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Sample records for primary healthcare sector

  1. Primary healthcare information system--the cornerstone for the next generation healthcare sector in Republic of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Koncar, Miroslav; Gvozdanović, Darko

    2006-01-01

    At no time in the history of medicine has the growth in knowledge and technologies been so profound [Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, Institute of Medicine (IOM), 2001. ISBN 0-309-07280-8]. However, healthcare delivery systems today are not able to keep up with the pace. Studies have shown that it takes an average of about 17 years for new knowledge generated by randomized trials to be incorporated into practice [B. Andrew, S. Boren, Managing clinical knowledge for health care improvement, in: Yearbook of Medical Informatics, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, 2000, pp. 65-70]. It is safe to say that today healthcare systems "have the data, but not information". In order to provide highest quality patient care, Republic of Croatia has started the process of introducing enterprise information systems to support business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: to provide efficient healthcare related data management in support of decision-making processes; and to support continuous process of healthcare resources spending optimization. The first initiated project refers to Primary Healthcare Information System (PHCIS) that provides domain of primary care with state-of-the-art enterprise information system that connects General Practitioners, Pediatricians and Gynecologists offices with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Public Health Institute. In the years to come, PHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of healthcare (e.g. hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of PHCIS, explains challenges that were faced in designing and implementing the system, and elaborates PHCIS role as the cornerstone for the next generation healthcare provisioning in Republic of Croatia.

  2. Experiences with primary healthcare in Fuzhou, urban China, in the context of health sector reform: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Rosalind; Chen, Lieping; ChenXiang, Tang; Liu, Xiaoyun; Starfield, Barbara; Jinhuan, Zheng; Tolhurst, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    China has recently placed increased emphasis on the provision of primary healthcare services through health sector reform, in response to inequitably distributed health services. With increasing funding for community level facilities, now is an opportune time to assess the quality of primary care delivery and identify areas in need of further improvement. A mixed methodology approach was adopted for this study. Quantitative data were collected using the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Chinese version (C-PCAT), a questionnaire previously adapted for use in China to assess the quality of care at each health facility, based on clients' experiences. In addition, qualitative data were gathered through eight semi-structured interviews exploring perceptions of primary care with health directors and a policy maker to place this issue in the context of health sector reform. The study found that patients attending community health and sub-community health centres are more likely to report better experiences with primary care attributes than patients attending hospital facilities. Generally low scores for community orientation, family centredness and coordination in all types of health facility indicate an urgent need for improvement in these areas. Healthcare directors and policy makers perceived the need for greater coordination between levels of health providers, better financial reimbursement, more formal government contracts and recognition/higher status for staff at the community level and more appropriate undergraduate and postgraduate training. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Job Satisfaction of Primary Health-Care Providers (Public Sector) in Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Khan, Abdul Majeed; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Job satisfaction is determined by a discrepancy between what one wants in a job and what one has in a job. The core components of information necessary for what satisfies and motivates the health work force in our country are missing at policy level. Therefore present study will help us to know the factors for job satisfaction among primary health care providers in public sector. Materials and Methods: Present study is descriptive in nature conducted in public sector dispensaries/primary urban health centers in Delhi among health care providers. Pretested structured questionnaire was administered to 227 health care providers. Data was analyzed using SPSS and relevant statistical test were applied. Results: Analysis of study reveals that ANMs are more satisfied than MOs, Pharmacist and Lab assistants/Lab technicians; and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Age and education level of health care providers don’t show any significant difference in job satisfaction. All the health care providers are dissatisfied from the training policies and practices, salaries and opportunities for career growth in the organization. Majority of variables studied for job satisfaction have low scores. Five factor were identified concerned with job satisfaction in factor analysis. Conclusion: Job satisfaction is poor for all the four groups of health care providers in dispensaries/primary urban health centers and it is not possible to assign a single factor as a sole determinant of dissatisfaction in the job. Therefore it is recommended that appropriate changes are required at the policy as well as at the dispensary/PUHC level to keep the health work force motivated under public sector in Delhi. PMID:24479088

  4. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  5. Healthcare is primary

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2nd National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on “healthcare” in India. The theme of this conference was “Healthcare is Primary.” The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the “general health system” instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, “family medicine” (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation. PMID:26985402

  6. Healthcare and Social Assistance Sector (NAICS 62)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental regulations and information for the Healthcare sector, including doctor's offices, hospitals, and medical laboratories. Includes information about dental amalgam wastewater, sterilizers, and medical waste.

  7. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature.

  8. Occupational Hazards in the Thai Healthcare Sector.

    PubMed

    Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Mawn, Barbara; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Woskie, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Healthcare personnel work in vulnerable conditions that can adversely impact physical and/or mental health. This paper aims to synthesize the state of knowledge on work-related illnesses, injuries, and risks experienced by Thai healthcare workers. We found that Thai healthcare personnel, like others worldwide, are at risk for injury related to needle sticks and sharp instruments; infectious diseases due to biological hazards exposure such as airborne pathogens and patient secretions; muscle pain due to workload and long duration of work; and psychological disorders related to stressful working conditions. Because detailed surveillance data are limited for the Thai healthcare workforce, we recommend that additional surveillance data on Thai healthcare workers' health outcomes be collected. Future research efforts should also focus on evidence-based interventions in order to develop methods to prevent and treat occupational health injuries and illnesses acquired in the workplace for Thai healthcare sector workers.

  9. Randomised controlled study in the primary healthcare sector to investigate the effectiveness and safety of auriculotherapy for the treatment of uncomplicated chronic rachialgia: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Campos, M Ángeles; Méndez, Camila; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Modesto, Manuela; Caro, Paloma; Martos, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Antonio J

    2008-01-01

    Background Uncomplicated chronic rachialgia is a highly prevalent complaint, and one for which therapeutic results are contradictory. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of treatment with auriculopressure, in the primary healthcare sector, carried out by trained healthcare professionals via a 30-hour course. Methods/Design The design consists of a multi-centre randomized controlled trial, with placebo, with two parallel groups, and including an economic evaluation. Patients with chronic uncomplicated rachialgia, whose GP is considering referral for auriculopressure sensory stimulation, are eligible for inclusion. Sampling will be by consecutive selection, and randomised allocation to one of the two study arms will be determined using a centralised method, following a 1:1 plan (true auriculopressure; placebo auriculopressure). The implants (true and placebo) will be replaced once weekly, and the treatment will have a duration of 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure will be the change in pain intensity, measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS) of 100 mm, at 9 weeks after beginning the treatment. A follow up study will be performed at 6 months after beginning treatment. An assessment will also be made of the changes measured in the Spanish version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, of the changes in the Lattinen test, and of the changes in quality of life (SF-12). Also planned is an analysis of cost-effectiveness and also, if necessary, a cost-benefit analysis. Discussion This study will contribute to developing evidence on the use of auriculotherapy using Semen vaccariae [wang bu liu xing] for the treatment of uncomplicated chronic rachialgia. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN01897462. PMID:18601750

  10. TQM implementation for the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate on total quality management (TQM) implementation in the healthcare sector and to evaluate how and whether leadership can affect TQM implementation. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on findings from a literature review of TQM and leadership. The authors analysed these findings to categorise causes of a lack of leadership in TQM programme implementations. Findings The authors propose three categories of causes of a lack of leadership in TQM programme implementation. The first cause is well-known: a lack of senior managers' involvement and commitment. The second category is the "combined leadership" that occurs in large healthcare organisations; and the third category is the influence of an external "political leadership" on public healthcare. Research limitations/implications This paper presents researchers with three categories of causes of failure of leadership in TQM implementation that can be investigated. It also encourages reflections from practitioners concerning TQM leadership in the healthcare sector. Practical implications The authors request that practitioners reflect on ways to create or sustain a "monolithic" leadership, especially in large organisations, to ensure a common vision, values and attitude for unitary TQM governance. Originality/value In an original way, this paper analyses and proposes three categories of causes linked to a lack of TQM leadership in the healthcare sector.

  11. Management by missions in the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Fonseca Pires, J; Rey, C; Más-Machuca, M; Bastons, M

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of the mission statement in the healthcare sector. It's also argued that only formal declaration of the mission it's insufficient to the appropriate professional coordination of doctors, nurses and managers. It's proposed a systematic approach to facilitate the introduction of the mission within the systems of the organization, what is called "Management by missions." It promotes horizontal and vertical integration between doctors, nurses and managers. Criteria that ensure this integration are specified.

  12. Health sector reforms for 21(st) century healthcare.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Darshan

    2015-01-01

    The form of the public health system in India is a three tiered pyramid-like structure consisting primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare services. The content of India's health system is mono-cultural and based on western bio-medicine. Authors discuss need for health sector reforms in the wake of the fact that despite huge investment, the public health system is not delivering. Today, 70% of the population pays out of pocket for even primary healthcare. Innovation is the need of the hour. The Indian government has recognized eight systems of healthcare viz., Allopathy, Ayurveda, Siddha, Swa-rigpa, Unani, Naturopathy, Homeopathy, and Yoga. Allopathy receives 97% of the national health budget, and 3% is divided amongst the remaining seven systems. At present, skewed funding and poor integration denies the public of advantage of synergy and innovations arising out of the richness of India's Medical Heritage. Health seeking behavior studies reveal that 40-70% of the population exercise pluralistic choices and seek health services for different needs, from different systems. For emergency and surgery, Allopathy is the first choice but for chronic and common ailments and for prevention and wellness help from the other seven systems is sought. Integrative healthcare appears to be the future framework for healthcare in the 21(st) century. A long-term strategy involving radical changes in medical education, research, clinical practice, public health and the legal and regulatory framework is needed, to innovate India's public health system and make it both integrative and participatory. India can be a world leader in the new emerging field of "integrative healthcare" because we have over the last century or so assimilated and achieved a reasonable degree of competence in bio-medical and life sciences and we possess an incredibly rich and varied medical heritage of our own.

  13. The role of criminal law within the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Alhafaji, Yasmin

    2012-12-01

    Health is for most of us the most precious thing one can have. However, in practice situations occur where the patient is harmed within the healthcare institution. Traditionally, there are several ways to protect individuals in society: with civil, criminal and administrative procedures. Over the years in the Netherlands complaints procedures were established in which the complaints about healthcare providers' performance can be handled. Recently, there are some developments within the criminal law that concern the healthcare sector. Examples are: the establishment of the Public Prosecution Service's Expertise Center on Medical Matters, appointments of medical prosecutors. In addition, in legal literature suggestions are made that criminal law is nowadays applied in order to provide redress to the patients (relatives) and as a 'safety tool' that is to ensure security and to counter the risks within the healthcare sector. The article discusses the role of criminal law within the healthcare sector, and in particular, whether criminal procedure is suitable for handling complaints about healthcare.

  14. Primary healthcare renewal in Canada: a glass half empty?

    PubMed

    van Soeren, Mary; Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Pogue, Pamela; Sanders, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Primary healthcare renewal was an important government initiative arising in the early 21st century. This sector of the healthcare system in Canada had been under-resourced and ignored for decades. Recent changes include the development of salaried models for physician care, the use of other professionals in primary care, the integration of inter-professional teams, funding for information management systems and some incentives to provide directed primary care services. However, these changes are limited by a lack of overall policy direction to drive innovation, the absence of a shift in the locus of control of healthcare, a lack of education for healthcare providers to support inter-professional team-based practices and a failure to be more accountable to the Canadian public's needs. Without these innovations, the primary healthcare system will again be overwhelmed by future healthcare needs. Based on these limitations, we question whether this renewal represents lasting change in primary healthcare or a band-aid solution to the continued issue of primary healthcare delivery.

  15. PAIR UP for primary care excellence: perspectives from a primary healthcare provider in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Singapore is facing an increasing noncommunicable disease burden due to its ageing population. Singapore’s primary healthcare services, provided by both polyclinic physicians and private general practitioners, are available to the public at differential fees for service. The resultant disproportionate patient loads lead to dissatisfaction for both healthcare providers and consumers. This article describes the ‘PAIR UP’ approach as a potential endeavour to facilitate primary care physicians (PCPs) in public and private sectors to collaborate to deliver enhanced primary care in Singapore. PAIR UP is an acronym referring to Policy, Academic development, Integration of healthcare information system, Research in primary care, Utility and safety evaluation, and Practice transformation. The current healthcare landscape is favourable to test out this multipronged approach. PCPs in both sectors can ride on it and work together synergistically to provide quality primary care in Singapore. PMID:24664374

  16. Privatization and management development in the healthcare sector of Georgia.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel J; Costello, Michael; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare reforms in Georgia parallel some of the major changes made by other Central and Eastern European countries. This is especially true of efforts to privatize the health sector and secure capital investments from Western Europe. Privatization of Georgian healthcare requires an understanding of the Soviet-era healthcare system and ideological orientation. Many of the issues and problems of privatization in Georgia require new knowledge to enhance equity outcomes, improve financial performance, increase access to care and encourage healthcare competition. Training existing and future healthcare leaders in modern management theory and practice is paramount. A university based health-management education partnership model was developed and implemented between several universities in the United States and Europe, along with two Georgian universities, to address workforce demands, changing market conditions, management knowledge and leadership competencies. Health-management education concentrations were developed and implemented along with several short courses to meet market demand for trained leaders and managers.

  17. Data Hemorrhages in the Health-Care Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. Eric

    Confidential data hemorrhaging from health-care providers pose financial risks to firms and medical risks to patients. We examine the consequences of data hemorrhages including privacy violations, medical fraud, financial identity theft, and medical identity theft. We also examine the types and sources of data hemorrhages, focusing on inadvertent disclosures. Through an analysis of leaked files, we examine data hemorrhages stemming from inadvertent disclosures on internet-based file sharing networks. We characterize the security risk for a group of health-care organizations using a direct analysis of leaked files. These files contained highly sensitive medical and personal information that could be maliciously exploited by criminals seeking to commit medical and financial identity theft. We also present evidence of the threat by examining user-issued searches. Our analysis demonstrates both the substantial threat and vulnerability for the health-care sector and the unique complexity exhibited by the US health-care system.

  18. Enhancing the Australian healthcare sector's responsiveness to environmental sustainability issues: suggestions from Australian healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Jillian L

    2013-05-01

    Identify strategies to implement change across the Australian healthcare sector to better support social and natural environments. Methods. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with Australian healthcare professionals. Interviewees described multiple barriers to implementing change and numerous strategies to overcome these barriers. They argued that action must be taken at the individual and systemic levels to produce substantial and effective change. The strategies recommended fall into four main categories: altering workplace cultures and professional identities, community engagement, political activity, and change from within. The overarching goals of these strategies are to reduce negative impacts on the natural environment, and increase social equity within and across generations. By implementing the strategies described, a more cohesive effort to address sustainability issues across the sector can be made. This may improve local and global health, within current and future generations. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? Healthcare has a significant impact on the natural and social environments, which in turn have a significant impact upon health and healthcare. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper describes strategies to alter healthcare to better support environmental sustainability. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? Collective implementation of the described strategies may allow a more cohesive and effective response across the Australian healthcare sector, to enhance local and global health for current and future generations.

  19. [Healthcare promotion in primary care: if Hippocrates were alive today…].

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Elena; March, Sebastià; Cabezas, Carmen; Segura, Andreu

    2016-11-01

    This article argues for the need to implement community healthcare promotion initiatives in medical practice. Some of the community initiatives introduced in primary care, as well as scientific evidence and associated implementation factors are described. The need for effective coordination between primary care and public health services, working with the community, is underlined. Two specific coordination initiatives are explained by way of example. The first is a project to develop healthcare plans in health centres in the Balearic Islands, by means of a participatory process with the collaboration of citizens, local organisations and the town council (urban planning, mobility, social services, etc.). The second is the Interdepartmental Public Health Plan of Catalonia, which was established to coordinate cross-sectoral healthcare. A specific part of this plan is the COMSalud project, the purpose of which is to introduce a community perspective to health centres and which is currently being piloted in 16 health areas. We review the proposals of a 2008 research study to implement healthcare promotion in primary care, assessing its achievements and shortfalls. The Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Strategy of the Spanish Ministry of Health is recognised as an opportunity to coordinate primary and public health. It is concluded that this change of mentality will require both financial and human resources to come to fruition. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of Performance Dashboards in Healthcare Sector: Key Practical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Safdari, Reza; Torabi, Mashallah; Mirzaee, Mahboobeh; Farzi, Jebraeil; Goodini, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Static nature of performance reporting systems in health care sector has resulted in inconsistent, incomparable, time consuming, and static performance reports that are not able to transparently reflect a round picture of performance and effectively support healthcare managers’ decision makings. So, the healthcare sector needs interactive performance management tools such as performance dashboards to measure, monitor, and manage performance more effectively. The aim of this article was to identify key issues that need to be addressed for developing high-quality performance dashboards in healthcare sector. Methods: A literature review was established to search electronic research databases, e-journals collections, and printed journals, books, dissertations, and theses for relevant articles. The search strategy interchangeably used the terms of “dashboard”, “performance measurement system”, and “executive information system” with the term of “design” combined with operator “AND”. Search results (n=250) were adjusted for duplications, screened based on their abstract relevancy and full-text availability (n=147) and then assessed for eligibility (n=40). Eligible articles were included if they had explicitly focused on dashboards, performance measurement systems or executive information systems design. Finally, 28 relevant articles included in the study. Results: Creating high-quality performance dashboards requires addressing both performance measurement and executive information systems design issues. Covering these two fields, identified contents were categorized to four main domains: KPIs development, Data Sources and data generation, Integration of dashboards to source systems, and Information presentation issues. Conclusion: This study implies the main steps to develop dashboards for the purpose of performance management. Performance dashboards developed on performance measurement and executive information systems principles and

  1. Development of Performance Dashboards in Healthcare Sector: Key Practical Issues.

    PubMed

    Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Safdari, Reza; Torabi, Mashallah; Mirzaee, Mahboobeh; Farzi, Jebraeil; Goodini, Azadeh

    2015-10-01

    Static nature of performance reporting systems in health care sector has resulted in inconsistent, incomparable, time consuming, and static performance reports that are not able to transparently reflect a round picture of performance and effectively support healthcare managers' decision makings. So, the healthcare sector needs interactive performance management tools such as performance dashboards to measure, monitor, and manage performance more effectively. The aim of this article was to identify key issues that need to be addressed for developing high-quality performance dashboards in healthcare sector. A literature review was established to search electronic research databases, e-journals collections, and printed journals, books, dissertations, and theses for relevant articles. The search strategy interchangeably used the terms of "dashboard", "performance measurement system", and "executive information system" with the term of "design" combined with operator "AND". Search results (n=250) were adjusted for duplications, screened based on their abstract relevancy and full-text availability (n=147) and then assessed for eligibility (n=40). Eligible articles were included if they had explicitly focused on dashboards, performance measurement systems or executive information systems design. Finally, 28 relevant articles included in the study. Creating high-quality performance dashboards requires addressing both performance measurement and executive information systems design issues. Covering these two fields, identified contents were categorized to four main domains: KPIs development, Data Sources and data generation, Integration of dashboards to source systems, and Information presentation issues. This study implies the main steps to develop dashboards for the purpose of performance management. Performance dashboards developed on performance measurement and executive information systems principles and supported by proper back-end infrastructure will result in

  2. Healthcare reform: implications for knowledge translation in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary care sector represents the linchpin of many health systems. However, the translation of evidence-based practices into patient care can be difficult, particularly during healthcare reform. This can have significant implications for patients, their communities, and the public purse. This is aptly demonstrated in the area of sexual health. The aim of this paper is to determine what works to facilitate evidence-based sexual healthcare within the primary care sector. Methods 431 clinicians (214 general practitioners and 217 practice nurses) in New South Wales, Australia, were surveyed about their awareness, their use, the perceived impact, and the factors that hindered the use of six resources to promote sexual healthcare. Descriptive statistics were calculated from the responses to the closed survey items, while responses to open-ended item were thematically analyzed. Results All six resources were reported to improve the delivery of evidence-based sexual healthcare. Two resources – both double-sided A4-placards – had the greatest reach and use. Barriers that hindered resource-use included limited time, limited perceived need, and limited access to, or familiarity with the resources. Furthermore, the reorganization of the primary care sector and the removal of particular medical benefits scheme items may have hampered clinician capacity to translate evidence-based practices into patient care. Conclusions Findings reveal: (1) the translation of evidence-based practices into patient care is viable despite reform; (2) the potential value of a multi-modal approach; (3) the dissemination of relatively inexpensive resources might influence clinical practices; and (4) reforms to governance and/or funding arrangements may widen the void between evidence-based practices and patient care. PMID:24274773

  3. Significant components of service brand equity in healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Hardeep; Bala, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine three significant components of service brand equity--i.e. perceived service quality, brand loyalty, and brand image--and analyze relationships among the components of brand equity and also their relationship with brand equity, which is still to be theorized and developed in the healthcare literature. Effective responses were received from 206 respondents, selected conveniently from the localities of Jammu city. After scale item analysis, the data were analyzed using factor analysis, correlations, t-tests, multiple regression analysis and path modeling using SEM. The findings of the study support that service brand equity in the healthcare sector is greatly influenced by brand loyalty and perceived quality. However, brand image has an indirect effect on service brand equity through brand loyalty (mediating variable). The research can be criticized on the ground that data were selected conveniently from respondents residing in the city of Jammu, India. But at the same time the respondents were appropriate for the study as they have adequate knowledge about the hospitals, and were associated with the selected hospital for more than four years. Furthermore, the validity and reliability of the data are strong enough to take care of the limitations of the convenience sampling selection method. The study has unique value addition to the service marketing vis-à-vis healthcare literature, from both theoretical and managerial perspectives. The study establishes a direct and significant relationship between service brand equity and its two components, i.e. perceived service quality and brand loyalty in the healthcare sector. It also provides directions to healthcare service providers in creating, enhancing, and maintaining service brand equity through service quality and brand loyalty, to sustain competitive advantage.

  4. Power over prices. New advisory board may take aim at doctors' pay, other healthcare sectors.

    PubMed

    Lubell, Jennifer

    2010-06-28

    As the pieces of reform are falling into place, providers are worried about the effect a new board will have on payments. While hospitals are exempt from Independent Payment Advisory Board recommendations until 2019, they're worried how changes to payment to other sectors will affect the system as the era of accountable care organizations dawns. "We need fair payment for primary-care doctors," says Herbert Pardes, left, of New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System.

  5. Interprofessional Competencies in Integrative Primary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kligler, Benjamin; Brooks, Audrey J; Maizes, Victoria; Goldblatt, Elizabeth; Klatt, Maryanna; Koithan, Mary S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Lee, Jeannie K; Lopez, Ana Marie; McClafferty, Hilary; Rhode, Robert; Sandvold, Irene; Saper, Robert; Taren, Douglas; Wells, Eden; Lebensohn, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    In October 2014, the National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare (NCIPH) was launched as a collaboration between the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and the Academic Consortium for Integrative Health and Medicine and supported by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. A primary goal of the NCIPH is to develop a core set of integrative healthcare (IH) competencies and educational programs that will span the interprofessional primary care training and practice spectra and ultimately become a required part of primary care education. This article reports on the first phase of the NCIPH effort, which focused on the development of a shared set of competencies in IH for primary care disciplines. The process of development, refinement, and adoption of 10 "meta-competencies" through a collaborative process involving a diverse interprofessional team is described. Team members represent nursing, the primary care medicine professions, pharmacy, public health, acupuncture, naturopathy, chiropractic, nutrition, and behavioral medicine. Examples of the discipline-specific sub-competencies being developed within each of the participating professions are provided, along with initial results of an assessment of potential barriers and facilitators of adoption within each discipline. The competencies presented here will form the basis of a 45-hour online curriculum produced by the NCIPH for use in primary care training programs that will be piloted in a wide range of programs in early 2016 and then revised for wider use over the following year.

  6. Interprofessional Competencies in Integrative Primary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Audrey J.; Maizes, Victoria; Goldblatt, Elizabeth; Klatt, Maryanna; Koithan, Mary S.; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Lee, Jeannie K.; Lopez, Ana Marie; McClafferty, Hilary; Rhode, Robert; Sandvold, Irene; Saper, Robert; Taren, Douglas; Wells, Eden; Lebensohn, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    In October 2014, the National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare (NCIPH) was launched as a collaboration between the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and the Academic Consortium for Integrative Health and Medicine and supported by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. A primary goal of the NCIPH is to develop a core set of integrative healthcare (IH) competencies and educational programs that will span the interprofessional primary care training and practice spectra and ultimately become a required part of primary care education. This article reports on the first phase of the NCIPH effort, which focused on the development of a shared set of competencies in IH for primary care disciplines. The process of development, refinement, and adoption of 10 “meta-competencies” through a collaborative process involving a diverse interprofessional team is described. Team members represent nursing, the primary care medicine professions, pharmacy, public health, acupuncture, naturopathy, chiropractic, nutrition, and behavioral medicine. Examples of the discipline-specific sub-competencies being developed within each of the participating professions are provided, along with initial results of an assessment of potential barriers and facilitators of adoption within each discipline. The competencies presented here will form the basis of a 45-hour online curriculum produced by the NCIPH for use in primary care training programs that will be piloted in a wide range of programs in early 2016 and then revised for wider use over the following year. PMID:26421232

  7. Formation of Defence Primary Healthcare: a new way of delivering firm base primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Burgess, John E; Gall, M; Orr, S; Kilbey, S

    2016-06-09

    Following the Strategic Defence and Security Review of 2010, the UK Surgeon General was directed to merge the delivery of primary healthcare from the three single Service organisations to a unified Defence Primary Healthcare. Although front line clinical staff were to be preserved, considerable savings were to be made in headquarters staff. This was one of the largest UK military medicine changes in delivery for a generation. The changes were completed on time with the transfer of UK and overseas general practice, specialist community services and dentistry, with a later requirement to add healthcare for the Reserves. The first years of this initiative have been remarkably successful, and Defence Primary Healthcare (DPHC) has progressively increased performance in all the QOF criteria measured by Defence Statistics.

  8. Standard Treatment Guidelines in Primary Healthcare Practice

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Udayshankar, P.M.; Rama, R.

    2014-01-01

    In India, healthcare delivery is implemented at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Of these, primary health care is the essential health care and is the first point of care for the public across the country. The primary health care system caters to nearly 70% of the population by treating about 90% of the common and locally prevailing problems. One of the integral elements of primary health care is provision of essential medicines, which should be available at all times in adequate amounts in appropriate dosage forms and at an affordable cost. It has an important bearing on the medical, economical and social outcomes of the healthcare delivery system. This situation mandates the need for rational use of medicines by standardizing the treatment of commonly occurring illness at the primary health care level. Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) have been in vogue in India only since recent times and is gaining popularity among practitioners. STGs have many advantages for the patients, healthcare providers, drug manufacturers and marketing agencies, and above all, the policy makers and the legislative system of the country. The drawback in STGs lies in the difficulties in implementation on a large scale. With due efforts to prioritize the health needs, comprehensive coverage of national health programs involving all the stakeholders including professional organizations, undergraduate medical curriculum planners and medical practitioners, STGs can be implemented effectively and thereby we can ensure a quality health care at the primary care level at an affordable cost as part of the now redefined Universal Health Coverage. This article is intended as a guide to understand the concept of STGs, prepared with the aim of capacity building for medical professionals in rationally treating patients in their day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:25657957

  9. Australian academic primary health-care careers: a scoping survey.

    PubMed

    Barton, Christopher; Reeve, Joanne; Adams, Ann; McIntyre, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to provide a snapshot of the academic primary health-care workforce in Australia and to provide some insight into research capacity in academic primary health care following changes to funding for this sector. A convenience sample of individuals self-identifying as working within academic primary health care (n=405) completed an anonymous online survey. Respondents were identified from several academic primary health-care mailing lists. The survey explored workforce demographics, clarity of career pathways, career trajectories and enablers/barriers to 'getting in' and 'getting on'. A mix of early career (41%), mid-career (25%) and senior academics (35%) responded. Early career academics tended to be female and younger than mid-career and senior academics, who tended to be male and working in 'balanced' (teaching and research) roles and listing medicine as their disciplinary background. Almost three-quarters (74%) indicated career pathways were either 'completely' or 'somewhat unclear', irrespective of gender and disciplinary backgrounds. Just over half (51%) had a permanent position. Males were more likely to have permanent positions, as were those with a medical background. Less than half (43%) reported having a mentor, and of the 57% without a mentor, more than two-thirds (69%) would like one. These results suggest a lack of clarity in career paths, uncertainty in employment and a large number of temporary (contract) or casual positions represent barriers to sustainable careers in academic primary health care, especially for women who are from non-medicine backgrounds. Professional development or a mentoring program for primary health-care academics was desired and may address some of the issues identified by survey respondents.

  10. [Healthcare consumption due to musculoskeletal pain in fishery sector workers].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Beatriz; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Martínez-Rodríguez, Alicia; Fernández-Cervantes, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    To determine the frequency and factors associated with medicine consumption and consultations with family physicians due to musculoskeletal pain in fishery workers. We performed a cross-sectional study (n = 929). The variables analyzed consisted of sociodemographic factors, the frequency of musculoskeletal pain, healthcare resource consumption, back pain disability (Roland-Morris) and health-related quality of life (SF-36). A total of 98.7% of the sample were women, with a mean age of 50.6 years. Musculoskeletal pain was reported by 66.5%, 43% were taking medication, and 64% had consulted their family physician due to musculoskeletal pain. The factors associated with medication intake in the logistic regression analysis were the number of years worked in the sector, hip-knee pain, bodily pain and physical functioning. The variables associated with physician visits were the presence of hip-knee pain, neck-back-shoulder pain, bodily pain, and social functioning. The variables most closely associated with resource utilization were hip-knee pain and the physical dimension of health-related quality of life, especially bodily pain. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Stakeholders’ Perceptions on Shortage of Healthcare Workers in Primary Healthcare in Botswana: Focus Group Discussions

    PubMed Central

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Shaibu, Sheila; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2015-01-01

    Background An adequate health workforce force is central to universal health coverage and positive public health outcomes. However many African countries have critical shortages of healthcare workers, which are worse in primary healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare workers, policy makers and the community on the shortage of healthcare workers in Botswana. Method Fifteen focus group discussions were conducted with three groups of policy makers, six groups of healthcare workers and six groups of community members in rural, urban and remote rural health districts of Botswana. All the participants were 18 years and older. Recruitment was purposive and the framework method was used to inductively analyse the data. Results There was a perceived shortage of healthcare workers in primary healthcare, which was believed to result from an increased need for health services, inequitable distribution of healthcare workers, migration and too few such workers being trained. Migration was mainly the result of unfavourable personal and family factors, weak and ineffective healthcare and human resources management, low salaries and inadequate incentives for rural and remote area service. Conclusions Botswana has a perceived shortage of healthcare workers, which is worse in primary healthcare and rural areas, as a result of multiple complex factors. To address the scarcity the country should train adequate numbers of healthcare workers and distribute them equitably to sufficiently resourced healthcare facilities. They should be competently managed and adequately remunerated and the living conditions and rural infrastructure should also be improved. PMID:26284617

  12. Do the stars align? Distribution of high-quality ratings of healthcare sectors across US markets.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Jose; Feyman, Yevgeniy; Blumenthal, Daniel; Jha, Ashish

    2017-09-12

    The US government created five-star rating systems to evaluate hospital, nursing homes, home health agency and dialysis centre quality. The degree to which quality is a property of organisations versus geographical markets is unclear. To determine whether high-quality healthcare service sectors are clustered within US healthcare markets. Using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Hospital, Dialysis, Nursing Home and Home Health Compare databases, we calculated the mean star ratings of four healthcare sectors in 304 US hospital referral regions (HRRs). For each sector, we ranked HRRs into terciles by mean star rating. Within each HRR, we assessed concordance of tercile rank across sectors using a multirater kappa. Using t-tests, we compared characteristics of HRRs with three to four top-ranked sectors, one to two top-ranked sectors and zero top-ranked sectors. Six HRRs (2.0% of HRRs) had four top-ranked healthcare sectors, 38 (12.5%) had three top-ranked health sectors, 71 (23.4%) had two top-ranked sectors, 111 (36.5%) had one top-ranked sector and 78 (25.7%) HRRs had no top-ranked sectors. A multirater kappa across all sectors showed poor to slight agreement (K=0.055). Compared with HRRs with zero top-ranked sectors, those with three to four top-ranked sectors had higher median incomes, fewer black residents, lower mortality rates and were less impoverished. Results were similar for HRRs with one to two top-ranked sectors. Few US healthcare markets exhibit high-quality performance across four distinct healthcare service sectors, suggesting that high-quality care in one sector may not be dependent on or improve care quality in other sectors. Policies that promote accountability for quality across sectors (eg, bundled payments and shared quality metrics) may be needed to systematically improve quality across sectors. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  13. The primary healthcare nurse practitioner role in Canada.

    PubMed

    Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Harbman, Patricia; Bourgeault, Ivy; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    Primary healthcare nurse practitioners (PHCNPs), also known as family or all-ages nurse practitioners, are the fastest growing advanced practice nursing role in Canada. All 10 provinces and three territories now have legislation that authorizes their role. Their introduction is linked to countrywide health reform efforts to improve the accessibility and quality of primary healthcare.

  14. Primary Healthcare Solo Practices: Homogeneous or Heterogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Boivin, Antoine; Prud'homme, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Solo practices have generally been viewed as forming a homogeneous group. However, they may differ on many characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify different forms of solo practice and to determine the extent to which they are associated with patient experience of care. Methods. Two surveys were carried out in two regions of Quebec in 2010: a telephone survey of 9180 respondents from the general population and a postal survey of 606 primary healthcare (PHC) practices. Data from the two surveys were linked through the respondent's usual source of care. A taxonomy of solo practices was constructed (n = 213), using cluster analysis techniques. Bivariate and multilevel analyses were used to determine the relationship of the taxonomy with patient experience of care. Results. Four models were derived from the taxonomy. Practices in the “resourceful networked” model contrast with those of the “resourceless isolated” model to the extent that the experience of care reported by their patients is more favorable. Conclusion. Solo practice is not a homogeneous group. The four models identified have different organizational features and their patients' experience of care also differs. Some models seem to offer a better organizational potential in the context of current reforms. PMID:24523964

  15. Primary healthcare solo practices: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    PubMed

    Pineault, Raynald; Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Provost, Sylvie; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Boivin, Antoine; Couture, Audrey; Prud'homme, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Solo practices have generally been viewed as forming a homogeneous group. However, they may differ on many characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify different forms of solo practice and to determine the extent to which they are associated with patient experience of care. Methods. Two surveys were carried out in two regions of Quebec in 2010: a telephone survey of 9180 respondents from the general population and a postal survey of 606 primary healthcare (PHC) practices. Data from the two surveys were linked through the respondent's usual source of care. A taxonomy of solo practices was constructed (n = 213), using cluster analysis techniques. Bivariate and multilevel analyses were used to determine the relationship of the taxonomy with patient experience of care. Results. Four models were derived from the taxonomy. Practices in the "resourceful networked" model contrast with those of the "resourceless isolated" model to the extent that the experience of care reported by their patients is more favorable. Conclusion. Solo practice is not a homogeneous group. The four models identified have different organizational features and their patients' experience of care also differs. Some models seem to offer a better organizational potential in the context of current reforms.

  16. Information and communication technologies in primary healthcare facilities in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Taghreed M; Hegazy, Nagwa N; Mowafy, Maha

    2017-08-08

    The health sector has always relied on technologies. According to World Health Organization, they form the backbone of the services to prevent, diagnose, and treat illness and disease. It is increasingly viewed as the most promising tool for improving the overall quality, safety and efficiency of the health delivery system. Aim of the study This was to assess the current situation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in primary healthcare in the terms of describing and classifying the existing work, identify gaps and exploring the personal experiences and the challenges of ICTs application in the primary healthcare. Subjects and methods A mixed research method in the form of sequential explanatory design was applied. In the quantitative phase a cross-sectional study was conducted among 172 family physicians using a predesigned questionnaire. Followed by qualitative data collection among 35 participants through focused group discussions. Nearly half of the physicians have ICTs in their work and they were trained on it. None of them developed a community-based research using ICTs technology. Training on ICTs showed a statistically significant difference regarding the availability and the type of ICTs present in the workplace (P<0.05). Focused group discussion revealed that the majority of the participants believe that there is poor commitment of policymaker toward ICTs utilization in the primary care. Nearly 97% thinks that there is insufficient budget allocated for ICTs utilization in the workplace. Almost 88% of the participants demanded more incentives for ICTs users than non-user at the workplace. ICTs resources are underutilized by health information professionals. Lack of funds, risk of instability of the electric supply and lack of incentives for ICTs users were the most common barriers to ICTs implementation thus a steady steps toward budget allocation and continuous training is needed.

  17. Homeland security and the non-federal healthcare sector: evaluation of your incident command system (ICS).

    PubMed

    Blair, James D

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare and other private sector industries have lagged behind federal agencies in fulfilling their security readiness mission, according to the author. A comprehensive and timely resource is now available, he reports, to help healthcare officials in improving emergency response and preparedness.

  18. Accelerated reforms in healthcare financing: the need to scale up private sector participation in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ejughemre, Ufuoma John

    2014-01-01

    The health sector, a foremost service sector in Nigeria, faces a number of challenges; primarily, the persistent under-funding of the health sector by the Nigerian government as evidence reveals low allocations to the health sector and poor health system performance which are reflected in key health indices of the country.Notwithstanding, there is evidence that the private sector could be a key player in delivering health services and impacting health outcomes, including those related to healthcare financing. This underscores the need to optimize the role of private sector in complementing the government’s commitment to financing healthcare delivery and strengthening the health system in Nigeria. There are also concerns about uneven quality and affordability of private-driven health systems, which necessitates reforms aimed at regulation. Accordingly, the argument is that the benefits of leveraging the private sector in complementing the national government in healthcare financing outweigh the challenges, particularly in light of lean public resources and finite donor supports. This article, therefore, highlights the potential for the Nigerian government to scale up healthcare financing by leveraging private resources, innovations and expertise, while working to achieve the universal health coverage. PMID:24596895

  19. Healthcare in Asia: a perspective from primary care at the gateway to a continent.

    PubMed

    Jiwa, Moyez; Othman, Sajaratulnisah; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Khoo, Ee Ming; Chia, Yook Chin

    2012-01-01

    Malaysia has achieved reasonable health outcomes even though the country spends a modest amount of Gross Domestic Product on healthcare. However, the country is now experiencing a rising incidence of both infectious diseases and chronic lifestyle conditions that reflect growing wealth in a vibrant and successful economy. With an eye on an ageing population, reform of the health sector is a government priority. As in other many parts of the world, general practitioners are the first healthcare professional consulted by patients. The Malaysian health system is served by public and private care providers. The integration of the two sectors is a key target for reform. However, the future health of the nation will depend on leadership in the primary care sector. This leadership will need to be informed by research to integrate care providers, empower patients, bridge cultural gaps and ensure equitable access to scarce health resources.

  20. Primary healthcare: the all-too-quiet revolution in waiting.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Steven; Edwards, Jeanette

    2005-01-01

    Remodelling the kitchen won't help the house with a weak foundation. The same holds truth in healthcare. We cannot solve quality and access problems or deal effectively with wait times unless primary healthcare the foundation of the system--is solid.

  1. Integration of mental health into primary healthcare in low-income countries: avoiding medicalization.

    PubMed

    Ventevogel, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Since 2008 the World Health Organization (WHO), through its mental health Gap Action Programme, has attempted to revitalize efforts to integrate mental health into non-specialized (e.g. primary) healthcare. While this has led to renewed interest in this potential method of mental health service delivery, it has also prompted criticism. Some concerns raised are that it would contribute to the medicalization of social and psychological problems, and narrowly focus on primary care without sufficient attention given to strengthening other levels of the healthcare system, notably community-based care and care on district levels. This paper discusses seven elements that may be critical to preventing inadvertently contributing to increasing a narrow biomedical approach to mental healthcare when integrating mental health into non-specialized healthcare: (1) using task shifting approaches within a system of stepped care, (2) ensuring primary mental healthcare also includes brief psychotherapeutic interventions, (3) promote community-based recovery-oriented interventions for people with disabling chronic mental disorders, (4) conceptualizing training as a continuous process of strengthening clinical competencies through supervision, (5) engaging communities as partners in psychosocial interventions, (6) embedding shifts to primary mental healthcare within wider health policy reforms, and (7) promoting inter-sectoral approaches to address social determinants of mental health.

  2. Healthcare professionals' accounts of challenges in managing motor neurone disease in primary healthcare: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lerum, Sverre Vigeland; Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Frich, Jan C

    2017-02-22

    Motor neurone disease (MND) is a progressive neurological disease causing muscle wasting, gradual paralysis and respiratory failure, with a life expectancy of 2-4 years. In order to better understand how MND is managed in the community, we conducted a qualitative study to explore the challenges healthcare professionals encounter when managing MND in primary healthcare. Based on data from 15 semi-structured interviews with primary healthcare professionals in Norway, we found that MND is viewed as a condition that requires exceptional effort and detailed planning. Healthcare professionals reported five main challenges in managing MND in primary healthcare: (i) building relationships with those giving and receiving care in the home; (ii) preventing caregiver burnout and breakdown; (iii) providing tailored care; (iv) ensuring good working conditions in patients' homes; and (v) recruiting and retaining qualified nursing assistants. Healthcare professionals reported needing working conditions that allow them to tailor their approach to the personal, emotional and existential nature of care preferences of those living with MND. However, people with MND and their families were sometimes perceived by healthcare professionals to prefer a strictly task-focused relationship with care providers. Such relationships limited the healthcare professionals' control over the MND trajectory and their capacity to prevent family caregiver burnout and breakdown. Adequate resources, along with training and support of nursing assistants, may increase the continuity of nursing assistants. Responsiveness to patient and family needs may enhance collaboration and promote tailored primary care and support for patients with MND and their families.

  3. Evaluating the Quality of Colorectal Cancer Care across the Interface of Healthcare Sectors

    PubMed Central

    Ludt, Sabine; Urban, Elisabeth; Eckardt, Jörg; Wache, Stefanie; Broge, Björn; Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Heller, Günther; Miksch, Antje; Glassen, Katharina; Hermann, Katja; Bölter, Regine; Ose, Dominik; Campbell, Stephen M.; Wensing, Michel; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a high prevalence in western countries. Diagnosis and treatment of CRC is complex and requires multidisciplinary collaboration across the interface of health care sectors. In Germany, a new nationwide established program aims to provide quality information of healthcare delivery across different sectors. Within this context, this study describes the development of a set of quality indicators charting the whole pathway of CRC-care including data specifications that are necessary to operationalize these indicators before practice testing. Methods Indicators were developed following a systematic 10 step modified ‘RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method’ which involved a multidisciplinary panel of thirteen participants. For each indicator in the final set, data specifications relating to sources of quality information, data collection procedures, analysis and feedback were described. Results The final indicator set included 52 indicators covering diagnostic procedures (11 indicators), therapeutic management (28 indicators) and follow-up (6 indicators). In addition, 7 indicators represented patient perspectives. Primary surgical tumor resection and pre-operative radiation (rectum carcinoma only) were perceived as most useful tracer procedures initiating quality data collection. To assess the quality of CRC care across sectors, various data sources were identified: medical records, administrative inpatient and outpatient data, sickness-funds billing code systems and patient survey. Conclusion In Germany, a set of 52 quality indicators, covering necessary aspects across the interfaces and pathways relevant to CRC-care has been developed. Combining different sectors and sources of health care in quality assessment is an innovative and challenging approach but reflects better the reality of the patient pathway and experience of CRC-care. PMID:23658684

  4. Waste management in primary healthcare centres of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Naddafi, Kazem; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Saeedi, Reza

    2009-06-01

    The waste management practices in primary healthcare centres of Iran were investigated in the present study. A total of 120 primary healthcare centres located across the country were selected using the cluster sampling method and the current situation of healthcare waste management was determined through field investigation. The quantities of solid waste and wastewater generation per outpatient were found to be 60 g outpatient(-1) day(-1) and 26 L outpatient(-1) day(-1), respectively. In all of the facilities, sharp objects were separated almost completely, but separation of other types of hazardous healthcare solid waste was only done in 25% of the centres. The separated hazardous solid waste materials were treated by incineration, temporary incineration and open burning methods in 32.5, 8.3 and 42.5% of the healthcare centres, respectively. In 16.7% of the centres the hazardous solid wastes were disposed of without any treatment. These results indicate that the management of waste materials in primary healthcare centres in Iran faced some problems. Staff training and awareness, separation of healthcare solid waste, establishment of the autoclave method for healthcare solid waste treatment and construction of septic tanks and disinfection units in the centres that were without access to a sewer system are the major measures that are suggested for improvement of the waste management practices.

  5. Determinants of Healthcare Utilisation and Out-of-Pocket Payments in the Context of Free Public Primary Healthcare in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Masiye, Felix; Kaonga, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background: Access to appropriate and affordable healthcare is needed to achieve better health outcomes in Africa. However, access to healthcare remains low, especially among the poor. In Zambia, poor access exists despite the policy by the government to remove user fees in all primary healthcare facilities in the public sector. The paper has two main objectives: (i) to examine the factors associated with healthcare choices among sick people, and (ii) to assess the determinants of the magnitude of out-of-pocket (OOP) payments related to a visit to a health provider. Methods: This paper employs a multilevel multinomial logistic regression to model the determinants of an individual’s choice of healthcare options following an illness. Further, the study analyses the drivers of the magnitude of OOP expenditure related to a visit to a health provider using a two-part generalised linear model. The analysis is based on a nationally representative healthcare utilisation and expenditure survey that was conducted in 2014. Results: Household per capita consumption expenditure is significantly associated with increased odds of seeking formal care (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = .000). Living in a household in which the head has a higher level of education is associated with increased odds of seeking formal healthcare (OR = 1.54, P = .000) and (OR = 1.55, P = .01), for secondary and tertiary education, respectively. Rural residence is associated with reduced odds of seeking formal care (OR = 0.706, P = .002). The magnitude of OOP expenditure during a visit is significantly dependent on household economic well-being, distance from a health facility, among other factors. A 10% increase in per capita consumption expenditure was associated with a 0.2% increase in OOP health expenditure while every kilometre travelled was associated with a K0.51 increase in OOP health expenditure. Conclusion: Despite the removal of user fees on public primary healthcare in Zambia, access to

  6. Determinants of Healthcare Utilisation and Out-of-Pocket Payments in the Context of Free Public Primary Healthcare in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Masiye, Felix; Kaonga, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Access to appropriate and affordable healthcare is needed to achieve better health outcomes in Africa. However, access to healthcare remains low, especially among the poor. In Zambia, poor access exists despite the policy by the government to remove user fees in all primary healthcare facilities in the public sector. The paper has two main objectives: (i) to examine the factors associated with healthcare choices among sick people, and (ii) to assess the determinants of the magnitude of out-of-pocket (OOP) payments related to a visit to a health provider. This paper employs a multilevel multinomial logistic regression to model the determinants of an individual's choice of healthcare options following an illness. Further, the study analyses the drivers of the magnitude of OOP expenditure related to a visit to a health provider using a two-part generalised linear model. The analysis is based on a nationally representative healthcare utilisation and expenditure survey that was conducted in 2014. Household per capita consumption expenditure is significantly associated with increased odds of seeking formal care (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = .000). Living in a household in which the head has a higher level of education is associated with increased odds of seeking formal healthcare (OR = 1.54, P = .000) and (OR = 1.55, P = .01), for secondary and tertiary education, respectively. Rural residence is associated with reduced odds of seeking formal care (OR = 0.706, P = .002). The magnitude of OOP expenditure during a visit is significantly dependent on household economic well-being, distance from a health facility, among other factors. A 10% increase in per capita consumption expenditure was associated with a 0.2% increase in OOP health expenditure while every kilometre travelled was associated with a K0.51 increase in OOP health expenditure. Despite the removal of user fees on public primary healthcare in Zambia, access to healthcare is highly dependent on an individual

  7. A case study of outsourced primary healthcare services in Sindh, Pakistan: is this a real reform?

    PubMed

    Tanzil, Sana; Zahidie, Aysha; Ahsan, Adeel; Kazi, Ambreen; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2014-06-25

    Since a decade, low and middle income countries have a rising trend of contracting their primary healthcare services to NGOs. In Pakistan, public sector often lacks capacity to effectively & equitably manage the healthcare services. It led the government to outsource the administration of primary health care services to a semi-autonomous government entity i.e. Peoples' Primary Healthcare Initiative (PPHI). This small scale study has assessed the quality of healthcare services at the contracted Basic Health Units (BHUs) with the PPHI and compared it with those managed by the local district government in the province of Sindh. A cross-sectional mix methods survey was conducted in November 2011. Two BHUs of each type were selected from the districts Karachi and Thatta in Sindh province. BHUs were selected randomly and a purposive sampling technique was used to recruit the study participants at the two study sites. Focus group discussions were conducted with patients visiting the facility while in-depth interviews were conducted with service providers. An observation based resource availability checklist was also administered. There was a significant difference between the PPHI and the district government administered BHUs with regard to infrastructure, availability of essential medicines, basic medical appliances, mini-lab facilities and vehicles for referrals. These BHUs were found to have sufficient number of trained clinical staff and no punctuality and retention issues whatsoever. The district government administered BHUs presented a dismal picture in all the aspects. Out-sourcing of primary healthcare facilities has resulted in significantly improved certain aspects quality and responsiveness of primary healthcare services. This strategy is likely to achieve an efficient and perhaps an equitable healthcare delivery in low and middle income countries where governments have limited capacity to manage healthcare services.

  8. A case study of outsourced primary healthcare services in Sindh, Pakistan: is this a real reform?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since a decade, low and middle income countries have a rising trend of contracting their primary healthcare services to NGOs. In Pakistan, public sector often lacks capacity to effectively & equitably manage the healthcare services. It led the government to outsource the administration of primary health care services to a semi-autonomous government entity i.e. Peoples’ Primary Healthcare Initiative (PPHI). This small scale study has assessed the quality of healthcare services at the contracted Basic Health Units (BHUs) with the PPHI and compared it with those managed by the local district government in the province of Sindh. Methods A cross-sectional mix methods survey was conducted in November 2011. Two BHUs of each type were selected from the districts Karachi and Thatta in Sindh province. BHUs were selected randomly and a purposive sampling technique was used to recruit the study participants at the two study sites. Focus group discussions were conducted with patients visiting the facility while in-depth interviews were conducted with service providers. An observation based resource availability checklist was also administered. Results There was a significant difference between the PPHI and the district government administered BHUs with regard to infrastructure, availability of essential medicines, basic medical appliances, mini-lab facilities and vehicles for referrals. These BHUs were found to have sufficient number of trained clinical staff and no punctuality and retention issues whatsoever. The district government administered BHUs presented a dismal picture in all the aspects. Conclusion Out-sourcing of primary healthcare facilities has resulted in significantly improved certain aspects quality and responsiveness of primary healthcare services. This strategy is likely to achieve an efficient and perhaps an equitable healthcare delivery in low and middle income countries where governments have limited capacity to manage healthcare services. PMID

  9. Civil society, third sector, and healthcare: the case of social cooperatives in Italy.

    PubMed

    Borzaga, Carlo; Fazzi, Luca

    2014-12-01

    In many European countries, the third sector is considered an actor able to improve both the efficiency and the efficacy of public healthcare systems afflicted by the crisis of the welfare state. Attributed to third-sector organizations is the role of a hybrid actor tasked with the professional supply of services, not for profit but rather for mutualistic purposes, and to serve the public interest. However, empirical evidence on the capacity of the third sector to pursue objectives of social inclusion in a phase of withdrawal by the public sector is almost entirely lacking in the European countries. The article describes the results of research on the transformation of the Italian healthcare system and on the emergence of a new third sector in Italy. The results of the inquiry highlight the strategies, characteristics, and governance processes which enable third-sector organizations operating in the healthcare sector to pursue objectives of inclusion, and to serve the needs of disadvantaged groups by assuming the form of social enterprises.

  10. Service quality, patient satisfaction and loyalty in the Bangladesh healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Selim; Tarique, Kazi Md; Arif, Ishtiaque

    2017-06-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate service quality, patient satisfaction and loyalty in Bangladesh's healthcare sector. It identifies healthcare quality conformance, patient satisfaction and loyalty based on demographics such as gender, age and marital status. It examines the differences between public and private healthcare sectors regarding service quality, patient satisfaction and loyalty. Design/methodology/approach The authors distributed 450 self-administered questionnaires to hospital patients resulting in 204 useful responses (45.3 per cent response rate). Data were analysed based on reliability analysis, exploratory factor analysis, independent samples t-tests, ANOVA and discriminant analysis using SPSS version 23. Findings Findings indicate that single patients perceive tangibles, reliability, empathy and loyalty higher compared to married patients. Young patients (⩽20 years) have a higher tangibles, empathy and loyalty scores compared to other age groups. The authors observed that private hospital patients perceive healthcare service quality performance higher compared to patients in public hospitals. Research limitations/implications The authors focussed solely on the Bangladesh health sector, so the results might not be applicable to other countries. Originality/value The findings provide guidelines for enhancing service quality, patient satisfaction and loyalty in the Bangladesh healthcare sector and other countries.

  11. Big data analysis framework for healthcare and social sectors in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Tae-Min; Ryu, Seewon

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed applications of big data analysis of healthcare and social services in developed countries, and subsequently devised a framework for such an analysis in Korea. We reviewed the status of implementing big data analysis of health care and social services in developed countries, and strategies used by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Korea (Government 3.0). We formulated a conceptual framework of big data in the healthcare and social service sectors at the national level. As a specific case, we designed a process and method of social big data analysis on suicide buzz. Developed countries (e.g., the United States, the UK, Singapore, Australia, and even OECD and EU) are emphasizing the potential of big data, and using it as a tool to solve their long-standing problems. Big data strategies for the healthcare and social service sectors were formulated based on an ICT-based policy of current government and the strategic goals of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. We suggest a framework of big data analysis in the healthcare and welfare service sectors separately and assigned them tentative names: 'health risk analysis center' and 'integrated social welfare service network'. A framework of social big data analysis is presented by applying it to the prevention and proactive detection of suicide in Korea. There are some concerns with the utilization of big data in the healthcare and social welfare sectors. Thus, research on these issues must be conducted so that sophisticated and practical solutions can be reached.

  12. Enhancing healthcare sector coordination through infrastructure and logistics support.

    PubMed

    Zoraster, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    The International Response to the 2004 Southeast Asia Tsunami was noted to have multiple areas of poor coordination, and in 2005, the "Health Cluster"approach to coordination was formulated. However, the 2010 Haiti response suggests that many of the same problems continue and that there are significant limitations to the cluster meetings. These limitations include the inconsistent attendance, poor dissemination of information, and perceived lack of benefit to providers. This article proposes that healthcare coordination would be greatly improved with logistical support, leading to improved efficiency and outcomes for those affected by disasters.

  13. Universal Health Coverage and Primary Healthcare: Lessons From Japan

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Gerald

    2017-01-01

    A recent editorial by Naoki Ikegami has proposed three key lessons from Japan’s experience of achieving virtually universal coverage with primary healthcare services: the need to integrate the existing providers of primary healthcare services into the organised health system; the need to limit government commitments to finance hospital services and the need to empower providers of primary healthcare to influence decisions that influence their livelihoods. Although the context of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) differs in many ways from Japan in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the lesson that short-term initiatives to achieve universal coverage need to be complemented by an understanding of the factors influencing long-term change management remains highly relevant.

  14. Patient Acceptability of Tear Collection in the Primary Healthcare Setting

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Joanne Hui Min; Tong, Louis; Barbier, Sylvaine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The primary healthcare setting is well placed for health screening. Tear fluid composition gives valuable information about the eye and systemic health, and there is now significant interest in the potential application of tears as a tool for health screening; however, the acceptability of tear collection in the primary healthcare setting as compared with other methods of human sample collection has not been previously addressed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the patient acceptability of tear collection in a primary healthcare setting. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on 383 adult patients seeking primary healthcare, who were not diabetic and were not attending for an eye-related complaint. Tear collection was done using Schirmer strips, and an interviewer-administered questionnaire was conducted to collate information on the pain score (0–10) of the Schirmer tear collection, as well as to score the pain associated with their previous experience of antecubital venous puncture and finger prick test. Results The pain score for Schirmer tear collection was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than antecubital venous puncture but higher (p < 0.001) than finger prick. The pain scores for all three procedures were significantly higher in participants of younger age, female gender, and higher education level. Among the participants, 70% did not mind their tears being collected to screen for eye problems, whereas only 38% did not mind this procedure being performed for general health screening. Nevertheless, 69% of the participants preferred tear to urine collection, and 74% of participants preferred tear to blood collection. Conclusions Tear collection using Schirmer strips is a highly acceptable form of investigation that has the potential for use in health screening in the primary healthcare setting. This study has implications on using tear collection as a method of ocular and systemic health screening in the primary healthcare

  15. The financial crisis in Italy: implications for the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    de Belvis, Antonio Giulio; Ferrè, Francesca; Specchia, Maria Lucia; Valerio, Luca; Fattore, Giovanni; Ricciardi, Walter

    2012-06-01

    The global economic and financial crisis is having and impact on the Italian healthcare system which is undergoing a devolution process from the central government to regions and where about one third of the regional governments (mainly in the central and southern part of the country) are facing large financial deficits. The paper briefly describes the current macro scenario and the main responses taken to face the crisis and highlights the downside risks of introducing "linear" cuts in the allocation of resources. While justified by the risk of a national debt default, present fiscal policies might increase inequalities in access to care, deteriorate overall health indicators and population wellbeing, and sharpen existing difference in the quality of care between regions. Preliminary evidence shows that the crisis is affecting the quality of nutrition and the incidence of psychiatric disorders. During this difficult financial situation Italy is also facing the risk of a major reduction in investments for preventive medicine, Evidence Based Medicine infrastructures, health information systems and physical capital renewal. This cost-cutting strategy may have negative long term consequences Also, important achievement in terms of limiting waiting lists, improving continuity of care and patients' centeredness, and promoting integration between social and health care may be negatively affected by unprecedented resources' cuts. It is essential that in such a period of public funding constraints health authorities monitor incidence of diseases and access to care of the most vulnerable groups and specifically target interventions to those who may be disproportionally hit by the crisis.

  16. Two decades of reforms. Appraisal of the financial reforms in the Russian public healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Gordeev, Vladimir S; Pavlova, Milena; Groot, Wim

    2011-10-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on the outcomes of the financial reforms in the Russian public healthcare sector. A systematic literature review identified 37 relevant publications that presented empirical evidence on changes in quality, equity, efficiency and sustainability in public healthcare provision due to the Russian public healthcare financial reforms. Evidence suggests that there are substantial inter-regional inequalities across income groups both in terms of financing and access to public healthcare services. There are large efficiency differences between regions, along with inter-regional variations in payment and reimbursement mechanisms. Informal and quasi-formal payments deteriorate access to public healthcare services and undermine the overall financing sustainability. The public healthcare sector is still underfinanced, although the implementation of health insurance gave some premises for future increases of efficiency. Overall, the available empirical data are not sufficient for an evidence-based evaluation of the reforms. More studies on the quality, equity, efficiency and sustainability impact of the reforms are needed. Future reforms should focus on the implementation of cost-efficiency and cost-control mechanisms; provide incentives for better allocation and distribution of resources; tackle problems in equity in access and financing; implement a system of quality controls; and stimulate healthy competition between insurance companies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The end of the decentralised model of healthcare governance? Comparing developments in the Scandinavian hospital sectors.

    PubMed

    Byrkjeflot, Haldor; Neby, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss recent contributions to comparative healthcare systems research, which emphasise decentralisation as a major characteristic of Scandinavian hospital systems. Whether the idea of such a "decentralised Scandinavian model" is appropriate and useful, how and why it was created, and what the alternative is, are central questions approached through a perspective gathered from historical institutionalism. The paper employs an analysis of primary and secondary sources on the history of Scandinavian hospital systems, a classification based on historical developments, and an explanatory framework based on historical institutionalism. The paper concludes that the idea of a decentralised Scandinavian model for hospital systems has had limited validity, constrained to the years 1970-2000. Historical trajectories and recent developments both indicate that the three systems are more different than commonly assumed, and that recently they seem to be moving in separate directions. The explanation for the developments is found in incremental dynamics, creating institutional change that to a large extent depends on national contexts. The paper contributes to the current discussion and research relating to classification of health care systems, and aims at developing a more elaborate understanding of the role of the hospital sectors within the Scandinavian welfare states. It challenges the idea that a single model can capture the essence of such diverse systems, and proposes an alternative to such modelling, based on a historical-institutional approach.

  18. Big Data Analysis Framework for Healthcare and Social Sectors in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae-Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We reviewed applications of big data analysis of healthcare and social services in developed countries, and subsequently devised a framework for such an analysis in Korea. Methods We reviewed the status of implementing big data analysis of health care and social services in developed countries, and strategies used by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Korea (Government 3.0). We formulated a conceptual framework of big data in the healthcare and social service sectors at the national level. As a specific case, we designed a process and method of social big data analysis on suicide buzz. Results Developed countries (e.g., the United States, the UK, Singapore, Australia, and even OECD and EU) are emphasizing the potential of big data, and using it as a tool to solve their long-standing problems. Big data strategies for the healthcare and social service sectors were formulated based on an ICT-based policy of current government and the strategic goals of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. We suggest a framework of big data analysis in the healthcare and welfare service sectors separately and assigned them tentative names: 'health risk analysis center' and 'integrated social welfare service network'. A framework of social big data analysis is presented by applying it to the prevention and proactive detection of suicide in Korea. Conclusions There are some concerns with the utilization of big data in the healthcare and social welfare sectors. Thus, research on these issues must be conducted so that sophisticated and practical solutions can be reached. PMID:25705552

  19. Prohibit, constrain, encourage, or purchase: how should we engage with the private health-care sector?

    PubMed

    Montagu, Dominic; Goodman, Catherine

    2016-08-06

    The private for-profit sector's prominence in health-care delivery, and concern about its failures to deliver social benefit, has driven a search for interventions to improve the sector's functioning. We review evidence for the effectiveness and limitations of such private sector interventions in low-income and middle-income countries. Few robust assessments are available, but some conclusions are possible. Prohibiting the private sector is very unlikely to succeed, and regulatory approaches face persistent challenges in many low-income and middle-income countries. Attention is therefore turning to interventions that encourage private providers to improve quality and coverage (while advancing their financial interests) such as social marketing, social franchising, vouchers, and contracting. However, evidence about the effect on clinical quality, coverage, equity, and cost-effectiveness is inadequate. Other challenges concern scalability and scope, indicating the limitations of such interventions as a basis for universal health coverage, though interventions can address focused problems on a restricted scale.

  20. Primary healthcare response to family violence: a Delphi evaluation tool.

    PubMed

    Gear, Claire; Koziol-McLain, Jane; Wilson, Denise; Rae, Ngaire; Samuel, Hayley; Clark, Faye; McNeill, Edith

    2012-01-01

    Family violence is identified as a significant yet preventable public health problem internationally and in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Despite this, responses to family violence within New Zealand primary healthcare settings are generally limited and ad hoc. Along with guidelines and resources, a systems approach is indicated to support a safe and effective response to those who experience violence in the home. To modify an existing United States evaluation tool to guide implementation of family violence intervention programmes within New Zealand primary healthcare. Twenty-nine expert panelists, representing diverse family violence prevention and intervention organisations across New Zealand, participated in three rounds of a modified Delphi method to identify ideal primary healthcare family violence response programme indicators. In Round One, tool scope and context issues for New Zealand were identified; in Round Two, expert panelists identified ideal indicators and rated indicator importance, and in Round Three, expert panelists attended a one-day workshop to achieve consensus on tool categories, indicators, scoring and measurement notes. The developed tool was subsequently piloted at six volunteer primary healthcare sites for performance, clarity and usefulness. The final tool encompasses 143 indicators organised within 10 categories. Pilot sites found the tool and evaluation experience useful in guiding programme development. The evaluation tool represents a best practice standard enabling focused family violence intervention programme development and quality improvement within primary healthcare settings. A standardised evaluation tool may be useful in guiding programme development. Future evaluations will enable individual and national benchmarking activities, using category, overall and target scores to measure progress across settings and over time.

  1. Health technology assessment and its role in the future development of the Indian healthcare sector

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Bastian; Pooley, Jayne; Feuring, Martin; Suvarna, Viraj; Harrington, Adrian E.

    2012-01-01

    Public expenditure on healthcare in India is low by international comparison, and access to essential treatment pushes many uninsured citizens below the poverty line. In many countries, policymakers utilize health technology assessment (HTA) methodologies to direct investments in healthcare, to obtain the maximum benefit for the population as a whole. With rising incomes and a commitment from the Government of India to increase the proportion of gross domestic product spent on health, this is an opportune moment to consider how HTA might help to allocate healthcare spending in India, in an equitable and efficient manner. Despite the predominance of out-of-pocket payments in the Indian healthcare sector, payers of all types are increasingly demanding value for money from expenditure on healthcare. In this review we demonstrate how HTA can be used to inform several aspects of healthcare provision. Areas in which HTA could be applied in the Indian context include, drug pricing, development of clinical practice guidelines, and prioritizing interventions that represent the greatest value within a limited budget. To illustrate the potential benefits of using the HTA approach, we present an example from a mature HTA market (Canada) that demonstrates how a new treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation — although more expensive than the current standard of care — improves clinical outcomes and represents a cost-effective use of public health resources. If aligned with the prevailing cultural and ethical considerations, and with the necessary investment in expert staff and resources, HTA promises to be a valuable tool for development of the Indian healthcare sector. PMID:22701823

  2. Readiness of healthcare providers for eHealth: the case from primary healthcare centers in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Shadi; Khodor, Rawya; Alameddine, Mohamad; Baroud, Maysa

    2016-11-10

    eHealth can positively impact the efficiency and quality of healthcare services. Its potential benefits extend to the patient, healthcare provider, and organization. Primary healthcare (PHC) settings may particularly benefit from eHealth. In these settings, healthcare provider readiness is key to successful eHealth implementation. Accordingly, it is necessary to explore the potential readiness of providers to use eHealth tools. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of healthcare providers working in PHC centers in Lebanon to use eHealth tools. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess participants' socio-demographics, computer use, literacy, and access, and participants' readiness for eHealth implementation (appropriateness, management support, change efficacy, personal beneficence). The study included primary healthcare providers (physicians, nurses, other providers) working in 22 PHC centers distributed across Lebanon. Descriptive and bivariate analyses (ANOVA, independent t-test, Kruskal Wallis, Tamhane's T2) were used to compare participant characteristics to the level of readiness for the implementation of eHealth. Of the 541 questionnaires, 213 were completed (response rate: 39.4 %). The majority of participants were physicians (46.9 %), and nurses (26.8 %). Most physicians (54.0 %), nurses (61.4 %), and other providers (50.9 %) felt comfortable using computers, and had access to computers at their PHC center (physicians: 77.0 %, nurses: 87.7 %, others: 92.5 %). Frequency of computer use varied. The study found a significant difference for personal beneficence, management support, and change efficacy among different healthcare providers, and relative to participants' level of comfort using computers. There was a significant difference by level of comfort using computers and appropriateness. A significant difference was also found between those with access to computers in relation to personal beneficence and

  3. Benefit Analyses of Technologies for Automatic Identification to Be Implemented in the Healthcare Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krey, Mike; Schlatter, Ueli

    The tasks and objectives of automatic identification (Auto-ID) are to provide information on goods and products. It has already been established for years in the areas of logistics and trading and can no longer be ignored by the German healthcare sector. Some German hospitals have already discovered the capabilities of Auto-ID. Improvements in quality, safety and reductions in risk, cost and time are aspects and areas where improvements are achievable. Privacy protection, legal restraints, and the personal rights of patients and staff members are just a few aspects which make the heath care sector a sensible field for the implementation of Auto-ID. Auto-ID in this context contains the different technologies, methods and products for the registration, provision and storage of relevant data. With the help of a quantifiable and science-based evaluation, an answer is sought as to which Auto-ID has the highest capability to be implemented in healthcare business.

  4. Smartphone threshold audiometry in underserved primary health-care contexts.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Josefin; Swanepoel, De Wet; Carel Myburgh, Hermanus; Laurent, Claude

    2016-01-01

    To validate a calibrated smartphone-based hearing test in a sound booth environment and in primary health-care clinics. A repeated-measure within-subject study design was employed whereby air-conduction hearing thresholds determined by smartphone-based audiometry was compared to conventional audiometry in a sound booth and a primary health-care clinic environment. A total of 94 subjects (mean age 41 years ± 17.6 SD and range 18-88; 64% female) were assessed of whom 64 were tested in the sound booth and 30 within primary health-care clinics without a booth. In the sound booth 63.4% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dB HL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 80.6% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.6 dB ± 9.9 SD. In primary health-care clinics 13.7% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dBHL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 92.9% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.0 dB ± 7.1 SD. Accurate air-conduction audiometry can be conducted in a sound booth and without a sound booth in an underserved community health-care clinic using a smartphone.

  5. Gatekeepers in the healthcare sector: Knowledge and Bourdieu's concept of field.

    PubMed

    Collyer, Fran M; Willis, Karen F; Lewis, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Choice is an imperative for patients in the Australian healthcare system. The complexity of this healthcare 'maze', however, means that successfully navigating and making choices depends not only on the decisions of patients, but also other key players in the healthcare sector. Utilising Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus and field, we analyse the role of gatekeepers (i.e., those who control access to resources, services and knowledge) in shaping patients' experiences of healthcare, and producing opportunities to enable or constrain their choices. Indepth interviews were conducted with 41 gatekeepers (GPs, specialists, nurses, hospital administrators and policymakers), exploring how they acquire and use knowledge within the healthcare system. Our findings reveal a hierarchy of knowledges and power within the healthcare field which determines the forms of knowledge that are legitimate and can operate as capital within this complex and dynamic arena. As a consequence, forms of knowledge which can operate as capital, are unequally distributed and strategically controlled, ensuring democratic 'reform' remains difficult and 'choices' limited to those beneficial to private medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How Business Cycles Affect the Healthcare Sector: A Cross-country Investigation.

    PubMed

    Cleeren, Kathleen; Lamey, Lien; Meyer, Jan-Hinrich; De Ruyter, Ko

    2016-07-01

    The long-term relationship between the general economy and healthcare expenditures has been extensively researched, to explain differences in healthcare spending between countries, but the midterm (i.e., business cycle) perspective has been overlooked. This study explores business cycle sensitivity in both public and private parts of the healthcare sector across 32 countries. Responses to the business cycle vary notably, both across spending sources and across countries. Whereas in some countries, consumers and/or governments cut back, in others, private and/or public healthcare buyers tend to spend more. We also assess long-term consequences of business cycle sensitivity and show that public cost cutting during economic downturns deflates the mortality rates, whereas private cut backs increase the long-term growth in total healthcare expenditures. Finally, multiple factors help explain variability in cyclical sensitivity. Private cost cuts during economic downturns are smaller in countries with a predominantly publicly funded healthcare system and more preventive public activities. Public cut backs during contractions are smaller in countries that rely more on tax-based resources rather than social health insurances. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Harmony in health sector: a requirement for effective healthcare delivery in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Osaro, Erhabor; Charles, Adias Teddy

    2014-09-01

    Harmony is defined as the pleasing combination of elements of a system to form an all-inclusive, all involving and more productive team. The aim of this present review was to investigate the factors militating against harmony among healthcare professional in the Nigerian healthcare delivery system. This review was carried out by searching through literature on the topic that bother on harmony among health professions in the health sector. Literature search and reports from previous studies indicates that harmony among health workers is pivotal to improving the health indices. However, available evidence suggests that unlike in the developed world, health care professionals do not collaborate well together in Nigeria because of the claim of superiority of a particular health professional over others. This has often resulted in inter-professional conflict which is threatening to tear the health sector apart to the detriment of the patients. The Nigeria health system should be based on team work. Health professionals from a variety of disciplines should work together to deliver the best possible healthcare services to all Nigerians. All members of the team are equally valuable and essential to the smooth running of hospitals. Hospitals should ideally be headed by health administrators or by a qualified member of any of the professions in the health sector. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A balanced scorecard approach in assessing IT value in healthcare sector: an empirical examination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ing-Long; Kuo, Yi-Zu

    2012-12-01

    Healthcare sector indicates human-based and knowledge-intensive property. Massive IT investments are necessary to maintain competitiveness in this sector. The justification of IT investments is the major concern of senior management. Empirical studies examining IT value have found inconclusive results with little or no improvement in productivity. Little research has been conducted in healthcare sector. The balanced scorecard (BSC) strikes a balance between financial and non-financial measure and has been applied in evaluating organization-based performance. Moreover, healthcare organizations often consider their performance goal at customer satisfaction in addition to financial performance. This research thus proposed a new hierarchical structure for the BSC with placing both finance and customer at the top, internal process at the next, and learning and growth at the bottom. Empirical examination has found the importance of the new BSC structure in assessing IT investments. Learning and growth plays the initial driver for reaching both customer and financial performance through the mediator of internal process. This can provide deep insight into effectively managing IT resources in the hospitals.

  9. To serve or to leave: a question faced by public sector healthcare providers in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mir, Ali Mohammad; Shaikh, Muhammad Saleem; Rashida, Gul; Mankani, Neha

    2015-11-25

    The availability of properly trained and motivated providers is a prerequisite for provision of easily accessible healthcare. Pakistan has been listed by the World Health Organization in its World Health Report 2006 as one of 57 countries with a critical health workforce deficiency. This study examines the factors associated with the willingness of public sector healthcare providers to leave government service and recommends measures that can be adopted to attract and retain staff in the country's public healthcare system. A stratified, random sampling methodology was adopted to recruit a nationally representative sample of 1,296 public sector healthcare providers, including paramedics, medical doctors, and specialists. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview these providers. Logistic regressions measured the association with determinants of their willingness to leave the public health sector for better prospects elsewhere. A third of all healthcare providers who were interviewed were of the view that, provided the opportunity, they would leave government service. The odds of willingness to leave service were highest among providers from the region of Azad Jammu and Kashmir (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.33; 95% CI, 2.49-7.54) followed by the province of Balochistan (AOR = 4.21; 95% CI, 2.41-7.33), and the region of Gilgit Baltistan (AOR = 3.34; 95% CI, 1.67-6.67). Providers who expressed dissatisfaction in the manner their performance was evaluated and those who were dissatisfied with the current salary, each had higher odds of considering leaving government service (AOR = 1.67; 95% CI, 1.18-2.40 and AOR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.47-2.81, respectively). Providers who reported experiencing interference in their work by influential politicians of the area were more inclined to leave (AOR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.05-1.98). This study clearly highlights the need to implement more focused strategies in the public healthcare system in Pakistan in

  10. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians.

  11. Intersections between interprofessional practice, cultural competency and primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Nelly D; Thurston, Wilfreda E; Arthur, Nancy

    2013-09-01

    The concepts of interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP), cultural competency and primary healthcare (PHC) appear to be linked in theory and practice. This discussion article provides arguments explicating the potential linkages between IPCP and cultural competency. We argue that cultural competency is an important component of IPCP both for relationships with patients and/or communities in which providers work and between team members. Organizational structures also play an important role in facilitating IPCP and cultural competency. The integration of both IPCP and cultural competency has the potential to enhance positive health outcomes. Furthermore, we argue IPCP and cultural competency have important implications for PHC service design, given interprofessional teams are a key component of PHC systems. Linking these concepts in providing PHC services can be essential for impacting outcomes at all levels of primary healthcare, including patient, provider and systems.

  12. Brazilian community health agents and qualitative primary healthcare information.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, Margareth S; Pinto, Rogério Meireles; Galhego-Garcia, Wilson; da Cunha, Zeilma; Cordeiro, Hésio A; Fagundes-Filho, Francisco E; Pinho, Mônica A L; Voet, Susan M V; Talbot, Yves; Caldas, Rodrigo S; de Souza, Thiago J; Costa, Edwaldo

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore female community health agents' views about the value of recording qualitative information on contextual health issues they observe during home visits, data that are not officially required to be documented for the Brazilian System of Primary Healthcare Information. The study was conducted in community primary healthcare centres located in the cities of Araçatuba and Coroados (state of São Paulo) and Rio de Janeiro (state of Rio de Janeiro), Brazil. The design was a qualitative, exploratory study. The purposeful sampling criteria were being female, with a minimum of three years of continuous service in the same location. Data collection with 62 participants was conducted via 11 focus groups (in 2007 and 2008). Audio files were transcribed and submitted to the method of thematic analysis. Four themes guided the analysis: working with qualitative information and undocumented observation; reflecting on qualitative information; integrating/analysing quantitative and qualitative information; and information-sharing with agents and family health teams. In 2010, 25 community health agents verified the final interpretation of the findings. Participants valued the recording of qualitative, contextual information to expand understanding of primary healthcare issues and as an indicator of clients' improved health behaviour and health literacy. While participants initiated the recording of additional health information, they generally did not inform the family health team about these findings. They perceived that team members devalued this type of information by considering it a reflection of the clientele's social conditions or problems beyond the scope of medical concerns. Documentation of qualitative evidence can account for the effectiveness of health education in two ways: by improving preventative care, and by amplifying the voices of underprivileged clients who live in poverty to ensure the most appropriate and best quality primary

  13. Pediatric Hearing Healthcare in Kentucky's Appalachian Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew L; Alexander, David; Noblitt, Bryce; Lester, Cathy; Shinn, Jennifer B

    2015-08-01

    Diagnosis and intervention for infant hearing loss is often delayed in areas of healthcare disparity, such as rural Appalachia. Primary care providers play a key role in timely hearing healthcare. The purpose of this study was to assess the practice patterns of rural primary care providers (PCPs) regarding newborn hearing screening (NHS) and experiences with rural early hearing diagnosis and intervention programs in an area of known hearing healthcare disparity. Cross sectional questionnaire study. Appalachian PCP's in Kentucky were surveyed regarding practice patterns and experiences regarding the diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss. 93 Appalachian primary care practitioners responded and 85% reported that NHS is valuable for pediatric health. Family practitioners were less likely to receive infant NHS results than pediatricians (54.5 versus 95.2%, p < 0.01). A knowledge gap was identified in the goal ages for diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss. Pediatrician providers were more likely to utilize diagnostic testing compared with family practice providers (p < 0.001). Very rural practices (Beale code 7-9) were less likely to perform hearing evaluations in their practices compared with rural practices (Beale code 4-6) (p < 0.001). Family practitioners reported less confidence than pediatricians in counseling and directing care of children who fail newborn hearing screening. 46% felt inadequately prepared or completely unprepared to manage children who fail the NHS. Rural primary care providers face challenges in receiving communication regarding infant hearing screening and may lack confidence in directing and providing rural hearing healthcare for children.

  14. Improving access to primary mental healthcare for Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Reifels, Lennart; Bassilios, Bridget; Nicholas, Angela; Fletcher, Justine; King, Kylie; Ewen, Shaun; Pirkis, Jane

    2015-02-01

    To examine the uptake, population reach and outcomes of primary mental healthcare services provided to Indigenous Australians via the Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS) program between 2003 and 2013, with particular reference to enhanced Indigenous ATAPS services introduced from 2010. Utilising ATAPS program data from a national minimum data set and comparative population data, we conducted descriptive analyses, regression analyses and t-tests to examine the uptake of ATAPS services, provider agency level predictors of service reach, and preliminary outcome data on consumer level outcomes. Between 2003 and 2013, 15,450 Indigenous client referrals were made that resulted in 55,134 ATAPS sessions. National Indigenous service volume more than doubled between 2010 and 2012, following the introduction of enhanced Indigenous ATAPS services. Non-Indigenous ATAPS service volume of primary care agencies was uniquely predictive of Indigenous service reach. Preliminary analysis of limited consumer outcome data indicated positive treatment gains and the need to enhance future outcome data collection. Concerted national efforts to enhance mainstream primary mental healthcare programs can result in significant gains in access to mental healthcare for Indigenous populations. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  15. Using morbidity and income data to forecast the variation of growth and employment in the oral healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Dennis A; Klingenberger, David

    2016-12-01

    The perception of the health sector from an economic policy point of view is changing. In the past, health expenditure was mostly seen as a "cost" item, probably because many medical treatments are covered by public health insurance. However, policymakers are increasingly realizing that a growing health sector may be quite beneficial for an economy. It creates employment opportunities and it is relatively resistant to the fluctuations of the business cycle. Input-output analysis could be a useful tool to study the structural change resulting from the growth of the health sector. This paper quantifies for the first time the economic significance of the oral healthcare sector as a component of the German healthcare sector as a whole. The current data for the healthcare sector comes from Health Satellite Accounts, which while comprehensive do fail to answer important questions due to not incorporating certain sectors such as the oral healthcare sector. Therefore on the basis of the Health Satellite Account a specific Satellite Account for the oral healthcare sector is created by using billing data as well as epidemiological data, provided by several dental associations and the Institute of German Dentists. Based on this added information, gross value added data and the number of employees in the oral healthcare sector are computed. Gross value added in 2010 amounted to €13.4 billion, with around €4 billion being attributable to the secondary oral healthcare market; the market for solely out-of-pocket payments. In a second step the paper develops a model to forecast oral healthcare sector growth based on various explanatory variables such as demographic change, take-up behaviour, medical-technical progress, oral morbidity, aggregated supply (collective dental treatment times) as well as income levels and distribution, where the latter two are considered to be of particular importance. According to this model, by 2030 gross value added in the oral healthcare sector

  16. Organizational culture in the primary healthcare setting of Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The concept of organizational culture is important in understanding the behaviour of individuals in organizations as they manage external demands and internal social changes. Cyprus healthcare system is under restructuring and soon a new healthcare scheme will be implemented starting at the Primary Healthcare (PHC) level. The aim of the study was to investigate the underlying culture encountered in the PHC setting of Cyprus and to identify possible differences in desired and prevailing cultures among healthcare professionals. Methods The population of the study included all general practitioners (GPs) and nursing staff working at the 42 PHC centres throughout the island. The shortened version of the Organizational Culture Profile questionnaire comprising 28 statements on organizational values was used in the study. The instrument was already translated and validated in Greek and cross-cultural adaptation was performed. Participants were required to indicate the organization’s characteristic cultural values orientation along a five-point Likert scale ranging from “Very Much = 1” to “Not at all= 5”. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0. Student t-test was used to compare means between two groups of variables whereas for more than two groups analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. Results From the total of 306 healthcare professionals, 223 participated in the study (72.9%). The majority of participants were women (75.3%) and mean age was 42.6 ± 10.7 years. Culture dimension “performance orientation” was the desired culture among healthcare professionals (mean: 1.39 ± 0.45). “Supportiveness” and “social responsibility” were the main cultures encountered in PHC (means: 2.37 ± 0.80, 2.38 ± 0.83). Statistical significant differences were identified between desired and prevailing cultures for all culture dimensions (p= 0.000). Conclusions This was the first study performed in Cyprus assessing organizational culture in

  17. Organizational culture in the primary healthcare setting of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Zachariadou, Theodora; Zannetos, Savvas; Pavlakis, Andreas

    2013-03-24

    The concept of organizational culture is important in understanding the behaviour of individuals in organizations as they manage external demands and internal social changes. Cyprus healthcare system is under restructuring and soon a new healthcare scheme will be implemented starting at the Primary Healthcare (PHC) level. The aim of the study was to investigate the underlying culture encountered in the PHC setting of Cyprus and to identify possible differences in desired and prevailing cultures among healthcare professionals. The population of the study included all general practitioners (GPs) and nursing staff working at the 42 PHC centres throughout the island. The shortened version of the Organizational Culture Profile questionnaire comprising 28 statements on organizational values was used in the study. The instrument was already translated and validated in Greek and cross-cultural adaptation was performed. Participants were required to indicate the organization's characteristic cultural values orientation along a five-point Likert scale ranging from "Very Much = 1" to "Not at all= 5". Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0. Student t-test was used to compare means between two groups of variables whereas for more than two groups analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. From the total of 306 healthcare professionals, 223 participated in the study (72.9%). The majority of participants were women (75.3%) and mean age was 42.6 ± 10.7 years. Culture dimension "performance orientation" was the desired culture among healthcare professionals (mean: 1.39 ± 0.45). "Supportiveness" and "social responsibility" were the main cultures encountered in PHC (means: 2.37 ± 0.80, 2.38 ± 0.83). Statistical significant differences were identified between desired and prevailing cultures for all culture dimensions (p= 0.000). This was the first study performed in Cyprus assessing organizational culture in the PHC setting. In the forthcoming health system reform

  18. The role of the registered nurse in the marketing of primary healthcare services, as part of health promotion.

    PubMed

    Rall, M; Meyer, S M

    2006-03-01

    Existing literature on the marketing of primary healthcare services was reviewed to determine the role of registered nurses in this regard. The systematic review included five searches and ensured wide coverage of the results of available primary research studies on the topic. The results were summarised and the role of registered nurses in the marketing of primary healthcare services was identified. Primary research sources on the topic included textbooks on marketing by experts in the field and relevant journal articles by authorities on healthcare marketing. The data were analysed and four main categories identified. To ensure the trustworthiness of the research, Lincoln and Guba's (1981: 215-216) criteria, as explained by Krefting (1991: 217), were applied. Because the population consisted of only literature, ethical considerations concerning human subjects were irrelevant. Results indicated that the basic commercial marketing principles (the so-called 4Ps--product, price, place, and promotion) could be adapted for the health sector. The conclusion was that registered nurses could contribute to the marketing of primary healthcare services by communicating with the community (promotion) and by ensuring effective service (product) delivery at the right price and place. Registered nurses could influence the community's perceptions of health care and facilitate behaviour changes, thereby promote health. The implementation of the findings and recommendations of this research could create a new awareness among registered nurses of their role in the marketing of primary healthcare services in South Africa and improve their skills in this regard.

  19. Needs Assessment of the Healthcare Sector in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area. Research Report. Business Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Virginia Community Coll., Annandale. Office of Institutional Research.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the growing population of elderly citizens will result in an increased demand for healthcare services that will rise for a full 50 years. This study assesses the need for healthcare sector workers in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Information on the skills, education, and experience that…

  20. [Hepatitis B vaccination and occupation exposure in the healthcare sector in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais].

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ada Ávila; Araújo, Tânia Maria de; Ribeiro, Rafael Brito Nery; Oliveira, Sérgio Vinícios Soares

    2012-08-01

    To identify factors associated with vaccination against hepatitis B among healthcare workers. This was a cross-sectional study on 1,808 public-sector healthcare workers in Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. A self-administered questionnaire was used and the vaccination situation was analyzed taking sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle and working conditions and characteristics into consideration. Univariate (p < 0.20) and multiple (p < 0.05) statistical analyses were performed using Poisson regression to evaluate factors associated with vaccination. Of the workers, 85.6% declared that they had been vaccinated, although only 74.9% of the vaccinated professionals had received a complete immunization schedule. Not having been vaccinated was associated with not having a partner; having high school, technical or incomplete higher education level; work characteristics such as working in surveillance or the administrative/general services sector; and not using personal protection equipment. Groups with lower vaccination coverage were identified. Efforts are required to ensure access and adherence to vaccination among healthcare workers, such as awareness-raising mechanisms.

  1. General Satisfaction Among Healthcare Workers: Differences Between Employees in Medical and Mental Health Sector

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.; Kleisiaris, Christos F.; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Fradelos, Evangelos C.; Kourkouta, Lambrini

    2015-01-01

    Background: General satisfaction is a personal experience and sources of satisfaction or dissatisfaction vary between professional groups. General satisfaction is usually related with work settings, work performance and mental health status. Aim: The purpose of this research study was to investigate the level of general satisfaction of health care workers and to examine whether there were any differences among employees of medical and mental health sector. Methods: The sample consisted of employees from the medical and mental health sector, who were all randomly selected. A two-part questionnaire was used to collect data. The first section involved demographic information and the second part was a General Satisfaction Questionnaire (GSQ). The statistical analysis of data was performed using the software package 19.0 for Windows. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. All data exhibited normal distributions and thus the parametric t-test was used to compare mean scores between the two health sectors. P values < 0.05 were defined as reflecting the acceptable level of statistical significance. Results: 457 healthcare workers completed the questionnaire. The mean age of the sample was 41.8 ± 7.9 years. The Cronbach alpha coefficient for GSQ was 0.79. The total mean score of general satisfaction for the employees in medical sector was 4.5 (5=very satisfied) and for the employees in mental health sector is 4.8. T-test showed that these results are statistical different (t=4.55, p<0.01) and therefore the two groups of healthcare workers feel different general satisfaction. Conclusions: Mental health employees appear to experience higher levels of general satisfaction and mainly they experience higher satisfaction from family roles, life and sexual life, emotional state and relations with patients. PMID:26543410

  2. The primary healthcare nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

    PubMed

    van Soeren, Mary; Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Goodwin, Sharon; Baker, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The role of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (NP-PHC) has a long history in Ontario. In this paper, we describe the evolution of the role with a focus on geographic distribution, a profile of client populations and the services provided by NP-PHCs. Comparisons will be made to findings from previous studies and reports on the NP-PHC role in Ontario. In 2004 and 2005, two-thirds of the nurse practitioners registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario responded to a descriptive self-reporting survey. The data collected revealed that NP-PHCs work throughout the healthcare system, including with underserviced and marginalized populations, in community health centres and in outpatient areas within acute care hospitals. They provide the entire spectrum of primary healthcare services. Barriers to fully enacting the role are related to restrictive legislation that limits NP prescribing and diagnosing, and the ability to work to full scope of practice in hospitals (for example, in emergency departments). Targeted funding has promoted the role throughout the province. However, inadequate and insecure pilot funding continues to be a concern. Findings from this study indicate that policy decisions to support the NP role in rural and remote areas have resulted in expansion of the role across the province. Yet, NPs perceive that legislation has lagged and inhibits their ability to meet patient and health systems needs.

  3. When free healthcare is not free. Corruption and mistrust in Sierra Leone's primary healthcare system immediately prior to the Ebola outbreak.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Pieternella; Lodge, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Sierra Leone is one of three countries recently affected by Ebola. In debates surrounding the circumstances that contributed to the initial failure to contain the outbreak, the word 'trust' is often used: In December 2014, WHO director Margret Chan used 'lack of trust in governments'; The Lancet's Editor-in-Chief, wrote how Ebola has exposed the '… breakdown of trust between communities and their governments.' This article explores the lack of trust in public healthcare providers in Sierra Leone, predating the Ebola outbreak, apparently linked to widespread petty corruption in primary healthcare facilities. It compares four NGO-supported accountability interventions targeting Sierra Leone's primary health sector. Field research was conducted in Kailahun, Kono and Tonkolili Districts, based on interviews with health workers and focus group discussions with primary healthcare users. Field research showed that in most clinics, women and children entitled to free care routinely paid for health services. A lack of accountability in Sierra Leone's health sector appears pervasive at all levels. Petty corruption is rife. Understaffing leads to charging for free care in order to pay clinic-based 'volunteers' who function as vaccinators, health workers and birth attendants. Accountability interventions were found to have little impact on healthworker (mis)behaviour. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Resilience of primary healthcare professionals: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Helen D; Elliott, Alison M; Burton, Christopher; Iversen, Lisa; Murchie, Peter; Porteous, Terry; Matheson, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Background Modern demands and challenges among healthcare professionals can be particularly stressful and resilience is increasingly necessary to maintain an effective, adaptable, and sustainable workforce. However, definitions of, and associations with, resilience have not been examined within the primary care context. Aim To examine definitions and measures of resilience, identify characteristics and components, and synthesise current evidence about resilience in primary healthcare professionals. Design and setting A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies relating to the primary care setting. Method Ovid®, Embase®, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Scopus databases were searched in December 2014. Text selections and data extraction were conducted by paired reviewers working independently. Data were extracted on health professional resilience definitions and associated factors. Results Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria: eight were quantitative, four qualitative, and one was an intervention study. Resilience, although multifaceted, was commonly defined as involving positive adaptation to adversity. Interactions were identified between personal growth and accomplishment in resilient physicians. Resilience, high persistence, high self-directedness, and low avoidance of challenges were strongly correlated; resilience had significant associations with traits supporting high function levels associated with demanding health professional roles. Current resilience measures do not allow for these different aspects in the primary care context. Conclusion Health professional resilience is multifaceted, combining discrete personal traits alongside personal, social, and workplace features. A measure for health professional resilience should be developed and validated that may be used in future quantitative research to measure the effect of an intervention to promote it. PMID:27162208

  5. Apprenticeship and Progression in the Healthcare Sector: Can Labour Market Theory Illuminate Barriers and Opportunities in Contrasting Occupations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turbin, Jill; Fuller, Alison; Wintrup, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There is growing research and policy interest in the extent to which government supported Apprenticeship in England provides a platform for educational and career progression in different occupational sectors. This paper makes a contribution to this debate by presenting research on the healthcare sector undertaken in a regional health authority in…

  6. Apprenticeship and Progression in the Healthcare Sector: Can Labour Market Theory Illuminate Barriers and Opportunities in Contrasting Occupations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turbin, Jill; Fuller, Alison; Wintrup, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There is growing research and policy interest in the extent to which government supported Apprenticeship in England provides a platform for educational and career progression in different occupational sectors. This paper makes a contribution to this debate by presenting research on the healthcare sector undertaken in a regional health authority in…

  7. Intellectual capital in the healthcare sector: a systematic review and critique of the literature.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jenna M; Brown, Adalsteinn; Baker, G Ross

    2015-12-15

    Variations in the performance of healthcare organizations may be partly explained by differing "stocks" of intellectual capital (IC), and differing approaches and capacities for leveraging IC. This study synthesizes what is currently known about the conceptualization, management and measurement of IC in healthcare through a review of the literature. Peer-reviewed papers on IC in healthcare published between 1990 and 2014 were identified through searches of five databases using the following key terms: intellectual capital/assets, knowledge capital/assets/resources, and intangible assets/resources. Articles deemed relevant for inclusion underwent systematic data extraction to identify overarching themes and were assessed for their methodological quality. Thirty-seven papers were included in the review. The primary research method used was cross-sectional questionnaires focused on hospital managers' perceptions of IC, followed by semi-structured interviews and analysis of administrative data. Empirical studies suggest that IC is linked to subjective process and performance indicators in healthcare organizations. Although the literature on IC in healthcare is growing, it is not advanced. In this paper, we identify and examine the conceptual, theoretical and methodological limitations of the literature. The concept and framework of IC offer a means to study the value of intangible resources in healthcare organizations, how to manage systematically these resources together, and their mutually enhancing interactions on performance. We offer several recommendations for future research.

  8. District nurses' views on quality of primary healthcare encounters.

    PubMed

    Nygren Zotterman, Anna; Skär, Lisa; Olsson, Malin; Söderberg, Siv

    2015-09-01

    Good encounters are fundamental for good and professional nursing care, and can be described as treating patients with respect and protecting their integrity and autonomy. This study describes district nurses' views on quality of healthcare encounters in primary healthcare. A purposive sample of 27 district nurses participated in five focus group interviews. The focus groups interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. The interview texts were analysed using a thematic content analysis. The analysis resulted in four themes, including being aware of the importance and difficulties during encounters, being the patient's advocate, being attentive to the unique person and being informed when a meeting turned out poorly. The results show that district nurses believed that encounters formed the basis of their work and it was vital for them to be aware of any difficulties. District nurses found that acting in a professional manner during encounters is the most significant factor, but this type of interaction was sometimes difficult because of stress and lack of time. The district nurses considered themselves to be the patients' advocate in the healthcare system; in addition, the acts of seeing, listening, believing and treating the patient seriously were important for providing good quality care. If a poor encounter occurred between the district nurse and the patient, the district nurses found that it was necessary to arrange a meeting to properly communicate what problems arose during the interaction. The district nurses highlighted that providing an apology and explanation could improve future encounters and establish a better nurse-patient relationship. In conclusion, this study shows the importance of confirming and respecting patients' dignity as the fundamental basis for a good quality encounter in primary healthcare.

  9. Service quality and performance in the public health-care sector.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Hardeep; Kumari, Neetu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate service quality and service performance relationship in the health-care sector using respective developed multidimensional scales. Data were collected from 400 inpatient respondents, using stratified sampling method from five departments, namely general medicine, surgery, pediatrics, orthopedics, gynecology, and ENT of a tertiary hospital (North India). The results confirm significant relationship among subdimensions of physical environment quality and interaction quality (service quality) and four service performance measures, namely waiting time, patient satisfaction, patient loyalty, and image in public hospitals.

  10. Institutional and matrix support and its relationship with primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Alaneir de Fátima; Machado, Antônio Thomaz Gonzaga da Matta; dos Reis, Clarice Magalhães Rodrigues; Abreu, Daisy Maria Xavier; de Araújo, Lucas Henrique Lobato; Rodrigues, Simone Cristina; de Lima, Ângela Maria de Lourdes Dayrell; Jorge, Alzira de Oliveira; Fonseca, Délcio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze whether the level of institutional and matrix support is associated with better certification of primary healthcare teams. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated two kinds of primary healthcare support – 14,489 teams received institutional support and 14,306 teams received matrix support. Logistic regression models were applied. In the institutional support model, the independent variable was “level of support” (as calculated by the sum of supporting activities for both modalities). In the matrix support model, in turn, the independent variables were the supporting activities. The multivariate analysis has considered variables with p < 0.20. The model was adjusted by the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. RESULTS The teams had institutional and matrix supporting activities (84.0% and 85.0%), respectively, with 55.0% of them performing between six and eight activities. For the institutional support, we have observed 1.96 and 3.77 chances for teams who had medium and high levels of support to have very good or good certification, respectively. For the matrix support, the chances of their having very good or good certification were 1.79 and 3.29, respectively. Regarding to the association between institutional support activities and the certification, the very good or good certification was positively associated with self-assessment (OR = 1.95), permanent education (OR = 1.43), shared evaluation (OR = 1.40), and supervision and evaluation of indicators (OR = 1.37). In regards to the matrix support, the very good or good certification was positively associated with permanent education (OR = 1.50), interventions in the territory (OR = 1.30), and discussion in the work processes (OR = 1.23). CONCLUSIONS In Brazil, supporting activities are being incorporated in primary healthcare, and there is an association between the level of support, both matrix and institutional, and the certification result. PMID:26274872

  11. Economic Evaluation in Ethiopian Healthcare Sector Decision Making: Perception, Practice and Barriers.

    PubMed

    Zegeye, Elias Asfaw; Mbonigaba, Josue; Kaye, Sylvia Blanche; Wilkinson, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Globally, economic evaluation (EE) is increasingly being considered as a critical tool for allocating scarce healthcare resources. However, such considerations are less documented in low-income countries, such as in Ethiopia. In particular, to date there has been no assessment conducted to evaluate the perception and practice of and barriers to health EE. This paper assesses the use and perceptions of EE in healthcare decision-making processes in Ethiopia. In-depth interview sessions with decision makers/healthcare managers and program coordinators across six regional health bureaus were conducted. A qualitative analysis approach was conducted on three thematic areas. A total of 57 decision makers/healthcare managers were interviewed from all tiers of the health sector in Ethiopia, ranging from the Federal Ministry of Health down to the lower levels of the health facility pyramid. At the high-level healthcare decision-making tier, only 56 % of those interviewed showed a good understanding of EE when explaining in terms of cost and consequences of alternative courses of action and value for money. From the specific program perspective, 50 % of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS program coordinators indicated the relevance of EE to program planning and decision making. These respondents reported a limited application of costing studies on the HIV/AIDS prevention and control program, which were most commonly used during annual planning and budgeting. The study uncovered three important barriers to growth of EE in Ethiopia: a lack of awareness, a lack of expertise and skill, and the traditional decision-making culture.

  12. Healthcare identities at the crossroads of service modernisation: the transfer of NHS clinicians to the independent sector?

    PubMed

    Waring, Justin; Bishop, Simon

    2011-07-01

    Health policies increasingly support private businesses to take an active role in the organisation and delivery of public healthcare services. For the English NHS, this is exemplified by the introduction of Independent Sector Treatment Centres. A number of these facilities involve the wholesale secondment of NHS clinicians to the private sector which, we suggest, raises important questions about the identities of healthcare professionals accustomed to working in the public sector. Our paper investigates this transition highlighting three prominent discontinuities in clinical work: the ethos of private sector ownership, new lines of authority and fragmented relationships. Drawing on Giddens, we examine how clinicians experience and interpret these changes and how they keep their biographical 'narrative going'. The 'pioneers' interpreted the independent sector as an opportunity to re-invigorate their practice through new roles, relationships and higher quality care; the 'guardians' as an opportunity to replicate and protect the customs and standards of the NHS in the private sector; whilst the 'marooned' longed to return to the NHS. Our study illustrates how the sectoral context can shape healthcare identities, and how contemporary reforms aimed at promoting partnerships across public and private sectors can have profound implications for clinicians. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Reforming healthcare systems on a locally integrated basis: is there a potential for increasing collaborations in primary healthcare?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, in the province of Quebec, Canada, the government has initiated two consecutive reforms. These have created a new type of primary healthcare – family medicine groups (FMGs) – and have established 95 geographically defined local health networks (LHNs) across the province. A key goal of these reforms was to improve collaboration among healthcare organizations. The objective of the paper is to analyze the impact of these reforms on the development of collaborations among primary healthcare practices and between these organisations and hospitals both within and outside administrative boundaries of the local health networks. Methods We surveyed 297 primary healthcare practices in 23 LHNs in Quebec’s two most populated regions (Montreal & Monteregie) in 2005 and 2010. We characterized collaborations by measuring primary healthcare practices’ formal or informal arrangements among themselves or with hospitals for different activities. These collaborations were measured based on the percentage of clinics that identified at least one collaborative activity with another organization within or outside of their local health network. We created measures of collaboration for different types of primary healthcare practices: first- and second-generation FMGs, network clinics, local community services centres (CLSCs) and private medical clinics. We compared their situations in 2005 and in 2010 to observe their evolution. Results Our results showed different patterns of evolution in inter-organizational collaboration among different types of primary healthcare practices. The local health network reform appears to have had an impact on territorializing collaborations firstly by significantly reducing collaborations outside LHNs areas for all types of primary healthcare practices, including new type of primary healthcare and CLSCs, and secondly by improving collaborations among healthcare organizations within LHNs areas for all organizations

  14. Healthy workplaces and effective teamwork: viewed through the lens of primary healthcare renewal.

    PubMed

    Jones, Linda; Way, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This commentary reviews the content of the lead papers through the lens of primary healthcare renewal (PHCR). Although PHCR has been on the national agenda for decades, only since the turn of the century has real progress been made with emerging new practice models based on inter-professional team care. While much is expected, relatively little is known of the function and effectiveness of such teams in Canada. As well, information regarding healthy workplaces has focused on individual professional groups rather than an inter-professional workforce. Much of the knowledge currently available regarding team effectiveness and healthy workplaces comes from the hospital sector and may not be completely transferable. The work of the Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Patient-Centred Practice initiative and the results of the Health Transition Fund and Primary Health Care Transition Fund are additional key sources of research and knowledge transfer to guide the education, function and evaluation of inter-professional teamwork in these new primary healthcare practice models.

  15. Community participation to design rural primary healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores how community participation can be used in designing rural primary healthcare services by describing a study of Scottish communities. Community participation is extolled in healthcare policy as useful in planning services and is understood as particularly relevant in rural settings, partly due to high social capital. Literature describes many community participation methods, but lacks discussion of outcomes relevant to health system reconfiguration. There is a spectrum of ideas in the literature on how to design services, from top-down standard models to contextual plans arising from population health planning that incorporates community participation. This paper addresses an evidence gap about the outcomes of using community participation in (re)designing rural community health services. Methods Community-based participatory action research was applied in four Scottish case study communities in 2008–10. Data were collected from four workshops held in each community (total 16) and attended by community members. Workshops were intended to produce hypothetical designs for future service provision. Themes, rankings and selections from workshops are presented. Results Community members identified consistent health priorities, including local practitioners, emergency triage, anticipatory care, wellbeing improvement and health volunteering. Communities designed different service models to address health priorities. One community did not design a service model and another replicated the current model despite initial enthusiasm for innovation. Conclusions Communities differ in their receptiveness to engaging in innovative service design, but some will create new models that fit in a given budget. Design diversity indicates that context influences local healthcare planning, suggesting community participation impacts on design outcomes, but standard service models maybe useful as part of the evidence in community participation discussions

  16. Reforming primary healthcare: from public policy to organizational change.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Frédéric; Denis, Jean-Louis; Lamothe, Lise; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; D'amour, Danielle; Goudreau, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Governments everywhere are implementing reform to improve primary care. However, the existence of a high degree of professional autonomy makes large-scale change difficult to achieve. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the change dynamics and the involvement of professionals in a primary healthcare reform initiative carried out in the Canadian province of Quebec. An empirical approach was used to investigate change processes from the inception of a public policy to the execution of changes in professional practices. The data were analysed from a multi-level, combined contextualist-processual perspective. Results are based on a longitudinal multiple-case study of five family medicine groups, which was informed by over 100 interviews, questionnaires, and documentary analysis. The results illustrate the multiple processes observed with the introduction of planned large-scale change in primary care services. The analysis of change content revealed that similar post-change states concealed variations between groups in the scale of their respective changes. The analysis also demonstrated more precisely how change evolved through the introduction of "intermediate change" and how cycles of prescribed and emergent mechanisms distinctively drove change process and change content, from the emergence of the public policy to the change in primary care service delivery. This research was conducted among a limited number of early policy adopters. However, given the international interest in turning to the medical profession to improve primary care, the results offer avenues for both policy development and implementation. The findings offer practical insights for those studying and managing large-scale transformations. They provide a better understanding of how deliberate reforms coexist with professional autonomy through an intertwining of change content and processes. This research is one of few studies to examine a primary care reform from emergence to implementation

  17. Knowledge and practice of primary eye care among primary healthcare workers in northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    AbdulRahman, Aminatu Ali; Rabiu, Mansur Muhammad; Alhassan, Mahmoud Babanini

    2015-06-01

    To assess knowledge and practice of primary eye care among primary healthcare workers known as community health extension workers in Funtua district of Nigeria. Cross-sectional mixed method study among health workers employed in government-owned primary healthcare facilities. Quantitative data were obtained using self-administered questionnaires and checklists, while qualitative data by modified Delphi technique, role plays and observation. A score of 1 was given for each correct answer, while a total score of ≥60% was considered 'good'. Eighty three of 88 health workers participated (94%) in the questionnaire survey; while 16 of them were selected for the qualitative survey. Good scores regarding the knowledge of common eye diseases were obtained by 68.7%, but only 26.4% of them could identify their most important features. Participants could undertake 3 of 5 steps in visual acuity testing. Skills in recognising common eye diseases and their management were weak; while practice was often not according to the guidelines. Community health extension workers displayed good knowledge of common eye diseases. Areas of weakness are recognition and interpretation of eye signs, and practice rarely follows the guidelines. Preventive medicine was neglected; community health extension workers require practical retraining and supervision to achieve integration of primary eye care into primary healthcare services. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Economic planning and equilibrium growth of human resources and capital in health-care sector: Case study of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahboobi-Ardakan, Payman; Kazemian, Mahmood; Mehraban, Sattar

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: During different planning periods, human resources factor has been considerably increased in the health-care sector. AIMS: The main goal is to determine economic planning conditions and equilibrium growth for services level and specialized workforce resources in health-care sector and also to determine the gap between levels of health-care services and specialized workforce resources in the equilibrium growth conditions and their available levels during the periods of the first to fourth development plansin Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the study after data collection, econometric methods and EViews version 8.0 were used for data processing. The used model was based on neoclassical economic growth model. RESULTS: The results indicated that during the former planning periods, although specialized workforce has been increased significantly in health-care sector, lack of attention to equilibrium growth conditions caused imbalance conditions for product level and specialized workforce in health-care sector. CONCLUSIONS: In the past development plans for health services, equilibrium conditions based on the full employment in the capital stock, and specialized labor are not considered. The government could act by choosing policies determined by the growth model to achieve equilibrium level in the field of human resources and services during the next planning periods. PMID:28616419

  19. Economic planning and equilibrium growth of human resources and capital in health-care sector: Case study of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mahboobi-Ardakan, Payman; Kazemian, Mahmood; Mehraban, Sattar

    2017-01-01

    During different planning periods, human resources factor has been considerably increased in the health-care sector. The main goal is to determine economic planning conditions and equilibrium growth for services level and specialized workforce resources in health-care sector and also to determine the gap between levels of health-care services and specialized workforce resources in the equilibrium growth conditions and their available levels during the periods of the first to fourth development plansin Iran. In the study after data collection, econometric methods and EViews version 8.0 were used for data processing. The used model was based on neoclassical economic growth model. The results indicated that during the former planning periods, although specialized workforce has been increased significantly in health-care sector, lack of attention to equilibrium growth conditions caused imbalance conditions for product level and specialized workforce in health-care sector. In the past development plans for health services, equilibrium conditions based on the full employment in the capital stock, and specialized labor are not considered. The government could act by choosing policies determined by the growth model to achieve equilibrium level in the field of human resources and services during the next planning periods.

  20. Examining Primary Healthcare Performance through a Triple Aim Lens

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Bridget L.; Brown, Judith Belle; Glazier, Richard H.; Hutchison, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to apply a Triple Aim framework to the measurement and evaluation of primary healthcare (PHC) team performance. Methods: Triple Aim components were populated with 10 dimensions derived from survey and health administrative data for 17 Family Health Teams (FHTs) in Ontario, Canada. Bivariate analyses and rankings of sites examined the relationships among dimensions and among Triple Aim components. Results: Readily available measures to fully populate the Triple Aim framework were lacking in FHTs. Within sites, there was little consistency in performance across the Triple Aim components (health, patient experience and cost). Conclusions: More and better measures are needed that can be readily used to examine the Triple Aim performance in PHC teams. FHTs, in this study, are partially achieving Triple Aim goals; however, there was a lack of consistency in performance. It is essential to collect appropriate measures and attend to performance across all components of the Triple Aim. PMID:27027790

  1. Willingness to pay for private primary care services in Hong Kong: are elderly ready to move from the public sector?

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Yam, Carrie H K; Huang, Olivia H Y; Griffiths, Sian M

    2013-10-01

    How to provide better primary care and achieve the right level of public-private balance in doing so is at the centre of many healthcare reforms around the world. In a healthcare system like Hong Kong, where inpatient services are largely funded through general taxation and ambulatory services out of pocket, the family doctor model of primary care is underdeveloped. Since 2008, the Government has taken forward various initiatives to promote primary care and encourage more use of private services. However, little is known in Hong Kong or elsewhere about consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for private services when care is available in the public sector. This study assessed willingness of the Hong Kong elderly to pay for specific primary care and preventive services in the private sector, through a cross-sectional in-person questionnaire survey and focus group discussions among respondents. The survey revealed that the WTP for private services in general was low among the elderly; particularly, reported WTP for chronic conditions and preventive care both fell below the current market prices. Sub-group analysis showed higher WTP among healthier and more affluent elderly. Among other things, concerns over affordability and uncertainty (of price and quality) in the private sector were associated with this low level of WTP. These results suggest that most elderly, who are heavy users of public health services but with limited income, may not use more private services without seeing significant reduction in price. Financial incentives for consumers alone may not be enough to promote primary care or public-private partnership. Public education on the value of prevention and primary care, as well as supply-side interventions should both be considered. Hong Kong's policy-making process of the initiative studied here may also provide lessons for other countries with ongoing healthcare reforms.

  2. Enhancing research capacity across healthcare and higher education sectors: development and evaluation of an integrated model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With current policy in healthcare research, in the United Kingdom and internationally, focused on development of research excellence in individuals and teams, building capacity for implementation and translation of research is paramount among the professionals who use that research in daily practice. The judicious use of research outcomes and evaluation of best evidence and practice in healthcare is integrally linked to the research capacity and capabilities of the workforce. In addition to promoting high quality research, mechanisms for actively enhancing research capacity more generally must be in place to address the complexities that both undermine and facilitate this activity. Methods A comprehensive collaborative model for building research capacity in one health professional group, speech and language therapy, was developed in a region within the UK and is presented here. The North East of England and the strong research ethos of this profession in addressing complex interventions offered a fertile context for developing and implementing a model which integrated the healthcare and university sectors. Two key frameworks underpin this model. The first addresses the individual participants’ potential trajectory from research consciousness to research participative to research active. The second embeds a model developed for general practitioners into a broader framework of practice-academic partnership and knowledge and skills exchange, and considers external drivers and impacts on practice and patient outcomes as key elements. Results and discussion The integration of practice and academia has been successful in building a culture of research activity within one healthcare profession in a region in the UK and has resulted, to date, in a series of research related outcomes. Understanding the key components of this partnership and the explicit strategies used has driven the implementation of the model and are discussed here. Conclusions A strong

  3. Knowledge mobilisation in healthcare: a critical review of health sector and generic management literature.

    PubMed

    Ferlie, Ewan; Crilly, Tessa; Jashapara, Ashok; Peckham, Anna

    2012-04-01

    The health policy domain has displayed increasing interest in questions of knowledge management and knowledge mobilisation within healthcare organisations. We analyse here the findings of a critical review of generic management and health-related literatures, covering the period 2000-2008. Using 29 pre-selected journals, supplemented by a search of selected electronic databases, we map twelve substantive domains classified into four broad groups: taxonomic and philosophical (e.g. different types of knowledge); theoretical discourse (e.g. critical organisational studies); disciplinary fields (e.g. organisational learning and Information Systems/Information Technology); and organisational processes and structures (e.g. organisational form). We explore cross-overs and gaps between these traditionally separate literature streams. We found that health sector literature has absorbed some generic concepts, notably Communities of Practice, but has not yet deployed the performance-oriented perspective of the Resource Based View (RBV) of the Firm. The generic literature uses healthcare sites to develop critical analyses of power and control in knowledge management, rooted in neo-Marxist/labour process and Foucauldian approaches. The review generates three theoretically grounded statements to inform future enquiry, by: (a) importing the RBV stream; (b) developing the critical organisational studies perspective further; and (c) exploring the theoretical argument that networks and other alternative organisational forms facilitate knowledge sharing.

  4. Manual handling incident claims in the healthcare sector: Factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dockrell, Sara; Johnson, Muriel; Ganly, Joe; Bennett, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Manual handling (MH) incidents may result in injury, absenteeism and/or compensation claim. This study investigated the factors associated with MH incidents among healthcare workers who had made a claim, and the management and outcome of those workers. A national sample of healthcare sector MH incident claim files (n=247) were accessed and 35~files met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected and presented graphically or descriptively using percentages (and 95% Confidence intervals, CI). Chi-square (χ2) tests were used for comparing proportions between groups. SPSS (v14.0) was used for analysis. Significance at p<0.05 is assumed. Attendants accounted for the highest number of claimants. The majority of claims (74%, 95% CI 68%, 81%) were for back injury; 11% (8%, 15%) for neck injury. Fifty-one percent (43%, 60%) involved patient-handling tasks at the time of incident; 46% (37%, 54%) involved inanimate handling. Ninety-one percent (89%, 94%) took sick leave, with 52% (43%, 60%) taking > 52 weeks. Only 58% (49%, 65%) returned to work. Claimants who had been in communication with employers were significantly more likely to return to work than those who did not (χ2 test, p=0.017). Improved management of MH incidents and injured workers are recommended.

  5. Primary healthcare providers’ views on improving sexual and reproductive healthcare for adolescents in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Orozco, Miguel; Ibarra, Marcia; Ossio, Freddy Cordova; Vega, Bernardo; Auquilla, Nancy; Medina, Joel; Gorter, Anna C.; Decat, Peter; De Meyer, Sara; Temmerman, Marleen; Edmonds, Alexander B.; Valius, Leonas; Lazarus, Jeffrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To elicit the views of primary healthcare providers from Bolivia, Ecuador, and Nicaragua on how adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) care in their communities can be improved. Methods Overall, 126 healthcare providers (46 from Bolivia, 39 from Ecuador, and 41 from Nicaragua) took part in this qualitative study. During a series of moderated discussions, they provided written opinions about the accessibility and appropriateness of ASRH services and suggestions for its improvement. The data were analyzed by employing a content analysis methodology. Results Study participants emphasized managerial issues such as the prioritization of adolescents as a patient group and increased healthcare providers’ awareness about adolescent-friendly approaches. They noted that such an approach needs to be extended beyond primary healthcare centers. Schools, parents, and the community in general should be encouraged to integrate issues related to ASRH in the everyday life of adolescents and become ‘gate-openers’ to ASRH services. To ensure the success of such measures, action at the policy level would be required. For example, decision-makers could call for developing clinical guidelines for this population group and coordinate multisectoral efforts. Conclusions To improve ASRH services within primary healthcare institutions in three Latin American countries, primary healthcare providers call for focusing on improving the youth-friendliness of health settings. To facilitate this, they suggested engaging with key stakeholders, such as parents, schools, and decision-makers at the policy level. PMID:23680267

  6. Incorporating Group Medical Visits into Primary Healthcare: Are There Benefits?

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Annette; Lavoie, Josée; Macleod, Martha L.P.; Chongo, Meck; Ulrich, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Group medical visits (GMVs) have been touted as an innovation to effectively and efficiently provide primary healthcare (PHC) services. The purpose of this paper is to report whether GMVs have tangible benefits for providers and patients. Methods: This descriptive study included in-depth interviews with patients attending and providers facilitating GMVs and direct observation. Five primary care practices in rural towns and four First Nations communities participated. This paper reports on an analysis of interviews and observations. Results: Thirty-four providers and 29 patients were interviewed. Patient participants were an average of 62 years old, mostly female and married. The three most common chronic conditions reported by patients were diabetes (n = 9), high blood pressure (n = 8) and arthritis (n = 7). Three themes illustrated how GMVs: (1) can foster access to needed health services; (2) expand opportunities for collaboration and team-based care; and (3) improve patient and provider experiences. A fourth theme captured structural challenges in delivering GMVs. Discussion: There are tangible benefits in delivering GMVs in PHC. While whole patient panels can benefit from the integration of GMVs into practice, those who could gain the most are patients with complex medical and social needs. GMVs provide an opportunity to enhance PHC, strengthening the system particularly for patients with chronic conditions. PMID:26742114

  7. The Challenges and Issues Regarding E-Health and Health Information Technology Trends in the Healthcare Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Pouyan; Sambasivan, Murali; Kumar, Naresh

    Like other industries, the utilization of the internet and Information Technology (IT) has increased in the health sector. Different applications attributed to the internet and IT in healthcare practice. It includes a range of services that intersect the edge of medicine, computer and information science. The presence of the internet helps healthcare practice with the use of electronic processes and communication. Also, health IT (HIT) deals with the devices, clinical guidelines and methods required to improve the management of information in healthcare. Although the internet and HIT has been considered as an influential means to enhance health care delivery, it is completely naive to imagine all new tools and mechanisms supported by the internet and HIT systems are simply adopted and used by all organizational members. As healthcare professionals play an important role in the healthcare sector, there is no doubt that mechanism of newly introduced HIT and new application of the internet in medical practice should be coupled with healthcare professionals' acceptance. Therefore, with great resistance by healthcare professionals new mechanism and tools supported by IT and the internet cannot be used properly and subsequently may not improve the quality of medical care services. However, factors affecting the healthcare professionals' adoption behavior concerning new e-health and HIT mechanism are still not conclusively identified. This research (as a theoretical study) tries to propose the source of resistance in order to handle the challenges over new e-technology in the health industry. This study uses the involved concepts and develops a conceptual framework to improve overall acceptance of e-health and HIT by healthcare professionals.

  8. Constructing taxonomies to identify distinctive forms of primary healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Pineault, Raynald; Hamel, Marjolaine; Levesque, Jean-Frédéric; Roberge, Danièle; Lamarche, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background. Primary healthcare (PHC) renewal gives rise to important challenges for policy makers, managers, and researchers in most countries. Evaluating new emerging forms of organizations is therefore of prime importance in assessing the impact of these policies. This paper presents a set of methods related to the configurational approach and an organizational taxonomy derived from our analysis. Methods. In 2005, we carried out a study on PHC in two health and social services regions of Quebec that included urban, suburban, and rural areas. An organizational survey was conducted in 473 PHC practices. We used multidimensional nonparametric statistical methods, namely, multiple correspondence and principal component analyses, and an ascending hierarchical classification method to construct a taxonomy of organizations. Results. PHC organizations were classified into five distinct models: four professional and one community. Study findings indicate that the professional integrated coordination and the community model have great potential for organizational development since they are closest to the ideal type promoted by current reforms. Conclusion. Results showed that the configurational approach is useful to assess complex phenomena such as the organization of PHC. The analysis highlights the most promising organizational models. Our study enhances our understanding of organizational change in health services organizations.

  9. Constructing Taxonomies to Identify Distinctive Forms of Primary Healthcare Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Pineault, Raynald; Hamel, Marjolaine; Levesque, Jean-Frédéric; Roberge, Danièle; Lamarche, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background. Primary healthcare (PHC) renewal gives rise to important challenges for policy makers, managers, and researchers in most countries. Evaluating new emerging forms of organizations is therefore of prime importance in assessing the impact of these policies. This paper presents a set of methods related to the configurational approach and an organizational taxonomy derived from our analysis. Methods. In 2005, we carried out a study on PHC in two health and social services regions of Quebec that included urban, suburban, and rural areas. An organizational survey was conducted in 473 PHC practices. We used multidimensional nonparametric statistical methods, namely, multiple correspondence and principal component analyses, and an ascending hierarchical classification method to construct a taxonomy of organizations. Results. PHC organizations were classified into five distinct models: four professional and one community. Study findings indicate that the professional integrated coordination and the community model have great potential for organizational development since they are closest to the ideal type promoted by current reforms. Conclusion. Results showed that the configurational approach is useful to assess complex phenomena such as the organization of PHC. The analysis highlights the most promising organizational models. Our study enhances our understanding of organizational change in health services organizations. PMID:24959575

  10. Unemployment, public-sector healthcare spending and stomach cancer mortality in the European Union, 1981-2009.

    PubMed

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Painter, Annabelle; Watkins, Johnathan; Williams, Callum; Ali, Raghib; Zeltner, Thomas; Faiz, Omar; Sheth, Hemant

    2014-11-01

    We sought to determine the association between changes in unemployment, healthcare spending and stomach cancer mortality. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess how changes in unemployment and public-sector expenditure on healthcare (PSEH) varied with stomach cancer mortality in 25 member states of the European Union from 1981 to 2009. Country-specific differences in healthcare infrastructure and demographics were controlled for 1- to 5-year time-lag analyses and robustness checks were carried out. A 1% increase in unemployment was associated with a significant increase in stomach cancer mortality in both men and women [men: coefficient (R)=0.1080, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.0470-0.1690, P=0.0006; women: R=0.0488, 95% CI=0.0168-0.0809, P=0.0029]. A 1% increase in PSEH was associated with a significant decrease in stomach cancer mortality (men: R=-0.0009, 95% CI=-0.0013 to -0.005, P<0.0001; women: R=-0.0004, 95% CI=-0.0007 to -0.0001, P=0.0054). The associations remained when economic factors, urbanization, nutrition and alcohol intake were controlled for, but not when healthcare resources were controlled for. Time-lag analysis showed that the largest changes in mortality occurred 3-4 years after any changes in either unemployment or PSEH. Increases in unemployment are associated with a significant increase in stomach cancer mortality. Stomach cancer mortality is also affected by public-sector healthcare spending. Initiatives that bolster employment and maintain public-sector healthcare expenditure may help to minimize increases in stomach cancer mortality during economic downturns.

  11. [Scientific medical forum as important source of scientific-information provision for innovation processes in the healthcare sector of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Horban', A Ie; Zakrut'ko, L I; Uvarenko, S V; Prysiazhniuk, L V

    2013-12-01

    The article made a retrospective analysis of the scientific medical forums (congresses, symposia and scientific conferences) in the healthcare sector of Ukraine in 2008-2012, planned by higher medical schools and post-graduate medical education schools, scientific institutions of Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine, National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine, medical associations and scientific and medical societies. Quantitative and qualitative assessment was carried out of the effectiveness of their implementation, provided suggestions for improving the planning and conducting of medical research forums.

  12. Patients' Perception of Clinicians Use of ICT During Patient Consultation in the Different Sectors of Danish Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lone Stub; Bertelsen, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    In Denmark ICT is a central part of almost all healthcare professionals' daily practices, and patients are increasingly encouraged to take and active interest in own health data. Therefore, ICT is an important part of what happens at consultations between the patients and the healthcare professionals. We explore the impact of ICT based on a survey of citizens'/patients' experience of interaction with healthcare professionals. How often and for what ICT was used in communication with the patients in different sectors of the Danish healthcare. The results show that ICT is used in communication with citizens and during interaction with patient, however the use of ICT is mostly for the healthcare professionals own benefit and only about 15%-39% of the reported instances ICT was used to communication and interact with the patient. Through the concept of boundary objects we proposes a model that split the object of the technology mediated information into three setting for communication between patients and healthcare professionals. We propose further studies into how ICT can be used to explore the possibilities for more interactive and involving care processes as a key element in further development of eHealth.

  13. Patients as healthcare consumers in the public and private sectors: a qualitative study of acupuncture in the UK.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Felicity L; Barlow, Fiona; Coghlan, Beverly; Lee, Philippa; Lewith, George T

    2011-05-27

    The aim of this study was to compare patients' experiences of public and private sector healthcare, using acupuncture as an example. In the UK, acupuncture is popular with patients, is recommended in official guidelines for low back pain, and is available in both the private sector and the public sector (NHS). Consumerism was used as a theoretical framework to explore patients' experiences. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in 2007-8 with a purposive sample of 27 patients who had recently used acupuncture for painful conditions in the private sector and/or in the NHS. Inductive thematic analysis was used to develop themes that summarised the bulk of the data and provided insights into consumerism in NHS- and private practice-based acupuncture. Five main themes were identified: value for money and willingness to pay; free and fair access; individualised holistic care: feeling cared for; consequences of choice: empowerment and vulnerability; and "just added extras": physical environment. Patients who had received acupuncture in the private sector constructed detailed accounts of the benefits of private care. Patients who had not received acupuncture in the private sector expected minimal differences from NHS care, and those differences were seen as not integral to treatment. The private sector facilitated consumerist behaviour to a greater extent than did the NHS, but private consumers appeared to base their decisions on unreliable and incomplete information. Patients used and experienced acupuncture differently in the NHS compared to the private sector. Eight different faces of consumerist behaviour were identified, but six were dominant: consumer as chooser, consumer as pragmatist, consumer as patient, consumer as earnest explorer, consumer as victim, and consumer as citizen. The decision to use acupuncture in either the private sector or the NHS was rarely well-informed: NHS and private patients both had misconceptions about acupuncture in the

  14. Patients as healthcare consumers in the public and private sectors: a qualitative study of acupuncture in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare patients' experiences of public and private sector healthcare, using acupuncture as an example. In the UK, acupuncture is popular with patients, is recommended in official guidelines for low back pain, and is available in both the private sector and the public sector (NHS). Consumerism was used as a theoretical framework to explore patients' experiences. Methods Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in 2007-8 with a purposive sample of 27 patients who had recently used acupuncture for painful conditions in the private sector and/or in the NHS. Inductive thematic analysis was used to develop themes that summarised the bulk of the data and provided insights into consumerism in NHS- and private practice-based acupuncture. Results Five main themes were identified: value for money and willingness to pay; free and fair access; individualised holistic care: feeling cared for; consequences of choice: empowerment and vulnerability; and "just added extras": physical environment. Patients who had received acupuncture in the private sector constructed detailed accounts of the benefits of private care. Patients who had not received acupuncture in the private sector expected minimal differences from NHS care, and those differences were seen as not integral to treatment. The private sector facilitated consumerist behaviour to a greater extent than did the NHS, but private consumers appeared to base their decisions on unreliable and incomplete information. Conclusions Patients used and experienced acupuncture differently in the NHS compared to the private sector. Eight different faces of consumerist behaviour were identified, but six were dominant: consumer as chooser, consumer as pragmatist, consumer as patient, consumer as earnest explorer, consumer as victim, and consumer as citizen. The decision to use acupuncture in either the private sector or the NHS was rarely well-informed: NHS and private patients both had

  15. Bullying behavior and mental health in healthcare and educational sectors in Kaunas, Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Bernotaite, Lina; Malinauskiene, Vilija; Leisyte, Palmira

    2017-05-16

    Investigations on workplace bullying in the countries of Eastern Europe are yet not too extensive. The aim of the study has been to identify the most frequent bullying behavior and to explore the associations with psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms in 3 female-dominated occupations in Kaunas, Lithuania. This crosssectional study employed 517 teachers (response rate (RR) = 71.3%), 174 family physicians (RR = 65.7%) and 311 internal medicine department nurses (RR = 69.1%). The twenty-two-item Negative Acts Questionnaire was used for measuring the exposure to bullying behavior, Goldberg 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) - psychological distress, Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) inventory - post-traumatic stress symptoms, Karasek & Theorell Demand-Control questionnaire - psychosocial job characteristics. The International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) SPSS Statistics version 20.0 was used for performing the statistical analysis. Logistic regression was used for assessing the associations among 22 negative acts as continuous variable and mental health outcomes adjusting to age, psychosocial factors at work and everyday life. Exposure to workplace bullying behavior on a weekly/daily basis was prevalent among family physicians at the rate of 19%, among nurses - 12.9%, among teachers - 4.1%. Even after adjustment to age, psychosocial job characteristics and threatening life events, the exposure to 22 negative acts as continuous variable was significantly associated with psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms for all 3 occupations. Health care sector is particularly affected by workplace bullying. Exposure to bullying behavior was associated with mental health problems for all 3 occupations. Preventive measures are necessary to improve psychosocial work environment conditions in healthcare and educational institutions in Lithuania. Med Pr 2017;68(3):307-314.

  16. Assessing health-care providers' readiness for reporting quality and patient safety indicators at primary health-care centres in Lebanon: a national cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Saleh, Shadi; Natafgi, Nabil

    2015-05-22

    Successful endorsement of quality indicators hinges on the readiness and acceptability of care providers for those measures. This paper aims to assess the readiness of care providers in the primary health-care sector in Lebanon for the implementation of quality and patient safety indicators. A cross-sectional survey methodology was utilized to gather information from 943 clinical care providers working at 123 primary health-care centres in Lebanon. The questionnaire included two sections: the first assessed four readiness dimensions (appropriateness, management support, efficacy, and personal valence) of clinical providers to use quality and safety indicators using the Readiness for Organization Change (ROC) scale, and the second section assessed the safety attitude at the primary care centre utilizing the Agency of Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ)-Ambulatory version. Although two thirds (66%) of respondents indicated readiness for implementation of quality and patient safety indicators in their centres, there appear to be differences by professional group. Physicians displayed the lowest scores on all readiness dimensions except for personal valence which was the lowest among nurses (60%). In contrast, allied health professionals displayed the highest scores across all readiness dimensions. Generally, respondents reflected a positive safety attitude climate in the centres. Yet, there remain a few areas of concern related to punitive culture (only 12.8% agree that staff should not be punished for reported errors/incidents), continuity of care (41.1% believe in the negative consequences of lack in continuity of care process), and resources (48.1% believe that the medical equipment they have are adequate). Providers with the highest SAQ score had 2.7, 1.7, 7 and 2.4 times the odds to report a higher readiness on the appropriateness, efficacy, management and personal valence ROC subscales, respectively (P value <0.01). Nurses

  17. The quality of outpatient primary care in public and private sectors in Sri Lanka--how well do patient perceptions match reality and what are the implications?

    PubMed

    Rannan-Eliya, Ravindra P; Wijemanne, Nilmini; Liyanage, Isuru K; Jayanthan, Janaki; Dalpatadu, Shanti; Amarasinghe, Sarasi; Anuranga, Chamara

    2015-03-01

    To compare the quality of clinical care and patient satisfaction in public and private outpatient primary care services in Sri Lanka. A prospective, cross-sectional comparison was done by direct observation of patient encounters and exit interviews of outpatients in 10 public hospital general outpatient clinics and 66 private practitioner clinics in three districts of Sri Lanka. A total of 1027 public sector patients and 944 private sector patients were surveyed. Data were collected for 39 quality indicators covering diarrhoea, cough, hypertension, diabetes, asthma, upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and five other conditions, along with prescribing indicators. The exit interviews collected data for 10 patient satisfaction indicators. The public sector performed better for some conditions (diarrhoea, cough and asthma) and the private sector performed better for others (hypertension, diabetes, URTI and tonsillitis). Overall quality was similar between the sectors in the domains of history taking, examination and investigations and management, but the private sector performed much better on patient education (57 vs 12%). Overall patient satisfaction was high in both sectors (98%), although the private sector performed much better in interpersonal satisfaction (94 vs 84%) and system-related indicators (95 vs 84%). Comparisons with studies from other countries suggest that both sectors perform considerably better than India, and similarly in many indicators to high-income countries. Quality of outpatient primary care in Sri Lanka is generally high for a lower-middle income developing country. The public and private sectors perform similarly, except that private sector patients have longer consultations, are more likely to receive education and advice, and obtain better interpersonal satisfaction. The public system, with its limited funding, is able to deliver care in diagnosis and management that is similar to the private sector, while private sector patients

  18. Pathways to research impact in primary healthcare: What do Australian primary healthcare researchers believe works best to facilitate the use of their research findings?

    PubMed

    Reed, Richard L; McIntyre, Ellen; Jackson-Bowers, Eleanor; Kalucy, Libby

    2017-03-02

    Primary healthcare researchers are under increasing pressure to demonstrate measurable and lasting improvement in clinical practice and healthcare policy as a result of their work. It is therefore important to understand the effectiveness of the research dissemination strategies used. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathways for research impact that have been achieved across several government-funded primary healthcare projects, and the effectiveness of these methods as perceived by their Chief Investigators. The project used an online survey to collect information about government-funded primary healthcare research projects. Chief Investigators were asked how they disseminated their findings and how this achieved impact in policy and practice. They were also asked to express their beliefs regarding the most effective means of achieving research impact and describe how this occurred. Chief Investigators of 17 projects indicated that a number of dissemination strategies were used but that professional networks were the most effective means of promoting uptake of their research findings. Utilisation of research findings for clinical practice was most likely to occur in organisations or among individual practitioners who were most closely associated with the research team, or when research findings were included in educational programmes involving clinical practice. Uptake of both policy- and practice-related research was deemed most successful if intermediary organisations such as formal professional networks were engaged in the research. Successful primary healthcare researchers had developed critical relationships with intermediary organisations within primary healthcare before the initiation of the research and had also involved them in the design. The scale of research impact was influenced by the current policy environment, the type and significance of the results, and the endorsement (or lack thereof) of professional bodies. Chief Investigators

  19. Valuing inter-sectoral costs and benefits of interventions in the healthcare sector: methods for obtaining unit prices.

    PubMed

    Drost, Ruben M W A; Paulus, Aggie T G; Ruwaard, Dirk; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2017-02-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about methods for valuing health intervention-related costs and monetary benefits in the education and criminal justice sectors, also known as 'inter-sectoral costs and benefits' (ICBs). The objective of this study was to develop methods for obtaining unit prices for the valuation of ICBs. By conducting an exploratory literature study and expert interviews, several generic methods were developed. The methods' feasibility was assessed through application in the Netherlands. Results were validated in an expert meeting, which was attended by policy makers, public health experts, health economists and HTA-experts, and discussed at several international conferences and symposia. The study resulted in four methods, including the opportunity cost method (A) and valuation using available unit prices (B), self-constructed unit prices (C) or hourly labor costs (D). The methods developed can be used internationally and are valuable for the broad international field of HTA.

  20. Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  1. Potentiality of Big Data in the Medical Sector: Focus on How to Reshape the Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Kyoungyoung

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The main purpose of this study was to explore whether the use of big data can effectively reduce healthcare concerns, such as the selection of appropriate treatment paths, improvement of healthcare systems, and so on. Methods By providing an overview of the current state of big data applications in the healthcare environment, this study has explored the current challenges that governments and healthcare stakeholders are facing as well as the opportunities presented by big data. Results Insightful consideration of the current state of big data applications could help follower countries or healthcare stakeholders in their plans for deploying big data to resolve healthcare issues. The advantage for such follower countries and healthcare stakeholders is that they can possibly leapfrog the leaders' big data applications by conducting a careful analysis of the leaders' successes and failures and exploiting the expected future opportunities in mobile services. Conclusions First, all big data projects undertaken by leading countries' governments and healthcare industries have similar general common goals. Second, for medical data that cuts across departmental boundaries, a top-down approach is needed to effectively manage and integrate big data. Third, real-time analysis of in-motion big data should be carried out, while protecting privacy and security. PMID:23882412

  2. Potentiality of big data in the medical sector: focus on how to reshape the healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Jee, Kyoungyoung; Kim, Gang-Hoon

    2013-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore whether the use of big data can effectively reduce healthcare concerns, such as the selection of appropriate treatment paths, improvement of healthcare systems, and so on. By providing an overview of the current state of big data applications in the healthcare environment, this study has explored the current challenges that governments and healthcare stakeholders are facing as well as the opportunities presented by big data. Insightful consideration of the current state of big data applications could help follower countries or healthcare stakeholders in their plans for deploying big data to resolve healthcare issues. The advantage for such follower countries and healthcare stakeholders is that they can possibly leapfrog the leaders' big data applications by conducting a careful analysis of the leaders' successes and failures and exploiting the expected future opportunities in mobile services. First, all big data projects undertaken by leading countries' governments and healthcare industries have similar general common goals. Second, for medical data that cuts across departmental boundaries, a top-down approach is needed to effectively manage and integrate big data. Third, real-time analysis of in-motion big data should be carried out, while protecting privacy and security.

  3. Ex-ante evaluation of PFIs within the Italian health-care sector: what is the basis for this PPP?

    PubMed

    Barretta, Antonio; Ruggiero, Pasquale

    2008-10-01

    This paper aims to explore the practices of ex-ante evaluation in the Italian health-care sector (HCS) in order to verify whether (and how), in spite of legislative requirements, public interests are also considered before choosing the PFI solution, and to understand the possible effects of the pre-evaluation method used on the expectations of the public partner regarding the future of the relationship. The research was carried out by interviewing the subjects responsible for six initiatives of project financing in the Italian health-care sector. The empirical analysis has shown that Italian health-care trusts, which are not required to apply a compulsory method for pre-evaluating PFIs from their own perspective, neither drew up any calculation for weighting their future costs and revenues related to the project, nor did they consider the social consequences for the community. However, they merely followed the legal requirements and prepared a financial plan from the private partner perspective. In this situation, the importance of ex-ante evaluation from the public perspective for guaranteeing the beginning of a PPP in a context more suitable for developing trust between partners is even stronger.

  4. A baseline survey of the Primary Healthcare system in south eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukwuani, Chinyere Mercellina; Olugboji, Akindeji; Akuto, Edward Erdorga; Odebunmi, Akim; Ezeilo, Ezenta; Ugbene, Emmanuel

    2006-07-01

    health tax among others. It was evident that poor funding, bad management practices and infrastructural decay is the bane of efficient PHC delivery. Consequently, we propose that cost determination studies, to establish the financial implication of the minimum package for provision of primary healthcare services, should be an essential prerequisite to the reform process. Some critical cross-cutting issues identified from the data obtained which could form the basis for major policy thrust include, development of strategies for sustainable promotion of public-private-partnership for enhanced community involvement in healthcare management, ensuring that interventional investment is proportional to the felt health needs of the populace and funding of healthcare through equitable integration of user fees/charges.

  5. The retention of health human resources in primary healthcare centers in Lebanon: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Saleh, Shadi; El-Jardali, Fadi; Dimassi, Hani; Mourad, Yara

    2012-11-22

    Critical shortages of health human resources (HHR), associated with high turnover rates, have been a concern in many countries around the globe. Of particular interest is the effect of such a trend on the primary healthcare (PHC) sector; considered a cornerstone in any effective healthcare system. This study is a rare attempt to investigate PHC HHR work characteristics, level of burnout and likelihood to quit as well as the factors significantly associated with staff retention at PHC centers in Lebanon. A cross-sectional design was utilized to survey all health providers at 81 PHC centers dispersed in all districts of Lebanon. The questionnaire consisted of four sections: socio-demographic/ professional background, organizational/institutional characteristics, likelihood to quit and level of professional burnout (using the Maslach-Burnout Inventory). A total of 755 providers completed the questionnaire (60.5% response rate). Bivariate analyses and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine factors associated with likelihood to quit. Two out of five respondents indicated likelihood to quit their jobs within the next 1-3 years and an additional 13.4% were not sure about quitting. The top three reasons behind likelihood to quit were poor salary (54.4%), better job opportunities outside the country (35.1%) and lack of professional development (33.7%). A U-shaped relationship was observed between age and likelihood to quit. Regression analysis revealed that high levels of burnout, lower level of education and low tenure were all associated with increased likelihood to quit. The study findings reflect an unstable workforce and are not conducive to supporting an expanded role for PHC in the Lebanese healthcare system. While strategies aiming at improving staff retention would be important to develop and implement for all PHC HHR; targeted retention initiatives should focus on the young-new recruits and allied health professionals. Particular attention should

  6. The retention of health human resources in primary healthcare centers in Lebanon: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Critical shortages of health human resources (HHR), associated with high turnover rates, have been a concern in many countries around the globe. Of particular interest is the effect of such a trend on the primary healthcare (PHC) sector; considered a cornerstone in any effective healthcare system. This study is a rare attempt to investigate PHC HHR work characteristics, level of burnout and likelihood to quit as well as the factors significantly associated with staff retention at PHC centers in Lebanon. Methods A cross-sectional design was utilized to survey all health providers at 81 PHC centers dispersed in all districts of Lebanon. The questionnaire consisted of four sections: socio-demographic/ professional background, organizational/institutional characteristics, likelihood to quit and level of professional burnout (using the Maslach-Burnout Inventory). A total of 755 providers completed the questionnaire (60.5% response rate). Bivariate analyses and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine factors associated with likelihood to quit. Results Two out of five respondents indicated likelihood to quit their jobs within the next 1–3 years and an additional 13.4% were not sure about quitting. The top three reasons behind likelihood to quit were poor salary (54.4%), better job opportunities outside the country (35.1%) and lack of professional development (33.7%). A U-shaped relationship was observed between age and likelihood to quit. Regression analysis revealed that high levels of burnout, lower level of education and low tenure were all associated with increased likelihood to quit. Conclusions The study findings reflect an unstable workforce and are not conducive to supporting an expanded role for PHC in the Lebanese healthcare system. While strategies aiming at improving staff retention would be important to develop and implement for all PHC HHR; targeted retention initiatives should focus on the young-new recruits and allied health

  7. Primary healthcare system and practice characteristics in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hwee Sing; Lim, Yee Wei; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Jm

    2014-01-01

    It is crucial to adapt and improve the (primary) health care systems of countries to prepare for future patient profiles and their related needs. The main aim of this study was to acquire a comprehensive overview of the perceptions of primary care experts in Singapore about the state of primary care in Singapore, and to compare this with the state of primary care in other countries. Notwithstanding ranked 2(nd) in terms of efficiency of health care, Singapore is facing significant health care challenges. Emails were sent to 85 experts, where they were asked to rate Singapore's primary care system based on nine internationally adopted health system characteristics and six practice characteristics (response rate = 29%). The primary care system in Singapore received an average of 10.9 out of 30 possible points. Lowest ratings were given to: earnings of primary care physicians compared to specialists, requirement for 24 hr accessibility of primary care services, standard of family medicine in academic departments, reflection of community served by practices in patient lists, and the access to specialists without needing to be referred by primary care physicians. Singapore was categorized as a 'low' primary care country according to the experts.

  8. KEY ITEMS OF INNOVATION MANAGEMENT IN THE PRIMARY HEALTHCARE CENTRES CASE STUDY: FINLAND.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Alireza; Zolfagharzadeh, Mohammad Mahdi; Naaranoja, Marja

    2015-09-01

    Trends such as aging populations, excess costs, rising public expectations, and progress in medical science and technologies point out the necessity of adaptation and development of innovation in the healthcare systems particularly in developed countries. The main objective of this article is to review diffusion of innovation in the healthcare sector. Different types of innovation, diffusion characteristics, and adoption mechanisms are the subjects that are discussed in the selected case study, Finland. Finally, the key items of innovation management in the Finnish health system are introduced. The results can be implemented in other countries as well.

  9. Mobility and Transparency of Vocational Qualifications: An Overview of Studies on the Tourism, Chemical and Healthcare Sectors in Europe. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Sten; Richards, Greg; Rolfe, Heather; Skar, Mariann

    Three studies covering the tourism, chemical industry, and healthcare sectors in the European Union investigated patterns of cross-border mobility at the sector level. Special focus was on transparency of vocational qualifications and the relation between transparency and mobility. A serious lack of information on labor force mobility within…

  10. Importance of healthcare utilization and multimorbidity level in choosing a primary care provider in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Midlöv, Patrik; Halling, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To study the associations between active choice of primary care provider and healthcare utilization, multimorbidity, age, and sex, comparing data from primary care and all healthcare in a Swedish population. Design. Descriptive cross-sectional study using descriptive analyses including t-test, correlations, and logistic regression modelling in four separate models. Setting and subjects. The population (151 731) and all healthcare in Blekinge in 2007. Main outcome measure. Actively or passively listed in primary care, registered on 31 December 2007. Results. Number of consultations (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.30–1.32), multimorbidity level (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.67–1.70), age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.03–1.03), and sex (OR for men 0.67, 95% CI 0.65–0.68) were all associated with registered active listing in primary care. Active listing was more strongly associated with number of consultations and multimorbidity level using primary care data (OR 2.11, 95% CI 2.08–2.15 and OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.11–2.17, respectively) than using data from all healthcare. Number of consultations and multimorbidity level were correlated and had similar associations with active listing in primary care. Modelling number of consultations, multimorbidity level, age, and sex gave four separate models with about 70% explanatory power for active listing in primary care. Combining number of consultations and multimorbidity did not improve the models. Conclusions. Number of consultations and multimorbidity level were associated with active listing in primary care. These factors were also associated with each other differently in primary care than in all healthcare. More complex models including non-health-related individual characteristics and healthcare-related factors are needed to increase explanatory power. PMID:24939741

  11. [The risk for illegal behaviour and corruption in the healthcare sector: what preventive measures can be taken?].

    PubMed

    Rivoiro, Chiara

    2016-05-01

    In the healthcare sector risk factors for illegal behavior and corruption are peculiar and greater than in other social areas, as it plays a crucial role in the community's economical, political and cultural life. The healthcare services is a complex network that require interaction between may people, constant contacts with the industry, safety and adequate facilities that require regular maintenance, upgrade and replacement of medical technology, connection with local and regional policy makers. This provides the opportunity of being exposed to improper influence. However, illegal behaviors can be prevented: first of all supporting all professionals that everyday work to protect our health with ethics and expertise; then with all instruments that anti-corruption action plans, such as the one introduced in Italy in 2012, aim to identify and target those areas most at risk of corruption phenomena.

  12. The role of organisational justice, burnout and commitment in the understanding of absenteeism in the Canadian healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Chênevert, Denis; Jourdain, Genevieve; Cole, Nona; Banville, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to integrate Greenberg's perspective on the connection between injustice and stress in order to clarify the role of organisational justice, burnout and organisational commitment in the understanding of absenteeism. The study was carried out among 457 workers of a large healthcare establishment in the Canadian public healthcare sector. The model was tested using structural equation methods. The results reveal that procedural and interactional justices have an indirect effect on exhaustion through distributive injustice. Moreover, it was found that distributive injustice is indirectly linked to short-term absences through exhaustion. By contrast, the relationship between distributive injustice and long-term absence can be explained by two mediating variables, namely, exhaustion and psychosomatic complaints. In spite of the non-longitudinal nature of this study, the results suggest that the stress model and the medical model best explain the relationship between organisational injustice and absenteeism, while the withdrawal model via organisational commitment is not associated in this study with absenteeism. Healthcare managers should consider the possibility of better involving employees in the decision-making process in order to increase their perception of procedural and interactional justice, and indirectly reduce exhaustion and absenteeism through a greater perception of distributive justice. For the healthcare sector, the need to reduce absenteeism is particularly urgent because of budget restrictions and the shortage of labour around the world. This is one of the first studies to provide a complete model that analyses the stress process in terms of how organisational justice affects short- and long-term absences, in a bid to understand the specific process and factors that lead to shorter and longer episodes of absence.

  13. Viability of healthcare service delivery alternatives for the Australian mining sector.

    PubMed

    Williams, Patricia A H; Giles, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The changing and demanding nature of the mining workforce in rural and remote Australia brings unique challenges to the delivery of healthcare services. In an attempt to control costs whilst delivering cost effective and quality healthcare, new models of delivery must be considered. For a workforce that is fly-in/fly-out, the provision of healthcare is problematic given the lack of consistency in location. A cost-benefit framework is analysed comparing three models of service provision using travel to a major location, locum services and remote health monitoring. Ultimately, new models of care must be considered to address the issues of increasing workforce turnover, to cater for rising healthcare costs, and to improve the health of such communities.

  14. How Do Primary Healthcare and Social Services Enable Young People's Participation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rytkönen, Minna Maarit; Kaunisto, Merita Anneli; Pietilä, Anna-Maija K

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Participation is a crucial factor in primary healthcare and social services, enabling clients to maintain their own health and well-being. However, adolescents' participation in service provision may be compromised because they are often not understood or heard as equal clients in encounters with primary services. The aim…

  15. Human resources and models of mental healthcare integration into primary and community care in India: Case studies of 72 programmes.

    PubMed

    van Ginneken, Nadja; Maheedhariah, Meera S; Ghani, Sarah; Ramakrishna, Jayashree; Raja, Anusha; Patel, Vikram

    2017-01-01

    Given the scarcity of specialist mental healthcare in India, diverse community mental healthcare models have evolved. This study explores and compares Indian models of mental healthcare delivered by primary-level workers (PHW), and health workers' roles within these. We aim to describe current service delivery to identify feasible and acceptable models with potential for scaling up. Seventy two programmes (governmental and non-governmental) across 12 states were visited. 246 PHWs, coordinators, leaders, specialists and other staff were interviewed to understand the programme structure, the model of mental health delivery and health workers' roles. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Programmes were categorised using an existing framework of collaborative and non-collaborative models of primary mental healthcare. A new model was identified: the specialist community model, whereby PHWs are trained within specialist programmes to provide community support and treatment for those with severe mental disorders. Most collaborative and specialist community models used lay health workers rather than doctors. Both these models used care managers. PHWs and care managers received support often through multiple specialist and non-specialist organisations from voluntary and government sectors. Many projects still use a simple yet ineffective model of training without supervision (training and identification/referral models). Indian models differ significantly to those in high-income countries-there are less professional PHWs used across all models. There is also intensive specialist involvement particularly in the community outreach and collaborative care models. Excessive reliance on specialists inhibits their scalability, though they may be useful in targeted interventions for severe mental disorders. We propose a revised framework of models based on our findings. The current priorities are to evaluate the comparative effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and scalability

  16. The role of the practice facilitators in Ontario primary healthcare quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Jyoti; Han, Han; Green, Michael; Russell, Grant; Martin, Mary I; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-07-30

    Practice facilitation is a key component of quality improvement in primary healthcare. Studies have reported the effectiveness of practice facilitation in improving quality management and care delivery. However, little has been published about practice facilitators' training, facilitation activities, and their perceived role in quality improvement in primary healthcare. This study examined practice facilitators' training and the perceptions of the practice facilitator role in a provincial primary healthcare learning collaborative quality improvement initiative in Ontario, Canada. Descriptive and qualitative methods were used to outline the practice facilitator training as well as to look into the experiences and perceptions of practice facilitators and primary healthcare teams regarding the practice facilitation role in quality improvement. Data collection included training artifacts, activity logs, self-reflection reports, and semi-structured interviews with practice facilitators and primary healthcare participants. Reflections and interviews were analyzed to identify the role of the practice facilitators from their own experience, and from the perspective of the participants. Descriptive statistics were used to learn about categories of facilitation activities undertaken and frequency of these activities. Sixteen practice facilitators and seven family healthcare teams participated in the study. Practice facilitators received a two-day intensive training workshop and continued training. Their time was spent mostly working directly with participating teams, continued learning and training, communications and administration. They served as coaches, resource providers, enablers and motivators. Participating teams expressed satisfaction with the practice facilitator role, although they had hoped this position would provide onsite and hands-on support in conducting activities of quality improvement at the practice level. Practice facilitators played a crucial role in

  17. Is healthcare a 'Necessity' or 'Luxury'? an empirical evidence from public and private sector analyses of South-East Asian countries?

    PubMed

    Khan, Jahangir Am; Mahumud, Rashidul Alam

    2015-01-01

    South-East Asian Regional (SEAR) countries range from low- to middle-income countries and have considerable differences in mix of public and private sector expenditure on health. This study intends to estimate the income-elasticities of healthcare expenditure in public and private sectors separately for investigating whether healthcare is a 'necessity' or 'luxury' for citizens of these countries. Panel data from 9 SEAR countries over 16 years (1995-2010) were employed. Fixed- and random-effect models were fitted to estimate income-elasticity of public, private and total healthcare expenditure. Results showed that one percent point increase in GDP per capita increased private expenditure on healthcare by 1.128%, while public expenditure increased by only 0.412%. Inclusion of three-year lagged variables of GDP per capita in the models did not have remarkable influence on the findings. The citizens of SEAR countries consider healthcare as a necessity while provided through public sector and a luxury when delivered by private sector. By increasing the public provisions of healthcare, more redistribution of healthcare resources can be ensured, which can accelerate the journey of SEAR countries towards universal health coverage.

  18. Do elections matter for private-sector healthcare management in Brazil? An analysis of municipal health policy.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alecia J; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Blendon, Robert J

    2017-07-12

    This study analyzed several political determinants of increased private-sector management in Brazilian health care. In Brazil, the poor depend almost exclusively on the public Unified Health System (the SUS), which remains severely underfunded. Given the overhead costs associated with privately contracted health services, increased private management is one driver of higher expenditures in the system. Although left parties campaign most vocally in support of greater public control of the SUS, the extent to which their stated positions translate into health care policy remains untested. Drawing on multiple publicly available data sources, we used linear regression to analyze how political party-in-power and existing private sector health care contracting affect the share of privately managed health care services and outsourcing in municipalities. Data from two election periods-2004 to 2008 and 2008 to 2012-were analyzed. Our findings showed that although private sector contracting varies greatly across municipalities, this variation is not systematically associated with political party in power. This suggests that electoral politics plays a relatively minor role in municipal-level health care administration. Existing levels of private sector management appear to have a greater effect on the public-private makeup of the Brazilian healthcare system, suggesting a strong role of path dependence in the evolution of Brazilian health care delivery. Despite campaign rhetoric asserting distinct positions on privatization in the SUS, factors other than political party in power have a greater effect on private-sector health system management at the municipal-level in Brazil. Given the limited effect of elections on this issue, strengthening participatory bodies such as municipal health councils may better enfranchise citizens in the fundamental debate over public and private roles in the health care sector.

  19. Examining health equity through satisfaction and confidence of patients in primary healthcare in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Rudzik, Alanna E F

    2003-09-01

    Surveys of patient satisfaction are widely used for identifying priorities and problems in healthcare reforms. The present study examined satisfaction and confidence of patients in public healthcare in Trinidad and Tobago. Data were gathered by interviewing a random sample (n = 280) of primary healthcare (PHC) patients. Level of patient satisfaction was high but not constant. Results of interviews showed that patients with a higher monthly income (p = 0.032) and patients who most recently used private medical care (p = 0.037) had lower levels of satisfaction with health services. Employment had an effect on satisfaction (p = 0.065), significant among patients who had recently accessed private medical care (p = 0.039). Patients using PHC clinics preferred private care to public care. Confidence in public care decreased with increasing complexity of the medical condition. These preliminary results support continued efforts in health-sector reforms and call for the enhancement of data on satisfaction through more comprehensive qualitative data-collection methods.

  20. Perceptions of rural primary healthcare personnel about expansion of early communication intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kritzinger, Alta

    2013-01-01

    Background Early communication intervention services rendered by speech-language therapists and audiologists to families of infants and young children with feeding difficulties, hearing loss or emerging communication disorders should be implemented throughout South Africa. Early intervention can ameliorate risks, enhance development and may prevent further delays. Based on research initiated during a community-service year experience in a rural subdistrict, an incremental process of establishing accessible early communication intervention services was deemed feasible. Such a process cannot be successful if the collaboration of primary healthcare personnel and managers is not ensured. Objectives The aim of the article was to describe the perceptions of primary healthcare personnel with regard to expansion of early communication intervention services to infants at risk of developmental delay. Method A qualitative descriptive survey design was followed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 primary healthcare nurses and sisters and eight primary healthcare programme managers in Ditsobotla subdistrict in the North West province of South Africa. Results The participants indicated that by improving team work, developing training programmes and evaluating identification methods and resources, the step-by-step rollout of early communication intervention functions on four organisational levels may be a realistic goal for sustainable services in the resource-limited district. Conclusion The positive perceptions and contributions by participants promise a rich human-resource basis for transdisciplinary collaboration between speech-language therapists, audiologists and primary healthcare personnel in order to reduce the burden of early communication disorders in a rural district.

  1. Improving Quality of Care in Primary Health-Care Facilities in Rural Nigeria: Successes and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Ugo, Okoli; Ezinne, Eze-Ajoku; Modupe, Oludipe; Nicole, Spieker; Winifred, Ekezie; Kelechi, Ohiri

    2016-01-01

    Nigeria has a high population density but a weak health-care system. To improve the quality of care, 3 organizations carried out a quality improvement pilot intervention at the primary health-care level in selected rural areas. To assess the change in quality of care in primary health-care facilities in rural Nigeria following the provision of technical governance support and to document the successes and challenges encountered. A total of 6 states were selected across the 6 geopolitical zones of the country. However, assessments were carried out in 40 facilities in only 5 states. Selection was based on location, coverage, and minimum services offered. The facilities were divided randomly into 2 groups. The treatment group received quality-of-care assessment, continuous feedback, and improvement support, whereas the control group received quality assessment and no other support. Data were collected using the SafeCare Healthcare Standards and managed on the SafeCare Data Management System-AfriDB. Eight core areas were assessed at baseline and end line, and compliance to quality health-care standards was compared. Outcomes from 40 facilities were accepted and analyzed. Overall scores increased in the treatment facilities compared to the control facilities, with strong evidence of improvement (t = 5.28, P = .0004) and 11% average improvement, but no clear pattern of improvement emerged in the control group. The study demonstrated governance support and active community involvement offered potential for quality improvement in primary health-care facilities.

  2. Implementing chronic disease management in the public healthcare sector in Singapore: the role of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cheah, J; Heng, B H

    2001-01-01

    The public health care delivery system in Singapore faces the challenges of a rapidly ageing population, an increasing chronic disease burden, increasing healthcare cost, rising expectations and demand for better health services, and shortage of resources. It is also fragmented, resulting in duplication and lack of coordination between institutions. A disease management approach has been adopted by the National Healthcare Group (NHG) as a critical strategy to provide holistic, cost-effective, seamless and well-coordinated care across the continuum. The framework in the development of the disease management plan included identifying the diseases and defining the target population, organizing a multi-disciplinary team lead by a clinician champion, defining the core components, treatment protocols and evaluation methods, defining the goals, and measuring and managing the outcomes. As disease management and case management for chronic diseases are new approaches adopted in the healthcare delivery system, there is a lack of understanding by healthcare professionals. The leadership and participation of hospital physicians was sought in the planning, design and outcomes monitoring to ensure their 'buy-in' and the successful implementation and effectiveness of the program. The episodic diagnosis related group (DRG)-based framework of funding and subvention for healthcare, and the shortage of step-care care facilities, have been recognized by the Ministry of Health as an impediments to the implementation, and these are currently being addressed.

  3. Experience of Behvarzes (Iranian primary healthcare providers) from giving primary health services in health houses

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary healthcare (PHC) providers play a major role in provision of public health in rural areas in Iran. They are considered as the key elements of health development in rural population. There is limited research on clarification of their experiences from provision of health services in their working conditions. This study aimed to clarify the experience of PHC providers from working conditions in giving primary health services in health houses (district branches of rural health care centers). Materials and Methods: This is a content analysis qualitative study, conducted through personal and group interviews with 12 health workers working in health care centers in rural areas in Isfahan province, 2010. Sampling continued until data saturation. Data were analyzed through conventional content analysis and constant comparative method. Results: Data analysis led to extraction of 11 categories, and finally, four themes of “ignoring the rights,” “causing tension in working climate,” “pressure or overload of expectations beyond the power,” and “occupational worn out” were yielded from the categories. These themes reveal the concepts and nature of PHC providers’ experiences from giving health care at health houses as the first level of PHC centers. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the PHC providers work in a tense condition in health houses. Although they devote themselves to the health of society members, their own health is neglected. Policy makers and authorities should amend working conditions of PHC providers through modification of resources and making supportive and collaborative strategies to improve the quality of services and promote the health level of the service receivers. PMID:27512699

  4. Primary healthcare NZ nurses' experiences of advance directives: understanding their potential role.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Raewyn; Banister, Elizabeth; de Vries, Kay

    2013-07-01

    Advance directives are one aspect of advance care planning designed to improve end of life care. The New Zealand Nurses Organisation released their first mission statement in 2010 concerning advance directives suggesting an increase in the use of these. A burgeoning older population, expected to rise over the next few years, places the primary healthcare nurse in a pivotal role to address the challenges in constructing advance directives. While literature supports the role for primary healthcare nurses in promoting advance directives, no research was found on this role in the New Zealand context. This paper presents results of a qualitative study conducted in New Zealand with 13 senior primary healthcare nurses with respect to their knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of advance directives. Results of the analysis revealed a dynamic process involving participants coming to understand their potential role in this area. This process included reflection on personal experience with advance directives; values and ethics related to end of life issues; and professional actions.

  5. Future of primary healthcare education: current problems and potential solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lord, J

    2003-01-01

    This review examines the origins of primary care and the pressures currently faced in terms of patient expectation, regulation, accountability, and work force shortages. It recognises the appropriateness of adding to the burden in primary care further by the shift both of more services and more medical education from secondary care. Some conclusions are drawn concerning potential solutions including skill mix changes, centralisation of services, a change in attitudes to professional mistakes, increased protected development time, evidence based education, and academic, leadership, and feedback skills for general practitioners. Six recommendations are offered as a prescription for organisational and educational change. PMID:14612596

  6. Nurses' perceptions of mental healthcare in primary-care settings in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Emily; Isaiah, Gitonga; Nelson, Bernadette; Musau, Abednego; Koon, Adam D; Smith, Lahra; Mutiso, Victoria; Ndetei, David

    2016-07-12

    Kenya maintains an extraordinary treatment gap for mental health services because the need for and availability of mental health services are extraordinarily misaligned. One way to narrow the treatment gap is task-sharing, where specialists rationally distribute tasks across the health system, with many responsibilities falling upon frontline health workers, including nurses. Yet, little is known about how nurses perceive task-sharing mental health services. This article investigates nurses' perceptions of mental healthcare delivery within primary-care settings in Kenya. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 60 nurses from a public urban (n = 20), private urban (n = 20), and public rural (n = 20) hospitals. Nurses participated in a one-hour interview about their perceptions of mental healthcare delivery. Nurses viewed mental health services as a priority and believed integrating it into a basic package of primary care would protect it from competing health priorities, financial barriers, stigma, and social problems. Many nurses believed that integrating mental healthcare into primary care was acceptable and feasible, but low levels of knowledge of healthcare providers, especially in rural areas, and few specialists, would be barriers. These data underscore the need for task-sharing mental health services into existing primary healthcare in Kenya.

  7. Counterfeit medicines in Poland: opinions of primary healthcare physicians, nurses and lay persons.

    PubMed

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Januszewicz, Pawel; Wolan, Maja; Sobolewski, Marek; Krauze, Martin; Fijalek, Zbigniew E

    2013-02-01

    To gain information concerning disparities in the understanding of the counterfeit medicines phenomenon between healthcare workers and lay persons. Central-eastern Europe is facing significant challenges in combating a multi-billion euro, and often lethal, trade in counterfeit medicines. It is a major challenge especially for primary healthcare workers to expand the understanding of counterfeit medicines to the benefit of patients. Use of questionnaires. Two separate questionnaires were distributed, one for healthcare professionals and the other for lay persons. Conducted between September 2009-May 2010. One thousand and seventy-eight primary healthcare professionals and 377 lay persons were surveyed. Findings revealed less awareness among healthcare professionals than lay persons about the danger of purchasing illegal medicines or dietary supplements outside pharmacies. Healthcare professionals have lower levels of awareness about the scale of counterfeit medicines as well as threats of counterfeit medicines to health than lay persons. The majority of medical workers do not know the procedure for reporting suspicious medicine and do not warn their patients against purchasing medicine from unknown sources. Primary healthcare workers have less awareness of the scale of the counterfeit medicines phenomenon than lay persons. Nurses and physician need to become aware of the counterfeit medicines phenomenon. Nurses are well positioned to assume the active role in educating patients about the threat of the presence of counterfeit medicines so as to enhance safety for their patients. However, to accomplish that aim, these findings suggest that healthcare professionals need to become better educated about counterfeit medicines and need to be trained in skills to identify counterfeit medicines. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. An analysis of the implementation and impact of speech-recognition technology in the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Parente, Ronaldo; Kock, Ned; Sonsini, John

    2004-06-18

    This paper develops a conceptual framework and offers research propositions for understanding the adoption of speech-recognition technology, drawing from Rogers's work on the diffusion of innovation, from interview findings, and from case study analysis. The study's focus was the analysis of the implementation of speech recognition and its impact on performance in the healthcare industry. Our interview findings indicated that, while there is still much room for improvement in the way speech-recognition technology is adopted and implemented, this particular technology has had a significant impact on the ability of healthcare providers to operate more cost effectively and provide a better level of patient care.

  9. Primary healthcare in transition--a qualitative study of how managers perceived a system change.

    PubMed

    Maun, Andy; Nilsson, Kerstin; Furåker, Carina; Thorn, Jörgen

    2013-10-03

    Primary healthcare in Sweden has undergone widespread reforms in recent years, including freedom of choice regarding provider, freedom of establishment and increased privatisation. The key aims of the reforms were to strengthen the role of the patient and improve performance in terms of access and responsiveness. The aim of this study was to explore how managers at publicly owned primary healthcare centres perceived the transition of the primary healthcare system and the impact it has had on their work. In this qualitative study, 24 managers of publicly owned primary healthcare centres in the metropolitan region of Gothenburg were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data were analysed using content analysis inspired by Silverman. The analysis revealed two core themes: The transition is perceived as a rapid change, enforced mainly through financial incentives and Prioritisation conflicts arise between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment. The transition has produced powerful and rapid effects that were considered to be both positive and negative. While the new financial incentives were seen as a driving force and a tool for change, they also became a stress factor due to uncertainty, competition with other primary healthcare centres and negative feelings associated with staff cutbacks. The shift in power towards the patient improved access and service but also led to more patients with unreasonable demands. Managers found it difficult to prioritise correctly between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment and they were concerned about potentially negative effects on less empowered patients, e.g. multi-morbid patients. Managers also experienced shortcomings in their change management skills. This qualitative study shows the complexity of the system change and describes the different effects and perceptions of the transition from a manager's perspective. This suggests a need for

  10. Primary healthcare in transition – a qualitative study of how managers perceived a system change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare in Sweden has undergone widespread reforms in recent years, including freedom of choice regarding provider, freedom of establishment and increased privatisation. The key aims of the reforms were to strengthen the role of the patient and improve performance in terms of access and responsiveness. The aim of this study was to explore how managers at publicly owned primary healthcare centres perceived the transition of the primary healthcare system and the impact it has had on their work. Methods In this qualitative study, 24 managers of publicly owned primary healthcare centres in the metropolitan region of Gothenburg were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data were analysed using content analysis inspired by Silverman. Results The analysis revealed two core themes: The transition is perceived as a rapid change, enforced mainly through financial incentives and Prioritisation conflicts arise between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment. The transition has produced powerful and rapid effects that were considered to be both positive and negative. While the new financial incentives were seen as a driving force and a tool for change, they also became a stress factor due to uncertainty, competition with other primary healthcare centres and negative feelings associated with staff cutbacks. The shift in power towards the patient improved access and service but also led to more patients with unreasonable demands. Managers found it difficult to prioritise correctly between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment and they were concerned about potentially negative effects on less empowered patients, e.g. multi-morbid patients. Managers also experienced shortcomings in their change management skills. Conclusions This qualitative study shows the complexity of the system change and describes the different effects and perceptions of the transition from a manager

  11. Reforming Victoria's primary health and community service sector: rural implications.

    PubMed

    Alford, K

    2000-01-01

    In 1999 the Victorian primary care and community support system began a process of substantial reform, involving purchasing reforms and a contested selection process between providers in large catchment areas across the State. The Liberal Government's electoral defeat in September 1999 led to a review of these reforms. This paper questions the reforms from a rural perspective. They were based on a generic template that did not consider rural-urban differences in health needs or other differences including socio-economic status, and may have reinforced if not aggravated rural-urban differences in the quality of and access to primary health care in Victoria.

  12. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-12-01

    The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is important to retain existing nursing staff in the healthcare sector to ensure a stable home-care workforce for the future. However, to date there has been little research about the job factors in home care that affect whether staff are considering leaving the healthcare sector. The main purpose of the study was to examine how home-care nursing staff's self-perceived autonomy relates to whether they have considered leaving the healthcare sector and to assess the possible mediating effect of work engagement. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study involved 262 registered nurses and certified nursing assistants employed in Dutch home-care organisations (mean age of 51; 97% female). The respondents were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide group of nursing staff members in various healthcare settings (67% response rate). The questionnaire included validated scales concerning self-perceived autonomy and work engagement and a measure for considering pursuing an occupation outside the healthcare sector. Logistic regression and mediation analyses were conducted to test associations between self-perceived autonomy, work engagement and considering leaving the healthcare sector. Nursing staff members in home care who perceive more autonomy are more engaged in their work and less likely to have considered leaving the healthcare sector. The positive association between self-perceived autonomy and considering leaving, found among nursing staff members regardless of their level of education, is mediated by work engagement. In developing strategies for retaining nursing staff in home care, employers and policy makers should target their efforts at enhancing nursing staff

  13. Evaluating the Quality of the Learning Outcome in Healthcare Sector: The Expero4care Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervai, Sara; Polo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model represents the first attempt of a "quality model" dedicated to the learning outcomes of healthcare trainings. Design/Methodology/Approach: Created as development…

  14. Winners and losers. Corporate tax overhaul would have very different effects for various healthcare sectors.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-04-15

    Washington is in the mood for a corporate tax overhaul, but not every segment of healthcare will like the result. One proposed change cracks down on opportunities for companies to shift profits on intellectual property to countries with lower tax rates---a tactic frequently deployed by the pharmaceutical industry. Providers and insurers would be winners under the proposals.

  15. Evaluating the Quality of the Learning Outcome in Healthcare Sector: The Expero4care Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervai, Sara; Polo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model represents the first attempt of a "quality model" dedicated to the learning outcomes of healthcare trainings. Design/Methodology/Approach: Created as development…

  16. Successful partnerships with third sector organisations to enhance the healthcare student experience: a partnership evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Katie; Tanner, Judith; Rutty, Jane; Astley-Pepper, Maxine; Hall, Richard

    2015-03-01

    There is limited research surrounding academic partnerships and more research is needed to educate universities, and the private, public and third sectors about the benefits and limitations of such partnerships. The aim of this study was to outline the unique partnership between Macmillan Cancer Support and De Montfort University and to evaluate the progress of this partnership. A qualitative approach was employed which involved interviews with nine members of the partnership's steering group. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that a partnership between a university and a third sector charity can have mutual benefits for all those involved, particularly for students and those affected by cancer. Furthermore, the module to develop volunteering among families affected cancer, created through this partnership is now being considered by other universities as a way of providing holistic and non-traditional lecture based learning experiences. Recommendations are made for future partnerships between third sector charities and universities.

  17. Perceptions of Obesity Treatment Options Among Healthcare Providers and Low-Income Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Betty M; Kennedy, Kathleen B; Sarpong, Daniel F; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is a key component of medical care delivery and has a role to play in reducing obesity in the United States. The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes and perceptions about obesity in low-income primary care patients and to identify preferences for weight management interventions from the patient and healthcare provider perspectives. A convenience sample of 28 patients and 6 healthcare providers from across the state of Louisiana participated in 1 of 5 structured focus groups. Demographic information was collected from both the patients and healthcare providers using survey instruments. Patients and healthcare providers were more similar than dissimilar in their perceptions of obesity in that both groups selected referral to a nutritionist, use of medication, and prescribed exercise as the top 3 strategies that would have the greatest impact on losing weight. Referral to a nutritionist was selected as the easiest strategy to implement. Receiving feedback from both patients and healthcare providers gives researchers the opportunity to acquire useful knowledge that may be beneficial in designing and conducting interventions suitable for patients desiring to lose weight, especially those in primary care settings.

  18. Estimating the unit costs of public hospitals and primary healthcare centers.

    PubMed

    Younis, Mustafa Z; Jaber, Samer; Mawson, Anthony R; Hartmann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many factors have affected the rise of health expenditures, such as high-cost medical technologies, changes in disease patterns and increasing demand for health services. All countries allocate a significant portion of resources to the health sector. In 2008, the gross domestic product of Palestine was estimated to be at $6.108bn (current price) or about $1697 per capita. Health expenditures are estimated at 15.6% of the gross domestic product, almost as much as those of Germany, Japan and other developed countries. The numbers of hospitals, hospital beds and primary healthcare centers in the country have all increased. The Ministry of Health (MOH) currently operates 27 of 76 hospitals, with a total of 3074 beds, which represent 61% of total beds of all hospitals in the Palestinian Authorities area. Also, the MOH is operating 453 of 706 Primary Health Care facilities. By 2007, about 40 000 people were employed in different sectors of the health system, with 33% employed by the MOH. This purpose of this study was to develop a financing strategy to help cover some or all of the costs involved in operating such institutions and to estimate the unit cost of primary and secondary programs and departments. A retrospective study was carried out on data from government hospitals and primary healthcare centers to identify and analyze the costs and output (patient-related services) and to estimate the unit cost of health services provided by hospitals and PHCs during the year 2008. All operating costs are assigned and allocated to the departments at MOH hospitals and primary health care centers (PPHCs) and are identified as overhead departments, intermediate-service and final-service departments. Intermediate-service departments provide procedures and services to patients in the final-service departments. The costs of the overhead departments are distributed to the intermediate-service and final-service departments through a step-down method, according to allocation

  19. [Catalonia's primary healthcare accreditation model: a valid model].

    PubMed

    Davins, Josep; Gens, Montserrat; Pareja, Clara; Guzmán, Ramón; Marquet, Roser; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    There are few experiences of accreditation models validated by primary care teams (EAP). The aim of this study was to detail the process of design, development, and subsequent validation of the consensus EAP accreditation model of Catalonia. An Operating Committee of the Health Department of Catalonia revised models proposed by the European Foundation for Quality Management, the Joint Commission International and the Institut Català de la Salut and proposed 628 essential standards to the technical group (25 experts in primary care and quality of care), to establish consensus standards. The consensus document was piloted in 30 EAP for the purpose of validating the contents, testing standards and identifying evidence. Finally, we did a survey to assess acceptance and validation of the document. The Technical Group agreed on a total of 414 essential standards. The pilot selected a total of 379. Mean compliance with the standards of the final document in the 30 EAP was 70.4%. The standards results were the worst fulfilment percentage. The survey target that 83% of the EAP found it useful and 78% found the content of the accreditation manual suitable as a tool to assess the quality of the EAP, and identify opportunities for improvement. On the downside they highlighted its complexity and laboriousness. We have a model that fits the reality of the EAP, and covers all relevant issues for the functioning of an excellent EAP. The model developed in Catalonia is a model for easy understanding.

  20. Evaluation of spatial accessibility to primary healthcare using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtsho, S.; Corner, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    Primary health care is considered to be one of the most important aspects of the health care system in any country, which directly helps in improving the health of the population. Potential spatial accessibility is a very important component of the primary health care system. One technique for studying spatial accessibility is by computing a gravity-based measure within a geographic information system (GIS) framework. In this study, straight-line distances between the associated population clusters and the health facilities and the provider-to-population ratio were used to compute the spatial accessibility of the population clusters for the whole country. Bhutan has been chosen as the case study area because it is quite easy to acquire and process data for the whole country due to its small size and population. The spatial accessibility measure of the 203 sub-districts shows noticeable disparities in health care accessibility in this country with about only 19 sub-districts achieving good health accessibility ranking. This study also examines a number of different health accessibility policy scenarios which can assist in identifying the most effective health policy from amongst many probable planning scenarios. Such a health accessibility measuring system can be incorporated into an existing spatial health system in developing countries to facilitate the proper planning and equitable distribution of health resources.

  1. "No-hire" clauses in healthcare sector contracts: their use and enforceability.

    PubMed

    Basanta, W Eugene

    2006-01-01

    In today's healthcare industry, many hospitals utilize outside agencies for both business and clinical functions. This Article acknowledges the prevalence of outsourcing contract labor in the healthcare arena and focuses on the restrictive provisions included in these employment contracts, particularly "no-hire" clauses. No-hire clauses are often included in contracts between healthcare providers and professional groups that provide clinical service employees to the provider, such as a medical practice group providing physicians to a hospital or an agency providing nurses to a nursing home. These clauses usually provide that the healthcare provider may not directly hire an employee provided by the professional group, nor may it contract with another professional group that later hires the employee. The purpose of a no-hire clause is two-fold: to protect the professional group's investment of time and moneyfor recruiting, training, and establishing the employee's clinical practice, and to give the professional group leverage to retain its employees. While noncompete clauses in employment contracts have traditionally been the subject of litigation, no-hire clauses raise distinct legal issues. Case law provides conflicting views as to the enforceability of these provisions. Some courts find no-hire clauses to be per se illegal restrictions on trade, while others will permit them when they are reasonable within a specific context. The author proposes that a multifactor test be applied on a case-by-case basis to determine the reasonableness of the no-hire provision in a given employment contract and suggests drafting improvements to facilitate enforcement.

  2. Implementation of ISO 9000 in the healthcare sector: a case study.

    PubMed

    Motwani, J G; Cheng, C H; Madan, M S

    1996-01-01

    In order to compete at the international level, companies are beginning to recognize ISO 9000 registration as a virtual necessity. As a result, the number of ISO certifications issued in the U.S. and Canada tripled between 1992 and 1994. By means of a case study, this paper describes how a large healthcare manufacturing organization recently achieved its ISO 9001 certification. Specifically, the strategies and the process used by the organization in obtaining the registration is explained.

  3. Involving patients in detecting quality gaps in a fragmented healthcare system: development of a questionnaire for Patients' Experiences Across Health Care Sectors (PEACS)

    PubMed Central

    Noest, Stefan; Ludt, Sabine; Klingenberg, Anja; Glassen, Katharina; Heiss, Friederike; Ose, Dominik; Rochon, Justine; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Wensing, Michel; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a generic questionnaire to evaluate experiences and reported outcomes in patients who receive treatment across a range of healthcare sectors. Design Mixed-methods design including focus groups, pretests and field test. Setting The patient questionnaire was developed in the context of a nationwide program in Germany aimed at quality improvements across the healthcare sectors. Participants For the field test, 589 questionnaires were distributed to patients via 47 general practices. Main Measurements Descriptive item analyzes non-responder analysis and factor analysis (PCA). Retest coefficients (r) calculated by correlation of sum scores of PCA factors. Quality gaps were assessed by the proportion of responders choosing a response category defined as indicating shortcomings in quality of care. Results The conceptual phase showed good content validity. Four hundred and seventy-four patients who received a range of treatment across a range of sectors were included (response rate: 80.5%). Data analysis confirmed the construct, oriented to the patient care journey with a focus on transitions between healthcare sectors. Quality gaps were assessed for the topics ‘Indication’, including shared-decision-making (6 items, 24.5–62.9%) and ‘Discharge and Transition’ (10 items; 20.7–48.2%). Retest coefficients ranged from r = 0.671 until r = 0.855 and indicated good reliability. Low ratios of item-non-response (0.8–9.3%) confirmed a high acceptance by patients. Conclusions The number of patients with complex healthcare needs is increasing. Initiatives to expand quality assurance across organizational borders and healthcare sectors are therefore urgently needed. A validated questionnaire (called PEACS 1.0) is available to measure patients' experiences across healthcare sectors with a focus on quality improvement. PMID:24758750

  4. Supporting Primary Healthcare Professionals to Care for People with Intellectual Disability: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, Nicholas; Van Driel, Mieke L.; van Dooren, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Background: The vast health inequities experienced by people with intellectual disability remain indisputable. Persistent and contemporary challenges exist for primary healthcare providers and researchers working to contribute to improvements to the health and well-being of people with intellectual disability. Over two decades after the only…

  5. Supporting Primary Healthcare Professionals to Care for People with Intellectual Disability: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, Nicholas; Van Driel, Mieke L.; van Dooren, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Background: The vast health inequities experienced by people with intellectual disability remain indisputable. Persistent and contemporary challenges exist for primary healthcare providers and researchers working to contribute to improvements to the health and well-being of people with intellectual disability. Over two decades after the only…

  6. Job satisfaction and turnover intent of primary healthcare nurses in rural South Africa: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Delobelle, Peter; Rawlinson, Jakes L; Ntuli, Sam; Malatsi, Inah; Decock, Rika; Depoorter, Anne Marie

    2011-02-01

    This paper is a report of a correlational study of the relationships between demographic variables, job satisfaction, and turnover intent among primary healthcare nurses in a rural area of South Africa. Health systems in Southern Africa face a nursing shortage fuelled by migration, but research on job satisfaction and turnover intent of primary healthcare nurses remains poorly described. A cross-sectional study with survey design was conducted in 2005 in all local primary healthcare clinics, including nurses on duty at the time of visit (n = 143). Scale development, anova, Spearman's rank correlation, and logistic regression were applied. Nurses reported satisfaction with work content and coworker relationships and dissatisfaction with pay and work conditions. Half of all nurses considered turnover within two years, of whom three in ten considered moving overseas. Job satisfaction was statistically significantly associated with unit tenure (P < 0·05), professional rank (P < 0·01) and turnover intent (P < 0·01). Turnover intent was statistically significantly explained by job satisfaction, age and education (P < 0·001), with younger and higher educated nurses being more likely to show turnover intent. Satisfaction with supervision was the only facet significantly explaining turnover intent when controlling for age, education, years of nursing and unit tenure (P < 0·001). Strategies aimed at improving job satisfaction and retention of primary healthcare nurses in rural South Africa should rely not only on financial rewards and improved work conditions but also on adequate human resource management. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Supporting primary healthcare professionals to care for people with intellectual disability: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Nicholas; Van Driel, Mieke L; van Dooren, Kate

    2015-01-01

    The vast health inequities experienced by people with intellectual disability remain indisputable. Persistent and contemporary challenges exist for primary healthcare providers and researchers working to contribute to improvements to the health and well-being of people with intellectual disability. Over two decades after the only review of supports for primary healthcare providers was published, this paper contributes to an evolving research agenda that aims to make meaningful gains in health-related outcomes for this group. The present authors updated the existing review by searching the international literature for developments and evaluations of multinational models of care. Based on our review, we present three strategies to support primary healthcare providers: (i) effectively using what we know, (ii) considering other strategies that offer support to primary healthcare professionals and (iii) researching primary health care at the system level. Strengthening primary care by supporting equitable provision of health-related care for people with intellectual disability is a much needed step towards improving health outcomes among people with intellectual disability. More descriptive quantitative and qualitative research, as well as intervention-based research underpinned by rigorous mixed-methods evaluating these strategies at the primary care level, which is sensitive to the needs of people with intellectual disability will assist primary care providers to provide better care and achieve better health outcomes. Many people with intellectual disability have poor health. The authors reviewed what has been written by other researchers about how to improve the health of people with intellectual disability. In the future, people who support adults with intellectual disability should continue doing what they do well, think of other ways to improve health, and do more research about health. At all times, the needs of people with intellectual disability should be the

  8. Improving Influenza Vaccination Rate among Primary Healthcare Workers in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Elawad, Khalid H; Farag, Elmoubasher A; Abuelgasim, Dina A; Smatti, Maria K; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E; Al Thani, Mohammed; Al Mujalli, Hanan; Shehata, Zienab; Alex, Merin; Al Thani, Asmaa A; Yassine, Hadi M

    2017-10-10

    The purpose of this study was to improve influenza vaccination, and determine factors influencing vaccine declination among health care workers (HCW) in Qatar. We launched an influenza vaccination campaign to vaccinate around 4700 HCW in 22 Primary Health Care Corporation (PHCC) centers in Qatar between 1st and 15th of November, 2015. Our target was to vaccinate 60% of all HCW. Vaccine was offered free of charge at all centers, and information about the campaign and the importance of influenza vaccination was provided to employees through direct communication, emails, and social media networks. Staff were reported as vaccinated or non-vaccinated using a declination form that included their occupation, place of work and reasons for declining the vaccine. Survey responses were summarized as proportional outcomes. We exceeded our goal, and vaccinated 77% of the target population. Only 9% declined to take the vaccine, and the remaining 14% were either on leave or had already been vaccinated. Vaccine uptake was highest among aides (98.1%), followed by technicians (95.2%), and was lowest amongst pharmacists (73.2%), preceded by physicians (84%). Of those that declined the vaccine, 34% provided no reason, 18% declined it due to behavioral issues, and 21% declined it due to medical reasons. Uptake of influenza vaccine significantly increased during the 2015 immunization campaign. This is attributed to good planning, preparation, a high level of communication, and providing awareness and training to HCW with proper supervision and monitoring.

  9. Accessibility and use of primary healthcare for immigrants living in the Niagara Region.

    PubMed

    Lum, Irene D; Swartz, Rebecca H; Kwan, Matthew Y W

    2016-05-01

    Although the challenges of accessing and using primary healthcare for new immigrants to Canada have been fairly well documented, the focus has primarily been on large cities with significant immigrant populations. The experiences of immigrants living in smaller, less diverse urban centres remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the lived experiences of immigrants living in a small urban centre with regards to the primary healthcare system. A total of 13 immigrants living in the Greater Niagara Region participated in semi-structured interviews. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then coded and analyzed for emergent themes using NVivo. Five factors were found to impact primary care access and use: lack of social contacts, lack of universal healthcare coverage during their initial arrival, language as a barrier, treatment preferences, and geographic distance to primary care. Overall findings suggest that immigrants moving to smaller areas such as the Niagara Region face similar barriers to primary care as those moving into large cities. Some barriers, however, appear to be specific to the context of smaller urban centres, further exacerbated by living in a small city due to a smaller immigrant population, fewer services for immigrants, and less diversity in practicing physicians. More research is required to understand the contextual factors inhibiting primary care access and use among immigrants moving to smaller urban centres, and determine effective strategies to overcome these barriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing integrative primary healthcare delivery: adding a chiropractor to the team.

    PubMed

    Garner, Michael J; Birmingham, Michael; Aker, Peter; Moher, David; Balon, Jeff; Keenan, Dirk; Manga, Pran

    2008-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine has been increasing in Canada despite the lack of coverage under the universal public health insurance system. Physicians and other healthcare practitioners are now being placed in multidisciplinary teams, yet little research on integration exists. We sought to investigate the effect of integrating chiropractic on the attitudes of providers on two healthcare teams. A mixed methods design with both quantitative and qualitative components was used to assess the healthcare teams. Assessment occurred prior to integration, at midstudy, and at the end of the study (18 months). Multidisciplinary healthcare teams at two community health centers in Ottawa, Ontario, participated in the study. All physicians, nurse practitioners, and degree-trained nurses employed at two study sites were approached to take part in the study. A chiropractor was introduced into each of the two healthcare teams. A quantitative questionnaire assessed providers' opinions, experiences with collaboration, and perceptions of chiropractic care. Focus groups were used to encourage providers to communicate their experiences and perceptions of the integration and of chiropractic. Twelve providers were followed for the full 18 months of integration. The providers expressed increased willingness to trust the chiropractors in shared care (F value = 7.18; P = .004). Questions regarding the legitimacy (F value = 12.33; P < .001) and effectiveness (F value = 11.17; P < .001) of chiropractic became increasingly positive by study end. This project has demonstrated the successful integration of chiropractors into primary healthcare teams.

  11. Reasons for Consultation among Patients attending Primary Healthcare Centres in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mandhari, Ahmed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Dorvlo, Atsu; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Pathways to care or care-seeking, which translate into healthcare utilisation, have been investigated in many parts of the world, but there is a dearth of studies in the Arabian Gulf. The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of attendees at primary healthcare centres in northern Oman and their reasons for visiting. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 676 participants attending 12 primary healthcare centres between June and July 2006. The catchment area was selected to represent the population structure in Oman. The 12-item questionnaire was read to every fifth eligible patient entering each healthcare centre for a routine appointment. Analyses were conducted using univariate statistics. Results: About a third (n = 200; 29.6%) of the participants had a history of chronic illness; 231 (34%) were on regular medications; 211 (31%) were taking part in health education programmes; 130 (19%) were open to complementary medicine. The majority of the participants mentioned physician’s advice (n = 570; 84%) as the strongest reason for seeking consultation. Conversely, physician’s advice was strongly related to particular demographic factors. Conclusion: This observational study identified some characteristics and reasons for visiting healthcare facilities in northern Oman. These are discussed within the context of prevailing sociocultural factors. The implications for the prevention and detection of ill health in Oman are also discussed. PMID:23862030

  12. Cases of mobbing activities as commonly seen in the healthcare sector in the world and in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ofluoğlu, Gökhan; Somunoğlu, Sinem

    2012-01-01

    Service process on a site in the health sector does not only bring people and services into contact, but also all other people who share the fate of particular working medium. Although these people should cooperate and care about each other, contributing new merits to humanity with their synergy, meeting of people with the other people from time to time intertwine into a bitter, pain giving relation, like the way it happens with meeting of people with services. Owing to its controversy to humanitarian nature, religious and social values, the pain that human beings cause to one another is occasionally disguised behind a veil, thus turning into a life tragedy for individuals in the background. Mobbing which is commonly a confrontable problem in every workplace means psychological violence, enclosure, harassment, molestation or endurance. This study aims to draw attention to the precautions required to be taken against mobbing activities by analyzing situations of health employees who undergo mobbing actions in Turkey and in the World. To achieve this, the existing studies concerning mobbing in the healthcare sector have been examined. In conclusion; it is determined that mobbing activities towards healthcare workers have limited their communication possibilities, damaged social relations and social image, prevented vocational improvement and destroyed mental health of employees. With respect to mobbing behavior towards health employees, we should adopt a democratic, contributing, and guiding administration style, we should apply organizational justice, excessive work inspections must be reduced, work ethics and social responsibility awareness must be developed, we should clearly determine the duties and responsibilities, physical conditions must be improved and necessary legal arrangements concerning the subject must be made to be able to prevent mobbing.

  13. Mental health care: how can Family Health teams integrate it into Primary Healthcare?

    PubMed

    Gryschek, Guilherme; Pinto, Adriana Avanzi Marques

    2015-10-01

    Mental health is one of the responsibilities of Brazil's Family Health system. This review of literature sought to understand what position Mental Health occupies in the practice of the Family Health Strategy. A search was made of the scientific literature in the database of the Virtual Health Library (Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde), for the keywords: 'Mental Health'; 'Family Health'; 'Primary Healthcare'. The criteria for inclusion were: Brazilian studies from 2009 through 2012 that contributed to understanding of the following question: "How to insert Mental health care into the routine of the Family Health Strategy?" A total of 11 articles were found, which identified difficulties and strategies of the professionals in Primary Healthcare in relation to mental health. Referral, and medicalization, were common practices. Matrix Support is the strategy of training and skill acquisition for teams that enables new approaches in mental health in the context of Primary healthcare. It is necessary for Management of the Health System to take an active role in the construction of healthcare networks in mental health.

  14. Cost analysis of Healthcare in a Private sector Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in India.

    PubMed

    Karambelkar, Geeta; Malwade, Sudhir; Karambelkar, Rajendra

    2016-09-08

    To study the actual cost of care per patient in private-sector level IIIa Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Prospective cost-analysis study. Cost incurred by the family on the treatment of baby, separately for every newborn for entire length of hospitalization, was calculated. 126 newborns were enrolled; High level of intervention was needed for 25.4% babies. The mean cost of care was US $ 90.7 per patient per day. Bulk of the cost of care was the hospital bill.

  15. Clinical utility of the informant AD8 as a dementia case finding instrument in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Chan, Qun Lin; Xu, Xin; Shaik, Muhammad Amin; Chong, Steven Shih Tsze; Hui, Richard Jor Yeong; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Dong, YanHong

    2016-01-01

    The informant AD8 has excellent discriminant ability for dementia case finding in tertiary healthcare settings. However, its clinical utility for dementia case finding at the forefront of dementia management, primary healthcare, is unknown. Therefore, we recruited participants from two primary healthcare centers in Singapore and measured their performance on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), and a local formal neuropsychological battery, in addition to the AD8. Logistic regression was conducted to examine the associations between demographic factors and dementia. Area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was used to establish the optimal cut-off points for dementia case finding. Of the 309 participants recruited, 243 (78.7%) had CDR = 0, 22 (7.1%) CDR = 0.5, and 44 (14.2%) CDR ≥1. Age was strongly associated with dementia, and the optimal age for dementia case finding in primary healthcare settings was ≥75 years. In this age group, the AD8 has excellent dementia case finding capability and was superior to the MMSE and equivalent to the MoCA [AD8 AUC (95% CI): 0.95 (0.91-0.99), cut-off: ≥3, sensitivity: 0.90, specificity: 0.88, PPV: 0.79 and NPV: 0.94; MMSE AUC (95% CI): 0.87 (0.79-0.94), p = 0.04; MoCA AUC (95% CI): 0.88 (0.82-0.95), p = 0.06]. In conclusion, the AD8 is well suited for dementia case finding in primary healthcare settings.

  16. Quality care provision for older people: an interview study with patients and primary healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    van de Pol, Marjolein Helena Johanna; Fluit, Cornelia Rita Maria Gertruda; Lagro, Joep; Niessen, Danielle; Rikkert, Marcellinus Gerardus Maria Olde; Lagro-Janssen, Antoinette Leonarda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, primary health care for the ageing population has become increasingly complex. Aim This study sought to explore the views and needs of healthcare professionals and older patients relating to primary care in order to identify focal areas for improving primary health care for older people. Design and setting This research was structured as a mixed interview study with focus groups and individual interviews. Participants were made up of primary healthcare professionals and older patients. Patients were recruited from five elderly care homes in a small city in the southern part of the Netherlands. Method All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by two individual researchers applying constant comparative analysis. Data collection proceeded until saturation was reached. Results Participants in the study agreed about the need for primary care for older patients, and showed sympathy with one another’s perspectives. They did note, however, a number of obstacles hindering good healthcare provision. The major themes that arose were: ‘autonomy and independence’, ‘organisational barriers’, and ‘professional expertise’. Participants generally noted that it is important to clarify differences in perspectives about good care between patients and healthcare professionals. Conclusion Effective primary care intervention for older patients requires mutual understanding of the expectations and goals of all parties involved. There are a number of important requirements, especially accessible patient information in the form of care plans; specialist training for nurses and GPs on complex care and multimorbidity; and training on discussing autonomy, goal setting, and shared care. Further improvement in health care for older people and its evaluation research should focus on these requirements. PMID:26212845

  17. Beyond the consultation room: Proposals to approach health promotion in primary care according to health-care users, key community informants and primary care centre workers.

    PubMed

    Berenguera, Anna; Pons-Vigués, Mariona; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; March, Sebastià; Ripoll, Joana; Rubio-Valera, Maria; Pombo-Ramos, Haizea; Asensio-Martínez, Angela; Bolaños-Gallardo, Eva; Martínez-Carazo, Catalina; Maderuelo-Fernández, José Ángel; Martínez-Andrés, Maria; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta

    2017-10-01

    Primary health care (PHC) is the ideal setting to provide integrated services centred on the person and to implement health promotion (HP) activities. To identify proposals to approach HP in the context of primary care according to health-care users aged 45-75 years, key community informants and primary care centre (PCC) workers. Descriptive-interpretive qualitative research with 276 participants from 14 PCC of seven Spanish regions. A theoretical sampling was used for selection. A total of 25 discussion groups, two triangular groups and 30 semi-structured interviews were carried out. A thematic interpretive contents analysis was carried out. Participants consider that HP is not solely a matter for the health sector and they emphasize intersectoral collaboration. They believe that it is important to strengthen community initiatives and to create a healthy social environment that encourages greater responsibility and participation of health-care users in decisions regarding their own health and better management of public services and resources. HP, care in the community and demedicalization should be priorities for PHC. Participants propose organizational changes in the PCC to improve HP. PCC workers are aware that HP falls within the scope of their responsibilities and propose to increase their training, motivation, competences and knowledge of the social environment. Informants emphasize that HP should be person-centred approach and empathic communication. HP activities should be appealing, ludic and of proven effectiveness. According to a socio-ecological and intersectoral model, PHC services must get actively involved in HP together with community and through outreach interventions. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Guidance Counselling as a Whole School Responsibility in the Irish Post Primary Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearne, Lucy; Geary, Tom; Martin, Noelle

    2017-01-01

    This paper will deliberate upon the relevance of guidance counselling as a "whole school" responsibility in the context of recent policy and practice changes in the Irish post primary sector since the Government of Ireland Budget 2012. Pertinent issues including the complexities of delivering a whole school approach to guidance…

  19. Multilevel Assessment of the Predictive Validity of Teacher Made Tests in the Zimbabwean Primary Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machingambi, Zadzisai

    2017-01-01

    The principal focus of this study was to undertake a multilevel assessment of the predictive validity of teacher made tests in the Zimbabwean primary education sector. A correlational research design was adopted for the study, mainly to allow for statistical treatment of data and subsequent classical hypotheses testing using the spearman's rho.…

  20. Effectiveness of a training programme to improve hand hygiene compliance in primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene is the most effective measure for preventing infections related to healthcare, and its impact on the reduction of these infections is estimated at 50%. Non-compliance has been highlighted in several studies in hospitals, although none have been carried out in primary healthcare. Main objective To evaluated the effect of a "Hand Hygiene for the reduction of healthcare-associated infections" training program for primary healthcare workers, measured by variation from correct hand hygiene compliance, according to regulatory and specific criteria, 6 months after the baseline, in the intervention group (group receiving a training program) and in the control group (a usual clinical practice). Secondary objectives -To describe knowledges, attitudes and behaviors as regards hand hygiene among the professionals, and their possible association with "professional burnout", stratifying the results by type of group (intervention and usual clinical practice). -To estimate the logistic regression model that best explains hand hygiene compliance. Methods/Design Experimental study of parallel groups, with a control group, and random assignment by Health Center. Area of study.- Health centers in north-eastern Madrid (Spain). Sample studied.- Healthcare workers (physicians, odontostomatologists, pediatricians, nurses, dental hygienists, midwife and nursing auxiliaries). Intervention.- A hand hygiene training program, including a theoretical-practical workshop, provision of alcohol-based solutions and a reminder strategy in the workplace. Other variables: sociodemographic and professional knowledges, attitudes, and behaviors with regard to hand hygiene. Statistical Analysis: descriptive and inferential, using multivariate methods (covariance analysis and logistic regression). Discussion This study will provide valuable information on the prevalence of hand hygiene non-compliance, and improve healthcare. PMID:20015368

  1. Healthcare professional acceptance of telemonitoring for chronic care patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A pilot experimentation of a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients is conducted in the Bilbao Primary Care Health Region (Basque Country, Spain). It seems important to understand the factors related to healthcare professionals’ acceptance of this new technology in order to inform its extension to the whole healthcare system. This study aims to examine the psychosocial factors related to telemonitoring acceptance among healthcare professionals and to apply a theory-based instrument. Methods A validated questionnaire, based on an extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), was distributed to a total of 605 nurses, general practitioners and paediatricians. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the theoretical model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed. Results A response rate of 44.3% was achieved. The original TAM model was good at predicting intention to use the telemonitoring system. However, the extended model, that included other theoretical variables, was more powerful. Perceived Usefulness, Compatibility, and Facilitators were the significant predictors of intention. A detailed analysis showed that intention to use telemonitoring was best predicted by healthcare professionals’ beliefs that they would obtain adequate training and technical support and that telemonitoring would require important changes in their practice. Conclusion The extended TAM explained a significant portion of the variance in healthcare professionals' intention to use a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients in primary care. The perception of facilitators in the organisational context is the most important variable to consider for increasing healthcare professionals’ intention to use the new technology. PMID:23194420

  2. Primary health-care network monitoring: a hierarchical resource allocation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Pur, Aleksander; Bohanec, Marko; Lavrac, Nada; Cestnik, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    Management of a primary health-care network (PHCN) is a difficult task in every country. A suitable monitoring system can provide useful information for PHCN management, especially given a large quantity of health-care data that is produced daily in the network. This paper proposes a methodology for structured development of monitoring systems and a PHCN resource allocation monitoring model based on this methodology. The purpose of the monitoring model is to improve the allocation of health-care resources. The proposed methodology is based on modules that are organized into a hierarchy, where each module monitors a particular aspect of the system. This methodology was used to design a PHCN monitoring model for Slovenia. Specific aspects of the Slovenian PHCN were taken into account such as varying needs of patients from different municipalities, existence of small municipalities having less than 1000 residents, the fact that many patients visit physicians in other municipalities, and that physicians may work at more than one location or organization. The main modules in the model are focused on the overall assessment of the PHCN, monitoring of patients visits to health-care providers (HCPs), physical accessibility of health services, segment of patients in municipalities who have not selected a personal physician, assessment of the availability of HCPs for patients, physicians working on more than one location, and available human resources in the PHCN. Most of the model's components are general and can be adapted for other national health-care systems.

  3. [Patients' characteristics and clinical management of atrial fibrillation in primary healthcare in Spain: FIATE Study].

    PubMed

    Lobos-Bejarano, José María; del Castillo-Rodríguez, José Carlos; Mena-González, Amparo; Alemán-Sánchez, José J; Cabrera de León, Antonio; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Pastor-Fuentes, Agustín

    2013-10-05

    The main therapeutic objective in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is stroke prevention. This study is aimed to determine whether the anticoagulant therapy may be appropriate regarding to the Guidelines and patients' profile in primary healthcare in Spain. A national, multicenter, cross-sectional study of AF patients attended in primary healthcare in Spain has been conducted. The study involved 185 family physicians whose patients were randomized. A total of 3,759 AF patients were randomized from the clinical records, and 2,070 were included in the study, at an average age of 74 (11) years old (50.7% female). Most of them (78%) had permanent AF and high comorbidity rates (hypertension 75%, obesity 30%, diabetes 27%, heart failure 20%, coronary heart disease 17%, and social risk 15%). Patients diagnosed in primary healthcare were more frequently asymptomatic than in hospital setting (36%; P<.001). The therapeutic strategy was based on the heart rate control in 4 out of 5 patients. Anticoagulation therapy was widely used (84%), more frequently in patients with permanent vs. non-permanent AF (91 vs. 60%, P<.001). Follow-up and monitoring was mainly performed in primary care (72%). The anticoagulation control was suboptimal, with a 66% of the international normalized ratio (INR) in therapeutic range, dropping to 33% when the last 3 available INR were included (P<.001). A high rate of patients with anticoagulant therapy in primary healthcare has been found in this research. INR control, however, remains suboptimal. Heart rate control is the most commonly used strategy. The decision about the anticoagulation should be based on the thromboembolic risk rather than in the arrhytmia type. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Equity of access to primary healthcare for vulnerable populations: the IMPACT international online survey of innovations.

    PubMed

    Richard, Lauralie; Furler, John; Densley, Konstancja; Haggerty, Jeannie; Russell, Grant; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Gunn, Jane

    2016-04-12

    Improving access to primary healthcare (PHC) for vulnerable populations is important for achieving health equity, yet this remains challenging. Evidence of effective interventions is rather limited and fragmented. We need to identify innovative ways to improve access to PHC for vulnerable populations, and to clarify which elements of health systems, organisations or services (supply-side dimensions of access) and abilities of patients or populations (demand-side dimensions of access) need to be strengthened to achieve transformative change. The work reported here was conducted as part of IMPACT (Innovative Models Promoting Access-to-Care Transformation), a 5-year Canadian-Australian research program aiming to identify, implement and trial best practice interventions to improve access to PHC for vulnerable populations. We undertook an environmental scan as a broad screening approach to identify the breadth of current innovations from the field. We distributed a brief online survey to an international audience of PHC researchers, practitioners, policy makers and stakeholders using a combined email and social media approach. Respondents were invited to describe a program, service, approach or model of care that they considered innovative in helping vulnerable populations to get access to PHC. We used descriptive statistics to characterise the innovations and conducted a qualitative framework analysis to further examine the text describing each innovation. Seven hundred forty-four responses were recorded over a 6-week period. 240 unique examples of innovations originating from 14 countries were described, the majority from Canada and Australia. Most interventions targeted a diversity of population groups, were government funded and delivered in a community health, General Practice or outreach clinic setting. Interventions were mainly focused on the health sector and directed at organisational and/or system level determinants of access (supply-side). Few innovations

  5. Perception of primary health professionals about female genital mutilation: from healthcare to intercultural competence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan-Marcusan, Adriana; Torán-Monserrat, Pere; Moreno-Navarro, Juana; Castany Fàbregas, Ma Jose; Muñoz-Ortiz, Laura

    2009-01-15

    The practice of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), a deeply-rooted tradition in 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, carries important negative consequences for the health and quality of life of women and children. Migratory movements have brought this harmful traditional practice to our medical offices, with the subsequent conflicts related to how to approach this healthcare problem, involving not only a purely healthcare-related event but also questions of an ethical, cultural identity and human rights nature. The aim of this study was to analyse the perceptions, degree of knowledge, attitudes and practices of the primary healthcare professionals in relation to FGM. A transversal, descriptive study was performed with a self-administered questionnaire to family physicians, paediatricians, nurses, midwives and gynaecologists. Trends towards changes in the two periods studied (2001 and 2004) were analysed. A total of 225 (80%) professionals answered the questionnaire in 2001 and 184 (62%) in 2004. Sixteen percent declared detection of some case in 2004, rising three-fold from the number reported in 2001. Eighteen percent stated that they had no interest in FGM. Less than 40% correctly identified the typology, while less than 30% knew the countries in which the practice is carried out and 82% normally attended patients from these countries. Female genital mutilations are present in primary healthcare medical offices with paediatricians and gynaecologists having the closest contact with the problem. Preventive measures should be designed as should sensitization to promote stands against these practices.

  6. How can insulin initiation delivery in a dual-sector health system be optimised? A qualitative study on healthcare professionals’ views

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries. However, glycaemia control remains suboptimal and insulin use is low. One important barrier is the lack of an efficient and effective insulin initiation delivery approach. This study aimed to document the strategies used and proposed by healthcare professionals to improve insulin initiation in the Malaysian dual-sector (public–private) health system. Methods In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in Klang Valley and Seremban, Malaysia in 2010–11. Healthcare professionals consisting of general practitioners (n = 11), medical officers (n = 8), diabetes educators (n = 3), government policy makers (n = 4), family medicine specialists (n = 10) and endocrinologists (n = 2) were interviewed. We used a topic guide to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. Results Three main themes emerged from the interviews. Firstly, there was a lack of collaboration between the private and public sectors in diabetes care. The general practitioners in the private sector proposed an integrated system for them to refer patients to the public health services for insulin initiation programmes. There could be shared care between the two sectors and this would reduce the disproportionately heavy workload at the public sector. Secondly, besides the support from the government health authority, the healthcare professionals wanted greater involvement of non-government organisations, media and pharmaceutical industry in facilitating insulin initiation in both the public and private sectors. The support included: training of healthcare professionals; developing and disseminating patient education materials; service provision by diabetes education teams; organising programmes for patients’ peer group sessions; increasing awareness and demystifying insulin via public

  7. How can insulin initiation delivery in a dual-sector health system be optimised? A qualitative study on healthcare professionals' views.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping Yein; Lee, Yew Kong; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2012-04-30

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries. However, glycaemia control remains suboptimal and insulin use is low. One important barrier is the lack of an efficient and effective insulin initiation delivery approach. This study aimed to document the strategies used and proposed by healthcare professionals to improve insulin initiation in the Malaysian dual-sector (public-private) health system. In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in Klang Valley and Seremban, Malaysia in 2010-11. Healthcare professionals consisting of general practitioners (n = 11), medical officers (n = 8), diabetes educators (n = 3), government policy makers (n = 4), family medicine specialists (n = 10) and endocrinologists (n = 2) were interviewed. We used a topic guide to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. Three main themes emerged from the interviews. Firstly, there was a lack of collaboration between the private and public sectors in diabetes care. The general practitioners in the private sector proposed an integrated system for them to refer patients to the public health services for insulin initiation programmes. There could be shared care between the two sectors and this would reduce the disproportionately heavy workload at the public sector. Secondly, besides the support from the government health authority, the healthcare professionals wanted greater involvement of non-government organisations, media and pharmaceutical industry in facilitating insulin initiation in both the public and private sectors. The support included: training of healthcare professionals; developing and disseminating patient education materials; service provision by diabetes education teams; organising programmes for patients' peer group sessions; increasing awareness and demystifying insulin via public campaigns; and subsidising glucose

  8. Comprehensiveness of Care from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Santor, Darcy A.; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Beaulieu, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensiveness relates both to scope of services offered and to a whole-person clinical approach. Comprehensive services are defined as “the provision, either directly or indirectly, of a full range of services to meet most patients' healthcare needs”; whole-person care is “the extent to which a provider elicits and considers the physical, emotional and social aspects of a patient's health and considers the community context in their care.” Among instruments that evaluate primary healthcare, two had subscales that mapped to comprehensive services and to the community component of whole-person care: the Primary Care Assessment Tool – Short Form (PCAT-S) and the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, a limited measure of whole-person care). Objective: To examine how well comprehensiveness is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. Method: 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to six instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation modelling) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance on common constructs. Results: Over one-quarter of respondents had missing responses on services offered or doctor's knowledge of the community. The subscales did not load on a single factor; comprehensive services and community orientation were examined separately. The community orientation subscales did not perform satisfactorily. The three comprehensive services subscales fit very modestly onto two factors: (1) most healthcare needs (from one provider) (CPCI Comprehensive Care, PCAT-S First-Contact Utilization) and (2) range of services (PCAT-S Comprehensive Services Available). Individual item performance revealed several problems. Conclusion: Measurement of comprehensiveness is problematic, making

  9. A systems-based partnership learning model for strengthening primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Strengthening primary healthcare systems is vital to improving health outcomes and reducing inequity. However, there are few tools and models available in published literature showing how primary care system strengthening can be achieved on a large scale. Challenges to strengthening primary healthcare (PHC) systems include the dispersion, diversity and relative independence of primary care providers; the scope and complexity of PHC; limited infrastructure available to support population health approaches; and the generally poor and fragmented state of PHC information systems. Drawing on concepts of comprehensive PHC, integrated quality improvement (IQI) methods, system-based research networks, and system-based participatory action research, we describe a learning model for strengthening PHC that addresses these challenges. We describe the evolution of this model within the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary healthcare context, successes and challenges in its application, and key issues for further research. Discussion IQI approaches combined with system-based participatory action research and system-based research networks offer potential to support program implementation and ongoing learning across a wide scope of primary healthcare practice and on a large scale. The Partnership Learning Model (PLM) can be seen as an integrated model for large-scale knowledge translation across the scope of priority aspects of PHC. With appropriate engagement of relevant stakeholders, the model may be applicable to a wide range of settings. In IQI, and in the PLM specifically, there is a clear role for research in contributing to refining and evaluating existing tools and processes, and in developing and trialling innovations. Achieving an appropriate balance between funding IQI activity as part of routine service delivery and funding IQI related research will be vital to developing and sustaining this type of PLM. Summary This paper draws together

  10. P4 medicine: how systems medicine will transform the healthcare sector and society.

    PubMed

    Flores, Mauricio; Glusman, Gustavo; Brogaard, Kristin; Price, Nathan D; Hood, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    Ten years ago, the proposition that healthcare is evolving from reactive disease care to care that is predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory was regarded as highly speculative. Today, the core elements of that vision are widely accepted and have been articulated in a series of recent reports by the US Institute of Medicine. Systems approaches to biology and medicine are now beginning to provide patients, consumers and physicians with personalized information about each individual's unique health experience of both health and disease at the molecular, cellular and organ levels. This information will make disease care radically more cost effective by personalizing care to each person's unique biology and by treating the causes rather than the symptoms of disease. It will also provide the basis for concrete action by consumers to improve their health as they observe the impact of lifestyle decisions. Working together in digitally powered familial and affinity networks, consumers will be able to reduce the incidence of the complex chronic diseases that currently account for 75% of disease-care costs in the USA.

  11. P4 medicine: how systems medicine will transform the healthcare sector and society

    PubMed Central

    Glusman, Gustavo; Brogaard, Kristin; Price, Nathan D; Hood, Leroy

    2014-01-01

    Ten years ago, the proposition that healthcare is evolving from reactive disease care to care that is predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory was regarded as highly speculative. Today, the core elements of that vision are widely accepted and have been articulated in a series of recent reports by the US Institute of Medicine. Systems approaches to biology and medicine are now beginning to provide patients, consumers and physicians with personalized information about each individual’s unique health experience of both health and disease at the molecular, cellular and organ levels. This information will make disease care radically more cost effective by personalizing care to each person’s unique biology and by treating the causes rather than the symptoms of disease. It will also provide the basis for concrete action by consumers to improve their health as they observe the impact of lifestyle decisions. Working together in digitally powered familial and affinity networks, consumers will be able to reduce the incidence of the complex chronic diseases that currently account for 75% of disease-care costs in the USA. PMID:25342952

  12. The framework of the practice of innovation in primary healthcare: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nodari, Cristine Hermann; Camargo, Maria Emilia; Olea, Pelayo Munhoz; Dorion, Eric Charles Henri; Claus, Suzete Marchetto

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the practice of innovation in primary healthcare in the second-largest county, by population, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The methodology employed case studies of multiple units of analysis, where various studies were simultaneously conducted. Forty-five semi-structured interviews were carried out with the directors of basic health clinics, followed by content analysis, beginning with the construction of a system of categories based on the literature. Fifty-six innovations in total were identified: Eighteen were innovations of products (goods and/or services), fifteen in processes, eleven in marketing, and twelve were organizational innovations. Studies that focus on and highlight innovation in primary healthcare facilitate changes, improvements, and alternatives in the form of services provided to the population, serving as a basis for the formulation of public health policy. Finally, we also highlight the limitations and opportunities of future research.

  13. Transporting integrated primary care to the private sector: addressing the business challenges.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Ronald B; Pollard, C Alec; Niemiec, Ryan

    2013-09-01

    The primary care literature provides some useful information and several project examples for clinicians attempting to develop an integrated care practice, but prior discussion has been based largely on projects developed in government-funded or HMO systems. The current paper focuses on the business challenges of establishing an integrated care practice in a private, fee-for-service setting. Despite increasing commitment to the concept of the medical home, which embraces behavioral health care, physicians in the private sector remain cautious about proposed practice changes such as integrated care. There are additional obstacles that can impede successful implementation of integrated primary care in the private sector. The authors identify five major challenges and suggest potential strategies to address these challenges, drawing, in part, on their experience with a 4-year integrated primary care demonstration project.

  14. Primary healthcare needs and barriers to care among Calgary's homeless populations.

    PubMed

    Campbell, David J T; O'Neill, Braden G; Gibson, Katherine; Thurston, Wilfreda E

    2015-10-13

    Despite Canada's universal healthcare system, significant barriers impede individuals experiencing homelessness from accessing health services. Furthermore, there is a paucity in the qualitative literature describing how Canadians experiencing homelessness access health care services. Our objective was to qualitatively explore perceived healthcare needs and barriers among individuals experiencing homelessness in one large Canadian city - Calgary, Alberta. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study that included open-ended interviews and focus groups with a variety of stakeholders who are involved in healthcare among Calgary's homeless populations. These included individuals experiencing homelessness (n = 11) as well as employees from several healthcare service providers for those experiencing homelessness (n = 11). Transcripts from these interviews were thematically analyzed by two analysts. Stakeholder interviews yielded several pervasive themes surrounding the health care needs of the homeless and barriers to accessing care. Some of the primary health care needs which were identified included mental health, addictions, and allied health as well as care that addresses the social determinants of health. Notably, it was difficult for many stakeholders to pinpoint specific health care priorities, as they identified that the health care needs among Calgary's homeless populations are diverse and complex, often even describing the needs as overwhelming. Types of barriers to primary care that were identified by stakeholders included: emotional, educational, geographical, financial and structural barriers, as well as discrimination. Our findings highlight the diverse primary health care needs of Calgary's homeless populations. Despite the fact that Canada has a universal publicly funded health care system, individuals experiencing homelessness face significant barriers in accessing primary care.

  15. Interpersonal Communication from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Santor, Darcy A.

    2011-01-01

    The operational definition of interpersonal communication is “the ability of the provider to elicit and understand patient concerns, to explain healthcare issues and to engage in shared decision-making if desired.” Objective: To examine how well interpersonal communication is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. Method: 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Eight subscales measure interpersonal communication: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS, two subscales); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, one subscale); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); and the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II, four subscales). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance. Results: Items not pertaining to interpersonal communication were removed from the EUROPEP-I. Most subscales are skewed positively. Normalized mean scores are similar across subscales except for IPC-II Patient-Centred Decision-Making and IPC-II Hurried Communication. All subscales load reasonably well on a single factor, presumed to be interpersonal communication. The best model has three underlying factors corresponding to eliciting (eigenvalue = 26.56), explaining (eigenvalue = 2.45) and decision-making (eigenvalue = 1.34). Both the PCAS Communication and the EUROPEP-I Clinical Behaviour subscales capture all three dimensions. Individual subscales within IPC-II measure each sub-dimension. Conclusion: The operational definition is well reflected in the available measures, although shared decision-making is poorly represented. These subscales can be used with confidence in the Canadian context to measure this crucial aspect of patient

  16. Interpersonal communication from the patient perspective: comparison of primary healthcare evaluation instruments.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Haggerty, Jeannie L; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Santor, Darcy A

    2011-12-01

    The operational definition of interpersonal communication is "the ability of the provider to elicit and understand patient concerns, to explain healthcare issues and to engage in shared decision-making if desired." To examine how well interpersonal communication is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Eight subscales measure interpersonal communication: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS, two subscales); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, one subscale); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); and the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II, four subscales). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance. Items not pertaining to interpersonal communication were removed from the EUROPEP-I. Most subscales are skewed positively. Normalized mean scores are similar across subscales except for IPC-II Patient-Centred Decision-Making and IPC-II Hurried Communication. All subscales load reasonably well on a single factor, presumed to be interpersonal communication. The best model has three underlying factors corresponding to eliciting (eigenvalue = 26.56), explaining (eigenvalue = 2.45) and decision-making (eigenvalue = 1.34). Both the PCAS Communication and the EUROPEP-I Clinical Behaviour subscales capture all three dimensions. Individual subscales within IPC-II measure each sub-dimension. The operational definition is well reflected in the available measures, although shared decision-making is poorly represented. These subscales can be used with confidence in the Canadian context to measure this crucial aspect of patient-centred care.

  17. Managing an online survey about influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Diana; Aerny, Nicole; Soldevila, Núria; Baricot, Maretva; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Torner, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Domíguez, Angela

    2015-01-09

    Online surveys are increasingly used due to their speed and efficiency. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that may have contributed to the quality and speed of response of an online survey on influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers. A multicenter study including family physicians, nurses and pediatricians from primary healthcare teams from seven Spanish Autonomous Communities was designed. The centers were selected by simple random sampling. The survey remained active and accessible for 56 days and four reminders were sent. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the association of sociodemographic variables and responding to the survey before the second reminder. Complete, validated information was obtained from 1965 primary healthcare workers. The total response rate was 36.2%. More nurses (46.3%) responded before the second reminder and more family physicians (52.8%) after the second reminder. The adjusted OR shows that family physicians responded later (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.2-1.8) than nurses. The responses obtained in the first 24 h after the initial sending and the reminders accounted for 41.7% of the completed surveys, indicating the importance of reminders.

  18. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective.

  19. The Impact of Brief Alcohol Interventions in Primary Healthcare: A Systematic Review of Reviews

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Amy; Anderson, Peter; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; Schulte, Bernd; Schmidt, Christiane; Reimer, Jens; Kaner, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the cumulative evidence on the effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions in primary healthcare in order to highlight key knowledge gaps for further research. Methods: An overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention in primary healthcare published between 2002 and 2012. Findings: Twenty-four systematic reviews met the eligibility criteria (covering a total of 56 randomized controlled trials reported across 80 papers). Across the included studies, it was consistently reported that brief intervention was effective for addressing hazardous and harmful drinking in primary healthcare, particularly in middle-aged, male drinkers. Evidence gaps included: brief intervention effectiveness in key groups (women, older and younger drinkers, minority ethnic groups, dependent/co-morbid drinkers and those living in transitional and developing countries); and the optimum brief intervention length and frequency to maintain longer-term effectiveness. Conclusion: This overview highlights the large volume of primarily positive evidence supporting brief alcohol intervention effects as well as some unanswered questions with regards to the effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention across different cultural settings and in specific population groups, and in respect of the optimum content of brief interventions that might benefit from further research. PMID:24232177

  20. Managing an Online Survey about Influenza Vaccination in Primary Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Diana; Aerny, Nicole; Soldevila, Núria; Baricot, Maretva; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Torner, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Domíguez, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used due to their speed and efficiency. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that may have contributed to the quality and speed of response of an online survey on influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers. A multicenter study including family physicians, nurses and pediatricians from primary healthcare teams from seven Spanish Autonomous Communities was designed. The centers were selected by simple random sampling. The survey remained active and accessible for 56 days and four reminders were sent. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the association of sociodemographic variables and responding to the survey before the second reminder. Complete, validated information was obtained from 1965 primary healthcare workers. The total response rate was 36.2%. More nurses (46.3%) responded before the second reminder and more family physicians (52.8%) after the second reminder. The adjusted OR shows that family physicians responded later (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.2–1.8) than nurses. The responses obtained in the first 24 h after the initial sending and the reminders accounted for 41.7% of the completed surveys, indicating the importance of reminders. PMID:25584421

  1. Networks and social capital: a relational approach to primary healthcare reform

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Catherine; Hofmeyer, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Collaboration among health care providers and across systems is proposed as a strategy to improve health care delivery the world over. Over the past two decades, health care providers have been encouraged to work in partnership and build interdisciplinary teams. More recently, the notion of networks has entered this discourse but the lack of consensus and understanding about what is meant by adopting a network approach in health services limits its use. Also crucial to this discussion is the work of distinguishing the nature and extent of the impact of social relationships – generally referred to as social capital. In this paper, we review the rationale for collaboration in health care systems; provide an overview and synthesis of key concepts; dispel some common misconceptions of networks; and apply the theory to an example of primary healthcare network reform in Alberta (Canada). Our central thesis is that a relational approach to systems change, one based on a synthesis of network theory and social capital can provide the fodation for a multi-focal approach to primary healthcare reform. Action strategies are recommended to move from an awareness of 'networks' to fully translating knowledge from existing theory to guide planning and practice innovations. Decision-makers are encouraged to consider a multi-focal approach that effectively incorporates a network and social capital approach in planning and evaluating primary healthcare reform. PMID:17894868

  2. Accessibility from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Santor, Darcy A.; Burge, Frederick; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Pineault, Raynald; Gass, David

    2011-01-01

    The operational definition of first-contact accessibility is “the ease with which a person can obtain needed care (including advice and support) from the practitioner of choice within a time frame appropriate to the urgency of the problem”; accommodation is “the way healthcare resources are organized to accommodate a wide range of patients' abilities to contact healthcare providers and reach healthcare services, that is to say telephone services, flexible appointment systems, hours of operation, and walk-in periods.” Objective: To compare how well accessibility is measured in validated subscales that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. Method: 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to six instruments that evaluate primary healthcare with four subscales that measure accessibility: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS), the Primary Care Assessment Tool – Short Form (PCAT-S, two subscales) and the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I). Scores were normalized to a 0-to-10 scale for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation modelling) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance on common constructs. Results: The subscales demonstrate similar psychometric measures to those reported by developers. The PCAT-S First-Contact Utilization subscale does not fit the accessibility construct. The remaining three subscales load reasonably onto a single factor, presumed to be accessibility, but the best-fitting model has two factors: “timeliness of obtaining needed care” (PCAT-S First-Contact Access, some EUROPEP-I items) and “how resources are organized to accommodate clients” (PCAS Organizational Access and most of EUROPEP-I organization of care). Items in the PCAS and PCAT-S subscales have good discriminability. Conclusion: Only three of the four subscales measure accessibility; all

  3. Implementing the HL7v3 standard in Croatian primary healthcare domain.

    PubMed

    Koncar, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    The mission of HL7 Inc. is to provide standards for the exchange, management and integration of data that supports clinical patient care and the management, delivery and evaluation of healthcare services. The scope of this work includes the specifications of flexible, cost-effective approaches, standards, guidelines, methodologies, and related services for interoperability between healthcare information systems. In the field of medical information technologies, HL7 provides the world's most advanced information standards. Versions 1 and 2 of the HL7 standard have on the one hand solved many issues, but on the other demonstrated the size and complexity of the health information sharing problem. As the solution, a complete new methodology has been adopted, which is being encompassed in version 3 recommendations. This approach standardizes the Reference Information Model (RIM), which is the source of all domain models and message structures. Message design is now defined in detail, enabling interoperability between loosely-coupled systems that are designed by different vendors and deployed in various environments. At the start of the Primary Healthcare Information System project, we have decided to go directly to HL7v3. Implementing the HL7v3 standard in healthcare applications represents a challenging task. By using standardized refinement and localization methods we were able to define information models for Croatian primary healthcare domain. The scope of our work includes clinical, financial and administrative data management, where in some cases we were compelled to introduce new HL7v3-compliant models. All of the HL7v3 transactions are digitally signed, using the W3C XML Digital Signature standard.

  4. Unemployment, public-sector health-care spending and breast cancer mortality in the European Union: 1990-2009.

    PubMed

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Watkins, Johnathan A; Waqar, Mueez; Williams, Callum; Ali, Raghib; Atun, Rifat; Faiz, Omar; Zeltner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The global economic crisis has been associated with increased unemployment, reduced health-care spending and adverse health outcomes. Insights into the impact of economic variations on cancer mortality, however, remain limited. We used multivariate regression analysis to assess how changes in unemployment and public-sector expenditure on health care (PSEH) varied with female breast cancer mortality in the 27 European Union member states from 1990 to 2009. We then determined how the association with unemployment was modified by PSEH. Country-specific differences in infrastructure and demographic structure were controlled for, and 1-, 3-, 5- and 10-year lag analyses were conducted. Several robustness checks were also implemented. Unemployment was associated with an increase in breast cancer mortality [P < 0.0001, coefficient (R) = 0.1829, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.0978-0.2680]. Lag analysis showed a continued increase in breast cancer mortality at 1, 3, 5 and 10 years after unemployment rises (P < 0.05). Controlling for PSEH removed this association (P = 0.063, R = 0.080, 95% CI -0.004 to 0.163). PSEH increases were associated with significant decreases in breast cancer mortality (P < 0.0001, R = -1.28, 95% CI -1.67 to -0.877). The association between unemployment and breast cancer mortality remained in all robustness checks. Rises in unemployment are associated with significant short- and long-term increases in breast cancer mortality, while increases in PSEH are associated with reductions in breast cancer mortality. Initiatives that bolster employment and maintain total health-care expenditure may help minimize increases in breast cancer mortality during economic crises. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  5. Public-private partnerships to improve primary healthcare surgeries: clarifying assumptions about the role of private provider activities.

    PubMed

    Mudyarabikwa, Oliver; Tobi, Patrick; Regmi, Krishna

    2017-07-01

    Aim To examine assumptions about public-private partnership (PPP) activities and their role in improving public procurement of primary healthcare surgeries. PPPs were developed to improve the quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, evidence of their effectiveness in delivering health benefits is limited. A qualitative study design was employed. A total of 25 interviews with public sector staff (n=23) and private sector managers (n=2) were conducted to understand their interpretations of assumptions in the activities of private investors and service contractors participating in Local Improvement Finance Trust (LIFT) partnerships. Realist evaluation principles were applied in the data analysis to interpret the findings. Six thematic areas of assumed health benefits were identified: (i) quality improvement; (ii) improved risk management; (iii) reduced procurement costs; (iv) increased efficiency; (v) community involvement; and (vi) sustainable investment. Primary Care Trusts that chose to procure their surgeries through LIFT were expected to support its implementation by providing an environment conducive for the private participants to achieve these benefits. Private participant activities were found to be based on a range of explicit and tacit assumptions perceived helpful in achieving government objectives for LIFT. The success of PPPs depended upon private participants' (i) capacity to assess how PPP assumptions added value to their activities, (ii) effectiveness in interpreting assumptions in their expected activities, and (iii) preparedness to align their business principles to government objectives for PPPs. They risked missing some of the expected benefits because of some factors constraining realization of the assumptions. The ways in which private participants preferred to carry out their activities also influenced the extent to which expected benefits were achieved. Giving more discretion to public than private participants over critical

  6. Can vouchers make a difference to the use of private primary care services by older people? Experience from the healthcare reform programme in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yam, Carrie H K; Liu, Su; Huang, Olivia H Y; Yeoh, E K; Griffiths, Sian M

    2011-10-07

    As part of its ongoing healthcare reform, the Hong Kong Government introduced a voucher scheme, intended for encouraging older patients to use primary healthcare services in the private sector, thereby, reducing burden on the overwhelmed public sector. The voucher program is also considered one of the strategies to further develop the public private partnership in healthcare, a policy direction of high political priority as indicated in the Chief Executive Policy Address in 2008-09. This study assessed whether the voucher scheme, as implemented so far, has reached its intended goals, and how it might be further improved in the context of public-private partnership. This was a cross-sectional study using structured questionnaires by face-to-face interviews with older people aged 70 or above in Hong Kong, the target group of the demand-side voucher program. 71.2% of 1,026 older people were aware of the new voucher scheme but only 35.0% had ever used it. The majority of the older people used the vouchers for acute curative services in the private sector (82.4%) and spent less on preventive services. Despite the provision of vouchers valued US$30 per year as an incentive to encourage the use of private primary care services, after 12-months of implementation, 66.2% of all respondents agreed with the statement that "the voucher scheme does not change their health seeking behaviours on seeing public or private healthcare professionals". The most common reasons for no change in their behaviours included "I am used to seeing doctors in the public system" and "The amount of the subsidy is too low". Those who usually used a mix of public and private doctors and those with better self-reported health condition compared to last year were more likely to perceive a change in their own health seeking behaviours. Our study showed that despite a reasonably high awareness of the voucher scheme, its usage was low. The voucher alone was not enough to realize the government's policy of

  7. Can vouchers make a difference to the use of private primary care services by older people? Experience from the healthcare reform programme in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As part of its ongoing healthcare reform, the Hong Kong Government introduced a voucher scheme, intended for encouraging older patients to use primary healthcare services in the private sector, thereby, reducing burden on the overwhelmed public sector. The voucher program is also considered one of the strategies to further develop the public private partnership in healthcare, a policy direction of high political priority as indicated in the Chief Executive Policy Address in 2008-09. This study assessed whether the voucher scheme, as implemented so far, has reached its intended goals, and how it might be further improved in the context of public-private partnership. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using structured questionnaires by face-to-face interviews with older people aged 70 or above in Hong Kong, the target group of the demand-side voucher program. Results 71.2% of 1,026 older people were aware of the new voucher scheme but only 35.0% had ever used it. The majority of the older people used the vouchers for acute curative services in the private sector (82.4%) and spent less on preventive services. Despite the provision of vouchers valued US$30 per year as an incentive to encourage the use of private primary care services, after 12-months of implementation, 66.2% of all respondents agreed with the statement that "the voucher scheme does not change their health seeking behaviours on seeing public or private healthcare professionals". The most common reasons for no change in their behaviours included "I am used to seeing doctors in the public system" and "The amount of the subsidy is too low". Those who usually used a mix of public and private doctors and those with better self-reported health condition compared to last year were more likely to perceive a change in their own health seeking behaviours. Conclusions Our study showed that despite a reasonably high awareness of the voucher scheme, its usage was low. The voucher alone was not

  8. Improving the network management of integrated primary mental healthcare for older people in a rural Australian region: protocol for a mixed methods case study

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Jeffrey; Oster, Candice; Dawson, Suzanne; O'Kane, Deb; Lawn, Sharon; Henderson, Julie; Gerace, Adam; Reed, Richard; Nosworthy, Ann; Galley, Philip; McPhail, Ruth; Cochrane, Eimear Muir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An integrated approach to the mental healthcare of older people is advocated across health, aged care and social care sectors. It is not clear, however, how the management of integrated servicing should occur, although interorganisational relations theory suggests a reflective network approach using evaluation feedback. This research will test a network management approach to help regional primary healthcare organisations improve mental health service integration. Methods and analysis This mixed methods case study in rural South Australia will test facilitated reflection within a network of health and social care services to determine if this leads to improved integration. Engagement of services will occur through a governance group and a series of three 1-day service stakeholder workshops. Facilitated reflection and evaluation feedback will use information from a review of health sector and local operational policies, a network survey about current service links, gaps and enablers and interviews with older people and their carers about their help seeking journeys. Quantitative and qualitative analysis will describe the policy enablers and explore the current and ideal links between services. The facilitated reflection will be developed to maximise engagement of senior management in the governance group and the service staff at the operational level in the workshops. Benefit will be assessed through indicators of improved service coordination, collective ownership of service problems, strengthened partnerships, agreed local protocols and the use of feedback for accountability. Ethics, benefits and dissemination Ethics approval will deal with the sensitivities of organisational network research where data anonymity is not preserved. The benefit will be the tested utility of a facilitated reflective process for a network of health and social care services to manage linked primary mental healthcare for older people in a rural region. Dissemination will

  9. Job Satisfaction Differences between Primary Health Care and Treatment Sectors: An Experience from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Shokoufe; Janati, Ali; Kousha, Ahmad; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the levels of job satisfaction and its predictors among primary health care and treatment sectors' staff in East Azerbaijan Province, Iran. Methods: This comparative study was conducted in East Azerbaijan Province,Iran in 2011. A questionnaire survey was performed on 420 staff from health care and treatment sectors using multi-stage proportional cluster sampling method. Job satisfaction was measured in five aspects namely: structural and managerial; individual; social; work-itself; environmental and welfare job satisfaction factors.The job satisfaction measurement score was normalized to fall into a range of zero to 100. Statistical analyses were performed using Friedman and independent sample t-tests. Results: Overall satisfaction in health and treatment sectors was moderate with a mean score above 50. Hospital General Practitioners reported significantly higher job satisfaction score (mean ± SD=57.34 ± 17.02) compared to health care center General Practitioners (mean ± SD= 31.74±14.99). The highest satisfaction scores belonged to individual factors both in health care sector staff (64.83±18.50) and treatment sector staff (63.55±17.44). The lowest job satisfaction was observed with environmental and welfare factors (38.47±19.86 and 36.83±19.86, respectively). Conclusion: The job satisfaction significantly differs between primary health care and treatment sectors. Based on the results, environmental and welfare factors may be targeted to improve the job satisfaction in public health care system. PMID:24688957

  10. Distribution and utilization of curative primary healthcare services in Lahej, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Bawazir, A A; Bin Hawail, T S; Al-Sakkaf, K A Z; Basaleem, H O; Muhraz, A F; Al-Shehri, A M

    2013-09-01

    No evidence-based data exist on the availability, accessibility and utilization of healthcare services in Lahej Governorate, Yemen. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution and utilization of curative services in primary healthcare units and centres in Lahej. Cross-sectional study (clustering sample). This study was conducted in three of the 15 districts in Lahej between December 2009 and August 2010. Household members were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine sociodemographic characteristics and types of healthcare services available in the area. The distribution of health centres, health units and hospitals did not match the size of the populations or areas of the districts included in this study. Geographical accessibility was the main obstacle to utilization. Factors associated with the utilization of curative services were significantly related to the time required to reach the nearest facility, seeking curative services during illness and awareness of the availability of health facilities (P < 0.01). There is an urgent need to look critically and scientifically at the distribution of healthcare services in the region in order to ensure accessibility and quality of services. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Equity in primary health care delivery: an examination of the cohesiveness of strategies relating to the primary healthcare system, the health workforce and hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Jane; Eliott, Jaklin; Miller, Emma; Aylward, Paul

    2015-04-01

    To suggest ways of increasing the cohesiveness of national primary healthcare strategies and hepatitis C strategies, with the aim of ensuring that all these strategies include ways to address barriers and facilitators to access to primary healthcare and equity for people with hepatitis C. A critical review was conducted of the first national Primary Healthcare System Strategy and Health Workforce Strategy with the concurrent Hepatitis C Strategy. Content relating to provision of healthcare in private general practice was examined, focussing on issues around access and equity. In all strategies, achieving access to care and equity was framed around providing sufficient medical practitioners for particular locations. Equity statements were present in all policies but only the Hepatitis C Strategy identified discrimination as a barrier to equity. Approaches detailed in the Primary Healthcare System Strategy and Health Workforce Strategy regarding current resource allocation, needs assessment and general practitioner incentives were limited to groups defined within these documents and may not identify or meet the needs of people with hepatitis C. Actions in the primary healthcare system and health workforce strategies should be extended to additional groups beyond those listed as priority groups within the strategies. Future hepatitis C strategies should outline appropriate, detailed needs assessment methodologies and specify how actions in the broad strategies can be applied to benefit the primary healthcare needs of people with hepatitis C.

  12. Expanding pharmacy roles and the interprofessional experience in primary healthcare: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Silvaggi, Andrea; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Reeves, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The pharmacist role is undergoing significant changes which are reshaping the way primary healthcare is delivered throughout England. Due to increased physician workload and focus on primary healthcare, the pharmacist role has expanded to provide enhanced patient services, integrating into general practice (GP) settings and working more closely as a member of the healthcare team. However, the experiences of pharmacists and team members are yet to be explored. The proposed study aims to explore the experiences, thoughts, and perceptions of a purposive sample of pharmacists, physicians, and nurses working in 10 GP clinics throughout the southeast of England. Interprofessional relationships, power dynamics, changing professional roles, and barriers and facilitators to the integration of the pharmacist role will be explored. An exploratory multiple case study design will be used to investigate interprofessional experiences within and between clinics. In-depth interviews will be completed with each participant. A thematic analysis will identify themes and patterns from the interview data. Results are expected to produce recommendations to help facilitate the integration of pharmacists in their new role and will have implications for interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education which are important for delivering safe and effective care.

  13. A randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of a referrals facilitator between primary care and the voluntary sector

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Clare; Goodenough, Trudy; Harvey, Ian; Hine, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To compare outcome and resource utilisation among patients referred to the Amalthea Project, a liaison organisation that facilitates contact between voluntary organisations and patients in primary care, with patients receiving routine general practitioner care. Design Randomised controlled trial with follow up at one and four months. Setting 26 general practices in Avon. Participants 161 patients identified by their general practitioner as having psychosocial problems. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were psychological wellbeing (assessed with the hospital anxiety and depression scale) and social support (assessed using the Duke-UNC functional social support questionnaire). Secondary outcomes were quality of life measures (the Dartmouth COOP/WONCA functional health assessment charts and the delighted-terrible faces scale), cost of contacts with the primary healthcare team and Amalthea Project, cost of prescribing in primary care, and cost of referrals to other agencies, over four months. Results The Amalthea group showed significantly greater improvements in anxiety (average difference between groups after adjustment for baseline −1.9, 95% confidence interval −3.0 to −0.7), other emotional feelings (average adjusted difference −0.5, −0.8 to −0.2), ability to carry out everyday activities (−0.5, −0.8 to −0.2), feelings about general health (−0.4, −0.7 to −0.1), and quality of life (−0.5, −0.9 to −0.1). No difference was detected in depression or perceived social support. The mean cost was significantly greater in the Amalthea arm than the general practitioner care arm (£153 v £133, P=0.025). Conclusion Referral to the Amalthea Project and subsequent contact with the voluntary sector results in clinically important benefits compared with usual general practitioner care in managing psychosocial problems, but at a higher cost. PMID:10669447

  14. The integration of primary care and behavioral healthcare in northern California Kaiser-Permanente.

    PubMed

    Dea, R A

    2000-01-01

    Integration of behavioral healthcare and primary care has a number of presumed benefits, including better communication between providers and systems, leading to improved patient care. There are studies showing medical cost offsets, although they tend to be in circumscribed research settings. Northern California Kaiser-Permanente has designed a new primary care system providing mental health clinicians on a primary care team. Those clinicians evaluate patients, create treatment plans, provide brief interventions, coordinate care with specialty behavioral healthcare, and consult with primary care physicians. Those physicians also have an increased role in the detection and treatment of behavioral health problems via guidelines developed with behavioral health. Structural changes within the overall system, including regional call centers and computerized clinical information systems, support the integration. Quality programs also support the ongoing improvement of the integration process. There are investment expenses in this type of re-design, but also expected cost savings. An infrastructure is now in place to measure both clinical outcomes, and cost effects of the new model.

  15. Doctors' opinions on clinical coordination between primary and secondary care in the Catalan healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Aller, Marta-Beatriz; Vargas, Ingrid; Coderch, Jordi; Calero, Sebastià; Cots, Francesc; Abizanda, Mercè; Colomés, Lluís; Farré, Joan; Vázquez-Navarrete, María-Luisa

    2017-08-26

    To analyse doctors' opinions on clinical coordination between primary and secondary care in different healthcare networks and on the factors influencing it. A qualitative descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on semi-structured interviews. A two-stage theoretical sample was designed: 1) healthcare networks with different management models; 2) primary care and secondary care doctors in each network. Final sample size (n = 50) was reached by saturation. A thematic content analysis was conducted. In all networks doctors perceived that primary and secondary care given to patients was coordinated in terms of information transfer, consistency and accessibility to SC following a referral. However, some problems emerged, related to difficulties in acceding non-urgent secondary care changes in prescriptions and the inadequacy of some referrals across care levels. Doctors identified the following factors: 1) organizational influencing factors: coordination is facilitated by mechanisms that facilitate information transfer, communication, rapid access and physical proximity that fosters positive attitudes towards collaboration; coordination is hindered by the insufficient time to use mechanisms, unshared incentives in prescription and, in two networks, the change in the organizational model; 2) professional factors: clinical skills and attitudes towards coordination. Although doctors perceive that primary and secondary care is coordinated, they also highlighted problems. Identified factors offer valuable insights on where to direct organizational efforts to improve coordination. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. The impact of an intervention to improve diabetes management in primary healthcare professionals' practices in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva Marinho, Michelly Georgia; Fontbonne, Annick; Vasconcelos Barbosa, Jessyka Mary; de Melo Rodrigues, Heloisa; Freese de Carvalho, Eduardo; Vieira de Souza, Wayner; Pessoa Cesse, Eduarda Angela

    2017-06-26

    To evaluate the results of a structured intervention in primary healthcare to improve type 2 diabetes management. The intervention was implemented in 2011-2012 in two cities in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, and evaluated in 2013 by interviewing healthcare professionals about their practices in all primary care facilities of these two cities (intervention group), and of two paired control cities (control group). Comparisons between the intervention and control groups were made using standard parametric tests. The percentage of professionals who measured adherence to treatment, developed educational actions to control high-risk situations or prevent complications, or declared that they "explained" the disease to the patients, was higher in the control group (p<0.05). Multidisciplinary involvement, requests for electrocardiograms and referrals to specialists were also more frequent in the control group (p<0.01). The only differences favoring the intervention group were the higher proportion of nurses (p<0.05) and community health workers (p<0.01) trained for diabetes management and a greater frequency of discussing the cases of diabetic patients at team meetings (p<0.01). These negative results raise questions about the effectiveness of actions aiming to improve diabetes management in primary care, and reinforce the need for careful evaluation of their impact. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of an Automated Healthcare Kiosk for the Management of Chronic Disease Patients in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Grace; Tan, Nicolette; Bahadin, Juliana; Shum, Eugene; Tan, Sze Wee

    2016-07-01

    An increase in the prevalence of chronic disease has led to a rise in the demand for primary healthcare services in many developed countries. Healthcare technology tools may provide the leverage to alleviate the shortage of primary care providers. Here we describe the development and usage of an automated healthcare kiosk for the management of patients with stable chronic disease in the primary care setting. One-hundred patients with stable chronic disease were recruited from a primary care clinic. They used a kiosk in place of doctors' consultations for two subsequent follow-up visits. Patient and physician satisfaction with kiosk usage were measured on a Likert scale. Kiosk blood pressure measurements and triage decisions were validated and optimized. Patients were assessed if they could use the kiosk independently. Patients and physicians were satisfied with all areas of kiosk usage. Kiosk triage decisions were accurate by the 2nd month of the study. Blood pressure measurements by the kiosk were equivalent to that taken by a nurse (p = 0.30, 0.14). Independent kiosk usage depended on patients' language skills and educational levels. Healthcare kiosks represent an alternative way to manage patients with stable chronic disease. They have the potential to replace physician visits and improve access to primary healthcare. Patients welcome the use of healthcare technology tools, including those with limited literacy and education. Optimization of environmental and patient factors may be required prior to the implementation of kiosk-based technology in the healthcare setting.

  18. Learning from people with long-term conditions: new insights for governance in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Ross, Fiona; Smith, Pam; Byng, Richard; Christian, Sara; Allan, Helen; Price, Linnie; Brearley, Sally

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of top-down centrally driven solutions to governance of healthcare, at the same time as increasing policy emphasis on greater 'bottom up' patient and public involvement in all aspects of healthcare, has set up complex tensions for policy implementation and healthcare practice. This paper explores the interplay of these agendas in the context of changes in primary healthcare services provided by the National Health Service in England. Specifically, it looks at service user involvement in a qualitative study of the professional response to changes in the governance and incentives in the care of people with long-term conditions. Service users influenced and guided the study at local and national levels. Vignettes of patient stories developed by service users informed in-depth interviews with 56 health and social care professionals engaged in the development of local policies and services for people with complex long-term illness, and themes generated by cross case analysis were validated through service users. The findings presented here focus on four themes about risk and comparison of professionals' and service users' perspectives of the issues: managing risks/consistent support, the risks of letting go/feeling in control, professional identity/helping people to help themselves, and managing expectations/professionals losing out. In this study, service user involvement added value by validating understandings of governance, framing debates to focus on what matters at the point of care and enabling perspective sharing and interaction. We suggest that more collaborative forms of governance in healthcare that take account of service user perspectives and enable interaction with professional groups could help validate processes of quality assurance and provide motivation for continuous quality improvement. We offer a model for 'opening up' collaborative projects to evaluation and critical reflection of the interrelationships between the context, methods

  19. Under what conditions do lesbians disclose their sexual orientation to primary healthcare providers? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Under what conditions do lesbians disclose their sexual orientation to primary healthcare providers? A review of the literature was undertaken to answer this question and to provide insight into the ways healthcare professionals can play an active role assisting their lesbian patients in "coming out." Thirty empirical studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Collectively, these separate studies have found that a myriad of internal (patient attributes) and external (healthcare context, patient-provider relationship) factors influence disclosure. The discussion highlights the critical role of healthcare professionals in supporting disclosure. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  20. Strengthening primary healthcare through community involvement in Cross River State, Nigeria: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Hilary; Igbang, Thomas; Otu, Akaninyene; Braide, Ekanem; Okon, Okpok; Ikpi, Edet; Joseph, Charles; Desousa, Alexander; Sommerfeld, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In preparation for implementation of primary healthcare (PHC) services in Cross River State, a study to identify perceptions of communities and health systems concerning such interventions was conducted. Methods Existing PHC practices were documented through observation and document reviews, including facility checklists at frontline levels. Perceptions of consumers and providers on PHC were elucidated through 32 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and 78 semi-structured questionnaires. Results There was some level of implementation of the Nigerian PHC policy in the study districts. However, this policy emphasized curative instead of preventive services. Private partners perceived healthcare programmes as largely donor driven with poor release of allocations for health by government. Conclusion Both providers and consumers presented similar perceptions on the current PHC implementation and similar perspectives on services to be prioritized. These common views together with their on-going participatory experience are important platforms for strengthening community participation in the delivery of PHC. PMID:25237418

  1. Adverse health effects of spousal violence among women attending Saudi Arabian primary health-care clinics.

    PubMed

    Eldoseri, H M; Tufts, K A; Zhang, Q; Fish, J N

    2014-12-17

    This study aimed to investigate the frequency of spousal violence among Saudi women and document the related health effects and injuries, as well as their attitudes to gender and violence. Structured interviews were conducted with 200 ever-married women recruited from primary-care centres in Jeddah. Nearly half of the surveyed women (44.5%) reported ever experiencing physical violence from their spouse. Although 37 women (18.5%) had received violence-related injuries, only 6.5% had reported these injuries to a health-care provider. Victims of spousal violence had poor perceptions of their overall health, and reported pain or discomfort, antidepressant use and suicidal thoughts. Women mostly disagreed with the presented justifications for wife-beating. However, the association between gender attitudes and spousal violence was not significant. The results of this study support calls for integration of education about partner violence into health-care curricula to enhance the access and quality of services.

  2. Primary care nurses’ experiences of how the mass media influence frontline healthcare in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mass media plays an important role in communicating about health research and services to patients, and in shaping public perceptions and decisions about health. Healthcare professionals also play an important role in providing patients with credible, evidence-based and up-to-date information on a wide range of health issues. This study aims to explore primary care nurses’ experiences of how mass media influences frontline healthcare. Methods In-depth telephone interviews were carried out with 18 primary care nurses (nine health visitors and nine practice nurses) working in the United Kingdom (UK). Interviews were recorded and transcribed. The data was analysed using thematic analysis, with a focus on constant comparative analysis. Results Three themes emerged from the data. First, participants reported that their patients were frequently influenced by controversial health stories reported in the media, which affected their perceptions of, and decisions about, care. This, in turn, impinged upon participants’ workloads as they had to spend additional time discussing information and reassuring patients. Second, participants also recalled times in their own careers when media reports had contributed to a decline in their confidence in current healthcare practices and treatments. Third, the participants in this study suggested a real need for additional resources to support and expand their own media literacy skills, which could be shared with patients. Conclusion In an ever expanding media landscape with greater reporting on health, nurses working in the primary care setting face increasing pressure to effectively manage media stories that dispute current health policies and practices. These primary care nurses were keen to expand their media literacy skills to develop critical autonomy in relation to all media, and to facilitate more meaningful conversations with their patients about their health concerns and choices. PMID:24267614

  3. Factors Influencing Early Detection of Oral Cancer by Primary Health-Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Y; Scully, C; Shahin, A; Maayta, W; Sawair, F

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to determine early detection practices performed by primary healthcare professionals, to compare medical and dental sub-groups, and to identify factors that influence the ability of medical and dental practitioners to recognize precancerous changes and clinical signs of oral cancer. A 28-item survey instrument was used to interview a total of 330 Jordanian primary health-care professionals (165 dental and 165 medical). An oral cancer knowledge scale (0 to 31) was generated from correct responses on oral cancer general knowledge. An early detection practice scale (0 to 24) was generated from the reported usage and frequency of procedures in oral cancer examination. Also, a diagnostic ability scale (0 to 100) was generated from correct selections of suspicious oral lesions. Only 17.8 % of the participants reported that they routinely performed oral cancer screening in practices. Their oral cancer knowledge scores ranged from 3 to 31 with a mean of 15.6. The early detection practice scores ranged from 2 to 21 with a mean of 11.6. A significant positive correlation was found between knowledge scores and early detection practice scores (r = 0.22; p < 0.001). The diagnostic ability scores ranged from 11.5 to 96 with a mean of 43.6. The diagnostic ability score was significantly correlated with knowledge scores (r = 0.39; p < 0.001), but not with early detection practice scores (r = 0.01; p = 0.92). Few significant differences were found between medical and dental primary care professionals. Continuous education courses on early diagnosis of oral cancer and oral mucosal lesions are needed for primary health-care professionals.

  4. Primary care nurses' experiences of how the mass media influence frontline healthcare in the UK.

    PubMed

    van Bekkum, Jennifer E; Hilton, Shona

    2013-11-24

    Mass media plays an important role in communicating about health research and services to patients, and in shaping public perceptions and decisions about health. Healthcare professionals also play an important role in providing patients with credible, evidence-based and up-to-date information on a wide range of health issues. This study aims to explore primary care nurses' experiences of how mass media influences frontline healthcare. In-depth telephone interviews were carried out with 18 primary care nurses (nine health visitors and nine practice nurses) working in the United Kingdom (UK). Interviews were recorded and transcribed. The data was analysed using thematic analysis, with a focus on constant comparative analysis. Three themes emerged from the data. First, participants reported that their patients were frequently influenced by controversial health stories reported in the media, which affected their perceptions of, and decisions about, care. This, in turn, impinged upon participants' workloads as they had to spend additional time discussing information and reassuring patients. Second, participants also recalled times in their own careers when media reports had contributed to a decline in their confidence in current healthcare practices and treatments. Third, the participants in this study suggested a real need for additional resources to support and expand their own media literacy skills, which could be shared with patients. In an ever expanding media landscape with greater reporting on health, nurses working in the primary care setting face increasing pressure to effectively manage media stories that dispute current health policies and practices. These primary care nurses were keen to expand their media literacy skills to develop critical autonomy in relation to all media, and to facilitate more meaningful conversations with their patients about their health concerns and choices.

  5. Education in the Wake of Healthcare Reform: Increasing Primary Care Usage by Individuals Currently Reliant upon Emergency Departments for Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannebaum, Michael; Wilkin, Holley A.; Keys, Jobia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was introduced, in part, to increase access to primary care, which has been shown to provide patients with myriad health benefits. Objective: To increase primary care usage by understanding the beliefs about primary and emergency care most salient to those whose healthcare-seeking practices may be impacted…

  6. Education in the Wake of Healthcare Reform: Increasing Primary Care Usage by Individuals Currently Reliant upon Emergency Departments for Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannebaum, Michael; Wilkin, Holley A.; Keys, Jobia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was introduced, in part, to increase access to primary care, which has been shown to provide patients with myriad health benefits. Objective: To increase primary care usage by understanding the beliefs about primary and emergency care most salient to those whose healthcare-seeking practices may be impacted…

  7. Accessibility of antenatal services at primary healthcare facilities in Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Majrooh, Muhammad Ashraf; Hasnain, Seema; Akram, Javaid; Siddiqui, Arif; Shah, Fatimah; Memon, Zahid Ali

    2013-04-01

    Almost one-fifth of the world's population constitutes women of reproductive age who are repeatedly exposed to pregnancy and childbearing. Many are often at high risk of illness and mortality during pregnancy and require maternal healthcare services for early detection of complications. More than 0.5 million women die every year worldwide due to pregnancy-related complications. Almost 0.03 million of them are in Pakistan. Maternal healthcare in Pakistan is poor and results in high rates of morbidity and mortality. This paper evaluates the accessibility of antenatal care (ANC) services in primary healthcare settings in the Punjab province of Pakistan during the period June 2010- August 2011. The paper uses a cross-sectional study including mix methods (qualitative and quantitative). Nine districts were included in the project; one from each administrative tier or division. Nineteen health facilities, including two rural health centres (RHCs) and 17 basic health units (BHUs) were randomly selected from each district. The total sample was 171 health facilities. The qualitative assessment was carried out through focus-group discussions (FGDs) and indepth interviews with clients, providers, and health managers. The reasons for the gaps in service accessibility were the distant location of facilities, a lack of transport, and inconvenient facility working hours. The issues of service accessibility were further exacerbated by sociocultural factors such as low levels of client awareness, a lack of decision-making by clients, and the influence of spiritual healers and quacks. Health managers further pointed out weak co-ordination between vertical programmes and routine integrated health services, and a lack of human resources in distantly located facilities. In order to increase the accessibility of ANC services, facility working hours must be extended and adjusted according to the convenience of clients in primary healthcare (PHC) facilities. The utilisation of ANC

  8. Quality of assistance provided to children with sickle cell disease by primary healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ludmila Mourão Xavier; Reis, Tatiana Carvalho; Vieira, Magda Mendes; de Andrade-Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Caldeira, Antônio Prates

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of healthcare provided to sickle cell disease children by primary healthcare services in a region of high prevalence. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed by interviewing members of families with sickle cell disease children. The children had been identified from the Neonatal Screening Program in Minas Gerais state over the last 12 years in towns of the Montes Claros-Bocaiuva microregion. A structured questionnaire specially developed for this study and based on three axes was used: indicators of the child's health (immunization, growth and development, prophylaxis antibiotic therapy), perception of care by the family (health education and accessibility) and knowledge of the family about the disease. Results Sixty-three of 71 families with children identified as having sickle cell disease were interviewed. The predominant genotypes were Hb SS (44.4%) and Hb SC (41.2%). Adequate monitoring of growth and development was recorded for the first year of life in 23 children (36.6%) and for the second year of life in 18 children (28.6%). The basic vaccination schedule was completed by 44 children (69.8%) but 62 vaccination record cards (98.4%) identified delays of special vaccines. Regular use of prophylactic penicillin was reported by 55 caregivers (87.3%). The family's perception of the care provided suggests poor accessibility to health services and lack of opportunities to answer doubts. The average performance of families in knowledge testing was 59.8%. Conclusion The quality of healthcare is unsatisfactory. The care provided to children with sickle cell disease in primary healthcare services needs improvements. PMID:23049319

  9. Management Continuity from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Burge, Frederick; Pineault, Raynald; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Beaulieu, Christine; Santor, Darcy A.; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Management continuity, operationally defined as “the extent to which services delivered by different providers are timely and complementary such that care is experienced as connected and coherent,” is a core attribute of primary healthcare. Continuity, as experienced by the patient, is the result of good care coordination or integration. Objective: To provide insight into how well management continuity is measured in validated coordination or integration subscales of primary healthcare instruments. Method: Relevant subscales from the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS), the Primary Care Assessment Tool – Short Form (PCAT-S), the Components of Primary Care Instrument (CPCI) and the Veterans Affairs National Outpatient Customer Satisfaction Survey (VANOCSS) were administered to 432 adult respondents who had at least one healthcare contact with a provider other than their family physician in the previous 12 months. Subscales were examined descriptively, by correlation and factor analysis and item response theory analysis. Because the VANOCSS elicits coordination problems and is scored dichotomously, we used logistic regression to examine how evaluative subscales relate to reported problems. Results: Most responses to the PCAS, PCAT-S and CPCI subscales were positive, yet 83% of respondents reported having one or more problems on the VANOCSS Overall Coordination subscale and 41% on the VANOCSS Specialist Access subscale. Exploratory factor analysis suggests two distinct factors. The first (eigenvalue=6.98) is coordination actions by the primary care physician in transitioning patient care to other providers (PCAS Integration subscale and most of the PCAT-S Coordination subscale). The second (eigenvalue=1.20) is efforts by the primary care physician to create coherence between different visits both within and outside the regular doctor's office (CPCI Coordination subscale). The PCAS Integration subscale was most strongly associated with lower likelihood of

  10. Improving the effectiveness of service delivery in the public healthcare sector: the case of ophthalmology services in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chee Yoong; Lim, Ka Keat; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Dahian, Kamilah Binti; Goh, Pik Pin

    2015-08-28

    Rising demand of ophthalmology care is increasingly straining Malaysia's public healthcare sector due to its limited human and financial resources. Improving the effectiveness of ophthalmology service delivery can promote national policy goals of population health improvement and system sustainability. This study examined the performance variation of public ophthalmology service in Malaysia, estimated the potential output gain and investigated several factors that might explain the differential performance. Data for 2011 and 2012 on 36 ophthalmology centres operating in the Ministry of Health hospitals were used in this analysis. We first consulted a panel of ophthalmology service managers to understand the production of ophthalmology services and to verify the production model. We then assessed the relative performance of these centres using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Efficiency scores (ES) were decomposed into technical, scale, and congestion component. Potential increase in service output was estimated. Sensitivity analysis of model changes was performed and stability of the result was assessed using bootstrap approach. Second stage Tobit regression was conducted to determine if hospital type, availability of day services and population characteristics were related to the DEA scores. In 2011, 33% of the ophthalmology centres were found to have ES > 1 (mean ES = 1.10). Potential output gains were 10% (SE ± 2.92), 7.4% (SE ± 2.06), 6.9% (SE ± 1.97) if the centres could overcome their technical, scale and congestion inefficiencies. More centres moved to the performance frontier in 2012 (mean ES = 1.07), with lower potential output gain. The model used has good stability. Robustness checks show that the DEA correctly identified low performing centres. Being in state hospital was significantly associated with better performance. Using DEA to benchmarking service performance of ophthalmology care could provide insights for policy

  11. Primary Healthcare-based Diabetes Registry in Puducherry: Design and Methods.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayanan, Subitha; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Gupta, Rajeev; Xavier, Denis; Bhaskar Reddy, S Vijaya

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes registries monitor the population prevalence and incidence of diabetes, monitor diabetes control program, provide information of quality of care to health service providers, and provide a sampling frame for interventional studies. This study documents the process of establishing a prospective diabetes registry in a primary health-care setting in Puducherry. This is a facility-based prospective registry conducted in six randomly selected urban health centers in Puducherry, with enrollment of all known patients with diabetes attending chronic disease clinics. Administrative approvals were obtained from Government Health Services. Manuals for training of medical officers, health-care workers, and case report forms were developed. Diabetes registry was prepared using Epi Info software. In the first phase, demographic characteristics, risk factors, complications, coexisting chronic conditions, lifestyle and medical management, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Around 2177 patients with diabetes have been registered in six Primary Health Centres out of a total of 2948 participants seeking care from chronic disease clinic. Registration coverage ranges from 61% to 105% in these centers. This study has documented methodological details, and learning experiences gained while developing a diabetes registry at the primary health care level and the scope for upscaling to a Management Information System for Diabetes and a State-wide Registry. Improvement in patient care through needs assessment and quality assurance in service delivery is an important theme envisioned by this registry.

  12. Healthy Lifestyle Medicine in the Traditional Healthcare Environment-Primary Care and Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark A; Kaminsky, Leonard A

    There is unquestioned value of the need to incorporate Healthy Lifestyle Medicine (HLM) within the traditional models of healthcare. Primary care providers are well positioned to implement HLM as a routine aspect of their healthcare practice. Unfortunately, barriers for this to occur, including poor professional training in the components of HLM and limitations in the time they have available to spend with patients, result in inadequate delivery of HLM from primary care providers. Thus, new approaches for the delivery of HLM need to be developed that would allow primary care providers better, and more, opportunities to make patient referrals. Ideally, this would start with creating a culture change within communities that embraces the importance on living a healthy lifestyle. One opportunity which should be considered is expanding access to currently available options, such as cardiac rehabilitation programs and worksite wellness programs. Both types of programs already provide key elements of HLM within their existing structure. However, new models also need to be developed. Community-based HL centers comprising HL specialists including counselors, exercise physiologists, dietitians, and physical therapists, could be developed and become core locations for the promotion of HLM.

  13. Primary Healthcare-based Diabetes Registry in Puducherry: Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Subitha; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Gupta, Rajeev; Xavier, Denis; Bhaskar Reddy, S. Vijaya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes registries monitor the population prevalence and incidence of diabetes, monitor diabetes control program, provide information of quality of care to health service providers, and provide a sampling frame for interventional studies. This study documents the process of establishing a prospective diabetes registry in a primary health-care setting in Puducherry. Methods: This is a facility-based prospective registry conducted in six randomly selected urban health centers in Puducherry, with enrollment of all known patients with diabetes attending chronic disease clinics. Administrative approvals were obtained from Government Health Services. Manuals for training of medical officers, health-care workers, and case report forms were developed. Diabetes registry was prepared using Epi Info software. Results: In the first phase, demographic characteristics, risk factors, complications, coexisting chronic conditions, lifestyle and medical management, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Around 2177 patients with diabetes have been registered in six Primary Health Centres out of a total of 2948 participants seeking care from chronic disease clinic. Registration coverage ranges from 61% to 105% in these centers. Conclusion: This study has documented methodological details, and learning experiences gained while developing a diabetes registry at the primary health care level and the scope for upscaling to a Management Information System for Diabetes and a State-wide Registry. Improvement in patient care through needs assessment and quality assurance in service delivery is an important theme envisioned by this registry. PMID:28553589

  14. Lessons from Albion: Can Australia learn from England's approach to primary healthcare funding?

    PubMed

    Norman, Richard; Robinson, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    As Australia struggles to meet increased demand for healthcare and contain expenditure there has been a focus on primary care and its role in demand management and keeping people out of expensive secondary care. However, with domestic policy struggling to find a suitable approach consideration of English policy could well be fruitful in the quest to strengthen and develop primary care in Australia. The purpose of this paper is to consider policy developments in England and explores these in relation to the Australian healthcare system. The authors highlight the key changes to policy that have occurred in the English healthcare system in recent years, and discuss whether they have proven successful. The authors discuss the barriers to implementing similar approaches in Australia, particularly the difference in system structure that would necessitate policy adaptation. Whilst there are differences in the structure and organisation of funding and service provision between countries, there are developments in England that are worthy of consideration from an Australian perspective. These include a focus on funding and commissioning that rewards quality not just activity and volume. As Australia sees the development of new primary care organisations that are tasked with commissioning then developments and lessons around the technical and relational aspects will be important to consider. The work highlights that Australia might consider learning from the English experience in this area and the types of incentives that may increase efficiency and quality of health service provision. This is important as it potentially gives greater certainty about those approaches most likely to yield beneficial outcomes for patients and the broader system.

  15. The Influence of Organizational Subculture on Information Technology Project Success in the Healthcare Sector: A Qualitative, Multi-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallet, Richard Kofi

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers face high demands for technology based healthcare services due to global population increases and adapting information technology (IT) to achieve quality patient care. IT has become center stage in the operations and management of healthcare organizations. IT requirements emerge from the visions, values, and beliefs of…

  16. The Influence of Organizational Subculture on Information Technology Project Success in the Healthcare Sector: A Qualitative, Multi-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallet, Richard Kofi

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers face high demands for technology based healthcare services due to global population increases and adapting information technology (IT) to achieve quality patient care. IT has become center stage in the operations and management of healthcare organizations. IT requirements emerge from the visions, values, and beliefs of…

  17. A conversation on health in Canada: revisiting universality and the centrality of primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    White, Franklin; Nanan, Debra

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, British Columbia launched a public consultation on how to strengthen the health system. We report on the processes and the inputs and views submitted and examine the perceived importance of universality and primary healthcare (PHC). Public response revealed strong support for the Canada Health Act, which upholds 5 principles: public administration, comprehensiveness, universality, portability, and accessibility, and also a need for the system to be more open to innovation. It recognized that keys to improving population health and efficiency gains within the health system lie within the scope of PHC and that prevention, demand management, and self-management are all part of PHC.

  18. Automated dose dispensing service for primary healthcare patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sinnemäki, Juha; Sihvo, Sinikka; Isojärvi, Jaana; Blom, Marja; Airaksinen, Marja; Mäntylä, Antti

    2013-01-08

    An automated dose dispensing (ADD) service has been implemented in primary healthcare in some European countries. In this service, regularly used medicines are machine-packed into unit-dose bags for each time of administration. The aim of this study is to review the evidence for ADD's influence on the appropriateness of medication use, medication safety, and costs in primary healthcare. A literature search was performed in April 2012 in the most relevant databases (n = 10), including the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library. The reference lists of the studies selected were manually searched. A study was included in the review if the study was conducted in primary healthcare or nursing home settings and medicines were dispensed in unit-dose bags. Out of 328 abstracts, seven studies met the inclusion and reporting quality criteria, but none applied a randomized controlled study design. Of the four controlled studies, one was a national register-based study. It showed that the patient group in the ADD scheme more often used three or more psychotropic drugs and anticholinergics than patients using the standard dispensing procedure, while women in the ADD group used less long-acting benzodiazepines and both genders had fewer drug-drug interactions. In another, regional controlled study, the ADD group consisted of patients with higher risk of inappropriate drug use, according to all indicators applied. The third controlled study indicated that ADD user drug treatments were more likely to remain unchanged than in patients using a standard dispensing procedure. A controlled study from Norway showed that ADD reduced discrepancies in the documentation of patient medication records. Costs were not investigated in any of the studies. A very limited number of controlled studies have explored ADD in primary healthcare. Consequently, the evidence for ADD's influence on appropriateness and safety of medication use is limited and lacking in information on costs. The findings of

  19. Collaboration across private and public sector primary health care services: benefits, costs and policy implications.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Julie; Powell Davies, Gawaine; Jayasuriya, Rohan; Fort Harris, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Ongoing care for chronic conditions is best provided by interprofessional teams. There are challenges in achieving this where teams cross organisational boundaries. This article explores the influence of organisational factors on collaboration between private and public sector primary and community health services involved in diabetes care. It involved a case study using qualitative methods. Forty-five participants from 20 organisations were purposively recruited. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and from content analysis of documents. Thematic analysis was used employing a two-level coding system and cross case comparisons. The patterns of collaborative patient care were influenced by a combination of factors relating to the benefits and costs of collaboration and the influence of support mechanisms. Benefits lay in achieving common or complementary health or organisational goals. Costs were incurred in bridging differences in organisational size, structure, complexity and culture. Collaboration was easier between private sector organisations than between private and public sectors. Financial incentives were not sufficient to overcome organisational barriers. To achieve more coordinated primary and community health care structural changes are also needed to better align funding mechanisms, priorities and accountabilities of the different organisations.

  20. Quality of Care for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases: Data for Accreditation Plan in Primary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    There are scarce reports in the literature on factors affecting the assessment of the quality of care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information is relevant in the accreditation process on implementing the healthcare. The study group consisted of 133 adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 125 adult patients with chronic non-respiratory diseases. In the present study, the level of satisfaction from healthcare provided by the primary healthcare unit, disease acceptance, quality of life, health behaviors, and met needs were examined, as well as associations between variables with the use of correspondence analysis. The results are that in patients with chronic respiratory diseases an increase in satisfaction depends on the improvement of well-being in the mental sphere. The lack of problems with obtaining a referral to a specialist and a higher level of fulfilled needs also have a positive effect. Additionally, low levels of satisfaction should be expected in those patients with chronic respiratory diseases who wait for an appointment in front of the office for a long time, report problems with obtaining a referral to additional tests, present a low level of health behaviors, and have a low index of benefits.

  1. [Primary healthcare geared to the needs of the elderly: from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Martins, Aline Blaya; D'Avila, Otávio Pereira; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Hugo, Fernando Neves

    2014-08-01

    This article seeks to establish a confrontation between theory and practice with respect to healthcare for the elderly. The theory was evaluated by a study of documents that comprise the legal and theoretical framework related to the health of the elderly, which generated a matrix to assess universal access, equity, comprehensiveness and quality of care. However, the practice of healthcare was evaluated by a population-based study conducted on 862 elderly individuals and a census that assessed primary healthcare (PHC) units in two districts of Porto Alegre in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The variables chosen to verify the categories were type of care accessed, first contact attribute, wheelchair accessibility and availability of priority access. Other variables include comprehensive care and the presence of dental root remains, basic PHC score, the adequacy of health facilities and ongoing professional training, as well as cross-sectional categories, elderly groups and home care. A mismatch was found between recommendation and practice in some factors and advances were observed in the equity and quality of care regarding the ongoing training of professionals.

  2. Social franchising primary healthcare clinics--a model for South African National Health Insurance?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew Ken Lacey

    2015-09-21

    This article describes the first government social franchise initiative in the world to deliver a 'brand' of quality primary healthcare (PHC) clinic services. Quality and standards of care are not uniformly and reliably delivered across government PHC clinics in North West Province, South Africa, despite government support, numerous policies, guidelines and in-service training sessions provided to staff. Currently the strongest predictor of good-quality service is the skill and dedication of the facility manager. A project utilising the social franchising business model, harvesting best practices, has been implemented with the aim of developing a system to ensure reliably excellent healthcare service provision in every facility in North West. The services of social franchising consultants have been procured to develop the business model to drive this initiative. Best practices have been benchmarked, and policies, guidelines and clinic support systems have been reviewed, evaluated and assessed, and incorporated into the business plan. A pilot clinic has been selected to refine and develop a working social franchise model. This will then be replicated in one clinic to confirm proof of concept before further scale-up. The social franchise business model can provide solutions to a reliable and recognisable 'brand' of quality universal coverage of healthcare services.

  3. Solid waste management in primary healthcare centers: application of a facilitation tool 1

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ana Maria Maniero; Günther, Wanda Maria Risso

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: to propose a tool to facilitate diagnosis, formulation and evaluation of the Waste Management Plan in Primary Healthcare Centers and to present the results of the application in four selected units. Method: descriptive research, covering the stages of formulation /application of the proposed instrument and the evaluation of waste management performance at the units. Results: the tool consists in five forms; specific indicators of waste generation for outpatients healthcare units were proposed, and performance indicators that give scores for compliance with current legislation. In the studied units it is generated common waste (52-60%), infectious-sharps (31-42%) and recyclable (5-17%). The average rates of generation are: 0,09kg of total waste/outpatient assistance and 0,09kg of infectious-sharps waste/outpatient procedure. The compliance with regulations, initially 26-30%, then reached 30-38% a year later. Conclusion: the tool showed to be easy to use, bypassing the existence of a complex range of existing regulatory requirements, allowed to identify non-conformities, pointed out corrective measures and evaluated the performance of waste management. In this sense, it contributes to decision making and management practices relating to waste, tasks usually assigned to nurses. It is recommended that the tool be applied in similar healthcare units for comparative studies, and implementation of necessary adaptations for other medical services. PMID:27556874

  4. Together Achieving More: Primary Care Team Communication and Alcohol-Related Healthcare Utilization and Costs.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Marlon P; Zakletskaia, Larissa I; Shoham, David A; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Carayon, Pascale

    2015-10-01

    Identifying and engaging excessive alcohol users in primary care may be an effective way to improve patient health outcomes, reduce alcohol-related acute care events, and lower costs. Little is known about what structures of primary care team communication are associated with alcohol-related patient outcomes. Using a sociometric survey of primary care clinic communication, this study evaluated the relation between team communication networks and alcohol-related utilization of care and costs. Between May 2013 and December 2013, a total of 155 healthcare employees at 6 primary care clinics participated in a survey on team communication. Three-level hierarchical modeling evaluated the link between connectedness within the care team and the number of alcohol-related emergency department visits, hospital days, and associated medical care costs in the past 12 months for each team's primary care patient panel. Teams (n = 31) whose registered nurses displayed more strong (at least daily) face-to-face ties and strong (at least daily) electronic communication ties had 10% fewer alcohol-related hospital days (rate ratio [RR] = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.84, 0.97). Furthermore, in an average team size of 19, each additional team member with strong interaction ties across the whole team was associated with $1,030 (95% CI: -$1,819, -$241) lower alcohol-related patient healthcare costs per 1,000 team patients in the past 12 months. Conversely, teams whose primary care practitioner (PCP) had more strong face-to-face communication ties and more weak (weekly or several times a week) electronic communication ties had 12% more alcohol-related hospital days (RR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.23) and $1,428 (95% CI: $378, $2,478) higher alcohol-related healthcare costs per 1,000 patients in the past 12 months. The analyses controlled for patient age, gender, insurance, and comorbidity diagnoses. Excessive alcohol-using patients may fair better if cared for by teams whose

  5. Influence of the type of work shift in Female Sexual Function Index of healthcare sector female workers.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Peters, Romina; Contreras-García, Yolanda; Manriquez-Vidal, Camilo

    2017-03-01

    To determine the influence of the type of work shift over the sexual function of healthcare sector female workers. Quantitative, cross-sectional and correlation type of study. Universe composed of a high complexity hospital female workers aged between 20 and 64 years old who worked in Day Shifts (DS) and Rotating Shifts (RS). Bio-social-demographic profile of 365 female workers was characterized by means of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v.19.0 Software and univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were applied. Mann-Whitney's non-parametric test was employed, altogether with Chi Square Test, Fisher's exact test and logistic regression with p-value<0.05. 36, 5 years old mean age (10, 65 SD); 43,2% belongs to DS and 56,7% belongs to RS. General FSFI scored 27, 86 points (6, 11 SD), with an mean of 27,47 points (6,82 SD) for DS and 28,16 points (5,51 SD) for the RS. Variables that might affect FSFI in the case of RS were the Health Service Assistant category, with 7, 11 OR; 2, 051-24,622 IC; p=0,002 and chronic disease with 2, 226 OR; 1093-4533 IC; p=0,027. Protective variables for DS, the use of hormonal contraceptive method with 0,322 OR; 0,145-0,713 IC; p=0,005 and non- hormonal contraceptive method with 0,229 OR; 0,09-0,586 IC; p=0,002. There was no significant FSFI difference per shift. A protective factor for DS and two Risk factors for RS were identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [The coverage gap for mental health disosrders in the primary healthcare level of the city of Cordoba, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Burrone, Maria Soledad; Enders, Julio E; Alvarado, Ruben; Valencia, Eliecer; Abeldaño, Ariel R; Susser, Ezra; Fernández, A Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with behavioral and mental health disorders do not receive care in specialized mental health services. These individuals could potentially be identified and managed in the primary healthcare level. To analyze the coverage gap on mental health disorders in the primary healthcare level of Córdoba city, Argentina. Stratified multistage random sample of individuals 19 to 69 years of age seeking care in primary healthcare centers of the public health system in Córdoba city. Presence of behavioral and mental health disorder and receiving healthcare through mental health services were assesed using CIDI 3.0. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. A total of 1,067 individuals were included in the present analysis. Overall, 20.15% of individuals included in the analysis had behavioral and mental health disorders during the last year, of whom 77.33% did not receive care through mental health services. The proportion of individuals with behavioral and mental health disorders and of those who did not receive care through mental health services are similar to those observed in other Latin American countries, but higher than those reported in Europe. This communication gives preliminary results about the coverage gap on mental health disorders present in the primary healthcare level in Cordoba city. These individuals may benefit from interventions aimed to identify and manage those with mental health disorders in the primary healthcare level.

  7. Preanalytical errors in primary healthcare: a questionnaire study of information search procedures, test request management and test tube labelling.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Johan; Brulin, Christine; Grankvist, Kjell; Wallin, Olof

    2009-01-01

    Most errors in laboratory medicine occur in the preanalytical phase and are the result of human mistakes. This study investigated information search procedures, test request management and test tube labelling in primary healthcare compared to the same procedures amongst clinical laboratory staff. A questionnaire was completed by 317 venous blood sampling staff in 70 primary healthcare centres and in two clinical laboratories (response rate = 94%). Correct procedures were not always followed. Only 60% of the primary healthcare staff reported that they always sought information in the updated, online laboratory manual. Only 12% reported that they always labelled the test tubes prior to drawing blood samples. No major differences between primary healthcare centres and clinical laboratories were found, except for test tube labelling, whereby the laboratory staff reported better practices. Re-education and access to documented routines were not clearly associated with better practices. The preanalytical procedure in the surveyed primary healthcare centres was associated with a risk of errors which could affect patient safety. To improve patient safety in laboratory testing, all healthcare providers should survey their preanalytical procedures and improve the total testing process with a systems perspective.

  8. Use of email in communication between the Finnish primary healthcare system and general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Karhula, Tuula; Kauppila, Timo; Elonheimo, Outi; Brommels, Mats

    2011-01-01

    The volume of emails is rising rapidly everywhere. However, there is no data available concerning how primary healthcare physicians feel about the use of email communication between themselves, with their managers and with other people contacting them. The objective of this study was to find out what the attitudes of primary care physicians are towards email at work. The use of email was studied among a convenience sample of primary healthcare physicians. Physicians thought that email was a good instrument for delivering information but not as an instrument for leadership. Physicians in lead positions thought more often than ordinary general practitioners (GPs) that email is good for information. The leaders used email more actively than other GPs. The contents of the emails received by the GPs differed depending on the site of work. The total number of emails was higher in urban areas than in rural areas. Emails relating to administration, educational information and meeting materials were more often sent in rural than in urban primary healthcare settings. Information about daily work arrangements and about social events were more frequently emailed in urban than in rural surroundings. Email was considered important for information inside the system but a somewhat difficult tool for discussing complicated subjects. Generally, it was agreed that there was some unimportant information filtering through this medium to the target GPs. GPs were uncertain whether important data reached everybody who needed it or not. Still, almost everybody used the email system regularly and the use of it was considered relatively easy. GPs were generally prone to adopt advice and instructions given via email and implemented those in their working routines. The use of the email system was related to technical ability to use the system. The easier the GP thought that the email system was the more he used it. Rural GPs were more critical in applying advice shared via email than their

  9. A situational analysis of ocular health promotion in the South African primary health-care system.

    PubMed

    Sithole, Hlupheka Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    South Africa has a serious burden of avoidable blindness and visual impairment, which may be due to poor ocular health promotional policies and programs or implementation. Therefore, this paper sought to critically analyse the South African primary health-care policies and programs, to identify the components of ocular health promotional policies and programs as well as how they are currently being implemented and to suggest areas that can be improved in order to minimise the burden of blindness and visual impairment. Triangulated quantitative and qualitative research methods were used in the study. Questionnaire and interviews were used to solicit data from national and provincial managers of different health directorates. Eye-care managers from each province also completed the questionnaire. Furthermore, relevant health policy and program documents from national and provincial departments of health were studied to identify areas relating to ocular health promotion. The study found varying degrees of implementation of various ocular health promotional activities in the provinces with the majority of respondents (62 per cent) indicating that ocular health promotion was not part of their responsibility and another 81 per cent revealing that vision screening does not form part of their health promotional programs. It further revealed a lack of a dedicated directorate for ocular health-care issues and the absence of an integrated ocular health promotional policy. Ocular health promotional activities were absent in other provinces. This may be a major contributing factor to poor ocular health promotion in South Africa and hence, the high prevalence of blindness and visual impairment. Therefore, it is recommended that an integrated ocular health promotional model (directorate and policies) be developed and be part of the South African primary health-care system. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  10. Pain measurement as part of primary healthcare of adult patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Andreza Aparecida Felix; Ribeiro, Sonia Beatriz Felix; Moraes-Souza, Helio; de Oliveira, Lucas Felix; Ribeiro, João Batista; da Silva, Sheron Hellen; de Oliveira, Daniel Fachinelli Felix; Ribeiro, Matheus Fernando Felix

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this exploratory, cross-sectional study was to evaluate pain in sickle cell disease patients and aspects related to primary healthcare. Methods Data were obtained through home interviews. The assessment instruments (body diagram, Numerical Pain Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire) collected information on the underlying disease and on pain. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program for Windows. Associations between the subgroups of sickle cell disease patients (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, sickle β-thalassemia and others) and pain were analyzed using contingency tables and non-parametric tests of association (classic chi-square, Fisher's and Kruskal-Wallis) with a level of 5% (p-value < 0.05) being set for the rejection of the null hypothesis. Results Forty-seven over 18-year-old patients with sickle cell disease were evaluated. Most were black (78.7%) and female (59.6%) and the mean age was 30.1 years. The average number of bouts of pain annually was 7.02; pain was predominantly reported by individuals with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS). The intensity of pain (Numeric Pain Scale) was 5.5 and the quantitative index (McGill) was 35.9. This study also shows that patients presented a high frequency of moderately painful crises in their own homes. Conclusion According to these facts, it is essential that pain related to sickle cell disease is properly identified, quantified, characterized and treated at the three levels of healthcare. In primary healthcare, accurate measurement of pain combined with better care may decrease acute painful episodes and consequently minimize tissue damage, thus improving the patient's overall health. PMID:24106446

  11. [Primary healthcare and underreporting and (in)visibility of violence against women].

    PubMed

    Kind, Luciana; Orsini, Maria de Lourdes Pereira; Nepomuceno, Valdênia; Gonçalves, Letícia; Souza, Gislaine Alves de; Ferreira, Monique Fernanda Félix

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to map indicators of violence against women as recorded by primary healthcare services in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, and to identify difficulties experienced by health professionals in reporting such violence. Epidemiological data on this type of notification were collected in the information system of the Municipal Health Department. Data were produced with a semi-structured questionnaire and three focus group sessions with participation by 270 primary care professionals. The data were submitted to content analysis and were coded, categorized, and discussed in light of a literature review. A central analytical axis was called (in)visibility of violence against women. The data revealed both the recognition of violence as a public health problem and the invisibility that prevents dealing with it properly. Notification of such violence is often viewed as a fuss or commotion, which hampers progress in discussing and acting on the problem.

  12. Public Perspectives on Health Human Resources in Primary Healthcare: Context, Choices and Change

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Sandra; Wong, Sabrina T.; Watson, Diane E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors identified by patients as relevant to health human resources (HHR) planning for primary healthcare (PHC). Eleven focus groups were conducted in British Columbia and a thematic analysis was undertaken, informed by a needs-based HHR planning framework. Three themes emerged: (a) the importance of geographic context, (b) change management at the practice level and (c) the need for choices and changes in delivery of PHC. Findings suggest that more attention could be focused on overcoming geographic barriers to providing services, change management within office-based practices, and providing support structures that allow primary care providers to work closer to their full scope of practice. That these factors align with many strategic directions set out by government and planners signals the readiness for change in how PHC is delivered and HHR planned. PMID:21286262

  13. Public perspectives on health human resources in primary healthcare: context, choices and change.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sandra; Wong, Sabrina T; Watson, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors identified by patients as relevant to health human resources (HHR) planning for primary healthcare (PHC). Eleven focus groups were conducted in British Columbia and a thematic analysis was undertaken, informed by a needs-based HHR planning framework. Three themes emerged: (a) the importance of geographic context, (b) change management at the practice level and (c) the need for choices and changes in delivery of PHC. Findings suggest that more attention could be focused on overcoming geographic barriers to providing services, change management within office-based practices, and providing support structures that allow primary care providers to work closer to their full scope of practice. That these factors align with many strategic directions set out by government and planners signals the readiness for change in how PHC is delivered and HHR planned.

  14. Primary healthcare in Portugal: 10 years of contractualization of health services in the region of Lisbon.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Baltazar Ricardo; Pisco, Ana Maria Silva Azenha; Candoso, Fátima; Bastos, Sónia; Reis, Magda

    2017-03-01

    Contractualization consists in the development and implementation of a documented agreement whereby one party (payer) provides compensation to the other party (provider) in exchange for a set of health services to a targeted population. We describe, through a case study, the history and the process of implementation of primary health care contractualization (since 1992) in Portugal, emphasizing the consolidation and future challenges of the primary healthcare reform started in 2005. This article resorts to a case study to reflect on the results obtained in the Cluster of Health Centers of the Northern West, Regional Administration of Lisbon and Tagus Valley, between 2009 and 2015, following implementation of contractualization. It was found that the incentive-related payments will have to be weighted considering the results obtained, strongly influenced by epidemiological and socioeconomic change.

  15. Resilience of primary healthcare professionals working in challenging environments: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Catriona; Robertson, Helen D; Elliott, Alison M; Iversen, Lisa; Murchie, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The modern primary healthcare workforce needs to be resilient. Early research framed professional resilience as avoiding 'burnout'; however, more recent literature has introduced the concept of positive adaptation to professional challenges, which results in individuals thriving in their role. To explore what primary health professionals working in challenging environments consider to be characteristics of resilience and what promotes or challenges professional resilience. A qualitative focus group in north east Scotland. Five focus groups were held with 20 health professionals (six GPs, nine nurses, four pharmacists, and a practice manager) based in rural or deprived city areas in the north east of Scotland. Inductive thematic analysis identified emerging themes. Personal resilience characteristics identified were optimism, flexibility and adaptability, initiative, tolerance, organisational skills, being a team worker, keeping within professional boundaries, assertiveness, humour, and a sense of self-worth. Workplace challenges were workload, information overload, time pressures, poor communication, challenging patients, and environmental factors (rural location). Promoters of professional resilience were strong management support, teamwork, workplace buffers, and social factors such as friends, family, and leisure activities. A model of health professional resilience is proposed that concurs with existing literature but adds the concept of personal traits being synergistic with workplace features and social networks. These facilitate adaptability and enable individual health professionals to cope with adversity that is inevitably part of the everyday experience of those working in challenging healthcare environments. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  16. Australia's personally controlled electronic health record and primary healthcare: generating a framework for implementation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Almond, H; Cummings, E; Turner, P

    2013-01-01

    The Australian Government launched a personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR) system in July 2012 committing $466.7m. Currently Australia lacks a clearly articulated implementation and evaluation framework and there remains limited detail on how this system's success will be determined. These problems are especially visible in primary healthcare. The UK and US, have been advocated as models, however they have started to report points of failure arising from their approaches. Evidence suggests that alternatives need to be considered, if mistakes are not to be replicated. Insights from e-health record implementation and evaluation approaches in Denmark and the Netherlands provide Australia with other approaches. The PCEHR requires different and radical thinking around the delivery of health services. Drawing on a range of English language articles identified between 1996 and 2012, the paper generates a conceptual framework for implementation and evaluation of the PCEHR. The generation of a grounded implementation and evaluation framework in primary healthcare will reduce provider scepticism and facilitate complex changes associated with PCEHR uptake.

  17. Smoking Prevalence Among Users of Primary Healthcare Units in Brazil: The Role of Religiosity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Giglio, Flávia Masili; Terada, Natalia Akemi Yamada; da Silva, Anderson Soares; Zucoloto, Miriane Lucindo

    2017-03-24

    The objective of this cross-sectional study is to examine the association between religious involvement and tobacco use in a large representative sample of users of primary healthcare units of Ribeirão Preto, Southeast Brazil. Current and past smoking habits were determined among 1055 users of primary healthcare units. Participants' religiosity was measured using the DUREL questionnaire. The prevalence of smoking among men was 16.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.0-22.5] and among women was 12.6% (95% CI 10.4-15.0). Among the current smokers, 40.9% were light smokers, 24.6% were moderate smokers, and 34.5% were heavy smokers. The mean number of cigarettes smoked per day was 13.5. Respondents who have a religion had a lower smoking prevalence than people who had no religion. Current smoking prevalence tended to be higher among people who do not practice their religion than people who practice their religion. Smoking status is also associated with self-reported religiosity, organizational religious activity and some aspects of intrinsic religiosity. Religiosity is an important factor in influencing the smoking behavior in Brazilian users of the public health services.

  18. Resilience of primary healthcare professionals working in challenging environments: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Catriona; Robertson, Helen D; Elliott, Alison M; Iversen, Lisa; Murchie, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background The modern primary healthcare workforce needs to be resilient. Early research framed professional resilience as avoiding ‘burnout’; however, more recent literature has introduced the concept of positive adaptation to professional challenges, which results in individuals thriving in their role. Aim To explore what primary health professionals working in challenging environments consider to be characteristics of resilience and what promotes or challenges professional resilience. Design and setting A qualitative focus group in north east Scotland. Method Five focus groups were held with 20 health professionals (six GPs, nine nurses, four pharmacists, and a practice manager) based in rural or deprived city areas in the north east of Scotland. Inductive thematic analysis identified emerging themes. Results Personal resilience characteristics identified were optimism, flexibility and adaptability, initiative, tolerance, organisational skills, being a team worker, keeping within professional boundaries, assertiveness, humour, and a sense of self-worth. Workplace challenges were workload, information overload, time pressures, poor communication, challenging patients, and environmental factors (rural location). Promoters of professional resilience were strong management support, teamwork, workplace buffers, and social factors such as friends, family, and leisure activities. Conclusion A model of health professional resilience is proposed that concurs with existing literature but adds the concept of personal traits being synergistic with workplace features and social networks. These facilitate adaptability and enable individual health professionals to cope with adversity that is inevitably part of the everyday experience of those working in challenging healthcare environments. PMID:27162205

  19. Using realist evaluation to assess primary healthcare teams' responses to intimate partner violence in Spain.

    PubMed

    Goicolea, Isabel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastian, Miguel; Marchal, Bruno; Vives-Cases, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Few evaluations have assessed the factors triggering an adequate health care response to intimate partner violence. This article aimed to: 1) describe a realist evaluation carried out in Spain to ascertain why, how and under what circumstances primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence, and 2) discuss the strengths and challenges of its application. We carried out a series of case studies in four steps. First, we developed an initial programme theory (PT1), based on interviews with managers. Second, we refined PT1 into PT2 by testing it in a primary healthcare team that was actively responding to violence. Third, we tested the refined PT2 by incorporating three other cases located in the same region. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected and thick descriptions were produced and analysed using a retroduction approach. Fourth, we analysed a total of 15 cases, and identified combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that triggered an adequate response to violence by using qualitative comparative analysis. There were several key mechanisms -the teams' self-efficacy, perceived preparation, women-centred care-, and contextual factors -an enabling team environment and managerial style, the presence of motivated professionals, the use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care- that should be considered to develop adequate primary health-care responses to violence. The full application of this realist evaluation was demanding, but also well suited to explore a complex intervention reflecting the situation in natural settings. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Creating community-based access to primary healthcare for the uninsured through strategic alliances and restructuring local health department programs.

    PubMed

    Scotten, E Shirin L; Absher, Ann C

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, the Wilkes County Health Department joined with county healthcare providers to develop the HealthCare Connection, a coordinated and continuous system of low-cost quality care for uninsured and low-income working poor. Through this program, local providers of primary and specialty care donate specialty care or ancillary services not provided by the Health Department, which provides case management for the program. Basing their methods on business models learned through the UNC Management Academy for Public Health, planners investigated the best practices for extending healthcare coverage to the underinsured and uninsured, analyzed operational costs, discovered underutilized local resources, and built capacity within the organization. The HealthCare Connection is an example of how a rural community can join together in a common business practice to improve healthcare access for uninsured and/or low-income adults.

  1. The role of the healthcare sector in the prevention of sexual violence against sub-Saharan transmigrants in Morocco: a study of knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan transmigrants in Morocco are extremely vulnerable to sexual violence. From a public health perspective, the healthcare system is globally considered an important partner in the prevention of sexual violence. The aim of this study is twofold. In a first phase, we aimed to identify the current role and position of the Moroccan healthcare sector in the prevention of sexual violence against sub-Saharan transmigrants. In a second phase, we wanted these results and available guidelines to be the topic of a participatory process with local stakeholders in order to formulate recommendations for a more desirable prevention of sexual violence against sub-Saharan transmigrants by the Moroccan healthcare sector. Methods Knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare workers in Morocco concerning sexual violence against sub-Saharan transmigrants and its prevention were firstly explored in semi-structured interviews after which they were discussed in a participatory process resulting in the formulation of recommendations. Results All participants (n=24) acknowledged the need for desirable prevention of sexual violence against transmigrants. Furthermore, important barriers in tertiary prevention practices, i.e. psychosocial and judicial referral and long-term follow-up, and in secondary prevention attitudes, i.e. active identification of victims were identified. Moreover, existing services for Moroccan victims of sexual violence currently do not address the sub-Saharan population. Thus, transmigrants are bound to rely on the aid of civil society. Conclusions This research demonstrates the low accessibility of existing Moroccan services for sub-Saharan migrants. In particular, there is an absence of prevention initiatives addressing sexual violence against the sub-Saharan transmigrant population. Although healthcare workers do wish to develop prevention initiatives, they are dealing with structural difficulties and a lack of expertise. Recommendations

  2. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care.

    PubMed

    Gvozdanović, Darko; Koncar, Miroslav; Kojundzić, Vinko; Jezidzić, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1) to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2) to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS) on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  3. Cost of Delivering Health Care Services in Public Sector Primary and Community Health Centres in North India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Verma, Ramesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kumar, Dinesh; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background With the commitment of the national government to provide universal healthcare at cheap and affordable prices in India, public healthcare services are being strengthened in India. However, there is dearth of cost data for provision of health services through public system like primary & community health centres. In this study, we aim to bridge this gap in evidence by assessing the total annual and per capita cost of delivering the package of health services at PHC and CHC level. Secondly, we determined the per capita cost of delivering specific health services like cost per antenatal care visit, per institutional delivery, per outpatient consultation, per bed-day hospitalization etc. Methods We undertook economic costing of fourteen public health facilities (seven PHCs and CHCs each) in three North-Indian states viz., Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Punjab. Bottom-up costing method was adopted for collection of data on all resources spent on delivery of health services in selected health facilities. Analysis was undertaken using a health system perspective. The joint costs like human resource, capital, and equipment were apportioned as per the time value spent on a particular service. Capital costs were discounted and annualized over the estimated life of the item. Mean annual costs and unit costs were estimated along with their 95% confidence intervals using bootstrap methodology. Results The overall annual cost of delivering services through public sector primary and community health facilities in three states of north India were INR 8.8 million (95% CI: 7,365,630–10,294,065) and INR 26.9 million (95% CI: 22,225,159.3–32,290,099.6), respectively. Human resources accounted for more than 50% of the overall costs at both the level of PHCs and CHCs. Per capita per year costs for provision of complete package of preventive, curative and promotive services at PHC and CHC were INR 170.8 (95% CI: 131.6–208.3) and INR162.1 (95% CI: 112–219

  4. Cost of Delivering Health Care Services in Public Sector Primary and Community Health Centres in North India.

    PubMed

    Prinja, Shankar; Gupta, Aditi; Verma, Ramesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kumar, Dinesh; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    With the commitment of the national government to provide universal healthcare at cheap and affordable prices in India, public healthcare services are being strengthened in India. However, there is dearth of cost data for provision of health services through public system like primary & community health centres. In this study, we aim to bridge this gap in evidence by assessing the total annual and per capita cost of delivering the package of health services at PHC and CHC level. Secondly, we determined the per capita cost of delivering specific health services like cost per antenatal care visit, per institutional delivery, per outpatient consultation, per bed-day hospitalization etc. We undertook economic costing of fourteen public health facilities (seven PHCs and CHCs each) in three North-Indian states viz., Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Punjab. Bottom-up costing method was adopted for collection of data on all resources spent on delivery of health services in selected health facilities. Analysis was undertaken using a health system perspective. The joint costs like human resource, capital, and equipment were apportioned as per the time value spent on a particular service. Capital costs were discounted and annualized over the estimated life of the item. Mean annual costs and unit costs were estimated along with their 95% confidence intervals using bootstrap methodology. The overall annual cost of delivering services through public sector primary and community health facilities in three states of north India were INR 8.8 million (95% CI: 7,365,630-10,294,065) and INR 26.9 million (95% CI: 22,225,159.3-32,290,099.6), respectively. Human resources accounted for more than 50% of the overall costs at both the level of PHCs and CHCs. Per capita per year costs for provision of complete package of preventive, curative and promotive services at PHC and CHC were INR 170.8 (95% CI: 131.6-208.3) and INR162.1 (95% CI: 112-219.1), respectively. The study estimates can be used

  5. Review of behavioral health integration in primary care at Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, Central Region

    PubMed Central

    Fluet, Norman R.; Reis, Michael D.; Stern, Charles H.; Thompson, Alexander W.; Jolly, Gillian A.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of behavioral health services in primary care has been referred to in many ways, but ultimately refers to common structures and processes. Behavioral health is integrated into primary care because it increases the effectiveness and efficiency of providing care and reduces costs in the care of primary care patients. Reimbursement is one factor, if not the main factor, that determines the level of integration that can be achieved. The federal health reform agenda supports changes that will eventually permit behavioral health to be fully integrated and will allow the health of the population to be the primary target of intervention. In an effort to develop more integrated services at Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, models of integration are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are discussed. Recommendations to increase integration include adopting a disease management model with care management, planned guideline-based stepped care, follow-up, and treatment monitoring. Population-based interventions can be completed at the pace of the development of alternative reimbursement methods. The program should be based upon patient-centered medical home standards, and research is needed throughout the program development process. PMID:27034543

  6. How to monitor patient safety in primary care? Healthcare professionals' views.

    PubMed

    Samra, R; Car, J; Majeed, A; Vincent, C; Aylin, P

    2016-08-01

    To identify patient safety monitoring strategies in primary care. Open-ended questionnaire survey. A total of 113 healthcare professionals returned the survey from a group of 500 who were invited to participate achieving a response rate of 22.6%. North-West London, United Kingdom. A paper-based and equivalent online survey was developed and subjected to multiple stages of piloting. Respondents were asked to suggest strategies for monitoring patient safety in primary care. These monitoring suggestions were then subjected to a content frequency analysis which was conducted by two researchers. Respondent-derived monitoring strategies. In total, respondents offered 188 suggestions for monitoring patient safety in primary care. The content analysis revealed that these could be condensed into 24 different future monitoring strategies with varying levels of support. Most commonly, respondents supported the suggestion that patient safety can only be monitored effectively in primary care with greater levels of staffing or with additional resources. Approximately one-third of all responses were recommendations for strategies which addressed monitoring of the individual in the clinical practice environment (e.g. GP, practice nurse) to improve safety. There was a clear need for more staff and resource set aside to allow and encourage safety monitoring. Respondents recommended the dissemination of specific information for monitoring patient safety such as distributing the lessons of significant event audits amongst GP practices to enable shared learning.

  7. How to monitor patient safety in primary care? Healthcare professionals' views

    PubMed Central

    Samra, R; Car, J; Majeed, A; Vincent, C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To identify patient safety monitoring strategies in primary care. Design Open-ended questionnaire survey. Participants A total of 113 healthcare professionals returned the survey from a group of 500 who were invited to participate achieving a response rate of 22.6%. Setting North-West London, United Kingdom. Method A paper-based and equivalent online survey was developed and subjected to multiple stages of piloting. Respondents were asked to suggest strategies for monitoring patient safety in primary care. These monitoring suggestions were then subjected to a content frequency analysis which was conducted by two researchers. Main Outcome measures Respondent-derived monitoring strategies. Results In total, respondents offered 188 suggestions for monitoring patient safety in primary care. The content analysis revealed that these could be condensed into 24 different future monitoring strategies with varying levels of support. Most commonly, respondents supported the suggestion that patient safety can only be monitored effectively in primary care with greater levels of staffing or with additional resources. Conclusion Approximately one-third of all responses were recommendations for strategies which addressed monitoring of the individual in the clinical practice environment (e.g. GP, practice nurse) to improve safety. There was a clear need for more staff and resource set aside to allow and encourage safety monitoring. Respondents recommended the dissemination of specific information for monitoring patient safety such as distributing the lessons of significant event audits amongst GP practices to enable shared learning. PMID:27540488

  8. The Australian primary healthcare experiment: a national survey of Medicare Locals

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Suzanne; Varhol, Richard; Ramamurthy, Vijaya; Denehy, Melissa; Hendrie, Delia; O'Leary, Peter; Selvey, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study are to evaluate the development and implementation of Medicare Locals as new primary care organisations and consider the implications of these findings for the wider challenge of strengthening primary healthcare in Australia and internationally. Design National survey of Medicare Locals which involved the use of content analysis and a descriptive survey tool. Setting 61 Medicare Locals in Australia. Participants The survey was distributed electronically to all 61 Medicare Local Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) between October and December 2013. Main outcome measures The research was interested in exploring the following areas; the form and function of Medicare Locals; the confidence and capacity of Medicare Locals to perform against their objectives around population planning and system integration; their ability to engage relevant stakeholder groups; and the barriers and facilitators to reform. Results A total of 43 (70%) of Medicare Locals completed the survey with representation from six of the eight Australian states and Territories. Results suggest differences in the form and function of the Medicare Local organisations and considerable diversity in the implementation of Medicare Local organisations across Australia. This diversity and lack of guidance from government impacted on the overall success of the reform. Other barriers to reform included difficulties in stakeholder relationships and limited incentives (financial and other) to drive and influence change. Conclusions Findings from this study produce important insights for primary care reform in Australia; and internationally it adds to the growing body of knowledge around primary care reform. PMID:25818276

  9. Development of a computerised decisions support system for renal risk drugs targeting primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Helldén, Anders; Al-Aieshy, Fadiea; Bastholm-Rahmner, Pia; Bergman, Ulf; Gustafsson, Lars L; Höök, Hans; Sjöviker, Susanne; Söderström, Anders; Odar-Cederlöf, Ingegerd

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess general practitioners (GPs) experience from the implementation and use of a renal computerised decision support system (CDSS) for drug dosing, developed for primary healthcare, integrated into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR), and building on estimation of the patient's creatinine clearance (ClCG). Design Qualitative research design by a questionnaire and a focus group discussion. Setting and participants Eight GPs at two primary healthcare centres (PHCs). Interventions The GP at PHC 1, and the project group, developed and tested the technical solution of the CDSS. Proof-of-concept was tested by seven GPs at PHC 2. They also participated in a group discussion and answered a questionnaire. A web window in the EHR gave drug and dosage in relation to ClCG. Each advice was according to three principles: If? Why? Because. Outcome measures (1) The GPs’ experience of ‘easiness to use’ and ‘perceived usefulness’ at PHC 2, based on loggings of use, answers from a questionnaire using a 5-point Likert scale, and answers from a focus group discussion. (2) The number of patients aged 65 years and older with an estimation of ClCG before and after the implementation of the CDSS. Results The GPs found the CDSS fast, simple and easy to use. They appreciated the automatic presentation of the CICG status on opening the medication list, and the ability to actively look up specific drug recommendations in two steps. The CDSS scored high on the Likert scale. All GPs wanted to continue the use of the CDSS and to recommend it to others. The number of patients with an estimated ClCG increased 1.6-fold. Conclusions Acceptance of the simple graphical interface of this push and pull renal CDSS was high among the primary care physicians evaluating this proof of concept. The graphical model should be useful for further development of renal decision support systems. PMID:26150141

  10. Uncontrolled hypertension among patients managed in primary healthcare facilities in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kika, TM; Kintoki, EV; M’Buyamba-Kabangu, JR; Lepira, FB; Makulo, JR; Sumaili, EK; Kayembe, PK

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Uncontrolled hypertension remains an important issue in daily clinical practice worldwide. Although the majority of patients are treated in primary care, most of the data on blood pressure control originate from populationbased studies or secondary healthcare. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of uncontrolled hypertension and associated risk factors among hypertensive patients followed at primary care facilities in Kinshasa, the capital city of Democratic Republic of the Congo. Methods A sample of 298 hypertensive patients seen at primary healthcare facilities, 90 men and 208 women, aged ≥ 18 years, were consecutively included in this cross-sectional study. The majority (66%) was receiving monotherapy, and diuretics (43%) were the most used drugs. According to 2007 European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology hypertension guidelines, uncontrolled hypertension was defined as blood pressure ≥ 140/90 or ≥ 130/80 mmHg (diabetes or chronic kidney disease). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of uncontrolled hypertension. Results Uncontrolled hypertension was observed in 231 patients (77.5%), 72 men and 159 women. Uncontrolled systolic blood pressure (SBP) was more frequent than uncontrolled diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and increased significantly with advancing age (p = 0.002). The proportion of uncontrolled SBP and DBP was significantly higher in patients with renal failure (p = 0.01) and those with high (p = 0.03) to very high (p = 0.02) absolute cardiovascular risk. The metabolic syndrome (OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.01–5.74; p = 0.04) emerged as the main risk factor associated with uncontrolled hypertension. Conclusion Uncontrolled hypertension was common in this case series and was associated with factors related to lifestyle and diet, which interact with blood pressure control. PMID:27965999

  11. Impact of a quality improvement program on primary healthcare in Canada: a mixed-method evaluation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael E; Brown, Judith Belle; Roberts, Sharon; Russell, Grant; Fournie, Meghan; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Paquette-Warren, Jann; Kotecha, Jyoti; Han, Han; Thind, Amardeep; Stewart, Moira; Reichert, Sonja; Tompkins, Jordan W; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Rigorous comprehensive evaluations of primary healthcare (PHC) quality improvement (QI) initiatives are lacking. This article describes the evaluation of the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership Learning Collaborative (QIIP-LC), an Ontario-wide PHC QI program targeting type 2 diabetes management, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, access to care, and team functioning. This article highlights the primary outcome results of an external retrospective, multi-measure, mixed-method evaluation of the QIIP-LC, including: (1) matched-control pre-post chart audit of diabetes management (A1c/foot exams) and rate of CRC screening; (2) post-only advanced access survey (third-next available appointment); and (3) post-only semi-structured interviews (team functioning). Chart audit data was collected from 34 consenting physicians per group (of which 88% provided access data). Between-group differences were not statistically significant (A1c [p=0.10]; foot exams [p=0.45]; CRC screening [p=0.77]; advanced access [p=0.22]). Qualitative interview (n=42) themes highlighted the success of the program in helping build interdisciplinary team functioning and capacity. The rigorous design and methodology of the QIIP-LC evaluation utilizing a control group is one of the most significant efforts thus far to demonstrate the impact of a QI program in PHC, with improvements over time in both QIIP and control groups offering a likely explanation for the lack of statistically significant primary outcomes. Team functioning was a key success, with team-based chronic care highlighted as pivotal for improved health outcomes. Policy makers should strive to endorse QI programs with proven success through rigorous evaluation to ensure evidence-based healthcare policy and funding. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Domestic abuse awareness and recognition among primary healthcare professionals and abused women: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Taylor, Julie; Kroll, Thilo; Duncan, Fiona

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the dynamics of domestic abuse awareness and recognition among primary healthcare professionals and abused women. Domestic abuse is a serious, public health issue that crosses geographical and demographic boundaries. Health professionals are well placed to recognise and respond to domestic abuse, but empirical evidence suggests that they are reluctant to broach the issue. Moreover, research has shown that women are reluctant to disclose abuse. A two-phase, qualitative study was conducted in Scotland. Twenty-nine primary health professionals (midwives, health visitors and general practitioners) participated in the first phase of the study, and 14 abused women took part in phase two. Data were collected in 2011. Semi-structured, individual interviews were conducted with the health professionals, and three focus groups were facilitated with the abused women. Data were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Differing levels of awareness of the nature and existence of abuse are held by abused women and primary healthcare professionals. Specifically, many women do not identify their experiences as abusive. A conceptual representation of domestic abuse - the "abused women, awareness, recognition and empowerment' framework - arising from the study - presents a new way of capturing the complexity of the disclosure process. Further research is necessary to test and empirically validate the framework, but it has potential pedagogical use for the training and education of health professionals and clinical use with abused women. The framework may be used in clinical practice by nurses and other health professionals to facilitate open discussion between professionals and women. In turn, this may empower women to make choices regarding disclosure and safety planning. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Integrating mental health in primary healthcare in low-income countries: changing the future for people with mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Carina Winkler; Bæk, Ole; Kallestrup, Per; Carlsson, Jessica

    2017-02-01

    Untreated mental disorders are a huge challenge for healthcare systems worldwide. Treatment possibilities are particularly scarce in low-income countries (LICs). WHO estimates that up to 85% of all people with a mental disorder in LICs do not have access to evidence-based treatment. This paper seeks to explore the rationale behind the WHO recommendations for improving mental health services in LICs. At the core of these recommendations is an integration of mental health services into existing primary healthcare. This article presents available research supporting this approach. Furthermore, it highlights challenges needing special attention and opportunities demanding additional research to guide a comprehensive restructuring of a healthcare system. A literature review of WHO documents and searches on PubMed for relevant supporting literature. Research from LICs that investigate mental health interventions is scarce. The evidence that does exist favours integration into primary healthcare. There is evidence that collaborative- and stepped-care interventions can provide viable treatment options for patients. Integration of mental health services into primary healthcare seems like a viable solution to ensure that treatment becomes more available, even though the evidence is limited. Locally conducted research is needed to guide the development of sustainable evidence-based mental health treatment, involving relevant healthcare providers, with optimal task-sharing and possibilities for referral of complex cases. Furthermore, to achieve this, comprehensive political will and investments are necessary pre-requisites.

  14. Community stakeholders’ perspectives on the role of occupational therapy in primary healthcare: Implications for practice

    PubMed Central

    Van Wyk, Jacqueline; Joubert, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare (PHC) is central to increased access and transformation in South African healthcare. There is limited literature about services required by occupational therapists in PHC. Despite policy being in place, the implementation of services at grassroots level does not always occur adequately. Objectives This study aimed at gaining an understanding of the challenges of being disabled and the services required by occupational therapists (OTs) in rural communities in order to better inform the occupational therapy (OT) training curriculum. Method An exploratory, descriptive qualitative design was implemented using purposive sampling to recruit 23 community healthcare workers from the uGu district. Snowball sampling was used to recruit 37 members of the uGu community, which included people with disability (PWD) and caregivers of PWDs. Audio-recorded focus groups and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data, which were thematically analysed. Ethical approval was obtained from the Biomedical and Research Ethics Committee of the University of KwaZulu-Natal (BE248/14). Results Two main themes emerged namely: firstly, the challenges faced by the disabled community and secondly appropriate opportunities for intervention in PHC. A snapshot of the social and physical inaccessibility challenges experienced by the community was created. Challenges included physical and sexual abuse, discrimination and marginalisation. Community-based rehabilitation and ideas for health promotion and prevention were identified as possible strategies for OT intervention. Conclusion The understanding of the intervention required by OT in PHC was enhanced through obtaining the views of various stakeholders’ on the role. This study highlighted the gaps in community-based services that OTs should offer in this context. PMID:28730063

  15. [Disaster nursing and primary school teachers' disaster-related healthcare knowledge and skills].

    PubMed

    Lai, Fu-Chih; Lei, Hsin-Min; Fang, Chao-Ming; Chen, Jiun-Jung; Chen, Bor-An

    2012-06-01

    The World Bank has ranked Taiwan as the 5th highest risk country in the world in terms of full-spectrum disaster risk. With volatile social, economic, and geologic environments and the real threat of typhoons, earthquakes, and nuclear disasters, the government has made a public appeal to raise awareness and reduce the impact of disasters. Disasters not only devastate property and the ecology, but also cause striking and long-lasting impacts on life and health. Thus, healthcare preparation and capabilities are critical to reducing their impact. Relevant disaster studies indicate children as a particularly vulnerable group during a disaster due to elevated risks of physical injury, infectious disease, malnutrition, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Primary school teachers are frontline educators, responders, and rehabilitators, respectively, prior to, during, and after disasters. The disaster prevention project implemented by the Taiwan Ministry of Education provides national guidelines for disaster prevention and education. However, within these guidelines, the focus of elementary school disaster prevention education is on disaster prevention and mitigation. Little guidance or focus has been given to disaster nursing response protocols necessary to handle issues such as post-disaster infectious diseases, chronic disease management, and psychological health and rehabilitation. Disaster nursing can strengthen the disaster healthcare response capabilities of school teachers, school nurses, and children as well as facilitate effective cooperation among communities, disaster relief institutes, and schools. Disaster nursing can also provide healthcare knowledge essential to increase disaster awareness, preparation, response, and rehabilitation. Implementing proper disaster nursing response protocols in Taiwan's education system is critical to enhancing disaster preparedness in Taiwan.

  16. Primary healthcare system capacities for responding to storm and flood-related health problems: a case study from a rural district in central Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van Minh, Hoang; Tuan Anh, Tran; Rocklöv, Joacim; Bao Giang, Kim; Trang, Le Quynh; Sahlen, Klas-Göran; Nilsson, Maria; Weinehall, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Background As a tropical depression in the East Sea, Vietnam is greatly affected by climate change and natural disasters. Knowledge of the current capacity of the primary healthcare system in Vietnam to respond to health issues associated with storms and floods is very important for policy making in the country. However, there has been little scientific research in this area. Objective This research was to assess primary healthcare system capacities in a rural district in central Vietnam to respond to such health issues. Design This was a cross-sectional descriptive study using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative methods used self-administered questionnaires. Qualitative methods (in-depth interviews and focus groups discussions) were used to broaden understanding of the quantitative material and to get additional information on actions taken. Results 1) Service delivery: Medical emergency services, especially surgical operations and referral systems, were not always available during the storm and flood seasons. 2) Governance: District emergency plans focus largely on disaster response rather than prevention. The plans did not clearly define the role of primary healthcare and had no clear information on the coordination mechanism among different sectors and organizations. 3) Financing: The budget for prevention and control of flood and storm activities was limited and had no specific items for healthcare activities. Only a little additional funding was available, but the procedures to get this funding were usually time-consuming. 4) Human resources: Medical rescue teams were established, but there were no epidemiologists or environmental health specialists to take care of epidemiological issues. Training on prevention and control of climate change and disaster-related health issues did not meet actual needs. 5) Information and research: Data that can be used for planning and management (including population and epidemiological data) were largely

  17. Primary healthcare system capacities for responding to storm and flood-related health problems: a case study from a rural district in central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van Minh, Hoang; Tuan Anh, Tran; Rocklöv, Joacim; Bao Giang, Kim; Trang, Le Quynh; Sahlen, Klas-Göran; Nilsson, Maria; Weinehall, Lars

    2014-01-01

    As a tropical depression in the East Sea, Vietnam is greatly affected by climate change and natural disasters. Knowledge of the current capacity of the primary healthcare system in Vietnam to respond to health issues associated with storms and floods is very important for policy making in the country. However, there has been little scientific research in this area. This research was to assess primary healthcare system capacities in a rural district in central Vietnam to respond to such health issues. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative methods used self-administered questionnaires. Qualitative methods (in-depth interviews and focus groups discussions) were used to broaden understanding of the quantitative material and to get additional information on actions taken. 1) Service delivery: Medical emergency services, especially surgical operations and referral systems, were not always available during the storm and flood seasons. 2) Governance: District emergency plans focus largely on disaster response rather than prevention. The plans did not clearly define the role of primary healthcare and had no clear information on the coordination mechanism among different sectors and organizations. 3) Financing: The budget for prevention and control of flood and storm activities was limited and had no specific items for healthcare activities. Only a little additional funding was available, but the procedures to get this funding were usually time-consuming. 4) Human resources: Medical rescue teams were established, but there were no epidemiologists or environmental health specialists to take care of epidemiological issues. Training on prevention and control of climate change and disaster-related health issues did not meet actual needs. 5) Information and research: Data that can be used for planning and management (including population and epidemiological data) were largely lacking. The district lacked a disease

  18. Polycystic ovary syndrome in Salvador, Brazil: a prevalence study in primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition in women of reproductive age. It is characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea and polycystic ovaries. It is associated with obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. No studies have been conducted on the prevalence of PCOS in Brazilian or South American women. Few studies using the Rotterdam criteria have been published. The objective of the present study was to calculate the prevalence of PCOS at primary healthcare level in Salvador, Brazil based on these criteria. Methods This was a cross-sectional, two-phase study conducted in a probability sample of women of 18–45 years of age screened for cervical cancer in the primary healthcare network of the city of Salvador, Brazil. In the first phase, interviews were conducted, weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure and random blood sugar levels were measured, and the presence of acne and hirsutism was investigated. Women with at least one diagnostic criterion were referred for the second phase, which consisted of specialist consultation, pelvic ultrasonography and hormone measurements for differential diagnosis and/or investigation of a second criterion. Results Of the 859 women interviewed, 88.5% were black and 58.7% had 11 years of schooling or less. A diagnosis of PCOS was excluded in 84.4%, undetermined in 7.1% and confirmed in 8.5% (95%CI: 6.80–10.56). There were no statistically significant differences between these three groups with respect to weight, body mass index, waist circumference, blood sugar levels or arterial blood pressure. Women with PCOS were younger (p = 0.00), taller (p = 0.04), had fewer children (p = 0.00), were better educated (p = 0.01), and had higher total testosterone levels (p = 0.01) and a higher LH/FSH ratio (p = 0.01). Conclusion According to the Rotterdam criteria, the prevalence of PCOS in women seeking primary healthcare in Salvador, Brazil

  19. Strengths of primary healthcare regarding care provided for chronic kidney disease 1

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Elaine Amaral; Costa, Mônica Barros; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; Bastos, Rita Maria Rodrigues; Vanelli, Chislene Pereira; Leite, Christiane Chaves Augusto; Caminhas, Márcio Santos; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the structure and results obtained by the "Chronic Renal Patients Care Program" in a Brazilian city. Method: epidemiological, cross-sectional study conducted in 14 PHC units and a secondary center from 2010 to 2013. The Donabedian Model was the methodological framework used. A total of 14 physicians, 13 supervisors, and 11 community health agents from primary healthcare were interviewed for the assessment of structure and process and 1,534 medical files from primary healthcare and 282 from secondary care were consulted to assess outcomes. Results: most units lacked sufficient offices for physicians and nurses to provide consultations, had incomplete staffing, and most professionals had not received proper qualification to provide care for chronic renal disease. Physicians from PHC units classified as capable more frequently referred patients to the secondary care service in the early stages of chronic renal disease (stage 3B) when compared to physicians of units considered not capable (58% vs. 36%) (p=0.049). Capable PHC units also more frequently presented stabilized glomerular filtration rates (51%) when compared to partially capable units (36%) and not capable units (44%) (p=0.046). Conclusion: patients cared for by primary healthcare units that scored higher in structure and process criteria presented better clinical outcomes. Objective: to identify the coping strategies of family members of patients with mental disorders and relate them to family member sociodemographic variables and to the patient's clinical variables. Method: this was a descriptive study conducted at a psychiatric hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo, with 40 family members of hospitalized patients over the age of 18, and who followed the patient before and during hospitalization. We used tools to characterize the subjects and the Folkman and Lazarus Inventory of Coping Strategies. Results: the coping strategies most often used by family members

  20. Primary care physician assistant and advance practice nurses roles: Patient healthcare utilization, unmet need, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Everett, Christine M; Morgan, Perri; Jackson, George L

    2016-12-01

    Team-based care involving physician assistants (PAs) and advance practice nurses (APNs) is one strategy for improving access and quality of care. PA/APNs perform a variety of roles on primary care teams. However, limited research describes the relationship between PA/APN role and patient outcomes. We examined multiple outcomes associated with primary care PA/APN roles. In this cross-sectional survey analysis, we studied adult respondents to the 2010 Health Tracking Household Survey. Outcomes included primary care and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, unmet need, and satisfaction. PA/APN role was categorized as physician only (no PA/APN visits; reference), usual provider (PA/APN provide majority of primary care visits) or supplemental provider (physician as usual provider, PA/APN provide a subset of visits). Multivariable logistic and multinomial logistic regressions were performed. Compared to people with physician only care, patients with PA/APNs as usual providers [5-9 visits RRR=2.4 (CI 1.8-3.4), 10+ visits RRR=3.0 (CI 2.0-4.5): reference 2-4 visits] and supplemental providers had increased risk of having 5 or more primary care visits [5-9 visits RRR=1.3 (CI 1.0-1.6)]. Patients reporting PA/APN as supplemental providers had increased risk of emergency department utilization [2+ visits: RRR 1.8 (CI 1.3, 2.5)], and lower satisfaction [very dissatisfied: RRR 1.8 (CI 1.03-3.0)]. No differences were seen for hospitalizations or unmet need. Healthcare utilization patterns and satisfaction varied between adults with PA/APN in different roles, but reported unmet need did not. These findings suggest a wide range of outcomes should be considered when identifying the best PA/APN role on primary care teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recommendations for Undergraduate Training in the Primary Care Sector – Position Paper of the GMA-Primary Care Committee

    PubMed Central

    Huenges, Bert; Gulich, Markus; Böhme, Klaus; Fehr, Folkert; Streitlein-Böhme, Irmgard; Rüttermann, Viktor; Baum, Erika; Niebling, Wilhelm-Bernhard; Rusche, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    During their studies to become medical professionals, all students are obliged to become familiar with various aspects of primary care. The aim is to provide all students with a high quality training which ensures the best possible cooperation across all sectors of the medical system. Primary care comprises the primary use of the medical service by an unfiltered set of patients as well as continued patient care – including home-care. This position paper was developed together with representatives of the German Society of University Teachers of General Practice (GHA), the German Society for Ambulatory General Paediatrics (DGAAP), the German Society of General Practice and Family Medicine (DEGAM) and the German Society for Internal Medicine (DGIM). It includes recommendations for teaching in the field of primary care in four different types of internships such as preclinical work experience (“Hospitation”), 4-week clinical traineeships of a casual nature (“Famulatur”) and 2-week courses of structured and assessed clinical training (“Blockpraktikum”) as well as a broad-based 4-month elective clinical placement in the final year (known as a practical year, “PJ”). The recommendations encompass structural and process criteria for internships in different general practices. In addition, for the first time recommendations for teaching on campus – in the fields of general medicine, paediatrics, numerous cross-sectional areas and other clinical fields, but also for clinical skills training – are set down here. In this position paper the intention is to demonstrate the possible ways in which more aspects of primary care could be integrated into undergraduate medical training. PMID:25228937

  2. Influence of a quality improvement learning collaborative program on team functioning in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Jyoti; Brown, Judith Belle; Han, Han; Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael; Russell, Grant; Roberts, Sharon; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Fournie, Meghan; Thind, Amardeep; Reichert, Sonja M; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) programs are frequently implemented to support primary healthcare (PHC) team development and to improve care outcomes. In Ontario, Canada, the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership (QIIP) offered a learning collaborative (LC) program to support the development of interdisciplinary team function and improve chronic disease management, disease prevention, and access to care. A qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was conducted as part of a mixed-method evaluation to explore the influence of the program on team functioning in participating PHC teams. A purposive sampling strategy was used to identify PHC teams (n = 10), from which participants of different professional roles were selected through a purposeful recruitment process to reflect maximum variation of team roles. Additionally, QI coaches working with the interview participants and the LC administrators were also interviewed. Data were collected through semistructured telephone interviews that were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was conducted through an iterative and interpretive approach. The shared experience of participating in the program appeared to improve team functioning. Participants described increased trust and respect for each other's clinical and administrative roles and were inspired by learning about different approaches to interdisciplinary care. This appeared to enhance collegial relationships, collapse professional silos, improve communication, and increase interdisciplinary collaboration. Teamwork involves more than just physically grouping healthcare providers from multiple disciplines and mandating them to work together. The LC program provided opportunities for participants to learn how to work collaboratively, and participation in the LC program appeared to enhance team functioning.

  3. [Subjectivity and a clinical approach in primary healthcare: narratives, life histories and social reality].

    PubMed

    Barros, Rebeca Silva de; Botazzo, Carlos

    2011-11-01

    The focus of this article is on oral healthcare in Primary Healthcare. We discuss the issue taking the relationship of listening-host-link as a focus debating on the existence of a dichotomy between clinical-collective health. This investigation, took place in Cotia, São Paulo State between July and December 2007, based on the following assumptions: 1) answer the user's relevant oral care problem; 2) remove the dental focus; 3) establish the case through anamnesis; and 4) use electronic scheduling, medical files and sterilization of the health unit. Listening to the complaint, the oral clinical examination and compilation of the clinic history were recorded in the medical file, without using dental records. To discuss the approaches in the clinical area, we list 8 `Patographic Histories.' The objectives of communication during consultation are to listen, perform an accurate diagnosis and interfere to alleviate suffering by restoring the corporal homeostasis and creating a bond by modifying technical references and clinical language. The bond is the result of dialogue, the acceptance of responsibilities of both the professional and the user and the resolution of their complaints and needs.

  4. Diabetes, depression, and healthcare utilization among African Americans in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Husaini, Baqar A.; Hull, Pamela C.; Sherkat, Darren E.; Emerson, Janice S.; Overton, Monica T.; Craun, Clinton; Cain, Van A.; Levine, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study tested for an association between diabetes and depressive symptoms and assessed the effect of co-occurring diabetes and depressive symptoms on healthcare utilization outcomes among African-American patients. PROCEDURE: The sample consisted of 303 adult African-American patients age 40 and over from a primary care clinic serving the low-income population in Nashville, TN. Measures were based on self-reports during a structured interview. Multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, socioeconomic status, and comorbid chronic conditions. FINDINGS: African-American patients with and without diabetes did not differ on the presence or severity of depressive symptoms. However, the co-occurrence of major depressive symptoms with diabetes among African Americans was associated with nearly three times more reported emergency room visits and three times more inpatient days, but was only marginally associated with a lower number of physician visits. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to previous studies with predominantly white samples that found a positive association between diabetes and depression, no association was found in this African-American sample. Nevertheless, the results did concur with research findings based on other samples, in that the co-occurrence of depression with diabetes was associated with more acute care utilization, such as emergency room visits and inpatient hospitalizations. This pattern of utilization may lead to higher healthcare costs among patients with diabetes who are depressed, regardless of race. PMID:15101668

  5. Simulation model for tracheotomy education for primary health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Dorton, LeighAnne H; Lintzenich, Catherine Rees; Evans, Adele K

    2014-01-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the competency of health-care providers managing patients with tracheotomies, and assess the need for, and efficacy of, a multidisciplinary educational program incorporating patient simulation. The prospective observational study included 87 subjects who manage patients with tracheotomies within a tertiary-care hospital. The subjects completed self-assessment questionnaires and objective multiple-choice tests before and after attending a comprehensive educational course using patient simulation. The outcome measurements included pre-course and post-course questionnaire and test scores, as well as observational data collected during recorded patient simulation sessions. Before the education and simulation, the subjects reported an average comfort level of 3.3 on a 5-point Likert scale across 10 categories in the questionnaire, which improved to 4.4 after the training (p < 0.0001). The subjects' mean scores improved from 56% on the pre-course test to 91% on the post-course test (p < 0.0001). The specific deficiencies observed during patient simulation scenarios included unfamiliarity with different tracheotomy tube types, misunderstanding of speaking valve physiology, and delayed recognition and treatment of a plugged or dislodged tracheotomy tube. There is a significant need for improved tracheotomy education among primary health-care providers. Incorporating patient simulation into a comprehensive tracheotomy educational program was effective in improving provider confidence, increasing provider knowledge, and teaching the skills necessary for managing patients with a tracheotomy.

  6. Strategies in health-promoting dialogues--primary healthcare nurses' perspectives--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hörnsten, Åsa; Lindahl, Karin; Persson, Kristina; Edvardsson, Kristina

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe dialogic strategies about health and lifestyle used by primary healthcare nurses (PHNs) in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) in Sweden. The VIP offers all citizens aged 40, 50 and 60 in Västerbotten County an individual health check-up followed by a health-promoting dialogue with a specialist PHN. Inconsistencies in previous reports of the effects of lifestyle counselling and health promotion suggest that it is important to study dialogues about health and lifestyle to understand health-promoting strategies and to highlight aspects important to improving their effects. In 2010, we conducted in-depth interviews with ten experienced PHNs working with the VIP at eight healthcare centres in Västerbotten County, Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used to illuminate the nurses' strategies in health-promoting dialogues. The Regional Ethics Board (Dno 06-126M) approved the study. The PHNs used various strategies in dialogues about health and lifestyle that fell under the five themes 'Guiding patients vs. pressuring them; Adjusting to patients vs. directing the conversation; Inspiring confidence vs. instilling fear; Motivating and supporting patients vs. demanding responsibility; and lastly, Introducing emotionally charged subjects or avoiding them'. The results of this study may add knowledge about the difficulties and opportunities in health counselling. In the discussion, we suggest professional reflection as a means to increase knowledge and awareness about the self and context in the process of health counselling. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Validation of Instruments to Evaluate Primary Healthcare from the Patient Perspective: Overview of the Method

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Burge, Frederick; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Pineault, Raynald; Beaulieu, Christine; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Santor, Darcy A.; Gass, David; Lawson, Beverley

    2011-01-01

    Patient evaluations are an important part of monitoring primary healthcare reforms, but there is little comparative information available to guide evaluators in the choice of instruments or to determine their relevance for Canada. Objective: To compare values and the psychometric performances of validated instruments thought to be most pertinent to the Canadian context for evaluating core attributes of primary healthcare. Method: Among validated instruments in the public domain, we selected six: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS); the Primary Care Assessment Tool – Short Form (PCAT-S); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II); and part of the Veterans Affairs National Outpatient Customer Satisfaction Survey (VANOCSS). We mapped subscales to operational definitions of attributes. All were administered to a sample of adult service users balanced by English/French language (in Nova Scotia and Quebec, respectively), urban/rural residency, high/low education and overall care experience. The sample was recruited from previous survey respondents, newspaper advertisements and community posters. We used common factor analysis to compare our factor resolution for each instrument to that of the developers. Results: Our sample of 645 respondents was approximately balanced by design variables, but considerable effort was required to recruit low-education and poor-experience respondents. Subscale scores are statistically different by excellent, average and poor overall experience, but interpersonal communication and respectfulness scores were the most discriminating of overall experience. We found fewer factors than did the developers, but when constrained to the number of expected factors, our item loadings were largely similar to those found by developers. Subscale reliability was equivalent to or higher than that reported by developers. Conclusion: These

  8. A cross-sectional assessment of primary healthcare facilities for provision of antenatal care: calling for improvements in Basic Health Units in Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Majrooh, Muhammad Ashraf; Hasnain, Seema; Akram, Javaid; Siddiqui, Arif

    2015-11-25

    There are two types of barriers to the utilisation of maternal health and antenatal care (ANC) services, including the supply-side barriers operating at the health facility level and demand-side, affecting the utilisation ANC services by pregnant women. The purpose of the study was to assess the essential resources required for the provision of ANC services in primary healthcare facilities in Punjab, Pakistan. A cross-sectional facility assessment was conducted in primary healthcare facilities across Punjab. A multi-stage sampling was used to randomly select nine districts from three stratifications and 19 primary healthcare facilities in the public sector (17 Basic Health Units (BHUs) and two Rural Health Centres (RHCs)) from each district. A total of 171 health facilities were included. Data on infrastructure and availability of equipment, essential supplies, medicines, treatment protocols, and infection control items was collected through pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaires. Univariate analysis was carried out to describe the frequency and percentages of facilities across three ratings (good, average, and poor) by type of facility. Overall, 28% of facilities had poor infrastructure and the availability of equipment was poor in 16% of the health facilities. Essential supply items, such as urine strips for albumin, blood sugar testing strips, and haemoglobin reagents, were particularly poorly stocked. However, infrastructure and the availability of equipment and supplies were generally better in RHCs compared to BHUs. Health facilities lacked the resources required to provide quality ANC services, particularly in terms of infrastructure, equipment, supply items, and medicines. The availability of these resources needs to be urgently addressed.

  9. A Decade Lost: Primary Healthcare Performance Reporting across Canada under the Action Plan for Health System Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Hogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    In 2004, Canada's First Ministers committed to reforms that would shape the future of the Canadian healthcare landscape. These agreements included commitments to improved performance reporting within the primary healthcare system. The aim of this paper was to review the state of primary healthcare performance reporting after the public reporting mandate agreed to a decade ago in the Action Plan for Health System Renewal of 2003 expired. A grey literature search was performed to identify reports released by the governmental and independent reporting bodies across Canada. No province, or the federal government, met their performance reporting obligations from the 2004 accords. Although the indicators required to report on in the 2004 Accord no longer reflect the priorities of patients, policy makers and physicians, provinces are also failing to report on these priorities. Canada needs better primary healthcare performance reporting to enable accountability and improvement within and across provinces. Despite the national mandate to improve public health system reporting, an opportunity to learn from the diverse primary healthcare reforms, underway across Canada for the past decade, has already been lost. PMID:27232240

  10. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized

  11. An Ethnographically Informed Participatory Design of Primary Healthcare Information Technology in a Developing Country Setting.

    PubMed

    Shidende, Nima Herman; Igira, Faraja Teddy; Mörtberg, Christina Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Ethnography, with its emphasis on understanding activities where they occur, and its use of qualitative data gathering techniques rich in description, has a long tradition in Participatory Design (PD). Yet there are limited methodological insights in its application in developing countries. This paper proposes an ethnographically informed PD approach, which can be applied when designing Primary Healthcare Information Technology (PHIT). We use findings from a larger multidisciplinary project, Health Information Systems Project (HISP) to elaborate how ethnography can be used to facilitate participation of health practitioners in developing countries settings as well as indicating the importance of ethnographic approach to participatory Health Information Technology (HIT) designers. Furthermore, the paper discusses the pros and cons of using an ethnographic approach in designing HIT.

  12. [The role of primary care in the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections].

    PubMed

    Padoveze, Maria Clara; Figueiredo, Rosely Moralez de

    2014-12-01

    Little research has been conducted to date on the role of primary health care (PHC) in the prevention of healthcare associated infections (HCAIs). The present article is a theoretical study of the principle of primum non nocere and aims to promote reflection on the role of PHC in HCAI prevention with emphasis on practical recommendations. The indirect and direct roles of PHC in HCAI prevention are debated in light of this guiding principle. With respect to the indirect role of PHC, we discuss the issues of hospital-centrism and ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. The article outlines a number of challenges faced by health services related to PHC's direct role in HCAI prevention, highlights seven key components of HCAI prevention programmes within the PHC sphere and provides practical recommendations for HCAI control and prevention.


  13. Contributions of the nursing intervention in primary healthcare for the promotion of breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    da Graça, Luís Carlos Carvalho; Figueiredo, Maria do Céu Barbiéri; Conceição, Maria Teresa Caetano Carreira

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the contributions of the Primary Healthcare nursing interventions, with primiparae in the promotion of breastfeeding. This is a quasi-experimental, longitudinal study, with a sample consisting of 151 primiparae, who had less than 28 weeks of pregnancy, with the child living for at least six months after the birth, performed between 15 October 2007 and 29 February 2008. Almost all the women initiated breastfeeding, with a sharp decline verified in the prevalence at six months. The mean duration of breastfeeding was 123.8±68.9 days. The intervention that began in the prepartum and continued into the postpartum period, using various strategies (individual consultation, preparation courses for parenting/childbirth, and domicile visits) and intervention contexts (health services and domicile) had significant effects on the duration of breastfeeding, which was not verified in the prevalence.

  14. Assessment of smokeless tobacco use in the history and physical examination by primary healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Talley, Brenda; Mary Gee, Rose; Allen, Deborah; Marshall, Elaine S; Encinas, Kendall; Lim, Sokny

    2011-08-01

    Following a simple descriptive research design, we examined how and to what extent primary healthcare providers in rural southern regions of the United States ask patients about the use of smokeless tobacco as indicated in the document used for the patient history. Copies of blank history and physical forms used in offices of primary care providers in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Tennessee were examined to identify items related specifically to tobacco use. Twenty-nine providers returned history and physical forms, which revealed 24% showed no item related to tobacco use. Others included questions related to smoking, but only 7% mentioned any sort of smokeless tobacco use. Although a few studies have suggested the use of smokeless tobacco to be less harmful than smoking, all forms of smokeless tobacco are recognized carcinogens and dangerous for health. It is not sufficient to simply ask patients about smoking behaviors. Primary care providers, especially nurse practitioners, have the unique opportunity to assess use of smokeless tobacco and to offer treatment and counsel to help patients to stop the behavior. 2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening program using hand-held ultrasound in primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Belchin; Navarro González, Marta; Cararach Salami, Daniel; Pérez Jiménez, Alfonso; Gilabert Solé, Rosa; Bru Saumell, Concepció; Donoso Bach, Lluís; Villalta Martí, Mireia; González-de Paz, Luis; Ruiz Riera, Rafael; Riambau Alonso, Vicenç; Acar-Denizli, Nihan; Farré Almacellas, Marta; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Benavent Àreu, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    We determined the feasibility of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening program led by family physicians in public primary healthcare setting using hand-held ultrasound device. The potential study population was 11,214 men aged ≥ 60 years attended by three urban, public primary healthcare centers. Participants were recruited by randomly-selected telephone calls. Ultrasound examinations were performed by four trained family physicians with a hand-held ultrasound device (Vscan®). AAA observed were verified by confirmatory imaging using standard ultrasound or computed tomography. Cardiovascular risk factors were determined. The prevalence of AAA was computed as the sum of previously-known aneurysms, aneurysms detected by the screening program and model-based estimated undiagnosed aneurysms. We screened 1,010 men, with mean age of 71.3 (SD 6.9) years; 995 (98.5%) men had normal aortas and 15 (1.5%) had AAA on Vscan®. Eleven out of 14 AAA-cases (78.6%) had AAA on confirmatory imaging (one patient died). The total prevalence of AAA was 2.49% (95%CI 2.20 to 2.78). The median aortic diameter at diagnosis was 3.5 cm in screened patients and 4.7 cm (p<0.001) in patients in whom AAA was diagnosed incidentally. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified coronary heart disease (OR = 4.6, 95%CI 1.3 to 15.9) as the independent factor with the highest odds ratio. A screening program led by trained family physicians using hand-held ultrasound was a feasible, safe and reliable tool for the early detection of AAA. PMID:28453577

  16. Preferred Primary Healthcare Provider Choice Among Insured Persons in Ashanti Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Boachie, Micheal Kofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In early 2012, National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) members in Ashanti Region were allowed to choose their own primary healthcare providers. This paper investigates the factors that enrolees in the Ashanti Region considered in choosing preferred primary healthcare providers (PPPs) and direction of association of such factors with the choice of PPP. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, the study sampled 600 NHIS enrolees in Kumasi Metro area and Kwabre East district. The sampling methods were a combination of simple random and systematic sampling techniques at different stages. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse demographic information and the criteria for selecting PPP. Multinomial logistic regression technique was used to ascertain the direction of association of the factors and the choice of PPP using mission PPPs as the base outcome. Results: Out of the 600 questionnaires administered, 496 were retained for further analysis. The results show that availability of essential drugs (53.63%) and doctors (39.92%), distance or proximity (49.60%), provider reputation (39.52%), waiting time (39.92), additional charges (37.10%), and recommendations (48.79%) were the main criteria adopted by enrolees in selecting PPPs. In the regression, income (-0.0027), availability of doctors (-1.82), additional charges (-2.14) and reputation (-2.09) were statistically significant at 1% in influencing the choice of government PPPs. On the part of private PPPs, availability of drugs (2.59), waiting time (1.45), residence (-2.62), gender (-2.89), and reputation (-2.69) were statistically significant at 1% level. Presence of additional charges (-1.29) was statistically significant at 5% level. Conclusion: Enrolees select their PPPs based on such factors as availability of doctors and essential drugs, reputation, waiting time, income, and their residence. Based on these findings, there is the need for healthcare providers to improve on their quality levels

  17. Preferred Primary Healthcare Provider Choice Among Insured Persons in Ashanti Region, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Boachie, Micheal Kofi

    2015-10-20

    In early 2012, National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) members in Ashanti Region were allowed to choose their own primary healthcare providers. This paper investigates the factors that enrolees in the Ashanti Region considered in choosing preferred primary healthcare providers (PPPs) and direction of association of such factors with the choice of PPP. Using a cross-sectional study design, the study sampled 600 NHIS enrolees in Kumasi Metro area and Kwabre East district. The sampling methods were a combination of simple random and systematic sampling techniques at different stages. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse demographic information and the criteria for selecting PPP. Multinomial logistic regression technique was used to ascertain the direction of association of the factors and the choice of PPP using mission PPPs as the base outcome. Out of the 600 questionnaires administered, 496 were retained for further analysis. The results show that availability of essential drugs (53.63%) and doctors (39.92%), distance or proximity (49.60%), provider reputation (39.52%), waiting time (39.92), additional charges (37.10%), and recommendations (48.79%) were the main criteria adopted by enrolees in selecting PPPs. In the regression, income (-0.0027), availability of doctors (-1.82), additional charges (-2.14) and reputation (-2.09) were statistically significant at 1% in influencing the choice of government PPPs. On the part of private PPPs, availability of drugs (2.59), waiting time (1.45), residence (-2.62), gender (-2.89), and reputation (-2.69) were statistically significant at 1% level. Presence of additional charges (-1.29) was statistically significant at 5% level. Enrolees select their PPPs based on such factors as availability of doctors and essential drugs, reputation, waiting time, income, and their residence. Based on these findings, there is the need for healthcare providers to improve on their quality levels by ensuring constant availability of

  18. Upscaling the recruitment and retention of human resources for health at primary healthcare centres in Lebanon: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Khodr, Hiba; Mourad, Yara; Yassoub, Rami; Abi Ramia, Jinane

    2016-05-01

    The sustainability of primary healthcare (PHC) worldwide has been challenged by a global shortage in human resources for health (HRH). This study is a unique attempt at systematically soliciting and synthesising the voice of PHC and community stakeholders on the HRH recruitment and retention strategies at the PHC sector in Lebanon, the obstacles and challenges hindering their optimisation and the recommendations to overcome such obstacles. A qualitative design was utilised, involving 22 semi-structured interviews with PHC experts in Lebanon conducted in 2013. Nvivo qualitative data analysis software was employed for the thematic analysis of data collected from interviews. Five comprehensive themes emerged: understanding PHC scope, HRH recruitment issues, HRH retention challenges, rural areas' specific challenges and stakeholders' recommendations. Analysis of stakeholders' responses revealed a lack of a unified understanding of the PHC scope impacting the capacity for appropriate HRH planning. Identified impediments to recruitment included the suboptimal supply of HRH, financial constraints and poor management. Retention difficulties were attributed to poor working environments, financial constraints and lack of professional development. There was consensus that HRH challenges faced were aggravated in rural areas, jeopardising the equitable access to PHC services of quality. Equitable access was also jeopardised by the reported shortage of female HRH in a sociocultural context where many females prefer providers of the same gender. The study sets the path towards upscaling recruitment and retention policies and practices through the endorsement of a nationally acknowledged PHC definition and scope, the sustainable development of the PHC workforce and through the implementation of targeted recruitment and retention strategies addressing rural settings and gender equity. Decision-makers and planners are urged to identify HRH as the most important input for the success

  19. Strengthening intersectoral collaboration for primary health care in developing countries: can the health sector play broader roles?

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Omokhoa Adedayo; Ofili, Antoinette Ngozi

    2010-01-01

    Many strategic challenges impeding the success of primary health care are rooted in weak strategic inputs, including intersectoral collaboration. Some encouraging evidence from programmes, projects, and studies suggests that intersectoral collaboration is feasible and useful. The strategy has the potential to fast-track the attainment of Millenium Development Goals. However, the strategy is not commonly utilised in developing countries. The health sector expects inputs from other sectors which may not necessarily subscribe to a shared responsibility for health improvement, whereas the public expects ''health" from the health sector. Yet, the health sector rarely takes on initiatives in that direction. The sector is challenged to mobilise all stakeholders for intersectoral collaboration through advocacy and programming. Pilot projects are advised in order to allow for cumulative experience, incremental lessons and more supportive evidence.

  20. Satisfaction of Patients Attending in Primary Healthcare Centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: A Random Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Khalid M

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to determine the level of satisfaction of patients who visit primary healthcare centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The investigation was a cross-sectional study conducted in twenty randomly selected primary healthcare centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from October to December 2014. A descriptive data analysis was performed. Eligible participants had visited at least one of the selected primary healthcare centers within the past 12 months. A total of 1741 participants completed the survey, providing a response rate of 87 % (43 % male, 57 % female). The highest satisfaction rates were in the following areas: comprehensiveness and coordination 76.2 % (95 % CI 74.8 ± 77.5), communication 72.7 % (95 % CI 71.3 ± 74) and attitude of staff 73.4 % (95 % CI 72.1 ± 74.8) The areas of greatest concern expressed by the participants were the length of the wait and the quality of the facility 55.4 % (95 % CI 53.3 ± 57.5), 50.5 % (95 % CI 48.3 ± 52.7), respectively. The majority of the patients attending primary healthcare centers in Riyadh showed high levels of satisfaction; however, there are still some factors that need to be considered and improved upon. These include the accessibility of primary healthcare centers as well as waiting time of patients. The results of the current study showed relative improvement in other factors such as comprehensiveness and coordination, communication and attitude of staff. The level of satisfaction of patients and stakeholders shows the progress of the quality of care in healthcare facilities in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

  1. Sedation for dental treatment of children in the primary care sector (UK).

    PubMed

    Ashley, P F; Parry, J; Parekh, S; Al-Chihabi, M; Ryan, D

    2010-06-01

    To audit the clinical practice of a dental sedation service in the primary care sector and determine which services dentists use to manage unco-operative children. Retrospective analysis and prospective audit. Sedation clinic in primary care, 2007, England. Children attending for dental treatment under sedation. General dental practitioners (GDPs) in the Brighton and West Sussex regions. Questionnaire. Clinical service audit, patient satisfaction, referrer satisfaction. Four hundred children (age range 5-12 years) had been referred for caries (78%), with the remainder for orthodontic extractions. The most common treatment carried out on primary and permanent teeth was extractions followed by restorations. A combination of intravenous (IV) midazolam/ketamine/fentanyl was used in 40% of cases, and IV midazolam/ketamine was used in 34% of cases. Seventy-four percent of parents responded to the satisfaction questionnaire; of these 97% rated sedation as excellent/good and 80% would choose sedation or recommend sedation for others. Only 45% of questionnaires to referrers were returned. Fifty-six percent of dentists preferred general anaesthesia (GA) and 66% preferred IV sedation. Dental treatment for children was provided under IV sedation with most parents satisfied with the procedure. Little difference was seen between referring dentists' perceptions of IV sedation or GA.

  2. Outcome of primary percutaneous coronary intervention at public sector tertiary care hospital in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farman, Muhammad Tariq; Sial, Jawaid Akbar; Khan, Naveed Ullah; Rizvi, Syed Nadeem Hasan; Saghir, Tahir; Zaman, Khan Shah

    2011-06-01

    To determine the outcome of Primary Precutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) in our setup and compare the results with the west. This study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching Hospital (National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases Karachi, Pakistan) during January 1st, 2008 to December 31st, 2008. A total of 113 patients were enrolled who came with STEMI and agreed to go for Primary PCI. We excluded the patients who had history of Thrombolytic therapy within 24 hours, presented with Non ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI) and coronary angiogram revealed significant left Main or equivalent disease. All Patients received Aspirin, Clopidogrel and Platelet Glycoprotein IIB IIIA Inhibitor. After Primary PCI patients were planned to follow at one month, 3 months and 6 months. Primary end point was to document death, MI, CABG and rehospitalization. Out of 113 cases, 102 (90.3%) were male and 11 (9.7%) were female, Mean age was 51.2 +/- 11.7 years, 54 (47.8%) patients had Hypertension, 28 (24.8%) were Diabetics and 44 (38.9%) were Smokers. Immediate success was achieved in 111 (98.2%) cases. In hospital mortality was 5.3% (3.5% in cardiogenic shock, 1.7% in non-shock patients). Mean Door to Balloon time remained 98.4 minutes. Twelve patients were lost to follow up. Therefore at 6 months, out of 101 patients, 8 (7.9%) died, 5 (4.9%) underwent Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery and 5 (4.9 %) had been re-hospitalized either for recurrent myocardial infarction or heart failure. Optimal results of primary percutaneous coronary intervention can be achieved for acute STEMI in a developing country at a tertiary care public sector hospital. The results are comparable and nearly similar to the west.

  3. Extrinsic and intrinsic factors impacting on the retention of older rural healthcare workers in the north Victorian public sector: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Jeni; Moore, Melissa L; Clune, Samantha J; Hodgkin, Suzanne P

    2014-01-01

    Workforce shortages in Australia's healthcare system, particularly across rural areas, are well documented. Future projections suggest that as the healthcare workforce ages and retires, there is an urgent need for strategies to retain older skilled employees. Very few qualitative studies, with theoretical underpinning, have focused on the retention of older rural nurses and allied healthcare workers. This study aimed to address these gaps in research knowledge. This qualitative study is phase 2 of a large mixed-methods study to determine the factors that impact on the retention of older rural healthcare workers across northern Victoria, Australia. The initial phase, drawing on the effort-reward imbalance model found high levels of imbalance across a large sample of this population. The present study builds on these findings to explore in more depth the organisational (extrinsic) and individual/social (intrinsic) factors associated with retention. A purposeful stratified sample was drawn from participants at the survey phase (phase 1) and invited to take part in a semistructured telephone interview. A diverse group of 17 rural healthcare workers (nurses and allied health) aged 55 years or more, employed in the north Victorian public sector, were interviewed. The data were transcribed and later analysed thematically and inductively. Data were categorised into extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influenced their decisions to remain in their roles or leave employment. The main extrinsic factors included feeling valued by the organisation, workload pressures, feeling valued by clients, collegial support, work flexibility, and a lack of options. The main intrinsic factors included intention to retire, family influences, work enjoyment, financial influences, health, sense of self, and social input. Given the noted imbalance between (high) effort and (low) reward among participants overall, strategies were identified for improving this balance, and in turn, the retention

  4. Health-care providers' perception of knowledge, skills and preparedness for disaster management in primary health-care centres in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, N M; Ibaid, A H Abu

    2015-12-13

    This survey in primary health-care centres in north Jordan aimed to assess health-care providers' perceptions of their knowledge, skills and preparedness for disaster management. A multistage random sample was used to recruit nurses and physicians from 57 health centres. A total of 207 participants completed the Arabic version of the Disaster Preparedness Evaluation Tool. Participants perceived themselves as having moderate preparation for disaster management [mean score 74.9 (SD 21.6)], moderate knowledge [mean 49.9 (SD 12.3)] and moderate to weak skills in disaster management [mean 35.3 (SD 12.7)]. Significant differences were revealed in participants' perceptions of their disaster preparedness, knowledge and skills according to their sex, specialty and exposure to a real disaster situation. Further education and training courses are needed to enhance providers' preparedness for disaster management in Jordan.

  5. Primary Healthcare Organization and Quality-of-Life Outcomes for Persons with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Lemieux, Valérie; Tourigny, André; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Tousignant, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the association between primary healthcare (PHC) organizational model and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in persons with chronic disease. Methods: We recruited 776 patients with a primary diagnosis of one of four chronic diseases from 33 PHC clinics. Patients were interviewed at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. We categorized PHC model by administrative type and by a taxonomy according to organizational attributes. HRQoL was measured by disease-specific questionnaires. Results: Mean age was 67 years and 55.3% were female. PHC models differed with respect to case mix: community models served older patients with higher co-morbidity and lower health status. Multilevel logistic regression revealed that none of the PHC organizational models was associated with HRQoL. Having fewer co-morbidities, higher self-rated health and not using home care services were associated with higher HRQoL. Conclusion: Despite their having patients with more complex health problems, HRQoL in patients of community practices was equivalent to that of patients in other types of PHC organizations. PMID:23372581

  6. The environment of professional practice and Burnout in nurses in primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Vera Regina; Guirardello, Edinêis de Brito

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to assess how nurses perceive autonomy, control over the environment, the professional relationship between nurses and physicians and the organizational support and correlate them with burnout, satisfaction at work, quality of work and the intention to quit work in primary healthcare. METHOD: cross-sectional and correlation study, using a sample of 198 nurses. The tools used were the Nursing Work Index Revised, Maslach Burnout Inventory and a form to characterize the nurses. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics were applied and Spearman's correlation coefficient was used. RESULTS: the nurses assessed that the environment is partially favorable for: autonomy, professional relationship and organizational support and that the control over this environment is limited. Significant correlations were evidenced between the Nursing Work Index Revised, Maslach Burnout Inventory and the variables: satisfaction at work, quality of care and the intent to quit the job. CONCLUSION: the nurses' perceptions regarding the environment of practice are correlated with burnout, satisfaction at work, quality of care and the intent to quit the job. This study provides support for the restructuring of work processes in the primary health care environment and for communication among the health service management, human resources and occupational health areas. PMID:25517928

  7. A training intervention on child feeding among primary healthcare workers in Ibadan Municipality

    PubMed Central

    Olaolorun, Funmilola M.; Adeniyi, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health workers at the primary level are well positioned to provide health information and counselling on child feeding to mothers on antenatal visits. The study was designed to evaluate the effect of training on the knowledge, attitudes and provision of infant and young child feeding (IYCF) information and counselling among primary healthcare (PHC) workers. Methods A two-stage cluster sample was used to select health workers for training on IYCF in Ibadan, Nigeria. Baseline, immediate and 4-week post-training surveys were conducted to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of health workers regarding IYCF. Paired t-tests were used to measure differences (p < 0.05) before and after the training. Results A total of 124 health workers were trained on current global IYCF recommendations. Participants included community health extension workers (59.7%), nurses (27.4%), community health officers (11.3%), and pharmacy technicians (1.6%). Mean age was 41.8 ± 8.2 years and 95.2% were women. Knowledge of health workers regarding IYCF, particularly complementary feeding, was low at baseline but improved significantly following the training intervention. Attitudes and practices regarding provision of IYCF were suboptimal among health workers at the PHC facilities, but this improved with training. Conclusion Health workers at the PHC level need regular retraining exercises to ensure effective counselling on IYCF. PMID:27796119

  8. Health care policy and community pharmacy: implications for the New Zealand primary health care sector.

    PubMed

    Scahill, Shane; Harrison, Jeff; Carswell, Peter; Shaw, John

    2010-06-25

    and other primary care providers. There are significant barriers to change. Some of these are financial but many are professional and organisational and require a genuine commitment from the whole primary health care sector.

  9. Juggling efficiency. An ethnographic study exploring healthcare seeking practices and institutional logics in Danish primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rikke Sand; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the mutually constituting relationship between healthcare seeking practices and the socio-political context of clinical encounters. On the basis of ethnographic fieldwork carried out in the context of Danish primary care (general practice) and inspired by recent writings on institutional logics, we illustrate how a logic of efficiency organise and give shape to healthcare seeking practices as they manifest in local clinical settings. Overall, patient concerns are reconfigured to fit the local clinical setting and healthcare professionals and patients are required to juggle efficiency in order to deal with uncertainties and meet more complex or unpredictable needs. Lastly, building on the empirical case of cancer diagnostics, we discuss the implications of the pervasiveness of the logic of efficiency in the clinical setting and argue that provision of medical care in today's primary care settings requires careful balancing of increasing demands of efficiency, greater complexity of biomedical knowledge and consideration for individual patient needs.

  10. Patient-reported confidence in primary healthcare: are there disparities by ethnicity or language?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sabrina T; Black, Charlyn; Cutler, Fred; Brooke, Rebecca; Haggerty, Jeannie L; Levesque, Jean-Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether confidence in primary healthcare (PHC) differs among ethnic–linguistic groups and which PHC experiences are associated with confidence. Design A cross-sectional study where patient surveys were administered using random digit dialling. Regression models identify whether ethnic–linguistic group remains significantly associated with confidence in PHC. Setting British Columbia, Canada. Main outcome measures Confidence in PHC measured using a 0–10 scale, where a higher score indicates increased confidence in the ability to get needed PHC services. Participants Community-dwelling adults in the following ethnic–linguistic groups: English-speaking Chinese, Chinese-speaking Chinese, English-speaking South Asians, Punjabi-speaking South Asians and English-speakers of presumed European descent. Findings Based on a sample of 1211 respondents, confidence in PHC differed by ethnicity and the ability to speak English. Most of the differences in confidence by ethnic–linguistic group can be explained by various aspects of care experience. Patient experiences associated with lower confidence in PHC were: if care was received outside Canada, having to wait months to see their regular doctor and rating the quality of healthcare as good or fair/poor. Better patient experiences of their doctor being concerned about their feelings and being respectful and if they found wait times acceptable were associated with higher levels of confidence in PHC. The final regression model explained 30% of the variance. Conclusions Improving the delivery of PHC services through positive interactions between patients and their usual provider and acceptability of wait times are examples of how the PHC system can be strengthened. PMID:24568960

  11. Wound care by district nurses at primary healthcare centres: a challenging task without authority or resources.

    PubMed

    Friman, Anne; Klang, Birgitta; Ebbeskog, Britt

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of studies that describes how district nurses experience the care they provide in connection with wound care. The aim of this study was therefore to describe district nurses experiences of their nursing actions when treating patients with different kinds of wounds at primary healthcare centres and in the home care in order to increase understanding of this kind of care. A qualitative, descriptive study was conducted, with interviews of eight district nurses. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes and nine sub-themes were identified. The first theme included two sub-themes which revealed that in performing wound care district nurses feel responsible for administering wound care, and they feel confident in making independent assessments. The second theme included three sub-themes which revealed that district nurses endeavour to assess all aspects of their patient's situation and to maintain continuity in both their contact with the patient and the treatment. A treatment plan for wound care and regular reports were identified as being important in collaboration with other healthcare professionals. District nurses wanted their own procedure for referral to facilitate the patient's direct contact with a dermatologist. The third theme included four sub-themes which revealed difficulties associated with ambiguous organisation. Lack of time led to the dressing of wounds being delegated to nursing assistants. Limited access to treatment rooms and equipment made wound care difficult and inefficient. Wound care in the home care was regarded as challenging due to the lack of equipment, and poor lighting, ergonomics and hygiene. The results of this study thus identified the aspirations of district nurses to provide expert wound care while working independently. However, these aspirations were aggravated by organisational shortcomings, such as a lack of authority and the resources required to carry out their nursing actions optimally

  12. VA healthcare costs of a collaborative intervention for chronic pain in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Kathryn C; Sharma, Rajiv; Duckart, Jonathan P; Corson, Kathryn; Gerrity, Martha S; Dobscha, Steven K

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain is costly to individuals and the healthcare system, and is often undertreated. Collaborative care models show promise for improving treatment of patients with chronic pain. The objectives of this article are to report the incremental benefit and incremental health services costs of a collaborative intervention for chronic pain from a veterans affairs (VA) healthcare perspective. Data on VA treatment costs incurred by participants were obtained from the VA's Decision Support System for all utilization except certain intervention activities which were tracked in a separate database. Outcome data were from a cluster-randomized trial of a collaborative intervention for chronic pain among 401 primary care patients at a VA medical center. Intervention group participants received assessments and care management; stepped-care components were offered to patients requiring more specialized care. The main outcome measure was pain disability-free days (PDFDs), calculated from Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores. Participants in the intervention group experienced an average of 16 additional PDFDs over the 12-month follow-up window as compared with usual care participants; this came at an adjusted incremental cost of $364 per PDFD for a typical participant. Important predictors of costs were baseline medical comorbidities, depression severity, and prior year's treatment costs. This collaborative intervention resulted in more pain disability-free days and was more expensive than usual care. Further research is necessary to identify if the intervention is more cost-effective for some patient subgroups and to learn whether pain improvements and higher costs persist after the intervention has ended.

  13. Comparison of primary health-care models in the management of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Negative lifestyle habits (potential risks for chronic kidney disease, CKD) are rarely modified by physicians in a conventional health-care model (CHCM). Multidisciplinary strategies may have better results; however, there is no information on their application in the early stages of CKD. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare a multiple intervention model versus CHCM on lifestyle and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CKD stage 1–2. In a prospective cohort study, a family medicine unit (FMU) was assigned a multiple intervention model (MIM) and another continued with conventional health-care model (CHCM). MIM patients received an educational intervention guided by a multidisciplinary team (family physician (FP), social worker, dietitian, physical trainer); self-help groups functioned with free activities throughout the study. CHCM patients were managed only by the FP, who decided if patients needed referral to other professionals. Thirty-nine patients were studied in each cohort. According to a lifestyle questionnaire, no baseline differences were found between cohorts, but results reflected an unhealthy lifestyle. After 6 months of follow-up, both cohorts showed significant improvement in their dietary habits. Compared to CHCM diet, exercise, emotional management, knowledge of disease, and adherence to treatment showed greater improvement in the MIM. Blood pressure decreased in both cohorts, but body mass index, waist circumference, and HbA1C significantly decreased only in MIM. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was maintained equally in both cohorts, but albuminuria significantly decreased only in MIM. In conclusion, MIM achieves better control of lifestyle-related variables and CKD risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with CKD stage 1–2. Broadly, implementation of a MIM in primary health care may produce superior results that might assist in preventing the progression of CKD. PMID:25018986

  14. A structural equation modeling approach for the adoption of cloud computing to enhance the Malaysian healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, Kalai Anand; Dominic, P D D; Ramayah, T

    2014-08-01

    The investments and costs of infrastructure, communication, medical-related equipments, and software within the global healthcare ecosystem portray a rather significant increase. The emergence of this proliferation is then expected to grow. As a result, information and cross-system communication became challenging due to the detached independent systems and subsystems which are not connected. The overall model fit expending over a sample size of 320 were tested with structural equation modelling (SEM) using AMOS 20.0 as the modelling tool. SPSS 20.0 is used to analyse the descriptive statistics and dimension reliability. Results of the study show that system utilisation and system impact dimension influences the overall level of services of the healthcare providers. In addition to that, the findings also suggest that systems integration and security plays a pivotal role for IT resources in healthcare organisations. Through this study, a basis for investigation on the need to improvise the Malaysian healthcare ecosystem and the introduction of a cloud computing platform to host the national healthcare information exchange has been successfully established.

  15. Domestic violence: knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practice of selected UK primary healthcare clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Jean; Rutterford, Clare; Gregory, Alison; Dunne, Danielle; Eldridge, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie; Feder, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Background Domestic violence affects one in four women and has significant health consequences. Women experiencing abuse identify doctors and other health professionals as potential sources of support. Primary care clinicians agree that domestic violence is a healthcare issue but have been reluctant to ask women if they are experiencing abuse. Aim To measure selected UK primary care clinicians’ current levels of knowledge, attitudes, and clinical skills in this area. Design and setting Prospective observational cohort in 48 general practices from Hackney in London and Bristol, UK. Method Administration of the Physician Readiness to Manage Intimate Partner Violence Survey (PREMIS), comprising five sections: responder profile, background (perceived preparation and knowledge), actual knowledge, opinions, and practice issues. Results Two hundred and seventy-two (59%) clinicians responded. Minimal previous domestic violence training was reported by participants. Clinicians only had basic knowledge about domestic violence but expressed a positive attitude towards engaging with women experiencing abuse. Many clinicians felt poorly prepared to ask relevant questions about domestic violence or to make appropriate referrals if abuse was disclosed. Forty per cent of participants never or seldom asked about abuse when a woman presented with injuries. Eighty per cent said that they did not have an adequate knowledge of local domestic violence resources. GPs were better prepared and more knowledgeable than practice nurses; they also identified a higher number of domestic violence cases. Conclusion Primary care clinicians’ attitudes towards women experiencing domestic violence are generally positive but they only have basic knowledge of the area. Both GPs and practice nurses need more comprehensive training on assessment and intervention, including the availability of local domestic violence services. PMID:22947586

  16. Consistency of denominator data in electronic health records in Australian primary healthcare services: enhancing data quality.

    PubMed

    Bailie, Ross; Bailie, Jodie; Chakraborty, Amal; Swift, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The quality of data derived from primary healthcare electronic systems has been subjected to little critical systematic analysis, especially in relation to the purported benefits and substantial investment in electronic information systems in primary care. Many indicators of quality of care are based on numbers of certain types of patients as denominators. Consistency of denominator data is vital for comparison of indicators over time and between services. This paper examines the consistency of denominator data extracted from electronic health records (EHRs) for monitoring of access and quality of primary health care. Data collection and analysis were conducted as part of a prospective mixed-methods formative evaluation of the Commonwealth Government's Indigenous Chronic Disease Package. Twenty-six general practices and 14 Aboriginal Health Services (AHSs) located in all Australian States and Territories and in urban, regional and remote locations were purposively selected within geographically defined locations. Percentage change in reported number of regular patients in general practices ranged between -50% and 453% (average 37%). The corresponding figure for AHSs was 1% to 217% (average 31%). In approximately half of general practices and AHSs, the change was ≥ 20%. There were similarly large changes in reported numbers of patients with a diagnosis of diabetes or coronary heart disease (CHD), and Indigenous patients. Inconsistencies in reported numbers were due primarily to limited capability of staff in many general practices and AHSs to accurately enter, manage, and extract data from EHRs. The inconsistencies in data required for the calculation of many key indicators of access and quality of care places serious constraints on the meaningful use of data extracted from EHRs. There is a need for greater attention to quality of denominator data in order to realise the potential benefits of EHRs for patient care, service planning, improvement, and policy. We

  17. Staff perceptions of primary healthcare service change: influences on staff satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tham, Rachel; Buykx, Penny; Kinsman, Leigh; Ward, Bernadette; Humphreys, John S; Asaid, Adel; Tuohey, Kathy; Jenner, Rohan

    2014-11-01

    Strong primary healthcare (PHC) services are efficient, cost-effective and associated with better population health outcomes. However, little is known about the role and perspectives of PHC staff in creating a sustainable service. Staff from a single-point-of-entry primary health care service in Elmore, a small rural community in north-west Victoria, were surveyed. Qualitative methods were used to collect data to show how the key factors associated with the evolution of a once-struggling medical service into a successful and sustainable PHC service have influenced staff satisfaction. The success of the service was linked to visionary leadership, teamwork and community involvement while service sustainability was described in terms of inter-professional linkages and the role of the service in contributing to the broader community. These factors were reported to have a positive impact on staff satisfaction. The contribution of service delivery change and ongoing service sustainability to staff satisfaction in this rural setting has implications for planning service change in other primary health care settings. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THIS TOPIC?: Integrated PHC services have an important role to play in achieving equitable population health outcomes. Many rural communities struggle to maintain viable PHC services. Innovative PHC models are needed to ensure equitable access to care and reduce the health differential between rural and metropolitan people. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD?: Multidisciplinary teams, visionary leadership, strong community engagement combined with service partnerships are important factors in the building of a rural PHC service that substantially contributes to enhanced staff satisfaction and service sustainability. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS?: Understanding and engaging local community members is a key driver in the success of service delivery changes in rural PHC services.

  18. Politics and partnerships: challenges and rewards of partnerships in workplace health research in the healthcare sector of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Yassi, Annalee; Tomlin, Katrina; Sidebottom, Claire; Rideout, Karen; De Boer, Henrietre

    2004-01-01

    In British Columbia (BC), Canada, a partnership of researchers, healthcare employers, and healthcare unions reduced high injury rates through examining determinants of healthy workplaces and designing, implementing, and evaluating interventions. Over 51 million dollars (Canadian) was saved from the BC healthcare budget over two years, largely attributable to the collaborative effort. Challenges and rewards of the process were determined from interviews and workshops with researchers and community stakeholders, and by obtaining direct input to this report. Challenges included maintaining communication and trust between partners, preserving partnerships during restructuring and labor disputes, and maintaining involvement and support of front-line workers and senior management. As all partners recognized the importance of the research agenda, the stakeholders remained committed to working through the challenges, and have consequently achieved considerable success.

  19. Ineffective Healthcare Technology Management in Benin’s Public Health Sector: The Perceptions of Key Actors and Their Ability to Address the Main Problems

    PubMed Central

    Houngbo, P. Thierry; De Cock Buning, Tjard; Bunders, Joske; Coleman, Harry L. S.; Medenou, Daton; Dakpanon, Laurent; Zweekhorst, Marjolein

    2017-01-01

    Background: Low-income countries face many contextual challenges to manage healthcare technologies effectively, as the majority are imported and resources are constrained to a greater extent. Previous healthcare technology management (HTM) policies in Benin have failed to produce better quality of care for the population and costeffectiveness for the government. This study aims to identify and assess the main problems facing HTM in Benin’s public health sector, as well as the ability of key actors within the sector to address these problems. Methods: We conducted 2 surveys in 117 selected health facilities. The first survey was based on 377 questionnaires and 259 interviews, and the second involved observation and group interviews at health facilities. The Temple-Bird Healthcare Technology Package System (TBHTPS), tailored to the context of Benin’s health system, was used as a conceptual framework. Results: The findings of the first survey show that 85% of key actors in Benin’s HTM sector characterized the system as failing in components of the TBHTPS framework. Biomedical, clinical, healthcare technology engineers and technicians perceived problems most severely, followed by users of equipment, managers and hospital directors, international organization officers, local and foreign suppliers, and finally policy-makers, planners and administrators at the Ministry of Health (MoH). The 5 most important challenges to be addressed are policy, strategic management and planning, and technology needs assessment and selection – categorized as major enabling inputs (MEI) in HTM by the TBHTPS framework – and installation and commissioning, training and skill development and procurement, which are import and use activities (IUA). The ability of each key actor to address these problems (the degree of political or administrative power they possess) was inversely proportional to their perception of the severity of the problems. Observational data gathered during site

  20. Teledentistry: A Tool to Promote Continuing Education Actions on Oral Medicine for Primary Healthcare Professionals.

    PubMed

    Roxo-Gonçalves, Michelle; Strey, Jéssica R; Bavaresco, Caren S; Martins, Marco Antonio T; Romanini, Juliana; Pilz, Carlos; Harzheim, Erno; Umpierre, Roberto; Martins, Manoela D; Carrard, Vinicius C

    2017-04-01

    Difficulties in diagnosis of oral mucosal lesions are a significant cause of delayed oral cancer diagnosis, and this difficulty may be due to gaps in knowledge. This study evaluated the diagnostic skills of primary healthcare professionals regarding oral cancer and presented them with an e-learning course. Forty-seven primary healthcare professionals (32 dentists and 15 nondentists) enrolled in a 24-h course on oral medicine delivered through an e-learning platform. A test, based on 33 clinical images of oral lesions, was used to evaluate the diagnostic skills of participants. The participants were requested to classify each lesion as benign, potentially malignant, or malignant as well as to inform their clinical impression. Three specialists also took the test as the gold standard. Twenty-seven participants completed the test. Nondentists and dentists showed a comparable sensitivity of 68.8 ± 11.1 and 63.7 ± 15.8, respectively. Specialists performed somewhat better; however, the difference was not statistically significant (81.0% ± 4.1%, p = 0.16). Dentists and specialists (70.0% ± 16.6% and 95.5% ± 3.1%, respectively) showed higher specificity than nondentists (39.3 ± 20.6, p < 0.01). Nondentists had a higher number of unanswered questions (p < 0.01) for classification and clinical impression (50.0% ±45.1% and 72.0% ± 25.0%, respectively) than dentists (5.7% ±11.9% and 19.8% ± 20%, respectively). Both dentists and nondentists had low attendance in the course (44.57% ± 37.38% and 26.53% ± 26.53%, respectively, p = 0.26). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the diagnostic skills of public health workers belonging to different professional categories. Both dentists and nondentists have a fairly good capacity for discriminating the nature of oral lesions. Early squamous cell carcinoma is the most challenging situation and remains an issue to be addressed.

  1. Primary healthcare provider knowledge, beliefs and clinic-based practices regarding alternative tobacco products and marijuana: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bascombe, Ta Misha S; Scott, Kimberly N; Ballard, Denise; Smith, Samantha A; Thompson, Winifred; Berg, Carla J

    2016-06-01

    Use prevalence of alternative tobacco products and marijuana has increased dramatically. Unfortunately, clinical guidelines have focused on traditional cigarettes with limited attention regarding these emerging public health issues. Thus, it is critical to understand how healthcare professionals view this issue and are responding to it. This qualitative study explored knowledge, beliefs and clinic-based practices regarding traditional and alternative tobacco products (cigar-like products, smokeless tobacco, hookah, e-cigarettes) and marijuana among rural and urban Georgia primary healthcare providers. The sample comprised 20 healthcare providers in primary care settings located in the Atlanta Metropolitan area and rural southern Georgia who participated in semi-structured interviews. Results indicated a lack of knowledge about these products, with some believing that some products were less harmful than traditional cigarettes or that they may be effective in promoting cessation or harm reduction. Few reported explicitly assessing use of these various products in clinic. In addition, healthcare providers reported a need for empirical evidence to inform their clinical practice. Healthcare providers must systematically assess use of the range of tobacco products and marijuana. Evidence-based recommendations or information sources are needed to inform clinical practice and help providers navigate conversations with patients using or inquiring about these products.

  2. Unemployment, public-sector healthcare expenditure and colorectal cancer mortality in the European Union: 1990-2009.

    PubMed

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Watson, Robert A; Watkins, Johnathan; Williams, Callum; Zeltner, Thomas; Faiz, Omar; Ali, Raghib; Atun, Rifat

    2016-01-01

    We examined the association between unemployment and government spending on healthcare with colorectal cancer mortality. Retrospective observational study using data from the World Bank and WHO. Multivariate regression analysis was used, controlling for country-specific differences in infrastructure and demographics. A 1 % increase in unemployment was associated with a significant increase in colorectal cancer mortality in both men and women [men: coefficient (R) = 0.0995, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.0132-0.1858, P = 0.024; women: R = 0.0742, 95 % CI 0.0160-0.1324, P = 0.013]. A 1 % increase in government spending on healthcare was associated with a statistically significant decrease in colorectal cancer mortality across both sexes (men: R = -0.4307, 95 % CI -0.6057 to -0.2557, P < 0.001; women: R = -0.2162, 95 % CI -0.3407 to -0.0917, P = 0.001). The largest changes in mortality occurred 3-4 years following changes in either economic variable. Unemployment rises are associated with a significant increase in colorectal cancer mortality, whilst government healthcare spending rises are associated with falling mortality. This is likely due, in part, to reduced access to healthcare services and has major implications for clinicians and policy makers alike.

  3. Supply and distribution of primary healthcare registered nurses in british columbia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sabrina T; Watson, Diane E; Young, Ella; Mooney, Dawn

    2009-11-01

    WHAT DID WE DO?: This study uses an existing data source to (a) describe the population and geographic distribution of registered nurses (RNs) working in primary healthcare (PHC) in British Columbia, (b) compare this workforce to PHC physicians and (c) assess the distribution of PHC-RNs relative to population health status. WHAT DID WE LEARN?: Of the 27,570 practising RNs in British Columbia in 2000, there were 3,179 (12%) in the PHC workforce. This translates into 147 people per practising RN and 1,277 people per PHC-RN. In 2000, there were 990 people per PHC physician. PHC-RNs represented 43% of the combined PHC workforce of physicians and RNs. A large proportion (47%) of PHC-RNs worked in community health centres, whereas less than 2% worked in physicians' offices. Geographic distribution of PHC-RNs is similar to the distribution of PHC physicians and is not associated with population health status. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?: There seem to be sufficient PHC-RNs to implement policy objectives in support of interdisciplinary PHC teams, but physicians and nurses will increasingly need to practice in the same location or have access to electronic information systems to support coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness of PHC. The PHC workforce could be better deployed to align with population health status.

  4. Patients' perceptions of the triage system in a primary healthcare facility, Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Adeniji, Adeloye A; Mash, Bob

    2016-06-17

    In public healthcare facilities, where the patient numbers and the available resources are often disproportionate, triage is used to prioritise when patients are seen. Patients may not understand the triage process and have strong views on how to improve their experience. This study explored the views of patients who had undergone triage in the emergency centre of a primary care facility. Gugulethu Community Health Centre, Cape Town. A purposive sample consisted of five women (one coded green, three orange, one yellow) and four men (one coded green and three yellow). A semi-structured qualitative interview was conducted in either Xhosa or English and the transcripts analysed using the framework method. All of the respondents complained of a lack of information and poor understanding of the triage process. Those coded green experienced the process as biased and unfair and reported that the triage nurse was rude and unprofessional. By contrast, those coded yellow or orange found the triage nurse to be helpful and professional. Most patients turned to support staff (e.g. security staff or cleaners) for assistance in dealing with the triage system. Most patients waited longer than the guidelines recommend and the green-coded patients complained about this issue. Patients did not have a good experience of the triage system. Managers of the triage system need to design better strategies to improve patient acceptance and share information. The important role of support staff needs to be recognised and strengthened.

  5. Patients’ perceptions of the triage system in a primary healthcare facility, Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji, Adeloye Amoo

    2016-01-01

    Background In public healthcare facilities, where the patient numbers and the available resources are often disproportionate, triage is used to prioritise when patients are seen. Patients may not understand the triage process and have strong views on how to improve their experience. Aim This study explored the views of patients who had undergone triage in the emergency centre of a primary care facility. Setting Gugulethu Community Health Centre, Cape Town. Methods A purposive sample consisted of five women (one coded green, three orange, one yellow) and four men (one coded green and three yellow). A semi-structured qualitative interview was conducted in either Xhosa or English and the transcripts analysed using the framework method. Results All of the respondents complained of a lack of information and poor understanding of the triage process. Those coded green experienced the process as biased and unfair and reported that the triage nurse was rude and unprofessional. By contrast, those coded yellow or orange found the triage nurse to be helpful and professional. Most patients turned to support staff (e.g. security staff or cleaners) for assistance in dealing with the triage system. Most patients waited longer than the guidelines recommend and the green-coded patients complained about this issue. Conclusion Patients did not have a good experience of the triage system. Managers of the triage system need to design better strategies to improve patient acceptance and share information. The important role of support staff needs to be recognised and strengthened. PMID:27380788

  6. GPs’ use of defibrillators and the national radio network in emergency primary healthcare in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the geographic size of out-of-hours districts, the availability of defibrillators and use of the national radio network in Norway. Design Survey. Setting The emergency primary healthcare system in Norway. Subjects A total of 282 host municipalities responsible for 260 out-of-hours districts. Main outcome measures Size of out-of-hours districts, use of national radio network and access to a defibrillator in emergency situations. Results The out-of-hours districts have a wide range of areas, which gives a large variation in driving time for doctors on call. The median longest transport time for doctors in Norway is 45 minutes. In 46% of out-of-hours districts doctors bring their own defibrillator on emergency callouts. Doctors always use the national radio network in 52% of out-of-hours districts. Use of the radio network and access to a defibrillator are significantly greater in out-of-hours districts with a host municipality of fewer then 5000 inhabitants compared with host municipalities of more than 20 000 inhabitants. Conclusion In half of out-of-hours districts doctors on call always use the national radio network. Doctors in out-of-hours districts with a host municipality of fewer than 5000 inhabitants are in a better state of readiness to attend an emergency, compared with doctors working in larger host municipalities. PMID:18570012

  7. Patients' perceptions of web self-service applications in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Ping; Yan, Jun; Hu, Hongxiang; Goureia, Niraj

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary findings of a case study of patients' acceptance and usage of web self-service - online appointment system - in a primary health care centre in a regional area in Australia. After two months of implementation, structured interviews were undertaken over three months to ascertain patients' perceptions of the web self-service application. The findings indicates that patients' acceptance of the web self-service application maybe hindered by their relative lower computer ownership or inadequate computer skills and access to the internet, their preference for flexible personal communication for appointment making and inadequate flexibility of the appointment system compared to phone call. Our preliminary findings may suggest that more than half of the healthcare consumers in this area are likely to accept the PCEHR initiative, however the decision makers of the PCEHR system need to carefully design the strategies and practice for the introduction of the innovation to overcome the substantial barriers to consumers' ability to access the internet-based e-health solutions.

  8. Paediatric otitis media at a primary healthcare clinic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Biagio, L; Swanepoel, D W; Laurent, C; Lundberg, T

    2014-05-12

    No published studies on the prevalence of paediatric otitis media at primary healthcare clinics (PHCs) in South Africa (SA) are available. To examine the point prevalence of otitis media in a paediatric population in a PHC in Johannesburg, SA, using otomicroscopy. A sample of 140 children aged 2 - 16 years (mean 6.4; 44.1% females) were recruited from patients attending the PHC. Otomicroscopy was completed for each of the participants' ears by a specialist otologist using a surgical microscope. Cerumen removal was necessary in 36.0% of participants (23.5% of ears). Otitis media with effusion was the most frequent diagnosis (16.5%). Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) was diagnosed in 6.6% of children and was the most common type of otitis media in participants aged 6 - 15 years. Acute otitis media was only diagnosed in the younger 2 - 5-year age group (1.7%). Otitis media was significantly more prevalent among younger (31.4%) than older children (16.7%). CSOM prevalence, as classified by the World Health Organization, was high. Consequently diagnosis, treatment and subsequent referral protocols may need to be reviewed to prevent CSOM complications.

  9. Collaboration and local networks for rural and remote primary mental healthcare in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jeffrey; Edwards, Jane; Martinez, Lee; Edwards, Bruce; Reid, Karyn

    2004-01-01

    This paper draws on a consultation with 200 stakeholders about a mental health plan in the most remote region of South Australia to discuss primary mental healthcare improvement strategies. In rural and remote environments, a lack of services means that it is more difficult to deal with a mental illness or provide assistance for circumstantial life problems. The authors' consultations revealed difficulties with service access, acceptability and teamwork. They also found that the availability of local human service workers leads to their use as first-level mental health contacts, but these workers are neither skilled nor supported for this. These difficulties will require attention to the boundaries between different service providers which can otherwise create inflexibility and service gaps. The regional mental health plan that is being rolled out will develop collaboration through regional interagency task groups, networking groups for local human service workers and the position of a regional mental health coordinator in order to overcome these difficulties and to operationalise service partnerships.

  10. Language, culture and emotions: exploring ethnic minority patients' emotional expressions in primary healthcare consultations.

    PubMed

    De Maesschalck, Stéphanie; Deveugele, Myriam; Willems, Sara

    2011-09-01

    This study explores ethnic minority patients' expression of emotional cues and concerns in primary healthcare, and examines relationships with patient, provider and consultation attributes. 191 video-recorded consultations were analyzed using the VR-CoDES. Patients were interviewed before the consultation. Generalized Estimating Equations models (GEE) were used to test for associations. Psychosocial versus bio-medically oriented encounters contained significantly more cues (p≤0.05). Patients with poor versus good language proficiency expressed significantly less cues (p≤0.001). No significant correlations were found with patients' cultural values, patients' or physicians' gender or the presence of an interpreter. Female patients express more concerns (p≤0.05), female physicians have a higher number of concerns expressed by patients (p≤0.02). This study shows that independent of physician and diagnosis, patients' language proficiency has a more important impact on the number of cues expressed by the patient than cultural difference. Medical schools and Continuing Medical Education should focus on training programs for recognizing and handling linguistic barriers between physicians and patients. Patient education programs should encourage patients who experience language barriers to open up to physicians. In situations where language is a barrier, physicians and patients should be encouraged to use interpreters to enhance the expression of emotions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Patients' adoption of the e-appointment scheduling service: A case study in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate patients' initial acceptance and ongoing use of a simple but typical type of consumer e-health service - an e-appointment scheduling (EAS) system - in order to identify facilitators and barriers for patients' adoption of e-health services in primary healthcare. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather patients' background information, their awareness of the system, their feedbacks on the characteristics of the system, and their reasons for use or not use the system. A total of 125 patients aged between 17 and 74 were interviewed. Study results show that 89% of the interviewed patients had shown reluctance to adopt this online service. The identified barriers for acceptance include many patients' lack of access to the internet, lack of awareness of the service, low computer skills and incompatibility of the online appointment service with many patients' habits of face-to-face or phone-call based medical appointment making. Health service providers need to consider the general public's acceptance for online services before implementing consumer e-health systems.

  12. Integrated primary care improves access to healthcare for newly arrived refugees in Canada.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Josephine; Breward, Katherine; Breward, Michael; Alder, Rob; Arya, Neil

    2014-08-01

    In this study we quantify the impact of a partnership between a dedicated health clinic for government assisted refugees (GARs), a local reception centre and community providers, on wait times and referrals. This study used a before and after, repeated survey study design to analyze archived administrative data. Using various statistical techniques, outcomes for refugees arriving 18 months prior to the introduction of the clinic were compared with those of refugees arriving in the 18 months after the clinic was established. Our investigation revealed wait times to see a health care provider decreased by 30 % with the introduction of a dedicated refugee health clinic. The likelihood of GARs being referred to physician specialists decreased by 45 %, but those referred were more likely to require multiple referrals due to increasingly complex medical needs. Referrals to non-physician specialist health care providers nearly doubled following the availability of the clinic. The time-limited, but intense health needs of GARs, require an integrated community-based primary healthcare intervention that includes dedicated health system navigators to support timely, more culturally appropriate care and successful integration.

  13. [Community vegetable gardens as a health promotion activity: an experience in Primary Healthcare Units].

    PubMed

    Costa, Christiane Gasparini Araújo; Garcia, Mariana Tarricone; Ribeiro, Silvana Maria; Salandini, Marcia Fernanda de Sousa; Bógus, Cláudia Maria

    2015-10-01

    Urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) is being practiced in different settings, contributing to the improvement of health in communities and healthier environments. In order to identify the meanings and implications of the practice of UPA in Primary Healthcare Units (PHU) as an activity of health promotion (HP), and to what extent its therapeutic dimension characterizes it as an activity aligned with complementary and integrative practices (CIP), a qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in Embu das Artes, State of São Paulo. From the analysis, the following main themes arose: health concept, health outcomes, the return to traditional practices and habits and the reorientation of health services. It was possible to identify the close link between the cultivation of vegetable gardens and HP guidelines and fields of action, such as creating healthier environments, boosting community actions, developing personal skills, stimulating autonomy and empowerment and demands for the reorientation of services. The garden activities, set up in PHU areas, proved to be an implementation strategy of CIP. The conclusion reached is that vegetable gardening activities in community gardens are seen to be health promotion practices that integrate key elements of CIP.

  14. Are primary healthcare services culturally appropriate for Aboriginal people? Findings from a remote community.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kaye; Fatima, Yaqoot; Knight, Sabina

    2017-04-13

    This study explored the views of key stakeholders on cultural appropriateness of primary health care (PHC) services for Aboriginal people. A total of 78 participants, including healthcare providers, administrative team members (n=24, ~30% of study sample) and Aboriginal community members (n=54, ~70% of study sample) living in remote North West Queensland participated in the study. Outcome measures were assessed by administering survey questionnaires comprising qualitative questions and various subscales (e.g. provider behaviours and attitudes, communication, physical environment and facilities, and support from administrative staff). Descriptive statistics were used to present quantitative findings, whereas inductive thematic analysis was used for qualitative data. In contrast to the views of PHC providers, a significant number of Aboriginal people did not perceive that they were receiving culturally appropriate services. Although PHC providers acknowledged cultural awareness training for familiarising themselves with Aboriginal culture, they found the training to be general, superficial and lacking prospective evaluation. PHC providers should understand that culturally inappropriate clinical encounters generate mistrust and dissatisfaction. Therefore, a broad approach involving culturally respectful association between PHC providers, Aboriginal consumers and administrative staff is required to bring sustainable changes at the practice level to improve the health of Aboriginal people.

  15. [Educational intervention for the prevention of osteoporosis in a rural primary healthcare service].

    PubMed

    Pérez Fernández, María Reyes; Almazán Ortega, Raquel; Martínez Portela, José María; Alves Pérez, M Teresa; Segura Iglesias, M Carmen; Pérez Fernández, Román

    2013-12-21

    The aim of this study is to determine whether an educational intervention in perimenopausal women in rural environments achieves significant changes in risk behaviors related to osteoporosis. Randomized clinical trials of parallel groups: 216 women (45-54 years old) of a rural Primary Healthcare service. Pre- and post- intervention were covered: body mass index (BMI), densitometry and blood test (calcium [Ca], parathormone [PTH]). Intervention group (n1=110): 2 interactive workshops on the prevention of osteoporosis. Control group (n2=106): information by post. After the educational intervention, the intervention group maintained its BMI, increased its bone mineral density (BMD) (P<.001) and decreased the Ca (P ≤.048) and PTH (P<.001) levels. The control group increased its BMI (P<.001) and its BMD (P ≤.048), maintained its Ca levels and decreased the PTH values (P=.01). The improvement in the objective parameters related to osteoporosis indicates the importance of health education as a preventive measure in this group of women. It would be interesting to analyze the repercussions of this improvement on a long-term basis in terms of reducing the incidence of osteoporosis and fractures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Falls among dizzy patients in primary healthcare: an intervention study with control group.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Eva Ekvall; Månsson, Nils-Ove; Ringsberg, Karin A; Håkansson, Anders

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether vestibular rehabilitation can improve balance, reduce self-perceived handicap because of dizziness and, if possible, reduce falls among dizzy patients in primary healthcare. The study also finds out which of the balance measures and measure of self-perceived handicap, if any, predicted the risk of falls. The design of this study is an intervention study with control group. Fifty-eight patients, 65 years and older, with multisensory dizziness were taken as participants. The intervention group trained vestibular rehabilitation twice a week for 9 weeks. All patients were assessed at baseline and after 3 months, with four different balance measures and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory. After 6, 9 and 12 months, a follow-up by telephone was performed and, at 12 months, the patients also filled out a Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaire. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups between baseline and 3 months in one static balance measure and in one dynamic measure (P=0.038 and 0.044). In total, 40 falls were reported, 31 were classified as intrinsic falls, 26 of them caused by vertigo and nine falls were classified as extrinsic. No difference was found between the two groups in proportions of patients who fell. Poor ability to stand in tandem stance doubled the risk for falls. Vestibular rehabilitation can improve balance in elderly patients with multisensory dizziness. Vertigo is a common cause of falls in this group of patients and vestibular rehabilitation is a feasible treatment.

  17. Perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services on the meaning and goals of clinical governance.

    PubMed

    Kwedza, Ruyamuro K; Larkins, Sarah; Johnson, Julie K; Zwar, Nicholas

    2017-08-21

    Definitions of clinical governance are varied and there is no one agreed model. This paper explored the perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services, located in North Queensland, Australia, on the meaning and goals of clinical governance. The study followed an embedded multiple case study design with semi-structured interviews, document analysis and non-participant observation. Participants included clinicians, non-clinical support staff, managers and executives. Similarities and differences in the understanding of clinical governance between health centre and committee case studies were evident. Almost one-third of participants were unfamiliar with the term or were unsure of its meaning; alongside limited documentation of a definition. Although most cases linked the concept of clinical governance to key terms, many lacked a comprehensive understanding. Similarities between cases included viewing clinical governance as a management and administrative function. Differences included committee members' alignment of clinical governance with corporate governance and frontline staff associating clinical governance with staff safety. Document analysis offered further insight into these perspectives. Clinical governance is well-documented as an expected organisational requirement, including in rural and remote areas where geographic, workforce and demographic factors pose additional challenges to quality and safety. However, in reality, it is not clearly, similarly or comprehensively understood by all participants.

  18. Primary health-care responses to methamphetamine use in Australian Indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Sarah; Harney, Angela; Arabena, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Crystal methamphetamine (commonly known as 'ice') use is currently a deeply concerning problem for some Australian Indigenous peoples and can cause serious harms to individual, families and communities. This paper is intended to support best practice responses by primary health-care staff working with Australian Indigenous people who use methamphetamine. It draws on a systematic search of relevant databases to identify literature from January 1999 to February 2014, providing an overview of prevalence, treatment, education and harm reduction, and community responses. The prevalence of methamphetamine use is higher in Indigenous than non-Indigenous communities, particularly in urban and regional settings. No evidence was identified that specifically related to effective treatment and treatment outcomes for Indigenous Australians experiencing methamphetamine dependence or problematic use. While studies involving methamphetamine users in the mainstream population suggest that psychological and residential treatments show short-term promise, longer-term outcomes are less clear. Community-driven interventions involving Indigenous populations in Australia and internationally appear to have a high level of community acceptability; however, outcomes in terms of methamphetamine use are rarely evaluated. Improved national data on prevalence of methamphetamine use among Indigenous people and levels of treatment access would support service planning. We argue for the importance of a strength-based approach to addressing methamphetamine use, to counteract the stigma and despair that frequently accompanies it.

  19. Information and communication technologies for approaching smokers: a descriptive study in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Puigdomènech, Elisa; Trujillo-Gómez, Jose-Manuel; Martín-Cantera, Carlos; Díaz-Gete, Laura; Manzano-Montero, Mónica; Sánchez-Fondevila, Jessica; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Yolanda; Garcia-Rueda, Beatriz; Briones-Carrió, Elena-Mercedes; Clemente-Jiménez, Ma-Lourdes; Castaño, Carmen; Birulés-Muntané, Joan

    2015-02-13

    Common interventions for smoking cessation are based on medical advice and pharmacological aid. Information and communication technologies may be helpful as interventions by themselves or as complementary tools to quit smoking. The objective of the study was to determine the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the smoking population attended in primary care, and describe the major factors associated with its use. Descriptive observational study in 84 health centres in Cataluña, Aragon and Salamanca. We included by simple random sampling 1725 primary healthcare smokers (any amount of tobacco) aged 18-85. Through personal interview professionals collected Socio-demographic data and variables related with tobacco consumption and ICTs use were collected through face to face interviews Factors associated with the use of ICTs were analyzed by logistic regression. Users of at least one ICT were predominantly male, young (18-45 years), from most favoured social classes and of higher education. Compared with non-ICTs users, users declared lower consumption of tobacco, younger onset age, and lower nicotine dependence. The percentages of use of email, text messages and web pages were 65.3%, 74.0% and 71.5%, respectively. Factors associated with the use of ICTs were age, social class, educational level and nicotine dependence level. The factor most closely associated with the use of all three ICTs was age; mainly individuals aged 18-24. The use of ICTs to quit smoking is promising, with the technology of mobile phones having a broader potential. Younger and more educated subjects are good targets for ICTs interventions on smoking cessation.

  20. Which women are missed by primary health-care based interventions for alcohol and drug use?

    PubMed

    Roberts, S C M; Ralph, L J; Wilsnack, S C; Foster, D G

    2016-04-01

    Women of reproductive age who binge drink or have alcohol-related problem symptoms (APS) and who do not use contraception are considered at risk of an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP). In the U.S., efforts to prevent AEPs focus largely on delivering interventions in primary health care settings. While research suggests that these interventions are efficacious for women reached, it is unclear to what extent these interventions are likely to reach women at risk of AEPs. Data are from the Turnaway Study, a study of 956 women seeking pregnancy termination at 30 U.S. facilities between 2008 and 2010, some of whom received and some of whom were denied terminations because they were past the gestational limit. We examined associations between binge drinking, APS, and drug use prior to pregnancy recognition and having a usual source of health care (USOC). Overall, 59% reported having a USOC. A smaller proportion with than without an APS reported a USOC (44 vs. 60%, p<.05) and a smaller proportion using than not using drugs reported a USOC (51 vs. 61%, p<.05). This pattern was not observed for binge drinking. In multivariate analyses, an APS continued to be associated with lack of a USOC, while drug use was no longer associated with lack of a USOC. As more than 40% did not have a USOC, with higher proportions among women with an APS, primary health-care based approaches to AEP prevention seem unlikely to reach the majority of women who have an APS and are at risk of an unintended pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Which women are missed by primary health-care based interventions for alcohol and drug use?

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, SCM; Ralph, LJ; Wilsnack, SC; Foster, DG

    2016-01-01

    Background Women of reproductive age who binge drink or have alcohol-related problem symptoms (APS) and who do not use contraception are considered at risk of an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP). In the U.S., efforts to prevent AEPs focus largely on delivering interventions in primary health care settings. While research suggests that these interventions are efficacious for women reached, it is unclear to what extent these interventions are likely to reach women at risk of AEPs. Methods Data are from the Turnaway Study, a study of 956 women seeking pregnancy termination at 30 U.S. facilities between 2008 and 2010, some of whom received and some of whom were denied terminations because they were past the gestational limit. We examined associations between binge drinking, APS, and drug use prior to pregnancy recognition and having a usual source of health care (USOC). Results Overall, 59% reported having a USOC. A smaller proportion with than without an APS reported a USOC (44 vs. 60%, p<.05) and a smaller proportion using than not using drugs reported a USOC (51 vs 61%, p<.05). This pattern was not observed for binge drinking. In multivariate analyses, an APS continued to be associated with lack of a USOC, while drug use was no longer associated with lack of a USOC. Conclusions As more than 40% did not have a USOC, with higher proportions among women with an APS, primary health-care based approaches to AEP prevention seem unlikely to reach the majority of women who have an APS and are at risk of an unintended pregnancy. PMID:26774493

  2. Effective teamwork in primary healthcare through a structured patient-sorting system - a qualitative study on staff members' conceptions.

    PubMed

    Maun, Andy; Engström, Miriam; Frantz, Anna; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Thorn, Jörgen

    2014-11-28

    Primary healthcare meets increased demands from an aging population concerning quality and availability while concurrently dealing with a growing shortage of general practitioners and imperfect efficiency in healthcare processes. Reorganization and team development can improve quality and performance but projects in primary care frequently do not attain the targeted results. By developing and introducing a structured patient-sorting system a primary healthcare centre in Western Sweden increased its access rate significantly and employed its medical professionals more efficiently. The aim of this study was to explore staff members' conceptions of the structured patient-sorting system in order to gain an inside perspective on this project. In this qualitative study 16 interviews were conducted over a period of two years and data was analysed using a phenomenographic approach to identify the various conceptions of the eleven participants. Three categories of description were identified: The system was conceptualized as 1) a framework for the development of patient-centred processes that were clear and consistent, 2) a promotor of professional development and a shared ideal of cooperative practice and 3) a common denominator and catalyst in conflict management. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a structured patient-sorting system makes it possible for several important change processes to take place concurrently: improvement of healthcare processes, empowerment of professionals and team development. It therefore indicates the importance of an appropriate, contextualized framework to support multiple concomitant quality improvement processes. Knowledge from this study can be used to assist and improve future implementations in primary healthcare centres.

  3. Access to primary healthcare services for the Roma population in Serbia: a secondary data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Serbia has proclaimed access to healthcare as a human right. In a context wherein the Roma population are disadvantaged, the aim of this study was to assess whether the Roma population are able to effectively access primary care services, and if not, what barriers prevent them from doing so. The history of the Roma in Serbia is described in detail so as to provide a context for their current vulnerable position. Methods Disaggregated data were analyzed from three population groups in Serbia; the general population, the Roma population, and the poorest quintile of the general population not including the Roma. The effective coverage framework, which incorporates availability, affordability, accessibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of health services, was used to structure the secondary data analysis. Acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children less than five years of age was used as an example as this is the leading cause of death in children under 5 years old in Serbia. Results Roma children were significantly more likely to experience an ARI than either the general population or the poorest quintile of the general population, not including the Roma. All three population groups were equally likely to not receive the correct treatment regime of antibiotics. An analysis of the factors that affect quality of access to health services reveal that personal documentation is a statistically significant problem; availability of health services is not an issue that disproportionately affects the Roma; however the geographical accessibility and affordability are substantive issues that disproportionately affect the Roma population. Affordability of services affected the Roma and the poorest quintile and affordability of medications significantly affected all three population groups. With regards to acceptability, mothers from all three population groups are equally likely to recognize the importance of seeking treatment. Conclusions The Roma should be

  4. [Human resources requirements for diabetic patients healthcare in primary care clinics of the Mexican Institute of Social Security].

    PubMed

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Ramírez-Sánchez, Claudine; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    To estimate the requirements of human resources (HR) of two models of care for diabetes patients: conventional and specific, also called DiabetIMSS, which are provided in primary care clinics of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). An evaluative research was conducted. An expert group identified the HR activities and time required to provide healthcare consistent with the best clinical practices for diabetic patients. HR were estimated by using the evidence-based adjusted service target approach for health workforce planning; then, comparisons between existing and estimated HRs were made. To provide healthcare in accordance with the patients' metabolic control, the conventional model required increasing the number of family doctors (1.2 times) nutritionists (4.2 times) and social workers (4.1 times). The DiabetIMSS model requires greater increase than the conventional model. Increasing HR is required to provide evidence-based healthcare to diabetes patients.

  5. Forest sector and primary forest products industry contributions to the economies of the southern states: 2011 update

    Treesearch

    Consuelo Brandeis; Donald G. Hodges

    2015-01-01

    The analysis in this article provides an update on the southern forest sector economic activity after the downturn experienced in 2008–2009. The analysis was conducted using Impact Analysis for Planning (IMPLAN) software and data sets for 2009 and 2011 and results from the USDA Forest Service Timber Products Output latest survey of primary wood processing mills....

  6. Autochthonous Minority Languages in Public-Sector Primary Education: Bilingual Policies and Politics in Brittany and Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Vaughan; McLeod, Wilson

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between policy and politics in relation to the development of public-sector primary education through Breton and Gaelic, considering closely the patterns of power through which such provision is delivered. Brittany and Scotland present many similarities as culturally distinctive territories, contained within…

  7. Links among high-performance work environment, service quality, and customer satisfaction: an extension to the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Dennis J; Harmon, Joel; Behson, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare managers must deliver high-quality patient services that generate highly satisfied and loyal customers. In this article, we examine how a high-involvement approach to the work environment of healthcare employees may lead to exceptional service quality, satisfied patients, and ultimately to loyal customers. Specifically, we investigate the chain of events through which high-performance work systems (HPWS) and customer orientation influence employee and customer perceptions of service quality and patient satisfaction in a national sample of 113 Veterans Health Administration ambulatory care centers. We present a conceptual model for linking work environment to customer satisfaction and test this model using structural equations modeling. The results suggest that (1) HPWS is linked to employee perceptions of their ability to deliver high-quality customer service, both directly and through their perceptions of customer orientation; (2) employee perceptions of customer service are linked to customer perceptions of high-quality service; and (3) perceived service quality is linked with customer satisfaction. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings, including suggestions of how healthcare managers can implement changes to their work environments, are discussed.

  8. Evaluating factors affecting the implementation of evidence based medicine in primary healthcare centers in Dubai

    PubMed Central

    Albarrak, Ahmed I.; Ali Abbdulrahim, Suhair Aqil; Mohammed, Rafiuddin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the current evidence based medicine (EBM) knowledge, attitude and perceptions of physicians at Dubai Primary Health Care Sector (PHCS). Further to evaluate barrier and facilitator factors toward implementing the EBM practice. Methodology A cross-sectional study, at Dubai PHCS, UAE between June and August 2010. The survey was composed of two phases. The first phase was a self administrated questionnaire employed for data collection and the second phase was qualitative method, which was in the form of individual interviews. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) was used for data analysis. Results In total 48 participants responded to the survey questionnaire and 13 responded to individual interviews. The response rate was 70.0%. Mean age was 42.18 (SD 10.46). The majority were females (64.6%). The physicians who attended EBM courses reported 70.30% using EBM and showed statistical significance (p = 0.002) from those who did not attend the EBM courses. 65.0% believe that 50–75% of the patients are capable of participating in clinical decision while 71.8% disagreed that the concept of EBM is not applicable to their culture. In addition they showed significance (p = 0.03) between physician beliefs with regard to patient capacity to take decision. About 67.0% of the family physicians were knowledgeable and followed systematic review as the strongest evidence. They had no access to the EBM resources (37.0%) and had no time to practice the EBM (38.0%). Nearly 40.0% interviewees reported lack of encouragement to attend EBM courses. EBM activities (22.0%) and active audit (18.0%) were top rated facilitating factors. Conclusions EBM is not fully utilized by indefinite physicians in the Dubai PHC sector. Factors associated with non-utilization of EBM in the PHCS are lack of encouragement to attend EBM courses, senior physicians resist adoption of EBM, lack of time and insufficient dissemination process for implementing the clinical guideline

  9. What are the barriers to access to mental healthcare and the primary needs of asylum seekers? A survey of mental health caregivers and primary care workers.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Javier; Baeriswyl-Cottin, Rachel; Framorando, David; Kasina, Filip; Premand, Natacha; Eytan, Ariel; Khazaal, Yasser

    2016-09-29

    We aimed to assess the opinion of primary care workers, social workers, translators and mental health caregivers who work with asylum seekers about the latter's unmet needs and barriers to access to mental healthcare. We used a Likert scale to assess the opinion of 135 primary care workers (general practitioners, nurses, social workers and translators) and mental health caregivers about the proportion of asylum seekers with psychiatric disorders, their priority needs and their main barriers to mental health services. Insufficient access to adequate financial resources, poor housing and security conditions, access to employment, professional training and legal aid were considered as priority needs, as were access to dental and mental healthcare. The main barriers to access to mental healthcare for asylum seekers included a negative representation of psychiatry, fear of being stigmatized by their own community and poor information about existing psychiatric services. We found a good correlation between the needs reported by healthcare providers and those expressed by the asylum-seeking population in different studies. We discuss the need for greater mobility and accessibility to psychiatric services among this population.

  10. Pharmaceutical cost control in primary care: opinion and contributions by healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Strategies adopted by health administrations and directed towards drug cost control in primary care (PC) can, according to earlier studies, generate tension between health administrators and healthcare professionals. This study collects and analyzes the opinions of general practitioners (GPs) regarding current cost control measures as well as their proposals for improving the effectiveness of these measures. Methods A qualitative exploratory study was carried out using 11 focus groups composed of GPs from the Spanish regions of Aragon, Catalonia and the Balearic Islands. A semi-structured guide was applied in obtaining the GPs' opinions. The transcripts of the dialogues were analyzed by two investigators who independently considered categorical and thematic content. The results were supervised by other members of the team, with overall responsibility assigned to the team leader. Results GPs are conscious of their public responsibility with respect to pharmaceutical cost, but highlight the need to spread responsibility for cost control among the different actors of the health system. They insist on implementing measures to improve the quality of prescriptions, avoiding mere quantitative evaluations of prescription costs. They also suggest moving towards the self-management of the pharmaceutical budget by each health centre itself, as a means to design personalized incentives to improve their outcomes. These proposals need to be considered by the health administration in order to pre-empt the feelings of injustice, impotence, frustration and lack of motivation that currently exist among GPs as a result of the implemented measures. Conclusion Future investigations should be oriented toward strategies that involve GPs in the planning and management of drug cost control mechanisms. The proposals in this study may be considered by the health administration as a means to move toward the rational use of drugs while avoiding concerns about injustice and feelings

  11. Development of pre-deployment primary healthcare training for Combat Medical Technicians.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Iain T; Rawden, M P; Wheatley, R J

    2014-09-01

    To develop and run a primary healthcare (PHC) refresher package to address the range of clinical presentations to Combat Medical Technicians (CMTs) on deployment and improve their confidence and capability in providing PHC for Op Herrick 18, with particular regard to the first month of deployment. A regimental level, two-and-a-half day refresher package was developed following analysis of PHC conditions most likely to be seen on Op HERRICK 18. It consisted of lectures and skill stations with written and case-based assessment phases to demonstrate effective and safe use of CMT clinical protocols on simulated patients. Internal feedback assessed the CMT's subjective understanding of each individual section. A qualitative questionnaire was used to retrospectively evaluate the package after 1 month of deployment. Immediate feedback showed that the refresher training was well received. Following the first month of deployment, CMTs who had attended the PHC refresher package felt more confident in managing PHC patients and felt they had received training for the majority of PHC conditions witnessed during their deployment in comparison with CMTs who had not. By delivering a training package acceptable to the majority of medics, we have increased the confidence and capability of CMTs in delivering PHC within the context of their protocols and prepared them for their first month of deployment. It suggests that PHC delivery can be improved by such a package and consideration should be given to formalising this into a military training qualification. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Motivation and Retention of Physicians in Primary Healthcare Facilities: A Qualitative Study From Abbottabad, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sayed Masoom; Zaidi, Shehla; Ahmed, Jamil; Rehman, Shafiq Ur

    2016-04-09

    Workforce motivation and retention is important for the functionality and quality of service delivery in health systems of developing countries. Despite huge primary healthcare (PHC) infrastructure, Pakistan's health indicators are not impressive; mainly because of under-utilization of facilities and low patient satisfaction. One of the major underlying issues is staff absenteeism. The study aimed to identify factors affecting retention and motivation of doctors working in PHC facilities of Pakistan. An exploratory study was conducted in a rural district in Khyber Puktunkhwa (KP) province, in Pakistan. A conceptual framework was developed comprising of three organizational, individual, and external environmental factors. Qualitative research methods comprising of semi-structured interviews with doctors working in basic health units (BHUs) and in-depth interviews with district and provincial government health managers were used. Document review of postings, rules of business and policy actions was also conducted. Triangulation of findings was carried out to arrive at the final synthesis. Inadequate remuneration, unreasonable facilities at residence, poor work environment, political interference, inadequate supplies and medical facilities contributed to lack of motivation among both male and female doctors. The physicians accepted government jobs in BHUs with a belief that these jobs were more secure, with convenient working hours. Male physicians seemed to be more motivated because they faced less challenges than their female counterparts in BHUs especially during relocations. Overall, the organizational factors emerged as the most significant whereby human resource policy, career growth structure, performance appraisal and monetary benefits played an important role. Gender and marital status of female doctors was regarded as most important individual factor affecting retention and motivation of female doctors in BHUs. Inadequate remuneration, unreasonable

  13. Diabetes awareness and diabetes risk reduction behaviors among attendance of primary healthcare centers.

    PubMed

    Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A; Al-Jaradeen, Najah

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess level of awareness about diabetes and the level of adoption of diabetes risk behaviors among adult attending primary healthcare centers. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using a self-administrated questionnaire. In addition to demographic information, the questionnaire contained questions on diabetes awareness related to diabetes definition, symptoms, risk factors, complications and management of diabetes as well as questions on diabetes risk reduction behaviors and sources of information on diabetes. The data was analyzed with independent t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and ANOVA test. A total of 541 participants aged ≥ 18 years were recruited. The mean score of diabetes awareness was 27.5/40 [SD=5.7]. The participants performed best in symptoms section with a mean score of 6.3/8 [SD=1.6], and worst in the risk factors section with a mean score of 3.6/6 (SD=1.4). With respect to diabetes risk reduction behaviors the results showed that the highest mean score was for fat reduction 2.0/4 [SD=0.8]; and the lowest mean score was for weight control or losing 1.7/4 [SD=0.8]. The current study demonstrated that substantial numbers of adult Jordanian lack the sufficient awareness about diabetes to prevent and cope with the increasing prevalence of diabetes in Jordan. Also, it demonstrated that adoption of diabetes risk reduction behaviors was suboptimal. Raising public awareness of diabetes and diabetes risk reduction behaviors through population-based programs and mass media should be planned and implemented. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: assessment and management of infertility at primary healthcare level.

    PubMed

    Loh, Seong Feei; Agarwal, Rachna; Chan, Jerry K; Chia, Sing Joo; Cho, Li Wei; Lim, Lean Huat; Lau, Matthew Sie Kuei; Loh, Sheila Kia Ee; Hendricks, Marianne Sybille; Nair, Suresh; Quah, Joanne Hui Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Wong, P C; Yeong, Cheng Toh; Yu, Su Ling

    2014-02-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for infertility. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the AMS-MOH clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical/2013/cpgmed_infertility.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  15. Development of a Mobile System Decision-support for Medical Diagnosis of Asthma in Primary Healthcare--InteliMED.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Júlio; Gusmão, Cristine

    2015-01-01

    The structure of public and primary healthcare in Brazil is organized in a way to provide decentralized services. In theory, this scenario could enable the usage of mobile devices integrated with information systems of several purposes. In addition, there is a need of decision-support tools that are based on collected evidences, once the professional of primary healthcare, which essentially has general knowledge (non-specialist). Therefore there is a need of information that support the decision-making process on more specific contexts. This paper presents the proposal, experience of development and application of the InteliMED, a decision-support system to asthma diagnosis of children and adolescents through decision-trees and mobile devices (smartphones and tablets).

  16. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Seong Feei; Agarwal, Rachna; Chan, Jerry; Chia, Sing Joo; Cho, Li Wei; Lim, Lean Huat; Lau, Matthew Sie Kuei; Loh, Sheila Kia Ee; Hendricks, Marianne Sybille; Nair, Suresh; Quah, Joanne Hui Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Wong, PC; Yeong, Cheng Toh; Yu, Su Ling

    2014-01-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for infertility. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the AMS-MOH clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_ medical/2013/cpgmed_infertility.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:24570313

  17. Age-Specific Incidence Rates for Norovirus in the Community and Presenting to Primary Healthcare Facilities in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Sarah J.; Donaldson, Anna L.; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Tam, Clarence C.

    2016-01-01

    In a prospective, population-based cohort study and a study of primary-healthcare consultations, we had a rare opportunity to estimate age-specific rates of norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease in the United Kingdom. Rates in children aged <5 years were significantly higher than those for other age groups in the community (142.6 cases per 1000 person-years [95% confidence interval {CI}, 99.8–203.9] vs 37.6 [95% CI, 31.5–44.7]) and those for individuals presenting to primary healthcare (14.4 cases per 1000 person-years [95% CI, 8.5–24.5] vs 1.4 [95% CI, .9–2.0]). Robust incidence estimates are crucial for vaccination policy makers. This study emphasises the impact of norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease, especially in children aged <5 years. PMID:26744427

  18. Primary healthcare reform in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East.

    PubMed

    Santoro, A; Abu-Rmeileh, N; Khader, A; Seita, A; McKee, M

    2016-09-25

    Palestinian refugees served by the United Nation Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) are experiencing increasing rates of diagnosis of non-communicable diseases. In response, in 2011 UNRWA initiated an Agency-wide programme of primary healthcare reform, informed by the Chronic Care Model framework. Health services were reorganized following a family-centred approach, with delivery by multidisciplinary family health teams supported by updated technical advice. An inclusive clinical information system, termed e-Health, was implemented to collect a wide range of health information, with a focus on continuity of treatment. UNRWA was able to bring about these wide-ranging changes within its existing resources, reallocating finances, reforming its payment mechanisms, and modernizing its drug-procurement policies. While specific components of UNRWA's primary healthcare reform are showing promising results, additional efforts are needed to empower patients further and to strengthen involvement of the community.

  19. Perceived efficacy of herbal remedies by users accessing primary healthcare in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Yuri N; Morton-Gittens, Jamie; Basdeo, Luke; Blades, Alexander; Francis, Marie-Joanna; Gomes, Natalie; Janjua, Meer; Singh, Adelle

    2007-01-01

    Background The increasing global popularity of herbal remedies requires further investigation to determine the probable factors driving this burgeoning phenomenon. We propose that the users' perception of efficacy is an important factor and assessed the perceived efficacy of herbal remedies by users accessing primary health facilities throughout Trinidad. Additionally, we determined how these users rated herbal remedies compared to conventional allopathic medicines as being less, equally or more efficacious. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken at 16 randomly selected primary healthcare facilities throughout Trinidad during June-August 2005. A de novo, pilot-tested questionnaire was interviewer-administered to confirmed herbal users (previous or current). Stepwise multiple regression analysis was done to determine the influence of predictor variables on perceived efficacy and comparative efficacy with conventional medicines. Results 265 herbal users entered the study and cited over 100 herbs for the promotion of health/wellness and the management of specific health concerns. Garlic was the most popular herb (in 48.3% of the sample) and was used for the common cold, cough, fever, as 'blood cleansers' and carminatives. It was also used in 20% of hypertension patients. 230 users (86.8%) indicated that herbs were efficacious and perceived that they had equal or greater efficacy than conventional allopathic medicines. Gender, ethnicity, income and years of formal education did not influence patients' perception of herb efficacy; however, age did (p = 0.036). Concomitant use of herbs and allopathic medicines was relatively high at 30%; and most users did not inform their attending physician. Conclusion Most users perceived that herbs were efficacious, and in some instances, more efficacious than conventional medicines. We suggest that this perception may be a major contributing factor influencing the sustained and increasing popularity of herbs

  20. School Sector Differences in Student Achievement in Australian Primary and Secondary Schools: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Gary N.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines school sector differences in student performance Years 3, 5, and 7 in numeracy, reading, writing, spelling and grammar using data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children and the national testing program (NAPLAN). At each of the 3 Year levels, there are sizable school sector differences with students from…

  1. Impact of the Mais Médicos (More Doctors) Program in reducing physician shortage in Brazilian Primary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Sábado Nicolau; Stralen, Ana Cristina de Sousa van; Cella, Joana Natalia; Wan Der Maas, Lucas; Carvalho, Cristiana Leite; Faria, Erick de Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    The Mais Médicos (More Doctors) Program (PMM) was put in place in Brazil aiming to reduce inequalities in access to Primary Healthcare. Based on diverse evidence that pointed to a scenario of profound shortage of doctors in the country, one of its central thrusts was emergency provision of these professionals in vulnerable areas, referred to as the Mais Médicos para o Brasil (More Doctors for Brazil) Project. The article analyses the impact of the PMM in reducing shortage of physicians in Brazilian municipalities. To do this, it uses the Primary Healthcare Physicians Shortage Index, which identifies and measures the shortage in the periods of March 2003 and September 2015, before and after implementation of the program. The results show that there was a substantial increase in the supply of physicians in primary healthcare in the period, which helped reduce the number of municipalities with shortage from 1,200 to 777. This impact also helped reduce inequalities between municipalities, but the inequities in distribution persisted. It was also found that there was a reduction in the regular supply of doctors made by municipalities, suggesting that these were being simply substituted by the supply coming from the program. Thus, an overall situation of insecurity in care persists, reflecting the dependence of municipalities on the physician supply from the federal government.

  2. Compilation and application of a primary PM 2.5 emissions inventory with high sectoral resolution in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Toshiharu; Nansai, Keisuke; Tohno, Susumu; Yamamoto, Kouhei

    To elucidate the macro-structure of the PM 2.5 emissions generated by Japan's economic activities, this paper presents an emission inventory of primary particles of PM 2.5 with high sectoral resolution based on the Japanese Input-Output Tables, comprising some 400 sectors. These primary PM 2.5 emissions were estimated by multiplying the estimated energy consumption associated with each fuel type by a PM 10 emission factor incorporating the technological level of dust collection in each sector and the mass ratio of PM 2.5 to PM 10. Non-energy emissions from agricultural open burning were also determined. Total PM 2.5 emissions in 2000 were 252 kt, 49% of which were due to mobile emission sources. Changes in total PM 2.5 emissions between 1990 and 2000 were also calculated. This showed that a substantial increase in energy sector emissions due to rising coal consumption was offset by a sharp decline in emissions from road vehicles and shipping vessels, resulting in an overall decrease in total emissions. In addition, the emissions induced by economic demand in each sector were quantified by means of input-output analysis, which revealed that demand for construction, foods and communications and services constituted the principal causes of real domestic emissions. An assessment of sectoral contributions to PM 2.5 emissions that takes into account the effects of human exposure, expressed as external costs, suggests that the contribution of transportation is greater than indicated on the grounds of direct emissions alone.

  3. RFID-enabled traceability system for consignment and high value products: a case study in the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Bendavid, Ygal; Boeck, Harold; Philippe, Richard

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a case study of a hospital operating room that evaluated a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID)-enabled traceability system for the management of consignment and high value products requiring item level traceability. Results indicate that the traceability system in conjunction with the redesign of replenishment processes facilitates item level traceability, improves financial controls and case costing, upgrades service levels and reduces inventory shrinkage. Other benefits include time saved from non-value-added activities that can be transferred to patient care activities. The solution can be considered (i) as an alternative to RFID-enabled cabinets used in the replenishment of consignment and high value supplies in certain operating rooms, cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional radiology departments, or (ii) as a complementary solution facilitating the tracking of medical devices removed from RFID-enabled cabinets. In short, the end-to-end traceability of medical products in the healthcare supply chain can be significantly enhanced.

  4. Are pricing and reimbursement decision-making criteria aligned with public preferences regarding allocation principles in the Polish healthcare sector?

    PubMed

    Kolasa, Katarzyna

    2014-10-01

    Given growing interest in multicriteria decision making and multiple cost-effectiveness thresholds' approach, it was decided to investigate its usefulness in Poland. The pricing and reimbursement (P&R) regulations were reviewed and a cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst nurses. The study investigated whether P&R rules are aligned with the preferences of healthcare professional towards the concept of equity. The references to aversion to inequalities in health and capacity to benefit were recognized as the most and least important principle respectively by the group of nurses. Different weightings of health gain dependent on disease severity were accepted by half of the study's population. In the review of legal acts, references to capacity to benefit were frequently found. The opposite was registered for other concepts of equity. There is room for further improvement with respect to the alignment between the Polish P&R decision making criteria and public preferences regarding allocation principles.

  5. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative fit-testing results for three commonly used respirators in the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Danyluk, Quinn; Bryce, Elizabeth; Janssen, Bob; Neudorf, Mike; Yassi, Annalee; Shen, Hui; Astrakianakis, George

    2017-03-01

    N95 filtering facepiece respirators are used by healthcare workers when there is a risk of exposure to airborne hazards during aerosol-generating procedures. Respirator fit-testing is required prior to use to ensure that the selected respirator provides an adequate face seal. Two common fit-test methods can be employed: qualitative fit-test (QLFT) or quantitative fit-test (QNFT). Respiratory protection standards deem both fit-tests to be acceptable. However, previous studies have indicated that fit-test results may differ between QLFT and QNFT and that the outcomes may also be influenced by the type of respirator model. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a difference in fit-test outcomes with our suite of respirators, 3M - 1860S, 1860, AND 1870, and whether the model impacts the fit-test results. Subjects were recruited from residential care facilities. Each participant was assigned a respirator and underwent sequential QLFT and QNFT fit-tests and the results (either pass or fail) were recorded. To ascertain the degree of agreement between the two fit-tests, a Kappa (Κ) statistic was conducted as per the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) respiratory protection standard. The pass-fail rates were stratified by respirator model and a Kappa statistic was calculated for each to determine effect of model on fit-test outcomes. We had 619 participants and the aggregate Κ statistic for all respirators was 0.63 which is below the suggested ANSI threshold of 0.70. There was no statistically significant difference in results when stratified by respirator model. QNFT and QLFT produced different fit-test outcomes for the three respirator models examined. The disagreement in outcomes between the two fit-test methods with our suite of N95 filtering facepiece respirators was approximately 12%. Our findings may benefit other healthcare organizations that use these three respirators.

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors about Breast Self-Examination and Mammography among Female Primary Healthcare Workers in Diyarbakır, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Özgür; Toktaş, İzzettin

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study aims to determine the knowledge level of the female primary healthcare workers about breast cancer and to reveal their attitude and behaviors about breast self-examination and mammography. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted on female primary healthcare workers who work in family health centres. 91% (n = 369) of female primary healthcare workers agreed to participate in the study. The questionnaire consisted of three parts: sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge about breast self-examination, and actual practice of breast self-examination. Results. The mean (SD) age of the female primary healthcare workers was 33.1 ± 6.8 (range, 20–54 years). The healthcare workers who practiced breast self-examination had significantly higher knowledge level (P = 0.001) than those who had not. The respondents had high knowledge level of breast self-examination; however, the knowledge level of breast cancer and mammography screen was low. Conclusions. While the female primary healthcare workers in this study had adequate knowledge of breast self-examination, this is not reflected in their attitudes and practices. Emphasis should be laid on breast self-examination in undergraduate and postgraduate courses for primary healthcare workers, since they are mostly involved in patient education. PMID:27123449

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors about Breast Self-Examination and Mammography among Female Primary Healthcare Workers in Diyarbakır, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Özgür; Toktaş, İzzettin

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study aims to determine the knowledge level of the female primary healthcare workers about breast cancer and to reveal their attitude and behaviors about breast self-examination and mammography. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted on female primary healthcare workers who work in family health centres. 91% (n = 369) of female primary healthcare workers agreed to participate in the study. The questionnaire consisted of three parts: sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge about breast self-examination, and actual practice of breast self-examination. Results. The mean (SD) age of the female primary healthcare workers was 33.1 ± 6.8 (range, 20-54 years). The healthcare workers who practiced breast self-examination had significantly higher knowledge level (P = 0.001) than those who had not. The respondents had high knowledge level of breast self-examination; however, the knowledge level of breast cancer and mammography screen was low. Conclusions. While the female primary healthcare workers in this study had adequate knowledge of breast self-examination, this is not reflected in their attitudes and practices. Emphasis should be laid on breast self-examination in undergraduate and postgraduate courses for primary healthcare workers, since they are mostly involved in patient education.

  8. The Impact of Trauma Exposure and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on Healthcare Utilization Among Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kartha, Anand; Brower, Victoria; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Keane, Terence M.; Liebschutz, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increase healthcare utilization in veterans, but their impact on utilization in other populations is uncertain. Objectives To examine the association of trauma exposure and PTSD with healthcare utilization, in civilian primary care patients. Research Design Cross-sectional study. Subjects English speaking patients at an academic, urban primary care clinic. Measures Trauma exposure and current PTSD diagnoses were obtained from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Outcomes were nonmental health outpatient and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and mental health outpatient visits in the prior year from an electronic medical record. Analyses included bivariate unadjusted and multivariable Poisson regressions adjusted for age, gender, income, substance dependence, depression, and comorbidities. Results Among 592 subjects, 80% had ≥1 trauma exposure and 22% had current PTSD. In adjusted regressions, subjects with trauma exposure had more mental health visits [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–14.1] but no other increased utilization. After adjusting for PTSD, this effect of trauma exposure was attenuated (IRR, 3.2; 95% CI, 0.9–11.7). Subjects with PTSD had more hospitalizations (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4–3.7), more hospital nights (IRR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4–5.0), and more mental health visits (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1–4.1) but no increase in outpatient and emergency department visits. Conclusions PTSD is associated with more hospitalizations, longer hospitalizations, and greater mental healthcare utilization in urban primary care patients. Although trauma exposure is independently associated with greater mental healthcare utilization, PTSD mediates a portion of this association. PMID:18362818

  9. Socio-economic and geographic differentials in costs and payment strategies for primary healthcare services in Southeast Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Uzochukwu, Benjamin

    2005-03-01

    The study explored socio-economic and geographic inequalities that exist in healthcare seeking, expenditures and methods of paying for healthcare. The study was conducted in two communities (one rural and urban) in Southeast Nigeria. A pre-tested questionnaire was administered to household heads or their representatives by trained interviewers. A socio-economic status (SES) index, together with urban-rural comparisons was used to examine the inequalities. The expenditures on healthcare and the proportions of respondents that used the different payment strategies were compared across SES quartiles and between the urban and rural areas. There were varying degrees of socio-economic and geographic inequalities in treatment expenditures, providers seen and payment modalities that were used. User fee without reimbursement was the commonest type of payment strategy, followed distantly by instalment payment. The two poorest quartiles were less likely to have used user fee and they mostly used instalment payment in the rural area. Logistic regression analysis showed that location was significantly and positively related to user fee but not to instalment payment. In conclusion, the poorest SES group and rural dwellers are the major sufferers of inequality and this could be mitigated through improved provision of primary healthcare services in rural areas and initiation of exemptions, vouchers and other pro-poor payment strategies for the poorest SES groups.

  10. Strengths of primary healthcare regarding care provided for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Paula, Elaine Amaral de; Costa, Mônica Barros; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; Bastos, Rita Maria Rodrigues; Vanelli, Chislene Pereira; Leite, Christiane Chaves Augusto; Caminhas, Márcio Santos; Paula, Rogério Baumgratz de

    2016-09-09

    to assess the structure and results obtained by the "Chronic Renal Patients Care Program" in a Brazilian city. epidemiological, cross-sectional study conducted in 14 PHC units and a secondary center from 2010 to 2013. The Donabedian Model was the methodological framework used. A total of 14 physicians, 13 supervisors, and 11 community health agents from primary healthcare were interviewed for the assessment of structure and process and 1,534 medical files from primary healthcare and 282 from secondary care were consulted to assess outcomes. most units lacked sufficient offices for physicians and nurses to provide consultations, had incomplete staffing, and most professionals had not received proper qualification to provide care for chronic renal disease. Physicians from PHC units classified as capable more frequently referred patients to the secondary care service in the early stages of chronic renal disease (stage 3B) when compared to physicians of units considered not capable (58% vs. 36%) (p=0.049). Capable PHC units also more frequently presented stabilized glomerular filtration rates (51%) when compared to partially capable units (36%) and not capable units (44%) (p=0.046). patients cared for by primary healthcare units that scored higher in structure and process criteria presented better clinical outcomes. to identify the coping strategies of family members of patients with mental disorders and relate them to family member sociodemographic variables and to the patient's clinical variables. this was a descriptive study conducted at a psychiatric hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo, with 40 family members of hospitalized patients over the age of 18, and who followed the patient before and during hospitalization. We used tools to characterize the subjects and the Folkman and Lazarus Inventory of Coping Strategies. the coping strategies most often used by family members were social support and problem solving. Mothers and fathers used more

  11. Motivation and Retention of Physicians in Primary Healthcare Facilities: A Qualitative Study From Abbottabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sayed Masoom; Zaidi, Shehla; Ahmed, Jamil; Rehman, Shafiq Ur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Workforce motivation and retention is important for the functionality and quality of service delivery in health systems of developing countries. Despite huge primary healthcare (PHC) infrastructure, Pakistan’s health indicators are not impressive; mainly because of under-utilization of facilities and low patient satisfaction. One of the major underlying issues is staff absenteeism. The study aimed to identify factors affecting retention and motivation of doctors working in PHC facilities of Pakistan. Methods: An exploratory study was conducted in a rural district in Khyber Puktunkhwa (KP) province, in Pakistan. A conceptual framework was developed comprising of three organizational, individual, and external environmental factors. Qualitative research methods comprising of semi-structured interviews with doctors working in basic health units (BHUs) and in-depth interviews with district and provincial government health managers were used. Document review of postings, rules of business and policy actions was also conducted. Triangulation of findings was carried out to arrive at the final synthesis. Results: Inadequate remuneration, unreasonable facilities at residence, poor work environment, political interference, inadequate supplies and medical facilities contributed to lack of motivation among both male and female doctors. The physicians accepted government jobs in BHUs with a belief that these jobs were more secure, with convenient working hours. Male physicians seemed to be more motivated because they faced less challenges than their female counterparts in BHUs especially during relocations. Overall, the organizational factors emerged as the most significant whereby human resource policy, career growth structure, performance appraisal and monetary benefits played an important role. Gender and marital status of female doctors was regarded as most important individual factor affecting retention and motivation of female doctors in BHUs. Conclusion

  12. A retrospective audit of antibiotic prescriptions in primary health-care facilities in Eastern Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ahiabu, Mary-Anne; Tersbøl, Britt P; Biritwum, Richard; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Magnussen, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is increasing globally and is a threat to public health. Research has demonstrated a correlation between antibiotic use and resistance development. Developing countries are the most affected by resistance because of high infectious disease burden, limited access to quality assured antibiotics and more optimal drugs and poor antibiotic use practices. The appropriate use of antibiotics to slow the pace of resistance development is crucial. The study retrospectively assessed antibiotic prescription practices in four public and private primary health-care facilities in Eastern Region, Ghana using the WHO/International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs rational drug use indicators. Using a systematic sampling procedure, 400 prescriptions were selected per facility for the period April 2010 to March 2011. Rational drug use indicators were assessed in the descriptive analysis and logistic regression was used to explore for predictors of antibiotic prescription. Average number of medicines prescribed per encounter was 4.01, and 59.9% of prescriptions had antibiotics whilst 24.2% had injections. In total, 79.2% and 88.1% of prescribed medicines were generics and from the national essential medicine list, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, health facility type (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42, 2.95), patient age (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.97, 0.98), number of medicines on a prescription (OR = 1.85; 95% CI: 1.63, 2.10) and ‘no malaria drug’ on prescription (OR = 5.05; 95% CI: 2.08, 12.25) were associated with an antibiotic prescription. A diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infection was positively associated with antibiotic use. The level of antibiotic use varied depending on the health facility type and was generally high compared with the national average estimated in 2008. Interventions that reduce diagnostic uncertainty in illness management should be considered. The National Health

  13. Post-conflict transition and sustainability in Kosovo: establishing primary healthcare-based antenatal care.

    PubMed

    Homan, Fay F; Hammond, Cristina S; Thompson, Ellen F; Kollisch, Donald O; Strickler, James C

    2010-01-01

    Kosovo is a post-conflict nation with an extensively damaged infrastructure, a weak primary care base, and poor maternal-child health outcomes. The Kosovo-Dartmouth Alliance for Healthy Newborns (the Alliance) sought to improve maternal and neonatal health in Kosovo by providing family medicine-based antenatal care (ANC). The ANC Program used a modification of the World Health Organization's four-visit, prenatal care model. The program is based in family medicine and requires minimal medical equipment, such as a blood pressure cuff, fetal doppler, measuring tape, urine dipstick, and charting materials. Patient education and counseling are stressed. Women are taught about danger signs in pregnancy and establishing an emergency plan, so that they can respond promptly if complications occur. Antenatal care doctors and nurses are trained to refer women to obstetricians for deviations from normal pregnancy. The providers are taught using a "Training of Trainers" approach, building on an existing system of family medicine trainers. In order to address challenges in implementation and sustainability, microsystems methodology is used to focus on implementing change and assuring quality improvement through shared decision-making and the study of outcomes. Based on chart reviews and direct observation, ANC providers showed mastery of the components of ANC, including physical examination, recognition and referral of high-risk pregnancies, and patient education. After an initial pilot project, Kosovo's Ministry of Health recommended this program for dissemination throughout the country. During the next year, ANC was implemented at 27 Family Medicine Centers in nine municipalities; 1,671 women were seen for a total of 3,399 visits. Currently, the Alliance's model of ANC is offered in 30% of Kosovo's municipalities. International aid projects often lack attention to long-term sustainability. Microsystems training gives participants the tools and framework to implement and

  14. A retrospective audit of antibiotic prescriptions in primary health-care facilities in Eastern Region, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ahiabu, Mary-Anne; Tersbøl, Britt P; Biritwum, Richard; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Magnussen, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is increasing globally and is a threat to public health. Research has demonstrated a correlation between antibiotic use and resistance development. Developing countries are the most affected by resistance because of high infectious disease burden, limited access to quality assured antibiotics and more optimal drugs and poor antibiotic use practices. The appropriate use of antibiotics to slow the pace of resistance development is crucial. The study retrospectively assessed antibiotic prescription practices in four public and private primary health-care facilities in Eastern Region, Ghana using the WHO/International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs rational drug use indicators. Using a systematic sampling procedure, 400 prescriptions were selected per facility for the period April 2010 to March 2011. Rational drug use indicators were assessed in the descriptive analysis and logistic regression was used to explore for predictors of antibiotic prescription. Average number of medicines prescribed per encounter was 4.01, and 59.9% of prescriptions had antibiotics whilst 24.2% had injections. In total, 79.2% and 88.1% of prescribed medicines were generics and from the national essential medicine list, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, health facility type (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42, 2.95), patient age (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.97, 0.98), number of medicines on a prescription (OR = 1.85; 95% CI: 1.63, 2.10) and 'no malaria drug' on prescription (OR = 5.05; 95% CI: 2.08, 12.25) were associated with an antibiotic prescription. A diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infection was positively associated with antibiotic use. The level of antibiotic use varied depending on the health facility type and was generally high compared with the national average estimated in 2008. Interventions that reduce diagnostic uncertainty in illness management should be considered. The National Health Insurance

  15. Community Health Volunteers in Primary Healthcare in Rural Uganda: Factors Influencing Performance.

    PubMed

    Kuule, Yusufu; Dobson, Andrew Eric; Woldeyohannes, Desalegn; Zolfo, Maria; Najjemba, Robinah; Edwin, Birungi Mutahunga R; Haven, Nahabwe; Verdonck, Kristien; Owiti, Philip; Wilkinson, Ewan

    2017-01-01

    Community health volunteers (CHVs) play an integral role in primary healthcare. Several countries rely on CHV programs as a major element in improving access to care and attaining universal health coverage. However, their performance has been heterogeneous and at times context-specific, and influenced by multiple factors. We describe the socio-demographic and workplace characteristics affecting CHVs' performance in a public health program in rural western Uganda. This was a cross-sectional study based on routine program data of CHVs serving the catchment of Bwindi Community Hospital, Kanungu District, South Western Uganda, in 2014 and 2015. Information was collected on individual socio-demographic and workplace characteristics of the CHVs. To assess their work output, we defined study-specific targets in terms of attendance at monthly CHVs' meetings with community health nurses, households followed-up and reported, children screened for malnutrition, immunization coverage, and health facility deliveries. Frequencies and proportions are reported for characteristics and outputs and odds ratios for study-specific factors associated with overall performance. Of the 508 CHVs, 65% were women, 48% were aged 35 years and below, and 37% took care of more than the recommended 20-30 households. Seventy-eight percent of the CHVs had ≥80% of pregnant women under their care delivering in health units, 71% had ≥95% of the children on schedule for routine immunization, while 27% screened ≥75% of the children under 5 years for malnutrition. More refresher trainings was associated with better overall performance [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 12.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-93.6, P = 0.02] while overseeing more than the recommended 20-30 households reduced overall performance (aOR: 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.9, P = 0.02). Being in-charge of more than the recommended households was associated with reduced performance of CHVs, while more refresher trainings were

  16. Solid waste management in primary healthcare centers: application of a facilitation tool.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana Maria Maniero; Günther, Wanda Maria Risso

    2016-08-18

    to propose a tool to facilitate diagnosis, formulation and evaluation of the Waste Management Plan in Primary Healthcare Centers and to present the results of the application in four selected units. descriptive research, covering the stages of formulation /application of the proposed instrument and the evaluation of waste management performance at the units. the tool consists in five forms; specific indicators of waste generation for outpatients healthcare units were proposed, and performance indicators that give scores for compliance with current legislation. In the studied units it is generated common waste (52-60%), infectious-sharps (31-42%) and recyclable (5-17%). The average rates of generation are: 0,09kg of total waste/outpatient assistance and 0,09kg of infectious-sharps waste/outpatient procedure. The compliance with regulations, initially 26-30%, then reached 30-38% a year later. the tool showed to be easy to use, bypassing the existence of a complex range of existing regulatory requirements, allowed to identify non-conformities, pointed out corrective measures and evaluated the performance of waste management. In this sense, it contributes to decision making and management practices relating to waste, tasks usually assigned to nurses. It is recommended that the tool be applied in similar healthcare units for comparative studies, and implementation of necessary adaptations for other medical services. propor instrumento para facilitar diagnóstico, elaboração e avaliação de Plano de Gerenciamento de Resíduos em Unidades Básicas de Saúde e apresentar os resultados da aplicação em quatro unidades selecionadas. pesquisa descritiva que contemplou as etapas de construção/aplicação do instrumento proposto e a avaliação de desempenho do gerenciamento de resíduos nas unidades estudadas. geração de instrumento composto por cinco formulários; proposta de indicadores específicos de geração de resíduos para unidades assistenciais de saúde sem

  17. Recent trends in working with the private sector to improve basic healthcare: a review of evidence and interventions.

    PubMed

    Montagu, Dominic; Goodman, Catherine; Berman, Peter; Penn, Amy; Visconti, Adam

    2016-10-01

    The private sector provides the majority of health care in Africa and Asia. A number of interventions have, for many years, applied different models of subsidy, support and engagement to address social and efficiency failures in private health care markets. We have conducted a review of these models, and the evidence in support of them, to better understand what interventions are currently common, and to what extent practice is based on evidence. Using established typologies, we examined five models of intervention with private markets for care: commodity social marketing, social franchising, contracting, accreditation and vouchers. We conducted a systematic review of both published and grey literature, identifying programmes large enough to be cited in publications, and studies of the listed intervention types. 343 studies were included in the review, including both published and grey literature. Three hundred and eighty programmes were identified, the earliest having begun operation in 1955. Commodity social marketing programmes were the most common intervention type, with 110 documented programmes operating for condoms alone at the highest period. Existing evidence shows that these models can improve access and utilization, and possibly quality, but for all programme types, the overall evidence base remains weak, with practice in private sector engagement consistently moving in advance of evidence. Future research should address key questions concerning the impact of interventions on the market as a whole, the distribution of benefits by socio-economic status, the potential for scale up and sustainability, cost-effectiveness compared to relevant alternatives and the risk of unintended consequences. Alongside better data, a stronger conceptual basis linking programme design and outcomes to context is also required. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. [Primary healthcare and the construction of meanings for oral health: a social constructionist interpretation of discourses by the elderly].

    PubMed

    Bulgarelli, Alexandre Favero; Lorenzi, Carla Guanáes; Silva, Rosalina Carvalho da; Mestriner, Soraya Fernandes; Villa, Teresa Cristina Scatena; Pinto, Ione Carvalho

    2012-08-01

    Dentistry is nowadays open to new ideas about the constructions of meanings for oral health. This openness tallies with the social production of health and shows the need to contextualize the social, historical and sundry knowledge in the development of oral health for different communities. The scope of this research is to build meanings for oral health with a group of elderly people. With this in mind, we propose an approximation between the discourses of the elderly on oral health and the Social Constructionist discourse. Thus, we interviewed 14 elderly people registered with a Family Health Unit in Ribeirão Preto in the State of São Paulo in the first semester of 2010. This enabled us to identify two Interpretative Repertoires with the use of Discourse Analysis, which showed the relationship between: 1 - Lack of dental information and assistance in childhood; and 2 - Primary Healthcare constructing meaning for oral health. We concluded that Social Constructionism assists epistemologically for the construction of meaning for oral health and that Primary Healthcare is essential for valuing healthcare for the construction of meaning for oral health on the part of the elderly by fostering conditions for self care and healthy attitudes.

  19. Knowledge of and attitudes to influenza vaccination in healthy primary healthcare workers in Spain, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Angela; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; García-Gutiérrez, Susana; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Torner, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for healthcare workers, but many do not follow the recommendation. The objective of this study was to investigate the factors associated with seasonal influenza vaccination in the 2011-2012 season. We carried out an anonymous web survey of Spanish primary healthcare workers in 2012. Information on vaccination, and knowledge and attitudes about the influenza vaccine was collected. Workers with medical conditions that contraindicated vaccination and those with high risk conditions were excluded. Multivariate analysis was performed using unconditional logistic regression. We included 1,749 workers. The overall vaccination coverage was 50.7% and was higher in workers aged ≥ 55 years (55.7%), males (57.4%) and paediatricians (63.1%). Factors associated with vaccination were concern about infection at work (aOR 4.93; 95% CI 3.72-6.53), considering that vaccination of heathcare workers is important (aOR 2.62; 95%CI 1.83-3.75) and that vaccination is effective in preventing influenza and its complications (aOR 2.40; 95% CI 1.56-3.67). No association was found between vaccination and knowledge of influenza or the vaccine characteristics. Educational programs should aim to remove the misconceptions and attitudes that limit compliance with recommendations about influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers rather than only increasing knowledge about influenza and the characteristics of the vaccine.

  20. How to create more supportive supervision for primary healthcare: lessons from Ngamiland district of Botswana: co-operative inquiry group.

    PubMed

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Wojczewski, Silvia; Kutalek, Ruth; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2016-01-01

    Supportive supervision is a way to foster performance, productivity, motivation, and retention of health workforce. Nevertheless there is a dearth of evidence of the impact and acceptability of supportive supervision in low- and middle-income countries. This article describes a participatory process of transforming the supervisory practice of district health managers to create a supportive environment for primary healthcare workers. The objective of the study was to explore how district health managers can change their practice to create a more supportive environment for primary healthcare providers. A facilitated co-operative inquiry group (CIG) was formed with Ngamiland health district managers. CIG belongs to the participatory action research paradigm and is characterised by a cyclic process of observation, reflection, planning, and action. The CIG went through three cycles between March 2013 and March 2014. Twelve district health managers participated in the inquiry group. The major insights and learning that emerged from the inquiry process included inadequate supervisory practice, perceptions of healthcare workers' experiences, change in the managers' supervision paradigm, recognition of the supervisors' inadequate supervisory skills, and barriers to supportive supervision. Finally, the group developed a 10-point consensus on what they had learnt regarding supportive supervision. Ngamiland health district managers have come to appreciate the value of supportive supervision and changed their management style to be more supportive of their subordinates. They also developed a consensus on supportive supervision that could be adapted for use nationally. Supportive supervision should be prioritised at all levels of the health system, and it should be adequately resourced.

  1. Knowledge of and Attitudes to Influenza Vaccination in Healthy Primary Healthcare Workers in Spain, 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Angela; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; García-Gutiérrez, Susana; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Torner, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for healthcare workers, but many do not follow the recommendation. The objective of this study was to investigate the factors associated with seasonal influenza vaccination in the 2011–2012 season. We carried out an anonymous web survey of Spanish primary healthcare workers in 2012. Information on vaccination, and knowledge and attitudes about the influenza vaccine was collected. Workers with medical conditions that contraindicated vaccination and those with high risk conditions were excluded. Multivariate analysis was performed using unconditional logistic regression. We included 1,749 workers. The overall vaccination coverage was 50.7% and was higher in workers aged ≥ 55 years (55.7%), males (57.4%) and paediatricians (63.1%). Factors associated with vaccination were concern about infection at work (aOR 4.93; 95% CI 3.72–6.53), considering that vaccination of heathcare workers is important (aOR 2.62; 95%CI 1.83–3.75) and that vaccination is effective in preventing influenza and its complications (aOR 2.40; 95% CI 1.56–3.67). No association was found between vaccination and knowledge of influenza or the vaccine characteristics. Educational programs should aim to remove the misconceptions and attitudes that limit compliance with recommendations about influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers rather than only increasing knowledge about influenza and the characteristics of the vaccine. PMID:24260560

  2. Using Participatory Learning & Action research to access and engage with 'hard to reach' migrants in primary healthcare research.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; de Brún, Tomas; Okonkwo, Ekaterina; Bonsenge-Bokanga, Jean-Samuel; De Almeida Silva, Maria Manuela; Ogbebor, Florence; Mierzejewska, Aga; Nnadi, Lovina; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; van Weel, Chris; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; MacFarlane, Anne

    2016-01-20

    Communication problems occur in general practice consultations when migrants and general practitioners do not share a common language and culture. Migrants' perspectives have rarely been included in the development of guidelines designed to ameliorate this. Considered 'hard-to-reach' on the basis of inaccessibility, language discordance and cultural difference, migrants have been consistently excluded from participation in primary healthcare research. The purpose of this qualitative study was to address this gap. The study was conducted in the Republic of Ireland, 2009 - 2011. We developed a multi-lingual community-university research team that included seven established migrants from local communities. They completed training in Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) - a qualitative research methodology. Then, as trained service-user peer researchers (SUPERs) they used their access routes, language skills, cultural knowledge and innovative PLA techniques to recruit and engage in research with fifty-one hard-to-reach migrant service-users (MSUs). In terms of access, university researchers successfully accessed SUPERs, who, in turn, successfully accessed, recruited and retained MSUs in the study. In terms of meaningful engagement, SUPERs facilitated a complex PLA research process in a language-concordant manner, enabling inclusion and active participation by MSUs. This ensured that MSUs' perspectives were included in the development of a guideline for improving communication between healthcare providers and MSUs in Ireland. SUPERs evaluated their experiences of capacity-building, training, research fieldwork and dissemination as positively meaningful for them. MSUs evaluated their experiences of engagement in PLA fieldwork and research as positively meaningful for them. Given the need to build primary healthcare 'from the ground up', the perspectives of diverse groups, especially the hard-to-reach, must become a normative part of primary healthcare research. PLA is a

  3. Analysis of government investment in primary healthcare institutions to promote equity during the three-year health reform program in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Health Report 2000 stated that increased public financing for healthcare was an integral part of the efforts to achieve equity of access. In 2009, the Chinese government launched a three-year health reform program to achieve equity of access. Through this reform program, the government intended to increase its investment in primary healthcare institutions (PHIs). However, reports about the outcome and the improvement of the equity of access have yet to be presented. Methods Stratified sampling was employed in this research. The samples used for the study comprised 34 community health service centers (CHSCs) and 92 township hospitals (THs) from six provinces of China. Collected data, which were publicly available, consisted of the total revenue, financial revenue, and the number of people for the periods covering January 2010 to September 2010 and January 2011 to September 2011. Revenue information for 2009 and 2010 was obtained from China’s Health Statistics Yearbook. By using indicators such as government investment, government finance proportion and per capita revenue, t-tests for paired and independent samples were used to analyze the changes in government investment. Results Government invest large amount of money to the primary healthcare institutions. Government finance proportion in 2008 was 18.2%. This percentage increased to 38.84% in 2011, indicating statistical significance (p = 0.000) between 2010 and 2011. The per capita financial input was 20.92 yuan in 2010 and 31.10 yuan in 2011. Compared with the figures from 2008 to 2010, the gap in different health sectors narrowed in 2011, and differences emerged. The government finance proportion in CHSCs revenue was 6.9% higher than that of THs, while the per capita revenue of CHSCs was higher. In 2011, the highest and lowest government finance proportions were 48.80% (Shaanxi) and 19.36% (Shandong), respectively. In that same year, the per capita revenue of Shaanxi (40.69 Yuan) was

  4. Analysis of government investment in primary healthcare institutions to promote equity during the three-year health reform program in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Xiong, Yuqi; Ye, Jing; Deng, Zhaohua; Zhang, Xinping

    2013-03-25

    The World Health Report 2000 stated that increased public financing for healthcare was an integral part of the efforts to achieve equity of access. In 2009, the Chinese government launched a three-year health reform program to achieve equity of access. Through this reform program, the government intended to increase its investment in primary healthcare institutions (PHIs). However, reports about the outcome and the improvement of the equity of access have yet to be presented. Stratified sampling was employed in this research. The samples used for the study comprised 34 community health service centers (CHSCs) and 92 township hospitals (THs) from six provinces of China. Collected data, which were publicly available, consisted of the total revenue, financial revenue, and the number of people for the periods covering January 2010 to September 2010 and January 2011 to September 2011. Revenue information for 2009 and 2010 was obtained from China's Health Statistics Yearbook.By using indicators such as government investment, government finance proportion and per capita revenue, t-tests for paired and independent samples were used to analyze the changes in government investment. Government invest large amount of money to the primary healthcare institutions. Government finance proportion in 2008 was 18.2%. This percentage increased to 38.84% in 2011, indicating statistical significance (p = 0.000) between 2010 and 2011. The per capita financial input was 20.92 yuan in 2010 and 31.10 yuan in 2011. Compared with the figures from 2008 to 2010, the gap in different health sectors narrowed in 2011, and differences emerged. The government finance proportion in CHSCs revenue was 6.9% higher than that of THs, while the per capita revenue of CHSCs was higher. In 2011, the highest and lowest government finance proportions were 48.80% (Shaanxi) and 19.36% (Shandong), respectively. In that same year, the per capita revenue of Shaanxi (40.69 Yuan) was higher than that of Liaoning (28

  5. Development of a Suicidal Ideation Detection Tool for Primary Healthcare Settings: Using Open Access Online Psychosocial Data.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Denny; Abbott, Jo-Anne; Rehm, Imogen; Bhar, Sunil; Barak, Azy; Deng, Gary; Wallace, Klaire; Ogden, Edward; Klein, Britt

    2017-04-01

    Suicidal patients often visit healthcare professionals in their last month before suicide, but medical practitioners are unlikely to raise the issue of suicide with patients because of time constraints and uncertainty regarding an appropriate approach. A brief tool called the e-PASS Suicidal Ideation Detector (eSID) was developed for medical practitioners to help detect the presence of suicidal ideation (SI) in their clients. If SI is detected, the system alerts medical practitioners to address this issue with a client. The eSID tool was developed due to the absence of an easy-to-use, evidence-based SI detection tool for general practice. The tool was developed using binary logistic regression analyses of data provided by clients accessing an online psychological assessment function. Ten primary healthcare professionals provided advice regarding the use of the tool. The analysis identified eleven factors in addition to the Kessler-6 for inclusion in the model used to predict the probability of recent SI. The model performed well across gender and age groups 18-64 (AUR 0.834, 95% CI 0.828-0.841, N = 16,703). Healthcare professionals were interviewed; they recommended that the tool be incorporated into existing medical software systems and that additional resources be supplied, tailored to the level of risk identified. The eSID is expected to trigger risk assessments by healthcare professionals when this is necessary. Initial reactions of healthcare professionals to the tool were favorable, but further testing and in situ development are required.

  6. Factors influencing motivation and retention of primary healthcare workers in the rural areas of Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Jegede, Ayodele S; Adejumo, Prisca; Ushie, Boniface Ayanbekongshie

    2013-01-01

    Limited data exist on retention of primary healthcare (PHC) staff in rural areas, crippling the already fragile healthcare systems in Nigeria. This study investigated why PHC staff would or would not want to work in rural areas and how they could be retained. Four hundred and twelve (412) health workers and caregivers, and 21 key informants were interviewed in Ona-Ara LGA. Logistic regression statistics was used to analyse quantitative data and narrative for qualitative data. There was no significant factor influencing health workers' unwillingness to work in rural areas and, relationship between their demographic characteristics and perceived reasons to do so. Combined factors influencing PHC workers' willingness to work in rural areas influenced use of PHC. Financial and non-financial incentives are responsible for workers' motivation to work in rural areas. The mal-distribution of health facilities and health workers between urban and rural areas must be addressed. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  7. Political economy of decentralising HIV and AIDS treatment services to primary healthcare facilities in three Nigerian states.

    PubMed

    Mbachu, Chinyere; Onwujekwe, Obinna; Ezumah, Nkoli; Ajayi, Olayinka; Sanwo, Olusola; Uzochukwu, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Decentralisation is defined as the dispersion, distribution or transfer of resources, functions and decision-making power from a central authority to regional and local authorities. It is usually accompanied by assignment of accountability and responsibility for results. Fundamental to understanding decentralisation is learning what motivates central governments to give up power and resources to local governments, and the practical significance of this on their positions regarding decentralisation. This study examined key political and institutional influences on role-players' capacity to support decentralisation of HIV and AIDS treatment services to primary healthcare facilities, and implications for sustainability. In-depth interviews were conducted with 55 purposively selected key informants, drawn from three Nigerian states that were at different stages of decentralising HIV and AIDS treatment services to primary care facilities. Key informants represented different categories of role-players involved in HIV and AIDS control programmes. Thematic framework analysis of data was done. Support for decentralisation of HIV and AIDS treatment services to primary healthcare facilities was substantial among different categories of actors. Political factors such as the local and global agenda for health, political tenure and party affiliations, and institutional factors such as consolidation of decision-making power and improvements in career trajectories, influenced role-players support for decentralisation of HIV and AIDS treatment services. It is feasible and acceptable to decentralise HIV and AIDS treatment services to primary healthcare facilities, to help improve coverage. However, role-players' support largely depends on how well the reform aligns with political structures and current institutional practices.

  8. Case management in primary care among frequent users of healthcare services with chronic conditions: protocol of a realist synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Burge, Fred; Pluye, Pierre; Bush, Paula L; Ramsden, Vivian R; Legare, France; Guenette, Line; Morin, Paul; Lambert, Mireille; Groulx, Antoine; Couture, Martine; Campbell, Cameron; Baker, Margaret; Edwards, Lynn; Sabourin, Véronique; Spence, Claude; Gauthier, Gilles; Warren, Mike; Godbout, Julie; Davis, Breanna; Rabbitskin, Norma

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A common reason for frequent use of healthcare services is the complex healthcare needs of individuals suffering from multiple chronic conditions, especially in combination with mental health comorbidities and/or social vulnerability. Frequent users (FUs) of healthcare services are more at risk for disability, loss of quality of life and mortality. Case management (CM) is a promising intervention to improve care integration for FU and to reduce healthcare costs. This review aims to develop a middle-range theory explaining how CM in primary care improves outcomes among FU with chronic conditions, for what types of FU and in what circumstances. Methods and analysis A realist synthesis (RS) will be conducted between March 2017 and March 2018 to explore the causal mechanisms that underlie CM and how contextual factors influence the link between these causal mechanisms and outcomes. According to RS methodology, five steps will be followed: (1) focusing the scope of the RS; (2) searching for the evidence; (3) appraising the quality of evidence; (4) extracting the data; and (5) synthesising the evidence. Patterns in context–mechanism–outcomes (CMOs) configurations will be identified, within and across identified studies. Analysis of CMO configurations will help confirm, refute, modify or add to the components of our initial rough theory and ultimately produce a refined theory explaining how and why CM interventions in primary care works, in which contexts and for which FU with chronic conditions. Ethics and dissemination Research ethics is not required for this review, but publication guidelines on RS will be followed. Based on the review findings, we will develop and disseminate messages tailored to various relevant stakeholder groups. These messages will allow the development of material that provides guidance on the design and the implementation of CM in health organisations. Trial registration number Prospero CRD42017057753. PMID:28871027

  9. Early Detection of Neonatal Cholestasis: Inadequate Assessment of Stool Color by Parents and Primary Healthcare Doctors.

    PubMed

    Witt, Mauri; Lindeboom, Jeanet; Wijnja, Corry; Kesler, Anneke; Keyzer-Dekker, Claudia M G; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hulscher, Jan B F

    2016-02-01

    Early diagnosis and surgery (< 60 days of age) improve outcomes in children with biliary atresia. Only 56% of patients undergo timely surgery in the Netherlands. Lack of acquaintance with symptoms such as discolored stools might underlie this delay. We analyzed whether Dutch parents, youth healthcare doctors, or general practitioners recognized discolored stools and evaluated the effect of the Infant Stool Color Card (ISCC) on recognizing discolored stools. We asked 100 parents, 33 youth healthcare doctors, and 50 general practitioners to classify photographs of stools as "normal" or "abnormal." Subsequently, we asked whether parents would seek medical help and doctors would refer the patient for medical investigation. Finally, parents scored stools using the ISCC. Two-third of both parents and youth healthcare doctors recognized all discolored stools. Only half of them would seek medical help for all discolored stools resp. refer patient for medical investigation. Only one-third of the general practitioners recognized all discolored stools and would refer for medical investigation for all discolored stools. Using the ISCC, the percentage of parents recognizing all discolored stool increased from 66 to 87% (p < 0.01). Neither parents nor youth healthcare doctors nor general practitioners reliably recognize discolored stool. The ISCC is an effective screening method for discolored stool. Our data indicate that the ISCC should be accompanied by unequivocal advices regarding referral for medical investigation upon detection of discolored stools. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. The Management of Long-Term Sickness Absence in Large Public Sector Healthcare Organisations: A Realist Evaluation Using Mixed Methods.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Angela; O'Halloran, Peter; Porter, Sam

    2015-09-01

    The success of measures to reduce long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in public sector organisations is contingent on organisational context. This realist evaluation investigates how interventions interact with context to influence successful management of LTSA. Multi-method case study in three Health and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland comprising realist literature review, semi-structured interviews (61 participants), Process-Mapping and feedback meetings (59 participants), observation of training, analysis of documents. Important activities included early intervention; workplace-based occupational rehabilitation; robust sickness absence policies with clear trigger points for action. Used appropriately, in a context of good interpersonal and interdepartmental communication and shared goals, these are able to increase the motivation of staff to return to work. Line managers are encouraged to take a proactive approach when senior managers provide support and accountability. Hindering factors: delayed intervention; inconsistent implementation of policy and procedure; lack of resources; organisational complexity; stakeholders misunderstanding each other's goals and motives. Different mechanisms have the potential to encourage common motivations for earlier return from LTSA, such as employees feeling that they have the support of their line manager to return to work and having the confidence to do so. Line managers' proactively engage when they have confidence in the support of seniors and in their own ability to address LTSA. Fostering these motivations calls for a thoughtful, diagnostic process, taking into account the contextual factors (and whether they can be modified) and considering how a given intervention can be used to trigger the appropriate mechanisms.

  11. Impact of Québec's healthcare reforms on the organization of primary healthcare (PHC): a 2003-2010 follow-up.

    PubMed

    Pineault, Raynald; Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Prud'homme, Alexandre; Fournier, Michel; Couture, Audrey; Provost, Sylvie; Levesque, Jean-Frédéric

    2014-05-21

    Healthcare reforms initiated in the early 2000s in Québec involved the implementation of new modes of primary healthcare (PHC) delivery and the creation of Health and Social Services Centers (HSSCs) to support it. The objective of this article is to assess and explain the degree of PHC organizational change achieved following these reforms. We conducted two surveys of PHC organizations, in 2005 and 2010, in two regions of the province of Québec, Canada. From the responses to these surveys, we derived a measure of organizational change based on an index of conformity to an ideal type (ICIT). One set of explanatory variables was contextual, related to coercive, normative and mimetic influences; the other consisted of organizational variables that measured receptivity towards new PHC models. Multilevel analyses were performed to examine the relationships between ICIT change in the post-reform period and the explanatory variables. Positive results were attained, as expressed by increase in the ICIT score in the post-reform period, mainly due to implementation of new types of PHC organizations (Family Medicine Groups and Network Clinics). Organizational receptivity was the main explanatory variable mediating the effect of coercive and mimetic influences. Normative influence was not a significant factor in explaining changes. Changes were modest at the system level but important with regard to new forms of PHC organizations. The top-down decreed reform was a determining factor in initiating change whereas local coercive and normative influences did not play a major role. The exemplar role played by certain PHC organizations through mimetic influence was more important. Receptivity of individual organizations was both a necessary condition and a mediating factor in influencing change. This supports the view that a combination of top-down and bottom-up strategy is best suited for achieving substantial changes in PHC local organization.

  12. Impact of Québec’s healthcare reforms on the organization of primary healthcare (PHC): a 2003-2010 follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare reforms initiated in the early 2000s in Québec involved the implementation of new modes of primary healthcare (PHC) delivery and the creation of Health and Social Services Centers (HSSCs) to support it. The objective of this article is to assess and explain the degree of PHC organizational change achieved following these reforms. Methods We conducted two surveys of PHC organizations, in 2005 and 2010, in two regions of the province of Québec, Canada. From the responses to these surveys, we derived a measure of organizational change based on an index of conformity to an ideal type (ICIT). One set of explanatory variables was contextual, related to coercive, normative and mimetic influences; the other consisted of organizational variables that measured receptivity towards new PHC models. Multilevel analyses were performed to examine the relationships between ICIT change in the post-reform period and the explanatory variables. Results Positive results were attained, as expressed by increase in the ICIT score in the post-reform period, mainly due to implementation of new types of PHC organizations (Family Medicine Groups and Network Clinics). Organizational receptivity was the main explanatory variable mediating the effect of coercive and mimetic influences. Normative influence was not a significant factor in explaining changes. Conclusion Changes were modest at the system level but important with regard to new forms of PHC organizations. The top-down decreed reform was a determining factor in initiating change whereas local coercive and normative influences did not play a major role. The exemplar role played by certain PHC organizations through mimetic influence was more important. Receptivity of individual organizations was both a necessary condition and a mediating factor in influencing change. This supports the view that a combination of top-down and bottom-up strategy is best suited for achieving substantial changes in PHC local

  13. ExpIR-RO: A Collaborative International Project for Experimenting Voluntary Incident Reporting In the Public Healthcare Sector in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Tereanu, C; Minca, DG; Costea, R; Janta, D; Grego, S; Ravera, L; Pezzano, D; Viganò, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patient safety within healthcare systems is a central aspect of health policy in most developed countries. From April 2007 to May 2009, the pilot project ExpIR-RO tested a voluntary incident reporting system in a public hospital in Bucharest Romania, in collaboration with two Italian hospitals (in Genoa and Milan). Methods: Data were collected anonymously through a form based on the Australian Incident Monitoring System. After appropriate training in reporting adverse events (AEs), staff in the participating Departments voluntarily completed the form. The study lasted 12 months in the Bucharest and Genoa hospitals and 3 months in the Milan hospital. Frequency distributions of replies and AE rates per 1,000 hospitalization days per month were assessed. Results: Overall, 185 AEs were reported (58 in Bucharest, 75 in Genoa and 52 in Milan). The corresponding rates (per 1,000 hospitalization days per month) were 1 in Bucharest, 3 in Genoa and 15 in Milan. Most AEs were related to diagnostic (28%) and surgical (14%) procedures and patient falls (12%) in Bucharest; patient falls (32%), nursing care (20%) and diagnostic procedures (19%) in Genoa; and nursing care (25%), drug prescription/administration (21%) and diagnostic procedures (17%) in Milan. Seventy-three per cent of respondents in Bucharest informed the patient of the AE, versus 64% in Genoa and 43% in Milan. Conversely, 75% of respondents in Genoa entered AEs in medical records versus 53% in Bucharest and 36% in Milan. Conclusion: ExpIR-RO experience suggests that incident reporting could be introduced on a larger scale in Romania. PMID:23113051

  14. Bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health: a qualitative study among decision-makers in the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Johanna M; Tompa, Emile; Clune, Laurie; Sarnocinska-Hart, Anna; Bongers, Paulien M; van Tulder, Maurits W; van der Beek, Allard J; van Wier, Marieke F

    2013-06-03

    Continued improvements in occupational health can only be ensured if decisions regarding the implementation and continuation of occupational health and safety interventions (OHS interventions) are based on the best available evidence. To ensure that this is the case, scientific evidence should meet the needs of decision-makers. As a first step in bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health, this study aimed to provide insight into the occupational health decision-making process and information needs of decision-makers. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted with a purposeful sample of occupational health decision-makers in the Ontario healthcare sector. Eighteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore the process by which occupational health decisions are made and the importance given to the financial implications of OHS interventions. Twenty-five structured telephone interviews were conducted to explore the sources of information used during the decision-making process, and decision-makers' knowledge on economic evaluation methods. In-depth interview data were analyzed according to the constant comparative method. For the structured telephone interviews, summary statistics were prepared. The occupational health decision-making process generally consists of three stages: initiation stage, establishing the need for an intervention; pre-implementation stage, developing an intervention and its business case in order to receive senior management approval; and implementation and evaluation stage, implementing and evaluating an intervention. During this process, information on the financial implications of OHS interventions was found to be of great importance, especially the employer's costs and benefits. However, scientific evidence was rarely consulted, sound ex-post program evaluations were hardly ever performed, and there seemed to be a need to advance the economic evaluation skill set of

  15. Bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health: a qualitative study among decision-makers in the healthcare sector

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Continued improvements in occupational health can only be ensured if decisions regarding the implementation and continuation of occupational health and safety interventions (OHS interventions) are based on the best available evidence. To ensure that this is the case, scientific evidence should meet the needs of decision-makers. As a first step in bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health, this study aimed to provide insight into the occupational health decision-making process and information needs of decision-makers. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was conducted with a purposeful sample of occupational health decision-makers in the Ontario healthcare sector. Eighteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore the process by which occupational health decisions are made and the importance given to the financial implications of OHS interventions. Twenty-five structured telephone interviews were conducted to explore the sources of information used during the decision-making process, and decision-makers’ knowledge on economic evaluation methods. In-depth interview data were analyzed according to the constant comparative method. For the structured telephone interviews, summary statistics were prepared. Results The occupational health decision-making process generally consists of three stages: initiation stage, establishing the need for an intervention; pre-implementation stage, developing an intervention and its business case in order to receive senior management approval; and implementation and evaluation stage, implementing and evaluating an intervention. During this process, information on the financial implications of OHS interventions was found to be of great importance, especially the employer’s costs and benefits. However, scientific evidence was rarely consulted, sound ex-post program evaluations were hardly ever performed, and there seemed to be a need to advance the economic

  16. Web-Based Training for Primary Healthcare Workers in Rural China: A Qualitative Exploration of Stakeholders’ Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhixia; Zhan, Xingxin; Li, Yingxue; Hu, Rong; Yan, Weirong

    2015-01-01

    Background Equitable access to basic public health services is a priority in China. However, primary healthcare workers’ competence to deliver public health services is relatively poor because they lack professional training. Since the availability of web-based training has increased in China, the current study explored stakeholders’ perceptions of a web-based training program on basic public health services to understand their thoughts, experiences, and attitudes about it. Methods Six focus group discussions with primary healthcare workers and three with directors of township hospitals, county-level Health Bureaus, and county-level Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were conducted in Yichang City during 2013. Semi-structured topic guides were used to facilitate qualitative data collection. Audio recordings of the sessions were transcribed verbatim and theme analysis was performed. Results Most of the study’s participants, especially the village doctors, had insufficient knowledge of basic public health services. The existing training program for primary healthcare workers consisted of ineffective traditional face-to-face sessions and often posed accessibility problems for the trainees. Most of the study’s participants had a positive attitude about web-based learning and expressed a strong desire to receive this novel training approach because of its flexibility and convenience. The perceived barriers to utilizing the web-based training method included poor computer literacy, lack of personal interaction, inadequate infrastructure, and lack of time and motivation. The facilitators of this approach included the training content applicability, the user-friendly and interactive learning format, and policy support. Conclusions Web-based training on basic public health services is a promising option in rural China. The findings of the study will contribute knowledge to implementation of web-based training in similar settings. PMID:25961727

  17. Burnout Subtypes and Absence of Self-Compassion in Primary Healthcare Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Montero-Marin, Jesus; Zubiaga, Fernando; Cereceda, Maria; Piva Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos; Trenc, Patricia; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Primary healthcare professionals report high levels of distress and burnout. A new model of burnout has been developed to differentiate three clinical subtypes: 'frenetic', 'underchallenged' and 'worn-out'. The aim of this study was to confirm the validity and reliability of the burnout subtype model in Spanish primary healthcare professionals, and to assess the explanatory power of the self-compassion construct as a possible protective factor. The study employed a cross-sectional design. A sample of n = 440 Spanish primary healthcare professionals (214 general practitioners, 184 nurses, 42 medical residents) completed the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire (BCSQ-36), the Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey (MBI-GS), the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). The factor structure of the BCSQ-36 was estimated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) by the unweighted least squares method from polychoric correlations. Internal consistency (R) was assessed by squaring the correlation between the latent true variable and the observed variables. The relationships between the BCSQ-36 and the other constructs were analysed using Spearman's r and multiple linear regression models. The structure of the BCSQ-36 fit the data well, with adequate CFA indices for all the burnout subtypes. Reliability was adequate for all the scales and sub-scales (R≥0.75). Self-judgement was the self-compassion factor that explained the frenetic subtype (Beta = 0.36; p<0.001); isolation explained the underchallenged (Beta = 0.16; p = 0.010); and over-identification the worn-out (Beta = 0.25; p = 0.001). Other significant associations were observed between the different burnout subtypes and the dimensions of the MBI-GS, UWES and PANAS. The typological definition of burnout through the BCSQ-36 showed good structure and appropriate internal consistence in Spanish primary healthcare professionals. The

  18. Burnout Subtypes and Absence of Self-Compassion in Primary Healthcare Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Marin, Jesus; Zubiaga, Fernando; Cereceda, Maria; Piva Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos; Trenc, Patricia; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare professionals report high levels of distress and burnout. A new model of burnout has been developed to differentiate three clinical subtypes: ‘frenetic’, ‘underchallenged’ and ‘worn-out’. The aim of this study was to confirm the validity and reliability of the burnout subtype model in Spanish primary healthcare professionals, and to assess the explanatory power of the self-compassion construct as a possible protective factor. Method The study employed a cross-sectional design. A sample of n = 440 Spanish primary healthcare professionals (214 general practitioners, 184 nurses, 42 medical residents) completed the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire (BCSQ-36), the Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey (MBI-GS), the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). The factor structure of the BCSQ-36 was estimated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) by the unweighted least squares method from polychoric correlations. Internal consistency (R) was assessed by squaring the correlation between the latent true variable and the observed variables. The relationships between the BCSQ-36 and the other constructs were analysed using Spearman’s r and multiple linear regression models. Results The structure of the BCSQ-36 fit the data well, with adequate CFA indices for all the burnout subtypes. Reliability was adequate for all the scales and sub-scales (R≥0.75). Self-judgement was the self-compassion factor that explained the frenetic subtype (Beta = 0.36; p<0.001); isolation explained the underchallenged (Beta = 0.16; p = 0.010); and over-identification the worn-out (Beta = 0.25; p = 0.001). Other significant associations were observed between the different burnout subtypes and the dimensions of the MBI-GS, UWES and PANAS. Conclusions The typological definition of burnout through the BCSQ-36 showed good structure and appropriate internal consistence

  19. Telehealth: the backbone of healthcare financing.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Abu Bakar

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia, like many other countries faces major challenges in meeting increasing demands with limited resources. Changes in demography, life-style diseases, increasing consumer expectations, new medical technologies and rapid economic growth all fuel demand for more healthcare services. There are problems related to the distribution and delivery of healthcare services, and there is inadequate integration of healthcare delivery and continuity of care is a major concern. Resources tend to be concentrated in the very expensive hospital sector, although services would be cost-effectively and conveniently delivered at primary care level. There is no ideal healthcare system, and how healthcare is supported and organized for service delivery influences the country's social, economic and political well-being. Like many other countries, Malaysia is undergoing health reform in meeting these challenges, and is becoming more reliant on telemedicine and telehealth.

  20. Adoption of Innovation from the Business Sector by Post-Primary Education Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzan, Orit; Zelig, Dafna

    2016-01-01

    Business organizations adopt innovation with the objective of meeting competition and improving their business performance; education organizations, likewise, operate in a competitive environment, are evaluated by stakeholders, and adopt innovation. The research presented here links these two sectors; its objective was to characterize the process…

  1. Adoption of Innovation from the Business Sector by Post-Primary Education Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzan, Orit; Zelig, Dafna

    2016-01-01

    Business organizations adopt innovation with the objective of meeting competition and improving their business performance; education organizations, likewise, operate in a competitive environment, are evaluated by stakeholders, and adopt innovation. The research presented here links these two sectors; its objective was to characterize the process…

  2. The impact of accreditation of primary healthcare centers: successes, challenges and policy implications as perceived by healthcare providers and directors in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Hemadeh, Randa; Jaafar, Maha; Sagherian, Lucie; El-Skaff, Ranime; Mdeihly, Reem; Jamal, Diana; Ataya, Nour

    2014-02-25

    In 2009, the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) launched the Primary Healthcare (PHC) accreditation program to improve quality across the continuum of care. The MOPH, with the support of Accreditation Canada, conducted the accreditation survey in 25 PHC centers in 2012. This paper aims to gain a better understanding of the impact of accreditation on quality of care as perceived by PHC staff members and directors; how accreditation affected staff and patient satisfaction; key enablers, challenges and strategies to improve implementation of accreditation in PHC. The study was conducted in 25 PHC centers using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach; all staff members were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire whereas semi-structured interviews were conducted with directors. The scales measuring Management and Leadership had the highest mean score followed by Accreditation Impact, Human Resource Utilization, and Customer Satisfaction. Regression analysis showed that Strategic Quality Planning, Customer Satisfaction and Staff Involvement were associated with a perception of higher Quality Results. Directors emphasized the benefits of accreditation with regards to documentation, reinforcement of quality standards, strengthened relationships between PHC centers and multiple stakeholders and improved staff and patient satisfaction. Challenges encountered included limited financial resources, poor infrastructure, and staff shortages. To better respond to population health needs, accreditation is an important first step towards improving the quality of PHC delivery arrangement system. While there is a need to expand the implementation of accreditation to cover all PHC centers in Lebanon, considerations should be given to strengthening their financial arrangements as well.

  3. Transforming primary healthcare by including the stakeholders involved in delivering care to people living in poverty: EQUIhealThY study protocol.

    PubMed

    Loignon, Christine; Hudon, Catherine; Boudreault-Fournier, Alexandrine; Dupéré, Sophie; Macaulay, Ann C; Pluye, Pierre; Gaboury, Isabelle; Haggerty, Jeannie L; Fortin, Martin; Goulet, Émilie; Lambert, Mireille; Pelissier-Simard, Luce; Boyer, Sophie; de Laat, Marianne; Lemire, Francine; Champagne, Louise; Lemieux, Martin

    2013-03-11

    Ensuring access to timely and appropriate primary healthcare for people living in poverty is an issue facing all countries, even those with universal healthcare systems. The transformation of healthcare practices and organization could be improved by involving key stakeholders from the community and the healthcare system in the development of research interventions. The aim of this project is to stimulate changes in healthcare organizations and practices by encouraging collaboration between care teams and people living in poverty. Our objectives are twofold: 1) to identify actions required to promote the adoption of professional practices oriented toward social competence in primary care teams; and 2) to examine factors that would encourage the inclusion of people living in poverty in the process of developing social competence in healthcare organizations. This study will use a participatory action research design applied in healthcare organizations. Participatory research is an increasingly recognized approach that is helpful for involving the people for whom the research results are intended. Our research team consists of 19 non-academic researchers, 11 academic researchers and six partners. A steering committee composed of academic researchers and stakeholders will have a decision-making role at each step, including knowledge dissemination and recommendations for new interventions. In this project we will adopt a multiphase approach and will use a variety of methods, including photovoice, group discussions and interviews. The proposed study will be one of only a few using participatory research in primary care to foster changes aimed at enhancing quality and access to care for people living in poverty. To our knowledge this will be the first study to use photovoice in healthcare organizations to promote new interventions. Our project includes partners who are targeted for practice changes and improvements in delivering primary care to persons living in poverty

  4. How to create more supportive supervision for primary healthcare: lessons from Ngamiland district of Botswana: co-operative inquiry group

    PubMed Central

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Wojczewski, Silvia; Kutalek, Ruth; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2016-01-01

    Background Supportive supervision is a way to foster performance, productivity, motivation, and retention of health workforce. Nevertheless there is a dearth of evidence of the impact and acceptability of supportive supervision in low- and middle-income countries. This article describes a participatory process of transforming the supervisory practice of district health managers to create a supportive environment for primary healthcare workers. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how district health managers can change their practice to create a more supportive environment for primary healthcare providers. Design A facilitated co-operative inquiry group (CIG) was formed with Ngamiland health district managers. CIG belongs to the participatory action research paradigm and is characterised by a cyclic process of observation, reflection, planning, and action. The CIG went through three cycles between March 2013 and March 2014. Results Twelve district health managers participated in the inquiry group. The major insights and learning that emerged from the inquiry process included inadequate supervisory practice, perceptions of healthcare workers’ experiences, change in the managers’ supervision paradigm, recognition of the supervisors’ inadequate supervisory skills, and barriers to supportive supervision. Finally, the group developed a 10-point consensus on what they had learnt regarding supportive supervision. Conclusion Ngamiland health district managers have come to appreciate the value of supportive supervision and changed their management style to be more supportive of their subordinates. They also developed a consensus on supportive supervision that could be adapted for use nationally. Supportive supervision should be prioritised at all levels of the health system, and it should be adequately resourced. PMID:27345024

  5. Attention to nurses' rewarding - an interview study of registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare in Finland.

    PubMed

    Seitovirta, Jaana; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Mitronen, Lasse; De Gieter, Sara; Kvist, Tarja

    2017-04-01

    To identify meaningful types of rewards and the consequences of rewards as expressed by Finnish registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare. Previous studies have found significant associations between nurses' rewards and both their commitment and job satisfaction. Furthermore, appropriate rewards can have beneficial effects on factors including workforce stability and occupational satisfaction that are highly important in times of nurse shortages. A cross-sectional, qualitative interview study. Data were collected via individual semi-structured interviews (n = 20) with registered nurses working in Finland's primary and private healthcare, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Six meaningful types of rewards were identified by the registered nurses: Financial compensation and benefits, Work-Life balance, Work content, Professional development, Recognition, and Supportive leadership. Rewards encouraged respondents to perform their work correctly and reinforced occupational satisfaction, but also caused feelings of envy and stress. It is essential to pay attention to nurses' preferences for particular rewards and to reward management. When designing effective reward systems for registered nurses, it is not sufficient to provide financial rewards alone, as various kinds of non-financial rewards are both meaningful and necessary. When trying to improve registered nurses' commitment and job satisfaction through reward management, it is important to listen to nurses' opinions to create a reward system that integrates financial and non-financial rewards and is fair from their perspective. Healthcare organisations that offer registered nurses a holistic reward system are more likely to retain satisfied and committed nurses at a time of increasing nursing shortages. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [The development of evaluation capacity in primary healthcare management: a case study in Santa Catarina State, Brazil, 2008-2011].

    PubMed

    Nickel, Daniela Alba; Calvo, Maria Cristina Marino; Natal, Sonia; Freitas, Sérgio Fernando Torres de; Hartz, Zulmira Maria de Araújo

    2014-04-01

    This article analyzes evaluation capacity-building based on the case study of a State Health Secretariat participating in the Project to Strengthen the Technical Capacity of State Health Secretariats in Monitoring and Evaluating Primary Healthcare. The case study adopted a mixed design with information from documents, semi-structured interviews, and evaluation of primary care by the State Health Secretariat in 2008-2011. Process analysis was used to identify the logical events that contributed to evaluation capacity-building, with two categories: evaluation capacity-building events and events for building organizational structure. The logical chain of events was formed by negotiation and agreement on the decision-making levels for the continuity of evaluation, data collection and analysis by the State Health Secretariat, a change in key indicators, restructuring of the evaluation matrix, and communication of the results to the municipalities. The three-way analysis showed that the aim of developing evaluation capacity was achieved.

  7. Cohort monitoring of persons with diabetes mellitus in a primary healthcare clinic for Palestine refugees in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Khader, Ali; Farajallah, Loai; Shahin, Yousef; Hababeh, Majed; Abu-Zayed, Ishtaiwi; Kochi, Arata; Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Kapur, Anil; Venter, Wendy; Seita, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    To illustrate the method of cohort reporting of persons with diabetes mellitus (DM) in a primary healthcare clinic in Amman, Jordan, serving Palestine refugees with the aim of improving quality of DM care services. A descriptive study using quarterly and cumulative case findings, as well as cumulative and 12-month analyses of cohort outcomes collected through E-Health in UNRWA Nuzha Primary Health Care Clinic. There were 55 newly registered patients with DM in quarter 1, 2012, and a total of 2851 patients with DM ever registered on E-Health because this was established in 2009. By 31 March 2012, 70% of 2851 patients were alive in care, 18% had failed to present to a healthcare worker in the last 3 months and the remainder had died, transferred out or were lost to follow-up. Cumulative and 12-month cohort outcome analysis indicated deficiencies in several components of clinical care: measurement of blood pressure, annual assessments for foot care and blood tests for glucose, cholesterol and renal function. 10-20% of patients with DM in the different cohorts had serious late complications such as blindness, stroke, cardiovascular disease and amputations. Cohort analysis provides data about incidence and prevalence of DM at the clinic level, clinical management performance and prevalence of serious morbidity. It needs to be more widely applied for the monitoring and management of non-communicable chronic diseases. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Tetanus vaccination status and its associated factors among women attending a primary healthcare center in Cairo governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Azza M; Shoman, Ahmed E; Abo-Elezz, Nahla F; Amer, Marwa M

    2016-09-01

    Maintaining maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT) elimination status in Egypt requires continued strengthening of routine tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization services for pregnant women. To measure the frequency rate of TT vaccination among women attending the well-baby clinic at the El-Darb El-Ahmar primary healthcare center in Cairo governorate and to identify different associated factors. This was a cross sectional study that targeted 277 mothers who attended the well-baby clinic at the El-Darb El-Ahmar primary healthcare center. Mothers were interviewed by a questionnaire inquiring about their sociodemographic characteristics, obstetric history, details of the last pregnancy, TT vaccination status and knowledge of the TT vaccine, and MNT disease. The results showed that 60.6% had taken all required doses of TT vaccine and 42.6% of the mothers studied were fully protected against MNT in their last birth. The rate of vaccination was found to be affected by mothers' socioeconomic level, education level, place of receiving antenatal care, health education about importance of TT vaccine, knowledge of mothers about NT disease and TT vaccine and the source of this knowledge.

  9. How much does it cost to achieve coverage targets for primary healthcare services? A costing model from Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Hort, Krishna; Abidin, Azwar Zaenal; Amin, Fadilah M

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant investment in improving service infrastructure and training of staff, public primary healthcare services in low-income and middle-income countries tend to perform poorly in reaching coverage targets. One of the factors identified in Aceh, Indonesia was the lack of operational funds for service provision. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and transparent costing tool that enables health planners to calculate the unit costs of providing basic health services to estimate additional budgets required to deliver services in accordance with national targets. The tool was developed using a standard economic approach that linked the input activities to achieving six national priority programs at primary healthcare level: health promotion, sanitation and environment health, maternal and child health and family planning, nutrition, immunization and communicable diseases control, and treatment of common illness. Costing was focused on costs of delivery of the programs that need to be funded by local government budgets. The costing tool consisting of 16 linked Microsoft Excel worksheets was developed and tested in several districts enabled the calculation of the unit costs of delivering of the six national priority programs per coverage target of each program (such as unit costs of delivering of maternal and child health program per pregnant mother). This costing tool can be used by health planners to estimate additional money required to achieve a certain level of coverage of programs, and it can be adjusted for different costs and program delivery parameters in different settings. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Social capital, the miniaturization of community and assessment of patient satisfaction in primary healthcare: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Martin; Axén, Elin

    2004-01-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the impact of social participation, trust and the miniaturization of community, i.e. high social participation/low trust, on two measures of patient dissatisfaction in primary healthcare. The Scania 2000 public-health survey is a cross-sectional, postal questionnaire study. A total of 3,456 persons aged 18-80 years who had a regular doctor within the primary healthcare system were included. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the social capital variables and dissatisfaction. Multivariate analysis analysed the importance of confounders on the differences in lack of general openness and lack of information concerning treatment in accordance with social capital variables. Lack of openness is positively associated with low trust, the miniaturization of community and low social capital, while lack of information is not significantly associated with the miniaturization of community, but to a lesser extent with low trust and low social capital. Low levels of trust and the miniaturization of community may enhance non-specific patient dissatisfaction such as experience of lack of openness by the patient. In contrast, the miniaturization of community was not significantly associated with the more specific "lack of information". The results have implications for the evaluation of patient dissatisfaction. Copyright 2004 Taylor & Francis

  11. Cost-Efficiency of Indigenously Fabricated Mobile-Portable Dental Unit in Delivery of Primary Healthcare in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ashok; Torwane, Nilesh Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Innovation in primary oral healthcare delivery is a potential yet relatively unexplored area in Dental literature. Aim of the present study was to assess the economic gains that can be made by designing and operating an indigenously fabricated portable dental unit in rural areas. Materials and Methods: Cost-efficiency was determined by comparing total revenue (number of patients treated) with total costs (direct – capital cost of fabrication; and indirect – dental materials, disposables, transport, miscellaneous) over a period of seven years (2005 to 2012). Operational efficiency of portable dental units was also compared with dental vans on various categories of performance indicators. Data analysis was based on institutional records of Rajasthan Dental College (RDC), Jaipur, India. Results: Results show that a total of 52,900 patients who attended 223 camps during this period were provided various primary oral healthcare services using four such portable dental units that were developed @ Rs. 24,000 ($ 417) per unit. Based on a cost-efficiency of Rs 35.53 ($ 0.65) per person, which is among the lowest reported from any part of the world, the authors conclude that indigenously fabricated portable dental units provide a cost-efficient service. The other aspects most relevant to portable equipment were ease of transportation and feasibility in domiciliary care provision. Conclusion: The Limitations of productivity due to time spent in setting up the unit and need for additional space/equipment was their main drawbacks vis-à-vis dental vans. PMID:25177627

  12. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of pregnant women towards antenatal care in primary healthcare centers in Benghazi, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hala K; El Borgy, Mohamed D; Mohammed, Huda O

    2014-12-01

    Many underlying factors influence the capacity of women to survive from complications emerging during pregnancy and childbirth, including women's health and nutritional status starting from childhood and during pregnancy. Also, women's access to and the use of appropriate health services according to their knowledge, attitude, and behavior during pregnancy. This study was designed to assess the knowledge, the attitude, and practices of pregnant women toward antenatal care in primary healthcare centers in Benghazi, Libya. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 300 pregnant women, who were chosen from three primary healthcare centers with the highest attendance rate of pregnant women in Benghazi, Libya, using a structured interview questionnaire. The highest percentage (85.3%) of pregnant women had a high knowledge score regarding antenatal care, and most of them (96.0%) showed a positive attitude; the highest percentage (76.4%) of pregnant women also had good practice scores.The level of overall knowledge had a significant direct correlation with the practices towards antenatal care (r=0.228, P≤0.001), whereas it had an insignificant correlation with the attitude (r=0.029, P=0.619). The majority of the participants of the study tended to have a high level of knowledge and practices. Also, most of them had a positive attitude towards antenatal care. These findings can be used to plan a customized health intervention program aiming to improve maternal health practices regarding antenatal care and eventually improve the health status of Libyan women.

  13. The Association Between Primary Source of Healthcare Coverage and Colorectal Cancer Screening Among US Veterans.

    PubMed

    May, Folasade P; Yano, Elizabeth M; Provenzale, Dawn; Neil Steers, W; Washington, Donna L

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a deadly but largely preventable disease. Screening improves outcomes, but screening rates vary across healthcare coverage models. In the Veterans Health Administration (VA), screening rates are high; however, it is unknown how CRC screening rates compare for Veterans with other types of healthcare coverage. To determine whether Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage (VA, military, TRICARE) have higher rates of CRC screening than Veterans with alternate sources of healthcare coverage. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of Veterans 50-75 years from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. We examined CRC screening rates and screening modalities. We performed multivariable logistic regression to identify the role of coverage type, demographics, and clinical factors on screening status. The cohort included 22,138 Veterans. Of these, 76.7% reported up-to-date screening. Colonoscopy was the most common screening modality (83.7%). Screening rates were highest among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage (82.3%), as was stool-based screening (10.8%). The adjusted odds of up-to-date screening among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage were 83% higher than among Veterans with private coverage (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.52-2.22). Additional predictors of screening included older age, black race, high income, access to medical care, frequent medical visits, and employed or married status. CRC screening rates were highest among Veterans with Veteran-status-related coverage. High CRC screening rates among US Veterans may be related to system-level characteristics of VA and military care. Insight to these system-level characteristics may inform mechanisms to improve CRC screening in non-VA settings.

  14. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Treatment for Substance Misuse in Québec Primary Healthcare Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Serge; Campbell, Emily; Boodhoo, Katie; Gauthier, Gail; Xenocostas, Spyridoula; Charney, Dara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In 2007, the Québec Ministry of Health issued a policy document that specifically mandated the development of addiction treatment services including screening, brief interventions and referral (SBIR) to be delivered by primary healthcare clinics throughout Québec. The current study examined the level of implementation of SBIR one year following the end of the mandate (2007–2012). Approach: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 45 participants from 21 primary health and social service centres throughout the province. Qualitative analysis was used to evaluate the level of success each centre had in implementing SBIR and to identify organizational measures that contributed to successful implementation. Results: The results show that Québec primary health and social service centres had limited success in their efforts to integrate SBIR into their services. A comparative analysis of the centres, categorized according to their level of implementation, revealed the presence of significant organizational- and staff-level factors, including the creation of formal action plans that were conducive to the successful implementation of SBIR in primary care. Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of offering support and guidance, as well as a menu of specific practices that are likely to assist primary health and social services centres to implement SBIR. At the organizational level, the adoption of local action plans and formal service trajectories offers a framework that allows for horizontal and vertical integration of new practices. PMID:26742118

  15. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Treatment for Substance Misuse in Québec Primary Healthcare Clinics.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Serge; Campbell, Emily; Boodhoo, Katie; Gauthier, Gail; Xenocostas, Spyridoula; Charney, Dara A; Gill, Kathryn

    2015-11-01

    In 2007, the Québec Ministry of Health issued a policy document that specifically mandated the development of addiction treatment services including screening, brief interventions and referral (SBIR) to be delivered by primary healthcare clinics throughout Québec. The current study examined the level of implementation of SBIR one year following the end of the mandate (2007-2012). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 45 participants from 21 primary health and social service centres throughout the province. Qualitative analysis was used to evaluate the level of success each centre had in implementing SBIR and to identify organizational measures that contributed to successful implementation. The results show that Québec primary health and social service centres had limited success in their efforts to integrate SBIR into their services. A comparative analysis of the centres, categorized according to their level of implementation, revealed the presence of significant organizational- and staff-level factors, including the creation of formal action plans that were conducive to the successful implementation of SBIR in primary care. The findings highlight the importance of offering support and guidance, as well as a menu of specific practices that are likely to assist primary health and social services centres to implement SBIR. At the organizational level, the adoption of local action plans and formal service trajectories offers a framework that allows for horizontal and vertical integration of new practices. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  16. Healthcare technology and technology assessment.

    PubMed

    Herndon, James H; Hwang, Raymond; Bozic, K J; Bozic, K H

    2007-08-01

    New technology is one of the primary drivers for increased healthcare costs in the United States. Both physician and industry play important roles in the development, adoption, utilization and choice of new technologies. The Federal Drug Administration regulates new drugs and new medical devices, but healthcare technology assessment remains limited. Healthcare technology assessment originated in federal agencies; today it is decentralized with increasing private sector efforts. Innovation is left to free market forces, including direct to consumer marketing and consumer choice. But to be fair to the consumer, he/she must have free knowledge of all the risks and benefits of a new technology in order to make an informed choice. Physicians, institutions and industry need to work together by providing proven, safe, clinically effective and cost effective new technologies, which require valid pre-market clinical trials and post-market continued surveillance with national and international registries allowing full transparency of new products to the consumer--the patient.

  17. Primary Care for Adults with Down Syndrome: Adherence to Preventive Healthcare Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, K. M.; Taylor, L. C.; Davis, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and…

  18. Primary Care for Adults with Down Syndrome: Adherence to Preventive Healthcare Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, K. M.; Taylor, L. C.; Davis, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and…

  19. Wait and consult times for primary healthcare services in central Mozambique: a time-motion study

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Bradley H.; Gimbel, Sarah; Hoek, Roxanne; Pfeiffer, James; Michel, Cathy; Cuembelo, Fatima; Quembo, Titos; Afonso, Pires; Gloyd, Stephen; Lambdin, Barrot H.; Micek, Mark A.; Porthé, Victoria; Sherr, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background We describe wait and consult times across public-sector clinics and identify health facility determinants of wait and consult times. Design We observed 8,102 patient arrivals and departures from clinical service areas across 12 public-sector clinics in Sofala and Manica Provinces between January and April 2011. Negative binomial generalized estimating equations were used to model associated health facility factors. Results Mean wait times (in minutes) were: 26.1 for reception; 43.5 for outpatient consults; 58.8 for antenatal visits; 16.2 for well-child visits; 8.0 for pharmacy; and 15.6 for laboratory. Mean consultation times (in minutes) were: 5.3 for outpatient consults; 9.4 for antenatal visits; and 2.3 for well-child visits. Over 70% (884/1,248) of patients arrived at the clinic to begin queuing for general reception prior to 10:30 am. Facilities with more institutional births had significantly longer wait times for general reception, antenatal visits, and well-child visits. Clinics in rural areas had especially shorter wait times for well-child visits. Outpatient consultations were significantly longer at the smallest health facilities, followed by rural hospitals, tertiary/quaternary facilities, compared with Type 1 rural health centers. Discussion The average outpatient consult in Central Mozambique lasts 5 min, following over 40 min of waiting, not including time to register at most clinics. Wait times for first antenatal visits are even longer at almost 1 h. Urgent investments in public-sector human resources for health alongside innovative operational research are needed to increase consult times, decrease wait times, and improve health system responsiveness. PMID:27580822

  20. The power of r - pharmaceutical sales decomposition in Cyprus public healthcare sector and determinants of drug expenditure evolution: any lessons learned?

    PubMed

    Petrou, Panagiotis

    2014-04-01

    The pharmaceutical sector has been established as the primary cost driver in health. The scope of this paper is to explore the drivers of pharmaceutical expenditure in Cyprus by decomposing sales and assessing impact of prices, volumes and substitution effect. We used a statistical approach to decompose the growth of public pharmaceutical expenditure during 2005-2011 into three elements: 1) substitution effect; 2) price effect; and 3) increase of consumption. We further decomposed consumption into: 1) prescription/visits; 2) visits/beneficiaries; and 3) beneficiaries. Pharmaceutical expenditure grew by 31.4 % and volume of medicines dispensed increased by 55%. Prices declined by 11% and product-mix residual was -5.5%, indicating that Cyprus experienced a switch to cheaper medicines (generics) without compromising access of patients to innovative medicines. This was enhanced by guidelines, monitoring of prescribing behavior, generic substitution and efficient tendering. The increasing number of products per prescriptions should be monitored with caution.

  1. Academisation, School Collaboration and the Primary School Sector in England: A Story of Six School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keddie, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents data from a study of five English primary schools. It examines some of the challenges associated with school autonomy and collaboration for state primary schools amid the uncertainty and complexity of governance in the present English education context. The paper features the voices of six leaders gathered from interviews that…

  2. Role Clarification Processes for Better Integration of Nurse Practitioners into Primary Healthcare Teams: A Multiple-Case Study

    PubMed Central

    D'Amour, Danielle; Contandriopoulos, Damien; Chouinard, Véronique; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2014-01-01

    Role clarity is a crucial issue for effective interprofessional collaboration. Poorly defined roles can become a source of conflict in clinical teams and reduce the effectiveness of care and services delivered to the population. Our objective in this paper is to outline processes for clarifying professional roles when a new role is introduced into clinical teams, that of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (PHCNP). To support our empirical analysis we used the Canadian National Interprofessional Competency Framework, which defines the essential components for role clarification among professionals. A qualitative multiple-case study was conducted on six cases in which the PHCNP role was introduced into primary care teams. Data collection included 34 semistructured interviews with key informants involved in the implementation of the PHCNP role. Our results revealed that the best performing primary care teams were those that used a variety of organizational and individual strategies to carry out role clarification processes. From this study, we conclude that role clarification is both an organizational process to be developed and a competency that each member of the primary care team must mobilize to ensure effective interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25692039

  3. A process-based framework to guide nurse practitioners integration into primary healthcare teams: results from a logic analysis.

    PubMed

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Brousselle, Astrid; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Perroux, Mélanie; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Brault, Isabelle; Kilpatrick, Kelley; D'Amour, Danielle; Sansgter-Gormley, Esther

    2015-02-27

    Integrating Nurse Practitioners into primary care teams is a process that involves significant challenges. To be successful, nurse practitioner integration into primary care teams requires, among other things, a redefinition of professional boundaries, in particular those of medicine and nursing, a coherent model of inter- and intra- professional collaboration, and team-based work processes that make the best use of the subsidiarity principle. There have been numerous studies on nurse practitioner integration, and the literature provides a comprehensive list of barriers to, and facilitators of, integration. However, this literature is much less prolific in discussing the operational level implications of those barriers and facilitators and in offering practical recommendations. In the context of a large-scale research project on the introduction of nurse practitioners in Quebec (Canada) we relied on a logic-analysis approach based, on the one hand on a realist review of the literature and, on the other hand, on qualitative case-studies in 6 primary healthcare teams in rural and urban area of Quebec. Five core themes that need to be taken into account when integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams were identified. Those themes are: planning, role definition, practice model, collaboration, and team support. The present paper has two objectives: to present the methods used to develop the themes, and to discuss an integrative model of nurse practitioner integration support centered around these themes. It concludes with a discussion of how this framework contributes to existing knowledge and some ideas for future avenues of study.