatment MR imaging can provide a reliable estimate of radionecrosis risk prior to treatment planning, with the greatest risk among tumors measuring >1 cm. PMID:26307446

  4. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin; Gao, Song; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within <2.5 cm of the chest wall; 104 (39%) developed skin toxicity (any grade); 14 (5%) developed acute pain (any grade), and 45 (17%) developed chronic pain (Grade 1 in 22 cases [49%] and Grade 2 or 3 in 23 cases [51%]). Both skin toxicity and chest wall pain were associated with the V{sub 30}, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI {>=}29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  5. Clinical Evaluation of an Immbolization System for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Stathakis, Sotirios; Crownover, Richard; Esquivel, Carlos; Shi Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-07-01

    In this study, a clinical evaluation of the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} System combined with the TomoTherapy megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) was performed for lung and liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to reduce interfractional setup uncertainty. Twenty patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT were analyzed retrospectively. The Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system was used in both CT simulation and during patient treatment setup. Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion placed posteriorly over the thoracic region, an abdominal compression plate, and a knee and foot sponge. Pretreatment MVCT scans of the TomoTherapy HI-ART II unit were fused with the planning kVCT before delivery of each fraction to determine the interfractional setup error. A total of 84 shifts were analyzed to assess the interfractional setup accuracy. Results showed that the mean interfractional setup errors and standard deviations were -0.9 {+-} 3.1 mm, 1.2 {+-} 5.5 mm, and 6.5 {+-} 2.6 mm for lateral (IEC-X), longitudinal (IEC-Y), and vertical (IEC-Z) variations, respectively. The maximum motion was 17.1 mm in the longitudinal direction. When all 3 translational coordinates were analyzed, a mean composite displacement vector of 8.2 {+-} 2.0 mm (range 4.1-11.7 mm) was obtained for all patients. Based on the findings, image-guided SBRT using the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system in conjunction with the MVCT of TomoTherapy is capable of minimizing interfractional setup error and improving treatment accuracy.

  6. Intensity-modulated stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Eun Seok; Min, Chul Kee; Se An, Pyung

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A prospective database of 16 consecutive patients receiving SBRT for pathologically-proven and peripherally-located stage I NSCLC was reviewed. Fifteen patients were medically inoperable and one patient refused to undergo surgery. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 69-86). Treatment planning used four-dimensional computed tomography and fixed-field IMRT (n=11) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT; n=5). The SBRT scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions (n=9) or 55 Gy in five fractions (n=7), delivered on consecutive days. The overall response rate at 6 months was 78.6%, including a complete response in three (21.4%) patients and a partial response in eight (57.1%). Three patients (21.4%) demonstrated a stable disease status. The median follow-up time was 14 months (range, 6-20) for the surviving patients. One patient developed local failure at 11 months, while another suffered from regional failure in a subcarinal lymph node at 4 months. Two patients did not survive within the first 6 months; one patient died during salvage chemotherapy for mediastinal lymph node metastasis and the other succumbed to a cause unrelated to lung cancer. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of local failure-free, progression-free and overall survival rates at 18 months were 91.0, 85.2 and 87.5%, respectively. The toxicity was mild; no severe (grade ≥3) toxicity was identified. IMRT-based (including VMAT) delivery of SBRT for patients with stage I NSCLC demonstrated favorable responses and local control without severe toxicity.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of patient setup strategies in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianzhou; He, Tongming T.; Betzing, Christopher; Fuss, Martin; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors retrospectively compared the accumulated dose over the treatment course for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer for three patient setup strategies. Methods: Ten patients who underwent lung SBRT were selected for this study. At each fraction, patients were immobilized using a vacuum cushion and were CT scanned. Treatment plans were performed on the simulation CT. The planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a 5-mm uniform margin to the internal target volume derived from the 4DCT. All plans were normalized such that 99% of the PTV received 60 Gy. The plan parameters were copied onto the daily CT images for dose recalculation under three setup scenarios: skin marker, bony structure, and soft tissue based alignments. The accumulated dose was calculated by summing the dose at each fraction along the trajectory of a voxel over the treatment course through deformable image registration of each CT with the planning CT. The accumulated doses were analyzed for the comparison of setup accuracy. Results: The tumor volume receiving 60 Gy was 91.7 {+-} 17.9%, 74.1 {+-} 39.1%, and 99.6 {+-} 1.3% for setup using skin marks, bony structures, and soft tissue, respectively. The isodose line covering 100% of the GTV was 55.5 {+-} 7.1, 42.1 {+-} 16.0, and 64.3 {+-} 7.1 Gy, respectively. The corresponding average biologically effective dose of the tumor was 237.3 {+-} 29.4, 207.4 {+-} 61.2, and 258.3 {+-} 17.7 Gy, respectively. The differences in lung biologically effective dose, mean dose, and V20 between the setup scenarios were insignificant. Conclusions: The authors' results suggest that skin marks and bony structure are insufficient for aligning patients in lung SBRT. Soft tissue based alignment is needed to match the prescribed dose delivered to the tumors.

  8. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    SciTech Connect

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lesions of the Spine and Paraspinal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Yoo, David S.; Sampson, John H.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Yin Fangfang; Wu, Q. Jackie; Wang Zhiheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience and clinical strategy for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of spinal lesions. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two patients with 33 spinal lesions underwent computed tomography-based simulation while free breathing. Gross/clinical target volumes included involved portions of the vertebral body and paravertebral/epidural tumor. Planning target volume (PTV) expansion was 6 mm axially and 3 mm radially; the cord was excluded from the PTV. Biologic equivalent dose was calculated using the linear quadratic model with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. Treatment was linear accelerator based with on-board imaging; dose was adjusted to maintain cord dose within tolerance. Survival, local control, pain, and neurologic status were monitored. Results: Twenty-one patients are alive at 1 year (median survival, 14 months). Median follow-up is 6 months for all patients (7 months for survivors). Mean previous radiotherapy dose to 22 patients was 35 Gy, and median interval was 17 months. Renal (31%), breast, and lung (19% each) were the most common histologic sites. Three SBRT fractions (range, one to four fractions) of 7 Gy (range, 5-16 Gy) were delivered. Median cord and target biologic equivalent doses were 70 Gy{sub 3} and 34.3 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. Thirteen patients reported complete and 17 patients reported partial pain relief at 1 month. There were four failures (mean, 5.8 months) with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of in-field progression. No dosimetric parameters predictive of failure were identified. No treatment-related toxicity was seen. Conclusions: Spinal SBRT is effective in the palliative/re-treatment setting. Volume expansion must ensure optimal PTV coverage while avoiding spinal cord toxicity. The long-term safety of spinal SBRT and the applicability of the linear-quadratic model in this setting remain to be determined, particularly the time-adjusted impact of prior radiotherapy.

  10. Local Tumor Control, Visual Acuity, and Survival After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Dieckmann, Karin; Gleiss, Andreas; Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Poetter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term local tumor control, visual acuity, and survival after hypofractionated linear accelerator-based stereotactic photon radiotherapy in patients with choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2007, 212 patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at a linear accelerator with 6-MV photon beams at the Medical University of Vienna in five fractions over 7 days. Twenty-four patients received a total dose of 70 Gy (five fractions of 14 Gy), 158 a total dose of 60 Gy (five fractions of 12 Gy) and 30 patients a total dose of 50 Gy (five fractions of 10 Gy) applied on the 80% isodose. Ophthalmologic examinations were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, every 6 months until 5 years, and once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Assessment of visual acuity, routine ophthalmologic examinations, and measurement of tumor base dimension and height using standardized A-scan and B-scan echography were done at each visit. Funduscopy and fluorescein angiography were done when necessary to document tumor response. Results: Median tumor height and volume decreased from 4.8 mm and 270.7 mm{sup 3} at baseline to 2.6 mm and 86.6 mm{sup 3} at the last individual follow-up, respectively (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Median visual acuity decreased from 0.55 at baseline to hand motion at the last individual follow-up (p < 0.001). Local tumor control was 95.9% after 5 years and 92.6% after 10 years. Thirty-two patients developed metastatic disease, and 22 of these patients died during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy with 70 to 50 Gy delivered in five fractions in 7 days is sufficient to achieve excellent local tumor control in patients with malignant melanoma of the choroid. Disease outcome and vision are comparable to those achieved with proton beam radiotherapy. Decreasing the

  11. Survival outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy for 79 Japanese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Naoya; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nomiya, Takuma; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a relatively new treatment for liver tumor. Outcomes of SBRT for liver tumors unsuitable for ablation or surgical resection were evaluated. A total of 79 patients treated with SBRT for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) between 2004 and 2012 in six Japanese institutions were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with SBRT preceded by trans-arterial chemoembolization were eligible. Their median age was 73 years, 76% were males, and their Child-Pugh scores were Grades A (85%) and B (11%) before SBRT. The median biologically effective dose (α/β = 10 Gy) was 96.3 Gy. The median follow-up time was 21.0 months for surviving patients. The 2-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival were 53%, 40% and 76%, respectively. Sex and serum PIVKA-II values were significant predictive factors for OS. Hypovascular or hypervascular types of HCC, sex and clinical stage were significant predictive factors for PFS. The 2-year PFS was 66% in Stage I vs 18% in Stages II-III. Multivariate analysis indicated that clinical stage was the only significant predictive factor for PFS. No Grade 3 laboratory toxicities in the acute, sub-acute, and chronic phases were observed. PFS after SBRT for liver tumor was satisfactory, especially for Stage I HCC, even though these patients were unsuitable for resection and ablation. SBRT is safe and might be an alternative to resection and ablation. PMID:25691453

  12. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  13. A round-robin gamma stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry interinstitution comparison of calibration protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, R. E.; Alvarez, P. E.; Bednarz, G.; Bourland, J. D.; DeWerd, L. A.; Ma, L.; Meltsner, S. G.; Neyman, G.; Novotny, J.; Petti, P. L.; Rivard, M. J.; Shiu, A. S.; Goetsch, S. J.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Absorbed dose calibration for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery is challenging due to the unique geometric conditions, dosimetry characteristics, and nonstandard field size of these devices. Members of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 178 on Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance have participated in a round-robin exchange of calibrated measurement instrumentation and phantoms exploring two approved and two proposed calibration protocols or formalisms on ten gamma radiosurgery units. The objectives of this study were to benchmark and compare new formalisms to existing calibration methods, while maintaining traceability to U.S. primary dosimetry calibration laboratory standards. Methods: Nine institutions made measurements using ten gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units in three different 160 mm diameter spherical phantoms [acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic, Solid Water, and liquid water] and in air using a positioning jig. Two calibrated miniature ionization chambers and one calibrated electrometer were circulated for all measurements. Reference dose-rates at the phantom center were determined using the well-established AAPM TG-21 or TG-51 dose calibration protocols and using two proposed dose calibration protocols/formalisms: an in-air protocol and a formalism proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) working group for small and nonstandard radiation fields. Each institution’s results were normalized to the dose-rate determined at that institution using the TG-21 protocol in the ABS phantom. Results: Percentages of dose-rates within 1.5% of the reference dose-rate (TG-21 + ABS phantom) for the eight chamber-protocol-phantom combinations were the following: 88% for TG-21, 70% for TG-51, 93% for the new IAEA nonstandard-field formalism, and 65% for the new in-air protocol. Averages and standard deviations for dose-rates over all measurements relative to the TG-21 + ABS

  14. Decision Analysis of Stereotactic Radiation Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 3 Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H.; Dosoretz, Arie P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is effective for controlling intracranial disease, it is also associated with neurocognitive side effects. It is unclear whether a theoretically improved quality of life after stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) alone relative to that after SRS with adjuvant WBRT would justify the omission of WBRT, given the higher risk of intracranial failure. This study compares SRS alone with SRS and WBRT, to evaluate the theoretical benefits of intracranial tumor control with adjuvant WBRT against its possible side effects, using quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) as a primary endpoint. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision analysis model was used to compare QALE in a cohort of patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases and Karnofsky performance status of at least 70. Patients were treated with SRS alone or with SRS immediately followed by WBRT. Patients treated with SRS alone underwent surveillance magnetic resonance imaging and received salvage WBRT if they developed intracranial relapse. All patients whose cancer relapsed after WBRT underwent simulation as dying of intracranial progression. Model parameters were estimated from published literature. Results: Treatment with SRS yielded 6.2 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). The addition of initial WBRT reduced QALE by 1.2 QALMs. On one-way sensitivity analysis, the model was sensitive only to a single parameter, the utility associated with the state of no evidence of disease after SRS alone. At values greater than 0.51, SRS alone was preferred. Conclusions: In general, SRS alone is suggested to have improved quality of life in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases compared to SRS and immediate WBRT. Our results suggest that immediate treatment with WBRT after SRS can be reserved for patients who would have a poor performance status regardless of treatment. These findings are stable under a wide range of assumptions.

  15. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  16. Comparison Between Infrared Optical and Stereoscopic X-Ray Technologies for Patient Setup in Image Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tagaste, Barbara; Riboldi, Marco; Spadea, Maria F.; Bellante, Simone; Baroni, Guido; Cambria, Raffaella; Garibaldi, Cristina; Ciocca, Mario; Catalano, Gianpiero; Alterio, Daniela; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To compare infrared (IR) optical vs. stereoscopic X-ray technologies for patient setup in image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective data analysis of 233 fractions in 127 patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was performed. Patient setup at the linear accelerator was carried out by means of combined IR optical localization and stereoscopic X-ray image fusion in 6 degrees of freedom (6D). Data were analyzed to evaluate the geometric and dosimetric discrepancy between the two patient setup strategies. Results: Differences between IR optical localization and 6D X-ray image fusion parameters were on average within the expected localization accuracy, as limited by CT image resolution (3 mm). A disagreement between the two systems below 1 mm in all directions was measured in patients treated for cranial tumors. In extracranial sites, larger discrepancies and higher variability were observed as a function of the initial patient alignment. The compensation of IR-detected rotational errors resulted in a significantly improved agreement with 6D X-ray image fusion. On the basis of the bony anatomy registrations, the measured differences were found not to be sensitive to patient breathing. The related dosimetric analysis showed that IR-based patient setup caused limited variations in three cases, with 7% maximum dose reduction in the clinical target volume and no dose increase in organs at risk. Conclusions: In conclusion, patient setup driven by IR external surrogates localization in 6D featured comparable accuracy with respect to procedures based on stereoscopic X-ray imaging.

  17. WE-E-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Renal Sympathetic Ablation for the Treatment of Refractory Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, P; Wheeler, M; Loo, B; Maguire, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy as a novel treatment for patients with refractory hypertension in a swine model. Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, substantially increasing the risk of ischemic stroke, ischemic heart disease, and kidney failure. Methods: High-resolution computed tomography (CT) images of anesthetized pigs were acquired and treatment plans for each renal artery and nerve were developed using our clinically implemented treatment planning system. Stereotactic radiotherapy, 40Gy in single fraction was delivered bilaterally to the renal nerves using a state-of-the-art medical linear accelerator under image guidance utilizing dynamic conformal arcs. Dose to nearby critical organs was evaluated by dosevolume histogram analysis and correlated to toxicity data obtained through follow up pathology analysis. The animals were observed for six months with serial measurements of blood pressure, urine analysis, serum laboratories, and overall clinical and behavioral status. Results: All animals survived to the follow-up point without evidence of renal dysfunction (stable serum creatinine), skin changes, or behavioral changes that might suggest animal discomfort. Plasma norepinephrine levels (ng/ml) were followed monthly for 6 months. The average reduction observed was 63%, with the median reduction at 73.5%. Microscopic evaluation 4–6 weeks after treatment showed evidence of damage to the nerves around treated renal arteries. Considerable attenuation in pan neurofilament expression by immunohistochemistry was observed with some vacuolar changes indicative of injury. There was no histological or immunohistochemical evidence of damage to nearby spinal cord or spinal nerve root structures. Conclusion: Our preclinical studies have shown stereotactic radiotherapy to the renal sympathetic plexus to be safe and effective in reducing blood pressure, thus this approach holds great

  18. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  19. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  20. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  1. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  2. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  3. Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Khan, Aftab; Kim, In-Young; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the role of Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the multidisciplinary management of brain metastases from an undiagnosed primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients who had solitary or multiple brain metastases without a detectable primary site underwent stereotactic radiosurgery between January 1990 and March 2007 at the University of Pittsburgh. The median patient age was 61.7 years (range, 37.9-78.7 years). The median target volume was 1.0 cc (range, 0.02-23.6 cc), and the median margin radiosurgical dose was 16 Gy (range, 20-70 Gy). Results: After radiosurgery, the local tumor control rate was 88.5%. Twenty four patients died and 5 patients were living at the time of this analysis. The overall median survival was 12 months. Actuarial survival rates from stereotactic radiosurgery at 1 and 2 years were 57.2% and 36.8%, respectively. Factors associated with poor progression-free survival included large tumor volume (3 cc or more) and brainstem tumor location. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is an effective and safe minimally invasive option for patients with brain metastases from an unknown primary site.

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  5. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon.

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Maverick W K

    2016-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  7. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kylie H.; Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B.; Siva, Shankar; Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications. PMID:26083933

  8. Robotic multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: work in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papasin, R.; Wallace, M.; Winters, J.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time identification of tissue would improve procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy (SBX), functional and implantation neurosurgery, and brain tumor excision. To standard SBX equipment has been added: (1) computer-controlled stepper motors to drive the biopsy needle/probe precisely; (2) multiple microprobes to track tissue density, detect blood vessels and changes in blood flow, and distinguish the various tissues being penetrated; (3) neural net learning programs to allow real-time comparisons of current data with a normative data bank; (4) three-dimensional graphic displays to follow the probe as it traverses brain tissue. The probe can differentiate substances such as pig brain, differing consistencies of the 'brain-like' foodstuff tofu, and gels made to simulate brain, as well as detect blood vessels imbedded in these substances. Multimodality probes should improve the safety, efficacy, and diagnostic accuracy of SBX and other neurosurgical procedures.

  9. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei; Pai, Reetesh K.; Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  10. Interactive sonar-operated device for stereotactic and open surgery.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, H F; Zweifel, H J

    1990-01-01

    An accuracy of +/- 1 mm in surgical localization of brain targets was reliably attained with a new sonar-operated system, provided that air turbulence was minimized. Since a conventional frame construction with coordinate settings has been disposed of, apart from a halo ring head holder, free access to the operating site is guaranteed. Using offset probes, measurements in depth can be realized with a relatively simple hardware arrangement. A small, 'floating' locator probe can be attached to all kinds of surgical instruments; its spatial position is computed in real time and immediately referred to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scans. Although this work is still in progress, promising applications both in stereotactic and in open surgery are envisaged.

  11. A Canadian Effort to Address Fractions Teaching and Learning Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearley, Shelley; Bruce, Catherine D.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and learning fraction concepts provides challenges in primary schools all over the world. In this article, Shelley Yearley and Catherine Bruce describe a fractions-based research project conducted in Ontario, Canada.

  12. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway. PMID

  13. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  14. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a dosimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T; Ziegler, Mark A; Hooker, Ted K; Dah, Samson D; Tran, Phuoc T; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non-duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal Dmax of<30Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal Dmean, Dmax, D1cc, D4%, and V20Gy compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V95% (p = 0.01) and Dmean (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at risk, whereas for IMRT it is compromised target coverage

  17. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Ohr, James; Clump, David A.; Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T.; Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on day −7 and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time.

  18. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  19. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  20. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  1. Stereotactic radiation therapy for oligometastases or oligorecurrence within mediastinal lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan-Huan; Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Meng, Mao-Bin; Zeng, Xian-Liang; Deng, Lei; Song, Yong-Chun; Zhuang, Hong-Qing; Li, Feng-Tong; Zhao, Lu-Jun; Yuan, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Ping; Hao, Xi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for the treatment of patients with oligometastases or oligorecurrence within mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) originating from different tumors. Methods Between October 2006 and May 2015, patients with MLN oligometastases or oligorecurrence were enrolled and treated with SRT at our hospital. The primary endpoint was MLN local control (LC). Secondary endpoints were time to symptom alleviation, overall survival (OS) after SRT, and toxicity using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v4.0). Results Eighty-five patients with 98 MLN oligometastases or oligorecurrences were treated with SRT. For the entire cohort, the 1-year and 5-year actuarial LC rates were 97% and 77%, respectively. Of 53 symptomatic patients, symptom alleviation was observed in 47 (89%) after a median of 5 days (range, 3-30 days). The median OS was 27.2 months for all patients. For patients with non-small cell lung cancer, univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that a shorter interval between diagnosis of primary tumors and SRT and larger MLN SRT volume were associated with worse OS. CTCAE v4.0 ≥ Grade 3 toxicities occurred in six patients (7%), with Grade 5 in three patients (all with RT history to MLN station 7). Conclusions SRT is a safe and efficacious treatment modality for patients with oligometastases or oligorecurrence to MLNs originating from different tumors, except for patients who received radiotherapy to MLN station 7. Further investigation is warranted to identify the patients who benefit most from this treatment modality. PMID:26919113

  2. Minimizing MRI Geometric Distortions for Improved Stereotactic Surgical Planning Accuracy: a Theoretical and Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolina, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate localization of internal structures is essential for successful stereotactic surgical planning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive modality for stereotactic imaging because it is highly sensitive to soft-tissue differences. Unfortunately, it has been shown to be susceptible to geometric distortions. These distortions contribute to object shifting and also to object -shape deformations. Research analyzing these distortions has found them to be complex and attributable to a variety of different sources. Furthermore, a wide range of stereotactic errors has been reported in numerous clinical studies, intimating that these errors are site specific. Because of the complexity of these distortions and the uncertainty of their effects from one imaging site to the next, most clinical sites choose either to ignore the likelihood that distortions exist, or image concurrently with MRI (for tissue specificity) and x-ray computed tomography (for geometric accuracy). Both of these strategies are unsatisfactory, however, as they either compromise patient care or induce unnecessary cost and inconvenience. This uncertainty in the accuracy of MRI was the impetus that prompted a comprehensive study of geometric distortion contributors and their subsequent effects on both imaged objects and stereotactic accuracy. This dissertation is a report of that study. As far as is known, it is the first comprehensive analysis (theoretical and experimental) of all of the individual distortion contributors that affect MRI geometric accuracy. Additionally, it is the first work that individually analyzes distortion effects on the stereotactic referencing system as well as on imaged objects. The dissertation begins with a brief history of the role of medical imaging in stereotactic surgical planning. Individual contributors to MRI geometric distortions are then analyzed theoretically and experimentally. How they affect both object distortions and stereotactic accuracy is

  3. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  4. Reproducibility of Tumor Motion Probability Distribution Function in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fan; Hu Jing; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David; Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using cine megavoltage (MV) images. Methods and Materials: Cine MV images of 20 patients acquired during three-dimensional conformal (6-11 beams) SBRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed to extract tumor motion trajectories. For each patient, tumor motion PDFs were generated per fraction (PDF{sub n}) using three selected 'usable' beams. Patients without at least three usable beams were excluded from the study. Fractional PDF reproducibility (R{sub n}) was calculated as the Dice similarity coefficient between PDF{sub n} to a 'ground-truth' PDF (PDF{sub g}), which was generated using the selected beams of all fractions. The mean of R{sub n}, labeled as R{sub m}, was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient's mean tumor motion rang (A{sub m}). Change of R{sub m} during the course of SBRT treatments was also evaluated. Intra- and intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of R{sub m} and A{sub m} were determined. Results: Thirteen patients had at least three usable beams and were analyzed. The mean of R{sub m} was 0.87 (range, 0.84-0.95). The mean of A{sub m} was 3.18 mm (range, 0.46-7.80 mm). R{sub m} was found to decrease as A{sub m} increases following an equation of R{sub m} = 0.17e{sup -0.9Am} + 0.84. R{sub m} also decreased slightly throughout the course of treatments. Intersubject CV of R{sub m} (0.05) was comparable to intrasubject CV of R{sub m} (range, 0.02-0.09); intersubject CV of A{sub m} (0.73) was significantly greater than intrasubject CV of A{sub m} (range, 0.09-0.24). Conclusions: Tumor motion PDF can be determined using cine MV images acquired during the treatments. The reproducibility of lung tumor motion PDF decreased exponentially as the tumor motion range increased and decreased slightly throughout the course of the treatments.

  5. Post operative stereotactic radiosurgery for positive or close margins after preoperative chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagoglu, Nergiz; Nedea, Elena; Poylin, Vitaliy; Nagle, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of positive margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and adequate surgery is very low. However, when patients do present with positive or close margins, they are at a risk of local failure and local therapy options are limited. We evaluated the role of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with positive or close margins after induction chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Methods This is a retrospective evaluation of patients treated with SBRT after induction chemoradiation and surgery for positive or close margins. Seven evaluable patients were included. Fiducial seeds were place at surgery. The CyberknifeTM system was used for planning and treatment. Patients were followed 1 month after treatment and 3-6 months thereafter. Descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meir method was used to repot the findings. Results Seven patients (3 men and 4 women) were included in the study with a median follow-up of 23.5 months. The median initial radiation dose was 5,040 cGy (in 28 fractions) and the median SBRT dose was 2,500 cGy (in 5 fractions). The local control at 2 years was 100%. The overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 100% and 71% respectively. There was no Grade III or IV toxicity. Conclusions SBRT reirradiation is an effective and safe method to address positive or close margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer. PMID:27284461

  6. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kinhikar, Rajesh Ashok; Ghadi, Yogesh G.; Sahoo, Priyadarshini; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Agarwal, Jaiprakash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription dose to 95% volume of planning target volume (PTV). Plan quality was assessed using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Doses to critical organs were assessed. Mean CI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.19 (standard deviation [SD] 0.13), 1.18 (SD 0.11), and 1.08 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean HI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.14 (SD 0.05), 1.08 (SD 0.02), and 1.07 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean R50% values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 8.5 (SD 0.35), 7.04 (SD 0.45), and 5.43 (SD 0.29), respectively. D2cm was found superior with IMRT and HT. Significant sparing of critical organs can be achieved with highly conformal techniques (IMRT and HT) without compromising the PTV conformity and homogeneity. PMID:26865754

  7. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with robotic stereotactic radiation therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Eun Kyung; Choi, Chul Won; Jang, Won Il; Lee, Sung Hyun; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum Bae; Lee, Dong Han

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy of RapidArc with robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of CyberKnife in the planning and delivery of SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment by analyzing dosimetric parameters. Materials and Methods Two radiation treatment plans were generated for 29 HCC patients, one using Eclipse for the RapidArc plan and the other using Multiplan for the CyberKnife plan. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 3 fractions. The dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and normal tissue sparing in the RapidArc and the CyberKnife plans were analyzed. Results The conformity index was 1.05 ± 0.02 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.13 ± 0.10 for the RapidArc plan. The homogeneity index was 1.23 ± 0.01 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.10 ± 0.03 for the RapidArc plan. For the normal liver, there were significant differences between the two plans in the low-dose regions of V1 and V3. The normalized volumes of V60 for the normal liver in the RapidArc plan were drastically increased when the mean dose of the PTVs in RapidArc plan is equivalent to the mean dose of the PTVs in the CyberKnife plan. Conclusion CyberKnife plans show greater dose conformity, especially in small-sized tumors, while RapidArc plans show good dosimetric distribution of low dose sparing in the normal liver and body. PMID:26484307

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Is Effective Salvage Therapy for Patients With Prior Radiation of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun Ames, Christopher; Chou, Dean; Ma Lijun; Huang, Kim; Xu Wei; Chin, Cynthia; Weinberg, Vivan; Chuang, Cynthia; Weinstein, Phillip; Larson, David A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To provide actuarial outcomes and dosimetric data for spinal/paraspinal metastases, with and without prior radiation, treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 39 consecutive patients (60 metastases) were treated with SBRT between April 2003 and August 2006 and retrospectively reviewed. In all, 23 of 60 tumors had no previous radiation (unirradiated) and 37/60 tumors had previous irradiation (reirradiated). Of 37 reirradiated tumors, 31 were treated for 'salvage' given image-based tumor progression. Local failure was defined as progression by imaging and/or clinically. Results: At last follow-up, 19 patients were deceased. Median patient survival time measured was 21 months (95% CI = 8-27 months), and the 2-year survival probability was 45%. The median total dose prescribed was 24 Gy in three fractions prescribed to the 67% and 60% isodose for the unirradiated and reirradiated cohorts, respectively. The median tumor follow-up for the unirradiated and reirradiated group was 9 months (range, 1-26) and 7 months (range, 1-48) respectively. Eight of 60 tumors have progressed, and the 1- and 2-year progression-free probability (PFP) was 85% and 69%, respectively. For the salvage group the 1 year PFP was 96%. There was no significant difference in overall survival or PFP between the salvage reirradiated vs. all other tumors treated (p = 0.08 and p = 0.31, respectively). In six of eight failures the minimum distance from the tumor to the thecal sac was {<=}1 mm. Of 60 tumors treated, 39 have {>=}6 months follow-up and no radiation-induced myelopathy or radiculopathy has occurred. Conclusion: Spine SBRT has shown preliminary efficacy and safety in patients with image-based progression of previously irradiated metastases.

  9. Prognostic Factors in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Shibuya, Keiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the factors that influence clinical outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 101 consecutive patients who underwent SBRT with 48 Gy in 4 fractions for histologically confirmed Stage I NSCLC were enrolled in this study. Factors including age, maximal tumor diameter, sex, performance status, operability, histology, and overall treatment time were evaluated with regard to local progression (LP), disease progression (DP), and overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. Prognostic models were built with recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Three-year OS was 58.6% with a median follow-up of 31.4 months. Cumulative incidence rates of LP and DP were 13.2% and 40.8% at 3 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor diameter was a significant factor in all endpoints of LP, DP, and OS. Other significant factors were age in DP and sex in OS. Recursive partitioning analysis indicated a condition for good prognosis (Class I) as follows: female or T1a (tumor diameter {<=}20 mm). When the remaining male patients with T1b-2a (>20 mm) were defined as Class II, 3-year LP, DP, and OS were 6.8%, 23.6%, and 69.9% in recursive partitioning analysis Class I, respectively, whereas these values were 19.9%, 58.3%, and 47.1% in Class II. The differences between the classes were statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor diameter and sex were the most significant factors in SBRT for NSCLC. T1a or female patients had good prognosis.

  10. Marginal Recurrence Requiring Salvage Radiotherapy After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Djemil, Toufik; Burdick, Michael J.; Woody, Neil; Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Angelov, Lilyana; Suh, John H.; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-05-01

    Introduction: We sought to quantify and identify risk factors associated with margin recurrence (MR) requiring salvage radiotherapy after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patients with spinal metastases who were treated with single-fraction SBRT between 2006 and 2009. Gross tumor was contoured, along with either the entire associated vertebral body(ies) or the posterior elements, and included in the planning target volume. No additional margins were used. MR was defined as recurrent tumor within one vertebral level above or below the treated lesion that required salvage radiotherapy. Only patients who presented for 3-month post-SBRT follow-up were included in the analysis. Fine and Gray competing risk regression models were generated to identify variables associated with higher risks of MR. MR was plotted using cumulative incidence analysis. Results: SBRT was delivered to 208 lesions in 149 patients. Median follow-up was 8.6 months, and median survival was 12.8 months. The median prescribed dose was 14 Gy (10-16 Gy). MR occurred in 26 (12.5%) treated lesions, at a median time of 7.7 months after SBRT. Patients with paraspinal disease at the time of SBRT (20.8% vs. 7.6% of patients; p = 0.02), and those treated with <16 Gy (16.3% vs. 6.3% of patients, p = 0.14) had higher rates of MR. Both variables were associated with significantly higher risk of MR on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: SBRT for spinal metastases results in a low overall rate of MR. The presence of paraspinal disease at the time of SBRT and a dose of <16 Gy were associated with higher risks of MR.

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  12. BRAF inhibitor and stereotactic radiosurgery is associated with an increased risk of radiation necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kirtesh R.; Chowdhary, Mudit; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Lawson, David H.; Cassidy, Richard J.; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively compared the outcomes and toxicities of melanoma brain metastases (MBM) patients treated with BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with SRS alone. We identified 87 patients with 157 MBM treated with SRS alone from 2005 to 2013. Of these, 15 (17.2%) patients with 32 MBM (21.4%) received BRAFi therapy: three (20.0%) before SRS, two (13.3%) concurrent, and 10 (66.7%) after SRS. Overall survival (OS) was compared between cohorts using the product limit method. Intracranial outcomes were compared using cumulative incidence with competing risk for death. Baseline patient characteristics were similar between groups, except for the SRS cohort, which had higher rates of chemotherapy and more recent year of diagnosis. Radiation characteristics, including dose per fraction, total dose, gross tumor volume size, and prescription isodose, were also similar between cohorts. One-year outcomes – OS (64.3 vs. 40.4%, P =0.205), local failure (3.3 vs. 9.6%, P =0.423), and distant intracranial failure (63.9 vs. 65.1%, P =0.450) were not statistically different between the SRS + BRAFi and SRS-alone groups, respectively. The SRS + BRAFi group showed higher rates of radiographic radiation necrosis (RN) (22.2 vs. 11.0% at 1 year, P <0.001) and symptomatic radiation necrosis (SRN) (28.2 vs. 11.1% at 1 year, P <0.001). Multivariable analysis showed that BRAFi predicted an increased risk of both radiographic and SRN. SRS and BRAFi predicted for an increased risk of radiographic and SRN compared with SRS alone. Approaches to mitigate RN for patients receiving SRS and BRAFi should be considered until the clinical trial (http//:www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01721603) evaluating this treatment regimen is completed. PMID:27223498

  13. Induction Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Miksad, Rebecca; Goldstein, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan; Bullock, Andrea; Buchbinder, Elizabeth; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Kent, Tara; Vollmer, Charles; Callery, Mark

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used successfully to treat patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, many patients develop metastatic disease soon after diagnosis and may receive little benefit from such therapy. We therefore retrospectively analyzed a planned strategy of initial chemotherapy with restaging and then treatment for those patients with no evidence of metastatic progression with SBRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} per week for 3 weeks then 1 week off) until tolerance, at least six cycles, or progression. Patients without metastases after two cycles were treated with SBRT (tolerance-based dose of 24-36 Gy in 3 fractions) between the third and fourth cycles without interrupting the chemotherapy cycles. Results: Eight of the 47 patients (17%) were found to have metastatic disease after two cycles of gemcitabine; the remaining 39 patients received SBRT. The median follow-up for survivors was 21 months (range, 6-36 months). The median overall survival for all patients who received SBRT was 20 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. The local control rate was 85% (33 of 39 patients); and 54% of patients (21 of 39) developed metastases. Late Grade III toxicities such as GI bleeding and obstruction were observed in 9% (3/39) of patients. Conclusion: For patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer, this strategy uses local therapy for those who are most likely to benefit from it and spares those patients with early metastatic progression from treatment. SBRT delivers such local therapy safely with minimal interruption to systemic chemotherapy, thereby potentially improving the outcome in these patients.

  14. The Use of Gated and 4D CT Imaging in Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D. . E-mail: wdsou001@umaryland.edu; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Zhang Bin; Deyoung, Chad; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Kwok, Young; Yu, Cedric X.; Regine, William F.

    2007-07-01

    The localization of treatment targets is of utmost importance for patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), where the dose per fraction is large. While both setup or respiration-induced motion components affect the localization of the treatment volume, the purpose of this work is to describe our management of the intrafraction localization uncertainty induced by normal respiration. At our institution, we have implemented gated computed tomography (CT) acquisition with an active breathing control system (ABC), and 4-dimensional (4D) CT using a skin-based marker and retrospective respiration phase-based image sorting. During gated simulation, 3D CT images were acquired corresponding to end-inhalation and end-exhalation. For 4D CT imaging, 3D CT images were acquired corresponding to 8 phases of the respiratory cycle. In addition to gated or 4D CT images, we acquired a conventional free-breathing CT (FB). For both gated and 4D CT images, the target contours were registered to the FB scan in the planning system. These contours were then combined in the FB image set to form the internal target volume (ITV). Dynamic conformal arc treatment plans were generated for the ITV using the FB scan and the gated or 4D scans with an additional 7-mm margin for patient setup uncertainty. We have described our results for a pancreas and a lung tumor case. Plans were normalized so that the PTV received 95% of the prescription dose. The dose distribution for all the critical structures in the pancreas and lung tumor cases resulted in increased sparing when the ITV was defined using gated or 4D CT images than when the FB scan was used. Our results show that patient-specific target definition using gated or 4D CT scans lead to improved normal tissue sparing.

  15. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  16. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Spinal Metastases Recurring in Close Proximity to Previously Irradiated Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Jackson, Paul S.; Minn, A. Yuriko; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: As the spinal cord tolerance often precludes reirradiation with conventional techniques, local recurrence within a previously irradiated field presents a treatment challenge. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 51 lesions in 42 patients treated from 2002 to 2008 whose spinal metastases recurred in a previous radiation field (median previous spinal cord dose of 40 Gy) and were subsequently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Results: SRS was delivered to a median marginal dose of 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy) in 1-5 fractions (median, 2), targeting a median tumor volume of 10.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-128.6 cm{sup 3}). Converting the SRS regimens with the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3), the median spinal cord maximum single-session equivalent dose (SSED) was 12.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 4.7-19.3 Gy{sub 3}). With a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 2-47 months), the Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival rates at 6/12 months were 87%/73% and 81%/68%, respectively. A time to retreatment of {<=}12 months and the combination of time to retreatment of {<=}12 months with an SSED of <15 Gy{sub 10} were significant predictors of local failure on univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients with a retreatment interval of <12 months, 6/12 month local control rates were 88%/58%, with a SSED of >15 Gy{sub 10}, compared to 45%/0% with <15 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. One patient (2%) experienced Grade 4 neurotoxicity. Conclusion: SRS is safe and effective in the treatment of spinal metastases recurring in previously irradiated fields. Tumor recurrence within 12 months may correlate with biologic aggressiveness and require higher SRS doses (SSED >15 Gy{sub 10}). Further research is needed to define the partial volume retreatment tolerance of the spinal cord and the optimal target dose.

  17. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J.; Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Bevacizumab With Hypofractionated Stereotactic Irradiation for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Gutin, Philip H. Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Beal, Kathryn; Mohile, Nimish A.; Karimi, Sasan; Hou, Bob L.; Lymberis, Stella; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chang, Jenghwa

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies suggest that inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improves glioma response to radiotherapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, has shown promise in recurrent gliomas, but the safety and efficacy of concurrent bevacizumab with brain irradiation has not been extensively studied. The objectives of this study were to determine the safety and activity of this combination in malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: After prior treatment with standard radiation therapy patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic gliomas (AG) received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenous) every 2 weeks of 28-day cycles until tumor progression. Patients also received 30 Gy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) in five fractions after the first cycle of bevacizumab. Results: Twenty-five patients (20 GBM, 5 AG; median age 56 years; median Karnofsky Performance Status 90) received a median of seven cycles of bevacizumab. One patient did not undergo HFSRT because overlap with prior radiotherapy would exceed the safe dose allowed to the optic chiasm. Three patients discontinued treatment because of Grade 3 central nervous system intratumoral hemorrhage, wound dehiscence, and bowel perforation. Other nonhematologic and hematologic toxicities were transient. No radiation necrosis was seen in these previously irradiated patients. For the GBM cohort, overall response rate was 50%, 6-month progression-free survival was 65%; median overall survival was 12.5 months, and 1-year survival was 54%. Discussion: Bevacizumab with HFSRT is safe and well tolerated. Radiographic responses, duration of disease control, and survival suggest that this regimen is active in recurrent malignant glioma.

  19. GammaPod-A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao Xinyu; Deng Jianchun; Duan Zhengcheng; Zhang Jin; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Regine, William

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%-95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously.

  20. Preliminary results of 45 patients with trigeminal neuralgia treated with radiosurgery compared to hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, using a dedicated linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Fraioli, Mario Francesco; Strigari, Lidia; Fraioli, Chiara; Lecce, Mario; Lisciani, Damiano

    2012-10-01

    Radiosurgery (RS) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) were performed in 23 and 22 patie