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Sample records for primary immunodeficiencies pid

  1. Current Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Teuber, Suzanne S.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2006-01-01

    Since the original description of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in 1952, the number of independent primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) has expanded to more than 100 entities. By definition, a PID is a genetically determined disorder resulting in enhanced susceptibility to infectious disease. Despite the heritable nature of these diseases, some PIDs are clinically manifested only after prerequisite environmental exposures but they often have associated malignant, allergic, or autoimmune manifestations. PIDs must be distinguished from secondary or acquired immunodeficiencies, which are far more common. In this review, we will place these immunodeficiencies in the context of both clinical and laboratory presentations as well as highlight the known genetic basis. PMID:17162365

  2. History of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Moin, Mostafa; Rezaei, Nima

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric immunology came into sight in the second half of 20th century, when pediatricians and basic immunologists began to give attention to diagnosis and treatment of children with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Understanding the genetic and mechanistic basis of PIDs provides unique insight into the functioning of the immune system. By progress in basic and clinical immunology, many infrastructural organizations and academic centers have been established in many countries worldwide to focus on training and research on the immune system and related disorders. Along with progress in basic and clinical immunology in the world, pediatric immunology had a good progress in Iran during the last 33-year period. Now, patients with PIDs can benefit from multidisciplinary comprehensive care, which is provided by clinical immunologists in collaboration with other specialists. Patients with history of recurrent and/or chronic infections suggestive of PIDs are evaluated by standard and research-based testing and receive appropriate treatment. The progress in PIDs can be described in three periods. Development of training program for clinical fellowship in allergy and immunology, multidisciplinary and international collaborative projects, primary immunodeficiency diseases textbooks, meetings on immunodeficiency disorders, improvement in diagnosis and treatment, and construction of Iranian primary immunodeficiency association, Students' research group for immunodeficiencies, Iranian primary immunodeficiency registry, and the immunological societies and centers were the main activities on PIDs during these years. In this article, we review the growth of modern pediatric immunology and PIDs status in Iran. PMID:23056678

  3. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years.

  4. Attentiveness of pediatricians to primary immunodeficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary immunodeficiency (PID) is a cluster of serious disorders that requires special alertness on the part of the medical staff for prompt diagnosis and management of the patient. This study explored PID knowledge and experience among pediatricians of wide educational backgrounds, practicing in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Method A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the competency of pediatricians in their knowledge of PID disorders. This study questionnaire included questions on PID signs and symptoms, syndromes associated with immunodeficiency, screening tests, interpreting laboratory tests and case management. The participants were 263 pediatricians of diverse education working in the 27 governmental hospitals in all regions of UAE. Results The overall performance of the pediatricians did not differ based on their age, gender, origin of certification, rank, or years of experience. Of the 50 questions, 20% of pediatricians answered correctly <60% of the questions, 76% answered correctly 60 to 79% of the questions, and 4% answered correctly ≥80% of the questions. Seventeen of the 19 PID signs and symptoms were identified by 55 to 97%. Four of 5 syndromes associated with immunodeficiency were identified by 50 to 90%. Appropriate screening tests were chosen by 64 to 96%. Attention to the laboratory reference range values as function of patient age was notably limited. Conclusions There was a noteworthy deficiency in PID work-up. Therefore, implementing effective educational strategies is needed to improve the competency of pediatricians to diagnose and manage PID disorders. PMID:22846098

  5. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Seeborg, Filiz O.; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  6. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S; Seeborg, Filiz O; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  7. Primary Immunodeficiencies: “New” Disease in an Old Country

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pamela P W; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2009-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs) are rare inborn errors of the immune system. Patients with PIDs are unique models that exemplify the functional and phenotypic consequences of various immune defects underlying infections, autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, allergy and cancer. Over 150 PID syndromes were characterized in the past 60 years, with an ever growing list of new entities being discovered. Because of their rarity, multi-center collaboration for pooled data analysis and molecular studies is important to gain meaningful insights into the phenotypic and genetic diversities of PIDs. In this article, we summarize our research findings on PIDs in Chinese population in the past 20 years. Close collaboration among various immunology centers, cross-referrals and systematic data analysis constitute the foundation for research on PIDs. Future directions include establishment of a national PID registry, raising awareness of PIDs and securing sufficient resources for patient care and scientific research. PMID:20003815

  8. Primary immunodeficiency update I: Syndromes associated with eczematous dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Dominique C.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the availability of powerful molecular techniques has accelerated the pace of discovery of several new primary immunodeficiencies (PID) and revealed the biologic basis of other established PID. These genetic advances, in turn, have facilitated more precise phenotyping of associated skin and systemic manifestations and provide a unique opportunity to better understand the complex human immunologic response. These continuing medical education articles will provide an update of recent advances about PID that may be encountered by dermatologists through their association with eczematous dermatitis, infectious, and non-infectious cutaneous manifestations. Part I will discuss new primary immunodeficiencies that have an eczematous dermatitis. Part II will focus on primary immunodeficiencies that greatly increase susceptibility to fungal infection and the noninfectious presentations of PID. PMID:26282794

  9. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications associated with primary immunodeficiency diseases

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sayna; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Mamishi, Setareh; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a group of inherited disorders, characterized by defects of the immune system predisposing individuals to variety of manifestations, including recurrent infections and unusual vaccine complications. There are a number of PIDs prone to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications. This review presents an update on our understanding about the BCGosis-susceptible PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. PMID:22430715

  10. Primary immunodeficiencies of food animals.

    PubMed

    McVey, D S; Tizard, I

    1993-03-01

    Although there are few, well-characterized PIDs of food animals, these diseases are important because they tend to be severe and with no cure. Most animals with PID do not receive the intensive and aggressive care required for survival: Veterinarians may be consulted only when the animals are in the terminal stages of illness; it is generally not economically practical for livestock producers or practitioners to pay for the exhaustive laboratory tests required to detect and characterize these anomalies. Another reason for the small numbers of characterized clinical cases of PID is that they are rare. It is possible, however, that intensive artificial insemination and embryo transfer could select for heterozygous carriers of these autosomal traits. As seen with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, as the frequency of an allele increases in the population, the numbers of affected animals increase. Furthermore, other immunodeficient syndromes are likely to exist. Veterinarians therefore should be aware of these disorders and should seek laboratory assistance to arrive at a correct diagnosis. Because of the inheritable nature of PID, livestock producers need assistance from veterinarians to identify carriers and establish sound breeding and control programs. One positive outcome from studies of PID is that research scientists and veterinarians learn much about immune systems from these afflicted animals. In fact, these animals may become models for gene therapy or marrow reconstruction procedures. PMID:8457931

  11. Neutropenia in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sokolic, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Neutropenia is a feature of several primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDDs). Because of the diverse pathophysiologies of the PIDDs and the rarity of each disorder, data are often lacking, leading to the necessity of empiric treatment. Recent developments in the understanding of neutropenia in several of the PIDDs make a review of the data timely. Recent findings The category of severe congenital neutropenia continues to expand. Mutations in G6PC3 have been identified as the cause of neutropenia in a minority of previously molecularly undefined cases. Recent advances have broadened our understanding of the pathophysiology and the clinical expression of this disorder. A possible function of the C16orf57 gene has been hypothesized that may explain the clinical overlap between Clerucuzio-type poikiloderma with neutropenia and other marrow diseases. Plerixafor has been shown to be a potentially useful treatment in the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infection, and myelokathexis syndrome. Investigations of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency have identified neutropenia, and particularly susceptibility to myelotoxins, as a feature of this disorder. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor is the treatment of choice for neutropenia in PIDD, whereas hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only curative option. Summary The number of PIDDs associated with neutropenia has increased, as has our understanding of the range of phenotypes. Additional data and hypotheses have been generated helping to explain the diversity of presentations of neutropenia in PIDDs. PMID:23196894

  12. Primary immunodeficiency update II: Syndromes associated with mucocutaneous candidiasis and non-infectious cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Dominique C.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Several primary immunodeficiencies (PID) have recently been described which confer elevated risk of fungal infections as well as non-infectious cutaneous manifestations. In addition, immunological advances have provided new insights into our understanding of the pathophysiology of fungal infections in established PID. We reviewed PID that present with an eczematous dermatitis in Part I. In Part II, we will discuss updates on PID associated with fungal infections and their biological basis in PID as well as non-infectious cutaneous manifestations. PMID:26282795

  13. Inborn errors of metabolism underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Parvaneh, Nima; Quartier, Pierre; Rostami, Parastoo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-10-01

    A number of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) have been shown to result in predominantly immunologic phenotypes, manifesting in part as inborn errors of immunity. These phenotypes are mostly caused by defects that affect the (i) quality or quantity of essential structural building blocks (e.g., nucleic acids, and amino acids), (ii) cellular energy economy (e.g., glucose metabolism), (iii) post-translational protein modification (e.g., glycosylation) or (iv) mitochondrial function. Presenting as multisystemic defects, they also affect innate or adaptive immunity, or both, and display various types of immune dysregulation. Specific and potentially curative therapies are available for some of these diseases, whereas targeted treatments capable of inducing clinical remission are available for others. We will herein review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) due to underlying metabolic disorders.

  14. Primary immunodeficiencies underlying fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Cypowyj, Sophie; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review We review the primary immunodeficiencies underlying an increasing variety of superficial and invasive fungal infections. We also stress that the occurrence of such fungal infections should lead physicians to search for the corresponding single-gene inborn errors of immunity. Finally, we suggest that other fungal infections may also result from hitherto unknown inborn errors of immunity, at least in some patients with no known risk factors. Recent findings An increasing number of primary immunodeficiencies are being shown to underlie fungal infectious diseases in children and young adults. Inborn errors of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase complex (chronic granulomatous disease), severe congenital neutropenia and leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I confer a predisposition to invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. More rarely, inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlie endemic mycoses. Inborn errors of IL-17 immunity have recently been shown to underlie chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of CARD9 immunity underlie deep dermatophytosis and invasive candidiasis. Summary Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, deep dermatophytosis, pneumocystosis, and endemic mycoses can all be caused by primary immunodeficiencies. Each type of infection is highly suggestive of a specific type of primary immunodeficiency. In the absence of overt risk factors, single-gene inborn errors of immunity should be sought in children and young adults with these and other fungal diseases. PMID:24240293

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  16. Novel Primary Immunodeficiency Candidate Genes Predicted by the Human Gene Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Germline genetic mutations underlie various primary immunodeficiency (PID) diseases. Patients with rare PID diseases (like most non-PID patients and healthy individuals) carry, on average, 20,000 rare and common coding variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. It is thus a major challenge to select only a few candidate disease-causing variants for experimental testing. One of the tools commonly used in the pipeline for estimating a potential PID-candidate gene is to test whether the specific gene is included in the list of genes that were already experimentally validated as PID-causing in previous studies. However, this approach is limited because it cannot detect the PID-causing mutation(s) in the many PID patients carrying causal mutations of as yet unidentified PID-causing genes. In this study, we expanded in silico the list of potential PID-causing candidate genes from 229 to 3,110. We first identified the top 1% of human genes predicted by the human genes connectome to be biologically close to the 229 known PID genes. We then further narrowed down the list of genes by retaining only the most biologically relevant genes, with functionally enriched gene ontology biological categories similar to those for the known PID genes. We validated this prediction by showing that 17 of the 21 novel PID genes published since the last IUIS classification fall into this group of 3,110 genes (p < 10−7). The resulting new extended list of 3,110 predicted PID genes should be useful for the discovery of novel PID genes in patients. PMID:25883595

  17. Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing In Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mousallem, Talal; Urban, Thomas J.; McSweeney, K. Melodi; Kleinstein, Sarah E.; Zhu, Mingfu; Adeli, Mehdi; Parrott, Roberta E.; Roberts, Joseph L.; Krueger, Brian; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Goldstein, David B

    2016-01-01

    Summary This report illustrates the value of whole genome sequencing (WGS) in elucidating the genetic cause of disease in patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID). As sequencing costs decline, we predict that utilization of next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical setting will increase. PMID:25981738

  18. [Lymphocytes B and primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    López-Herrera, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies represent the most frequent genetic diseases of the immune system and the first to be recognized along immunology history. The antibodies were recognized as part of the humoral immune system long ago, and after immunoglobulin discovery, the first antibody immunodeficiency were recognized and named as "agammaglobulinemia", followed by the common variable immunoendeficiency and the hyper-IgM syndrome. The following discoveries in immunology history made possible the understanding of these pathologies, for example: the discoveries of B cells, pre-B cells, the signaling pathway directed by the antigen receptor and many other cellular and molecular mechanisms. Primary antibody deficiencies have been studied for a long time and the discoveries of new syndromes have been helpful in the understanding of immunological mechanisms that take place in our organism. Then, this manuscript pretends to review the relevant findings in the history of immunology, focused on the B cells and the connection with the description of representative clinical entities of primary antibody deficiencies. The aim of this manuscript is to show to the reader that the generation of scientific knowledge has a direct application in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are affected in these diseases.

  19. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: an Update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency 2015.

    PubMed

    Picard, Capucine; Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Holland, Steven M; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D; Oksenhendler, Eric; Puck, Jennifer M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Tang, Mimi L K; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-11-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies compiled by the Primary Immunodeficiency Expert Committee (PID EC) of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). In the two years since the previous version, 34 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. In this new version we continue to see the increasing overlap between immunodeficiency, as manifested by infection and/or malignancy, and immune dysregulation, as manifested by auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, and/or allergy. There is also an increased number of genetic defects that lead to susceptibility to specific organisms which reflects the finely tuned nature of immune defense systems. This classification is the most up to date catalogue of all known and published primary immunodeficiencies and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the genetic and molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases.

  20. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children Can Reveal a Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gaschignard, Jean; Levy, Corinne; Chrabieh, Maya; Boisson, Bertrand; Bost-Bru, Cécile; Dauger, Stéphane; Dubos, François; Durand, Philippe; Gaudelus, Joël; Gendrel, Dominique; Gras Le Guen, Christèle; Grimprel, Emmanuel; Guyon, Gaël; Jeudy, Catherine; Jeziorski, Eric; Leclerc, Francis; Léger, Pierre-Louis; Lesage, Fabrice; Lorrot, Mathie; Pellier, Isabelle; Pinquier, Didier; de Pontual, Loïc; Sachs, Philippe; Thomas, Caroline; Tissières, Pierre; Valla, Frédéric V.; Desprez, Philippe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Varon, Emmanuelle; Bossuyt, Xavier; Cohen, Robert; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    Background. About 10% of pediatric patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) die from the disease. Some primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are known to confer predisposition to IPD. However, a systematic search for these PIDs has never been carried out in children presenting with IPD. Methods. We prospectively identified pediatric cases of IPD requiring hospitalization between 2005 and 2011 in 28 pediatric wards throughout France. IPD was defined as a positive pneumococcal culture, polymerase chain reaction result, and/or soluble antigen detection at a normally sterile site. The immunological assessment included abdominal ultrasound, whole-blood counts and smears, determinations of plasma immunoglobulin and complement levels, and the evaluation of proinflammatory cytokines. Results. We included 163 children with IPD (male-to-female ratio, 1.3; median age, 13 months). Seventeen children had recurrent IPD. Meningitis was the most frequent type of infection (87%); other infections included pleuropneumonitis, isolated bloodstream infection, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and mastoiditis. One patient with recurrent meningitis had a congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula. The results of immunological explorations were abnormal in 26 children (16%), and a PID was identified in 17 patients (10%), including 1 case of MyD88 deficiency, 3 of complement fraction C2 or C3 deficiencies, 1 of isolated congenital asplenia, and 2 of Bruton disease (X-linked agammaglobulinemia). The proportion of PIDs was much higher in children aged >2 years than in younger children (26% vs 3%; P < .001). Conclusions. Children with IPD should undergo immunological investigations, particularly those aged >2 years, as PIDs may be discovered in up to 26% of cases. PMID:24759830

  1. Flow Cytometry, a Versatile Tool for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Genetic defects of the immune system are referred to as primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). These immunodeficiencies are clinically and immunologically heterogeneous and, therefore, pose a challenge not only for the clinician but also for the diagnostic immunologist. There are several methodological tools available for evaluation and monitoring of patients with PIDs, and of these tools, flow cytometry has gained prominence, both for phenotyping and functional assays. Flow cytometry allows real-time analysis of cellular composition, cell signaling, and other relevant immunological pathways, providing an accessible tool for rapid diagnostic and prognostic assessment. This minireview provides an overview of the use of flow cytometry in disease-specific diagnosis of PIDs, in addition to other broader applications, which include immune phenotyping and cellular functional measurements. PMID:26912782

  2. Autoimmune and other cytopenias in primary immunodeficiencies: pathomechanisms, novel differential diagnoses, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity and immune dysregulation may lead to cytopenia and represent key features of many primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Especially when cytopenia is the initial symptom of a PID, the order and depth of diagnostic steps have to be performed in accordance with both an immunologic and a hematologic approach and will help exclude disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, common variable immunodeficiency, and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndromes, hemophagocytic disorders, lymphoproliferative diseases, and novel differential diagnoses such as MonoMac syndrome (GATA2 deficiency), CD27 deficiency, lipopolysaccharide-responsive beige-like anchor (LRBA) deficiency, activated PI3KD syndrome (APDS), X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect (MAGT1 deficiency), and others. Immunosuppressive treatment often needs to be initiated urgently, which impedes further relevant immunologic laboratory analyses aimed at defining the underlying PID. Awareness of potentially involved disease spectra ranging from hematologic to rheumatologic and immunologic disorders is crucial for identifying a certain proportion of PID phenotypes and genotypes among descriptive diagnoses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, chronic immune thrombocytopenia, Evans syndrome, severe aplastic anemia/refractory cytopenia, and others. A synopsis of pathomechanisms, novel differential diagnoses, and advances in treatment options for cytopenias in PID is provided to facilitate multidisciplinary management and to bridge different approaches. PMID:25163701

  3. Autoimmune and other cytopenias in primary immunodeficiencies: pathomechanisms, novel differential diagnoses, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Markus G

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmunity and immune dysregulation may lead to cytopenia and represent key features of many primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Especially when cytopenia is the initial symptom of a PID, the order and depth of diagnostic steps have to be performed in accordance with both an immunologic and a hematologic approach and will help exclude disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, common variable immunodeficiency, and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndromes, hemophagocytic disorders, lymphoproliferative diseases, and novel differential diagnoses such as MonoMac syndrome (GATA2 deficiency), CD27 deficiency, lipopolysaccharide-responsive beige-like anchor (LRBA) deficiency, activated PI3KD syndrome (APDS), X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect (MAGT1 deficiency), and others. Immunosuppressive treatment often needs to be initiated urgently, which impedes further relevant immunologic laboratory analyses aimed at defining the underlying PID. Awareness of potentially involved disease spectra ranging from hematologic to rheumatologic and immunologic disorders is crucial for identifying a certain proportion of PID phenotypes and genotypes among descriptive diagnoses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, chronic immune thrombocytopenia, Evans syndrome, severe aplastic anemia/refractory cytopenia, and others. A synopsis of pathomechanisms, novel differential diagnoses, and advances in treatment options for cytopenias in PID is provided to facilitate multidisciplinary management and to bridge different approaches.

  4. The European internet-based patient and research database for primary immunodeficiencies: results 2004–06

    PubMed Central

    Eades-Perner, A-M; Gathmann, B; Knerr, V; Guzman, D; Veit, D; Kindle, G; Grimbacher, B

    2007-01-01

    Because primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are rare diseases, transnational studies are essential to maximize the scientific outcome and lead to improved diagnosis and therapy. Immunologists in Europe have united to determine the prevalence of PID in Europe and to establish and evaluate harmonized guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of PID as well as to improve the awareness of PID in Europe. In order to achieve this aim we have developed an internet-based database for clinical and research data on patients with PID. This database forms the platform for studies of demographics, the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and the identification of novel disease-associated genes. The database is completely secure, while providing access to researchers via a standard browser using password and encrypted log-in sessions and conforms to all European and national ethics and data protection guidelines. So far 2386 patients have been documented by 35 documenting centres in 20 countries. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common entity, accounting for almost 30% of all entries. First statistical analyses on the quality of life of patients show the advantages of immunoglobulin replacement therapy, at the same time revealing a mean diagnostic delay of over 4 years. First studies on specific questions on selected PID are now under way. The platform of this database can be used for any type of medical condition. PMID:17223972

  5. Warts and All: HPV in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and DOCK8 are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects have severe HPV much less frequently. We review immunodeficiencies with severe HPV infections and the mechanisms underlying them. PMID:23036745

  6. Primary immunodeficiency investigation in patients during and after hospitalization in a pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Suavinho, Érica; de Nápolis, Ana Carolina R.; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze whether the patients with severe infections, admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, underwent the active screening for primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Methods: Retrospective study that assessed the data records of patients with any severe infections admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, covering a period from January 2011 to January 2012, in order to confirm if they performed an initial investigation for PID with blood count and immunoglobulin dosage. Results: In the studied period, 53 children were hospitalized with severe infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and only in seven (13.2%) the initial investigation of PID was performed. Among these patients, 3/7 (42.8%) showed quantitative alterations in immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, 1/7 (14.3%) had the diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, and 1/7 (14.3%) presented thrombocytopenia and a final diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Therefore, the PID diagnosis was confirmed in 5/7 (71.4%) of the patients. Conclusions: The investigation of PID in patients with severe infections has not been routinely performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Our findings suggest the necessity of performing PID investigation in this group of patients. PMID:24676187

  7. Primary immunodeficiency disorders in the developing world: data from a hospital-based registry in India.

    PubMed

    Chinnabhandar, Vasant; Yadav, Satya Prakash; Kaul, Dinesh; Verma, I C; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2014-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) are under-reported from the developing world. We present data regarding diagnosis and outcome from a hospital-based registry in India. Forty-seven patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria. Majority were males. Subgroups were disorders of immune dysregulation-29%, B&T-cell abnormalities-28%, predominant antibody deficiencies-23%, other well-defined immunodeficiencies-15%, and phagocyte disorders-4%. Molecular diagnosis was attempted in 12 and was positive in seven. Overall 24 children died. Only three out of 28 children needing stem cell transplant (SCT) underwent the same. Registry data highlights that molecular diagnosis and SCT are a rarity for children with PIDs in the developing world and mortality is high.

  8. Exome Sequencing Reveals Primary Immunodeficiencies in Children with Community-Acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Samira; McLaren, Paul J.; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Wong, Richard; Bartha, Istvan; Francis, Joshua R.; Abarca, Katia; Gelderman, Kyra A.; Agyeman, Philipp; Aebi, Christoph; Berger, Christoph; Fellay, Jacques; Schlapbach, Luregn J.; Posfay-Barbe, Klara

    2016-01-01

    One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium mostly associated with health care-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. Two out of eight (25%) fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in PID genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing PIDs in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying PIDs. PMID:27703454

  9. The European internet-based patient and research database for primary immunodeficiencies: update 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gathmann, B; Binder, N; Ehl, S; Kindle, G

    2012-01-01

    In order to build a common data pool and estimate the disease burden of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) in Europe, the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) has developed an internet-based database for clinical and research data on patients with PID. This database is a platform for epidemiological analyses as well as the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and the identification of novel disease-associated genes. Since its start in 2004, 13 708 patients from 41 countries have been documented in the ESID database. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) represents the most common entity with 2880 patients or 21% of all entries, followed by selective immunoglobulin A (sIgA) deficiency (1424 patients, 10·4%). The total documented prevalence of PID is highest in France, with five patients per 100 000 inhabitants. The highest documented prevalence for a single disease is 1·3 per 100 000 inhabitants for sIgA deficiency in Hungary. The highest reported incidence of PID per 100 000 live births was 16·2 for the period 1999–2002 in France. The highest reported incidence rate for a single disease was 6·7 for sIgA deficiency in Spain for the period 1999–2002. The genetic cause was known in 36·2% of all registered patients. Consanguinity was reported in 8·8%, and 18·5% of patients were reported to be familial cases; 27·9% of patients were diagnosed after the age of 16. We did not observe a significant decrease in the diagnostic delay for most diseases between 1987 and 2010. The most frequently reported long-term medication is immunoglobulin replacement. PMID:22288591

  10. Unbalanced Immune System: Immunodeficiencies and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, Giuliana; Gallo, Vera; Prencipe, Rosaria; Gaudino, Giovanni; Romano, Roberta; De Cataldis, Marco; Lorello, Paola; Palamaro, Loredana; Di Giacomo, Chiara; Capalbo, Donatella; Cirillo, Emilia; D’Assante, Roberta; Pignata, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations has been identified in different primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). In such conditions, autoimmunity and immune deficiency represent intertwined phenomena that reflect inadequate immune function. Autoimmunity in PIDs may be caused by different mechanisms, including defects of tolerance to self-antigens and persistent stimulation as a result of the inability to eradicate antigens. This general immune dysregulation leads to compensatory and exaggerated chronic inflammatory responses that lead to tissue damage and autoimmunity. Each PID may be characterized by distinct, peculiar autoimmune manifestations. Moreover, different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie autoimmunity in PID. In this review, the main autoimmune manifestations observed in different PID, including humoral immunodeficiencies, combined immunodeficiencies, and syndromes with immunodeficiencies, are summarized. When possible, the pathogenetic mechanism underlying autoimmunity in a specific PID has been explained. PMID:27766253

  11. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  12. A family history of serious complications due to BCG vaccination is a tool for the early diagnosis of severe primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Roxo-Junior, Pérsio; Silva, Jorgete; Andrea, Mauro; Oliveira, Larissa; Ramalho, Fernando; Bezerra, Thiago; Nunes, Altacílio A

    2013-09-10

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) is one of the most severe forms of primary immunodeficiency (PID). Complications of BCG vaccination, especially disseminated infection and its most severe forms, are known to occur in immunodeficient patients, particularly in SCID. A carefully taken family history before BCG injection as well as delaying vaccination if PID is suspected could be a simple and effective method to avoid inappropriate vaccination of an immunodeficient child in some cases until the prospect of newborn screening for SCID has been fully developed. We describe a patient with a very early diagnosis of SCID, which was suspected on the basis of the previous death of two siblings younger than one year due to severe complications secondary to the BCG vaccine. We suggest that a family history of severe or fatal reactions to BCG should be included as a warning sign for an early diagnosis of SCID.

  13. Primary immunodeficiencies of the B lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Moise, Ana; Nedelcu, Filofteia Daniela; Toader, Maria Adela; Sora, Steluta Mihaela; Tica, Anca; Ferastraoaru, Denisa Elena; Constantinescu, Ileana

    2010-01-01

    The immune response consists of two main components: humoral immunity represented by B lymphocytes and cellular immunity maintained by the T lymphocytes. Immunoglobulins, produced by B-lymphocytes, are the main mediators of humoral immunity, and deficiencies at this level affect the body's response to infection. Plasmocytes produce nine antibody izotypes: immunoglobulins G (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4), immunoglobulins M (IgM), immunoglobulins A (IgA1, IgA2), immunoglobulins D (IGD) and immunoglobulins E (IgE). Primary hypogammaglobulinemias are characterized by the occurrence of recurrent infections and, paradoxically, by the occurrence of autoimmune diseases. Characteristic for these diseases is that symptoms occur at 7-9 months after birth, when transplacental antibody titers transmitted from the mother decrease, and the infant's body is unable to synthesize them to normal levels. Primary hypogammaglobulinemias are transmitted genetically, but mutations at the molecular level are still not fully understood. The most common are: Bruton agammaglobulinemia, transient newborn hypogammaglobulinemia, selective immunoglobulin deficiency and variable common immunodeficiency. Treatment consists of monthly antibiotics and immunoglobulins, depending on antibody titers (except for IgA deficiency).

  14. Stem cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiency diseases: The North American Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sung-Yun; Cowan, Morton J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Review This review describes recent studies on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for primary immunodeficiency (PID) in North America including severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Recent Findings Using uniform diagnostic criteria, the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) described the baseline characteristics of newly diagnosed infants with SCID in North America. Analysis of outcomes of HCT for SCID in North America from 2000–2009 showed that young infants, and older infants without active infection, had excellent survival irrespective of type of donor, or transplant approach with regards to conditioning. While pre-transplant conditioning with chemotherapy had a clear and strong negative impact on survival in infants with active infection at the time of transplant, among survivors, conditioning was associated with improved immune reconstitution. However, the potential late effects of conditioning in these infants remain to be characterized. Advances in transplant outcomes for WAS and CGD support the strategy of early transplantation before the onset of severe complications; additional multicenter studies are needed to fully define optimal approaches. Summary The formation of the PIDTC, a multi-institutional North American consortium, has contributed to our understanding of outcomes after transplant for PID. PMID:25259542

  15. Primary immunodeficiency association with systemic lupus erythematosus: review of literature and lessons learned by the Rheumatology Division of a tertiary university hospital at São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Errante, Paolo Ruggero; Perazzio, Sandro Félix; Frazão, Josias Brito; da Silva, Neusa Pereira; Andrade, Luis Eduardo Coelho

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) represent a heterogeneous group of diseases resulting from inherited defects in the development, maturation and normal function of immune cells; thus, turning individuals susceptible to recurrent infections, allergy, autoimmunity, and malignancies. In this retrospective study, autoimmune diseases (AIDs), in special systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) which arose associated to the course of PID, are described. Classically, the literature describes three groups of PID associated with SLE: (1) deficiency of Complement pathway components, (2) defects in immunoglobulin synthesis, and (3) chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Currently, other PID have been described with clinical manifestation of SLE, such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and idiopathic CD4(+) lymphocytopenia. Also we present findings from an adult cohort from the outpatient clinic of the Rheumatology Division of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. The PID manifestations found by our study group were considered mild in terms of severity of infections and mortality in early life. Thus, it is possible that some immunodeficiency states are compatible with survival regarding infectious susceptibility; however these states might represent a strong predisposing factor for the development of immune disorders like those observed in SLE.

  16. Cancers Related to Immunodeficiencies: Update and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Tabarsi, Payam; Mansouri, Davod; Khosravi, Adnan; Garssen, Johan; Velayati, Aliakbar; Adcock, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The life span of patients with primary and secondary immunodeficiency is increasing due to recent improvements in therapeutic strategies. While the incidence of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) is 1:10,000 births, that of secondary immunodeficiencies are more common and are associated with posttransplantation immune dysfunction, with immunosuppressive medication for human immunodeficiency virus or with human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection. After infection, malignancy is the most prevalent cause of death in both children and adults with (PIDs). PIDs more often associated with cancer include common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and severe combined immunodeficiency. This suggests that a protective immune response against both infectious non-self-(pathogens) and malignant self-challenges (cancer) exists. The increased incidence of cancer has been attributed to defective elimination of altered or “transformed” cells and/or defective immunity towards cancer cells. The concept of aberrant immune surveillance occurring in PIDs is supported by evidence in mice and from patients undergoing immunosuppression after transplantation. Here, we discuss the importance of PID defects in the development of malignancies and the current limitations associated with molecular pathogenesis of these diseases and emphasize the need for further knowledge of how specific mutations can modulate the immune system to alter immunosurveillance and thereby play a key role in the etiology of malignancies in PID patients. PMID:27703456

  17. Recent advances in treatment of severe primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Gennery, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare, inborn errors that result in impaired, disordered or uncontrolled immune responses. Whilst symptomatic and prophylactic treatment is available, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an option for many diseases, leading to cure of the immunodeficiency and establishing normal physical and psychological health. Newborn screening for some diseases, whilst improving outcomes, is focusing research on safer and less toxic treatment strategies, which result in durable and sustainable immune function without adverse effects. New conditioning regimens have reduced the risk of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and new methods of manipulating stem cell sources should guarantee a donor for almost all patients. Whilst incremental enhancements in transplantation technique have gradually improved survival outcomes over time, some of these new applications are likely to radically alter our approach to treating primary immunodeficiencies. PMID:26918153

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  19. Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses and Children with Primary Immunodeficiency, Iran, 1995-2014.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Soleyman-Jahi, Saeed; Parvaneh, Leila; Mahmoudi, Sussan; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Yazdani, Reza; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Eslamian, Mohammad H; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Yousefi, Maryam; Kandelousi, Yaghoob M; Oujaghlou, Aliasghar; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-10-01

    Widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccine has led to an ≈99.9% decrease in global incidence of poliomyelitis (from ≈350,000 cases in 1988 to 74 cases in 2015) and eradication of wild-type poliovirus serotypes 2 and 3. However, patients with primary immunodeficiency might shed vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) for an extended period, which could pose a major threat to polio eradication programs. Since 1995, sixteen VDPV populations have been isolated from 14 patients with immunodeficiency in Iran. For these patients, vaccine-associated paralysis, mostly in >1 extremity, was the first manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Seven patients with humoral immunodeficiency cleared VDPV infection more frequently than did 6 patients with combined immunodeficiencies. Our results raise questions about manifestations of VDPVs in immunodeficient patients and the role of cellular immunity against enterovirus infections. On the basis of an association between VDPVs and immunodeficiency, we advocate screening of patients with primary immunodeficiency for shedding of polioviruses.

  20. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, R.; Fernandez-Infante, B.; Fernandez-Rozas, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking. PMID:9799910

  1. Guidelines for genetic studies in single patients: lessons from primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Conley, Mary Ellen; Seligman, Stephen J; Abel, Laurent; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2014-10-20

    Can genetic and clinical findings made in a single patient be considered sufficient to establish a causal relationship between genotype and phenotype? We report that up to 49 of the 232 monogenic etiologies (21%) of human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) were initially reported in single patients. The ability to incriminate single-gene inborn errors in immunodeficient patients results from the relative ease in validating the disease-causing role of the genotype by in-depth mechanistic studies demonstrating the structural and functional consequences of the mutations using blood samples. The candidate genotype can be causally connected to a clinical phenotype using cellular (leukocytes) or molecular (plasma) substrates. The recent advent of next generation sequencing (NGS), with whole exome and whole genome sequencing, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, and gene editing technologies-including in particular the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology-offer new and exciting possibilities for the genetic exploration of single patients not only in hematology and immunology but also in other fields. We propose three criteria for deciding if the clinical and experimental data suffice to establish a causal relationship based on only one case. The patient's candidate genotype must not occur in individuals without the clinical phenotype. Experimental studies must indicate that the genetic variant impairs, destroys, or alters the expression or function of the gene product (or two genetic variants for compound heterozygosity). The causal relationship between the candidate genotype and the clinical phenotype must be confirmed via a relevant cellular phenotype, or by default via a relevant animal phenotype. When supported by satisfaction of rigorous criteria, the report of single patient-based discovery of Mendelian disorders should be encouraged, as it can provide the first step in the understanding of a group of human

  2. Guidelines for genetic studies in single patients: lessons from primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Mary Ellen; Seligman, Stephen J.; Abel, Laurent; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2014-01-01

    Can genetic and clinical findings made in a single patient be considered sufficient to establish a causal relationship between genotype and phenotype? We report that up to 49 of the 232 monogenic etiologies (21%) of human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) were initially reported in single patients. The ability to incriminate single-gene inborn errors in immunodeficient patients results from the relative ease in validating the disease-causing role of the genotype by in-depth mechanistic studies demonstrating the structural and functional consequences of the mutations using blood samples. The candidate genotype can be causally connected to a clinical phenotype using cellular (leukocytes) or molecular (plasma) substrates. The recent advent of next generation sequencing (NGS), with whole exome and whole genome sequencing, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, and gene editing technologies—including in particular the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology—offer new and exciting possibilities for the genetic exploration of single patients not only in hematology and immunology but also in other fields. We propose three criteria for deciding if the clinical and experimental data suffice to establish a causal relationship based on only one case. The patient’s candidate genotype must not occur in individuals without the clinical phenotype. Experimental studies must indicate that the genetic variant impairs, destroys, or alters the expression or function of the gene product (or two genetic variants for compound heterozygosity). The causal relationship between the candidate genotype and the clinical phenotype must be confirmed via a relevant cellular phenotype, or by default via a relevant animal phenotype. When supported by satisfaction of rigorous criteria, the report of single patient–based discovery of Mendelian disorders should be encouraged, as it can provide the first step in the understanding of a group of

  3. Guidelines for genetic studies in single patients: lessons from primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Conley, Mary Ellen; Seligman, Stephen J; Abel, Laurent; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2014-10-20

    Can genetic and clinical findings made in a single patient be considered sufficient to establish a causal relationship between genotype and phenotype? We report that up to 49 of the 232 monogenic etiologies (21%) of human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) were initially reported in single patients. The ability to incriminate single-gene inborn errors in immunodeficient patients results from the relative ease in validating the disease-causing role of the genotype by in-depth mechanistic studies demonstrating the structural and functional consequences of the mutations using blood samples. The candidate genotype can be causally connected to a clinical phenotype using cellular (leukocytes) or molecular (plasma) substrates. The recent advent of next generation sequencing (NGS), with whole exome and whole genome sequencing, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, and gene editing technologies-including in particular the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology-offer new and exciting possibilities for the genetic exploration of single patients not only in hematology and immunology but also in other fields. We propose three criteria for deciding if the clinical and experimental data suffice to establish a causal relationship based on only one case. The patient's candidate genotype must not occur in individuals without the clinical phenotype. Experimental studies must indicate that the genetic variant impairs, destroys, or alters the expression or function of the gene product (or two genetic variants for compound heterozygosity). The causal relationship between the candidate genotype and the clinical phenotype must be confirmed via a relevant cellular phenotype, or by default via a relevant animal phenotype. When supported by satisfaction of rigorous criteria, the report of single patient-based discovery of Mendelian disorders should be encouraged, as it can provide the first step in the understanding of a group of human

  4. Placental transfer of maternally-derived IgA precludes the use of guthrie card eluates as a screening tool for primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Borte, Stephan; Janzi, Magdalena; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Nordvall, Lennart; Winiarski, Jacek; Fasth, Anders; Hammarström, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for neonatal screening tools to improve the long-term clinical outcome of patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Recently, a PCR-based screening method for both TRECs and KRECs using Guthrie card samples has been developed. However, the applicability of these excision circle assays is limited to patients with severe T or B cell lymphopenia (SCID, XLA and A-T), whereas the most common forms of PID are not detected. Absence of serum IgA is seen in a major fraction of patients with immunological defects. As serum IgA in newborns is considered to be of fetal origin, eluates from routinely collected dried blood spot samples might thus be suitable for identification of children with PID. To assess the applicability of such screening assays, stored Guthrie card samples were obtained from 47 patients with various forms of primary immunodeficiency diseases (SCID, XLA, A-T, HIGM and IgAD), 20 individuals with normal serum IgA levels born to IgA-deficient mothers and 51 matched healthy newborns. Surprisingly, normal serum IgA levels were found in all SCID, XLA, A-T and HIGM patients and, additionally, in all those IgAD patients born to IgA-sufficient mothers. Conversely, no serum IgA was found in any of the 16 IgAD patients born by IgA-deficient mothers. Moreover, half of the IgA-sufficient individuals born by IgA-deficient mothers also lacked IgA at birth whereas no IgA-deficient individuals were found among the controls. IgA in neonatal dried blood samples thus appears to be of both maternal and fetal origin and precludes its use as a reliable marker for neonatal screening of primary immunodeficiency diseases. PMID:22916257

  5. Practice parameter for the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Francisco A; Khan, David A; Ballas, Zuhair K; Chinen, Javier; Frank, Michael M; Hsu, Joyce T; Keller, Michael; Kobrynski, Lisa J; Komarow, Hirsh D; Mazer, Bruce; Nelson, Robert P; Orange, Jordan S; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Sorensen, Ricardo U; Verbsky, James W; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Lang, David; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen; Wallace, Dana

    2015-11-01

    The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing the "Practice parameter for the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion.

  6. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Gennery, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy using autologous haematopoietic stem cells offers a valuable treatment option for patients with primary immunodeficiencies who do not have access to an HLA-matched donor, although such treatments have not been without their problems. This review details gene therapy trials for X-linked and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). X-linked SCID was chosen for gene therapy because of previous 'natural' genetic correction through a reversion event in a single lymphoid precursor, demonstrating limited thymopoiesis and restricted T-lymphocyte receptor repertoire, showing selective advantage of progenitors possessing the wild-type gene. In early studies, patients were treated with long terminal repeats-intact gamma-retroviral vectors, without additional chemotherapy. Early results demonstrated gene-transduced cells, sustained thymopoiesis, and a diverse T-lymphocyte repertoire with normal function. Serious adverse effects were subsequently reported in 5 of 20 patients, with T-lymphocyte leukaemia developing, secondary to the viral vector integrating adjacent to a known oncogene. New trials using self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vectors are progressing. Trials for ADA-SCID using gamma-retroviral vectors have been successful, with no similar serious adverse effects reported; trials using lentiviral vectors are in progress. Patients with WAS and CGD treated with early gamma-retroviral vectors have developed similar lymphoproliferative adverse effects to those seen in X-SCID--current trials are using new-generation vectors. Targeted gene insertion using homologous recombination of corrected gene sequences by cellular DNA repair pathways following targeted DNA breakage will improve efficacy and safety of gene therapy. A number of new techniques are discussed.

  7. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiencies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-10-14

    Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Graft Versus Host Disease; X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; Familial Erythrophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Hyper IgM Syndrome; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome; Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome

  8. Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses and Children with Primary Immunodeficiency, Iran, 1995-2014.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Soleyman-Jahi, Saeed; Parvaneh, Leila; Mahmoudi, Sussan; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Yazdani, Reza; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Eslamian, Mohammad H; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Yousefi, Maryam; Kandelousi, Yaghoob M; Oujaghlou, Aliasghar; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-10-01

    Widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccine has led to an ≈99.9% decrease in global incidence of poliomyelitis (from ≈350,000 cases in 1988 to 74 cases in 2015) and eradication of wild-type poliovirus serotypes 2 and 3. However, patients with primary immunodeficiency might shed vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) for an extended period, which could pose a major threat to polio eradication programs. Since 1995, sixteen VDPV populations have been isolated from 14 patients with immunodeficiency in Iran. For these patients, vaccine-associated paralysis, mostly in >1 extremity, was the first manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Seven patients with humoral immunodeficiency cleared VDPV infection more frequently than did 6 patients with combined immunodeficiencies. Our results raise questions about manifestations of VDPVs in immunodeficient patients and the role of cellular immunity against enterovirus infections. On the basis of an association between VDPVs and immunodeficiency, we advocate screening of patients with primary immunodeficiency for shedding of polioviruses. PMID:27648512

  9. Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses and Children with Primary Immunodeficiency, Iran, 1995–2014

    PubMed Central

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Soleyman-jahi, Saeed; Parvaneh, Leila; Mahmoudi, Sussan; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Yazdani, Reza; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Eslamian, Mohammad H.; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Yousefi, Maryam; Kandelousi, Yaghoob M.; Oujaghlou, Aliasghar; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccine has led to an ≈99.9% decrease in global incidence of poliomyelitis (from ≈350,000 cases in 1988 to 74 cases in 2015) and eradication of wild-type poliovirus serotypes 2 and 3. However, patients with primary immunodeficiency might shed vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) for an extended period, which could pose a major threat to polio eradication programs. Since 1995, sixteen VDPV populations have been isolated from 14 patients with immunodeficiency in Iran. For these patients, vaccine-associated paralysis, mostly in >1 extremity, was the first manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Seven patients with humoral immunodeficiency cleared VDPV infection more frequently than did 6 patients with combined immunodeficiencies. Our results raise questions about manifestations of VDPVs in immunodeficient patients and the role of cellular immunity against enterovirus infections. On the basis of an association between VDPVs and immunodeficiency, we advocate screening of patients with primary immunodeficiency for shedding of polioviruses. PMID:27648512

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    AGARWAL, SHRADHA; MAYER, LLOYD

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders such as chronic or acute diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, and inflammatory bowel diseases can indicate immune deficiency. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest lymphoid organ in the body, so it is not surprising that intestinal diseases are common among immunodeficient patients. Gastroenterologists therefore must be able to diagnose and treat patients with primary immunodeficiency. Immune-related gastrointestinal diseases can be classified as those that develop primarily via autoimmunity, infection, an inflammatory response, or malignancy. Immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients with gastrointestinal diseases present with similar symptoms. However, intestinal biopsy specimens from immunodeficient patients often have distinct histologic features, and these patients often fail to respond to conventional therapies. Therefore, early recognition of symptoms and referral to an immunologist for a basic immune evaluation is required to select appropriate treatments. Therapies for primary immunodeficiency comprise immunoglobulin replacement, antibiotics, and, in severe cases, bone marrow transplantation. Treatment of immunodeficient patients with concomitant gastrointestinal disease can be challenging, and therapy with immunomodulators often is required for severe disease. This review aims to guide gastroenterologists in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiency. PMID:23501398

  11. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  12. A phenotypic approach for IUIS PID classification and diagnosis: guidelines for clinicians at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz; Jeddane, Leïla; Ailal, Fatima; Al Herz, Waleed; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Fischer, Alain; Franco, Jose Luis; Geha, Raif S; Hammarström, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D; Roifman, Chaim M; Seger, Reinhard; Tang, Mimi L K; Puck, Jennifer M; Chapel, Helen; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The number of genetically defined Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PID) has increased exponentially, especially in the past decade. The biennial classification published by the IUIS PID expert committee is therefore quickly expanding, providing valuable information regarding the disease-causing genotypes, the immunological anomalies, and the associated clinical features of PIDs. These are grouped in eight, somewhat overlapping, categories of immune dysfunction. However, based on this immunological classification, the diagnosis of a specific PID from the clinician's observation of an individual clinical and/or immunological phenotype remains difficult, especially for non-PID specialists. The purpose of this work is to suggest a phenotypic classification that forms the basis for diagnostic trees, leading the physician to particular groups of PIDs, starting from clinical features and combining routine immunological investigations along the way. We present 8 colored diagnostic figures that correspond to the 8 PID groups in the IUIS Classification, including all the PIDs cited in the 2011 update of the IUIS classification and most of those reported since.

  13. Long-term outcomes of fludarabine, melphalan and antithymocyte globulin as reduced-intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiency disorders: a prospective single center study.

    PubMed

    Hamidieh, A A; Behfar, M; Pourpak, Z; Faghihi-Kashani, S; Fazlollahi, M R; Hosseini, A S; Movahedi, M; Mozafari, M; Moin, M; Ghavamzadeh, A

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) has offered many primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID) patients who are ineligible for myeloablative regimens a chance of cure. However, the beneficial role of RIC was questioned following reports suggesting higher chance of rejection and lower symptom resolution rate in mixed chimerism settings. Forty-five children affected by PIDs with a median age of 21 months underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in our institute from 2007 to 2013. All patients received an identical RIC regimen. Forty-one patients had successful primary engraftment (91%). Of the successful engraftments, 80% (n=33) had stable full donor chimerism at last contact. Overall, eleven transplant-related mortalities were reported including five patients due to sepsis, three children due to grade IV acute GvHD, two due to chronic GvHD and one patient due to sepsis after primary graft failure. The median post-transplantation follow-up of deceased patients was 55 days. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 75.6% and 68.89%, respectively. All surviving patients with successful engraftment became disease free, regardless of having full or mixed chimerism. Our study suggests that RIC regimen provides satisfactory rates of successful engraftment and full chimerism. Furthermore, patients with mixed chimerism were stable in long-term follow-up and this chimerism status offered the potential to resolve symptoms of immunodeficiency. PMID:26595073

  14. Human T Follicular Helper Cells in Primary Immunodeficiency: Quality Just as Important as Quantity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cindy S

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of effector CD4(+) T cells specialised to induce Ab production by B cells. This review highlights some of the recent advances in the field of human Tfh cells that have come from the study of primary immunodeficiencies. In particular it is increasingly evident that the quality of the Tfh cells that are generated, is just as important as the quantity.

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coat Protein Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide in Primary Cortical Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Uhl, George R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1993-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coat protein, gp120, kills neurons in primary cortical cultures at low picomolar concentrations. The toxicity requires external glutamate and calcium and is blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to gp120 toxicity, since nitroarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, prevents toxicity as does deletion of arginine from the incubation medium and hemoglobin, which binds NO. Superoxide dismutase also attenuates toxicity, implying a role for superoxide anions.

  16. Guidelines for the use of human immunoglobulin therapy in patients with primary immunodeficiencies in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Condino-Neto, A; Costa-Carvalho, B T; Grumach, A S; King, A; Bezrodnik, L; Oleastro, M; Leiva, L; Porras, O; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Franco, J L; Sorensen, R U

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are an essential component of the adaptative immune response and hold long-term memory of the immunological experiences throughout life. Antibody defects represent approximately half of the well-known primary immunodeficiencies requiring immunoglobulin replacement therapy. In this article, the authors review the current indications and therapeutic protocols in the Latin American environment. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been a safe procedure that induces dramatic positive changes in the clinical outcome of patients who carry antibody defects. PMID:23333411

  17. Activating PI3Kδ mutations in a cohort of 669 patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Elgizouli, M; Lowe, D M; Speckmann, C; Schubert, D; Hülsdünker, J; Eskandarian, Z; Dudek, A; Schmitt-Graeff, A; Wanders, J; Jørgensen, S F; Fevang, B; Salzer, U; Nieters, A; Burns, S; Grimbacher, B

    2016-02-01

    The gene PIK3CD codes for the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ (PI3Kδ), and is expressed solely in leucocytes. Activating mutations of PIK3CD have been described to cause an autosomal dominant immunodeficiency that shares clinical features with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We screened a cohort of 669 molecularly undefined primary immunodeficiency patients for five reported mutations (four gain-of-function mutations in PIK3CD and a loss of function mutation in PIK3R1) using pyrosequencing. PIK3CD mutations were identified in three siblings diagnosed with CVID and two sporadic cases with a combined immunodeficiency (CID). The PIK3R1 mutation was not identified in the cohort. Our patients with activated PI3Kδ syndrome (APDS) showed a range of clinical and immunological findings, even within a single family, but shared a reduction in naive T cells. PIK3CD gain of function mutations are more likely to occur in patients with defective B and T cell responses and should be screened for in CVID and CID, but are less likely in patients with a pure B cell/hypogammaglobulinaemia phenotype. PMID:26437962

  18. Cytokine immunomodulation for the treatment of infectious diseases: lessons from primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Donald C

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, management of infectious diseases focuses on identification of the causative microbe and the use of pathogen-targeted therapy. With increasing antimicrobial resistance, novel approaches are required. One strategy is to modulate those natural host immune responses that critically mediate resistance to specific microbes. Clinically, this host-directed tactic could be used either alone or in combination with antimicrobial therapy. While conceptually attractive, there is potential concern that the pathways governing host resistance to pathogens in animal models may not extrapolate linearly to humans. Targeting these immune processes clinically may precipitate damaging, epiphenomenal responses. The field of Primary Immunodeficiencies focuses on the characterization of humans with inborn errors of immunity. These rare conditions permit the identification of those molecular and cellular processes that are central to human susceptibility to microbes. In efforts to compensate for defective host responses, this field has also provided a wealth of clinical experience in the effective use of cytokines to treat various active infections, while demonstrating their safety. In this review, we provide a historical perspective of the treatment of infectious diseases, evolving from a focus on the microbe, to an understanding of human immunity; we then outline the growing contribution of Primary Immunodeficiencies to the rational use of adjunctive cytokine immunotherapy in the management of infections.

  19. Prevalence and Morbidity of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases, United States 2001–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kobrynski, Lisa; Powell, Rachel Waltenburg; Bowen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have estimated population prevalence and morbidity of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). We used administrative healthcare databases to estimate the prevalence of PIDD diagnoses in the United States from 2001 to 2007. Methods MarketScan databases compile claims from commercial health insurance plans and Medicaid, recording individual diagnoses for outpatient encounters and hospital stays. We used a cross sectional survey to estimate prevalence of PIDD using related ICD-9 codes (279.0, 279.1, 279.2, 279.8, 279.9, 288.1 and 288.2). Persons with secondary immunodeficiency diagnoses were excluded from analysis. Results Between 2001 and 2007, prevalence of any PIDD diagnosis increased from 38.9 to 50.5 per 100,000 among privately insured and from 29.1 to 41.1 per 100,000 among publicly insured persons. B cell defects predominated. Prevalence was more than twice as high among Whites as among Blacks or Hispanics. Conclusion In this large database, we found a higher prevalence of diagnosed PIDD than has been reported previously from registries. Increased awareness may have contributed to the increasing prevalence. PMID:25257253

  20. Primary immunodeficiencies worldwide: an updated overview from the Jeffrey Modell Centers Global Network.

    PubMed

    Modell, Vicki; Quinn, Jessica; Orange, Jordan; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Modell, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PI) are defects of the immune system that cause severe, sometimes life-threatening, infections if not diagnosed and treated appropriately. Many patients with PI are undiagnosed, under-diagnosed, or misdiagnosed. To raise awareness and assure earliest diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and proper care management, the Jeffrey Modell Foundation (JMF) implemented a physician education and public awareness program beginning in 2003. Data are requested annually from physician experts within the Jeffrey Modell Centers Network (JMCN), consisting of 602 expert physicians, at 253 academic institutions, in 206 cities, and 84 countries spanning six continents. Center Directors reported on patients' specific PI defects and treatment modalities including immunoglobulins, transplantation, and gene therapy as well as data on gender and age. Center Directors also provided physician-reported patient outcomes as well as pre- and post-diagnosis differences. Costs were assigned to these factors. In collaboration with the Network, JMF advocated, funded, and implemented population-based newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency and T cell lymphopenia, covering 96.2 % of all newborns in the US. Finally, 21 JMF Centers participated in a polio surveillance study of patients with PI who either received or have been exposed to the oral polio vaccine. These initiatives have led to an overall better understanding of the immune system and will continue to improve quality of life for those with PI.

  1. Disseminated bronchiectasis in an adult with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Andrés Felipe; Agudelo-Rojas, Olga Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are traditionally considered childhood diseases; however, adults account for 35% of all patients with PID. Antibody deficiencies, especially Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), which have their peak incidence in adulthood, require a high suspicion index. Even though the estimated frequency of CVID is not high (1:25,000), high rates of under diagnosis and under reporting are very likely. The delay in diagnosis increases the morbidity and mortality; therefore, adult physicians should be able to suspect, identify and initiate management of individuals with PID. Here we report the case of a 37 year-old man presenting to the emergency room with dyspnea, fever and cough; he developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. He complained of recurring pneumonia associated with widespread bronchiectasis since he was 18 years old. Serum immunoglobulins quantification showed severe hypogammaglobulinemia (total IgG <140 mg/dL; total IgA, 2.9 mg/dL; and total IgM <5 mg/dL). Treatment with Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) 10% was started, and with antibiotic treatment for severe pneumonia (during 14 days) was also prescribed. His clinical evolution has been favorable after one year follow-up. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) diagnosis was made.

  2. Disseminated bronchiectasis in an adult with common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo-Rojas, Olga Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are traditionally considered childhood diseases; however, adults account for 35% of all patients with PID. Antibody deficiencies, especially Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), which have their peak incidence in adulthood, require a high suspicion index. Even though the estimated frequency of CVID is not high (1:25,000), high rates of under diagnosis and under reporting are very likely. The delay in diagnosis increases the morbidity and mortality; therefore, adult physicians should be able to suspect, identify and initiate management of individuals with PID. Here we report the case of a 37 year-old man presenting to the emergency room with dyspnea, fever and cough; he developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. He complained of recurring pneumonia associated with widespread bronchiectasis since he was 18 years old. Serum immunoglobulins quantification showed severe hypogammaglobulinemia (total IgG <140 mg/dL; total IgA, 2.9 mg/dL; and total IgM <5 mg/dL). Treatment with Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) 10% was started, and with antibiotic treatment for severe pneumonia (during 14 days) was also prescribed. His clinical evolution has been favorable after one year follow-up. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) diagnosis was made. PMID:26019385

  3. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Course Is Predicted by the Extent of Virus Replication during Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Staprans, Silvija I.; Dailey, Peter J.; Rosenthal, Ann; Horton, Chris; Grant, Robert M.; Lerche, Nicholas; Feinberg, Mark B.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between early viral infection events and immunodeficiency virus disease progression, quantitative-competitive and branched-DNA methods of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA quantitation were cross-validated and used to measure viremia following infection of rhesus macaques with the pathogenic SIVmac251 virus isolate. Excellent correlation between the methods suggests that both accurately approximate SIV copy number. Plasma viremia was evident 4 days postinfection, and rapid viral expansion led to peak viremia levels of 107 to 109 SIV RNA copies/ml by days 8 to 17. Limited resolution of primary viremia was accompanied by relatively short, though variable, times to the development of AIDS (81 to 630 days). The persistent high-level viremia observed following intravenous inoculation of SIVmac251 explains the aggressive disease course in this model. Survival analyses demonstrated that the disease course is established 8 to 17 days postinfection, when peak viremia is observed. The most significant predictor of disease progression was the extent of viral decline following peak viremia; larger decrements in viremia were associated with both lower steady-state viremia (P = 0.0005) and a reduced hazard of AIDS (P = 0.004). The data also unexpectedly suggested that following SIVmac251 infection, animals with the highest peak viremia were better able to control virus replication rather than more rapidly developing disease. Analysis of early viral replication dynamics should help define host responses that protect from disease progression and should provide quantitative measures to assess the extent to which protective responses may be induced by prophylactic vaccination. PMID:10233944

  4. Characterization of Primary Isolate-Like Variants of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John M.; Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy H.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Zhou, Jin Tao; Pauza, C. David; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Letvin, Norman L.; Montefiori, David C.

    1999-01-01

    Several different strains of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) that contain the envelope glycoproteins of either T-cell-line-adapted (TCLA) strains or primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are now available. One of the advantages of these chimeric viruses is their application to studies of HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies in preclinical AIDS vaccine studies in nonhuman primates. In this regard, an important consideration is the spectrum of antigenic properties exhibited by the different envelope glycoproteins used for SHIV construction. The antigenic properties of six SHIV variants were characterized here in neutralization assays with recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4), monoclonal antibodies, and serum samples from SHIV-infected macaques and HIV-1-infected individuals. Neutralization of SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, 89.6, and 89.6P by autologous and heterologous sera from SHIV-infected macaques was restricted to an extent that these viruses may be considered heterologous to one another in their major neutralization determinants. Little or no variation was seen in the neutralization determinants on SHIV variants 89.6P, 89.6PD, and SHIV-KB9. Neutralization of SHIV HXBc2 by sera from HXBc2-infected macaques could be blocked with autologous V3-loop peptide; this was less true in the case of SHIV 89.6 and sera from SHIV 89.6-infected macaques. The poorly immunogenic but highly conserved epitope for monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 was a target for neutralization on SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, and 89.6 but not on 89.6P and KB9. The 2G12 epitope was a target for neutralization on all five SHIV variants. SHIV variants KU2, 89.6, 89.6P, 89.6PD, and KB9 exhibited antigenic properties characteristic of primary isolates by being relatively insensitive to neutralization in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with serum samples from HIV-1-infected individuals and 12-fold to 38-fold less sensitive to inhibition with recombinant soluble CD4 than TCLA

  5. Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search AAAAI Breadcrumb navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Library ▸ Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies Share | Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI ...

  6. Primary stage of feline immunodeficiency virus infection: viral dissemination and cellular targets.

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, A M; Dua, N; Faith, T G; Moore, P F; Pedersen, N C; Dandekar, S

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify cellular and organ targets of acute feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in vivo. Tissues of FIV-infected cats were studied at eight time points during the first 3 months after experimental infection. FIV nucleic acids were first detected by in situ hybridization 21 days after infection, approximately 1.5 weeks after lymph node enlargement was first observed and 3 weeks before the primary acute flu-like illness. The majority of FIV-infected cells were present in lymphoid organs, though low numbers of infected cells were noted in nonlymphoid organs as well. Germinal centers harbored many of the FIV-infected cells within lymphoid tissues. The thymic cortex was also a major site of early infection. Combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that T lymphocytes were the primary target of early FIV infection in tissues of cats before the onset of clinical signs of acute illness. An unidentified population of mononuclear cells and a few macrophages were also infected. During the ensuing acute flu-like illness, the proportion of FIV-infected macrophages in tissues increased dramatically. This early shift in the predominant cellular localization of FIV from T lymphocytes to macrophages may be important for establishing viral persistence. Images PMID:8151773

  7. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  8. Serotyping of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates from diverse geographic locations by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zolla-Pazner, S; O'Leary, J; Burda, S; Gorny, M K; Kim, M; Mascola, J; McCutchan, F

    1995-01-01

    The immunologic relatedness of the various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clades was determined with 13 human anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to six immunogenic regions of the HIV-1 structural proteins. The immunoreactivity of the native, oligomeric viral envelope glycoproteins expressed on the surfaces of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected in vitro with primary isolates from clades A through E was determined by flow cytometry. Some epitopes in the immunodominant region of gp41 and the C terminus of gp120 appear to be HIV-1 group specific in that they are expressed on the surfaces of cells in cultures infected with the majority of viruses tested from clades A to E. Epitopes within the V3 region appear to be clade restricted. Surprisingly, one MAb to an epitope in the C terminus of gp120 was entirely clade B specific. Staining with anti-V2 and anti-CD4 binding domain (CD4bd) reagents was infrequently detected. Anti-CD4bd MAbs stained only CD4-negative T cells because the CD4bd of gp120 appeared to be complexed with membrane CD4. When present, the epitopes of V2 and the CD4bd appeared to be expressed on cells infected with various clades. Thus, the results suggest that MAbs to gp41, the C terminus, and the V3 loop of gp120 are most useful in serotyping primary isolates of HIV-1, providing group-specific, clade-restricted, and clade-specific reagents. The use of the immunofluorescent method with the reagents described herein distinguishes infection with clade B from that with all other HIV-1 clades. With additional MAbs, this technique will allow a broadly applicable, reproducible, and practical method for serotyping HIV-1. PMID:7745728

  9. TOXIRAE PRO PID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ToxiRAE Pro PID measures total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a photoionization detector (PID). This sensor can be programmed to measure concentrations of a specified compound automatically and has a real time reading of VOC concentrations in parts per million (ppm) ...

  10. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... herpes, syphilis, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]). Ultrasonography: A test in which sound waves are used to examine internal structures. During pregnancy, it can be used to examine ...

  11. Advances in neonatal screening for primary immune deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, TINGTING; LI, ZHENGUANG; ZHANG, QIULI

    2016-01-01

    The congenital disorders of immune competence are known as primary immunodeficiencies (PID) and are mainly characterized by a pathological susceptibility to infection. These infections are mostly of time repetitive and drug resistant in nature. The number of infected infants has reached over 200 and is on the increase. Additionally, clinical severity of the disease has been confirmed to be extensive. The increasing number of these severe PIDs is due to the lack of specific as well as efficient management avenues. New assays and concepts for newborn screening of severe primary immune deficiencies are being explored and the present review focused on these new upcoming strategies for improved screening of neonates. PMID:27168770

  12. Persistence and Fitness of Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Acquired in Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Bluma G.; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Petrella, Marco; Moisi, Daniela; Oliveira, Maureen; Detorio, Mervi; Spira, Bonnie; Essabag, Vidal; Conway, Brian; Lalonde, Richard; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the persistence and fitness of multidrug-resistant (MDR) viruses acquired during primary human immunodeficiency virus infection (PHI). In four individuals, MDR infections persisted over the entire study period, ranging from 36 weeks to 5 years, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. In stark contrast, identified source partners in two cases showed expected outgrowth of wild-type (WT) virus within 12 weeks of treatment interruption. In the first PHI case, triple-class MDR resulted in low plasma viremia (1.6 to 3 log copies/ml) over time compared with mean values obtained for an untreated PHI group harboring WT infections (4.1 to 4.3 log copies/ml). Increasing viremia in PHI patient 1 at week 52 was associated with the de novo emergence of a protease inhibitor-resistant variant through a recombination event involving the original MDR virus. MDR infections in two other untreated PHI patients yielded viremia levels typical of the untreated WT group. A fourth patient's MDR infection yielded low viremia (<50 to 500 copies/ml) for 5 years despite his having phenotypic resistance to all antiretroviral drugs in his treatment regimen. In two of these PHI cases, a rebound to higher levels of plasma viremia only occurred when the M184V mutation in reverse transcriptase could no longer be detected and, in a third case, nondetection of M184V was associated with an inability to isolate virus. To further evaluate the fitness of MDR variants acquired in PHI, MDR and corresponding WT viruses were isolated from index and source partners, respectively. Although MDR viral infectivity (50% tissue culture infective dose) was comparable to that observed for WT viruses, MDR infections in each case demonstrated 2-fold and 13- to 23-fold reductions in p24 antigen and reverse transcriptase enzymatic activity, respectively. In dual-infection competition assays, MDR viruses consistently demonstrated a marked replicative disadvantage compared with WT virus. These results

  13. Current state and future perspectives of the Latin American Society for Immunodeficiencies (LASID).

    PubMed

    Condino-Neto, A; Sorensen, R U; Gómez Raccio, A C; King, A; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Franco, J L

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are genetic diseases that affect the immune system and for the last 20 years, the Latin American Society for Immunodeficiencies (LASID) has been promoting initiatives in awareness, research, diagnosis, and treatment for the affected patients in Latin America. These initiatives have resulted in the development of programmes such as the LASID Registry (with 4900 patients registered as of January 2014), fellowships in basic and clinical research, PID summer schools, biannual meetings, and scientific reports, amongst others. These achievements highlight the critical role that LASID plays as a scientific organisation in promoting science, research and education in this field in Latin America. However, challenges remain in some of these areas and the Society must envision additional strategies to tackle them for the benefit of the patients. In June 2013, a group of experts in the field met to discuss the contributions of LASID to the initiatives of PID in Latin America, and this article summarises the current state and future perspectives of this society and its role in the advance of PIDs in Latin America. PMID:25294607

  14. Primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viremia and central nervous system invasion in a novel hu-PBL-immunodeficient mouse strain.

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Y; Tanaka, Y; Kira, J; Ito, M; Hioki, K; Misawa, N; Kawano, Y; Yamasaki, K; Tanaka, R; Suzuki, Y; Ueyama, Y; Terada, E; Tanaka, T; Miyasaka, M; Kobayashi, T; Kumazawa, Y; Yamamoto, N

    1997-01-01

    We established four new mouse strains with defective T and B cells as well as defects in innate immunological reactions using an NK cell depletion antibody and showed that all mutant mouse strains efficiently received human peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) engraftment (hu-PBL-scid mice). Higher levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication were observed in these new hu-PBL-scid mice than in conventional hu-PBL-C.B-17-scid mice. In one particular strain, hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice, high levels of HIV-1 viremia (more than 10(6) 50% infectious doses per ml) were detected after infection with HIV-1. The plasma viral load was about 100 to 1,000 times higher than that observed in other hu-PBL-scid mice infected with HIV-1. Although high-level viremia did not correlate with the total amount of HIV-1 RNA in cells from infected mice, high levels of free virions were detected only in hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice. HIV-1 viremia induced systemic HIV-1 infection involving the liver, lungs, and brain. PCR in situ hybridization confirmed that HIV-1-infected cells invaded the brain tissue of the hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice. Our results suggest that the genetic background, including innate immunity, is critical in the development of primary HIV-1 viremia and subsequent central nervous system invasion with HIV-1. The hu-PBL-NOD-scid mouse represents a useful model for the study of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 in vivo, especially brain involvement, and therapy of primary HIV-1 viremia. PMID:9032379

  15. Primary Neuritic Hansen's Disease presenting as Ulnar Nerve Abscess in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Karjigi, S; Herakal, K; Murthy, S C; Bathina, A; Kusuma, M R; Nikhil, K R Y

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy has been increasingly known to have an enigmatic relationship with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Co-infection may result in atypical manifestations of leprosy. A 45-year old human immunodeficiency virus-positive male; agricultural laborer presented with a swelling over right elbow, right hand deformity, generalized itching and recurrent vesicles overthe perinasal area. Clinical and investigational findings were consistent with mononeuritic type of Hansen's disease with right sided silent ulnar nerve abscess, partial claw hand. CD4+ count of the patientwas 430 cells/cmm. This patient also hadherpes simplex labialis, with HIV-associated pruritus. To the best of our knowledge such an atypical presentation has not been reported earlier. PMID:26999990

  16. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection.

  17. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection. PMID:25374871

  18. Temporal association of cellular immune responses with the initial control of viremia in primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koup, R A; Safrit, J T; Cao, Y; Andrews, C A; McLeod, G; Borkowsky, W; Farthing, C; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    Virologic and immunologic studies were performed on five patients presenting with primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors specific for cells expressing antigens of HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Env were detected at or within 3 weeks of presentation in four of the five patients and were detected in all five patients by 3 to 6 months after presentation. The one patient with an absent initial CTL response had prolonged symptoms, persistent viremia, and low CD4+ T-cell count. Neutralizing antibody activity was absent at the time of presentation in all five patients. These findings suggest that cellular immunity is involved in the initial control of virus replication in primary HIV-1 infection and indicate a role for CTL in protective immunity to HIV-1 in vivo. PMID:8207839

  19. Comprehensive models of human primary and metastatic colorectal tumors in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice by chemokine targeting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired subcutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening.

  20. Genetic Diagnosis Using Whole Exome Sequencing in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maffucci, Patrick; Filion, Charles A.; Boisson, Bertrand; Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has proven an effective tool for the discovery of genetic defects in patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). However, success in dissecting the genetic etiology of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has been limited. We outline a practical framework for using WES to identify causative genetic defects in these subjects. WES was performed on 50 subjects diagnosed with CVID who had at least one of the following criteria: early onset, autoimmune/inflammatory manifestations, low B lymphocytes, and/or familial history of hypogammaglobulinemia. Following alignment and variant calling, exomes were screened for mutations in 269 PID-causing genes. Variants were filtered based on the mode of inheritance and reported frequency in the general population. Each variant was assessed by study of familial segregation and computational predictions of deleteriousness. Out of 433 variations in PID-associated genes, we identified 17 probable disease-causing mutations in 15 patients (30%). These variations were rare or private and included monoallelic mutations in NFKB1, STAT3, CTLA4, PIK3CD, and IKZF1, and biallelic mutations in LRBA and STXBP2. Forty-two other damaging variants were found but were not considered likely disease-causing based on the mode of inheritance and/or patient phenotype. WES combined with analysis of PID-associated genes is a cost-effective approach to identify disease-causing mutations in CVID patients with severe phenotypes and was successful in 30% of our cohort. As targeted therapeutics are becoming the mainstay of treatment for non-infectious manifestations in CVID, this approach will improve management of patients with more severe phenotypes. PMID:27379089

  1. Genetic Diagnosis Using Whole Exome Sequencing in Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Maffucci, Patrick; Filion, Charles A; Boisson, Bertrand; Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has proven an effective tool for the discovery of genetic defects in patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). However, success in dissecting the genetic etiology of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has been limited. We outline a practical framework for using WES to identify causative genetic defects in these subjects. WES was performed on 50 subjects diagnosed with CVID who had at least one of the following criteria: early onset, autoimmune/inflammatory manifestations, low B lymphocytes, and/or familial history of hypogammaglobulinemia. Following alignment and variant calling, exomes were screened for mutations in 269 PID-causing genes. Variants were filtered based on the mode of inheritance and reported frequency in the general population. Each variant was assessed by study of familial segregation and computational predictions of deleteriousness. Out of 433 variations in PID-associated genes, we identified 17 probable disease-causing mutations in 15 patients (30%). These variations were rare or private and included monoallelic mutations in NFKB1, STAT3, CTLA4, PIK3CD, and IKZF1, and biallelic mutations in LRBA and STXBP2. Forty-two other damaging variants were found but were not considered likely disease-causing based on the mode of inheritance and/or patient phenotype. WES combined with analysis of PID-associated genes is a cost-effective approach to identify disease-causing mutations in CVID patients with severe phenotypes and was successful in 30% of our cohort. As targeted therapeutics are becoming the mainstay of treatment for non-infectious manifestations in CVID, this approach will improve management of patients with more severe phenotypes. PMID:27379089

  2. Primary infection with simian immunodeficiency virus: plasmacytoid dendritic cell homing to lymph nodes, type I interferon, and immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Malleret, Benoît; Manéglier, Benjamin; Karlsson, Ingrid; Lebon, Pierre; Nascimbeni, Michelina; Perié, Leïla; Brochard, Patricia; Delache, Benoît; Calvo, Julien; Andrieu, Thibault; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Hosmalin, Anne; Le Grand, Roger; Vaslin, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are antigen-presenting cells that develop into type-I interferon (IFN-I)-producing cells in response to pathogens. Their role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis needs to be understood. We analyzed their dynamics in relation to innate and adaptive immunity very early during the acute phase of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in 18 macaques. pDC counts decreased in blood and increased in peripheral lymph nodes, consistent with early recruitment in secondary lymphoid tissues. These changes correlated with the kinetic and intensity of viremia and were associated with a peak of plasma IFN-I. IFN-I and viremia were positively correlated with functional activity of the immune suppression associated enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and FoxP3(+)CD8(+) T cells, which both negatively correlated with SIV-specific T-cell proliferation and CD4(+) T-cell activation. These data suggest that pDCs and IFN-I play a key role in shaping innate and adaptive immunity toward suppressive pathways during the acute phase of SIV/HIV primary infection. PMID:18787223

  3. An Aggressive Plasmablastic Lymphoma of the Oral Cavity as Primary Manifestation of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Minué, Gonzalo; Campitelli, Ana; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare entity that was first described in the jaws and the oral cavity of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Plasmablastic lymphoma is considered as a diffuse, large, B-cell lymphoma with a unique phenotype and a predilection for the oral cavity. Objective The authors describe a case of an aggressive plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity as the primary manifestation of AIDS. Resumed Report We report a case of plasmablastic lymphoma involving only the oral cavity as the first manifestation of AIDS. Diagnosis was confirmed by the oral lesion biopsy and the histopathologic examination that showed a dense infiltrate composed of atypical lymphocytes with numerous plasmocytes that expressed the plasma cell markers MUM-1 and CD138 and that were negative for the B-cell markers CD3, CD20, and CD45. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization revealed the Epstein-Barr virus genome in the atypical cells. Polymerase chain reaction was also positive for human herpesvirus-8 RNA. Conclusion The HIV serologic status should be evaluated in all patients with plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity or extraoral sites.

  4. Use of intravenous immunoglobulin and adjunctive therapies in the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies: A working group report of and study by the Primary Immunodeficiency Committee of the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology.

    PubMed

    Yong, Pierre L; Boyle, John; Ballow, Mark; Boyle, Marcia; Berger, Melvin; Bleesing, Jack; Bonilla, Franciso A; Chinen, Javier; Cunninghamm-Rundles, Charlotte; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Nelson, Lois; Wasserman, Richard L; Williams, Kathleen C; Orange, Jordan S

    2010-05-01

    There are an expanding number of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDDs), each associated with unique diagnostic and therapeutic complexities. Limited data, however, exist supporting specific therapeutic interventions. Thus, a survey of PIDD management was administered to allergists/immunologists in the United States to identify current perspectives and practices. Among 405 respondents, the majority of key management practices identified were consistent with existing data and guidelines, including the provision of immunoglobulin therapy, immunoglobulin dosing and selective avoidance of live viral vaccines. Practices for which there are little specific data or evidence-based guidance were also examined, including evaluation of IgG trough levels for patients receiving immunoglobulin, use of prophylactic antibiotics and recommendations for complementary/alternative medicine. Here, variability applied to PIDD patients was identified. Differences between practitioners clinically focused upon PIDD and general allergists/immunologists were also identified. Thus, a need for expanded clinical research in PIDD to optimize management and potentially improve outcomes was defined.

  5. Use of intravenous immunoglobulin and adjunctive therapies in the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies: A working group report of and study by the Primary Immunodeficiency Committee of the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology.

    PubMed

    Yong, Pierre L; Boyle, John; Ballow, Mark; Boyle, Marcia; Berger, Melvin; Bleesing, Jack; Bonilla, Franciso A; Chinen, Javier; Cunninghamm-Rundles, Charlotte; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Nelson, Lois; Wasserman, Richard L; Williams, Kathleen C; Orange, Jordan S

    2010-05-01

    There are an expanding number of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDDs), each associated with unique diagnostic and therapeutic complexities. Limited data, however, exist supporting specific therapeutic interventions. Thus, a survey of PIDD management was administered to allergists/immunologists in the United States to identify current perspectives and practices. Among 405 respondents, the majority of key management practices identified were consistent with existing data and guidelines, including the provision of immunoglobulin therapy, immunoglobulin dosing and selective avoidance of live viral vaccines. Practices for which there are little specific data or evidence-based guidance were also examined, including evaluation of IgG trough levels for patients receiving immunoglobulin, use of prophylactic antibiotics and recommendations for complementary/alternative medicine. Here, variability applied to PIDD patients was identified. Differences between practitioners clinically focused upon PIDD and general allergists/immunologists were also identified. Thus, a need for expanded clinical research in PIDD to optimize management and potentially improve outcomes was defined. PMID:19914873

  6. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a serious condition, in women. 1 in 8 women with a history of PID experience difficulties getting pregnant. You can ... negative STD test results; • Using latex condoms the right way every time you have ... your medical history, physical exam, and other test results. You may ...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of a new 10% intravenous immunoglobulin in patients receiving replacement therapy for primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard L; Church, Joseph A; Peter, Hans H; Sleasman, John W; Melamed, Isaac; Stein, Mark R; Bichler, Johann

    2009-06-28

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used in treating immunodeficiencies and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders. As manufacturing processes and storage can alter IgG molecules, pharmacokinetic assessments are important for new preparations. Thus, we studied pharmacokinetics of IgPro10, a new 10% liquid IVIg product stabilised with l-proline, in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA). Patients received IgPro10 for >or=4 months (median dose of 444mg/kg, at 3- or 4-week intervals). Median total IgG serum concentrations increased from 10.2g/l pre-infusion to 23.2g/l at infusion end. Serum IgG concentrations decreased in a biphasic manner; median terminal half-life was 36.6 days. Median half-lives were 33.2 for IgG(1), 36.3 for IgG(2), 25.9 for IgG(3) and 36.4 days for IgG(4). Specific antibody concentrations (anti-CMV, anti-Hemophilus influenzae type B, anti-tetanus toxoid and anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae) decreased with median half-lives of 22.3-30.5 days. IgPro10 pharmacokinetics were similar in patients with CVID and XLA, although patients with CVID showed higher levels of anti-tetanus and anti-S. pneumoniae antibodies than patients with XLA, suggesting residual specific antibody production. IgPro10 pharmacokinetics fulfilled expectations for and were similar to intact IgG products. Administration of IgPro10 at 3- or 4-week intervals achieved sufficient plasma concentrations of total IgG, IgG subclasses and antibodies specific to important pathogens.

  8. Exome Sequencing Analysis Reveals Variants in Primary Immunodeficiency Genes in Patients With Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelsen, Judith R.; Dawany, Noor; Moran, Christopher J.; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Sarmady, Mahdi; Sasson, Ariella; Pauly-Hubbard, Helen; Martinez, Alejandro; Maurer, Kelly; Soong, Joanne; Rappaport, Eric; Franke, Andre; Keller, Andreas; Winter, Harland S.; Mamula, Petar; Piccoli, David; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Daly, Mark; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Devoto, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD), IBD diagnosed ≤5 y of age, frequently presents with a different and more severe phenotype than older-onset IBD. We investigated whether patients with VEO-IBD carry rare or novel variants in genes associated with immunodeficiencies that might contribute to disease development. Methods Patients with VEO-IBD and parents (when available) were recruited from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from March 2013 through July 2014. We analyzed DNA from 125 patients with VEO-IBD (ages 3 weeks to 4 y) and 19 parents, 4 of whom also had IBD. Exome capture was performed by Agilent SureSelect V4, and sequencing was performed using the Illumina HiSeq platform. Alignment to human genome GRCh37 was achieved followed by post-processing and variant calling. Following functional annotation, candidate variants were analyzed for change in protein function, minor allele frequency <0.1%, and scaled combined annotation dependent depletion scores ≤10. We focused on genes associated with primary immunodeficiencies and related pathways. An additional 210 exome samples from patients with pediatric IBD (n=45) or adult-onset Crohn's disease (n=20) and healthy individuals (controls, n=145) were obtained from the University of Kiel, Germany and used as control groups. Results Four-hundred genes and regions associated with primary immunodeficiency, covering approximately 6500 coding exons totaling > 1 Mbp of coding sequence, were selected from the whole exome data. Our analysis revealed novel and rare variants within these genes that could contribute to the development of VEO-IBD, including rare heterozygous missense variants in IL10RA and previously unidentified variants in MSH5 and CD19. Conclusions In an exome sequence analysis of patients with VEO-IBD and their parents, we identified variants in genes that regulate B- and T-cell functions and could contribute to pathogenesis. Our analysis could lead to the

  9. Determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape from the primary CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola A; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R; Wong, Mailee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nowak, Martin A; Shaw, George M; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-11-15

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication.

  10. Determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape from the primary CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola A; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R; Wong, Mailee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nowak, Martin A; Shaw, George M; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-11-15

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication. PMID:15545352

  11. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  12. [House calls to patients with an immunodeficiency disorder].

    PubMed

    Keestra, R W

    1988-10-01

    Eighty-seven patients with a primary immunodeficiency (PID) and their family doctors were interviewed on their opinions and experiences with the illness and the treatment. The aim of this inquiry was to gain insight in the problems that arise at home. Primary immunodeficiencies are rare and therefore unknown not only to the broad public, but also to many doctors. Patients experience much uncertainty about the character of their ailment, the risk of infections, the treatment possibilities and the prognosis. Information is greatly needed, but hardly available. Patients receive no written information on the subject from their specialists. The contact between PID patients and their family doctor is, generally speaking, poor. Treatment is done mainly on a (poli)clinical basis, leaving the family doctor out of the picture. Most patients say they would prefer home treatment; most family doctors say they would like to be more involved. The patient, however, is very often rushed to the hospital with the first symptoms of an infection. In this article it is argued why it is advisable to improve the contact between these patients and their family practitioners, even when the disease requires treatment by (super)specialists. In view of these facts and arguments it can be considered a challenge for the doctors at home and in the hospital to integrate both kinds of medical care, in order to prevent psychosocial disorders as a sequel of a somatic disease. The second part of the article deals with the setting up of an organisation of PID patients. Benefits of such an organisation, and also the possible risks involved, are discussed. PMID:3206519

  13. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  14. WS/PIDS: standard interoperable PIDS in web services environments.

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, E; Dorobanţu, M; Govoni, S; Padh, S; Mun, S K

    2008-01-01

    An electronic health record depends on the consistent handling of people's identities within and outside healthcare organizations. Currently, the Person Identification Service (PIDS), a CORBA specification, is the only well-researched standard that meets these needs. In this paper, we introduce WS/PIDS, a PIDS specification for Web Services (WS) that closely matches the original PIDS and improves on it by providing explicit support for medical multimedia attributes. WS/PIDS is currently supported by a test implementation, layered on top of a PIDS back-end, with Java- and NET-based, and Web clients. WS/PIDS is interoperable among platforms; it preserves PIDS semantics to a large extent, and it is intended to be fully compliant with established and emerging WS standards. The specification is open source and immediately usable in dynamic clinical systems participating in grid environments. WS/PIDS has been tested successfully with a comprehensive set of use cases, and it is being used in a clinical research setting.

  15. An env gene derived from a primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate confers high in vivo replicative capacity to a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, K A; Li, J T; Voss, G; Lekutis, C; Tenner-Racz, K; Racz, P; Lin, W; Montefiori, D C; Lee-Parritz, D E; Lu, Y; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Letvin, N L

    1996-01-01

    To explore the roles played by specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes in determining the in vivo replicative capacity of AIDS viruses, we have examined the replication kinetics and virus-specific immune responses in rhesus monkeys following infection with two chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs). These viruses were composed of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 expressing HIV-1 env and the associated auxiliary HIV-1 genes tat, vpu, and rep. Virus replication was assessed during primary infection of rhesus monkeys by measuring plasma SIVmac p27 levels and by quantifying virus replication in lymph nodes using in situ hybridization. SHIV-HXBc2, which expresses the HIV-1 env of a T-cell-tropic, laboratory-adapted strain of HIV-1 (HXBc2), replicated well in rhesus monkey peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in vitro but replicated only to low levels when inoculated in rhesus monkeys. In contrast, SHIV-89.6 was constructed with the HIV-1 env gene of a T-cell- and macrophage-tropic clone of a patient isolate of HIV-1 (89.6). This virus replicated to a lower level in monkey PBL in vitro but replicated to a higher degree in monkeys during primary infection. Moreover, monkeys infected with SHIV-89.6 developed an inversion in the PBL CD4/CD8 ratio coincident with the clearance of primary viremia. The differences in the in vivo consequences of infection by these two SHIVs could not be explained by differences in the immune responses elicited by these viruses, since infected animals had comparable type-specific neutralizing antibody titers, proliferative responses to recombinant HIV-1 gp120, and virus-specific cytolytic effector T-cell responses. With the demonstration that a chimeric SHIV can replicate to high levels during primary infection in rhesus monkeys, this model can now be used to define genetic determinants of HIV-1 pathogenicity. PMID:8627800

  16. Genetic polymorphism study of regulatory B cell molecules and cellular immunity function in an adult patient with Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, A; Tselios, K; Skendros, P; Bougiouklis, D; Theodorou, I; Boura, P

    2008-01-01

    A 43 year old female patient presented for recurrent bacterial lower respiratory infections. A research for immunodeficiency status revealed total hypogammaglobulinemia, reduced IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 subclass levels, and low number of B lymphocytes (CD19+). Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) 11.2 category was diagnosed according to recent criteria of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Further immunological study consisting of genetic polymorphism of genes relating to differentiation, activation and function of B cells (ICOS, BAFF receptor BCMA and TACI) was performed, which did not reveal any related mutations. T cell parameters and Th1/Th2 cytokine network did not show any disturbances. It is postulated that probable endstage B cell differentiation defects should be investigated. The patient receives IVIGs replacement thereafter and the rate and severity of infections have significantly improved. PMID:18923749

  17. Comparison of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral loads in Kenyan women, men, and infants during primary and early infection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Barbra A; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Lavreys, Ludo; John-Stewart, Grace C; Nduati, Ruth; Panteleeff, Dana D; Emery, Sandra; Kreiss, Joan K; Overbaugh, Julie

    2003-06-01

    Steady-state levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in plasma reached at approximately 4 months postinfection are highly predictive of disease progression. Several studies have investigated viral levels in adults or infants during primary and early infection. However, no studies have directly compared these groups. We compared differences in peak and set point plasma HIV-1 RNA viral loads among antiretrovirus-naive Kenyan infants and adults for whom the timing of infection was well defined. Peak and set point viral loads were significantly higher in infants than in adults. We did not observe any gender-specific differences in viral set point in either adults or infants. However, infants who acquired HIV-1 in the first 2 months of life, either in utero, intrapartum, or through early breast milk transmission, had significantly higher set point HIV-1 RNA levels than infants who were infected after 2 months of age through late breast milk transmission or adults who were infected through heterosexual transmission.

  18. Biallelic loss-of-function mutation in NIK causes a primary immunodeficiency with multifaceted aberrant lymphoid immunity

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Katharina L.; Klaver, Stefanie; Doğu, Figen; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Garncarz, Wojciech; Bilic, Ivan; Mace, Emily; Salzer, Elisabeth; Domínguez Conde, Cecilia; Sic, Heiko; Májek, Peter; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Haskoloğlu, Şule; Gökalp Bolkent, Musa; Küpesiz, Alphan; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Pickl, Winfried F.; van Zelm, Menno C.; Eibel, Hermann; Orange, Jordan S.; Ikincioğulları, Aydan; Boztuğ, Kaan

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders enable identification of genes with crucial roles in the human immune system. Here we study patients suffering from recurrent bacterial, viral and Cryptosporidium infections, and identify a biallelic mutation in the MAP3K14 gene encoding NIK (NF-κB-inducing kinase). Loss of kinase activity of mutant NIK, predicted by in silico analysis and confirmed by functional assays, leads to defective activation of both canonical and non-canonical NF-κB signalling. Patients with mutated NIK exhibit B-cell lymphopenia, decreased frequencies of class-switched memory B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia due to impaired B-cell survival, and impaired ICOSL expression. Although overall T-cell numbers are normal, both follicular helper and memory T cells are perturbed. Natural killer (NK) cells are decreased and exhibit defective activation, leading to impaired formation of NK-cell immunological synapses. Collectively, our data illustrate the non-redundant role for NIK in human immune responses, demonstrating that loss-of-function mutations in NIK can cause multiple aberrations of lymphoid immunity. PMID:25406581

  19. Neutralizing Antibodies in Sera from Macaques Infected with Chimeric Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Containing the Envelope Glycoproteins of either a Laboratory-Adapted Variant or a Primary Isolate of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy; Lewis, Mark G.; Collman, Ronald G.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Bolognesi, Dani P.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1998-01-01

    The magnitude and breadth of neutralizing antibodies raised in response to infection with chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in rhesus macaques were evaluated. Infection with either SHIV-HXB2, SHIV-89.6, or SHIV-89.6PD raised high-titer neutralizing antibodies to the homologous SHIV (SHIV-89.6P in the case of SHIV-89.6PD-infected animals) and significant titers of neutralizing antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains MN and SF-2. With few exceptions, however, titers of neutralizing antibodies to heterologous SHIV were low or undetectable. The antibodies occasionally neutralized heterologous primary isolates of HIV-1; these antibodies required >40 weeks of infection to reach detectable levels. Notable was the potent neutralization of the HIV-1 89.6 primary isolate by serum samples from SHIV-89.6-infected macaques. These results demonstrate that SHIV-HXB2, SHIV-89.6, and SHIV-89.6P possess highly divergent, strain-specific neutralization epitopes. The results also provide insights into the requirements for raising neutralizing antibodies to primary isolates of HIV-1. PMID:9525675

  20. Vaccine-Elicited V3 Loop-Specific Antibodies in Rhesus Monkeys and Control of a Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Expressing a Primary Patient Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolate Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Letvin, Norman L.; Robinson, Suzanne; Rohne, Daniela; Axthelm, Michael K.; Fanton, John W.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Palker, Thomas J.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Vaccine-elicited antibodies specific for the third hypervariable domain of the surface gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (V3 loop) were assessed for their contribution to protection against infection in the simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/rhesus monkey model. Peptide vaccine-elicited anti-V3 loop antibody responses were examined for their ability to contain replication of SHIV-89.6, a nonpathogenic SHIV expressing a primary patient isolate HIV-1 envelope, as well as SHIV-89.6P, a pathogenic variant of that virus. Low-titer neutralizing antibodies to SHIV-89.6 that provided partial protection against viremia following SHIV-89.6 infection were generated. A similarly low-titer neutralizing antibody response to SHIV-89.6P that did not contain viremia after infection with SHIV-89.6P was generated, but a trend toward protection against CD4+ T-lymphocyte loss was seen in these infected monkeys. These observations suggest that the V3 loop on some primary patient HIV-1 isolates may be a partially effective target for neutralizing antibodies induced by peptide immunogens. PMID:11287566

  1. PID Tuning Using Extremum Seeking

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Krstic, M

    2005-11-15

    Although proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process industry, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. Manual tuning of PID controllers, which requires optimization of three parameters, is a time-consuming task. To remedy this difficulty, much effort has been invested in developing systematic tuning methods. Many of these methods rely on knowledge of the plant model or require special experiments to identify a suitable plant model. Reviews of these methods are given in [1] and the survey paper [2]. However, in many situations a plant model is not known, and it is not desirable to open the process loop for system identification. Thus a method for tuning PID parameters within a closed-loop setting is advantageous. In relay feedback tuning [3]-[5], the feedback controller is temporarily replaced by a relay. Relay feedback causes most systems to oscillate, thus determining one point on the Nyquist diagram. Based on the location of this point, PID parameters can be chosen to give the closed-loop system a desired phase and gain margin. An alternative tuning method, which does not require either a modification of the system or a system model, is unfalsified control [6], [7]. This method uses input-output data to determine whether a set of PID parameters meets performance specifications. An adaptive algorithm is used to update the PID controller based on whether or not the controller falsifies a given criterion. The method requires a finite set of candidate PID controllers that must be initially specified [6]. Unfalsified control for an infinite set of PID controllers has been developed in [7]; this approach requires a carefully chosen input signal [8]. Yet another model-free PID tuning method that does not require opening of the loop is iterative feedback tuning (IFT). IFT iteratively optimizes the controller parameters with respect to a cost function derived from the output signal of the closed-loop system, see [9

  2. Augmentation of virus secretion by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein is cell type independent and occurs in cultured human primary macrophages and lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, U; Clouse, K A; Strebel, K

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific Vpu protein is a small integral membrane phosphoprotein that induces degradation of the virus receptor CD4 in the endoplasmic reticulum and, independently, increases the release of progeny virions from infected cells. To address the importance of Vpu for virus replication in primary human cells such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), we used three different sets of monocyte-tropic molecular clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: a primary isolate, AD8+, and two chimeric variants of the T-cell-tropic isolate NL4-3 carrying the env determinants of either AD8+ or SF162 monocyte-tropic primary isolates. Isogenic variants of these chimeric viruses were constructed to express either wild-type Vpu or various mutants of Vpu. The effects of these mutations in the vpu gene on virus particle secretion from infected MDM or PBMC were assessed by determination of the release of virion-associated reverse transcriptase into culture supernatants, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of pelleted virions, and steady-state or pulse-chase metabolic labeling. Wild-type Vpu increased virus release four- to sixfold in MDM and two- to threefold in PBMC, while nonphosphorylated Vpu and a C-terminal truncation mutant of Vpu were partially active on virus release in primary cells. These results demonstrate that Vpu regulates virus release in primary lymphocyte and macrophage cultures in a similar manner and to a similar extent to those previously observed in HeLa cells or CD4+ T-cell lines. Thus, our findings provide evidence that Vpu functions in a variety of human cells, both primary cells and continuous cell lines, and mutations in Vpu affect its biological activity independent of the cell type and virus isolate used. PMID:7494279

  3. Multivariable PID control by decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Juan; Vázquez, Francisco; Morilla, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new methodology to design multivariable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers based on decoupling control. The method is presented for general n × n processes. In the design procedure, an ideal decoupling control with integral action is designed to minimise interactions. It depends on the desired open-loop processes that are specified according to realisability conditions and desired closed-loop performance specifications. These realisability conditions are stated and three common cases to define the open-loop processes are studied and proposed. Then, controller elements are approximated to PID structure. From a practical point of view, the wind-up problem is also considered and a new anti-wind-up scheme for multivariable PID controller is proposed. Comparisons with other works demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology through the use of several simulation examples and an experimental lab process.

  4. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication in Primary Macrophages by Using Tat- or CCR5-Specific Small Interfering RNAs Expressed from a Lentivirus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Ta M.; Coburn, Glen A.; McClure, Myra O.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2003-01-01

    Although several groups have demonstrated that RNA interference, induced by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes, can protect cells against a viral challenge in culture, this protection is transient. Here, we describe lentivirus expression vectors that can stably express siRNAs at levels sufficient to block virus replication. We have used these vectors to stably express siRNAs specific for the essential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat transcription factor or specific for a cellular coreceptor, CCR5, that is required for infection by the majority of primary HIV-1 isolates. These lentivirus vectors are shown to protect cells, including primary macrophages, against HIV-1 infection in culture by inducing selective degradation of their target mRNA species. These data suggest that it should be possible to block the expression of specific viral or cellular genes in vivo by using viral vectors to stably express the appropriate siRNAs. PMID:14581533

  5. Pathway Interaction Database (PID) —

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) in collaboration with Nature Publishing Group has established the Pathway Interaction Database (PID) in order to provide a highly structured, curated collection of information about known biomolecular interactions and key cellular processes assembled into signaling pathways.

  6. The case for a national service for primary immune deficiency disorders in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Steele, Richard; Jordan, Anthony; Preece, Kahn; Barker, Russell; Brewerton, Maia; Lindsay, Karen; Sinclair, Jan; Storey, Peter; Woon, See-Tarn

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune deficiency disorders (PIDs) are rare conditions for which effective treatment is available. It is critical these patients are identified at an early stage to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Treatment of these disorders is expensive and expert evaluation and ongoing management by a clinical immunologist is essential. Until recently there has been a major shortage of clinical immunologists in New Zealand. While the numbers of trained immunologists have increased in recent years, most are located in Auckland. The majority of symptomatic PID patients require life-long immunoglobulin replacement. Currently there is a shortage of subcutaneous and intravenous immunoglobulin (SCIG/IVIG) in New Zealand. A recent audit by the New Zealand Blood Service (NZBS) showed that compliance with indications for SCIG/IVIG treatment was poor in District Health Boards (DHBs) without an immunology service. The NZBS audit has shown that approximately 20% of annual prescriptions for SCIG/IVIG, costing $6M, do not comply with UK or Australian guidelines. Inappropriate use may have contributed to the present shortage of SCIG/IVIG necessitating importation of the product. This is likely to have resulted in a major unnecessary financial burden to each DHB. Here we present the case for a national service responsible for the tertiary care of PID patients and oversight for immunoglobulin use for primary and non-haematological secondary immunodeficiencies. We propose that other PIDs, including hereditary angioedema, are integrated into a national PID service. Ancillary services, including the customised genetic testing service, and research are also an essential component of an integrated national PID service and are described in this review. As we show here, a hub-and-spoke model for a national service for PIDs would result in major cost savings, as well as improved patient care. It would also allow seamless transition from paediatric to adult services.

  7. The case for a national service for primary immune deficiency disorders in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Steele, Richard; Jordan, Anthony; Preece, Kahn; Barker, Russell; Brewerton, Maia; Lindsay, Karen; Sinclair, Jan; Storey, Peter; Woon, See-Tarn

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune deficiency disorders (PIDs) are rare conditions for which effective treatment is available. It is critical these patients are identified at an early stage to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Treatment of these disorders is expensive and expert evaluation and ongoing management by a clinical immunologist is essential. Until recently there has been a major shortage of clinical immunologists in New Zealand. While the numbers of trained immunologists have increased in recent years, most are located in Auckland. The majority of symptomatic PID patients require life-long immunoglobulin replacement. Currently there is a shortage of subcutaneous and intravenous immunoglobulin (SCIG/IVIG) in New Zealand. A recent audit by the New Zealand Blood Service (NZBS) showed that compliance with indications for SCIG/IVIG treatment was poor in District Health Boards (DHBs) without an immunology service. The NZBS audit has shown that approximately 20% of annual prescriptions for SCIG/IVIG, costing $6M, do not comply with UK or Australian guidelines. Inappropriate use may have contributed to the present shortage of SCIG/IVIG necessitating importation of the product. This is likely to have resulted in a major unnecessary financial burden to each DHB. Here we present the case for a national service responsible for the tertiary care of PID patients and oversight for immunoglobulin use for primary and non-haematological secondary immunodeficiencies. We propose that other PIDs, including hereditary angioedema, are integrated into a national PID service. Ancillary services, including the customised genetic testing service, and research are also an essential component of an integrated national PID service and are described in this review. As we show here, a hub-and-spoke model for a national service for PIDs would result in major cost savings, as well as improved patient care. It would also allow seamless transition from paediatric to adult services. PMID:27355232

  8. Immunodeficiency disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... destroy bacteria and other foreign substances. Proteins called complement help with this process. Immunodeficiency disorders may affect any part of the immune system. Most often, these conditions occur when special white ...

  9. Dynamics of adaptive and innate immunity in patients treated during primary human immunodeficiency virus infection: results from Maraviroc in HIV Acute Infection (MAIN) randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ripa, M; Pogliaghi, M; Chiappetta, S; Galli, L; Pensieroso, S; Cavarelli, M; Scarlatti, G; De Biasi, S; Cossarizza, A; De Battista, D; Malnati, M; Lazzarin, A; Nozza, S; Tambussi, G

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the dynamics of innate and adaptive immunity in patients treated with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) during primary human immunodeficiency virus infection (PHI), enrolled in a prospective randomized trial (MAIN, EUDRACT 2008-007004-29). After 48 weeks of cART, we documented a reduction in activated B cells and CD8(+) T cells. Natural killer cell and dendritic cell frequencies were measured and a decrease in CD16(+) CD56(dim) with a reciprocal rise in CD56(high) natural killer cells and an increase in myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were recorded. In conclusion, 48 weeks of cART during PHI showed significant benefits for both innate and adaptive immunity.

  10. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  11. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) Report

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C.; Bleesing, Jack J. H.; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M.; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J.; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Logan, Brent R.; Long-Boyle, Janel R.; Malech, Harry L.; McGhee, Sean A.; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J.; Routes, John M.; Shearer, William T.; Small, Trudy N.; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R.; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome and Chronic Granulomatous Disease through retrospective, prospective and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to: encourage training of junior investigators; establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues; work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness; and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for PID. To date, the PIDTC has funded two pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans; and B cell reconstitution in SCID patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first two PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. PMID:24139498

  12. Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-Linked Syndrome: A Paradigm of Immunodeficiency with Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Barzaghi, Federica; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID) due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type-1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase. The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease. This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed. PMID:23060872

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Teaniese Latham; DiClemente, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. Surveillance data from 2012 indicate an estimated 1.2 million people aged 13 years and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, and 12.8% do not know their status. There are approximately 50,000 new HIV infections annually. With no available cure for HIV, primary prevention to reduce incident cases of HIV is essential. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission include reducing sexual risk behavior and needle sharing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has multiple resources available for primary and secondary prevention to reduce disease transmission and severity. PMID:26980130

  14. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  15. The Natural History of Children with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Baseline Features of the First Fifty Patients of the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium Prospective Study 6901

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.; Logan, Brent R.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Griffith, Linda M.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Kohn, Donald B.; Shearer, William T.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Hanson, I. Celine; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Filipovich, Alexandra; Goldman, Frederick; Kapoor, Neena; Small, Trudy; Smith, Angela; Chan, Ka-Wah; Cuvelier, Geoff; Heimall, Jennifer; Knutsen, Alan; Loechelt, Brett; Moore, Theodore; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2013-01-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) consists of 33 centers in North America. We hypothesized that the analysis of uniform data on patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) enrolled in a prospective protocol will identify variables that contribute to optimal outcomes following treatment. We report baseline clinical, immunologic, and genetic features of the first 50 patients enrolled, and the initial therapies administered, reflecting current practice in the diagnosis and treatment of both typical (n = 37) and atypical forms (n = 13) of SCID. From August 2010 to May 2012, patients with suspected SCID underwent evaluation and therapy per local center practices. Diagnostic information was reviewed by the PIDTC eligibility review panel, and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) details were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Most patients (92%) had mutations in a known SCID gene. Half of the patients were diagnosed by newborn screening or family history, were younger than those diagnosed by clinical signs (median 15 vs. 181 days; P = <0.0001), and went to HCT at a median of 67 days vs. 214 days of life (P = <0.0001). Most patients (92%) were treated with HCT within 1–2 months of diagnosis. Three patients were treated with gene therapy and 1 with enzyme replacement. The PIDTC plans to enroll over 250 such patients and analyze short and long-term outcomes for factors beneficial or deleterious to survival, clinical outcome, and T- and B-cell reconstitution, and which biomarkers are predictive of these outcomes. PMID:23818196

  16. Calculating the Dose of Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin for Primary Immunodeficiency Disease in Patients Switched From Intravenous to Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Without the Use of a Dose-Adjustment Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Fadeyi, Michael; Tran, Tin

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) is an inherited disorder characterized by an inadequate immune system. The most common type of PIDD is antibody deficiency. Patients with this disorder lack the ability to make functional immunoglobulin G (IgG) and require lifelong IgG replacement therapy to prevent serious bacterial infections. The current standard therapy for PIDD is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions, but IVIG might not be appropriate for all patients. For this reason, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) has emerged as an alternative to IVIG. A concern for physicians is the precise SCIG dose that should be prescribed, because there are pharmacokinetic differences between IVIG and SCIG. Manufacturers of SCIG 10% and 20% liquid (immune globulin subcutaneous [human]) recommend a dose-adjustment coefficient (DAC). Both strengths are currently approved by the FDA. This DAC is to be used when patients are switched from IVIG to SCIG. In this article, we propose another dosing method that uses a higher ratio of IVIG to SCIG and an incremental adjustment based on clinical status, body weight, and the presence of concurrent diseases. PMID:24391400

  17. Macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes from two multiply exposed, uninfected individuals resist infection with primary non-syncytium-inducing isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, R I; Paxton, W A; Sheridan, K E; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    Despite multiple, high-risk sexual exposures, some individuals remain uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CD4+ lymphocytes from these individuals are less susceptible to infection in vitro with some strains of HIV-1, suggesting that the phenotype of the virus may influence its ability to interact with certain CD4+ cells. In the present study, we examined the susceptibility of CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from two exposed uninfected individuals (EU2 and EU3) to infection with a panel of biologically cloned isolates of HIV-1 having either a non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or a syncytium-inducing (SI) phenotype. Our results indicate that CD4+ T lymphocytes from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with NSI isolates of HIV-1 but are susceptible to infection with primary SI isolates. In addition, we found that macrophages from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with both NSI and SI isolates. The latter finding was confirmed by using several uncloned NSI and SI isolates obtained from patients during acute HIV-1 infection. In further experiments, env clones encoding glycoproteins characteristic of NSI or SI viruses were used in single-cycle infectivity assays to evaluate infection of CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages from EU2 and EU3. Consistent with our previous results, we found that macrophages from these individuals are resistant to infection with NSI and SI env-pseudotyped viruses, while CD4+ T lymphocytes are resistant to NSI, but not SI, pseudotyped viruses. Overall, our results demonstrate that CD4+ cells from two exposed uninfected individuals resist infection in vitro with primary, macrophage-tropic, NSI isolates of HIV-1, which is the predominant viral phenotype found following HIV-1 transmission. Furthermore, infection with NSI isolates was blocked in both CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from these individuals, suggesting that there may be a common mechanism for resistance in both cell types. PMID:8971004

  18. Retention of viral infectivity after extensive mutation of the highly conserved immunodominant domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Pancino, G; Sonigo, P

    1997-01-01

    In lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), the principal immunodominant domain (PID) of the transmembrane glycoprotein elicits a strong humoral response in infected hosts. The PID is marked by the presence of two cysteines that delimit a sequence, composed of five to seven amino acids in different lentiviruses, which is highly conserved among isolates of the same lentiviral species. While the conservation of the sequence suggests the presence of functional constraints, the conservation of the immunodominance among divergent lentiviruses raises the hypothesis of a selective advantage for the infecting virus conferred by the host humoral response against this domain. We and others have previously shown that an appropriate structure of the PID is required for the production of a functional envelope. In the present work, we analyzed virological functions and immune reactivity of the envelope after random mutagenesis of the PID of FIV. We obtained nine mutant envelopes which were correctly processed and retained fusogenic ability. Mutation of the two C-terminal residues of the PID sequence between the cysteines in a molecular clone of FIV abolished infectivity. In contrast, three molecular clones containing extensive mutations in the four N-terminal amino acids were infectious. However, the mutations affected PID reactivity with sera from infected cats. Our results suggest that functional constraints, although existent, are not sufficient to account for PID sequence conservation. Such conservation may also result from positive selection by anti-PID antibodies which enhance infection. PMID:9151822

  19. Recent advances in transplantation for primary immune deficiency diseases: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    de la Morena, M Teresa; Nelson, Robert P

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapeutic option for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a group of diseases which otherwise carry life expectancies that are of limited duration and quality. Survival following HCT for SCID has improved from approximately 23 to 91 % over the last 40 years. Success with SCID prompted efforts to apply HCT to the therapeutic challenge of well over 20 molecularly defined primary immune deficiency diseases (PID). Such success is due to both early recognition of PIDs and advances in the field of transplantation. Such advances include high-resolution HLA DNA donor-recipient matching, expansion of donor sources, better tolerated conditioning, new antibiotics, and wider availability. International collaborative efforts have provided patients and caregivers information that permit better treatment decisions now, and direct clinicians and investigators to ensure progress in the future. Pioneers in screening for SCID have taken steps to correct the fundamental challenge to successful treatment, which is the rapid discovery and characterization of cases and offering the transplant option to an affected child early in life; blood spot testing for T and B cell receptor quantification is now available to a growing fraction of newborns. Organizations including the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium in the USA, The European Society for Primary Immunodeficiency, the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, the United States Immunodeficiency Network, the Immune Deficiency Foundation, and the Jeffrey Modell Foundation are contributing mightily to increase awareness and standardize optimal utilization to the benefit of patients. This review will update the allergist-immunologist concerning disease presentations, indications for transplantation, methodologies, conditioning regimens, and clinical outcomes for patients with PID for which timely HCT is

  20. Effect of extracellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein 120 on primary human vascular endothelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Huang, M B; Hunter, M; Bond, V C

    1999-09-20

    During the course of an HIV-1 infection, free infectious and noninfectious virus particles, and free HIV-1 proteins, circulate within the host, exposing the host endothelium to these viral factors, even if the endothelium is not infected. This suggests that extracellular HIV-1 proteins could influence endothelial cell function, leading to pathogenesis. In light of this, we have used primary cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) to screen for effects of the HIV-1 protein gp120 on endothelial cell function. The results of this study show that short exposure of HUVEC cultures to this protein causes significant levels of cytotoxicity. Further, using several different assays, we have shown that this cytotoxic effect on HUVECs appears to be due to induction of an apoptotic program. The biphasic nature of gp120 titration curves suggests that multiple cellular factors are mediating these gp120-induced effects. Competition studies appear to confirm this by showing that the apoptotic effect is mediated through two cell surface receptors on HUVECs, CCR5 and CXCR4. Alternatively, competition studies examining CD4 receptors suggests that CD4 played no role in gp12O-induced effects on HUVECs.

  1. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Primary Immune Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Caroline Y; Kohn, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The use of gene therapy in the treatment of primary immune deficiencies (PID) has advanced significantly in the last decade. Clinical trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome have demonstrated that gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells and autologous transplant can result in clinical improvement and is curative for many patients. Unfortunately, early clinical trials were complicated by vector-related insertional mutagenic events for several diseases with the exception of ADA-deficiency SCID. These results prompted the current wave of clinical trials for primary immunodeficiency using alternative retro- or lenti-viral vector constructs that are self-inactivating, and they have shown clinical efficacy without leukemic events thus far. The field of gene therapy continues to progress, with improvements in viral vector profiles, stem cell culturing techniques, and site-specific genome editing platforms. The future of gene therapy is promising, and we are quickly moving towards a time when it will be a standard cellular therapy for many forms of PID.

  2. Current treatment options with immunoglobulin G for the individualization of care in patients with primary immunodeficiency disease1

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, S; Orange, J S; Gardulf, A; Stein, M R; Shapiro, R; Borte, M; Berger, M

    2015-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies require lifelong replacement therapy with immunoglobulin (Ig)G to reduce the incidence and severity of infections. Both subcutaneous and intravenous routes of administering IgG can be effective and well tolerated. Treatment regimens can be individualized to provide optimal medical and quality-of-life outcomes in infants, children, adults and elderly people. Frequency, dose, route of administration, home or infusion-centre administration, and the use of self- or health-professional-administered infusion can be tailored to suit individual patient needs and circumstances. Patient education is needed to understand the disease and the importance of continuous therapy. Both the subcutaneous and intravenous routes have advantages and disadvantages, which should be considered in selecting each patient's treatment regimen. The subcutaneous route is attractive to many patients because of a reduced incidence of systemic adverse events, flexibility in scheduling and its comparative ease of administration, at home or in a clinic. Self-infusion regimens, however, require independence and self-reliance, good compliance on the part of the patient/parent and the confidence of the physician and the nurse. Intravenous administration in a clinic setting may be more appropriate in patients with reduced manual dexterity, reluctance to self-administer or a lack of self-reliance, and intravenous administration at home for those with good venous access who prefer less frequent treatments. Both therapy approaches have been demonstrated to provide protection from infections and improve health-related quality of life. Data supporting current options in IgG replacement are presented, and considerations in choosing between the two routes of therapy are discussed. PMID:25384609

  3. Detection of Candida dubliniensis in Oropharyngeal Samples from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in North America by Primary CHROMagar Candida Screening and Susceptibility Testing of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William R.; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Mcatee, Robert K.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Fothergill, Annette W.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Sanche, Stephen E.; Cantu, Rebecca A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    1998-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis has been associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). C. dubliniensis isolates may have been improperly characterized as atypical Candida albicans due to the phenotypic similarity between the two species. Prospective screening of oral rinses from 63 HIV-infected patients detected atypical dark green isolates on CHROMagar Candida compared to typical C. albicans isolates, which are light green. Forty-eight atypical isolates and three control strains were characterized by germ tube formation, differential growth at 37, 42, and 45°C, identification by API 20C, fluorescence, chlamydoconidium production, and fingerprinting by Ca3 probe DNA hybridization patterns. All isolates were germ tube positive. Very poor or no growth occurred at 42°C with 22 of 51 isolates. All 22 poorly growing isolates at 42°C and one isolate with growth at 42°C showed weak hybridization of the Ca3 probe with genomic DNA, consistent with C. dubliniensis identification. No C. dubliniensis isolate but only 18 of 28 C. albicans isolates grew at 45°C. Other phenotypic or morphologic tests were less reliable in differentiating C. dubliniensis from C. albicans. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed fluconazole MICs ranging from ≤0.125 to 64 μg/ml. Two isolates were resistant to fluconazole (MIC, 64 μg/ml) and one strain was dose dependent susceptible (MIC, 16 μg/ml). MICs of other azoles, including voriconazole, itraconazole, and SCH 56592, for these isolates were lower. C. dubliniensis was identified in 11 of 63 (17%) serially evaluated patients. Variability in phenotypic characteristics dictates the use of molecular and biochemical techniques to identify C. dubliniensis. This study identifies C. dubliniensis in HIV-infected patients from San Antonio, Tex., and shows that C. dubliniensis is frequently detected in those patients by using a primary CHROMagar screen. PMID:9738058

  4. Cross-clade neutralization of primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by human monoclonal antibodies and tetrameric CD4-IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Trkola, A; Pomales, A B; Yuan, H; Korber, B; Maddon, P J; Allaway, G P; Katinger, H; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Ho, D D

    1995-01-01

    We have tested three human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) IgG1b12, 2G12, and 2F5) to the envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and a tetrameric CD4-IgG molecule (CD4-IgG2), for the ability to neutralize primary HIV-1 isolates from the genetic clades A through F and from group O. Each of the reagents broadly and potently neutralized B-clade isolates. The 2F5 MAb and the CD4-IgG2 molecule also neutralized strains from outside the B clade, with the same breadth and potency that they showed against B-clade strains. The other two MAbs were able to neutralize a significant proportion of strains from outside the B clade, although there was a reduction in their efficacy compared with their activity against B-clade isolates. Neutralization of isolates by 2F5 correlated with their possession of the LDKW motif in a segment of gp41 near the membrane-spanning domain. The other two MAbs and CD4-IgG2 recognize discontinuous binding sites on gp120, and so no comparison between genetic sequence and virus neutralization was possible. Our data show that a vaccine based on the induction of humoral immunity that is broadly active across the genetic clades is not impossible if immunogens that express the epitopes for MAbs such as 2F5, 2G12, and IgG1b12 in immunogenic configurations can be created. Furthermore, if the three MAbs and CD4-IgG2 produce clinical benefit in immunotherapeutic trials in the United States or Europe, they may also do so elsewhere in the world. PMID:7474069

  5. Perturbation of the natural killer cell compartment during primary human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection primarily involving the CD56bright subset

    PubMed Central

    Mantegani, Paola; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Galli, Laura; Din, Chiara Tassan; Lazzarin, Adriano; Fortis, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of natural killer (NK) cell subsets, their activating and inhibitory receptors, and their cytolytic potential, in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHI) individuals at baseline and during 1 year of follow-up with or without antiretroviral therapy, and compared the results with those obtained in treatment-naïve, chronically HIV-infected (CHI) individuals, and HIV-seronegative (HN) healthy individuals. The proportion of the CD56dim and CD56bright subsets decreased with disease progression, whereas that of the CD56− CD16+ subset increased. In the CD56dim subset, the proportion of cells with natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) decreased with disease progression, and their cytolytic potential was reduced. Conversely, the CD56bright subset was characterized by a high proportion of NCR-positive, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-positive NKG2A+ cells in both CHI and PHI individuals, which was associated with an increase in their cytolytic potential. During the 1 year of follow-up, the PHI individuals with high viraemia levels and low CD4+ T-cell counts who received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had a similar proportion of NK subsets to CHI individuals, while patients with low viraemia levels and high CD4+ T-cell counts who remained untreated had values similar to those of the HN individuals. Our results indicate a marked perturbation of the NK cell compartment during HIV-1 infection that is multifaceted, starts early and is progressive, primarily involves the CD56bright subset, and is partially corrected by effective HAART. PMID:19824914

  6. The repair of DNA damages/modifications during the maturation of the immune system: lessons from human primary immunodeficiency disorders and animal models.

    PubMed

    Revy, Patrick; Buck, Dietke; le Deist, Françoise; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The immune system is the site of various genotoxic stresses that occur during its maturation as well as during immune responses. These DNA lesions/modifications are primarily the consequences of specific physiological processes such as the V(D)J recombination, the immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR), and the generation of somatic hypermutations (SHMs) within Ig variable domains. The DNA lesions can be introduced either by specific factors (RAG1 and RAG2 in the case of V(D)J recombination and AID in the case of CSR and SHM) or during the various phases of cellular proliferation and cellular activation. All these DNA lesions are taken care of by the diverse DNA repair machineries of the cell. Several animal models as well as human conditions have established the critical importance of these DNA lesions/modifications and their repair in the physiology of the immune system. Indeed their defects have consequences ranging from immune deficiency to development of immune malignancy. The survey of human pathology has been highly instrumental in the past in identifying key factors involved in the generation of DNA modifications (AID for the Ig CSR and generation of SHM) or the repair of specific DNA damages (Artemis for V(D)J recombination). Defects in factors involved in the cell cycle checkpoints following DNA damage also have deleterious consequences on the immune system. The continuous survey of human diseases characterized by primary immunodeficiency associated with increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation should help identify other important DNA repair factors essential for the development and maintenance of the immune system. PMID:16102576

  7. Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of a Novel Human Immune Globulin Subcutaneous, 20 % in Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in North America.

    PubMed

    Suez, Daniel; Stein, Mark; Gupta, Sudhir; Hussain, Iftikhar; Melamed, Isaac; Paris, Kenneth; Darter, Amy; Bourgeois, Christelle; Fritsch, Sandor; Leibl, Heinz; McCoy, Barbara; Gelmont, David; Yel, Leman

    2016-10-01

    Patients with primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) typically require life-long intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy to prevent recurrent infections. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of a highly concentrated (20 %) Ig preparation for SC administration (IGSC 20 %) were evaluated in a prospective trial in patients with PIDD. A total of 74 patients (aged 3-83 years) received 4327 IGSC 20 % infusions over a median of 380.5 days. The rate of validated serious bacterial infections was 0.012 event/patient-year (p < 0.0001 compared with the historical control), and the annualized rate of infection was 2.41 events/patient. Median IgG trough levels were >14.5 g/l. The median maximum infusion rate was 60 ml/h/site (range 4.4-180), resulting in a median infusion duration of 0.95 h. A volume ≥30 ml was infused per site in 74.8 % of IGSC 20 % infusions. Most (84.9 %) infusions were administered using ≤2 infusion sites; for 99.8 % of infusions, there was no need to interrupt/stop administration or reduce the infusion rate. No related serious adverse event (AE) occurred during IGSC 20 % treatment; related non-serious AEs occurred at a rate of 0.036 event/infusion. The incidence of related local AEs was 0.015 event/infusion and of related systemic AEs was 0.021 event/infusion; most were mild in severity, none severe. Increased infusion rates or volumes were not associated with higher AE rates. The investigated IGSC 20 % treatment was shown to be effective and safe, enabling higher infusion rates and volumes per site compared to conventional SC treatments, resulting in fewer infusion sites and shorter infusion durations. PMID:27582171

  8. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Herpes Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ... is pelvic inflammatory disease treated? Several types of antibiotics can cure PID. Antibiotic treatment does not, however, reverse any ...

  9. Neuron model-free PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shuqing

    2001-09-01

    Based on the neuron model and learning strategy, the neuron intelligent PID control system is set up in this paper. The neuron model-free PID control method is posed. The simulation tests with an example of a hydraulic turbine generator unit are made. The result show that god control performances are obtained. This new intelligent controller is very simple and has very strong adaptability and robustness. It can be used directly in practice.

  10. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): from molecular basis to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Sponzilli, Ivonne; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2011-04-01

    Primary immune deficiency diseases (PID) comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that affect distinct components of the innate and adaptive immune system, such as neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, complement proteins, natural killer cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a group of disorders characterized by increased susceptibility to severe infections and early death. The diagnosis of SCID is supported by the demonstration of low absolute lymphocyte count and T cell lymphopenia (variably associated with numerical defects of B and NK cells). In the last two decades, advances in the characterization of the molecular pathophysiology of SCID, have permitted the development of novel diagnostic assays based on analysis of the expression of the disease-associated proteins and mutation analysis. More recently, pilot newborn screening programs for the identification of infants with SCID have been initiated in the United States. Prompt and aggressive treatment of infections, antimicrobial prophylaxis (in particular against Pneumocystis jiroveci) and regular administration of immunoglobulins are essential to reduce the risk of early death. However, survival ultimately depends on reconstitution of immune function, that is usually achieved by means of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Gene therapy and enzyme replacement therapy have also been used successfully is selected forms of SCID. Here we review the molecular and cellular pathophysiology and the mainstay of treatment of SCID.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genome Research Institute: Learning About Severe Combined Immunodeficiency National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune ... Manual Consumer Version Orphanet: T-B+ severe ...

  12. Interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein V3 loop with CCR5 and CD4 at the membrane of human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rabehi, L; Seddiki, N; Benjouad, A; Gluckman, J C; Gattegno, L

    1998-12-20

    We show that infection of primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and blood lymphocytes (PBLs) by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) R5 strains, but not that of PBLs by X4 strain HIV-1LAI, is inhibited by beta-chemokines RANTES and MIP-1alpha. A biotinylated disulfide-bridged peptide mimicking the complete loop of clade B consensus V3 domain of gp120 (V3Cs), but not a biotinylated V3LAI peptide or a control beta-endorphin peptide of approximately the same molecular weight (MW), was found to bind specifically to MDM membrane proteins, in particular two proteins of 42 and 62 kDa migrating as sharp bands after electroblotting onto Immobilon, and this was specifically inhibited by anti-V3 antibodies. When biotinylated V3Cs was incubated with intact MDMs, which were then washed and lysed, and the resulting material was incubated with streptavidin-agarose beads and electroblotted onto Immobilon, fresh V3Cs also bound to proteins of the same molecular weight recovered in the V3Cs-interacting material. This binding was inhibited by anti-V3 antibodies, and no binding occurred with the control peptides. V3Cs also bound to soluble recombinant CD4, and CD4 monoclonal antibody Q4120 specifically recognized the V3Cs-interacting 62-kDa protein, which should thus correspond to CD4. Recombinant radiolabeled RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta, but not IL-8, also bound to a 42-kDa protein on the membrane of MDMs as well as to the V3Cs-interacting 42-kDa protein, and excess unlabeled V3Cs inhibited such binding. This protein was also recognized by antibodies to CCR5, the RANTES/MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta receptor. These data show that V3Cs binds to MDM membrane proteins that comprise CD4 and CCR5, and that multimolecular complexes involving at least gp120 V3, CD4, and CCR5 are formed on the surface of MDMs as part of V3-mediated postbinding events occurring during HIV-1 infection.

  13. Neurodevelopmental Impairment among Infants Born to Mothers Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Uninfected Mothers from Three Peri-Urban Primary Care Clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandawasvika, Gwendoline Q.; Ogundipe, Enitan; Gumbo, Felicity Z.; Kurewa, Edith N.; Mapingure, Munyaradzi P.; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article is to document the risk of neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) among infants enrolled in a programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) in Zimbabwe using the Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener (BINS). Method: We prospectively followed up infants at three…

  14. Assessment of intracellular cytokines and regulatory cells in patients with autoimmune diseases and primary immunodeficiencies - novel tool for diagnostics and patient follow-up.

    PubMed

    Osnes, Liv T; Nakken, Britt; Bodolay, Edit; Szodoray, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Serum and intracytoplasmic cytokines are mandatory in host defense against microbes, but also play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by initiating and perpetuating various cellular and humoral autoimmune processes. The intricate interplay and fine balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory processes drive, whether inflammation and eventually organ damage will occur, or the inflammatory cascade quenches. In the early and late, as well as inactive and active stages of autoimmune diseases, different cellular and molecular patterns can dominate in these patients. However, the simultaneous assessment of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers aids to define the immunological state of a patient. A group of the most useful inflammatory biomarkers are cytokines, and with increasing knowledge during the last decade their role have been well-defined in patients with autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies. Multiple pathological processes drive the development of autoimmunity and immunodeficiencies, most of which involve quantitative and qualitative disturbances in regulatory cells, cytokine synthesis and signaling pathways. The assessment of these biomarkers does not aid only in the mechanistic description of autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies, but further helps to subcategorize diseases and to evaluate therapy responses. Here, we provide an overview, how monitoring of cytokines and regulatory cells aid in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies furthermore, we pinpoint novel cellular and molecular diagnostic possibilities in these diseases.

  15. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  16. Quantum Efficiency Loss after PID Stress: Wavelength Dependence on Cell Surface and Cell Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jaewon; Bowden, Stuart; TamizhMani, GovindaSamy; Hacke, Peter

    2015-06-14

    It is known that the potential induced degradation (PID) stress of conventional p-base solar cells affects power, shunt resistance, junction recombination, and quantum efficiency (QE). One of the primary solutions to address the PID issue is a modification of chemical and physical properties of antireflection coating (ARC) on the cell surface. Depending on the edge isolation method used during cell processing, the ARC layer near the edges may be uniformly or non-uniformly damaged. Therefore, the pathway for sodium migration from glass to the cell junction could be either through all of the ARC surface if surface and edge ARC have low quality or through the cell edge if surface ARC has high quality but edge ARC is defective due to certain edge isolation process. In this study, two PID susceptible cells from two different manufacturers have been investigated. The QE measurements of these cells before and after PID stress were performed at both surface and edge. We observed the wavelength dependent QE loss only in the first manufacturer's cell but not in the second manufacturer's cell. The first manufacturer's cell appeared to have low quality ARC whereas the second manufacturer's cell appeared to have high quality ARC with defective edge. To rapidly screen a large number of cells for PID stress testing, a new but simple test setup that does not require laminated cell coupon has been developed and is used in this investigation.

  17. CD4, CXCR-4, and CCR-5 dependencies for infections by primary patient and laboratory-adapted isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S L; Platt, E J; Madani, N; Ferro, F E; Peden, K; Kabat, D

    1997-01-01

    We have used a focal infectivity method to quantitatively analyze the CD4, CXCR-4, and CCR-5 dependencies for infections by diverse primary patient (PR) and laboratory-adapted (LA) isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Infectivities of T-cell-tropic viruses were analyzed in a panel of HeLa-CD4 cell clones that have distinct quantities of CD4 and in human astroglioma U87MG-CD4 cells that express a large quantity of CD4 and become highly susceptible to infection after transfection with a CXCR-4 expression vector. The latter analysis indicated that PR as well as LA T-cell-tropic viruses efficiently employ CXCR-4 as a coreceptor in an optimal human cell line that contains abundant CD4. Previous uncertainties regarding coreceptor usage by PR T-cell-tropic HIV-1 isolates may therefore have derived from the assay conditions. As reported previously, unrelated LA and PR T-cell-tropic HIV-1 isolates differ in infectivities for the HeLa-CD4 clonal panel, with LA viruses infecting all clones equally and PR viruses infecting the clones in proportion to cellular CD4 quantities (D. Kabat, S. L. Kozak, K. Wherly, and B. Chesebro, J. Virol. 68:2570-2577, 1994). To analyze the basis for this difference, we used the HeLa-CD4 panel to compare a molecularly cloned T-cell-tropic PR virus (ELI1) with six of its variants that grow to different extents in CD4-positive leukemic cell lines and that differ only at specific positions in their gp120 and gp41 envelope glycoproteins. All mutations in gp120 or gp41 that contributed to laboratory adaptation preferentially enhanced infectivity for cells that had little CD4 and thereby decreased the CD4 dependencies of the infections. There was a close correlation between abilities of T-cell-tropic ELI viruses to grow in an expanded repertoire of leukemic cell lines, the reduced CD4 dependencies of their infections of the HeLa-CD4 panel, and their sensitivities to inactivation by soluble CD4 (sCD4). Since all of the ELI viruses can

  18. [Cancer as secondary immunodeficiency. Review].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Guido-Bayardo, Ricardo Leopoldo; Martínez-Aguilar, Nora Ernestina; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Secondary immunodeficiencys, previously presented in immunocompetent individuals. The lack of primary or secondary response to the presence of a foreign antigen, in the case of infections is a sentinel data in the diagnosis of immunodeficiency (can be primary or secondary), in the case of a self antigen may generate the presence of Cancer. Cancer has shown an increase in the prevalence and incidence globally. Most current medical treatments in cancer are focused primarily on immunomodulatory actions (immunosuppression / immune stimulation or both). Knowledge of key concepts from the perspective of innate and acquired immunity lead to cancer development, engaging immune surveillance and escape mechanisms of this that contribute to better understand the origin, behavior and treatment of neoplasm's. These treatments can cause immunological disorders such as allergy, anaphylaxis, lack of response immunogenicity care fields specialist in allergy and clinical immunology. PMID:27174760

  19. [Cancer as secondary immunodeficiency. Review].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Guido-Bayardo, Ricardo Leopoldo; Martínez-Aguilar, Nora Ernestina; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Secondary immunodeficiencys, previously presented in immunocompetent individuals. The lack of primary or secondary response to the presence of a foreign antigen, in the case of infections is a sentinel data in the diagnosis of immunodeficiency (can be primary or secondary), in the case of a self antigen may generate the presence of Cancer. Cancer has shown an increase in the prevalence and incidence globally. Most current medical treatments in cancer are focused primarily on immunomodulatory actions (immunosuppression / immune stimulation or both). Knowledge of key concepts from the perspective of innate and acquired immunity lead to cancer development, engaging immune surveillance and escape mechanisms of this that contribute to better understand the origin, behavior and treatment of neoplasm's. These treatments can cause immunological disorders such as allergy, anaphylaxis, lack of response immunogenicity care fields specialist in allergy and clinical immunology.

  20. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... a serious condition, in women. 1 in 8 women with a history of PID experience difficulties getting pregnant. You can ... negative STD test results; Using latex condoms the right way every time ... a combination of your medical history, physical exam, and other test results. You may ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (4 links) Disease InfoSearch: ... Resources (6 links) American Liver Foundation Children's Liver Disease ... Foundation International Patient Organisation for Primary Immunodeficiencies ...

  2. PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David D.; Marsh, Christopher L.; Poston, David I.

    2007-01-30

    Control of space and surface fission reactors should be kept as simple as possible, because of the need for high reliability and the difficulty to diagnose and adapt to control system failures. Fortunately, compact, fast-spectrum, externally controlled reactors are very simple in operation. In fact, for some applications it may be possible to design low-power surface reactors without the need for any reactor control after startup; however, a simple proportional, integral, derivative (PID) controller can allow a higher performance concept and add more flexibility to system operation. This paper investigates the effectiveness of a PID control scheme for several anticipated transients that a surface reactor might experience. To perform these analyses, the surface reactor transient code FRINK was modified to simulate control drum movements based on bulk coolant temperature.

  3. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in an human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient mimicking bilateral eye sign in brain seen in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusany; Thirugnanam, Rajasekar; Shibu, Deepu; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan Edathurthy; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has proven useful in the diagnosis, staging, and detection of metastasis and posttreatment monitoring of several malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It also has the ability to make the important distinction between malignancy and infection in the evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, leading to the initiation of the appropriate treatment and precluding the need for invasive biopsy. We report an interesting case of HIV positive 35-year-old woman presented with headache, disorientation, and decreased level of consciousness. She underwent whole body PET/CT which showed multiple lesions in the cerebrum which mimics bilateral eye in brain. A diagnosis of a primary CNS lymphoma was made and patient was started on chemotherapy. PMID:24761060

  4. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in an human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient mimicking bilateral eye sign in brain seen in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusany; Thirugnanam, Rajasekar; Shibu, Deepu; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan Edathurthy; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-04-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has proven useful in the diagnosis, staging, and detection of metastasis and posttreatment monitoring of several malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It also has the ability to make the important distinction between malignancy and infection in the evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, leading to the initiation of the appropriate treatment and precluding the need for invasive biopsy. We report an interesting case of HIV positive 35-year-old woman presented with headache, disorientation, and decreased level of consciousness. She underwent whole body PET/CT which showed multiple lesions in the cerebrum which mimics bilateral eye in brain. A diagnosis of a primary CNS lymphoma was made and patient was started on chemotherapy.

  5. Virions of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to soluble CD4 (sCD4) neutralization differ in sCD4 binding and glycoprotein gp120 retention from sCD4-sensitive isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; McKeating, J A; Huang, Y X; Ashkenazi, A; Ho, D D

    1992-01-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are much less sensitive to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and sCD4-immunoglobulin (Ig) chimeras (CD4-IgG) than are HIV-1 strains adapted to growth in cell culture. We demonstrated that there are significant reductions (10- to 30-fold) in the binding of sCD4 and CD4-IgG to intact virions of five primary isolates compared with sCD4-sensitive, cell culture-adapted isolates RF and IIIB. However, soluble envelope glycoproteins (gp120) derived from the primary isolate virions, directly by detergent solubilization or indirectly by recombinant DNA technology, differed in affinity from RF and IIIB gp120 by only one- to threefold. The reduced binding of sCD4 to these primary isolate virions must therefore be a consequence of the tertiary or quaternary structure of the envelope glycoproteins in their native, oligomeric form on the viral surface. In addition, the rate and extent of sCD4-induced gp120 shedding from these primary isolates was lower than that from RF. We suggest that reduced sCD4 binding and increased gp120 retention together account for the relative resistance of these primary isolates to neutralization by sCD4 and CD4-IgG and that virions of different HIV-1 isolates vary both in the mechanism of sCD4 binding and in subsequent conformational changes in their envelope glycoproteins. PMID:1727487

  6. Soft Real-Time PID Control on a VME Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karayan, Vahag; Sander, Stanley; Cageao, Richard

    2007-01-01

    microPID (uPID) is a computer program for real-time proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control of a translation stage in a Fourier-transform ultraviolet spectrometer. microPID implements a PID control loop over a position profile at sampling rate of 8 kHz (sampling period 125microseconds). The software runs in a strippeddown Linux operating system on a VersaModule Eurocard (VME) computer operating in real-time priority queue using an embedded controller, a 16-bit digital-to-analog converter (D/A) board, and a laser-positioning board (LPB). microPID consists of three main parts: (1) VME device-driver routines, (2) software that administers a custom protocol for serial communication with a control computer, and (3) a loop section that obtains the current position from an LPB-driver routine, calculates the ideal position from the profile, and calculates a new voltage command by use of an embedded PID routine all within each sampling period. The voltage command is sent to the D/A board to control the stage. microPID uses special kernel headers to obtain microsecond timing resolution. Inasmuch as microPID implements a single-threaded process and all other processes are disabled, the Linux operating system acts as a soft real-time system.

  7. Primary Extranodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Head and Neck in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Clinicopathologic Study of 24 Patients in a Single Hospital of Infectious Diseases in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  8. Primary extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinicopathologic study of 24 patients in a single hospital of infectious diseases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  9. Primary extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinicopathologic study of 24 patients in a single hospital of infectious diseases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients.

  10. Primary immune deficiency in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Ozerovitch, Lorraine

    The primary purpose of the immune system is to protect the body from infection. Failure of the immune system can lead to repeated infections. The aim of this review is to discuss primary immune deficiency (PID) and its relationship with bronchiectasis in adults. It examines treatment options for patients with PID and provides practical details of how nurses can empower these patients to reduce their risk of respiratory infections.

  11. Primary immune deficiency in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Ozerovitch, Lorraine

    The primary purpose of the immune system is to protect the body from infection. Failure of the immune system can lead to repeated infections. The aim of this review is to discuss primary immune deficiency (PID) and its relationship with bronchiectasis in adults. It examines treatment options for patients with PID and provides practical details of how nurses can empower these patients to reduce their risk of respiratory infections. PMID:27400622

  12. Infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary R5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibited by natural polyreactive anti-CCR5 antibodies purified from cervicovaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Eslahpazir, Jobin; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Bouhlal, Hicham; Hocini, Hakim; Carbonneil, Cédric; Grésenguet, Gérard; Mbopi Kéou, François-Xavier; LeGoff, Jérôme; Saïdi, Héla; Requena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-05-01

    Heterosexual contact is the primary mode of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) transmission worldwide. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor that is associated with the mucosal transmission of R5-tropic HIV-1 during sexual intercourse. The CCR5 molecule is thus a target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking HIV-1 entry into cells. We have previously demonstrated that polyreactive natural antibodies (NAbs) from therapeutic preparations of immunoglobulin G and from human breast milk contain NAbs directed against CCR5. Such antibodies inhibit the infection of human macrophages and T lymphocytes by R5-tropic isolates of HIV in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that human immunoglobulins from the cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-seronegative or HIV-seropositive women contain NAbs directed against the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. Natural affinity-purified anti-CCR5 antibodies bound to CCR5 expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells and further inhibited the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary and laboratory-adapted R5-tropic HIV but not with X4-tropic HIV. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies moderately inhibited R5-tropic HIV transfer from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells. Our results suggest that mucosal anti-CCR5 antibodies from healthy immunocompetent donors may hamper the penetration of HIV and may be suitable for use in the development of novel passive immunotherapy regimens in specific clinical settings of HIV infection. PMID:18353923

  13. Proteomic analyses of monocyte-derived macrophages infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 primary isolates from Hispanic women with and without cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Nieves, DM; Rodriguez, Y; Plaud, M; Ciborowski, P; Duan, F; Laspiur, J Pérez; Wojna, V; Meléndez, LM

    2009-01-01

    The signature for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neurovirulence remains a subject of intense debate. Macrophage viral tropism is one prerequisite but others, including virus-induced alterations in innate and adaptive immunity, remain under investigation. HIV-1–infected mononuclear phagocytes (MPs; perivascular macrophages and microglia) secrete toxins that affect neurons. The authors hypothesize that neurovirulent HIV-1 variants affect the MP proteome by inducing a signature of neurotoxic proteins and thus affect cognitive function. To test this hypothesis, HIV-1 isolates obtained from peripheral blood of women with normal cognition (NC) were compared to isolates obtained from women with cognitive impairment (CI) and to the laboratory adapted SF162, a spinal fluid R5 isolate from a patient with HIV-1–associated dementia. HIV-1 isolates were used to infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and infection monitored by secreted HIV-1 p24 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell lysates of uninfected and HIV-1–infected MDMs at 14 days post infection were fractionated by cationic exchange chromatography and analyzed by surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF) using generalized estimating equations statistics. Proteins were separated by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D SDS-PAGE) and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Levels of viral replication were similar amongst the HIV-1 isolates, although higher levels were obtained from one viral strain obtained from a patient with CI. Significant differences were found in protein profiles between virus-infected MDMs with NC, CI, and SF162 isolates (adjusted P value after multiple testing corrections, or q value < .10). The authors identified 6 unique proteins in NC, 7 in SF162, and 20 in CI. Three proteins were common to SF162 and CI strains. The MDM proteins linked to infection with CI strains were related to apoptosis

  14. Use of aspirin and statins for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Eun; Yusuff, Jameela; Sharma, Roopali

    2016-05-01

    This retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluated whether HIV-infected patients received aspirin and statins for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke. Among the 258 patients included, 50.4% (n = 130/258) of the patients had a high risk of myocardial infarction and 14% (n = 36/258) of stroke. Overall, 43.1% (n = 56/130) and 50% (n = 18/36) of the patients were prescribed aspirin for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. Among the patients who required statin therapy, 42.5% (n = 34/80) and 37.1% (n = 13/35) of patients received it for the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. The patients who had hypertension (odds ratio 3.8, 95% confidence interval 1.5-10.9) and diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 5.6, 95% confidence interval 2.6-12.4) were more likely to receive aspirin. Interventions are needed to improve provider awareness of the use of aspirin and statins in the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in HIV-infected patients.

  15. Syncytium induction in primary CD4+ T-cell lines from normal donors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates with non-syncytium-inducing genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, B J; Kedar, P; Pope, J H

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates classified as syncytium-inducing (SI) or non-SI (NSI) in the MT-2 T-cell line exhibit characteristic sequence differences in the V1-V2 and V3 regions of the env gene. Seven HIV-1 isolates were phenotyped as NSI or SI in the MT-2 cell line. Unexpectedly, all four NSI viruses induced large syncytia 4 to 8 days postinoculation in a panel of five primary CD4+ T-cell lines (including two clones) generated from the peripheral blood of normal donors by exposure to infectious HIV-1, inactivated HIV-1, or Epstein-Barr virus. The primary T-cell lines yielded neither HIV-1 provirus nor infectious HIV by PCR analysis or exhaustive coculture with phytohemagglutinin-treated blast cells. Three isolates (TC354, PK1, and PK2) were biologically cloned and retained their SI or NSI phenotypes in MT-2 and primary T-cell lines. The biologically cloned provirus DNA was also used to clone and sequence the relevant V2 and V3 regions of the env genes. The amino acid sequences of the V2 and V3 regions were characteristic of patterns already reported for the NSI, switch NSI, and SI phenotypes, respectively. This evidence precludes the possibility that these results were due to contamination of the NSI isolates with SI virus. The results unequivocally indicate that HIV-1 isolates with the NSI genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells may actively induce syncytia in cloned CD4+ T cells in vitro and support the view that direct cytopathic effects may contribute to the steady decline in CD4+ T cells in asymptomatic HIV-1-seropositive patients without detectable SI virus. PMID:7474129

  16. The Effect of Latency Reversal Agents on Primary CD8+ T Cells: Implications for Shock and Kill Strategies for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Eradication.

    PubMed

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Tarwater, Patrick M; Blankson, Joel N

    2016-06-01

    Shock and kill strategies involving the use of small molecules to induce viral transcription in resting CD4+ T cells (shock) followed by immune mediated clearance of the reactivated cells (kill), have been proposed as a method of eliminating latently infected CD4+ T cells. The combination of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor romidepsin and protein kinase C (PKC) agonist bryostatin-1 is very effective at reversing latency in vitro. However, we found that primary HIV-1 specific CD8+ T cells were not able to eliminate autologous resting CD4+ T cells that had been reactivated with these drugs. We tested the hypothesis that the drugs affected primary CD8+ T cell function and found that both agents had inhibitory effects on the suppressive capacity of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells from patients who control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy (elite suppressors/controllers). The inhibitory effect was additive and multi-factorial in nature. These inhibitory effects were not seen with prostratin, another PKC agonist, either alone or in combination with JQ1, a bromodomain-containing protein 4 inhibitor. Our results suggest that because of their adverse effects on primary CD8+ T cells, some LRAs may cause immune-suppression and therefore should be used with caution in shock and kill strategies. PMID:27428432

  17. Severe combined immunodeficiency in Serbia and Montenegro between years 1986 and 2010: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Pasic, Srdjan; Vujic, Dragana; Veljković, Dobrila; Slavkovic, Bojana; Mostarica-Stojkovic, Marija; Minic, Predrag; Minic, Aleksandra; Ristic, Goran; Giliani, Silvia; Villa, Anna; Sobacchi, Cristina; Lilić, Desa; Abinun, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), including the 'variant' Omenn syndrome (OS), represent a heterogeneous group of monogenic disorders characterized by defect in differentiation of T- and/or B lymphocytes and susceptibility to infections since birth. In the period of 25 years, between January 1986 and December 2010, a total of 21 patients (15 SCID, 6 OS) were diagnosed in Mother & Child Health Institute of Serbia, a tertiary-care teaching University hospital and a national referral center for patients affected with primary immunodeficiency (PID). The diagnoses were based on anamnestic data, clinical findings, and immunological and genetic analysis. The median age at the onset of the first infection was the 2nd month of life. Seven (33 %) patients had positive family history for SCID. Out of five male infants with T-B+NK- SCID phenotype, mutation analysis revealed interleukin-2 (common) gamma-chain receptor (IL2RG) mutations in 3 with positive X-linked family history, and Janus-kinase (JAK)-3 gene defects in the other two. Six patients had T-B-NK+ SCID phenotype and further 6 features of OS, 11 of which had recombinase-activating gene (RAG1or RAG2) and 1 Artemis gene mutations. One child with T+B+NK+ SCID phenotype as well had proven RAG mutation. One child each with T-B+NK+ SCID phenotype, CD8 lymphopenia and unknown phenotype remained without known underlying genetic defect. Of the eight patients who underwent hematopoetic stem cell transplant (HSCT) 5 survived, the other 13 died between 2 days and 12 months after diagnosis was made. Early diagnosis of SCID, before onset of severe infections, offers possibility for HSCT and cure. Education of primary-care pediatricians, in particular including awareness of the risk of using live vaccines and non-irradiated blood products, should improve prognosis of SCID in our setting.

  18. PID techniques: Alternatives to RICH Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vavra, J.; /SLAC

    2011-03-01

    In this review article we discuss the recent progress in PID techniques other than the RICH methods. In particular we mention the recent progress in the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), dE/dx cluster counting, and Time Of Flight (TOF) techniques. The TRD technique is mature and has been tried in many hadron colliders. It needs space though, about 20cm of detector radial space for every factor of 10 in the {pi}/e rejection power, and this tends to make such detectors large. Although the cluster counting technique is an old idea, it was never tried in a real physics experiment. Recently, there are efforts to revive it for the SuperB experiment using He-based gases and waveform digitizing electronics. A factor of almost 2 improvement, compared to the classical dE/dx performance, is possible in principle. However, the complexity of the data analysis will be substantial. The TOF technique is well established, but introduction of new fast MCP-PMT and G-APD detectors creates new possibilities. It seems that resolutions below 20-30ps may be possible at some point in the future with relatively small systems, and perhaps this could be pushed down to 10-15ps with very small systems, assuming that one can solve many systematic issues. However, the cost, rate limitation, aging and cross-talk in multi-anode devices at high BW are problems. There are several groups working on these issues, so progress is likely. Table 6 summarizes the author's opinion of pros and cons of various detectors presented in this paper based on their operational capabilities. We refer the reader to Ref.40 for discussion of other more general limits from the PID point of view.

  19. A new adaptive configuration of PID type fuzzy logic controller.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Alireza; Masoum, Mohammad A S; Moghbel, Moayed

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, an adaptive configuration for PID type fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is proposed to improve the performances of both conventional PID (C-PID) controller and conventional PID type FLC (C-PID-FLC). The proposed configuration is called adaptive because its output scaling factors (SFs) are dynamically tuned while the controller is functioning. The initial values of SFs are calculated based on its well-tuned counterpart while the proceeding values are generated using a proposed stochastic hybrid bacterial foraging particle swarm optimization (h-BF-PSO) algorithm. The performance of the proposed configuration is evaluated through extensive simulations for different operating conditions (changes in reference, load disturbance and noise signals). The results reveal that the proposed scheme performs significantly better over the C-PID controller and the C-PID-FLC in terms of several performance indices (integral absolute error (IAE), integral-of-time-multiplied absolute error (ITAE) and integral-of-time-multiplied squared error (ITSE)), overshoot and settling time for plants with and without dead time.

  20. Emergence of clusters of CRF02_AG and B human immunodeficiency viral strains among men having sex with men exhibiting HIV primary infection in southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Tamalet, Catherine; Ravaux, Isabelle; Moreau, Jacques; Brégigeon, Sylvie; Tourres, Christian; Richet, Hervé; Abat, Cedric; Colson, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    The number of new HIV diagnoses is increasing in the western world and transmission clusters have been recently identified among men having sex with men despite Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy efficacy. The objective of this study was to assess temporal trends, epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of primary HIV infections. A retrospective analysis of 79 patients presenting primary HIV infections from 2005 to 2012 was performed in Marseille University Hospitals, southeastern France. Clinical, epidemiological and immunovirological data including phylogeny based on the polymerase gene were collected. 65 males and 14 females were enrolled. The main transmission route was homosexual contact (60.8%). Patients were mostly infected with subtype B (73.4%) and CRF02_AG (21.5%) HIV-1 strains. An increase in the annual number of HIV seroconversions among new HIV diagnoses from 5% in 2005 to 11.2% in 2012 (P = 0.06) and of the proportion of CRF02_AG HIV strains among primary HIV infections in 2011-2012 as compared to 2005-2010 (P = 0.055) was observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed four transmission clusters including three transmission clusters among men having sex with men: two large clusters of nine CRF02_AG, six B HIV strains; and one small cluster of three B HIV strains. Clusters involved more frequently men (P = 0.01) belonging to caucasian ethicity (P = 0.05), with a higher HIV RNA load at inclusion (P = 0.03). These data highlight the importance of improving epidemiological surveillance and of implementing suitable prevention strategies to control the spread of HIV transmission among men having sex with men.

  1. Novel intelligent PID control of traveling wave ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Jingzhuo, Shi; Yu, Liu; Jingtao, Huang; Meiyu, Xu; Juwei, Zhang; Lei, Zhang

    2014-09-01

    A simple control strategy with acceptable control performance can be a good choice for the mass production of ultrasonic motor control system. In this paper, through the theoretic and experimental analyses of typical control process, a simpler intelligent PID speed control strategy of TWUM is proposed, involving only two expert rules to adjust the PID control parameters based on the current status. Compared with the traditional PID controller, this design requires less calculation and more cheap chips which can be easily involved in online performance. Experiments with different load torques and voltage amplitudes show that the proposed controller can deal with the nonlinearity and load disturbance to maintain good control performance of TWUM.

  2. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  3. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Ivan K; Shearer, William T

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders represent pediatric emergencies due to absence of adaptive immune responses to infections. The conditions result from either intrinsic defects in T-cell development (ie, severe combined immunodeficiency disease [SCID]) or congenital athymia (eg, complete DiGeorge anomaly). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant provides the only clinically approved cure for SCID, although gene therapy research trials are showing significant promise. For greatest survival, patients should undergo transplant before 3.5 months of age and before the onset of infections. Newborn screening programs have yielded successful early identification and treatment of infants with SCID and congenital athymia in the United States. PMID:26454313

  4. Computation of robustly stabilizing PID controllers for interval systems.

    PubMed

    Matušů, Radek; Prokop, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The paper is focused on the computation of all possible robustly stabilizing Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers for plants with interval uncertainty. The main idea of the proposed method is based on Tan's (et al.) technique for calculation of (nominally) stabilizing PI and PID controllers or robustly stabilizing PI controllers by means of plotting the stability boundary locus in either P-I plane or P-I-D space. Refinement of the existing method by consideration of 16 segment plants instead of 16 Kharitonov plants provides an elegant and efficient tool for finding all robustly stabilizing PID controllers for an interval system. The validity and relatively effortless application of presented theoretical concepts are demonstrated through a computation and simulation example in which the uncertain mathematical model of an experimental oblique wing aircraft is robustly stabilized. PMID:27350931

  5. Variable Structure PID Control to Prevent Integrator Windup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C. E.; Hodel, A. S.; Hung, J. Y.

    1999-01-01

    PID controllers are frequently used to control systems requiring zero steady-state error while maintaining requirements for settling time and robustness (gain/phase margins). PID controllers suffer significant loss of performance due to short-term integrator wind-up when used in systems with actuator saturation. We examine several existing and proposed methods for the prevention of integrator wind-up in both continuous and discrete time implementations.

  6. IMC-EB10, an anti-FLT3 monoclonal antibody, prolongs survival and reduces nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient engraftment of some acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and primary leukemic samples.

    PubMed

    Piloto, Obdulio; Nguyen, Bao; Huso, David; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Li, Yiwen; Witte, Larry; Hicklin, Daniel J; Brown, Patrick; Small, Donald

    2006-05-01

    The class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 is expressed on the blasts of >90% of patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL). In addition, it is expressed at extremely high levels in ALL patients with mixed lineage leukemia rearrangements or hyperdiploidy and is sometimes mutated in these same patients. In this report, we investigate the effects of treating ALL cell lines and primary samples with human anti-FLT3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) capable of preventing binding of FLT3 ligand. In vitro studies, examining the ability of two anti-FLT3 mAbs (IMC-EB10 and IMC-NC7) to affect FLT3 activation and downstream signaling in ALL cell lines and primary blasts, yielded variable results. FLT3 phosphorylation was consistently inhibited by IMC-NC7 treatment, but in some cell lines, IMC-EB10 actually stimulated FLT3 activation, possibly as a result of antibody-mediated receptor dimerization. Through antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, such an antibody could still prove efficacious against leukemia cells in vivo. In fact, IMC-EB10 treatment significantly prolonged survival and/or reduced engraftment of several ALL cell lines and primary ALL samples in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. This occurred even when IMC-EB10 treatment resulted in FLT3 activation in vitro. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and PCR analysis of IMC-EB10-treated NOD/SCID mice surviving 150 days post-leukemic cell injection revealed that FLT3 immunotherapy reduced leukemic engraftment below the level of detection in these assays (<0.001%). Furthermore, in vivo IMC-EB10 treatment did not select for resistant cells, because cells surviving IMC-EB10 treatment remain sensitive to IMC-EB10 cytotoxicity upon retransplantation. In vivo studies involving either partial depletion or activation of natural killer (NK) cells show that most of the cytotoxic effect of IMC-EB10 is mediated through NK cells. Therefore, such an antibody, either

  7. Clinical characteristics and genetic profiles of 44 patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): report from Shanghai, China (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Yao, Chun-Mei; Han, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Yi-Dan; Zhang, Hui; Jin, Ying-Ying; Cao, Rui-Ming; Wang, Xi; Liu, Quan-Hua; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a rare type of genetic associated immune disorder, is poorly characterized in mainland China. We retrospectively reviewed 44 patients with SCID who received treatment from 2004 to 2011 in Shanghai, China, and herein summarize their clinical manifestations and immunological and preliminary genetic features. The male-to-female ratio was 10:1. Twenty five patients presented with X-SCID symptoms. Only one patient was diagnosed before the onset of symptoms due to positive family history. The mean time of delay in the diagnosis of X-SCID was 2.69 months (range, 0.5-8.67). Thirty-seven of the 44 patients died by the end of 2011 with the mean age of death being 7.87 months (range, 1.33-31). Six patients received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); only one of them survived, who was transplanted twice. The time between onset and death was shorter in the HSCT-treated group compared with the untreated group (2.87 ± 1.28 and 3.34 ± 0.59 months, respectively), probably due to active infections during transplantation. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications occurred in 14 of the 34 patients who received BCG vaccination. Transfusion-induced graft-versus-host disease occurred in 5 patients. Total 20 mutations in interleukin-2 receptor subunit gamma (IL2RG) were identified in 22 patients, including 11 novel mutations. Most patients were misdiagnosed before referred to our SCID Center. Therefore, establishing more diagnostic centers dedicated to the care of PID and accessible by primary immunodeficiency patients will facilitate early, correct diagnosis and better care of SCID in China.

  8. Protein microarrays: a new tool for the study of autoantibodies in immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jacob M; Utz, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is highly coincident with immunodeficiency. In a small but growing number of primary immunodeficiencies, autoantibodies are diagnostic of a given disease and implicated in disease pathogenesis. In order to improve our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in immunodeficiencies and to discover novel autoantibodies, new proteomic tools are needed. Protein microarrays have the ability to screen for reactivity to hundreds to many thousands of unique autoantigens simultaneously on a single chip using minimal serum input. Here, we review different types of protein microarrays and how they can be useful in framing the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. PMID:25904912

  9. [Radiographic changes in children with primary immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    González-Uribe, Víctor; Pietropaolo-Cienfuegos, Dino Roberto; Del Río-Navarro, Blanca Estela; Del Río-Chivardi, Jaime Mariano; Sienra-Monge, Juan José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: si bien se cuenta con información epidemiológica de las inmunodeficiencias primarias, la información disponible en México es escasa. Objetivos: dar información epidemiológica del retraso del diagnóstico de las inmunodeficiencias primarias y de su correlación con daño pulmonar crónico. Material y método: estudio retrospectivo, analítico, efectuado en pacientes de 0 a 18 años de edad con diagnóstico de inmunodeficiencias primarias durante 11 años en el Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez; las variables estudiadas fueron: edad al inicio de los síntomas, edad al diagnóstico, tiempo desde el inicio de los síntomas al diagnóstico, número de neumonías previas y estudios radiográficos con datos de daño pulmonar crónico. Resultados: se incluyeron 48 pacientes que cumplieron los criterios de inclusión; 33 tenían daño pulmonar al diagnóstico, el déficit de anticuerpos fue el grupo con mayor afectación. Al correlacionar la edad de inicio de los síntomas y la diferencia de tiempo del inicio de los síntomas al diagnóstico se obtuvo una fuerte correlación (p <0.001, Rho > 0.80). Se observó una correlación moderada entre la diferencia en tiempo vs número de neumonías (p=0.005, Rho=0.495) y la correlación entre número de neumonías y daño pulmonar mostró significación alta (p <0.001, Rho=0.704). Conclusión: se encontró una relación estrecha entre el tiempo transcurrido desde el inicio de los síntomas y el número de neumonías con el daño pulmonar, por lo que las neumonías de repetición (más de dos) deben hacer sospechar el diagnóstico de inmunodeficiencia primaria, como se recomienda en la bibliografía mundial.

  10. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Over 60 patients affected by SCID due to IL2RG deficiency (SCID-X1) or adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID have received hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in the past 15 years using gammaretroviral vectors, resulting in immune reconstitution and clinical benefit in the majority of them. However, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in the SCID-X1 trials has led to the development of new clinical trials based on integrating vectors with improved safety design as well as investigation on new technologies for highly efficient gene targeting and site-specific gene editing. Here we will present the experience and perspectives of gene therapy for SCID-X1 and ADA-SCID and discuss the pros and cons of gene therapy in comparison to allogeneic transplantation.

  11. NeuroPID: a classifier of neuropeptide precursors.

    PubMed

    Karsenty, Solange; Rappoport, Nadav; Ofer, Dan; Zair, Adva; Linial, Michal

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptides (NPs) are short secreted peptides produced in neurons. NPs act by activating signaling cascades governing broad functions such as metabolism, sensation and behavior throughout the animal kingdom. NPs are the products of multistep processing of longer proteins, the NP precursors (NPPs). We present NeuroPID (Neuropeptide Precursor Identifier), an online machine-learning tool that identifies metazoan NPPs. NeuroPID was trained on 1418 NPPs annotated as such by UniProtKB. A large number of sequence-based features were extracted for each sequence with the goal of capturing the biophysical and informational-statistical properties that distinguish NPPs from other proteins. Training several machine-learning models, including support vector machines and ensemble decision trees, led to high accuracy (89-94%) and precision (90-93%) in cross-validation tests. For inputs of thousands of unseen sequences, the tool provides a ranked list of high quality predictions based on the results of four machine-learning classifiers. The output reveals many uncharacterized NPPs and secreted cell modulators that are rich in potential cleavage sites. NeuroPID is a discovery and a prediction tool that can be used to identify NPPs from unannotated transcriptomes and mass spectrometry experiments. NeuroPID predicted sequences are attractive targets for investigating behavior, physiology and cell modulation. The NeuroPID web tool is available at http:// neuropid.cs.huji.ac.il.

  12. Precision positioning system based on intelligent Fuzzy-PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Liqiong; Li, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To break through the limitations of static and dynamic characteristics of conventional step motor driven open-loop positioning devices, a two-dimensional precision positioning system with a travel range of 100mm×100mm has been developed. This paper presents its structure, control principle and performance experiments. This system, equipped with cross roller guides working as linear guiding elements, is driven by step motors through ball screw transmission. A threeaxis dual-frequency laser interferometric measurement system is established for real-time measurement and feedback of system's movements in three degrees of freedom (DOF) and an intelligent Fuzzy-PID controller is implemented for this system's motion control. In the controller, the PID module calculates the output from motor drivers and its initial parameters are tuned through expansion of critical proportioning method; the Fuzzy module optimizes PID parameters to fulfill specific requirements of different movement stages. A dead zone control mechanism is developed in this controller to minimize the oscillations around target position. Experimental results indicate that system with Fuzzy-PID controller shows faster response than that with ordinary PID controller. Moreover, with this controller implemented, the developed precision positioning system achieves better repeatability (+/-2μm) and accuracy (+/-2.5μm) within the full range than open-loop system using step motor.

  13. Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  14. Noninfectious Granulomas: A Sign of an Underlying Immunodeficiency?

    PubMed

    Shoimer, Ilya; Wright, Nicola; Haber, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders, such as ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), may rarely be associated with cutaneous granulomas without an identifiable infection. The authors report a case of a 3-year-old boy with A-T who presented with two persistent ulcerated erythematous nodules. Histopathology was consistent with a granulomatous process secondary to A-T, without an infectious origin. Partial improvement was noted with clobetasol propionate 0.05% cream applied twice daily under occlusion. Of note, the presence of multiple noninfectious granulomas in a child may be the initial sign of an immune deficiency and should alert the astute clinician to investigate for an underlying primary immunodeficiency. Herein, the authors discuss the associations of noninfectious granulomas and primary immunodeficiency disorders and present management options for these difficult-to-treat lesions.

  15. Noninfectious Granulomas: A Sign of an Underlying Immunodeficiency?

    PubMed

    Shoimer, Ilya; Wright, Nicola; Haber, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders, such as ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), may rarely be associated with cutaneous granulomas without an identifiable infection. The authors report a case of a 3-year-old boy with A-T who presented with two persistent ulcerated erythematous nodules. Histopathology was consistent with a granulomatous process secondary to A-T, without an infectious origin. Partial improvement was noted with clobetasol propionate 0.05% cream applied twice daily under occlusion. Of note, the presence of multiple noninfectious granulomas in a child may be the initial sign of an immune deficiency and should alert the astute clinician to investigate for an underlying primary immunodeficiency. Herein, the authors discuss the associations of noninfectious granulomas and primary immunodeficiency disorders and present management options for these difficult-to-treat lesions. PMID:26728658

  16. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  17. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  18. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype: A Global Case-report Study of a Well-Defined Syndrome With Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-03-01

    Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs*2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs*3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the characteristic

  19. Novel intelligent PID control of traveling wave ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Jingzhuo, Shi; Yu, Liu; Jingtao, Huang; Meiyu, Xu; Juwei, Zhang; Lei, Zhang

    2014-09-01

    A simple control strategy with acceptable control performance can be a good choice for the mass production of ultrasonic motor control system. In this paper, through the theoretic and experimental analyses of typical control process, a simpler intelligent PID speed control strategy of TWUM is proposed, involving only two expert rules to adjust the PID control parameters based on the current status. Compared with the traditional PID controller, this design requires less calculation and more cheap chips which can be easily involved in online performance. Experiments with different load torques and voltage amplitudes show that the proposed controller can deal with the nonlinearity and load disturbance to maintain good control performance of TWUM. PMID:24957274

  20. Monocytotropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants detectable in all stages of HIV-1 infection lack T-cell line tropism and syncytium-inducing ability in primary T-cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Schuitemaker, H; Kootstra, N A; de Goede, R E; de Wolf, F; Miedema, F; Tersmette, M

    1991-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a correlation between the presence of syncytium-inducing (SI) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants showing tropism for cell line H9 and the occurrence of rapid CD4 cell decline and progression to AIDS. In contrast, in stable asymptomatic individuals, we detected only isolates with low replication rates that were non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) and nontropic for the H9 cell line. Here, we investigated the monocytotropism of established HIV-1 isolates with a panel of isolates and with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes. Moreover, the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic HIV-1 variants in the course of HIV-1 infection were analyzed in comparative primary isolation studies on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). In cell-free infection studies with MDM from eight blood donors, 13 of 17 NSI isolates but only 4 of 14 SI isolates were able to infect MDM. NSI isolates also infected significantly more different donors than SI variants (median, 3 of 8 versus 0 of 8). This enhanced monocytotropism of NSI isolates was confirmed in experiments with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes recovered from the same donor. To investigate the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic variants in different stages of HIV-1 infection, sequential isolates from peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from nine asymptomatic individuals, five of whom progressed to AIDS and seven of whom had a known time of seroconversion, were recovered by cocultivation with both PBL and MDM. Monocytotropic variants were obtained from 37 of 42 time points. All monocytotropic variants were NSI in PBL culture and non-T-cell-line tropic, even when SI, T-cell-line-tropic HIV-1 variants could be recovered from the same patient sample by cocultivation with PBL. We conclude that monocytotropic HIV-1 variants mostly have an NSI phenotype in PBL and, in contrast to SI variants, are

  1. Organising pneumonia in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Boujaoude, Ziad; Arya, Rohan; Rafferty, William; Dammert, Pedro

    2013-06-07

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common of the primary immunodeficiency disorders. Pulmonary manifestations are characterised by recurrent rhinosinusitis, respiratory tract infections and bronchiectasis. Less commonly the lung may be affected by lymphoid disorders and sarcoid-like granulomas. Organising pneumonia (OP) is a rare pulmonary manifestation. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with CVID who presented with fever, dyspnoea and persistent lung infiltrates despite antibiotic therapy. CT of the chest showed bilateral patchy alveolar infiltrates. Pulmonary function tests revealed moderate restriction and reduction in diffusion capacity. Initial bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsies did not yield a diagnosis but surgical lung biopsies identified OP. Significant clinical, radiographic and physiological improvement was achieved after institution of corticosteroid therapy.

  2. Bidimensional MRI-based navigation system using a PID controller.

    PubMed

    Tamaz, Samer; Gourdeau, Richard; Martel, Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of using 2D real-time control to navigate ferromagnetic entities in an MRI bore for novel medical interventions is assessed. Preliminary experimental results confirm that a simple PID controller can be suitable for several applications where targeting out-of-reach locations within the cardiovascular system is essential.

  3. A Design of CMAC Based Intelligent PID Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurozumi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Toru

    Owing to the rapid progress of the computer technology in recent years, lots of works about intelligent control schemes have been developed in the field of control engineering. However, PID control algorithms still continue to be widely used for most industrial control systems, particularly in chemical process industries. However, it is difficult to find a suitable set of PID gains, because most processes are represented by nonlinear systems. On the other hand, in recent years, various neural networks (NNs) have been proposed. These technologies of the NNs enable us to deal with the nonlinear systems, and they play an important role in the field of control engineering. Furthermore, a Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller (CMAC) has been proposed as one of artificial neural networks. This paper presents a new design scheme of intelligent PID controllers whose PID gains are generated by using CMACs. Owing to the high-generalizing ability of the CMAC, the proposed scheme does not need large learning time with comparison to the conventional NN. Furthermore, the computational burden can be drastically reduced and the robust tracking can be realized for untrained reference signals. The newly proposed control scheme is numerically evaluated on some simulation examples.

  4. Design of a PID Controller for a PCR Micro Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinca, M. P.; Gheorghe, M.; Galvin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in process control, and consequently they are described in most of the textbooks on automatic control. However, rather than presenting the overall design process, the examples given in such textbooks are intended to illuminate specific focused aspects of selection, tuning and…

  5. Space Flight Immunodeficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, William T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has had sufficient concern for the well-being of astronauts traveling in space to create the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), which is investigating several areas of biomedical research including those of immunology. As part of the Immunology, Infection, and Hematology Team, the co-investigators of the Space Flight Immunodeficiency Project began their research projects on April 1, 1998 and are now just into the second year of work. Two areas of research have been targeted: 1) specific immune (especially antibody) responses and 2) non-specific inflammation and adhesion. More precise knowledge of these two areas of research will help elucidate the potential harmful effects of space travel on the immune system, possibly sufficient to create a secondary state of immunodeficiency in astronauts. The results of these experiments are likely to lead to the delineation of functional alterations in antigen presentation, specific immune memory, cytokine regulation of immune responses, cell to cell interactions, and cell to endothelium interactions.

  6. Design and implementation of a 2-DOF PID compensation for magnetic levitation systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arun; Rakesh Krishnan, T; Tejaswy, Pailla; Mandal, Abhisek; Pradhan, Jatin K; Ranasingh, Subhakant

    2014-07-01

    This paper employs a 2-DOF (degree of freedom) PID controller for compensating a physical magnetic levitation system. It is shown that because of having a feedforward gain in the proposed 2-DOF PID control, the transient performance of the compensated system can be changed in a desired manner unlike the conventional 1-DOF PID control. It is also shown that for a choice of PID parameters, although the theoretical loop robustness is the same for both the compensated systems, in real-time, 2-DOF PID control may provide superior robustness if a suitable choice of the feedforward parameter is made. The results are verified through simulations and experiments. PMID:24947430

  7. Functional analysis of Pid3-A4, an ortholog of rice blast resistance gene Pid3 revealed by allele mining in common wild rice.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiming; Xu, Xiao; Shang, Junjun; Jiang, Guanghuai; Pang, Zhiqian; Zhou, Zhuangzhi; Wang, Jing; Liu, Ya; Li, Ting; Li, Xiaobing; Xu, Jichen; Cheng, Zhukuan; Zhao, Xianfeng; Li, Shigui; Zhu, Lihuang

    2013-06-01

    The rice blast resistance gene Pid3 encodes a nucleotide-binding-site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) protein. This gene was cloned from the rice 'Digu' (indica) by performing a genome-wide comparison of the NBS-LRR gene family between two genome-sequenced varieties, '9311' (indica) and 'Nipponbare' (japonica). In this study, we performed functional analysis of Pid3-A4, an ortholog of Pid3 revealed by allele mining in the common wild rice A4 (Oryza rufipogon). The predicted protein encoded by Pid3-A4 shares 99.03% sequence identity with Pid3, with only nine amino-acid substitutions. In wild rice plants, Pid3-A4 is constitutively expressed, and its expression is not induced by Magnaporthe oryzae isolate Zhong-10-8-14 infection. Importantly, in transgenic plants, Pid3-A4, as compared with Pid3, displays a distinct resistance spectrum to a set of M. oryzae isolates, including those that prevail in the rice fields of Sichuan Province. Therefore, Pid3-A4 should be quite useful for the breeding of rice blast resistance, especially in southwestern China.

  8. A Rare Case of Flare-Up of PID in Infertility Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Leena; Wadhwa, Sanjana N; Jindal, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Case Presentation. Mrs. X, 35 years old, case of primary infertility, was diagnosed to have genital tuberculosis on the basis of PCR positive and hysterolaparoscopy findings and received category I ATT for 6 months. Following ATT completion, her USG revealed no evidence of tuboovarian mass or hydrosalpinx. Since her tubes were patent, she underwent 3 cycles of ovulation induction and 2 cycles of IUI. The women presented with acute PID, five days after IUI, and was conservatively managed. She again presented 24 days after IUI with persistent low grade fever and abdominal pain. Suspecting relapse of genital tuberculosis, she was started on category II ATT. She had acute episodes of high grade fever with chills 2 weeks after starting ATT and MRI revealed bilateral TO masses suggestive of pyosalpinx. Emergency laparotomy was done, pus was drained, and cyst wall was removed and HPE was suggestive of chronic inflammation with few granulation tissues. ATT was continued for one year and the woman improved. Conclusion. The possibility of flare-up of PID (pelvic inflammatory disease) in treated case of tuberculosis undergoing infertility management should be kept in mind and aggressive management should be done. PMID:26600959

  9. A Rare Case of Flare-Up of PID in Infertility Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Leena; Wadhwa, Sanjana N.; Jindal, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Case Presentation. Mrs. X, 35 years old, case of primary infertility, was diagnosed to have genital tuberculosis on the basis of PCR positive and hysterolaparoscopy findings and received category I ATT for 6 months. Following ATT completion, her USG revealed no evidence of tuboovarian mass or hydrosalpinx. Since her tubes were patent, she underwent 3 cycles of ovulation induction and 2 cycles of IUI. The women presented with acute PID, five days after IUI, and was conservatively managed. She again presented 24 days after IUI with persistent low grade fever and abdominal pain. Suspecting relapse of genital tuberculosis, she was started on category II ATT. She had acute episodes of high grade fever with chills 2 weeks after starting ATT and MRI revealed bilateral TO masses suggestive of pyosalpinx. Emergency laparotomy was done, pus was drained, and cyst wall was removed and HPE was suggestive of chronic inflammation with few granulation tissues. ATT was continued for one year and the woman improved. Conclusion. The possibility of flare-up of PID (pelvic inflammatory disease) in treated case of tuberculosis undergoing infertility management should be kept in mind and aggressive management should be done. PMID:26600959

  10. Neural PID Control of Robot Manipulators With Application to an Upper Limb Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    In order to minimize steady-state error with respect to uncertainties in robot control, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control needs a big integral gain, or a neural compensator is added to the classical proportional-derivative (PD) control with a large derivative gain. Both of them deteriorate transient performances of the robot control. In this paper, we extend the popular neural PD control into neural PID control. This novel control is a natural combination of industrial linear PID control and neural compensation. The main contributions of this paper are semiglobal asymptotic stability of the neural PID control and local asymptotic stability of the neural PID control with a velocity observer which are proved with standard weight training algorithms. These conditions give explicit selection methods for the gains of the linear PID control. An experimental study on an upper limb exoskeleton with this neural PID control is addressed. PMID:23033432

  11. Neural PID Control of Robot Manipulators With Application to an Upper Limb Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    In order to minimize steady-state error with respect to uncertainties in robot control, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control needs a big integral gain, or a neural compensator is added to the classical proportional-derivative (PD) control with a large derivative gain. Both of them deteriorate transient performances of the robot control. In this paper, we extend the popular neural PD control into neural PID control. This novel control is a natural combination of industrial linear PID control and neural compensation. The main contributions of this paper are semiglobal asymptotic stability of the neural PID control and local asymptotic stability of the neural PID control with a velocity observer which are proved with standard weight training algorithms. These conditions give explicit selection methods for the gains of the linear PID control. An experimental study on an upper limb exoskeleton with this neural PID control is addressed.

  12. Poor specific antibody response immunodeficiency (dysgammaglobulinemia) predates systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Al Hamzi, H; Al Shaikh, A; Arnaout, R K

    2013-08-01

    Poor specific antibody response is a well-known primary immunodeficiency that is related to hypogammaglobulinemia or common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). The co-existence of CVID or hypogammaglobulinemia and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been rarely described. In all reported cases, the diagnosis of SLE antedates CVID. We report a 15-year-old Saudi girl who was diagnosed with poor specific antibody response at age 6 years in the form of poor or no antibody response and dysgammaglobulinemia. She developed SLE with musculoskeletal and hematological manifestations, positive antinuclear antibody and high anti-dsDNA nine years later. She was treated with rituximab with good response.

  13. Tuning of PID controllers for boiler-turbine units.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Liu, Jizhen; Fang, Fang; Chen, Yanqiao

    2004-10-01

    A simple two-by-two model for a boiler-turbine unit is demonstrated in this paper. The model can capture the essential dynamics of a unit. The design of a coordinated controller is discussed based on this model. A PID control structure is derived, and a tuning procedure is proposed. The examples show that the method is easy to apply and can achieve acceptable performance.

  14. An Attitude Control of Flexible Spacecraft Using Fuzzy-PID Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Oh; Im, Young-Do

    This primary objective of this study is to demonstrate simulation and ground-based experiment for the attitude control of flexible spacecraft. A typical spacecraft structure consists of the rigid body and flexible appendages which are large flexible solar panels, parabolic antennas built from light materials in order to reduce their weight. Therefore the attitude control has a big problem because these appendages induce structural vibration under the excitation of external forces. A single-axis rotational simulator with a flexible arm is constructed with on-off air thrusters and reaction wheel as actuation. The simulator is also equipped with payload pointing capability by simultaneous thruster and DC servo motor actuation. The experiment of flexible spacecraft attitude control is performed using only the reaction wheel. Using the reaction wheel the performance of the fuzzy-PID controller is illustrated by simulation and experimental results for a single-axis rotational simulator.

  15. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F.; Jeggo, Penny A.; Martin, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  16. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F; Jeggo, Penny A; Martin, Olga A

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  17. Hybrid Takagi-Sugeno Fuzzy FED PID Control of Nonlinear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Basil; El Khateb, Ahmad

    2008-06-01

    The new method of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is proposed in this paper for a hybrid fuzzy PID controller for nonlinear system. The important feature of the proposed approach is that it combines the fuzzy gain scheduling method and a fuzzy fed PID controller to solve the nonlinear control problem. The resultant fuzzy rule base of the proposed controller contains one part. This single part of the rules uses the Takagi-Sugeno method for solving the nonlinear problem. The simulation results of a nonlinear system show that the performance of a fed PID Hybrid Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy controller is better than that of the conventional fuzzy PID controller or Hybrid Mamdani fuzzy FED PID controller.

  18. PID1 (NYGGF4), a new growth-inhibitory gene in embryonal brain tumors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Robison, Nathan; Ren, Xiuhai; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Jingying; Davidson, Tom B.; Schur, Mathew; Gilles, Floyd H.; Ji, Lingyun; Malvar, Jemily; Shackleford, Gregory M.; Margol, Ashley S.; Krieger, Mark D.; Judkins, Alexander R.; Jones, David T.W.; Pfister, Stefan; Kool, Marcel; Sposto, Richard; Asgharazadeh, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We present here the first report of PID1 (Phosphotyrosine Interaction Domain containing 1; NYGGF4) in cancer. PID1 was identified in 2006 as a gene that modulates insulin signaling and mitochondrial function in adipocytes and muscle cells. Experimental Design and Results Using four independent medulloblastoma datasets, we show that mean PID1 mRNA levels were lower in unfavorable medulloblastomas (Groups 3 and 4, and anaplastic histology) compared with favorable medulloblastomas (SHH and WNT groups, and desmoplastic/nodular histology) and with fetal cerebellum. In two large independent glioma datasets PID1 mRNA was lower in glioblastomas (GBMs), the most malignant gliomas, compared to other astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and non-tumor brains. Neural and proneural GBM subtypes had higher PID1 mRNA compared to classical and mesenchymal GBM. Importantly, overall survival and radiation-free progression-free survival were longer in medulloblastoma patients with higher PID1 mRNA (univariate and multivariate analyses). Higher PID1 mRNA also correlated with longer overall survival in glioma and GBM patients. In cell culture, overexpression of PID1 inhibited colony formation in medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) and GBM cell lines. Increasing PID1 also increased cell death and apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, induced mitochondrial depolarization, and decreased serum-mediated phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in medulloblastoma, ATRT and/or GBM cell lines, whereas siRNA to PID1 diminished mitochondrial depolarization. Conclusions These data are the first to link PID1 to cancer and suggest that PID1 may have a tumor inhibitory function in these pediatric and adult brain tumors. PMID:24300787

  19. Mutation particle swarm optimization of the BP-PID controller for piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaqing; Jiang, Minlan

    2016-01-01

    PID control is the most common used method in industrial control because its structure is simple and it is easy to implement. PID controller has good control effect, now it has been widely used. However, PID method has a few limitations. The overshoot of the PID controller is very big. The adjustment time is long. When the parameters of controlled plant are changing over time, the parameters of controller could hardly change automatically to adjust to changing environment. Thus, it can't meet the demand of control quality in the process of controlling piezoelectric ceramic. In order to effectively control the piezoelectric ceramic and improve the control accuracy, this paper replaced the learning algorithm of the BP with the mutation particle swarm optimization algorithm(MPSO) on the process of the parameters setting of BP-PID. That designed a better self-adaptive controller which is combing the BP neural network based on mutation particle swarm optimization with the conventional PID control theory. This combination is called the MPSO-BP-PID. In the mechanism of the MPSO, the mutation operation is carried out with the fitness variance and the global best fitness value as the standard. That can overcome the precocious of the PSO and strengthen its global search ability. As a result, the MPSO-BP-PID can complete controlling the controlled plant with higher speed and accuracy. Therefore, the MPSO-BP-PID is applied to the piezoelectric ceramic. It can effectively overcome the hysteresis, nonlinearity of the piezoelectric ceramic. In the experiment, compared with BP-PID and PSO-BP-PID, it proved that MPSO is effective and the MPSO-BP-PID has stronger adaptability and robustness.

  20. PID controller design for nonlinear systems represented by discrete-time local model networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hametner, Christoph; Mayr, Christian H.; Kozek, Martin; Jakubek, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller design for nonlinear systems represented by local model networks. The proposed method is based on the concept of parallel distributed compensators where the scheduling of the local model network is adopted for the PID parameters. The proposed design method for nonlinear PID controllers considers closed-loop stability by means of a Lyapunov stability criterion as well as closed-loop performance. All PID parameters are determined by a multi-objective genetic algorithm (multiGA), which handles the trade-off between stability and performance. A simulation example demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Simple PID parameter tuning method based on outputs of the closed loop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianda; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Ziya; He, Yuqing

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing PID parameters tuning methods are only effective with pre-known accurate system models, which often require some strict identification experiments and thus infeasible for many complicated systems. Actually, in most practical engineering applications, it is desirable for the PID tuning scheme to be directly based on the input-output response of the closed-loop system. Thus, a new parameter tuning scheme for PID controllers without explicit mathematical model is developed in this paper. The paper begins with a new frequency domain properties analysis of the PID controller. After that, the definition of characteristic frequency for the PID controller is given in order to study the mathematical relationship between the PID parameters and the open-loop frequency properties of the controlled system. Then, the concepts of M-field and θ-field are introduced, which are then used to explain how the PID control parameters influence the closed-loop frequency-magnitude property and its time responses. Subsequently, the new PID parameter tuning scheme, i.e., a group of tuning rules, is proposed based on the preceding analysis. Finally, both simulations and experiments are conducted, and the results verify the feasibility and validity of the proposed methods. This research proposes a PID parameter tuning method based on outputs of the closed loop system.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious and relatively frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that may associate with increased morbidity and mortality and may prove difficult to manage, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:25337392

  3. Progress on Development of the New FDIRC PID Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vavra, Jerry

    2012-08-03

    We present a progress status of a new concept of PID detector called FDIRC, intended to be used at the SuperB experiment, which requires {pi}/K separation up to a few GeV/c. The new photon camera is made of the solid fused-silica optics with a volume 25x smaller and speed increased by a factor of ten compared to the BaBar DIRC, and therefore will be much less sensitive to electromagnetic and neutron background

  4. Chronic Giardiasis in a Case of Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, Supriya M; Koticha, Avani; Mehta, Preeti R

    2016-07-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by low antibody levels and recurrent infections. This makes an individual more prone to recurrent respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In cases where there is persistent positive finding of intestinal parasites in stool, a high index of suspicion should be raised to rule out immunodeficiency state. Early diagnosis of such cases will help in reducing the morbidity and better management of the patient. A case of CVID in 18-year-old male with recurrent lower respiratory tract infection and chronic diarrhoea due to Giardia lamblia is reported herewith. PMID:27630845

  5. Chronic Giardiasis in a Case of Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Koticha, Avani; Mehta, Preeti R

    2016-01-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by low antibody levels and recurrent infections. This makes an individual more prone to recurrent respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In cases where there is persistent positive finding of intestinal parasites in stool, a high index of suspicion should be raised to rule out immunodeficiency state. Early diagnosis of such cases will help in reducing the morbidity and better management of the patient. A case of CVID in 18-year-old male with recurrent lower respiratory tract infection and chronic diarrhoea due to Giardia lamblia is reported herewith. PMID:27630845

  6. Chronic Giardiasis in a Case of Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Koticha, Avani; Mehta, Preeti R

    2016-01-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by low antibody levels and recurrent infections. This makes an individual more prone to recurrent respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In cases where there is persistent positive finding of intestinal parasites in stool, a high index of suspicion should be raised to rule out immunodeficiency state. Early diagnosis of such cases will help in reducing the morbidity and better management of the patient. A case of CVID in 18-year-old male with recurrent lower respiratory tract infection and chronic diarrhoea due to Giardia lamblia is reported herewith.

  7. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System National Library of Medicine, Genetics Home Reference ​​​​​ ... and an increased risk of infections. Although the disease usually is diagnosed in ... a defect in the capability of immune cells to produce normal amounts of all types ...

  8. Autoimmune Cytopenias In Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Podjasek, Jenna C.; Abraham, Roshini S.

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20–50%; Chapel et al., 2008; Cunningham-Rundles, 2008), autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4–20% (Michel et al., 2004; Chapel et al., 2008) of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical “prima facie” that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21 low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID. PMID:22837758

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, J Q; Semiatin, S L

    1991-01-01

    We summarize information from three sets of epidemiologic data: the Nevada AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] Surveillance System, which contains information about every case identified within the state boundaries through September 1989; the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence reporting systems, which currently include data on all HIV-positive reports submitted statewide to public health authorities; and surveys on the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Nevadans concerning HIV-related disease. The Nevada State AIDS Task Force outlined major policy recommendations, nearly half of which concerned testing; only 2 dealt with preventing HIV transmission. Greater efforts should go into education, particularly directed toward groups at greatest risk of exposure to HIV, and to improve community-based care of infected persons.

  10. PID controller design for trailer suspension based on linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushairi, S.; Omar, A. R.; Schmidt, R.; Isa, A. A. Mat; Hudha, K.; Azizan, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    A quarter of an active trailer suspension system having the characteristics of a double wishbone type was modeled as a complex multi-body dynamic system in MSC.ADAMS. Due to the complexity of the model, a linearized version is considered in this paper. A model reduction technique is applied to the linear model, resulting in a reduced-order model. Based on this simplified model, a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller was designed in MATLAB/Simulink environment; primarily to reduce excessive roll motions and thus improving the ride comfort. Simulation results show that the output signal closely imitates the input signal in multiple cases - demonstrating the effectiveness of the controller.

  11. Adolescents and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1992-12-01

    As of March 31, 1992, individuals 13 to 19 years of age had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; over one third were diagnosed in the past 2 years alone. Because of the long incubation period from initial infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, the majority of young adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were probably initially infected as adolescents. In 1991, 34% of adolescents with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were female, and their predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence studies of adolescents show a male-to-female ratio approaching 1:1, with many human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescent women identifying none of the standard risk. Factors such as sexual and drug experimentation, risk taking, and sense of invulnerability so characteristic of adolescence put adolescents at special risk for human immunodeficiency virus. There is no published information on if or how clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus disease in adolescents might differ from those seen in adults. Medical care should be broad-based and should include access to clinical trials for new drug treatments. General knowledge levels about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are high among US adolescents, but behavioral changes have lagged behind. All adolescents should be targeted for intensive education about human immunodeficiency virus along with interventions designed to enhance their general coping, communication, and decision-making skills.

  12. Nonpathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Nichole R.; Silvestri, Guido; Hirsch, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) are a diverse group of viruses that naturally infect a wide range of African primates, including African green monkeys (AGMs) and sooty mangabey monkeys (SMs). Although natural infection is widespread in feral populations of AGMs and SMs, this infection generally does not result in immunodeficiency. However, experimental inoculation of Asian macaques results in an immunodeficiency syndrome remarkably similar to human AIDS. Thus, natural nonprogressive SIV infections appear to represent an evolutionary adaptation between these animals and their primate lentiviruses. Curiously, these animals maintain robust virus replication but have evolved strategies to avoid disease progression. Adaptations observed in these primates include phenotypic changes to CD4+ T cells, limited chronic immune activation, and altered mucosal immunity. It is probable that these animals have achieved a unique balance between T-cell renewal and proliferation and loss through activation-induced apoptosis, and virus-induced cell death. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying the lack of disease progression in natural hosts for SIV infection should therefore yield insights into the pathogenesis of AIDS and may inform vaccine design. PMID:22315718

  13. Interval type-2 fuzzy PID controller for uncertain nonlinear inverted pendulum system.

    PubMed

    El-Bardini, Mohammad; El-Nagar, Ahmad M

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the interval type-2 fuzzy proportional-integral-derivative controller (IT2F-PID) is proposed for controlling an inverted pendulum on a cart system with an uncertain model. The proposed controller is designed using a new method of type-reduction that we have proposed, which is called the simplified type-reduction method. The proposed IT2F-PID controller is able to handle the effect of structure uncertainties due to the structure of the interval type-2 fuzzy logic system (IT2-FLS). The results of the proposed IT2F-PID controller using a new method of type-reduction are compared with the other proposed IT2F-PID controller using the uncertainty bound method and the type-1 fuzzy PID controller (T1F-PID). The simulation and practical results show that the performance of the proposed controller is significantly improved compared with the T1F-PID controller.

  14. Design of a Performance-Adaptive PID Control System Based on Modeling Performance Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Toru

    In industrial processes represented by petroleum and refinery processes, it is necessary to establish the performance-driven control strategy in order to improve the productivity, which the control performance is firstly evaluated, and the controller is reconstructed. This paper describes a design scheme of performance-adaptive PID controllers which are based on the above control mechanism. According to the proposed control scheme, the system identification works corresponding to the result of modeling performance assessment, and PID parameters are computed using the newly estimated system parameters. In calculating the PID parameters, the desired control performance is considered. The behaviour of the proposed control scheme is numerically examined in some simulation examples.

  15. Stereotactic biopsy of cerebral lesions in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, M A; Pell, M F; Brew, B J

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy, mortality and morbidity of CT directed stereotactic biopsy of a cerebral lesion in 32 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected patients between July 1991 and June 1994 who had an atypical presentation for toxoplasmosis or who were failing or intolerant of empirical antitoxoplasmosis treatment was evaluated. An histological diagnosis was able to be made in 85%: progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in 13, primary cerebral lymphoma in 10, toxoplasmosis in 3 and HIV encephalitis in one. Non-specific reactive changes or gliosis were seen in 5 patients. There was no mortality, and morbidity occurred in 2 patients: one intraventricular haemorrhage and one transient third nerve palsy. Correct diagnosis made by image-directed stereotactic biopsy of central nervous system (CNS) disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients may improve outcome, particularly in those diseases where effective treatment strategies already exist and become increasingly available in the future.

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Primary CNS Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  17. Treatment Options for Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities.

  19. Thermal response simulation for tuning PID controllers in a 1016 mm guarded hot plate apparatus.

    PubMed

    Thomas, William C; Zarr, Robert R

    2011-07-01

    A mathematical model has been developed and used to simulate the controlled thermal performance of a large guarded hot-plate apparatus. This highly specialized apparatus comprises three interdependent components whose temperatures are closely controlled in order to measure the thermal conductivity of insulation materials. The simulation model was used to investigate control strategies and derive controller gain parameters that are directly transferable to the actual instrument. The simulations take orders-of-magnitude less time to carry out when compared to traditional tuning methods based on operating the actual apparatus. The control system consists primarily of a PC-based PID control algorithm that regulates the output voltage of programmable power amplifiers. Feedback parameters in the form of controller gains are required for the three heating circuits. An objective is to determine an improved set of gains that meet temperature control criteria for testing insulation materials of interest. The analytical model is based on aggregated thermal capacity representations of the primary components and includes the same control algorithm as used in the actual hot-plate apparatus. The model, accounting for both thermal characteristics and temperature control, was validated by comparisons with test data. The tuning methodology used with the simulation model is described and results are presented. The resulting control algorithm and gain parameters have been used in the actual apparatus without modification during several years of testing materials over wide ranges of thermal conductivity, thickness, and insulation resistance values.

  20. A new multiobjective performance criterion used in PID tuning optimization algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Sahib, Mouayad A.; Ahmed, Bestoun S.

    2015-01-01

    In PID controller design, an optimization algorithm is commonly employed to search for the optimal controller parameters. The optimization algorithm is based on a specific performance criterion which is defined by an objective or cost function. To this end, different objective functions have been proposed in the literature to optimize the response of the controlled system. These functions include numerous weighted time and frequency domain variables. However, for an optimum desired response it is difficult to select the appropriate objective function or identify the best weight values required to optimize the PID controller design. This paper presents a new time domain performance criterion based on the multiobjective Pareto front solutions. The proposed objective function is tested in the PID controller design for an automatic voltage regulator system (AVR) application using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed performance criterion can highly improve the PID tuning optimization in comparison with traditional objective functions. PMID:26843978

  1. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-01

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  2. Effect of PID Power System Stabilizer for a Synchronous Machine in Simulink Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian Yi, Tan; Kasilingam, Gowrishankar; Raguraman, Raman

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the use of Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) Controller with power system stabilizer (PSS) in a single machine infinite bus system. A PSS is used to generate supplementary damping control signals for an excitation system in order to damp out low frequency oscillations (LFO) of an electric power system. The paper is modelled in the MATLAB Simulink Environment to analyze the performance of a synchronous machine under a wide range of operating conditions. The functional blocks of PID controller with PSS are generated and the simulation studies are conducted based on different test cases to observe the dynamic performance of the power system. Analysis in this paper reveals that the PID-PSS gives better dynamic performance as compared to that of conventional power system stabilizer and also the optimal gain settings of PID PSS obtained at normal operating condition works well to other operating condition without much deterioration of the dynamic responses.

  3. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-10

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  4. Design of sewage treatment system by applying fuzzy adaptive PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liang-Ping; Li, Hong-Chan

    2013-03-01

    In the sewage treatment system, the dissolved oxygen concentration control, due to its nonlinear, time-varying, large time delay and uncertainty, is difficult to establish the exact mathematical model. While the conventional PID controller only works with good linear not far from its operating point, it is difficult to realize the system control when the operating point far off. In order to solve the above problems, the paper proposed a method which combine fuzzy control with PID methods and designed a fuzzy adaptive PID controller based on S7-300 PLC .It employs fuzzy inference method to achieve the online tuning for PID parameters. The control algorithm by simulation and practical application show that the system has stronger robustness and better adaptability.

  5. Frequency-domain Model Matching PID Controller Design for Aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Huang, Jinquan; Lu, Feng

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear model of aero-engine was linearized at multiple operation points by using frequency response method. The validation results indicate high accuracy of static and dynamic characteristics of the linear models. The improved PID tuning method of frequency-domain model matching was proposed with the system stability condition considered. The proposed method was applied to the design of PID controller of the high pressure rotor speed control in the flight envelope, and the control effects were evaluated by the nonlinear model. Simulation results show that the system had quick dynamic response with zero overshoot and zero steadystate error. Furthermore, a PID-fuzzy switching control scheme for aero-engine was designed, and the fuzzy switching system stability was proved. Simulations were studied to validate the applicability of the multiple PIDs fuzzy switching controller for aero-engine with wide range dynamics.

  6. Combined immunodeficiency in a calf.

    PubMed

    Bartram, P A; Smith, B P; Holmberg, C; Mandell, C P

    1989-08-01

    Combined immunodeficiency was documented in a 6-week-old Angus calf. The calf had lymphopenia, undetectable serum IgM or IgA, and low concentrations of serum IgG (420 mg/dl). The calf was treated for diarrhea, pneumonia, and shock, and was given antimicrobial drugs, fluids, and plasma. The calf died of systemic candidiasis and Escherichia coli bacteremia. Aggregated lymphatic folliculi (Peyer patches), lymph nodes, and thymic and splenic lymphoid tissue could not be identified at necropsy. PMID:2768060

  7. PID feedback controller used as a tactical asset allocation technique: The G.A.M. model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, G.; Sabatini, A.; Rossolini, M.

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to illustrate a tactical asset allocation technique utilizing the PID controller. The proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is widely applied in most industrial processes; it has been successfully used for over 50 years and it is used by more than 95% of the plants processes. It is a robust and easily understood algorithm that can provide excellent control performance in spite of the diverse dynamic characteristics of the process plant. In finance, the process plant, controlled by the PID controller, can be represented by financial market assets forming a portfolio. More specifically, in the present work, the plant is represented by a risk-adjusted return variable. Money and portfolio managers’ main target is to achieve a relevant risk-adjusted return in their managing activities. In literature and in the financial industry business, numerous kinds of return/risk ratios are commonly studied and used. The aim of this work is to perform a tactical asset allocation technique consisting in the optimization of risk adjusted return by means of asset allocation methodologies based on the PID model-free feedback control modeling procedure. The process plant does not need to be mathematically modeled: the PID control action lies in altering the portfolio asset weights, according to the PID algorithm and its parameters, Ziegler-and-Nichols-tuned, in order to approach the desired portfolio risk-adjusted return efficiently.

  8. A novel auto-tuning PID control mechanism for nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Meric; Iplikci, Serdar

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a novel Runge-Kutta (RK) discretization-based model-predictive auto-tuning proportional-integral-derivative controller (RK-PID) is introduced for the control of continuous-time nonlinear systems. The parameters of the PID controller are tuned using RK model of the system through prediction error-square minimization where the predicted information of tracking error provides an enhanced tuning of the parameters. Based on the model-predictive control (MPC) approach, the proposed mechanism provides necessary PID parameter adaptations while generating additive correction terms to assist the initially inadequate PID controller. Efficiency of the proposed mechanism has been tested on two experimental real-time systems: an unstable single-input single-output (SISO) nonlinear magnetic-levitation system and a nonlinear multi-input multi-output (MIMO) liquid-level system. RK-PID has been compared to standard PID, standard nonlinear MPC (NMPC), RK-MPC and conventional sliding-mode control (SMC) methods in terms of control performance, robustness, computational complexity and design issue. The proposed mechanism exhibits acceptable tuning and control performance with very small steady-state tracking errors, and provides very short settling time for parameter convergence. PMID:26117284

  9. Longitudinal control of aircraft dynamics based on optimization of PID parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, S. N.; Sudha, G.

    2016-03-01

    Recent years many flight control systems and industries are employing PID controllers to improve the dynamic behavior of the characteristics. In this paper, PID controller is developed to improve the stability and performance of general aviation aircraft system. Designing the optimum PID controller parameters for a pitch control aircraft is important in expanding the flight safety envelope. Mathematical model is developed to describe the longitudinal pitch control of an aircraft. The PID controller is designed based on the dynamic modeling of an aircraft system. Different tuning methods namely Zeigler-Nichols method (ZN), Modified Zeigler-Nichols method, Tyreus-Luyben tuning, Astrom-Hagglund tuning methods are employed. The time domain specifications of different tuning methods are compared to obtain the optimum parameters value. The results prove that PID controller tuned by Zeigler-Nichols for aircraft pitch control dynamics is better in stability and performance in all conditions. Future research work of obtaining optimum PID controller parameters using artificial intelligence techniques should be carried out.

  10. A Method for Precision Closed-Loop Irrigation Using a Modified PID Control Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, Martin; Kühn, Karl; Jenkins, Malcolm; Burek, Kazimierz; Dutton, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The benefits of closed-loop irrigation control have been demonstrated in grower trials which show the potential for improved crop yields and resource usage. Managing water use by controlling irrigation in response to soil moisture changes to meet crop water demands is a popular approach but requires knowledge of closed-loop control practice. In theory, to obtain precise closed-loop control of a system it is necessary to characterise every component in the control loop to derive the appropriate controller parameters, i.e. proportional, integral & derivative (PID) parameters in a classic PID controller. In practice this is often difficult to achieve. Empirical methods are employed to estimate the PID parameters by observing how the system performs under open-loop conditions. In this paper we present a modified PID controller, with a constrained integral function, that delivers excellent regulation of soil moisture by supplying the appropriate amount of water to meet the needs of the plant during the diurnal cycle. Furthermore, the modified PID controller responds quickly to changes in environmental conditions, including rainfall events which can result in: controller windup, under-watering and plant stress conditions. The experimental work successfully demonstrates the functionality of a constrained integral PID controller that delivers robust and precise irrigation control. Coir substrate strawberry growing trial data is also presented illustrating soil moisture control and the ability to match water deliver to solar radiation.

  11. Two modified discrete PID-based sliding mode controllers for piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Chen, X. B.

    2014-01-01

    Hysteresis is a nonlinear effect that can result in the degraded performance of piezoelectric actuators (PEAs). To counteract the effect, several control methods have been developed and reported in the literature. One promising method for compensation is the use of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-based sliding mode control (SMC), in which the PEA hysteresis is treated as an unknown disturbance to the PEA input. If the hysteresis can be modelled or partially modelled, the integration of the hysteresis models into the control schemes may lead to further improved performance. On this philosophy, this paper presents the development of two modified discrete PID-based sliding mode controllers (PID-SMCs) for the PEAs, namely an inversion-based PID-SMC and a disturbance-observer (DOB)-based PID-SMC, in which the PEA hysteresis is predicted or partially predicted through the use of existing models for the PEA hysteresis. Experiments were performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control schemes. The results were compared to those of the nominal PID-SMC. By employing the inversion hysteresis and the DOB, the PEA performance was greatly improved.

  12. PID controller design of nonlinear systems using an improved particle swarm optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wei-Der; Shih, Shun-Peng

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, an improved particle swarm optimization is presented to search for the optimal PID controller gains for a class of nonlinear systems. The proposed algorithm is to modify the velocity formula of the general PSO systems in order for improving the searching efficiency. In the improved PSO-based nonlinear PID control system design, three PID control gains, i.e., the proportional gain Kp, integral gain Ki, and derivative gain Kd are required to form a parameter vector which is called a particle. It is the basic component of PSO systems and many such particles further constitute a population. To derive the optimal PID gains for nonlinear systems, two principle equations, the modified velocity updating and position updating equations, are employed to move the positions of all particles in the population. In the meanwhile, an objective function defined for PID controller optimization problems may be minimized. To validate the control performance of the proposed method, a typical nonlinear system control, the inverted pendulum tracking control, is illustrated. The results testify that the improved PSO algorithm can perform well in the nonlinear PID control system design.

  13. Species-Specific, Postentry Barriers to Primate Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Wolfgang; Schubert, David; LaBonte, Jason; Munson, Linda; Gibson, Susan; Scammell, Jonathan; Ferrigno, Paul; Sodroski, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    By using replication-defective vectors derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac), and murine leukemia virus (MuLV), all of which were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoprotein, the efficiency of postentry, early infection events was examined in target cells of several mammalian species. Titers of HIV-1 vectors were significantly lower than those of SIVmac and MuLV vectors in most cell lines and primary cells from Old World monkeys. By contrast, most New World monkey cells exhibited much lower titers for the SIVmac vector compared with those of the HIV-1 vector. Prosimian cells were resistant to both HIV-1 and SIVmac vectors, although the MuLV vector was able to infect these cells. Cells from other mammalian species were roughly equivalent in susceptibility to the three vectors, with the exception of rabbit cells, which were specifically resistant to the HIV-1 vector. The level of HIV-1 vector expression was very low in transduced cells of rodent, rabbit, cow, and pig origin. Early postentry restriction of primate immunodeficiency virus infection exhibits patterns largely coincident with species borders and applies to diverse cell types within an individual host, suggesting the involvement of species-specific, widely expressed cellular factors. PMID:10559316

  14. Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kalapila, Aley G; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is considered a chronic medical condition. Several new drugs are available, including fixed-dose combination tablets, that have greatly simplified combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens to treat HIV, while increasing the life-expectancy of infected individuals. In the last decade, multiple well-regarded studies have established the benefits of using ART in high-risk, HIV-negative persons to prevent HIV acquisition. The primary care provider must not only understand commonly encountered issues pertaining to ART, such as toxicities and drug interactions, but also needs to be aware of using ART for HIV prevention. PMID:27235622

  15. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  16. Multivariate analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization data.

    PubMed Central

    Nyambi, P N; Nkengasong, J; Lewi, P; Andries, K; Janssens, W; Fransen, K; Heyndrickx, L; Piot, P; van der Groen, G

    1996-01-01

    We report on the use of spectral map analysis of the inter- and intraclade neutralization data of 14 sera of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals and 16 primary isolates, representing genetic clades A to H in group M and group O. This multivariate analysis has been used previously to study the interaction between drugs and receptors and between viruses and antiviral compounds. The analysis reveals the existence of neutralization clusters, not correlated with the known genetic clades. The structural factors that have been identified may correlate with the most important neutralization epitopes. Three key primary HIV-1 isolates, which allow discrimination of sera that are likely or unlikely to neutralize primary isolates from most of the genetic clades, were identified. Our method of analysis will facilitate the evaluation as well as the design of suitable HIV-1 vaccines, which induce high-titer interclade cross-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:8709250

  17. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  18. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection.

  19. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection. PMID:27515208

  20. The application of variable universe fuzzy PID controller in computer-aided alignment of lithography projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Zheng, Meng; Li, Yanqiu

    2013-12-01

    A variable universe fuzzy PID algorithm is designed to control the misalignment of the lithography projection optics to meet the requirement of high image quality. This paper first simulates the alignment of Schwarzschild objective designed by us. Secondly, the variable universe fuzzy PID control is introduced to feed back the misalignment of Schwarzschild objective to the control system to drive the stage which holds the objective. So the position can be adjusted automatically. This feedback scheme can adjust the variables' universe self-adaptively by using fuzzy rules so that the concrete function and parameters of the contraction-expansion factor are not necessary. Finally, the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulations. The results show that, variable universe fuzzy PID method exhibits better performance in both improving response speed and decreasing overshoot compared to conventional PID and fuzzy PID control methods. In addition, the interference signal can be effectively restrained. It is concluded that this method can improve the dynamic and static properties of system and meet the requirement of fast response.

  1. Intelligent algorithm tuning PID method of function electrical stimulation using knee joint angle.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuang; He, Feng; Tang, Jiabei; Xu, Jiapeng; Zhang, Lixin; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Xiaoman; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) could restore motor functions for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). By applying electric current pulses, FES system could produce muscle contractions, generate joint torques, and thus, achieve joint movements automatically. Since the muscle system is highly nonlinear and time-varying, feedback control is quite necessary for precision control of the preset action. In the present study, we applied two methods (Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controller based on Back Propagation (BP) neural network and that based on Genetic Algorithm (GA)), to control the knee joint angle for the FES system, while the traditional Ziegler-Nichols method was used in the control group for comparison. They were tested using a muscle model of the quadriceps. The results showed that intelligent algorithm tuning PID controller displayed superior performance than classic Ziegler-Nichols method with constant parameters. More particularly, PID controller tuned by BP neural network was superior on controlling precision to make the feedback signal track the desired trajectory whose error was less than 1.2°±0.16°, while GA-PID controller, seeking the optimal parameters from multipoint simultaneity, resulted in shortened delay in the response. Both strategies showed promise in application of intelligent algorithm tuning PID methods in FES system.

  2. Experimental studies on active vibration control of a smart composite beam using a PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Miroslav M.; Simonović, Aleksandar M.; Zorić, Nemanja D.; Lukić, Nebojša S.; Stupar, Slobodan N.; Ilić, Slobodan S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents experimental verification of the active vibration control of a smart cantilever composite beam using a PID controller. In order to prevent negative occurrences in the derivative and integral terms in a PID controller, first-order low-pass filters are implemented in the derivative action and in the feedback of the integral action. The proposed application setup consists of a composite cantilever beam with a fiber-reinforced piezoelectric actuator and strain gage sensors. The beam is modeled using a finite element method based on third-order shear deformation theory. The experiment considers vibration control under periodic excitation and an initial static deflection. A control algorithm was implemented on a PIC32MX440F256H microcontroller. Experimental results corresponding to the proposed PID controller are compared with corresponding results using proportional (P) control, proportional-integral (PI) control and proportional-derivative (PD) control. Experimental results indicate that the proposed PID controller provides 8.93% more damping compared to a PD controller, 14.41% more damping compared to a PI controller and 19.04% more damping compared to a P controller in the case of vibration under periodic excitation. In the case of free vibration control, the proposed PID controller shows better performance (settling time 1.2 s) compared to the PD controller (settling time 1.5 s) and PI controller (settling time 2.5 s).

  3. Intelligent algorithm tuning PID method of function electrical stimulation using knee joint angle.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuang; He, Feng; Tang, Jiabei; Xu, Jiapeng; Zhang, Lixin; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Xiaoman; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) could restore motor functions for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). By applying electric current pulses, FES system could produce muscle contractions, generate joint torques, and thus, achieve joint movements automatically. Since the muscle system is highly nonlinear and time-varying, feedback control is quite necessary for precision control of the preset action. In the present study, we applied two methods (Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controller based on Back Propagation (BP) neural network and that based on Genetic Algorithm (GA)), to control the knee joint angle for the FES system, while the traditional Ziegler-Nichols method was used in the control group for comparison. They were tested using a muscle model of the quadriceps. The results showed that intelligent algorithm tuning PID controller displayed superior performance than classic Ziegler-Nichols method with constant parameters. More particularly, PID controller tuned by BP neural network was superior on controlling precision to make the feedback signal track the desired trajectory whose error was less than 1.2°±0.16°, while GA-PID controller, seeking the optimal parameters from multipoint simultaneity, resulted in shortened delay in the response. Both strategies showed promise in application of intelligent algorithm tuning PID methods in FES system. PMID:25570513

  4. Neuronal damage and its relation to dementia in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Trillo-Pazos, G; Everall, I P

    1996-01-01

    There are an estimated 21.8 million people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide [Weekly Epidemiol Rec 1996; 27:204-208] and 90% of these people will have some form of neuropathological abnormality during the course of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this review, we will highlight the primary HIV-associated brain disorders. The role of HIV proteins and cytokines on neuronal damage will be assessed. We will also discuss the role of neuronal loss and functional damage in HIV-associated dementia.

  5. Delayed presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency due to prolonged maternal T cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhsen, Saleh Z

    2010-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder with heterogenous genetic etiologies. We describe a typical case in a 9-year-old boy that was masked by a clinically functional maternal T cell engraftment leading to late presentation with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and cytomegalovirus infection, probably following exhaustion of maternally engrafted cells. Based on immunological findings, he had a T- B+SCID phenotype.This report suggests that in rare cases, engrafted maternal T cell might persist for long time leading to partial constitution of immune function and delayed clinical presentation of SCID.

  6. Lymphoma Secondary to Congenital and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes at a Turkish Pediatric Oncology Center.

    PubMed

    Tanyildiz, Hikmet G; Dincaslan, Handan; Yavuz, Gulsan; Unal, Emel; Ikinciogulları, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Tacyildiz, Nurdan

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of lymphoma in primary immunodeficiency cases and autoimmune diseases, as well as on a background of immunodeficiency following organ transplants, is increasing. The lymphoma treatment success rate is known to be a low prognosis. Our study aimed to emphasize the low survival rates in immunodeficient vs. immunocompetent lymphoma patients and also to investigate the effect of rituximab in patients with ataxia telangiectasia and other immunodeficiencies. We summarized the clinical characteristics and treatment results of 17 cases with primary immunodeficiency that developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) retrospectively. Seven patients were diagnosed with ataxia-telangiectasia, two with common variable immunodeficiency, two with selective IgA deficiency, one with X-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, one with Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (ITK) deficiency, and one with lymphoma developing after autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). One patient underwent a renal transplant. Of the nine males and eight females (aged 3-12 years, median = 7) that developed lymphoma, seven were diagnosed with HL and ten with NHL (seven B-cell, three T-cell). The NHL patients were started on the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster, POG9317, LMB-96, or R-CHOP treatment protocols with reduced chemotherapy dosages. HL cases were started on the doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and/or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) protocol, also with modified dosages. Importantly, all seven cases of HL are alive and in remission, while six of the ten NHL patients have died. Primary immunodeficiency is a strong predisposing factor for developing lymphoma. Low treatment success rates relative to other lymphomas and difficulties encountered during treatment indicate that new treatment agents are needed

  7. Pathogenesis of experimentally induced feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, J K; Sparger, E; Ho, E W; Andersen, P R; O'Connor, T P; Mandell, C P; Lowenstine, L; Munn, R; Pedersen, N C

    1988-08-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV; formerly, feline T-lymphotropic lentivirus) is a typical lentivirus resembling human and simian immunodeficiency viruses in morphologic features, protein structure, and reverse transcriptase enzyme. It is antigenically dissimilar, however. The virus is tropic for primary and permanent feline T-lymphoblastoid cells and Crandell feline kidney cells. The virus did not grow in other permanent feline non-lymphoblastoid cells that were tested, or in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells from man, dogs, mice, and sheep. During short-term inoculation studies in cats, the feline immunodeficiency-like syndrome found in nature was not experimentally induced, but a distinct primary phase of infection was observed. Fever and neutropenia were observed 4 to 5 weeks after inoculation; fever lasted several days, and neutropenia persisted from 1 to 9 weeks. Generalized lymphadenopathy that persisted for 2 to 9 months appeared at the same time. Antibodies to FIV appeared 2 weeks after inoculation and then plateaued. Virus was reisolated from the blood of all infected cats within 4 to 5 weeks after inoculation and persisted indefinitely in the face of humoral antibody response. Virus was recovered from blood, plasma, CSF and saliva, but not from colostrum or milk. Contact transmission was achieved slowly in one colony of naturally infected cats, but not between experimentally infected and susceptible specific-pathogen-free cats kept together for periods as long as 4 to 14 months. The infection was transmitted readily, however, by parenteral inoculation with blood, plasma, or infective cell culture fluids. In utero and lactogenic transmission were not observed in kittens born to naturally or experimentally infected queens. Lymphadenopathy observed during the initial stage of FIV infection was ascribed to lymphoid hyperplasia and follicular dysplasia. A myeloproliferative disorder was observed in 1 cat with experimentally induced infection. PMID:2459996

  8. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of this screening: (1) Everyone aged 15 to ... the disease to other people. Potential Benefits and Harms of Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The ...

  9. Aspects épidémiologiques du suicide à Dakar

    PubMed Central

    Soumah, Mohamed Maniboliot; Eboué, Brice Angwé; Ndiaye, Mor; Sow, Mamadou Lamine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Le suicidé est le sujet mort par suicide et le suicidant est la personne ayant fait des tentatives de suicide. L'objectif de cette étude porte sur l'analyse épidémiologique des suicides dans la région de Dakar. Méthodes Par une étude rétrospective portant sur les registres du service d'anatomie pathologique de l'Hôpital Aristide Le Dantec, nous rapportons 143 suicides sur 10 ans. Le traitement et l'analyse des données ont été faits sur Epidata version 2.1 b pour la saisie et Epiinfo version 6.04 fr pour l'analyse. Résultats A Dakar, les morts par suicide restent peu fréquentes au regard de la mortalité générale. Les hommes se suicident deux fois plus que les femmes et le suicide reste l'apanage de l'adulte jeune dont l'âge se situe entre 21 et 30 ans. Les suicidés résident le plus souvent en zone périurbaine et ils commettent cet acte dans la majorité des cas en période de froid (pendant les mois de janvier, février et mars), plus avant midi et en soirée qu'en après-midi. Aussi 97.2% des suicidés ont utilisé un seul moyen pour se suicider et le suicide complexe (utilisation de plusieurs moyens) a concerné seulement un cas dans notre étude. La pendaison reste le mode le plus utilisé. Conclusion Les hommes préfèrent donc des moyens de suicides violents (pendaison, arme à feu et arme blanche) alors que les femmes et les adolescents (tout sexe confondu) utilisent les intoxications. Le recueil des facteurs concourant au suicide permettrait une prévention de ce dernier. PMID:23847707

  10. PID self tuning control based on Mamdani fuzzy logic control for quadrotor stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyambodo, Tri Kuntoro; Dharmawan, Andi; Putra, Agfianto Eko

    2016-02-01

    Quadrotor as one type of UAV have the ability to perform Vertical Take Off and Landing (VTOL). It allows the Quadrotor to be stationary hovering in the air. PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) control system is one of the control methods that are commonly used. It is usually used to optimize the Quadrotor stabilization at least based on the three Eulerian angles (roll, pitch, and yaw) as input parameters for the control system. The three constants of PID can be obtained in various methods. The simplest method is tuning manually. This method has several weaknesses. For example if the three constants are not exact, the resulting response will deviate from the desired result. By combining the methods of PID with fuzzy logic systems where human expertise is implemented into the machine language is expected to further optimize the control system.

  11. Nonlinear adaptive PID control for greenhouse environment based on RBF network.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Songwei; Hu, Haigen; Xu, Lihong; Li, Guanghui

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid control strategy, combining Radial Basis Function (RBF) network with conventional proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controllers, for the greenhouse climate control. A model of nonlinear conservation laws of enthalpy and matter between numerous system variables affecting the greenhouse climate is formulated. RBF network is used to tune and identify all PID gain parameters online and adaptively. The presented Neuro-PID control scheme is validated through simulations of set-point tracking and disturbance rejection. We compare the proposed adaptive online tuning method with the offline tuning scheme that employs Genetic Algorithm (GA) to search the optimal gain parameters. The results show that the proposed strategy has good adaptability, strong robustness and real-time performance while achieving satisfactory control performance for the complex and nonlinear greenhouse climate control system, and it may provide a valuable reference to formulate environmental control strategies for actual application in greenhouse production.

  12. Performance assessment of PID and IMC tuning methods for a mixing process with time delay.

    PubMed

    Selvi, J Arputha Vijaya; Radhakrishnan, T K; Sundaram, S

    2007-06-01

    A flow process with time delay has been considered for modeling and control. A dilute solution of sodium chloride is used as tracer and an online conductivity measurement unit as sensor and recorder. The objective of the current study is to design control algorithms and present corresponding robust control analysis for the process. The control methodologies considered are (i) conventional PID control and (ii) internal model control (IMC). The control structures are comparatively analyzed using standard robustness measures for stability and performance. Of the two control algorithms, conventional PID and IMC, IMC exhibits faster settling time, no overshoot, better set-point tracking and disturbance rejection, and good robust performance than the PID control scheme.

  13. Nonlinear Adaptive PID Control for Greenhouse Environment Based on RBF Network

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Songwei; Hu, Haigen; Xu, Lihong; Li, Guanghui

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid control strategy, combining Radial Basis Function (RBF) network with conventional proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controllers, for the greenhouse climate control. A model of nonlinear conservation laws of enthalpy and matter between numerous system variables affecting the greenhouse climate is formulated. RBF network is used to tune and identify all PID gain parameters online and adaptively. The presented Neuro-PID control scheme is validated through simulations of set-point tracking and disturbance rejection. We compare the proposed adaptive online tuning method with the offline tuning scheme that employs Genetic Algorithm (GA) to search the optimal gain parameters. The results show that the proposed strategy has good adaptability, strong robustness and real-time performance while achieving satisfactory control performance for the complex and nonlinear greenhouse climate control system, and it may provide a valuable reference to formulate environmental control strategies for actual application in greenhouse production. PMID:22778587

  14. Symptomatic Secondary Selective IgM Immunodeficiency in Adult Man with Undiagnosed Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Feldman, Viktor; Joseph, Mishal; Israel, Hadari

    2012-01-01

    Selective IgM immunodeficiency (SIgMID) is a heterogeneous disorder with no known genetic background and may occur as a primary or a secondary condition. Celiac disease has been reported in association with several humeral immunodeficiencies, including isolated severe selective IgA deficiency, panhypogammaglobulinemia, and isolated combined IgA and IgM deficiency. There are only few reported cases of pediatric and adult patients with SIgMID and celiac disease. In this paper, we describe an adult patient with a symptomatic secondary SIgMID associated with undiagnosed celiac disease, with a resolution of clinical symptoms of immunodeficiency and serum IgM normalization following a gluten-free diet. PMID:25374731

  15. Glioblastoma multiforme of the brain stem in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Zimmermann, M; Marquardt, Gerhard; Lanfermann, H; Nafe, R; Seifert, V

    2002-09-01

    Glioblastoma of the brain stem is rare and there is no description of such a lesion in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The majority of intracerebral mass lesions are due either to toxoplasmosis or primary central nervous system lymphomas so that it is usually not included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions of the central nervous system in these patients. A 31-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected man presented with a four months history of slowly progressive deterioration of brainstem associated symptoms despite antitoxoplasmic therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large ring enhancing lesion in the brainstem. Clinical and neuroradiological data could not establish a proper diagnosis and a stereotactic serial biopsy was undertaken. Histological examination of the specimen showed a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) as the first reported case of GBM located in the brainstem in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. Patient management and effectiveness of stereotactic serial biopsy are discussed.

  16. Inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying tuberculosis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Parvaneh, Nima; Azbaoui, Safaa El; Agader, Aomar; Hassani, Amal; Hafidi, Naima El; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Jouhadi, Zineb; Ailal, Fatima; Najib, Jilali; Reisli, Ismail; Zamani, Adil; Yosunkaya, Sebnem; Gulle-Girit, Saniye; Yildiran, Alisan; Cipe, Funda Erol; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Metin, Ayse; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Dogu, Figen; Karaca, Neslihan; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil; Keser-Emiroglu, Melike; Somer, Ayper; Tanir, Gonul; Aytekin, Caner; Adimi, Parisa; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mamishi, Setareh; Bousfiha, Aziz; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. PMID:25703555

  17. Neural Network-Based Self-Tuning PID Control for Underwater Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Alvarado, Rodrigo; García-Valdovinos, Luis Govinda; Salgado-Jiménez, Tomás; Gómez-Espinosa, Alfonso; Fonseca-Navarro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    For decades, PID (Proportional + Integral + Derivative)-like controllers have been successfully used in academia and industry for many kinds of plants. This is thanks to its simplicity and suitable performance in linear or linearized plants, and under certain conditions, in nonlinear ones. A number of PID controller gains tuning approaches have been proposed in the literature in the last decades; most of them off-line techniques. However, in those cases wherein plants are subject to continuous parametric changes or external disturbances, online gains tuning is a desirable choice. This is the case of modular underwater ROVs (Remotely Operated Vehicles) where parameters (weight, buoyancy, added mass, among others) change according to the tool it is fitted with. In practice, some amount of time is dedicated to tune the PID gains of a ROV. Once the best set of gains has been achieved the ROV is ready to work. However, when the vehicle changes its tool or it is subject to ocean currents, its performance deteriorates since the fixed set of gains is no longer valid for the new conditions. Thus, an online PID gains tuning algorithm should be implemented to overcome this problem. In this paper, an auto-tune PID-like controller based on Neural Networks (NN) is proposed. The NN plays the role of automatically estimating the suitable set of PID gains that achieves stability of the system. The NN adjusts online the controller gains that attain the smaller position tracking error. Simulation results are given considering an underactuated 6 DOF (degrees of freedom) underwater ROV. Real time experiments on an underactuated mini ROV are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:27608018

  18. Neural Network-Based Self-Tuning PID Control for Underwater Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Alvarado, Rodrigo; García-Valdovinos, Luis Govinda; Salgado-Jiménez, Tomás; Gómez-Espinosa, Alfonso; Fonseca-Navarro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    For decades, PID (Proportional + Integral + Derivative)-like controllers have been successfully used in academia and industry for many kinds of plants. This is thanks to its simplicity and suitable performance in linear or linearized plants, and under certain conditions, in nonlinear ones. A number of PID controller gains tuning approaches have been proposed in the literature in the last decades; most of them off-line techniques. However, in those cases wherein plants are subject to continuous parametric changes or external disturbances, online gains tuning is a desirable choice. This is the case of modular underwater ROVs (Remotely Operated Vehicles) where parameters (weight, buoyancy, added mass, among others) change according to the tool it is fitted with. In practice, some amount of time is dedicated to tune the PID gains of a ROV. Once the best set of gains has been achieved the ROV is ready to work. However, when the vehicle changes its tool or it is subject to ocean currents, its performance deteriorates since the fixed set of gains is no longer valid for the new conditions. Thus, an online PID gains tuning algorithm should be implemented to overcome this problem. In this paper, an auto-tune PID-like controller based on Neural Networks (NN) is proposed. The NN plays the role of automatically estimating the suitable set of PID gains that achieves stability of the system. The NN adjusts online the controller gains that attain the smaller position tracking error. Simulation results are given considering an underactuated 6 DOF (degrees of freedom) underwater ROV. Real time experiments on an underactuated mini ROV are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:27608018

  19. A PID de-tuned method for multivariable systems, applied for HVAC plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    A simple yet effective de-tuning of PID parameters for multivariable applications has been described. Although the method is felt to have wider application it is simulated in a 3-input/ 2-output building energy management system (BEMS) with known plant dynamics. The controller performances such as the sum output squared error and total energy consumption when the system is at steady state conditions are studied. This tuning methodology can also be extended to reduce the number of PID controllers as well as the control inputs for specified output references that are necessary for effective results, i.e. with good regulation performances being maintained.

  20. Continuous Firefly Algorithm for Optimal Tuning of Pid Controller in Avr System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjeghaba, Omar

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a tuning approach based on Continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to obtain the proportional-integral- derivative (PID) controller parameters in Automatic Voltage Regulator system (AVR). In the tuning processes the CFA is iterated to reach the optimal or the near optimal of PID controller parameters when the main goal is to improve the AVR step response characteristics. Conducted simulations show the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed approach. Furthermore the proposed approach can improve the dynamic of the AVR system. Compared with particle swarm optimization (PSO), the new CFA tuning method has better control system performance in terms of time domain specifications and set-point tracking.

  1. Performances of PID and Different Fuzzy Methods for Controlling a Ball on Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Vu Trieu; Mart, Tamre; Moezzi, Reza; Oliver, Mets; Martin, Jurise; Ahti, Polder; Leo, Teder; Mart, Juurma

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops and analyses the performances evaluation of different control strategies applied for a nonlinear motion of a ball on a beam system. Comparison results provide in-depth comprehension on the stable ability of different controllers for this real mechanical application. The three different controllers are a conventional PID method, a Mamdani-type fuzzy rule method and a Sugeno-type fuzzy rule method. In this study, the PID shows the fastest sinuous reference tracking while the Mamdani-type fuzzy method proves the highest stability performance for tracking square wave motions.

  2. Intelligent self-tuning of PID control for the robotic testing system for human musculoskeletal joints test.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lianfang

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, an intelligent proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control method is introduced to the robotic testing system for the biomechanical study of human musculoskeletal joints. For the testing system, the robot is a highly nonlinear and heavily coupled complicated system, and the human spinal specimen also demonstrates nonlinear property when undergoing testing. Although the conventional PID control approach is extensively used in most industrial control systems, it will break down for nonlinear systems, particularly for complicated systems that have no precise mathematical models. To overcome those difficulties, an intelligent fuzzy PID controller is proposed replacing the widely used conventional PID controllers. The fuzzy PID algorithm is outlined using the fuzzy set theory. The design techniques are developed based on the linguistic phase plane approach. The heuristic rules of syntheses are summarized into a rule-based expert system. Experiments are carried out and the results demonstrate the good performance of the robotic testing system using the proposed control method.

  3. Intelligent self-tuning of PID control for the robotic testing system for human musculoskeletal joints test.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lianfang

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, an intelligent proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control method is introduced to the robotic testing system for the biomechanical study of human musculoskeletal joints. For the testing system, the robot is a highly nonlinear and heavily coupled complicated system, and the human spinal specimen also demonstrates nonlinear property when undergoing testing. Although the conventional PID control approach is extensively used in most industrial control systems, it will break down for nonlinear systems, particularly for complicated systems that have no precise mathematical models. To overcome those difficulties, an intelligent fuzzy PID controller is proposed replacing the widely used conventional PID controllers. The fuzzy PID algorithm is outlined using the fuzzy set theory. The design techniques are developed based on the linguistic phase plane approach. The heuristic rules of syntheses are summarized into a rule-based expert system. Experiments are carried out and the results demonstrate the good performance of the robotic testing system using the proposed control method. PMID:15255220

  4. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  5. Application of multi-objective controller to optimal tuning of PID gains for a hydraulic turbine regulating system using adaptive grid particle swam optimization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihuan; Yuan, Yanbin; Yuan, Xiaohui; Huang, Yuehua; Li, Xianshan; Li, Wenwu

    2015-05-01

    A hydraulic turbine regulating system (HTRS) is one of the most important components of hydropower plant, which plays a key role in maintaining safety, stability and economical operation of hydro-electrical installations. At present, the conventional PID controller is widely applied in the HTRS system for its practicability and robustness, and the primary problem with respect to this control law is how to optimally tune the parameters, i.e. the determination of PID controller gains for satisfactory performance. In this paper, a kind of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, named adaptive grid particle swarm optimization (AGPSO) is applied to solve the PID gains tuning problem of the HTRS system. This newly AGPSO optimized method, which differs from a traditional one-single objective optimization method, is designed to take care of settling time and overshoot level simultaneously, in which a set of non-inferior alternatives solutions (i.e. Pareto solution) is generated. Furthermore, a fuzzy-based membership value assignment method is employed to choose the best compromise solution from the obtained Pareto set. An illustrative example associated with the best compromise solution for parameter tuning of the nonlinear HTRS system is introduced to verify the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed AGPSO-based optimization approach, as compared with two another prominent multi-objective algorithms, i.e. Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGAII) and Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II (SPEAII), for the quality and diversity of obtained Pareto solutions set. Consequently, simulation results show that this AGPSO optimized approach outperforms than compared methods with higher efficiency and better quality no matter whether the HTRS system works under unload or load conditions.

  6. Tunning PID controller using particle swarm optimization algorithm on automatic voltage regulator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranza, M. F.; Kustija, J.; Trisno, B.; Hakim, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    PID Controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) was invented since 1910, but till today still is used in industries, even though there are many kind of modern controllers like fuzz controller and neural network controller are being developed. Performance of PID controller is depend on on Proportional Gain (Kp), Integral Gain (Ki) and Derivative Gain (Kd). These gains can be got by using method Ziegler-Nichols (ZN), gain-phase margin, Root Locus, Minimum Variance dan Gain Scheduling however these methods are not optimal to control systems that nonlinear and have high-orde, in addition, some methods relative hard. To solve those obstacles, particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is proposed to get optimal Kp, Ki and Kd. PSO is proposed because PSO has convergent result and not require many iterations. On this research, PID controller is applied on AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulator). Based on result of analyzing transient, stability Root Locus and frequency response, performance of PID controller is better than Ziegler-Nichols.

  7. Active sway control of a gantry crane using hybrid input shaping and PID control schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Tumari, M. Z.; Shabudin, L.; Zawawi, M. A.; Shah, L. H. Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    This project presents investigations into the development of hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes for active sway control of a gantry crane system. The application of positive input shaping involves a technique that can reduce the sway by creating a common signal that cancels its own vibration and used as a feed-forward control which is for controlling the sway angle of the pendulum, while the proportional integral derivative (PID) controller is used as a feedback control which is for controlling the crane position. The PID controller was tuned using Ziegler-Nichols method to get the best performance of the system. The hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes guarantee a fast input tracking capability, precise payload positioning and very minimal sway motion. The modeling of gantry crane is used to simulate the system using MATLAB/SIMULINK software. The results of the response with the controllers are presented in time domains and frequency domains. The performances of control schemes are examined in terms of level of input tracking capability, sway angle reduction and time response specification.

  8. Design and implementation of a new fuzzy PID controller for networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Fadaei, A; Salahshoor, K

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a practical network platform to design and implement a networked-based cascade control system linking a Smar Foundation Fieldbus (FF) controller (DFI-302) and a Siemens programmable logic controller (PLC-S7-315-2DP) through Industrial Ethernet to a laboratory pilot plant. In the presented network configuration, the Smar OPC tag browser and Siemens WinCC OPC Channel provide the communicating interface between the two controllers. The paper investigates the performance of a PID controller implemented in two different possible configurations of FF function block (FB) and networked control system (NCS) via a remote Siemens PLC. In the FB control system implementation, the desired set-point is provided by the Siemens Human-Machine Interface (HMI) software (i.e, WinCC) via an Ethernet Modbus link. While, in the NCS implementation, the cascade loop is realized in remote Siemens PLC station and the final element set-point is sent to the Smar FF station via Ethernet bus. A new fuzzy PID control strategy is then proposed to improve the control performances of the networked-based control systems due to an induced transmission delay degradation effect. The proposed strategy utilizes an innovative idea based on sectionalizing the error signal of the step response into three different functional zones. The supporting philosophy behind these three functional zones is to decompose the desired control objectives in terms of rising time, settling time and steady-state error measures maintained by an appropriate PID-type controller in each zone. Then, fuzzy membership factors are defined to configure the control signal on the basis of the fuzzy weighted PID outputs of all three zones. The obtained results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed fuzzy PID control scheme in improving the performances of the implemented NCS for different transportation delays. PMID:18692184

  9. Design and implementation of a new fuzzy PID controller for networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Fadaei, A; Salahshoor, K

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a practical network platform to design and implement a networked-based cascade control system linking a Smar Foundation Fieldbus (FF) controller (DFI-302) and a Siemens programmable logic controller (PLC-S7-315-2DP) through Industrial Ethernet to a laboratory pilot plant. In the presented network configuration, the Smar OPC tag browser and Siemens WinCC OPC Channel provide the communicating interface between the two controllers. The paper investigates the performance of a PID controller implemented in two different possible configurations of FF function block (FB) and networked control system (NCS) via a remote Siemens PLC. In the FB control system implementation, the desired set-point is provided by the Siemens Human-Machine Interface (HMI) software (i.e, WinCC) via an Ethernet Modbus link. While, in the NCS implementation, the cascade loop is realized in remote Siemens PLC station and the final element set-point is sent to the Smar FF station via Ethernet bus. A new fuzzy PID control strategy is then proposed to improve the control performances of the networked-based control systems due to an induced transmission delay degradation effect. The proposed strategy utilizes an innovative idea based on sectionalizing the error signal of the step response into three different functional zones. The supporting philosophy behind these three functional zones is to decompose the desired control objectives in terms of rising time, settling time and steady-state error measures maintained by an appropriate PID-type controller in each zone. Then, fuzzy membership factors are defined to configure the control signal on the basis of the fuzzy weighted PID outputs of all three zones. The obtained results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed fuzzy PID control scheme in improving the performances of the implemented NCS for different transportation delays.

  10. Autoimmunity and infection in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID).

    PubMed

    Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Alessandro; Tinazzi, Elisa; Veneri, Dino; Argentino, Giuseppe; Moretta, Francesca; Puccetti, Antonio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by primary hypogammaglobulinemia. B and T cell abnormalities have been described in CVID. Typical clinical features of CVID are recurrent airway infections; lymphoproliferative, autoinflammatory, or neoplastic disorders; and autoimmune diseases among which autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state. Considering both innate and adaptive immune response abnormalities in CVID, it is easier to understand the mechanisms that lead to a breakdown of self-tolerance. CD21(low) B cells derive from mature B cells that have undergone chronic immune stimulation; they are increased in CVID patients. The expansion of CD21(low) B cells is also observed in certain autoimmune diseases. We have studied CD21(low) B cells in patients with CVID, CVID, and ITP and with ITP only. We observed a statistically significant increase in the CD21(low) population in the three pathological groups. Moreover, we found statistical differences between the two groups of CVID patients: patients with ITP had a higher percentage of CD21(low) cells. Our data suggest that CD21(low) cells are related to autoimmunity and may represent a link between infection and autoimmunity.

  11. Autoimmunity and infection in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID).

    PubMed

    Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Alessandro; Tinazzi, Elisa; Veneri, Dino; Argentino, Giuseppe; Moretta, Francesca; Puccetti, Antonio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by primary hypogammaglobulinemia. B and T cell abnormalities have been described in CVID. Typical clinical features of CVID are recurrent airway infections; lymphoproliferative, autoinflammatory, or neoplastic disorders; and autoimmune diseases among which autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state. Considering both innate and adaptive immune response abnormalities in CVID, it is easier to understand the mechanisms that lead to a breakdown of self-tolerance. CD21(low) B cells derive from mature B cells that have undergone chronic immune stimulation; they are increased in CVID patients. The expansion of CD21(low) B cells is also observed in certain autoimmune diseases. We have studied CD21(low) B cells in patients with CVID, CVID, and ITP and with ITP only. We observed a statistically significant increase in the CD21(low) population in the three pathological groups. Moreover, we found statistical differences between the two groups of CVID patients: patients with ITP had a higher percentage of CD21(low) cells. Our data suggest that CD21(low) cells are related to autoimmunity and may represent a link between infection and autoimmunity. PMID:27392505

  12. The Construct Validity of the Dutch Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Personality Disorders (PID-5) in a Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Tim; Claes, Laurence; Smits, Dirk; De Clercq, Barbara; De Fruyt, Filip; Rossi, Gina; Vanwalleghem, Dominique; Vermote, Rudi; Lowyck, Benedicte; Claes, Stephan; De Hert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    The factor structure and the convergent validity of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), a self-report questionnaire designed to measure personality pathology as advocated in the fifth edition, Section III of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), are already demonstrated in general population samples, but need replication in clinical samples. In 240 Flemish inpatients, we examined the factor structure of the PID-5 by means of exploratory structural equation modeling. Additionally, we investigated differences in PID-5 higher order domain scores according to gender, age and educational level, and explored convergent and discriminant validity by relating the PID-5 with the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire and by comparing PID-5 scores of inpatients with and without a DSM-IV categorical personality disorder diagnosis. Our results confirmed the original five-factor structure of the PID-5. The reliability and the convergent and discriminant validity of the PID-5 proved to be adequate. Implications for future research are discussed.

  13. Simultaneous gains tuning in boiler/turbine PID-based controller clusters using iterative feedback tuning methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Taft, Cyrus W; Bentsman, Joseph; Hussey, Aaron; Petrus, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Tuning a complex multi-loop PID based control system requires considerable experience. In today's power industry the number of available qualified tuners is dwindling and there is a great need for better tuning tools to maintain and improve the performance of complex multivariable processes. Multi-loop PID tuning is the procedure for the online tuning of a cluster of PID controllers operating in a closed loop with a multivariable process. This paper presents the first application of the simultaneous tuning technique to the multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) PID based nonlinear controller in the power plant control context, with the closed-loop system consisting of a MIMO nonlinear boiler/turbine model and a nonlinear cluster of six PID-type controllers. Although simplified, the dynamics and cross-coupling of the process and the PID cluster are similar to those used in a real power plant. The particular technique selected, iterative feedback tuning (IFT), utilizes the linearized version of the PID cluster for signal conditioning, but the data collection and tuning is carried out on the full nonlinear closed-loop system. Based on the figure of merit for the control system performance, the IFT is shown to deliver performance favorably comparable to that attained through the empirical tuning carried out by an experienced control engineer.

  14. Simultaneous gains tuning in boiler/turbine PID-based controller clusters using iterative feedback tuning methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Taft, Cyrus W; Bentsman, Joseph; Hussey, Aaron; Petrus, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Tuning a complex multi-loop PID based control system requires considerable experience. In today's power industry the number of available qualified tuners is dwindling and there is a great need for better tuning tools to maintain and improve the performance of complex multivariable processes. Multi-loop PID tuning is the procedure for the online tuning of a cluster of PID controllers operating in a closed loop with a multivariable process. This paper presents the first application of the simultaneous tuning technique to the multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) PID based nonlinear controller in the power plant control context, with the closed-loop system consisting of a MIMO nonlinear boiler/turbine model and a nonlinear cluster of six PID-type controllers. Although simplified, the dynamics and cross-coupling of the process and the PID cluster are similar to those used in a real power plant. The particular technique selected, iterative feedback tuning (IFT), utilizes the linearized version of the PID cluster for signal conditioning, but the data collection and tuning is carried out on the full nonlinear closed-loop system. Based on the figure of merit for the control system performance, the IFT is shown to deliver performance favorably comparable to that attained through the empirical tuning carried out by an experienced control engineer. PMID:22633781

  15. Women and the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, Constance B.

    1988-01-01

    SPECIAL EDITOR'S NOTE: Constance B. Wofsy, MD, is Co-Director of AIDS Activities at San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, as well as Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco; Assistant Chief, Infectious Diseases, San Francisco General Hospital; and Principal Investigator, Project AWARE (Association for Women's AIDS Research and Education). Although she was not able to contribute an article for WOMEN AND MEDICINE on this very important subject, she kindly agreed to an interview. Both physicians and nonphysicians were asked what questions they had about the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women. Images PMID:3250110

  16. Design of Performance Driven Self-Tuning PID Control Systems and It's Application for DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yoshihiro; Ikemoto, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toru

    This paper proposes an adaptive PID controller which is driven by current control performance. The calculations of the PID parameters are based on the generalized minimum variance control(GMVC) algorithm. The current control performance is obtained in an online manner over a user-specified time-window with some overlap. The retuning of PID parameters are only carried out when controller performance deteriorates below a user-specified threshold. Experimental evaluations on the voltage control of the DC-DC converter demonstrates the practicality and utility of this idea.

  17. Too much of a good thing: immunodeficiency due to hyperactive PI3K signaling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Craig M; Fruman, David A

    2014-09-01

    Primary immune deficiency diseases arise due to heritable defects that often involve signaling molecules required for immune cell function. Typically, these genetic defects cause loss of gene function, resulting in primary immune deficiencies such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA); however, gain-of-function mutations may also promote immune deficiency. In this issue of the JCI, Deau et al. establish that gain-of-function mutations in PIK3R1, which encodes the p85α regulatory subunit of class IA PI3Ks, lead to immunodeficiency. These observations are consistent with previous reports that hyperactivating mutations in PIK3CD, which encodes the p110δ catalytic subunit, are capable of promoting immune deficiency. Mutations that reduce PI3K activity also result in defective lymphocyte development and function; therefore, these findings support the notion that too little or too much PI3K activity leads to immunodeficiency.

  18. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies.

  19. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  20. Transplantation Outcomes for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sung-Yun; Logan, Brent R.; Griffith, Linda M.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Parrott, Roberta E.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Kapoor, Neena; Hanson, Imelda C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Jyonouchi, Soma; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Small, Trudy N.; Burroughs, Lauri; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Haight, Ann E.; Grizzle, Audrey; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Chan, Ka Wah; Fuleihan, Ramsay L.; Haddad, Elie; Loechelt, Brett; Aquino, Victor M.; Gillio, Alfred; Davis, Jeffrey; Knutsen, Alan; Smith, Angela R.; Moore, Theodore B.; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Goldman, Frederick D.; Connelly, James A.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Xiang, Qun; Shearer, William T.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Cowan, Morton J.; O’Reilly, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium was formed to analyze the results of hematopoietic-cell transplantation in children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other primary immunodeficiencies. Factors associated with a good transplantation outcome need to be identified in order to design safer and more effective curative therapy, particularly for children with SCID diagnosed at birth. METHODS We collected data retrospectively from 240 infants with SCID who had received transplants at 25 centers during a 10-year period (2000 through 2009). RESULTS Survival at 5 years, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and CD3+ T-cell and IgA recovery were more likely among recipients of grafts from matched sibling donors than among recipients of grafts from alternative donors. However, the survival rate was high regardless of donor type among infants who received transplants at 3.5 months of age or younger (94%) and among older infants without prior infection (90%) or with infection that had resolved (82%). Among actively infected infants without a matched sibling donor, survival was best among recipients of haploidentical T-cell–depleted transplants in the absence of any pretransplantation conditioning. Among survivors, reduced-intensity or myeloablative pre-transplantation conditioning was associated with an increased likelihood of a CD3+ T-cell count of more than 1000 per cubic millimeter, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and IgA recovery but did not significantly affect CD4+ T-cell recovery or recovery of phytohemagglutinin-induced T-cell proliferation. The genetic subtype of SCID affected the quality of CD3+ T-cell recovery but not survival. CONCLUSIONS Transplants from donors other than matched siblings were associated with excellent survival among infants with SCID identified before the onset of infection. All available graft sources are expected to lead to excellent survival among asymptomatic infants. (Funded by the

  1. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell signaling and leads to a novel human primary immunodeficiency. Magnes Res. 2011 Sep;24(3):S109-14. doi: 10.1684/mrh.2011.0286. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Wolf FI, Trapani V. MagT1: ...

  2. A GA-based PID active queue management control design for TCP/IP networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, H.-H.; Chen, C.-K.; Yan, J.-J.; Liao, T.-L.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based (GA-based) proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller as an active queue manager for Internet routers is proposed to reduce packet loss and improve network utilization in TCP/IP networks. Based on the window-based nonlinear dynamics, the TCP network was modeled as a time-delayed system with a saturated input due to the limitations of packet-dropping probability and the effects of propagation delays in TCP networks. An improved genetic algorithm is employed to derive optimal or near optimal PID control gains such that a performance index of integrated-absolute error (IAE) in terms of the error between the router queue length and the desired queue length is minimized. The performance of the proposed control scheme was evaluated in various network scenarios via a series of numerical simulations. The simulation results confirm that the proposed scheme outperforms other AQM schemes.

  3. The power stability of a fiber amplifier based on a multifunction card and PID control program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Yang, Wenguang; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, JianMing; Jia, Suotang

    2016-06-01

    The power stability of a fiber amplifier was significantly improved by means of simultaneously controlling the current of a fiber amplifier and the diffraction efficiency of an acousto-optical modulator. The real-time fluctuation of laser power was recorded by a multifunction card and processed by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control program. The feedback loop voltage was introduced to the fiber laser amplifier and acoustic-optic modulator through the analog output of the multifunction card. The control method based on a multifunction card and PID program has good scalability, flexibility and reliability for the complex system on the condition in which the frequency and power of the laser need to be precisely stabilized.

  4. Fuzzy auto-tuning PID control of multiple joint robot driven by ultrasonic motors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhijun; Xing, Rentao; Zhao, Chunsheng; Huang, Weiqing

    2007-11-01

    A three-joint robot is directly driven by ultrasonic motors with advantage of high torque at low speed. The speed of the ultrasonic motors is actually controlled by regulating their operating frequencies. The kinematic and kinetic analyses of the robot have been carried out using Adams. Due to the lack of accurate control model of ultrasonic motors and the time-varying motor parameters, a fuzzy auto-tuning proportional integral derivative (PID) controller for the robot is experimented, in which a simple method to tune parameters of the PID type fuzzy controller on-line is developed and a new position-speed feedback strategy is proposed and implemented. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy and fuzzy logic controller is verified by experimental investigation.

  5. Covariance Matrix Adapted Evolution Strategy Based Design of Mixed H2/H ∞ PID Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willjuice Iruthayarajan, M.; Baskar, S.

    This paper discusses the application of the covariance matrix adapted evolution strategy (CMAES) technique to the design of the mixed H2/H ∞ PID controller. The optimal robust PID controller is designed by minimizing the weighted sum of integral squared error (ISE) and balanced robust performance criterion involving robust stability and disturbance attenuation performance subjected to robust stability and disturbance attenuation constraints. In CMAES algorithm, these constraints are effectively handled by penalty parameter-less scheme. In order to test the performance of CMAES algorithm, MIMO distillation column model is considered. For the purpose of comparison, reported intelligent genetic algorithm (IGA) method is used. The statistical performances of combined ISE and balanced robust performance criterion in ten independent simulation runs show that a performance of CMAES is better than IGA method. Robustness test conducted on the system also shows that the robust performance of CMAES designed controller is better than IGA based controller under model uncertainty and external disturbances.

  6. Stability domains of the delay and PID coefficients for general time-delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almodaresi, Elham; Bozorg, Mohammad; Taghirad, Hamid D.

    2016-04-01

    Time delays are encountered in many physical systems, and they usually threaten the stability and performance of closed-loop systems. The problem of determining all stabilising proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers for systems with perturbed delays is less investigated in the literature. In this study, the Rekasius substitution is employed to transform the system parameters to a new space. Then, the singular frequency (SF) method is revised for the Rekasius transformed system. A novel technique is presented to compute the ranges of time delay for which stable PID controller exists. This stability range cannot be readily computed from the previous methods. Finally, it is shown that similar to the original SF method, finite numbers of singular frequencies are sufficient to compute the stable regions in the space of time delay and controller coefficients.

  7. Tuning of PID controllers for integrating systems using direct synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Anil, Ch; Padma Sree, R

    2015-07-01

    A PID controller is designed for various forms of integrating systems with time delay using direct synthesis method. The method is based on comparing the characteristic equation of the integrating system and PID controller with a filter with the desired characteristic equation. The desired characteristic equation comprises of multiple poles which are placed at the same desired location. The tuning parameter is adjusted so as to achieve the desired robustness. Tuning rules in terms of process parameters are given for various forms of integrating systems. The tuning parameter can be selected for the desired robustness by specifying Ms value. The proposed controller design method is applied to various transfer function models and to the nonlinear model equations of jacketed CSTR to show its effectiveness and applicability.

  8. An optimal PID controller via LQR for standard second order plus time delay systems.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Anuraag; Thakur, S K; Pandit, V S

    2016-01-01

    An improved tuning methodology of PID controller for standard second order plus time delay systems (SOPTD) is developed using the approach of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and pole placement technique to obtain the desired performance measures. The pole placement method together with LQR is ingeniously used for SOPTD systems where the time delay part is handled in the controller output equation instead of characteristic equation. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology has been demonstrated via simulation of stable open loop oscillatory, over damped, critical damped and unstable open loop systems. Results show improved closed loop time response over the existing LQR based PI/PID tuning methods with less control effort. The effect of non-dominant pole on the stability and robustness of the controller has also been discussed.

  9. Experimental results on the design for the APS PID global orbit control system.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Kirchman, J. A.

    1997-12-05

    The Advanced Photon Source third generation synchrotrons light source needs a stabilized particle beam position to produce high brightness and low emittance radiation. Global orbit correction control is introduced and is utilized to satisfy the demanding needs of the accelerator. This paper presents the experimental results for determining an effective and optimal controller to meet the global orbit correction requirements. These requirements include frequency/time domain demands consisting of vibrational noise attenuation, limiting of controller gains for stability and improving the system time response. Experiments were conducted with a digital signal processor implementing various PID sets to make comparisons between simulations and experiments. Measurements at these PID sets supported the results of software simulation.

  10. A PSO-PID quaternion model based trajectory control of a hexarotor UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artale, Valeria; Milazzo, Cristina L. R.; Orlando, Calogero; Ricciardello, Angela

    2015-12-01

    A quaternion based trajectory controller for a prototype of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is discussed in this paper. The dynamics of the UAV, a hexarotor in details, is described in terms of quaternion instead of the usual Euler angle parameterization. As UAV flight management concerns, the method here implemented consists of two main steps: trajectory and attitude control via Proportional-Integrative-Derivative (PID) and Proportional-Derivative (PD) technique respectively and the application of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) method in order to tune the PID and PD parameters. The optimization is the consequence of the minimization of a objective function related to the error with the respect to a proper trajectory. Numerical simulations support and validate the proposed method.

  11. Decentralized PI/PID controllers based on gain and phase margin specifications for TITO processes.

    PubMed

    Maghade, D K; Patre, B M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a decentralized PI/PID controller design method based on gain and phase margin specifications for two-input-two-output (TITO) interactive processes is proposed. The decouplers are designed for systems to minimize the interaction between the loops, and the first order plus dead time (FOPDT) model is achieved for each decoupled subsystem based on the frequency response fitting. An independent PI/PID controller is designed for each reduced order decoupled subsystem to obtain the desired gain and phase margins, and the performance is verified on the original interactive system to show the effectiveness of the proposed design method for the general class of TITO systems. Simulation examples are incorporated to validate the usefulness of the presented algorithm. An experimentation is performed on the Level-Temperature reactor process to show the practical applicability of the proposed method for the interactive system.

  12. IMC-PID-fractional-order-filter controllers design for integer order systems.

    PubMed

    Maâmar, Bettayeb; Rachid, Mansouri

    2014-09-01

    One of the reasons of the great success of standard PID controllers is the presence of simple tuning rules, of the automatic tuning feature and of tables that simplify significantly their design. For the fractional order case, some tuning rules have been proposed in the literature. However, they are not general because they are valid only for some model cases. In this paper, a new approach is investigated. The fractional property is not especially imposed by the controller structure but by the closed loop reference model. The resulting controller is fractional but it has a very interesting structure for its implementation. Indeed, the controller can be decomposed into two transfer functions: an integer transfer function which is generally an integer PID controller and a simple fractional filter.

  13. Chicken barn climate and hazardous volatile compounds control using simple linear regression and PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. H.; Bakar, M. A. A.; Shukor, S. A. A.; Saad, F. S. A.; Kamis, M. S.; Mustafa, M. H.; Khalid, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    The hazardous volatile compounds from chicken manure in chicken barn are potentially to be a health threat to the farm animals and workers. Ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) produced in chicken barn are influenced by climate changes. The Electronic Nose (e-nose) is used for the barn's air, temperature and humidity data sampling. Simple Linear Regression is used to identify the correlation between temperature-humidity, humidity-ammonia and ammonia-hydrogen sulphide. MATLAB Simulink software was used for the sample data analysis using PID controller. Results shows that the performance of PID controller using the Ziegler-Nichols technique can improve the system controller to control climate in chicken barn.

  14. The power stability of a fiber amplifier based on a multifunction card and PID control program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Yang, Wenguang; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, JianMing; Jia, Suotang

    2016-06-01

    The power stability of a fiber amplifier was significantly improved by means of simultaneously controlling the current of a fiber amplifier and the diffraction efficiency of an acousto-optical modulator. The real-time fluctuation of laser power was recorded by a multifunction card and processed by a proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control program. The feedback loop voltage was introduced to the fiber laser amplifier and acoustic-optic modulator through the analog output of the multifunction card. The control method based on a multifunction card and PID program has good scalability, flexibility and reliability for the complex system on the condition in which the frequency and power of the laser need to be precisely stabilized.

  15. Performance Comparison Between Lqr and Pid Controllers for AN Inverted Pendulum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, A. N. K.; Ahmad, M. A.; Rahmat, M. F.

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the time specification performance between two conventional controllers for an inverted pendulum system. The goal is to determine which control strategy delivers better performance with respect to pendulum's angle and cart's position. The inverted pendulum represents a challenging control problem, which continually moves toward an uncontrolled state. Two controllers are presented such as Linear-Quadratic-Regulator (LQR) and Proportional-Integral-Derivatives (PID) controllers for controlling the linearized system of inverted pendulum model. Simulation study has been done in Matlab simulink environment shows that both controllers are capable to control multi output inverted pendulum system successfully. The result shows that LQR produced better response compared to PID control strategies and is presented in time domain.

  16. Sliding mode control with PID sliding surface and experimental application to an electromechanical plant.

    PubMed

    Eker, Ilyas

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a sliding mode control system with a proportional+integral+derivative (PID) sliding surface is adopted to control the speed of an electromechanical plant. A robust sliding mode controller is derived so that the actual trajectory tracks the desired trajectory despite uncertainty, nonlinear dynamics, and external disturbances. The proposed sliding mode controller is chosen to ensure the stability of overall dynamics during the reaching phase and sliding phase. The stability of the system is guaranteed in the sense of the Lyapunov stability theorem. The chattering problem is overcome using a hyperbolic function for the sliding surface. Experimental results that are compared with the results of conventional PID verify that the proposed sliding mode controller can achieve favorable tracking performance, and it is robust with regard to uncertainties and disturbances.

  17. Design of Intelligent Hydraulic Excavator Control System Based on PID Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Jiao, Shengjie; Liao, Xiaoming; Yin, Penglong; Wang, Yulin; Si, Kuimao; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Hairong

    Most of the domestic designed hydraulic excavators adopt the constant power design method and set 85%~90% of engine power as the hydraulic system adoption power, it causes high energy loss due to mismatching of power between the engine and the pump. While the variation of the rotational speed of engine could sense the power shift of the load, it provides a new method to adjust the power matching between engine and pump through engine speed. Based on negative flux hydraulic system, an intelligent hydraulic excavator control system was designed based on rotational speed sensing method to improve energy efficiency. The control system was consisted of engine control module, pump power adjusted module, engine idle module and system fault diagnosis module. Special PLC with CAN bus was used to acquired the sensors and adjusts the pump absorption power according to load variation. Four energy saving control strategies with constant power method were employed to improve the fuel utilization. Three power modes (H, S and L mode) were designed to meet different working status; Auto idle function was employed to save energy through two work status detected pressure switches, 1300rpm was setting as the idle speed according to the engine consumption fuel curve. Transient overload function was designed for deep digging within short time without spending extra fuel. An increasing PID method was employed to realize power matching between engine and pump, the rotational speed's variation was taken as the PID algorithm's input; the current of proportional valve of variable displacement pump was the PID's output. The result indicated that the auto idle could decrease fuel consumption by 33.33% compared to work in maximum speed of H mode, the PID control method could take full use of maximum engine power at each power mode and keep the engine speed at stable range. Application of rotational speed sensing method provides a reliable method to improve the excavator's energy efficiency and

  18. Development of a GA-Fuzzy-Immune PID Controller with Incomplete Derivation for Robot Dexterous Hand

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-hua; Chen, Xiao-hu; Zheng, Xian-hua; Li, Sheng-peng; Wang, Zhong-bin

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of robot dexterous hand, a controller based on GA-fuzzy-immune PID was designed. The control system of a robot dexterous hand and mathematical model of an index finger were presented. Moreover, immune mechanism was applied to the controller design and an improved approach through integration of GA and fuzzy inference was proposed to realize parameters' optimization. Finally, a simulation example was provided and the designed controller was proved ideal. PMID:25097881

  19. Optimized linear motor and digital PID controller setup used in Mössbauer spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Pavel; Kouřil, Lukáš; Navařík, Jakub; Novák, Petr; Pechoušek, Jiří

    2014-10-01

    Optimization of a linear motor and digital PID controller setup used in a Mössbauer spectrometer is presented. Velocity driving system with a digital PID feedback subsystem was developed in the LabVIEW graphical environment and deployed on the sbRIO real-time hardware device (National Instruments). The most important data acquisition processes are performed as real-time deterministic tasks on an FPGA chip. Velocity transducer of a double loudspeaker type with a power amplifier circuit is driven by the system. Series of calibration measurements were proceeded to find the optimal setup of the P, I, D parameters together with velocity error signal analysis. The shape and given signal characteristics of the velocity error signal are analyzed in details. Remote applications for controlling and monitoring the PID system from computer or smart phone, respectively, were also developed. The best setup and P, I, D parameters were set and calibration spectrum of α-Fe sample with an average nonlinearity of the velocity scale below 0.08% was collected. Furthermore, the width of the spectral line below 0.30 mm/s was observed. Powerful and complex velocity driving system was designed.

  20. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: improvements in performance, thermal comfort, and electricity use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Sartor, Karina

    2016-08-01

    The use of smarter temperature control technologies in heating systems can optimize the use of electric power and performance of piglets. Two control technologies of a resistive heating system were assessed in a pig nursery: a PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) controller and a thermostat. The systems were evaluated regarding thermal environment, piglet performance, and use of electric power for 99 days. The heating system with PID controller improved the thermal environment conditions and was significantly ( P < 0.001) more efficient in terms of electricity use to produce 1 kg of body weight (2.88 kWh kg-1), specific cost (0.75 R kg-1), weight gain (7.3 kg), daily weight gain (0.21 kg day-1), and feed conversion (1.71) than the system with thermostat (3.98 kWh kg-1; 1.03 R kg-1; 5.2 kg; 0.15 kg day-1, and 2.62, respectively). The results indicate that the PID-controlled heating system is more efficient in electricity use and provides better conditions for thermal comfort and animal performance than heating with thermostat.

  1. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  2. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: improvements in performance, thermal comfort, and electricity use.

    PubMed

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Sartor, Karina

    2016-08-01

    The use of smarter temperature control technologies in heating systems can optimize the use of electric power and performance of piglets. Two control technologies of a resistive heating system were assessed in a pig nursery: a PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) controller and a thermostat. The systems were evaluated regarding thermal environment, piglet performance, and use of electric power for 99 days. The heating system with PID controller improved the thermal environment conditions and was significantly (P < 0.001) more efficient in terms of electricity use to produce 1 kg of body weight (2.88 kWh kg(-1)), specific cost (0.75 R$ kg(-1)), weight gain (7.3 kg), daily weight gain (0.21 kg day(-1)), and feed conversion (1.71) than the system with thermostat (3.98 kWh kg(-1); 1.03 R$ kg(-1); 5.2 kg; 0.15 kg day(-1), and 2.62, respectively). The results indicate that the PID-controlled heating system is more efficient in electricity use and provides better conditions for thermal comfort and animal performance than heating with thermostat.

  3. An adaptive PID like controller using mix locally recurrent neural network for robotic manipulator with variable payload.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Kumar, Vikas; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2016-05-01

    Being complex, non-linear and coupled system, the robotic manipulator cannot be effectively controlled using classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. To enhance the effectiveness of the conventional PID controller for the nonlinear and uncertain systems, gains of the PID controller should be conservatively tuned and should adapt to the process parameter variations. In this work, a mix locally recurrent neural network (MLRNN) architecture is investigated to mimic a conventional PID controller which consists of at most three hidden nodes which act as proportional, integral and derivative node. The gains of the mix locally recurrent neural network based PID (MLRNNPID) controller scheme are initialized with a newly developed cuckoo search algorithm (CSA) based optimization method rather than assuming randomly. A sequential learning based least square algorithm is then investigated for the on-line adaptation of the gains of MLRNNPID controller. The performance of the proposed controller scheme is tested against the plant parameters uncertainties and external disturbances for both links of the two link robotic manipulator with variable payload (TL-RMWVP). The stability of the proposed controller is analyzed using Lyapunov stability criteria. A performance comparison is carried out among MLRNNPID controller, CSA optimized NNPID (OPTNNPID) controller and CSA optimized conventional PID (OPTPID) controller in order to establish the effectiveness of the MLRNNPID controller. PMID:26920088

  4. An adaptive PID like controller using mix locally recurrent neural network for robotic manipulator with variable payload.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Kumar, Vikas; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2016-05-01

    Being complex, non-linear and coupled system, the robotic manipulator cannot be effectively controlled using classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. To enhance the effectiveness of the conventional PID controller for the nonlinear and uncertain systems, gains of the PID controller should be conservatively tuned and should adapt to the process parameter variations. In this work, a mix locally recurrent neural network (MLRNN) architecture is investigated to mimic a conventional PID controller which consists of at most three hidden nodes which act as proportional, integral and derivative node. The gains of the mix locally recurrent neural network based PID (MLRNNPID) controller scheme are initialized with a newly developed cuckoo search algorithm (CSA) based optimization method rather than assuming randomly. A sequential learning based least square algorithm is then investigated for the on-line adaptation of the gains of MLRNNPID controller. The performance of the proposed controller scheme is tested against the plant parameters uncertainties and external disturbances for both links of the two link robotic manipulator with variable payload (TL-RMWVP). The stability of the proposed controller is analyzed using Lyapunov stability criteria. A performance comparison is carried out among MLRNNPID controller, CSA optimized NNPID (OPTNNPID) controller and CSA optimized conventional PID (OPTPID) controller in order to establish the effectiveness of the MLRNNPID controller.

  5. Combined immunodeficiency presenting with vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis: a case report and narrative review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Parvaneh, Nima; Ostad-Rahimi, Pouya; Fathi, Seyed Mohammad; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic abnormalities compatible with vaccine-related poliovirus infection (VAPP) may be a first presentation of some primary immunodeficient patients. The risk of VAPP rises from 1 case per 750 000 in normal population to 1 per 7000 times higher, particularly for persons with agammaglobulinemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, there is no appropriate estimation for VAPP occurrence in patients with cellular immunity defects. Herein we report a case of combined immunodeficiency with paralytic complication due to oral polio vaccine and we present a literature review on this topic.

  6. Diagnostic Immunization with Bacteriophage ΦX 174 in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency/Hypogammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lauren L.; Buckley, Rebecca; Lugar, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Use of the T cell-dependent neoantigen bacteriophage ΦX 174 has been described since the 1960s as a method to assess specific antibody response in patients with primary immunodeficiencies. We reviewed a cohort of patients at Duke University Medical Center who received immunization with bacteriophage and report the clinical utility and safety of the immunization, as well as patient characteristics. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed of all Duke Immunology Clinic patients (pediatric and adult) who received immunizations with bacteriophage, from 1976 to 2012. Subjects were selected for inclusion if their diagnosis at the time of bacteriophage was either presumed or confirmed common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), hypogammaglobulinemia, transient hypogammaglobulinemia, or antibody deficiency unspecified. Follow up post-immunization was also recorded. Results: One hundred twenty-six patients were identified, 36 adults and 90 pediatric patients. Diagnoses prior to bacteriophage were CVID (n = 100), hypogammaglobulinemia (n = 23), and antibody deficiency (n = 3). Post-immunization diagnoses were CVID (n = 65), hypogammaglobulinemia (n = 19), unknown (n = 23), no primary immune deficiency (n = 10), and other primary immunodeficiency (n = 9). Seventy-five patients had abnormal bacteriophage results, 37 were normal, and 14 were borderline. There were 257 recorded administrations of the immunization. Information was available on adverse reactions for 171 administrations. Fourteen immunizations were associated with minor adverse events. Nineteen patients stopped their immunoglobulin replacement therapy based on reported normal responses to immunization. Conclusion: Bacteriophage ΦX 174 immunization is a safe, well-tolerated, and clinically useful method to assess antibody response in patients with suspected antibody-mediated immunodeficiencies, particularly those who are on immunoglobulin replacement therapy at the

  7. A new method for direct total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the troposphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently the atmospheric sinks of OH are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink term of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. The first direct measurements of total OH reactivity were performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) [1], [2]. Recently a new method for determining OH reactivity was developed called the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [3]. The measurement principle is based on a competitive reaction between a reactive molecule not normally present in air with OH, and atmospheric OH reactive molecules with OH. The reactive molecule (X), is passed through a Teflon coated glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced into the reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the competing ambient air molecules directly provides the atmospheric total OH reactivity. In the first version of this set up, molecule X is pyrrole (C5H4N) and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In comparison to the original LIF based system, the PTR-MS has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and commercially available. However, using the PTR-MS for total OH reactivity measurements prevents it from probing the broad variety of volatile organic compounds in ambient air. Moreover, even smaller, less expensive and more portable detectors are available. This work examines the potential for a GC-PID in order to make the total OH reactivity measurement accessible to more practitioners. This study presents measurements of total OH reactivity with a custom built GC-PID (VOC-Analyzer from IUT-Berlin, now ENIT (Environics-IUT GmbH))[4]. The GC-PID is small (260

  8. Immunodeficiency associated with anorexia nervosa is secondary and improves after refeeding.

    PubMed Central

    Allende, L M; Corell, A; Manzanares, J; Madruga, D; Marcos, A; Madroño, A; López-Goyanes, A; García-Pérez, M A; Moreno, J M; Rodrigo, M; Sanz, F; Arnaiz-Villena, A

    1998-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the question of starvation effects on immune function by means of changes in lymphocyte subsets, cytokine induction or lymphocyte activation. Anorexia nervosa (AN) patients are severely malnourished and contradictory results have been obtained regarding the accompanying immunodeficiency, including its assignation as a part of the primary nervous disorder. In the present work, an extensive immunological function examination was carried out on 40 AN patients who were compared with a control group of 14 healthy girls. The AN patients were also classified according to their nutritional status (by the Body Mass Index: BMI), this being critical for a better understanding of these secondary immunodeficiency bases. Moreover, another immune system study was performed on five patients after refeeding. Lymphocyte subsets and function, cytokine induction and peripheral blood concentrations, and innate as well as humoral immunity were evaluated. Deregulation in the cytokine network, owing to the interaction of the central nervous (CNS) and immune systems, seems to be the initial immune alteration in AN immunodeficiency but it has not been disproved that the immunodeficiency is a direct consequence of the original psychiatric perturbation. Spontaneous high levels of circulating interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been observed; this is probably one of the causes of the anomalies found in the T-cell subpopulations (mainly the naive CD4+CD45RA+ reduction and the cytotoxic CD8+ increase) and T-cell activation status (mainly the down-regulation of the CD2 and CD69 activation pathways). This finally leads to an impairment, not only in T-cell function but also in T-cell to B-cell co-operation. The AN specificity of these results is confirmed by the fact that these immune alterations improve after refeeding and when nutritional status becomes less critical, which also suggests that AN immunodeficiency is indeed

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic is clearly one of the most serious health-care crises in the professional lives of contemporary physicians. It cannot be regarded as a curiosity to be dealt with by inner-city infectious-disease experts, but rather must be considered a problem for all health-care providers and a problem in which the obstetrician-gynecologist has a special role to play. PMID:18475370

  10. Silvery grey hair: clue to diagnose immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Sahana, Ms; Sacchidanand, S; Hiremagalore, R; Asha, Gs

    2012-04-01

    Silvery hair is a common presentation of rare group of autosomal recessive disorders called Silvery hair syndromes including Griscelli syndrome (GS), Chediak-Higashi syndrome, and Elejalde syndrome. GS is characterized by a silvery grey sheen to hair, large clumped melanosomes in hair shaft, partial albinism, and variable cellular immunodeficiency. We report two cases of GS with classical clinical features and confirmatory findings by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  11. Immunodeficiency, radiosensitivity, and the XCIND syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Richard A; Boder, Elena; Good, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Through the analysis of a rare disorder called ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), many important biological lessons have been gleaned. Today, it is clear that the underlying defect of A-T lies in the nucleus, as an inability to repair or process double strand breaks. More important, by the A-T phenotype now allows us to appreciate a much more general distinction between immunodeficiencies that are radiosensitive and those that are not.

  12. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  13. Problems of Prophylaxis of Secondary Immunodeficiency States.

    PubMed

    Pershin, Boris B.; Kuzmin, Sergey N.; Medvedev, Vladimir Ya.; Tolstov, Dmitry V.

    1999-12-01

    An attempt is made in this paper to draw up some results of long-term studies conducted by the "Immunoprophylaxis" Center of RANS on such studies. The results of mass and individual studies among 250 thousand blue- and white-collar workers in Russian industrial enterprises are processed in the data bank of the Center, including an analysis of the immunological reactions of 30 thousand individuals studied. An analysis of the results shows that secondary immunodeficiency is encountered in 30% of the people occupied in industrial positions, in 40% of professional athletes and in more than 60% of the children studied. It should be emphasized that in enterprises where there is substantial excessive environmental harm, the frequency of development of immunodeficiency also exceeded the 60% mark. There are many reasons for the development of immunological deficiency and they depend on a large number of factors. Among them, in the first place, is the anthropogenic effect on the environment, which results in contamination of working zones, the earth, water and, as a consequence, food products, the use of which inevitably results in immunodepression. A special place in this problem is occupied by stress, which accompanies almost any professional activity. There is no doubt concerning the opinion that normal functioning of the immune system provides a sufficiently effective "interdiction" against the development of many diseases. Immune deficiency "opens the door" to illness. In other words, immunodeficiency is a detonator for the growth of a pathology.

  14. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  15. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti–human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID

  16. Nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prem L; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda; Beltran, Thierry; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel compounds that can effectively inhibit both wild type and the most consensus resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary focus in HIV disease management. Combination therapy, comprising at least three classes of drugs, has become the standard of care for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or HIV-infected individuals. The drug cocktail can comprise all three classes of HIV inhibitors, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI). Due to their competitive mode of inhibition and requirement for metabolic activation, almost all NRTI drugs lack the virological potency of NNRTI or PI drugs. However, data from clinical trials indicate that sustained viral suppression could not be achieved with NRTI, NNRTI or PIs alone. Therefore, the NRTIs will remain essential components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the foreseeable future, because they enhance the virological potency of the regimen, they do not bind excessively to protein and most regimens are small pills/tablets given once a day. It has become apparent in recent years that the prolonged use of certain NRTIs exhibits adverse events as a class, limiting the length of time for which they can be safely used. Of major clinical concern is their association with the potentially fatal lactic acidaemia and hepatic steatosis. These class events, as well as individual drug effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are linked to delayed mitochondrial destruction. In addition to toxicity, the development of resistance-conferring mutations against exposure to nucleoside analogs currently in use influences long-term therapeutic benefits. Of critical importance for the evaluation of new NRTIs are recent studies showing that the efficiency of discrimination or excision by pyrophosphorolysis in the presence of nucleotides of a given NRTI is a key

  17. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  18. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  19. Ocular syphilis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John P; Huang, Lynn L; Rosberger, Daniel F

    2015-06-01

    As Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease (AIDS) turns thirty-years old, much progress has been made. 56,000 new cases of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are expected in Americans this year. At least half or more will be in African Americans. Reports of the association between syphilis and HIV infection are well documented. We present a case of bilateral optic neuritis and panuveitis as the initial presentation in a previously undiagnosed patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:27269502

  20. The efficacy of image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy in neurologically symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, R M; Russell, E; Yungbluth, M; Hidvegi, D F; Brody, B A; Dal Canto, M C

    1992-02-01

    A prospective series of 50 neurologically symptomatic human immunodeficiency infected patients with intracranial lesions who underwent image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy is presented. Patients were diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma (14 patients), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (14 patients), toxoplasmosis (13 patients), human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (3 patients), infarction (2 patients), and 1 patient each with metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, cryptococcoma, and atypical mycobacterial infection. Two of the patients with toxoplasmosis had a second intracranial abnormality. Two biopsies resulted in either descriptive diagnosis only or were nondiagnostic; the definitive diagnostic efficacy of image-guided stereotactic biopsy was thus 96%. No deaths were incurred as a result of biopsy. Four intraoperative or postoperative hemorrhages occurred; in only 1 patient was there a residual neurological deficit related to the surgery. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy may thus be considered both safe and effective in this patient population.

  1. Reliability and validity of the personality inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5): predicting DSM-IV personality disorders and psychopathy in community-dwelling Italian adults.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Andrea; Krueger, Robert F; Markon, Kristian E; Borroni, Serena; Maffei, Cesare

    2013-12-01

    In order to assess the internal consistency, factor structure, and ability to recover DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) scales, 710 Italian adult community dwelling volunteers were administered the Italian translation of the PID-5, as well as the Italian translation of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+ (PDQ-4+). Cronbach's alpha values were >.70 for all PID-5 facet scales and greater than .90 for all PID-5 domain scales. Parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analysis supported the theoretical five-factor model of the PID-5 trait scales. Regression analyses showed that both PID-5 trait and domain scales explained a substantial amount of variance in the PDQ-4+ PD scales, with the exception of the Passive-Aggressive PD scale. When the PID-5 was administered to a second independent sample of 389 Italian adult community dwelling volunteers, the basic psychometric properties of the scale were replicated. In this second sample, the PID-5 trait and domain scales proved to be significant predictors of psychopathy measures. As a whole, the results of the present study support the hypothesis that the PID-5 is a reliable instrument which is able to recover DSM-IV PDs, as well as to capture personality pathology that is not included in the DSM-IV (namely, psychopathy).

  2. Comparison of Diagnostic Criteria for Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Brewerton, Maia; Slade, Charlotte; Jordan, Anthony; Gillis, David; Steele, Richard; Koopmans, Wikke; Woon, See-Tarn

    2014-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVIDs) are the most frequent symptomatic primary immune deficiency condition in adults. The genetic basis for the condition is not known and no single clinical feature or laboratory test can establish the diagnosis; it has been a diagnosis of exclusion. In areas of uncertainty, diagnostic criteria can provide valuable clinical information. Here, we compare the revised European society of immune deficiencies (ESID) registry (2014) criteria with the diagnostic criteria of Ameratunga et al. (2013) and the original ESID/pan American group for immune deficiency (ESID/PAGID 1999) criteria. The ESID/PAGID (1999) criteria either require absent isohemagglutinins or impaired vaccine responses to establish the diagnosis in patients with primary hypogammaglobulinemia. Although commonly encountered, infective and autoimmune sequelae of CVID were not part of the original ESID/PAGID (1999) criteria. Also excluded were a series of characteristic laboratory and histological abnormalities, which are useful when making the diagnosis. The diagnostic criteria of Ameratunga et al. (2013) for CVID are based on these markers. The revised ESID registry (2014) criteria for CVID require the presence of symptoms as well as laboratory abnormalities to establish the diagnosis. Once validated, criteria for CVID will improve diagnostic precision and will result in more equitable and judicious use of intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy. PMID:25309532

  3. Regulation of flow through a T-Shaped open cavity by temperature dependent P, PI, and PID controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sourav; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sumon

    2016-07-01

    P (proportional), PI (proportional-integral), and PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers are popular means of controlling industrial processes. Due to superior response, accuracy, and stable performance, PID controllers are mostly used in control systems. This paper presents a mathematical model and subsequent response analysis regarding regulation of flow in mixed convection through a T-shaped open cavity by temperature dependent controllers. The T-shaped cavity has cold top and hot bottom walls, while air is flowing through the inlet at surrounding temperature. The inflow is regulated by a controlled gate which operates according to the signal received from the controller. Values of proportional gain (kp), integral gain (ki), and derivative gain (kd) are varied to obtain the desired system response and to ensure a stable system with fastest response. At first, only P controller is used and eventually PI and finally PID control scheme is applied for controller tuning. Tuning of different controllers (P, PI, and PID) are carried out systematically based on the reference temperature which is continuously monitored at a certain location inside the cavity. It is found that PID controller performs better than P or PI controller.

  4. Gyrotron Output Power Stabilization by PID Feedback Control of Heater Current and Anode Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.

    2014-12-01

    To provide stable output power of a gyrotron during long operation time the power stabilization was achieved by two schemes with PID feedback control of heater current and anode voltage. It was based on the dependence of the output power on both the anode voltage and the beam current and also on the dependence of the beam current on the gun heater current. Both schemes provided decrease of the power standard deviation to 0.3-0.5%. The comparison between parameters of both schemes is discussed in the paper.

  5. Incorporation of fractional-order dynamics into an existing PI/PID DC motor control loop.

    PubMed

    Tepljakov, Aleksei; Gonzalez, Emmanuel A; Petlenkov, Eduard; Belikov, Juri; Monje, Concepción A; Petráš, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The problem of changing the dynamics of an existing DC motor control system without the need of making internal changes is considered in the paper. In particular, this paper presents a method for incorporating fractional-order dynamics in an existing DC motor control system with internal PI or PID controller, through the addition of an external controller into the system and by tapping its original input and output signals. Experimental results based on the control of a real test plant from MATLAB/Simulink environment are presented, indicating the validity of the proposed approach.

  6. PI/PID controller design based on IMC and percentage overshoot specification to controller setpoint change.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmad; Majhi, Somanath

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the normalized Internal Model Control (IMC) filter time constant is designed to achieve a specified value of the maximum sensitivity for stable first and second order plus time delay process models, respectively. Since a particular value of the maximum sensitivity results in an almost constant percentage overshoot to controller setpoint change, an empirical relationship between the normalized IMC filter time constant and percentage overshoot is presented. The main advantage of the proposed method is that only a user-defined overshoot is required to design a PI/PID controller. Simulation examples are given to demonstrate the value of the proposed method.

  7. A Simple Robust PID Controller Design Method Based on Sine Wave Identification of the Uncertain Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucz, Štefan; Marič, Ladislav; Harsányi, Ladislav; Veselý, Vojtech

    2010-05-01

    The paper deals with the development and application of a new simple empirical approach to the design of robust PID controllers for technological processes in industrial practice. The main advantage of the proposed approach is the possibility to specify the required performance before the design algorithm implementation. Identification of characteristic data of the black-box type plant with varying parameters is carried out using the sine wave excitation signal, thus allowing to design the controller without necessarily knowing the mathematical model of the plant. The proposed approach has been verified on a real-world physical process.

  8. Severe immunodeficiency associated with a human immunodeficiency virus 1 NEF/3'-long terminal repeat transgene

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have generated several transgenic mouse strains carrying a human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) NEF/3' long terminal repeat (LTR) transgene under control of a T cell-specific promoter-enhancer element, showing a depletion of CD4+ T cells in the thymus and periphery. The immunological functions of the line with the most dramatic changes in lymphocyte populations, B6/338L, were analyzed in greater detail. The presence of the transgene in the heterozygous animal is associated with a dominant severe immunodeficiency. Older animals develop lymph- adenopathy and splenomegaly. CD4+CD8+ and CD4+CD8- single positive thymocytes already are depleted in these mice at the earliest stages in ontogeny, and peripheral T cells are reduced in frequency and present cell surface marker expression, which is characteristic for memory and activated T cells. The immunological response of B6/338L mice to several viral infections is also greatly impaired. Thus, the HIV-1 NEF/3' LTR as transgene in T cells can cause immunodeficiency and disease with striking similarities to a known retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency called murine AIDS (H. C. Morse III, S. K. Chattopadhyay, M. Makino, T. N. Frederickson, A. W. Hugin, and J. W. Hartley. 1992. AIDS. 6:607). PMID:8113676

  9. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research. Patient-Focused Drug... Fee Act (PDUFA V). FDA is interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of HIV on daily...

  10. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal Register of May 21, 2013 (78 FR 29755). In that notice, FDA requested public comment regarding...

  11. Endemic mycosis complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sarosi, G A; DAvies, S F

    1996-01-01

    Persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus are prone to the development of many fungal diseases. Normal hosts with intact immunity usually recover from infection by these less-invasive fungi. In persons with compromised T-cell-mediated immunity, however, widespread dissemination from a pulmonary focus occurs. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the three major North American mycoses, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis. In most cases, amphotericin B is the initial drug of choice, followed by one of the azoles for lifelong maintenance therapy. PMID:8732733

  12. Lipid management in human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Merle

    2015-05-01

    The development and use of antiretroviral medications to treat patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has dramatically changed the course of this disease from one that was fatal to a chronic and more manageable condition. Recommendations and guidelines for the general population are presented in this review with suggestions as to how they may be applied to this patient population. Issues for which there is little or no information available are noted to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of dyslipidemia for patients living with HIV.

  13. Depoliticize Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Public-health policy is inconsistent in its approach to the sexually transmitted disease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Nearly every health agency has politicized the reporting, finding, and contacting of HIV cases. There is also no consistency among the various state health departments and the various federal health agencies. Until we have a uniform health policy that treats HIV infection as every other reportable sexually transmitted disease, we will make little progress toward controlling its inevitable increase in both cases and costs. PMID:18475369

  14. Data Publication Process for CMIP5 Data and the Role of PIDs within Federated Earth System Science Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhause, M.; Höck, H.; Toussaint, F.; Weigel, T.; Lautenschlager, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present the publication process for the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) data with special emphasis on the current role of identifiers and the potential future role of PIDs in such distributed technical infrastructures. The DataCite data publication with DOI assignment finalizes the 3 levels quality control procedure for CMIP5 data (Stockhause et al., 2012). WDCC utilizes the Assistant System Atarrabi to support the publication process. Atarrabi is a web-based workflow system for metadata reviews of data creators and Publication Agents (PAs). Within the quality checks for level 3 all available information in the different infrastructure components is cross-checked for consistency by the DataCite PA. This information includes: metadata on data, metadata in the long-term archive of the Publication Agency, quality information, and external metadata on model and simulation (CIM). For these consistency checks metadata related to the data publication has to be identified. The Data Reference Syntax (DRS) convention functions as global identifier for data. Since the DRS structures the data, hierarchically, it can be used to identify data collections like DataCite publication units, i.e. all data belonging to a CMIP5 simulation. Every technical component of the infrastructure uses DRS or maps to it, but there is no central repository storing DRS_ids. Thus they have to be mapped, occasionally. Additional local identifiers are used within the different technical infrastructure components. Identification of related pieces of information in their repositories is cumbersome and tricky for the PA. How could PIDs improve the situation? To establish a reliable distributed data and metadata infrastructure, PIDs for all objects are needed as well as relations between them. An ideal data publication scenario for federated community projects within Earth System Sciences, e.g. CMIP, would be: 1. Data creators at the modeling centers define their simulation

  15. Lymphatic Dissemination of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus after Penile Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Dutra, Joseph; Fritts, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily transmitted by heterosexual contact, and approximately equal numbers of men and women worldwide are infected with the virus. Understanding the biology of HIV acquisition and dissemination in men exposed to the virus by insertive penile intercourse is likely to help with the rational design of vaccines that can limit or prevent HIV transmission. To characterize the target cells and dissemination pathways involved in establishing systemic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, we necropsied male rhesus macaques at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after penile SIV inoculation and quantified the levels of unspliced SIV RNA and spliced SIV RNA in tissue lysates and the number of SIV RNA-positive cells in tissue sections. We found that penile (glans, foreskin, coronal sulcus) T cells and, to a lesser extent, macrophages and dendritic cells are primary targets of infection and that SIV rapidly reaches the regional lymph nodes. At 7 days after inoculation, SIV had disseminated to the blood, systemic lymph nodes, and mucosal lymphoid tissues. Further, at 7 days postinoculation (p.i.), spliced SIV RNA levels were the highest in the genital lymph nodes, indicating that this is the site where the infection is initially amplified. By 14 days p.i., spliced SIV RNA levels were high in all tissues, but they were the highest in the gastrointestinal tract, indicating that the primary site of virus replication had shifted from the genital lymph nodes to the gut. The stepwise pattern of virus replication and dissemination described here suggests that vaccine-elicited immune responses in the genital lymph nodes could help prevent infection after penile SIV challenge. IMPORTANCE To be the most effective, vaccines should produce antiviral immune responses in the anatomic sites of virus replication. Thus, understanding the path taken by HIV from the mucosal surfaces, which are the site of virus exposure, to the deeper tissues where

  16. Tinea imbricata as a clue to occult immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Maroñas Jiménez, Lidia; Monsálvez, Verónica; Gutiérrez García-Rodrigo, Carlota; Postigo Llorente, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Tinea imbricata (TI) is a geographically restricted dermatophytosis with distinctive clinical and immunologic features. We present a case of TI occurring in a native Brazilian child with previously undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection. Physicians should bear in mind that diagnosis of TI may be a clinical clue to potentially serious underlying immunodeficiency.

  17. High precision position control of voice coil motor based on single neuron PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liyi; Chen, Qiming; Tan, Guangjun; Zhu, He

    2013-01-01

    Voice coil motor(VCM) is widely used in high-speed and high-precision positioning control system in recent years. However, there are system uncertainty, nonlinear, modeling error, and external disturbances in the high-precision positioning control system, traditional PID control method is difficult to achieve precise positioning control. In this paper, a new position control strategy with a single neuron controller which has the capability of self-studying and self-adapting composed with PID controller is put forward, and the feedforward compensator is added to improve the dynamic response of the system in the position loop. Moreover, the disturbance observer is designed to suppress model parameter uncertainty and external disturbance signal in the current loop. In addition, the problem of high precision position control of VCM under the influence of significant disturbances is addressed, which including the gas-lubricated damping, the spring, the back EMF and ripple forces, on the basis, the mathematical model of VCM is established accurately. The simulation results show that this kind of controller can improve the dynamic characteristic and strengthen the robustness of the system, and the current loop with disturbance observer can also restrain disturbance and high frequency.

  18. PSO-tuned PID controller for coupled tank system via priority-based fitness scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, Hazriq Izzuan; Hussien, Sharifah Yuslinda Syed; Selamat, Nur Asmiza; Abidin, Amar Faiz Zainal; Aras, Mohd Shahrieel Mohd; Nasir, Mohamad Na'im Mohd; Bohari, Zul Hasrizal

    2015-05-01

    The industrial applications of Coupled Tank System (CTS) are widely used especially in chemical process industries. The overall process is require liquids to be pumped, stored in the tank and pumped again to another tank. Nevertheless, the level of liquid in tank need to be controlled and flow between two tanks must be regulated. This paper presents development of an optimal PID controller for controlling the desired liquid level of the CTS. Two method of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm will be tested in optimizing the PID controller parameters. These two methods of PSO are standard Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Priority-based Fitness Scheme in Particle Swarm Optimization (PFPSO). Simulation is conducted within Matlab environment to verify the performance of the system in terms of settling time (Ts), steady state error (SSE) and overshoot (OS). It has been demonstrated that implementation of PSO via Priority-based Fitness Scheme (PFPSO) for this system is potential technique to control the desired liquid level and improve the system performances compared with standard PSO.

  19. A numerical model including PID control of a multizone crystal growth furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarella, Charles H.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    This paper presents a 2D axisymmetric combined conduction and radiation model of a multizone crystal growth furnace. The model is based on a programmable multizone furnace (PMZF) designed and built at NASA Lewis Research Center for growing high quality semiconductor crystals. A novel feature of this model is a control algorithm which automatically adjusts the power in any number of independently controlled heaters to establish the desired crystal temperatures in the furnace model. The control algorithm eliminates the need for numerous trial and error runs previously required to obtain the same results. The finite element code, FIDAP, used to develop the furnace model, was modified to directly incorporate the control algorithm. This algorithm, which presently uses PID control, and the associated heat transfer model are briefly discussed. Together, they have been used to predict the heater power distributions for a variety of furnace configurations and desired temperature profiles. Examples are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PID controlled model in establishing isothermal, Bridgman, and other complicated temperature profies in the sample. Finally, an example is given to show how the algorithm can be used to change the desired profile with time according to a prescribed temperature-time evolution.

  20. Tuning of IMC based PID controllers for integrating systems with time delay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D B Santosh; Padma Sree, R

    2016-07-01

    Design of Proportional Integral and Derivative (PID) controllers based on IMC principles for various types of integrating systems with time delay is proposed. PID parameters are given in terms of process model parameters and a tuning parameter. The tuning parameter is IMC filter time constant. In the present work, the IMC filter (Q) is chosen in such a manner that the order of the denominator of IMC controller is one less than the order of the numerator. The IMC filter time constant (λ) is tuned in such a way that a good compromise is made between performance and robustness for both servo and regulatory problems. To improve servo response of the controller a set point filter is designed such that the closed loop response is similar to that of first order plus time delay system. The proposed controller design method is applied to various transfer function models and to the non-linear model equations of jacketed CSTR to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. The performance of the proposed controller is compared with the recently reported methods in terms of IAE and ITAE. The smooth functioning of the controller is determined in terms of total variation and compared with recently reported methods. Simulation studies are carried out on various integrating systems with time delay to show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed controllers. PMID:27087135

  1. Research on PID controller with input shaping algorithm for linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Yue; Fan, Wenchao; Fu, Zhenxian

    2015-02-01

    The reticle stage of lithography is a high precision servo motion platform, which requires using macro movement of linear motor and micro movement of voice coil motor to realize an nm-level positioning precision and tracking. In order to increase the control effect and response speed of macro movement linear motor of reticle stage of lithography, the paper presents an efficient control for linear motor. The method use input shaping technique with Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controller to realize the high position precision in small stetting time. In the paper we firstly build the linear motor mathematical modeling which is end to velocity loop or position loop. so that we mainly focus on the tracking of speed signal. Then a PID controller is introduced in the system, which is high frequency used in industrial control. Finally, as the need of high positioning precision and small stetting time, we apply input shaping algorithm to solve the problem. The simulation of the system is performed by using MATLAB/Simulation. The evaluation of the method is the performance of input tracking capability.

  2. Evaluating knee replacement mechanics during ADL with PID-controlled dynamic finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Baldwin, Mark A; Clary, Chadd W; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Validated computational knee simulations are valuable tools for design phase development of knee replacement devices. Recently, a dynamic finite element (FE) model of the Kansas knee simulator was kinematically validated during gait and deep flexion cycles. In order to operate the computational simulator in the same manner as the experiment, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was interfaced with the FE model to control the quadriceps actuator excursion and produce a target flexion profile regardless of implant geometry or alignment conditions. The controller was also expanded to operate multiple actuators simultaneously in order to produce in vivo loading conditions at the joint during dynamic activities. Subsequently, the fidelity of the computational model was improved through additional muscle representation and inclusion of relative hip-ankle anterior-posterior (A-P) motion. The PID-controlled model was able to successfully recreate in vivo loading conditions (flexion angle, compressive joint load, medial-lateral load distribution or varus-valgus torque, internal-external torque, A-P force) for deep knee bend, chair rise, stance-phase gait and step-down activities.

  3. Coordinating IMC-PID and adaptive SMC controllers for a PEMFC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Wang, Yong; Shi, Jun-Hai; Shao, Hui-He

    2010-01-01

    For a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) power plant with a methanol reformer, the process parameters and power output are considered simultaneously to avoid violation of the constraints and to keep the fuel cell power plant safe and effective. In this paper, a novel coordinating scheme is proposed by combining an Internal Model Control (IMC) based PID Control and adaptive Sliding Mode Control (SMC). The IMC-PID controller is designed for the reformer of the fuel flow rate according to the expected first-order dynamic properties. The adaptive SMC controller of the fuel cell current has been designed using the constant plus proportional rate reaching law. The parameters of the SMC controller are adaptively tuned according to the response of the fuel flow rate control system. When the power output controller feeds back the current references to these two controllers, the coordinating controllers system works in a system-wide way. The simulation results of the PEMFC power plant demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:19781698

  4. Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) Control of Secreted Factors for Blood Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Julia; Wang, Weijia; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical use of umbilical cord blood has typically been limited by the need to expand hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) ex vivo. This expansion is challenging due to the accumulation of secreted signaling factors in the culture that have a negative regulatory effect on HSPC output. Strategies for global regulation of these factors through dilution have been developed, but do not accommodate the dynamic nature or inherent variability of hematopoietic cell culture. We have developed a mathematical model to simulate the impact of feedback control on in vitro hematopoiesis, and used it to design a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm. This algorithm was implemented with a fed-batch bioreactor to regulate the concentrations of secreted factors. Controlling the concentration of a key target factor, TGF-β1, through dilution limited the negative effect it had on HSPCs, and allowed global control of other similarly-produced inhibitory endogenous factors. The PID control algorithm effectively maintained the target soluble factor at the target concentration. We show that feedback controlled dilution is predicted to be a more cost effective dilution strategy compared to other open-loop strategies, and can enhance HSPC expansion in short term culture. This study demonstrates the utility of secreted factor process control strategies to optimize stem cell culture systems, and motivates the development of multi-analyte protein sensors to automate the manufacturing of cell therapies. PMID:26348930

  5. GA-based PID control of the plate width in hot-plate mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungman; Lee, Dae Y.; Cho, Hyungsuck

    1999-11-01

    In hot plate mills the slabs from incoming reheat furnace are reduced to the desired width and thickness, being rolled out with considerable accuracy. The process of changing the plate width is controlled by a pair of edge rolls, which is called edger. The objectives of this edging process are to meet tight width tolerances of plates and to reduce the yield loss caused by trimming when irregular width is formed at the plate edge. There are several factors that result in complexity and uncertainty in width control. These include inaccurate edger set-up model, degradation of various mill equipment, variation of operation conditions, environments and variation of the dimension of incoming cast slabs. In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based PID control is proposed to ensure the control of the desired width at the exit of the mill. The approach adopted here is essentially optimization of the PID controller gains in order to minimize the error between the desired and actual slab width. Since the design parameters associated with genetic algorithm affect convergence performance, the effects of these parameters are investigated in detail. In addition, the control performance is also evaluated for various process parameters such as initial width of the incoming slab and temperature of the slab. Based on the result obtained from a series of simulations, the proposed control method is found to yield satisfactory performance for various process conditions.

  6. Tuning of IMC based PID controllers for integrating systems with time delay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D B Santosh; Padma Sree, R

    2016-07-01

    Design of Proportional Integral and Derivative (PID) controllers based on IMC principles for various types of integrating systems with time delay is proposed. PID parameters are given in terms of process model parameters and a tuning parameter. The tuning parameter is IMC filter time constant. In the present work, the IMC filter (Q) is chosen in such a manner that the order of the denominator of IMC controller is one less than the order of the numerator. The IMC filter time constant (λ) is tuned in such a way that a good compromise is made between performance and robustness for both servo and regulatory problems. To improve servo response of the controller a set point filter is designed such that the closed loop response is similar to that of first order plus time delay system. The proposed controller design method is applied to various transfer function models and to the non-linear model equations of jacketed CSTR to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. The performance of the proposed controller is compared with the recently reported methods in terms of IAE and ITAE. The smooth functioning of the controller is determined in terms of total variation and compared with recently reported methods. Simulation studies are carried out on various integrating systems with time delay to show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed controllers.

  7. Coordinating IMC-PID and adaptive SMC controllers for a PEMFC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Wang, Yong; Shi, Jun-Hai; Shao, Hui-He

    2010-01-01

    For a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) power plant with a methanol reformer, the process parameters and power output are considered simultaneously to avoid violation of the constraints and to keep the fuel cell power plant safe and effective. In this paper, a novel coordinating scheme is proposed by combining an Internal Model Control (IMC) based PID Control and adaptive Sliding Mode Control (SMC). The IMC-PID controller is designed for the reformer of the fuel flow rate according to the expected first-order dynamic properties. The adaptive SMC controller of the fuel cell current has been designed using the constant plus proportional rate reaching law. The parameters of the SMC controller are adaptively tuned according to the response of the fuel flow rate control system. When the power output controller feeds back the current references to these two controllers, the coordinating controllers system works in a system-wide way. The simulation results of the PEMFC power plant demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Combined Immunodeficiency Associated with DOCK8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Davis, Jeremiah C.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Jing, Huie; Favreau, Amanda J.; Matthews, Helen F.; Davis, Joie; Turner, Maria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.; Su, Helen C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections with elevated serum levels of IgE are features of some variants of combined immunodeficiency. The genetic causes of these variants are unknown. METHODS We collected longitudinal clinical data on 11 patients from eight families who had recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections. We performed comparative genomic hybridization arrays and targeted gene sequencing. Variants with predicted loss-of-expression mutations were confirmed by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase –polymerase-chain-reaction assay and immunoblotting. We evaluated the number and function of lymphocytes with the use of in vitro assays and flow cytometry. RESULTS Patients had recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonias; recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin infections with otitis externa; recurrent, severe herpes simplex virus or herpes zoster infections; extensive and persistent infections with molluscum contagiosum; and human papillomavirus infections. Most patients had severe atopy with anaphylaxis; several had squamous-cell carcinomas, and one had T-cell lymphoma –leukemia. Elevated serum IgE levels, hypereosinophilia, low numbers of T cells and B cells, low serum IgM levels, and variable IgG antibody responses were common. Expansion in vitro of activated CD8 T cells was impaired. Novel homozygous or compound heterozygous deletions and point mutations in the gene encoding the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) led to the absence of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS Autosomal recessive DOCK8 deficiency is associated with a novel variant of combined immunodeficiency. PMID:19776401

  9. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors that potently and specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, D L; Busso, M; Tan, C K; Reusser, F; Palmer, J R; Poppe, S M; Aristoff, P A; Downey, K M; So, A G; Resnick, L

    1991-01-01

    Certain bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) at concentrations lower by 2-4 orders of magnitude than that which inhibits normal cellular DNA polymerase activity. Combination of a BHAP with nucleoside analog HIV-1 RT inhibitors suggested that together these compounds inhibited RT synergistically. In three human lymphocytic cell systems using several laboratory and clinical HIV-1 isolates, the BHAPs blocked HIV-1 replication with potencies nearly identical to those of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine or 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine; in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, concentrations of these antiviral agents were lower by at least 3-4 orders of magnitude than cytotoxic levels. The BHAPs do not inhibit replication of HIV-2, the simian or feline immunodeficiency virus, or Rauscher murine leukemia virus in culture. Evaluation of a BHAP in HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice (severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with human fetal lymph node) showed that the compound could block HIV-1 replication in vivo. The BHAPs are readily obtained synthetically and have been extensively characterized in preclinical evaluations. These compounds hold promise for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:1717988

  10. Common variable immunodeficiency diagnosed during the treatment of bronchial asthma: Unusual cause of wheezing.

    PubMed

    Akaba, Tomohiro; Kondo, Mitsuko; Toriyama, Midori; Kubo, Ayako; Hara, Kaori; Yamada, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Kentaro; Tamaoki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency in adults and children. We herein report a case of CVID, who was misdiagnosed with asthma due to wheezing episodes and relatively late onset. A 51-year-old woman had suffered from recurrent upper and lower airway infection for recent 2 years. She repeated wheezing attacks and was treated as asthma exacerbation triggered by infection. She was referred to our hospital for investigation and treatment. Lung function tests showed no reversibility of FEV1 by β-adrenergic agonist, but the increase of V50/V25. Chest CT showed slight to moderate bronchial wall thickening and bronchiectasis. After that, she suffered from pneumonia with wheezing attacks twice a month, and immunodeficiency was strongly suspected. Her blood tests showed marked decreases of all classes of immunoglobulin and nearly lack of memory B cells, NKT cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. She was diagnosed with CVID, and was treated with replacement of gammaglobulin. Thereafter, her wheezing episodes with infection were remarkably improved. Because the delay of diagnosis with CVID likely causes poor mortality and morbidity, a possibility of CVID should be considered in patients with frequent asthma-like symptoms due to recurrent airway infection. PMID:26744651

  11. Infectious Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype C from an African Isolate: Rhesus Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Ndung'u, Thumbi; Lu, Yichen; Renjifo, Boris; Touzjian, Neal; Kushner, Nicholas; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Novitsky, Vladimir A.; Lee, Tun-Hou; Essex, Max

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C is responsible for more than 56% of all infections in the HIV and AIDS pandemic. It is the predominant subtype in the rapidly expanding epidemic in southern Africa. To develop a relevant model that would facilitate studies of transmission, pathogenesis, and vaccine development for this subtype, we generated SHIVMJ4, a simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) chimera based on HIV-1 subtype C. SHIVMJ4 contains the majority of env, the entire second exon of tat, and a partial sequence of the second exon of rev, all derived from a CCR5-tropic, primary isolate envelope clone from southern Africa. SHIVMJ4 replicated efficiently in human, rhesus, and pig-tailed macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro but not in CEMx174 cells. To assess in vivo infectivity, SHIVMJ4 was intravenously inoculated into four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). All four animals became infected as determined through virus isolation, PCR analysis, and viral loads of 107 to 108 copies of viral RNA per ml of plasma during the primary infection phase. We have established a CCR5-tropic SHIVMJ4/rhesus macaque model that may be useful in the studies of HIV-1 subtype C immunology and biology and may also facilitate the evaluation of vaccines to control the spread of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa and elsewhere. PMID:11689623

  12. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  13. Testicular dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed

    Poretsky, L; Can, S; Zumoff, B

    1995-07-01

    This review pertains to gonadal function in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, who often exhibit clinical and biochemical evidence of hypogonadism. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism appears to be the most commonly encountered abnormality, although complete anterior pituitary insufficiency and primary gonadal failure have been reported. Levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) are either unchanged or increased. Plasma levels of estrogens, progesterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and prolactin vary. Pathologically, except for involvement by opportunistic infections, no significant abnormality in the hypothalamic-pituitary area has been described, but evidence of orchitis is commonly present. The cause(s) of these abnormalities remains unclear. The possible factors leading to hypogonadism in HIV-infected men include HIV infection itself, opportunistic infections, chronic debilitating illness, and effects of cytokines on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further studies are needed to clarify the cause(s) of testicular dysfunction in HIV-infected men and its clinical significance, treatment, relevance to the progression of HIV infection, and influence on the immune system.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  15. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  16. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 536: Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and women of color.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, most new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur among women of color (primarily African American and Hispanic women). Most women of color acquire the disease from heterosexual contact, often from a partner who has undisclosed risk factors for HIV infection. Safe sex practices, especially consistent condom use, must be emphasized for all women, including women of color. A combination of testing, education, and brief behavioral interventions can help reduce the rate of HIV infection and its complications among women of color. In addition,biomedical interventions such as early treatment of patients infected with HIV and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis of high-risk individuals offer promise for future reductions in infections.

  17. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation.

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1989-01-01

    AIDS is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defined by a severe depletion of T cells and over 20 conventional degenerative and neoplastic diseases. In the U.S. and Europe, AIDS correlates to 95% with risk factors, such as about 8 years of promiscuous male homosexuality, intravenous drug use, or hemophilia. Since AIDS also correlates with antibody to a retrovirus, confirmed in about 40% of American cases, it has been hypothesized that this virus causes AIDS by killing T cells. Consequently, the virus was termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and antibody to HIV became part of the definition of AIDS. The hypothesis that HIV causes AIDS is examined in terms of Koch's postulates and epidemiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary conditions of viral pathology. HIV does not fulfill Koch's postulates: (i) free virus is not detectable in most cases of AIDS; (ii) virus can only be isolated by reactivating virus in vitro from a few latently infected lymphocytes among millions of uninfected ones; (iii) pure HIV does not cause AIDS upon experimental infection of chimpanzees or accidental infection of healthy humans. Further, HIV violates classical conditions of viral pathology. (i) Epidemiological surveys indicate that the annual incidence of AIDS among antibody-positive persons varies from nearly 0 to over 10%, depending critically on nonviral risk factors. (ii) HIV is expressed in less than or equal to 1 of every 10(4) T cells it supposedly kills in AIDS, whereas about 5% of all T cells are regenerated during the 2 days it takes the virus to infect a cell. (iii) If HIV were the cause of AIDS, it would be the first virus to cause a disease only after the onset of antiviral immunity, as detected by a positive "AIDS test." (iv) AIDS follows the onset of antiviral immunity only after long and unpredictable asymptomatic intervals averaging 8 years, although HIV replicates within 1 to 2 days and induces immunity within 1 to 2 months. (v) HIV supposedly causes AIDS

  19. Testing women for human immunodeficiency virus infection: who, when, and how?

    PubMed

    Clark, Jill; Lampe, Margaret A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2008-09-01

    Obstetrician-gynecologists provide comprehensive primary and preventive care for women and are ideally suited to provide human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening for their patients. This paper provides a summary and rationale for the current recommendations for HIV testing among women in the United States, emphasizing recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists [corrected] Who should receive HIV testing, when and how often testing should be conducted, and how testing should be offered are discussed. These recommendations are described separately for general populations (including nonpregnant women) and for pregnant women and their infants.

  20. Two-degree-of-freedom fractional order-PID controllers design for fractional order processes with dead-time.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjie; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jinggang

    2016-03-01

    Recently, fractional order (FO) processes with dead-time have attracted more and more attention of many researchers in control field, but FO-PID controllers design techniques available for the FO processes with dead-time suffer from lack of direct systematic approaches. In this paper, a simple design and parameters tuning approach of two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) FO-PID controller based on internal model control (IMC) is proposed for FO processes with dead-time, conventional one-degree-of-freedom control exhibited the shortcoming of coupling of robustness and dynamic response performance. 2-DOF control can overcome the above weakness which means it realizes decoupling of robustness and dynamic performance from each other. The adjustable parameter η2 of FO-PID controller is directly related to the robustness of closed-loop system, and the analytical expression is given between the maximum sensitivity specification Ms and parameters η2. In addition, according to the dynamic performance requirement of the practical system, the parameters η1 can also be selected easily. By approximating the dead-time term of the process model with the first-order Padé or Taylor series, the expressions for 2-DOF FO-PID controller parameters are derived for three classes of FO processes with dead-time. Moreover, compared with other methods, the proposed method is simple and easy to implement. Finally, the simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  1. Optimal Self-Tuning PID Controller Based on Low Power Consumption for a Server Fan Cooling System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chengming; Chen, Rongshun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, saving the cooling power in servers by controlling the fan speed has attracted considerable attention because of the increasing demand for high-density servers. This paper presents an optimal self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, combining a PID neural network (PIDNN) with fan-power-based optimization in the transient-state temperature response in the time domain, for a server fan cooling system. Because the thermal model of the cooling system is nonlinear and complex, a server mockup system simulating a 1U rack server was constructed and a fan power model was created using a third-order nonlinear curve fit to determine the cooling power consumption by the fan speed control. PIDNN with a time domain criterion is used to tune all online and optimized PID gains. The proposed controller was validated through experiments of step response when the server operated from the low to high power state. The results show that up to 14% of a server’s fan cooling power can be saved if the fan control permits a slight temperature response overshoot in the electronic components, which may provide a time-saving strategy for tuning the PID controller to control the server fan speed during low fan power consumption. PMID:26007725

  2. Optimal Self-Tuning PID Controller Based on Low Power Consumption for a Server Fan Cooling System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chengming; Chen, Rongshun

    2015-05-20

    Recently, saving the cooling power in servers by controlling the fan speed has attracted considerable attention because of the increasing demand for high-density servers. This paper presents an optimal self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, combining a PID neural network (PIDNN) with fan-power-based optimization in the transient-state temperature response in the time domain, for a server fan cooling system. Because the thermal model of the cooling system is nonlinear and complex, a server mockup system simulating a 1U rack server was constructed and a fan power model was created using a third-order nonlinear curve fit to determine the cooling power consumption by the fan speed control. PIDNN with a time domain criterion is used to tune all online and optimized PID gains. The proposed controller was validated through experiments of step response when the server operated from the low to high power state. The results show that up to 14% of a server's fan cooling power can be saved if the fan control permits a slight temperature response overshoot in the electronic components, which may provide a time-saving strategy for tuning the PID controller to control the server fan speed during low fan power consumption.

  3. Four families with immunodeficiency and chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Candy, D C; Hayward, A R; Hughes, D T; Layward, L; Soothill, J F

    1979-01-01

    Six children, with severe deficiency of some or all of the immunoglobulins and minor somatic abnormalities, had chromosomal abnormalities: (1) 45,XY,t(13q/18q), (2) 46,XY,21ps +, (3) two brothers 46,XY (inv. 7) (4) 45,X,t(11p/10p)/46X,iXq,t(11p/10p) and, (5) in addendum, 45,XX,-18;46,XX, r18. The chromosome abnormalities were detected in B- as well as T-lymphocytes (as evidenced by using both PHA- and PWM-stimulated cultures) in all probands, but one was mosaic in PHA culture, although all his PWM-stimulated cells were abnormal. Chromosomal variants were also detected in relatives of three and immunodeficiency in relatives of two. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:314782

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Warrier, S Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection.

  5. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  7. Concept for Future Data Services at the Long-Term Archive of WDCC combining DOIs with common PIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhause, Martina; Weigel, Tobias; Toussaint, Frank; Höck, Heinke; Thiemann, Hannes; Lautenschlager, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The World Data Center for Climate (WDCC) hosted at the German Climate Computing Center (DKRZ) maintains a long-term archive (LTA) of climate model data as well as observational data. WDCC distinguishes between two types of LTA data: Structured data: Data output of an instrument or of a climate model run consists of numerous, highly structured individual datasets in a uniform format. Part of these data is also published on an ESGF (Earth System Grid Federation) data node. Detailed metadata is available allowing for fine-grained user-defined data access. Unstructured data: LTA data of finished scientific projects are in general unstructured and consist of datasets of different formats, different sizes, and different contents. For these data compact metadata is available as content information. The structured data is suitable for WDCC's DataCite DOI process, the project data only in exceptional cases. The DOI process includes a thorough quality control process of technical as well as scientific aspects by the publication agent and the data creator. DOIs are assigned to data collections appropriate to be cited in scientific publications, like a simulation run. The data collection is defined in agreement with the data creator. At the moment there is no possibility to identify and cite individual datasets within this DOI data collection analogous to the citation of chapters in a book. Also missing is a compact citation regulation for a user-specified collection of data. WDCC therefore complements its existing LTA/DOI concept by Persistent Identifier (PID) assignment to datasets using Handles. In addition to data identification for internal and external use, the concept of PIDs allows to define relations among PIDs. Such structural information is stored as key-value pair directly in the handles. Thus, relations provide basic provenance or lineage information, even if part of the data like intermediate results are lost. WDCC intends to use additional PIDs on metadata

  8. New genetic discoveries and primary immune deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2014-04-01

    The field of immunology has undergone recent discoveries of genetic causes for many primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). The ever-expanding knowledge has led to increased understanding behind the pathophysiology of these diseases. Since these diseases are rare, the patients are frequently misdiagnosed early in the presentation of their illnesses. The identification of new genes has increased our opportunities for recognizing and making the diagnosis in patients with PIDD before they succumb to infections that may result secondary to their PIDD. Some mutations lead to a variety of presentations of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The myriad and ever-growing genetic mutations which lead to SCID phenotypes have been identified in recent years. Other mutations associated with some genetic syndromes have associated immunodeficiency and are important for making the diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency in patients with some syndromes, who may otherwise be missed within the larger context of their syndromes. A variety of mutations also lead to increased susceptibility to infections due to particular organisms. These patterns of infections due to specific organisms are important keys in properly identifying the part of the immune system which is affected in these patients. This review will discuss recent genetic discoveries that enhance our understanding of these complex diseases.

  9. Accelerated Loss of TCR Repertoire Diversity in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Gabriel K.; Millar, David; Penny, Sarah; Heather, James M.; Mistry, Punam; Buettner, Nico; Bryon, Jane; Huissoon, Aarnoud P.

    2016-01-01

    Although common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has long been considered as a group of primary Ab deficiencies, growing experimental data now suggest a global disruption of the entire adaptive immune response in a segment of patients. Oligoclonality of the TCR repertoire was previously demonstrated; however, the manner in which it relates to other B cell and T cell findings reported in CVID remains unclear. Using a combination approach of high-throughput TCRβ sequencing and multiparametric flow cytometry, we compared the TCR repertoire diversity between various subgroups of CVID patients according to their B cell immunophenotypes. Our data suggest that the reduction in repertoire diversity is predominantly restricted to those patients with severely reduced class-switched memory B cells and an elevated level of CD21lo B cells (Freiburg 1a), and may be driven by a reduced number of naive T cells unmasking underlying memory clonality. Moreover, our data indicate that this loss in repertoire diversity progresses with advancing age far exceeding the expected physiological rate. Radiological evidence supports the loss in thymic volume, correlating with the decrease in repertoire diversity. Evidence now suggests that primary thymic failure along with other well-described B cell abnormalities play an important role in the pathophysiology in Freiburg group 1a patients. Clinically, our findings emphasize the integration of combined B and T cell testing to identify those patients at the greatest risk for infection. Future work should focus on investigating the link between thymic failure and the severe reduction in class-switched memory B cells, while gathering longitudinal laboratory data to examine the progressive nature of the disease. PMID:27481850

  10. Non-Contact Linear Actuator Position Sensor Having a PID-Compensating Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A position sensor or controller generates a response signal in existing armature windings of an actuator and detects the response signal to determine the position of the armature. To generate the response signal, the actuator includes a sensor excitation winding near the armature. Two sensor excitation windings can be provided, above and below the armature, to cancel out z components and thus allow for a variable gap. The sensor excitation winding or windings are supplied with an excitation signal to induce the response signal in the armature windings. The response signal is derived by differentially amplifying and frequency filtering a raw output of the armature windings. The response signal is demodulated to determine position. If a position controller rather than a mere sensor is desired, the position signal can be buffered, PID compensated, amplified, and fed back to the armature windings.

  11. Multiobjective optimization design of a fractional order PID controller for a gun control system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Chen, Jilin; Wang, Li; Xu, Shiqing; Hou, Yuanlong

    2013-01-01

    Motion control of gun barrels is an ongoing topic for the development of gun control equipments possessing excellent performances. In this paper, a typical fractional order PID control strategy is employed for the gun control system. To obtain optimal parameters of the controller, a multiobjective optimization scheme is developed from the loop-shaping perspective. To solve the specified nonlinear optimization problem, a novel Pareto optimal solution based multiobjective differential evolution algorithm is proposed. To enhance the convergent rate of the optimization process, an opposition based learning method is embedded in the chaotic population initialization process. To enhance the robustness of the algorithm for different problems, an adapting scheme of the mutation operation is further employed. With assistance of the evolutionary algorithm, the optimal solution for the specified problem is selected. The numerical simulation results show that the control system can rapidly follow the demand signal with high accuracy and high robustness, demonstrating the efficiency of the proposed controller parameter tuning method.

  12. PID-Type Fuzzy Control for Anti-Lock Brake Systems with Parameter Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Keng; Shih, Ming-Chang

    In this research, a platform is built to accomplish a series of experiments to control the Antilock Brake System (ABS). A commercial ABS module controlled by a controller is installed and tested on the platform. The vehicle and tire models are deduced and simulated by a personal computer for real time control. An adaptive PID-type fuzzy control scheme is used. Two on-off conversion methods: pulse width modulation (PWM) and conditional on-off, are used to control the solenoid valves in the ABS module. With the pressure signal feedbacks in the caliper, vehicle dynamics and wheel speeds are computed during braking. Road surface conditions, vehicle weight and control schemes are varied in the experiments to study braking properties.

  13. IMC-PID design based on model matching approach and closed-loop shaping.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qi B; Liu, Q

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by the limitations of the conventional internal model control (IMC), this communication addresses the design of IMC-based PID in terms of the robust performance of the control system. The IMC controller form is obtained by solving an H-infinity problem based on the model matching approach, and the parameters are determined by closed-loop shaping. The shaping of the closed-loop transfer function is considered both for the set-point tracking and for the load disturbance rejection. The design procedure is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem which is solved by a specific optimization algorithm. A nice feature of this design method is that it permits a clear tradeoff between robustness and performance. Simulation examples show that the proposed method is effective and has a wide applicability.

  14. System-wide hybrid MPC-PID control of a continuous pharmaceutical tablet manufacturing process via direct compaction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravendra; Ierapetritou, Marianthi; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2013-11-01

    The next generation of QbD based pharmaceutical products will be manufactured through continuous processing. This will allow the integration of online/inline monitoring tools, coupled with an efficient advanced model-based feedback control systems, to achieve precise control of process variables, so that the predefined product quality can be achieved consistently. The direct compaction process considered in this study is highly interactive and involves time delays for a number of process variables due to sensor placements, process equipment dimensions, and the flow characteristics of the solid material. A simple feedback regulatory control system (e.g., PI(D)) by itself may not be sufficient to achieve the tight process control that is mandated by regulatory authorities. The process presented herein comprises of coupled dynamics involving slow and fast responses, indicating the requirement of a hybrid control scheme such as a combined MPC-PID control scheme. In this manuscript, an efficient system-wide hybrid control strategy for an integrated continuous pharmaceutical tablet manufacturing process via direct compaction has been designed. The designed control system is a hybrid scheme of MPC-PID control. An effective controller parameter tuning strategy involving an ITAE method coupled with an optimization strategy has been used for tuning of both MPC and PID parameters. The designed hybrid control system has been implemented in a first-principles model-based flowsheet that was simulated in gPROMS (Process System Enterprise). Results demonstrate enhanced performance of critical quality attributes (CQAs) under the hybrid control scheme compared to only PID or MPC control schemes, illustrating the potential of a hybrid control scheme in improving pharmaceutical manufacturing operations.

  15. Neuromuscular complications of human immunodeficiency virus infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R G

    1994-01-01

    At least 4 distinct peripheral neuropathy syndromes occur in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The most common, painful sensory neuropathy, may be related to the viral infection or may be medication induced and is treated symptomatically. The other 3, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex (some patients), and the progressive polyradiculopathies related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may all respond to appropriate therapy. Both inflammatory myopathy and zidovudine myopathy also abate with early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:8048229

  16. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) presenting with malabsorption due to giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Onbaşi, Kevser; Günşar, Fulya; Sin, Aytül Z; Ardeniz, Omür; Kokuludağ, Ali; Sebik, Filiz

    2005-06-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is characterized with B-cell and T-cell dysfunction and hypogammaglobulinemia. Recurrent bacterial infections, such as otitis media, chronic sinusitis and recurrent pneumonia due to diminished immunoglobulin (Ig) levels and impaired antibody production are frequently observed in common variable immunodeficiency. Almost half of the patients with common variable immunodeficiency have problems related to the gastrointestinal system. A 39-year-old woman was referred to our department with the complaint of chronic diarrhea. She had experienced diarrhea without mucus or blood in the last year and had lost 30 kg. In her medical history, she had suffered from recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections like sinusitis, otitis media and pneumonia since childhood. Serum immunoglobulin levels were low. There were no parasites or ova in her stool examinations. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy detected widespread macroscopic nodular appearance on duodenum, and biopsies from the duodenum revealed giardiasis invading the tissue. She was diagnosed as common variable immunodeficiency. After metronidazole therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin infusion was started, her diarrhea attacks ceased and she regained her normal weight. Common gastrointestinal system problems in patients with common variable immunodeficiency are lactose intolerance, lymphoid hyperplasia/diffuse lymphoid infiltration, loss of villi and infection, especially with Giardia lamblia. Giardiasis may lead to severe mucosal flattening and sometimes to lymphoid hyperplasia at the lamina propria of the duodenum. Medical history should be evaluated carefully regarding recurrent respiratory infections. In such cases with chronic diarrhea, common variable immunodeficiency should be kept in mind as a possible cause. PMID:16252205

  17. Diagnostic Criteria and Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Carrie E; Sanchez, Matthew J; LaBelle, James L

    2015-07-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders (SCID) are a group of primary immunodeficiencies resulting from any one of a diverse group of mutations impacting T-cell development. SCID is diagnosed and classified through assessment of the lymphocyte subset(s) affected and by the mechanisms responsible for the primary immune defect. Regardless of the genetics involved, patients invariably succumb to an early death without medical intervention. In the past, patients were primarily identified either by previous family history, physical manifestations, or after the onset of symptoms. However, the introduction of newborn screening for SCID has allowed the pediatrician to identify these patients at a much earlier age, greatly improving their survival. Currently, 23 states include SCID testing for T-cell deficiencies in their newborn screening platform. Protocols for confirmatory testing and medical intervention after a positive screen vary slightly from state-to-state. However, the standard curative treatment remains stem cell transplantation, although depending on the genetic cause of the disease, enzyme replacement and gene therapy may also be considered.

  18. Genes associated with common variable immunodeficiency: one diagnosis to rule them all?

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Delfien J A; Dullaers, Melissa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Vermaelen, Karim Y; De Baere, Elfride; Haerynck, Filomeen

    2016-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary antibody deficiency characterised by hypogammaglobulinaemia, impaired production of specific antibodies after immunisation and increased susceptibility to infections. CVID shows a considerable phenotypical and genetic heterogeneity. In contrast to many other primary immunodeficiencies, monogenic forms count for only 2-10% of patients with CVID. Genes that have been implicated in monogenic CVID include ICOS, TNFRSF13B (TACI), TNFRSF13C (BAFF-R), TNFSF12 (TWEAK), CD19, CD81, CR2 (CD21), MS4A1 (CD20), TNFRSF7 (CD27), IL21, IL21R, LRBA, CTLA4, PRKCD, PLCG2, NFKB1, NFKB2, PIK3CD, PIK3R1, VAV1, RAC2, BLK, IKZF1 (IKAROS) and IRF2BP2 With the increasing number of disease genes identified in CVID, it has become clear that CVID is an umbrella diagnosis and that many of these genetic defects cause distinct disease entities. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence that at least a subgroup of patients with CVID has a complex rather than a monogenic inheritance. This review aims to discuss current knowledge regarding the molecular genetic basis of CVID with an emphasis on the relationship with the clinical and immunological phenotype. PMID:27250108

  19. Diagnostic Criteria and Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Carrie E; Sanchez, Matthew J; LaBelle, James L

    2015-07-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders (SCID) are a group of primary immunodeficiencies resulting from any one of a diverse group of mutations impacting T-cell development. SCID is diagnosed and classified through assessment of the lymphocyte subset(s) affected and by the mechanisms responsible for the primary immune defect. Regardless of the genetics involved, patients invariably succumb to an early death without medical intervention. In the past, patients were primarily identified either by previous family history, physical manifestations, or after the onset of symptoms. However, the introduction of newborn screening for SCID has allowed the pediatrician to identify these patients at a much earlier age, greatly improving their survival. Currently, 23 states include SCID testing for T-cell deficiencies in their newborn screening platform. Protocols for confirmatory testing and medical intervention after a positive screen vary slightly from state-to-state. However, the standard curative treatment remains stem cell transplantation, although depending on the genetic cause of the disease, enzyme replacement and gene therapy may also be considered. PMID:26171708

  20. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8+ T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127−CD28−CD57+ phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21− CD11c+ phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias. PMID:25414442

  1. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future. PMID:27262745

  2. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  3. Inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Fesen, M R; Kohn, K W; Leteurtre, F; Pommier, Y

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to further extend the number of targets for development of antiretroviral agents, we have used an in vitro integrase assay to investigate a variety of chemicals, including topoisomerase inhibitors, antimalarial agents, DNA binders, naphthoquinones, the flavone quercetin, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester as potential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors. Our results show that although several topoisomerase inhibitors--including doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, ellipticines, and quercetin--are potent integrase inhibitors, other topoisomerase inhibitors--such as amsacrine, etoposide, teniposide, and camptothecin--are inactive. Other intercalators, such as chloroquine and the bifunctional intercalator ditercalinium, are also active. However, DNA binding does not correlate closely with integrase inhibition. The intercalator 9-aminoacridine and the polyamine DNA minor-groove binders spermine, spermidine, and distamycin have no effect, whereas the non-DNA binders primaquine, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibit the integrase. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester was the only compound that inhibited the integration step to a substantially greater degree than the initial cleavage step of the enzyme. A model of 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone interaction with the zinc finger region of the retroviral integrase protein is proposed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8460151

  4. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  5. Immunodeficiency and laser magnetic therapy in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maati, Moufagued; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Avdoshin, V. P.

    1996-11-01

    The importance of immunodeficiency problem has increased last time not only due to AIDS appearance, but also to a great extent as a result of the development and active practical use of the methods of immunology parameters investigations. Al great pharmaceutical firms are organizing the process of creating the drugs, influencing on the different phases of immunity, but unfortunately, the problem of their adverse effect and connected complications is till today a milestone. A great number of investigations, proving a good effect of laser-magnetic therapy concerning immune system have been done today. There is, in particular, changing of blood counts and immunologic tests after intravenous laser irradiation of blood. Intravenous laser irradiation of blood results in increasing of lymphocytes, T-immuno stimulation, stabilization of t-lymphocyte subpopulation, increasing of t-lymphocyte helper activity and decreasing of suppressor one.Under this laser action number of circulating immune complexes is decreased, and blood serum bactericide activity and lisozyme number are increased.

  6. Goldenhar syndrome: a cause of secondary immunodeficiency?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome (GS) results from an aberrant development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. There is a wide range of clinical manifestations, the most common being microtia, hemifacial microsomia, epibulbar dermoids and vertebral malformations. We present two cases of GS and secondary immunodeficiency due to anatomical defects characteristic of this disorder. Case 1 (3-year-old female) averaged 6 episodes of sinusitis and otitis media per year. Case 2 (7-year-old female) also had recurrent otitis media, an episode of bacterial pneumonia, and 2 episodes of bacterial meningitis. Their immune evaluation included a complete blood count with differential, serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody concentrations, lymphocyte phenotyping, and mitogen and antigen responses, the results of which were all within normal ranges. Both children demonstrated major structural abnormalities of the inner and middle ear structures, retention of fluid in mastoid air cells, and chronic sinusitis by computed tomography. These two cases illustrate how a genetically-associated deviation of the middle ear cleft can cause recurrent infections and chronic inflammation of the middle ear and adjacent sinuses, even meninges, leading to a greatly reduced quality of life for the child and parents. PMID:22747588

  7. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Burkala, Evan; Poss, Mary

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the predicted biochemical properties of Gag proteins from a diverse group of feline immunodeficiency viruses (FIV) to determine how different evolutionary histories of virus and host have changed or constrained these important structural proteins. Our data are based on FIV sequences derived from domestic cat (FIVfca), cougar (FIVpco), and lions (FIVple). Analyses consisted of determining the selective forces acting at each position in the protein and the comparing predictions for secondary structure, charge, hydrophobicity and flexibility for matrix, capsid and nucleocapsid, and the C-terminal peptide, which comprise the Gag proteins. We demonstrate that differences among the FIV Gag proteins have largely arisen by neutral evolution, although many neutrally evolving regions have maintained biochemical features. Regions with predicted differences in biochemical features appear to involve intramolecular interactions and structural elements that undergo conformational changes during particle maturation. In contrast, the majority of sites involved in intermolecular contacts on the protein surface are constrained by purifying selection. There is also conservation of sites that interact with host proteins associated with cellular trafficking and particle budding. NC is the only protein with evidence of positive selection, two of which occur in the N-terminal region responsible for RNA binding and interaction with host proteins.

  8. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-01

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors. PMID:7638144

  9. Primary pleuro-pulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Unmil B; Joshi, S; Ghorpade, S V; Gaikwad, S N; Sundrani, R M

    2010-01-01

    Primary pleuro-pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare tumour and poses adiagnostic challenge particularly when unusual histological features are present. We report a case of a 30-year-old immunocompromised human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sero-positive male who was referred to us with complaints of cough, breathlessness and left-sided chestpain for the past two months. The PPSS can be confirmed on tru-cut biopsy. PMID:20949738

  10. Profil épidémiologique des uvéites: à propos de 105 cas

    PubMed Central

    Souley, Abdoul Salam Youssoufou; Abdellah, Hamed Ould Mohamed; Khmamouche, Mehdi; Naji, Alwan Alsubari; Elasri, El Ouatassi Narjis Fouad; Reda, Karim; Oubaaz, Abdelbarre

    2016-01-01

    La difficulté du diagnostic des uvéites réside dans la multiplicité des étiologies. La détermination des facteurs épidémiologiques des uvéites permettent une meilleure orientation diagnostique et facilitent leur prise en charge thérapeutique. C'une étude rétrospective s’étalant sur 4 ans de janvier 2012 à décembre 2015. Nous avons colligé 105 dossiers d'uvéite et étudié les aspects épidémiologiques, cliniques et étiologiques. L’âge moyen était de 42 ans, la tranche d’âge la plus touchée était de 40-50ans. Les hommes étaient plus atteints (57,14%) que les femmes (42,86%). L'uvéite était unilatérale dans 60,95% des cas. Nous avons noté une uvéite antérieure dans 35,24%, une uvéite intermédiaire dans 5,71%, une uvéite postérieure dans 10,48% et une panuvéite dans 48,57%. Les étiologies étaient dominées par la maladie de Behçet, la sarcoïdose, et la maladie de Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada. L'origine restait indéterminée dans 43,81% des cas. L’évolution était variable. Les uvéites sont des inflammations intraoculaires qui peuvent représenter une réelle menace pour la vision. La démarche permettant de découvrir la cause doit être codifiée et repose sur plusieurs étapes. Nos résultats sont relativement proches de ceux de la littérature. Les uvéites constituent une entité clinique où ophtalmologie et médecine interne se rejoignent. Le champ des causes et des investigations permettant le diagnostic est vaste voire illimité. Cette étude a permis de mettre en évidence les difficultés cliniques et de souligner les limites de notre formation sanitaire dans la prise en charge des uvéites. PMID:27642436

  11. Potential Induced Degradation (PID) of Pre-Stressed Photovoltaic Modules: Effect of Glass Surface Conductivity Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatapudi, Sai Ravi Vasista

    Potential induced degradation (PID) due to high system voltages is one of the major degradation mechanisms in photovoltaic (PV) modules, adversely affecting their performance due to the combined effects of the following factors: system voltage, superstrate/glass surface conductivity, encapsulant conductivity, silicon nitride anti-reflection coating property and interface property (glass/encapsulant; encapsulant/cell; encapsulant/backsheet). Previous studies carried out at ASU's Photovoltaic Reliability Laboratory (ASU-PRL) showed that only negative voltage bias (positive grounded systems) adversely affects the performance of commonly available crystalline silicon modules. In previous studies, the surface conductivity of the glass surface was obtained using either conductive carbon layer extending from the glass surface to the frame or humidity inside an environmental chamber. This thesis investigates the influence of glass surface conductivity disruption on PV modules. In this study, conductive carbon was applied only on the module’s glass surface without extending to the frame and the surface conductivity was disrupted (no carbon layer) at 2cm distance from the periphery of frame inner edges. This study was carried out under dry heat at two different temperatures (60°C and 85°C) and three different negative bias voltages (-300V, -400V, and -600V). To replicate closeness to the field conditions, half of the selected modules were pre-stressed under damp heat for 1000 hours (DH 1000) and the remaining half under 200 hours of thermal cycling (TC 200). When the surface continuity was disrupted by maintaining a 2 cm gap from the frame to the edge of the conductive layer, as demonstrated in this study, the degradation was found to be absent or negligibly small even after 35 hours of negative bias at elevated temperatures. This preliminary study appears to indicate that the modules could become immune to PID losses if the continuity of the glass surface conductivity

  12. Common variable immunodeficiency with coexisting central nervous system sarcoidosis: case report and literature review with implications for diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dziadzio, Magdalena; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Kidd, Desmond; Chee, Ronnie

    2011-11-30

    We describe a patient with a history of longstanding primary generalised epilepsy, on anticonvulsant therapy, who presented with fever, headache, worsening seizures and hallucinations. Among various investigations, the patient had high CSF protein and ACE levels, leptomeningeal nodular enhancement on MRI brain and non-caseating granulomas in the brain and meninges on the biopsy. The patient was diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis. Subsequently, he was found to be panhypogammaglobulinaemic and was diagnosed with probable common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). The coexistence of common variable immunodeficiency and neurosarcoidosis is rare. Typically, non-caseating granulomas in CVID patients are localised in the lymphatic tissue and solid organs. To our knowledge, there are only five reports of the granulomas of the central nervous system (CNS) in CVID. We discuss the diagnostic difficulties in this case and review the literature. PMID:22611619

  13. Feedback control system based on a remote operated PID controller implemented using mbed NXP LPC1768 development board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, Emil; Zamfir, Florin; Paraschiv, Nicolae

    2015-11-01

    Process control is a challenging research topic for both academia and industry for a long time. Controllers evolved from the classical SISO approach to modern fuzzy or neuro-fuzzy embedded devices with networking capabilities, however PID algorithms are still used in the most industrial control loops. In this paper, we focus on the implementation of a PID controller using mbed NXP LPC1768 development board. This board integrates a powerful ARM Cortex- M3 core and has networking capabilities. The implemented controller can be remotely operated by using an Internet connection and a standard Web browser. The main advantages of the proposed embedded system are customizability, easy operation and very low power consumption. The experimental results obtained by using a simulated process are analysed and shows that the implementation can be done with success in industrial applications.

  14. Robust nonlinear PID-like fuzzy logic control of a planar parallel (2PRP-PPR) manipulator.

    PubMed

    Londhe, P S; Singh, Yogesh; Santhakumar, M; Patre, B M; Waghmare, L M

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a robust nonlinear proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-like fuzzy control scheme is presented and applied to complex trajectory tracking control of a 2PRP-PPR (P-prismatic, R-revolute) planar parallel manipulator (motion platform) with three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) in the presence of parameter uncertainties and external disturbances. The proposed control law consists of mainly two parts: first part uses a feed forward term to enhance the control activity and estimated perturbed term to compensate for the unknown effects namely external disturbances and unmodeled dynamics, and the second part uses a PID-like fuzzy logic control as a feedback portion to enhance the overall closed-loop stability of the system. Experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:27012441

  15. Synthesis of a PID-controller of a trim robust control system of an autonomous underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozhaev, I. V.; Gayvoronskiy, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are often used for performing scientific, emergency or other types of missions under harsh conditions and environments, which can have non-stable, variable parameters. So, the problem of developing autonomous underwater vehicle motion control systems, capable of operating properly in random environments, is highly relevant. The paper is dedicated to the synthesis of a PID-controller of a trim robust control system, capable of keeping an underwater vehicle stable during a translation at different angles of attack. In order to synthesize the PID-controller, two problems were solved: a new method of synthesizing a robust controller was developed and a mathematical model of an underwater vehicle motion process was derived. The newly developed mathematical model structure is simpler than others due to acceptance of some of the system parameters as interval ones. The synthesis method is based on a system poles allocation approach and allows providing the necessary transient process quality in a considered system.

  16. Use of PID and Iterative Learning Controls on Improving Intra-Oral Hydraulic Loading System of Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Cheng; Chan, Manuel; Hsin, Yi-Ping; Ko, Ching-Chang

    This study presents the control design and tests of an intra-oral hydraulic system for quantitatively loading of a dental implant. The computer-controlled system was developed and employed for better pressure error compensation by PID (proportional-integral-derivative) control and point-to-point iterative learning algorithm. In vitro experiments showed that implant loading is precisely controlled (error 3%) for 0.5Hz loading without air inclusion, and reasonably performed (error<10%) with air inclusion up to 20% of the total hydraulic volume. The PID controller maintains forces at the desired level while the learning controller eliminates overshoot/undershoot at the onset of each loading cycle. The system can be potentially used for in vivo animal studies for better understanding of how bone responds to implant loading. Quantitative information derived from this biomechanical model will add to improved designs of dental implants.

  17. Design of a Multiloop One-Spot Tuning PID Controller and Its Application for a Crude Distillation Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Toru

    In petroleum refineries and petrochemical processes, the production cost reduction is a key matter in improving competitiveness. Previously, the authors proposed the cyclic one-spot tuning PID control scheme for single-input and single-output systems, and applied it to the atmospheric distillation tower. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme has been verified in steady operation mode. However, satisfactory performance could not be obtained when the operation mode was switched to transition operation mode. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to consider the influence of the interactions upon each input and each output. This paper presents a new multiloop one-spot tuning PID control scheme with a static pre-compensator. According to the newly proposed control scheme, satisfactory control performance can be obtained in both the steady and the transition operation modes.

  18. Robust nonlinear PID-like fuzzy logic control of a planar parallel (2PRP-PPR) manipulator.

    PubMed

    Londhe, P S; Singh, Yogesh; Santhakumar, M; Patre, B M; Waghmare, L M

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a robust nonlinear proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-like fuzzy control scheme is presented and applied to complex trajectory tracking control of a 2PRP-PPR (P-prismatic, R-revolute) planar parallel manipulator (motion platform) with three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) in the presence of parameter uncertainties and external disturbances. The proposed control law consists of mainly two parts: first part uses a feed forward term to enhance the control activity and estimated perturbed term to compensate for the unknown effects namely external disturbances and unmodeled dynamics, and the second part uses a PID-like fuzzy logic control as a feedback portion to enhance the overall closed-loop stability of the system. Experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  19. The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) for efficient target analysis and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Meik; Liang, Chunguang; Nilla, Santosh; Cecil, Alexander; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) has been designed to provide fast, tailored information on drugs and their protein networks including indications, protein targets and side-targets. Starting queries include compound, target and protein interactions and organism-specific protein families. Furthermore, drug name, chemical structures and their SMILES notation, affected proteins (potential drug targets), organisms as well as diseases can be queried including various combinations and refinement of searches. Drugs and protein interactions are analyzed in detail with reference to protein structures and catalytic domains, related compound structures as well as potential targets in other organisms. DrumPID considers drug functionality, compound similarity, target structure, interactome analysis and organismic range for a compound, useful for drug development, predicting drug side-effects and structure–activity relationships. Database URL: http://drumpid.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de PMID:27055828

  20. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  1. The severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis: deficits in cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Cook, Jennifer E; Tyor, William R

    2004-04-01

    The severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis exhibits many of the histopathological and pathophysiological features of human HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Although deficits that may resemble HAD in humans have been reported for HIV-infected SCID mice, the cognitive deficit aspect of the model has very limited empirical support. Here, the authors report that HIV-infected SCID mice display cognitive deficits on a task requiring the animal to learn and remember the spatial relationship of cues in its environment in order to locate a submerged platform in a Morris water maze. The cognitive deficits manifest as longer latencies to locate the platform on the last day of the maze acquisition period and during a retention test 8 days later. Control experiments indicated that the poor performance by HIV-infected mice in comparison to controls was not due to impaired motor function or swimming ability, impaired visual acuity, or increased susceptibility to fatigue. Thus, the increased times required for HIV-infected mice to locate the submerged platform during the acquisition and memory tests likely reflect a cognitive deficit, rather than sensorimotor or emotional abnormalities. These behavioral deficits are associated with significant increases in astrogliosis and microgliosis in the HIV-infected mice. The results of this study strengthen the SCID mouse model of HIV encephalitis by definitively establishing cognitive deficits for the model in addition to its previously reported neuropathological features.

  2. Immunoassay for detection of antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus and human immunodeficiency virus in serum.

    PubMed

    Otsyula, M G; Yee, J A; Suleman, M A; Marx, P A; Jennings, M B

    1996-04-01

    We developed a simple, inexpensive, rapid assay for the detection of antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serum. The immunoassay uses inactivated SIV and HIV-1 gp41 transmembrane recombinant protein as antigenic adsorbents on a nitrocellulose filter membrane. Diluted serum, with the addition of Protein-A-Gold, is gravity-filtered through the filter membrane, blocked, and buffer-washed. Antibodies to HIV or SIV or both in serum bind to the appropriate antigen, and the resulting antigen-antibody complex reacts with Protein-A-Gold to produce a readable pink color. Field evaluation of the test on 30 human and 70 nonhuman primate sera in Kenya and Zaire indicated that the test had at least 93 and 90% correlation with Western blot sensitivity and specificity respectively. Prior refrigeration of the test kit and incubation of sera during testing were not required. This result indicates that the test may be a rapid, economical, and simple test for detecting HIV, SIV, or both in serum. This immunoassay can be useful for carrying out HIV and SIV serosurveys in countries with limited or no laboratory facilities. PMID:8723237

  3. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  4. Performance analysis of two-degree of freedom fractional order PID controllers for robotic manipulator with payload.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2015-09-01

    The robotic manipulators are multi-input multi-output (MIMO), coupled and highly nonlinear systems. The presence of external disturbances and time-varying parameters adversely affects the performance of these systems. Therefore, the controller designed for these systems should effectively deal with such complexities, and it is an intriguing task for control engineers. This paper presents two-degree of freedom fractional order proportional-integral-derivative (2-DOF FOPID) controller scheme for a two-link planar rigid robotic manipulator with payload for trajectory tracking task. The tuning of all controller parameters is done using cuckoo search algorithm (CSA). The performance of proposed 2-DOF FOPID controllers is compared with those of their integer order designs, i.e., 2-DOF PID controllers, and with the traditional PID controllers. In order to show effectiveness of proposed scheme, the robustness testing is carried out for model uncertainties, payload variations with time, external disturbance and random noise. Numerical simulation results indicate that the 2-DOF FOPID controllers are superior to their integer order counterparts and the traditional PID controllers. PMID:25896827

  5. The maladaptive personality traits of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) in relation to the HEXACO personality factors and schizotypy/dissociation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Michael C; Lee, Kibeom; de Vries, Reinout E; Hendrickse, Joshua; Born, Marise Ph

    2012-10-01

    The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), a new measure of maladaptive personality traits, has recently been developed by the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Workgroup. The PID-5 variables were examined within the seven-factor space defined by the six HEXACO factors and the Schizotypy/Dissociation factor (Ashton & Lee, 2012) using participant samples from Canada (N = 378) and the Netherlands (N = 476). Extension analyses showed that several PID-5 facet-level scales represented each of the Honesty-Humility, Emotionality, Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Schizotypy/Dissociation factors. In contrast, only one PID-5 scale loaded strongly on HEXACO Agreeableness, and no PID-5 scales loaded strongly on Openness to Experience. In addition, a joint factor analysis involving the PID-5 variables and facets of the Five-Factor Model was conducted in the Canadian sample and recovered a set of seven factors corresponding rather closely to the HEXACO factors plus Schizotypy/Dissociation. The authors discuss implications for the assessment and structure of normal and abnormal personality.

  6. Energetically efficient proportional-integral-differential (PID) control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pramode K.; Mathew, Sam; Shaiju, A. J.; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2016-02-01

    The control of vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder is a precursor to a wide range of external shear flow problems in engineering, in particular the flow-induced vibrations. In the present study, numerical simulation of an energetically efficient active flow control strategy is proposed, for the control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder at a low Reynolds number of 100. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible and Newtonian with negligible variation in properties. Reflectionally symmetric controllers are designed such that, they are located on a small sector of the cylinder over which, tangential sliding mode control is imparted. In the field of modern controls, proportional (P), integral (I) and differential (D) control strategies and their numerous combinations are extremely popular in industrial practice. To impart suitable control actuation, the vertically varying lift force on the circular cylinder, is synthesised for the construction of an error term. Four different types of controllers considered in the present study are, P, I, PI and PID. These controllers are evaluated for their energetic efficiency and performance. A linear quadratic optimal control problem is formulated, to minimise the cost functional. By performing detailed simulations, it was observed that, the system is energetically efficient, even when the twin eddies are still persisting behind the circular cylinder. To assess the adaptability of the controllers, the actuators were switched on and off to study their dynamic response.

  7. Multiobjective Optimization Design of a Fractional Order PID Controller for a Gun Control System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jilin; Wang, Li; Xu, Shiqing; Hou, Yuanlong

    2013-01-01

    Motion control of gun barrels is an ongoing topic for the development of gun control equipments possessing excellent performances. In this paper, a typical fractional order PID control strategy is employed for the gun control system. To obtain optimal parameters of the controller, a multiobjective optimization scheme is developed from the loop-shaping perspective. To solve the specified nonlinear optimization problem, a novel Pareto optimal solution based multiobjective differential evolution algorithm is proposed. To enhance the convergent rate of the optimization process, an opposition based learning method is embedded in the chaotic population initialization process. To enhance the robustness of the algorithm for different problems, an adapting scheme of the mutation operation is further employed. With assistance of the evolutionary algorithm, the optimal solution for the specified problem is selected. The numerical simulation results show that the control system can rapidly follow the demand signal with high accuracy and high robustness, demonstrating the efficiency of the proposed controller parameter tuning method. PMID:23766721

  8. Design of an iterative auto-tuning algorithm for a fuzzy PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Bakhtiar I.; Mehrdadi, B.

    2012-05-01

    Since the first application of fuzzy logic in the field of control engineering, it has been extensively employed in controlling a wide range of applications. The human knowledge on controlling complex and non-linear processes can be incorporated into a controller in the form of linguistic terms. However, with the lack of analytical design study it is becoming more difficult to auto-tune controller parameters. Fuzzy logic controller has several parameters that can be adjusted, such as: membership functions, rule-base and scaling gains. Furthermore, it is not always easy to find the relation between the type of membership functions or rule-base and the controller performance. This study proposes a new systematic auto-tuning algorithm to fine tune fuzzy logic controller gains. A fuzzy PID controller is proposed and applied to several second order systems. The relationship between the closed-loop response and the controller parameters is analysed to devise an auto-tuning method. The results show that the proposed method is highly effective and produces zero overshoot with enhanced transient response. In addition, the robustness of the controller is investigated in the case of parameter changes and the results show a satisfactory performance.

  9. Thymus involution in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grody, W W; Fligiel, S; Naeim, F

    1985-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a severe disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis, predominantly affecting homosexual males and other high-risk groups and characterized by profound alterations in T-lymphocyte function. The authors have examined thymus tissue from 14 patients who died of AIDS and compared the results with findings in five control groups: healthy age-matched controls, elderly individuals, patients with chronic or debilitating illnesses other than AIDS, infants with conditions causing "stress atrophy," and patients with myasthenia gravis. The AIDS group included 11 homosexual males, 1 Haitian, 1 homosexual who was also a drug abuser, and a 10-month-old infant believed to have contracted AIDS following blood transfusion. All the AIDS cases showed marked thymus involution with severe depletion of both lymphocytes and epithelial elements. The latter component consisted primarily of thin cords and nests of primitive-appearing epithelial cells that could be defined by positive immunohistochemical staining for keratin. Many cases showed a variable plasma cell infiltration, and the majority exhibited distinct vascular changes in the form of hyalinization and/or onion-skin patterns, primarily in the adventitia. Most striking of all was the marked paucity of Hassall's corpuscles; four patients had none at all, while in the other ten patients all the Hassall's corpuscles were calcified. These changes were far more extensive than those seen in any of the control groups, which retained most of their complement of Hassall's corpuscles even in the face of marked overall involution. The physiologic function of Hassall's corpuscles is not known, but recent immunohistochemical studies have implicated them in the synthesis of "facteur thymique serique" (FTS, thymulin) and other thymic hormones known to play a role in regulating T-helper and suppressor cell activity. It is conceivable that the extensive destruction of Hassall's corpuscles observed in

  10. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  11. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis.

  12. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies. PMID:25599590

  13. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04494.001 PMID:25599590

  14. Septic arthritis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; Monteagudo, I; Lopez-Longo, J; Sanchez-Atrio, A

    1992-12-01

    We have evaluated the presence and characteristics of septic arthritis in intravenous (iv) drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Sixteen patients with both HIV infection and septic arthritis were studied and compared with 5 patients with septic arthritis but no HIV infection. Clinical profile, laboratory findings at the time of onset, localization, causative organisms, mean hospitalization time and presence of complications were the same in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism in both groups. We conclude that septic arthritis in HIV infected iv drug users is not uncommon, it is produced by the same organisms and presents similar characteristics to the ones found in iv drug users without HIV infection. Therefore, the presence of HIV infection does not appear to modify the characteristics of septic arthritis.

  15. The case for mandatory newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H B; Hammarström, L; Mahlaoui, N; Borte, M; Borte, S

    2014-05-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is the most severe form of inherited primary immunodeficiency and is a paediatric emergency. Delay in recognising and detecting SCID can have fatal consequences and also reduces the chances of a successful haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Screening for SCID at birth would prevent children from dying before HSCT can be attempted and would increase the success of HSCT. There is strong evidence to show that SCID fulfills the internationally-established criteria for a condition to be screened for at birth. There is also a test (the T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) assay) that is now being successfully used in an increasing number of US states to screen for SCID in routine newborn Guthrie samples. Concerted lobbying efforts have highlighted the need for newborn screening (NBS) for SCID, and its implementation is being discussed in Europe both at EU and individual country level, but as yet there is no global mandate to screen for this rare and frequently lethal condition. This paper summarizes the current evidence for, and the success of SCID NBS, together with a review of the practical aspects of SCID testing and the arguments in favour of adding SCID to the conditions screened for at birth.

  16. Conserved serines in simian immunodeficiency virus capsid are required for virus budding.

    PubMed

    Rue, Sarah M; Roos, Jason W; Clements, Janice E; Barber, Sheila A

    2005-05-25

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) capsid protein (CA), a constituent of the Pr55Gag polyprotein, is phosphorylated in virions but not in virus-producing cells (Rue, S.M., Roos, J.W., Tarwater, P.M., Clements, J.E., Barber, S.A., 2005. Phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of gag proteins in budded simian immunodeficiency virus. J. Virol. 79 (4), 2484-2492.). Using phosphoamino acid analysis of CA, we show that serine is the primary phosphate acceptor. A series of substitution mutants of serines in the CA domain of Pr55Gag were constructed in the infectious viral clone SIVmac239. These virus mutants were examined for defects in virus replication and virion infectivity, release, and morphology, as well as alterations in phosphorylation of CA-containing proteins. Although the virus mutants exhibited a number of replication defects, none of these defects could be directly attributed to aberrant CA phosphorylation. A novel defect was a block in early budding, which was common among several virus mutants with substitutions in the CA N terminus. Together, these results indicate that certain residues in the CA N terminus are crucial for early budding events.

  17. Distribution of immunodeficiency fact files with XML – from Web to WAP

    PubMed Central

    Väliaho, Jouni; Riikonen, Pentti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2005-01-01

    Background Although biomedical information is growing rapidly, it is difficult to find and retrieve validated data especially for rare hereditary diseases. There is an increased need for services capable of integrating and validating information as well as proving it in a logically organized structure. A XML-based language enables creation of open source databases for storage, maintenance and delivery for different platforms. Methods Here we present a new data model called fact file and an XML-based specification Inherited Disease Markup Language (IDML), that were developed to facilitate disease information integration, storage and exchange. The data model was applied to primary immunodeficiencies, but it can be used for any hereditary disease. Fact files integrate biomedical, genetic and clinical information related to hereditary diseases. Results IDML and fact files were used to build a comprehensive Web and WAP accessible knowledge base ImmunoDeficiency Resource (IDR) available at . A fact file is a user oriented user interface, which serves as a starting point to explore information on hereditary diseases. Conclusion The IDML enables the seamless integration and presentation of genetic and disease information resources in the Internet. IDML can be used to build information services for all kinds of inherited diseases. The open source specification and related programs are available at . PMID:15978138

  18. Simian virus 40-induced disease in rhesus monkeys with simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, C. J.; Simon, M. A.; Bergsagel, D. J.; Pauley, D. R.; King, N. W.; Garcea, R. L.; Ringler, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) disease was diagnosed in four rhesus monkeys that died with SIV-induced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). One juvenile monkey seroconverted for SV40 6 months after inoculation with SIV and developed severe bilateral tubulointerstitial nephritis. In contrast, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurred in two adult monkeys that were seropositive for SV40 before SIV inoculation, as well as a third adult that was naturally infected with SIV and seropositive for SV40 5 years before death. Large intranuclear inclusions containing abundant polyomavirus particles were limited to either renal tubular epithelial cells or oligodendrocytes. In situ DNA hybridization for SV40 large T antigen further demonstrated that SV40 nucleic acid was localized to either kidney or brain tissue. By immunohistochemical analysis, areas of central nervous system inflammation and demyelination were shown to contain CD68+ macrophages (gitter cells), aggregates of CD8+ T lymphocytes, and numerous gemistocytic astrocytes that labeled for glial fibrillary acidic protein. These observations indicate that rhesus monkeys with SIV-induced AIDS are predisposed to polyomaviral disease, in which SV40 nucleic acid is observed in renal tissue in primary infections and brain tissue after viral reactivation. Furthermore, this organ-specific replication suggests that tissue-tropic strains of SV40 may develop in immunodeficient monkeys. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1376560

  19. Salivary gland lymph nodes. The site of lymphadenopathies and lymphomas associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ioachim, H L; Ryan, J R; Blaugrund, S M

    1988-12-01

    Normally, lymph nodes are intimately associated with the salivary glands, particularly the parotid gland. Several lymph nodes are embedded in the parotid gland, other lymph nodes are adjacent to the submaxillary gland, and ectopic salivary gland acini and ducts are commonly present in cervical lymph nodes. These salivary gland lymph nodes may become the primary site of the benign lymphadenopathy and the malignant lymphomas characteristically associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This report of a series of HIV-associated lymphatic lesions originating in salivary gland lymph nodes comprises nine cases of salivary gland masses that were surgically excised, it includes six cases of lymphadenitides and three cases of lymphoma--all originating in salivary gland lymph nodes and showing the histologic lesions known to occur in association with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The HIV-related infections and neoplasias located in the salivary gland lymph nodes raise interesting questions about the possible etiologic role of an oral portal of entry and of the virus-infected saliva. The recognition of their clinical and pathologic features is indispensable to enable correct diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Anthony A.; Rosenthal, David G.; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  1. Persistent cryptosporidiosis in horses with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Bjorneby, J M; Leach, D R; Perryman, L E

    1991-01-01

    Cryptosporidial infections were established in five young foals with severe combined immunodeficiency following oral administration of 10(8) Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All foals shed oocysts (average of 8 x 10(6) to 2 x 10(8)/g of feces) until death. Inflammation and C. parvum organisms were observed in the common bile duct, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. Since foals with severe combined immunodeficiency lack functional T and B lymphocytes and are incapable of antigen-specific immune responses, they are well suited for evaluating the pathogenesis and treatment of persistent cryptosporidiosis. Images PMID:1894380

  2. HIV-1 Superinfection Resembles Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sheward, Daniel J.; Ntale, Roman; Garrett, Nigel J.; Woodman, Zenda L.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Williamson, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of superinfection as a model to identify correlates of protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depends on whether the superinfecting transmission resembles primary infection, which has not been established. Here, we characterize the genetic bottleneck in superinfected individuals for the first time. In all 3 cases, superinfection produced a spike in viral load and could be traced to a single, C-C chemokine receptor 5–tropic founder virus with shorter, less glycosylated variable regions than matched chronic viruses. These features are consistent with primary HIV transmission and provide support for the use of superinfection as a model to address correlates of protection against HIV. PMID:25754982

  3. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  4. Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Jørgensen, Silje F; Maggadottir, S Melkorka; Bakay, Marina; Warnatz, Klaus; Glessner, Joseph; Pandey, Rahul; Salzer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Goldacker, Sigune; Buchta, Mary; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Videm, Vibeke; Folseraas, Trine; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Elder, James T; Nair, Rajan P; Winkelmann, Juliane; Gieger, Christian; Nöthen, Markus M; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Orange, Jordan S; Fevang, Børre; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Aukrust, Pål; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H; Grimbacher, Bodo; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammarström, Lennart; Ellinghaus, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults, characterized by B-cell abnormalities and inadequate antibody response. CVID patients have considerable autoimmune comorbidity and we therefore hypothesized that genetic susceptibility to CVID may overlap with autoimmune disorders. Here, in the largest genetic study performed in CVID to date, we compare 778 CVID cases with 10,999 controls across 123,127 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Immunochip. We identify the first non-HLA genome-wide significant risk locus at CLEC16A (rs17806056, P=2.0 × 10(-9)) and confirm the previously reported human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations on chromosome 6p21 (rs1049225, P=4.8 × 10(-16)). Clec16a knockdown (KD) mice showed reduced number of B cells and elevated IgM levels compared with controls, suggesting that CLEC16A may be involved in immune regulatory pathways of relevance to CVID. In conclusion, the CLEC16A associations in CVID represent the first robust evidence of non-HLA associations in this immunodeficiency condition. PMID:25891430

  5. Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Jørgensen, Silje F.; Maggadottir, S. Melkorka; Bakay, Marina; Warnatz, Klaus; Glessner, Joseph; Pandey, Rahul; Salzer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Goldacker, Sigune; Buchta, Mary; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Videm, Vibeke; Folseraas, Trine; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Elder, James T.; Nair, Rajan P.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Gieger, Christian; Nöthen, Markus M; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Orange, Jordan S.; Fevang, Børre; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Aukrust, Pål; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.; Grimbacher, Bodo; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammarström, Lennart; Ellinghaus, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults, characterized by B cell abnormalities and inadequate antibody response. CVID patients have considerable autoimmune comorbidity and we therefore hypothesized that genetic susceptibility to CVID may overlap with autoimmune disorders. Here, in the largest genetic study performed in CVID to date, we compare 778 CVID cases with 10,999 controls across 123,127 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Immunochip. We identify the first non-HLA genome-wide significant risk locus at CLEC16A (rs17806056, P=2.0×10−9) and confirm the previously reported human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations on chromosome 6p21 (rs1049225, P =4.8×10−16). Clec16a knock down (KD) mice showed reduced number of B cells and elevated IgM levels compared to controls, suggesting that CLEC16A may be involved in immune regulatory pathways of relevance to CVID. In conclusion, the CLEC16A associations in CVID represent the first robust evidence of non-HLA associations in this immunodeficiency condition. PMID:25891430

  6. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  7. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  8. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  9. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  10. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  11. Hepatitis B and E Co-Primary Infections in an HIV-1-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bouamra, Yanis; Benali, Souad; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Tamalet, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    We report an autochthonous hepatitis E virus (HEV)-hepatitis B virus co-primary infection in a 41-year-old man having sex with men and infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This case prompts testing for HEV in HIV-infected patients with acute hepatitis even if primary infection with another hepatitis virus is diagnosed. PMID:23303497

  12. Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum and immunodeficiency problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, K. Ya.; Fedchenko, P. P.

    2004-05-01

    The importance of the presence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum for development of immunodeficiency has been demonstrated. In vitro and in vivo tests of illumination within Mg lines have proved the possibility to reduce the level of HIV/AIDS development.

  13. Spatial analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cougars.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David C; Waller, Lance A; Biek, Roman

    2010-07-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations.

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda.

    PubMed

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  15. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  16. Titration of feline immunodeficiency virus-based lentiviral vector preparations.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Dyana T; Barraza, Román; Loewen, Nils; Teo, Wulin; Poeschla, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vectors are useful for introducing integrated transgenes into nondividing human cells. This protocol describes methods for measuring and calculating vector titers in transducing units (TU)/mL. Alternate methods are provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP) vectors and for β-galactosidase vectors.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  18. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications.

  19. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  20. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. PMID:25577549

  1. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  2. Spatial Analysis of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Cougars

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David C.; Waller, Lance A.; Biek, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations. PMID:21197421

  3. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  4. The Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic, Washington, DC.

    This document presents findings of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic. The executive summary lists 20 major findings and recommendations which together comprise a comprehensive national strategy for managing the HIV epidemic. The commission recommends: (1) replacement of the obsolete term "AIDS"…

  5. Toxicity of oral radiotherapy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.; Fried, P.R.

    1987-03-01

    Although radiotherapy is a standard form of management of head and neck tumors, treatment of the oral cavity in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has produced unacceptable toxicity. Five such patients are described as a warning of enhanced toxicity of oral radiotherapy in this patient population.

  6. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  7. Subject Control of the Literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used to index the literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Subject access to the AIDSLINE database developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is examined, and changes in subject headings that reflect the growth of the field are analyzed. (12…

  8. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted. PMID:26560977

  9. Proteomic analysis of sera from common variable immunodeficiency patients undergoing replacement intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Giuseppe; D'Orio, Concetta; Genovese, Arturo; Galeotafiore, Antonella; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Di Giovanni, Stefano; Vitale, Monica; Capasso, Mario; Lamberti, Vincenzo; Scaloni, Andrea; Marone, Gianni; Zambrano, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common form of symptomatic primary antibody failure in adults and children. Replacement immunoglobulin is the standard treatment of these patients. By using a differential proteomic approach based on 2D-DIGE, we examined serum samples from normal donors and from matched, naive, and immunoglobulin-treated patients. The results highlighted regulated expression of serum proteins in naive patients. Among the identified proteins, clusterin/ApoJ serum levels were lower in naive patients, compared to normal subjects. This finding was validated in a wider collection of samples from newly enrolled patients. The establishment of a cellular system, based on a human hepatocyte cell line HuH7, allowed to ascertain a potential role in the regulation of CLU gene expression by immunoglobulins.

  10. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted. PMID:26560977

  11. Potent and Specific Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Glen A.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been shown to induce the degradation of specific mRNA targets in human cells by inducing RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we demonstrate that siRNA duplexes targeted against the essential Tat and Rev regulatory proteins encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can specifically block Tat and Rev expression and function. More importantly, we show that these same siRNAs can effectively inhibit HIV-1 gene expression and replication in cell cultures, including those of human T-cell lines and primary lymphocytes. These observations demonstrate that RNAi can effectively block virus replication in human cells and raise the possibility that RNAi could provide an important innate protective response, particularly against viruses that express double-stranded RNAs as part of their replication cycle. PMID:12186906

  12. Multi-objective optimal design of online PID controllers using model predictive control based on the group method of data handling-type neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdabadi-Farahani, V.; Hanif, M.; Gholaminezhad, I.; Jamali, A.; Nariman-Zadeh, N.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, model predictive control (MPC) is used for optimal selection of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller gains. In conventional tuning methods a history of response error of the system under control in the passed time is measured and used to adjust PID parameters in order to improve the performance of the system in proceeding time. But MPC obviates this characteristic of classic PID. In fact MPC tries to tune the controller by predicting the system's behaviour some time steps ahead. In this way, PID parameters are adjusted before any real error occurs in the system's response. For this purpose, polynomial meta-models based on the evolved group method of data handling neural networks are obtained to simply simulate the time response of the dynamic system. Moreover, a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm has been used in a multi-objective Pareto optimisation to select the parameters of the MPC which are prediction horizon, control horizon and relation of weight of Δ u and error, to minimise simultaneously two objective functions that are control effort and integral time absolute error of the system response. The results mentioned at the end obviously declare that the proposed method surpasses conventional tuning methods for PID controllers, and Pareto optimal selection of predictive parameters also improves the performance of the introduced method.

  13. In vitro evaluation of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as human immunodeficiency virus microbicides.

    PubMed

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as Human Immunodeficiency Virus Microbicides†

    PubMed Central

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  15. Successful Xenograft of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Specimen from Human Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma into an Immunodeficient Mouse.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se Young; Bae, Han Ik; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Hwan Ki; Cho, Chang-Min

    2015-11-23

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft is the transfer of primary human tumors directly into an immunodeficient mouse. Patient-derived tumor xenograft plays an important role in the development and evaluation of new chemotherapeutic agents. We succeeded in generating a patient-derived tumor xenograft of a biliary tumor obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration from a patient who had an inoperable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. This patient-derived tumor xenograft will be a promising tool for individualized cancer therapy and can be used in developing new chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of biliary cancer in the future.

  16. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boyce, W.M.; Riley, S.P.D.; Roelke, M.E.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Investigation et riposte à une épidémie de poliovirus sauvage à Kinshasa

    PubMed Central

    Nsambu, Muriel Nzazi; Bazira, Léodegal; Coulibaly, Tiekoura; Mbule, Albert; Wilmet, Michèle Dramaix; Likwela, Joris Losimba

    2013-01-01

    Introduction La République Démocratique du Congo a été considérée comme un pays à circulation rétablie de poliovirus sauvage (PVS). Cet article décrit l’épidémie de PVS qui a sévit dans la province de Kinshasa de 2010 à 2011. Méthodes Les analyses ont porté sur les cas de paralysie flasque aigüe (PFA) enregistrés de décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, les données de surveillance des PFA, les données de couverture vaccinale et celles du monitorage indépendant des activités de vaccination supplémentaires. Résultats Entre décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, 298 cas de PFA ont été enregistrés par les zones de santé parmi lesquels 34 cas de PVS confirmés. 58% des cas de PVS avaient plus de 15 ans avec plus d'hommes que de femmes. 10 passages d'activités de vaccination supplémentaires ont été mis en œuvre dont 4 avaient ciblé toute la population de Kinshasa. Il n'y a plus eu de cas de PVS après le 3e passage. Le monitorage des activités de vaccination a montré une proportion de sujets non vaccinés allant de 4 à 13%. La performance du système de surveillance était globalement bonne. Conclusion La prédominance des adultes parmi les cas notifiés traduit leur susceptibilité alors qu'ils ne sont généralement pas concernés lors des campagnes de vaccination supplémentaires. Ceci devrait engager les autorités sanitaires à envisager des activités vaccinales supplémentaires ciblant les adultes afin de casser plus rapidement la chaîne de transmission. Les faiblesses subsistant dans le système de surveillance pourraient être jugulées par le renforcement de la surveillance à base communautaire. PMID:24062866

  18. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  19. Overall non-linear correction of phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system based on displacement feedback control combined with fuzzy PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningfang; Luo, Xinkai; Li, Huipeng; Li, Jiao

    2015-10-01

    The non-linearity of the phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system can seriously affect the measuring accuracy of the system. In this paper, the correcting method is to combine the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology. Displacement feedback control mechanism and fuzzy PID controller are designed and then try to figure it out through Matlab simulation and experiment.. The result shows that combining the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology can fulfill decent overall non-linear correction in the white light interferometry measuring system. Meanwhile, the accuracy of the correction is high and the non-linearity drop from 2% to 0.1%.

  20. Care Seeking Behavior after Notification among Young Women With Recurrent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) after Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    PubMed Central

    Butz, Arlene M.; Gaydos, Charlotte; Chung, Shang-En; Johnson, Betty H.; Huettner, Steven; Trent, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the level of nurse case management and outreach required to notify young women with sexually transmitted infection (STI) positive test results after pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and percent seeking treatment. Methods Participants (N=153) were enrolled in a clinical trial of young women diagnosed with PID and followed for 3 months for recurrent STIs. Vaginal swabs were obtained at 1 and 3 months. All participants were notified of positive STIs at 1 and 3 months and treatment arranged. Data were analyzed with logistic regression for comparison of treatment status by number of nurse contacts. Results Over the 3-month period 59 participants (38.6%) tested positive for one or more STIs and all received notification. Only 50% (19/38) of participants with STI at 1 month and 43% (16/37) at 3 months received treatment. Conclusions Despite the high notification rate of positive test results for young adults with recurrent STIs, many failed to seek treatment. PMID:27507807

  1. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by SDZ NIM 811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine analog.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwirth, B; Billich, A; Datema, R; Donatsch, P; Hammerschmid, F; Harrison, R; Hiestand, P; Jaksche, H; Mayer, P; Peichl, P

    1994-01-01

    (Me-Ile-4)cyclosporin (SDZ NIM 811) is a 4-substituted cyclosporin which is devoid of immunosuppressive activity but retains full capacity for binding to cyclophilin and exhibits potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity. SDZ NIM 811 selectively inhibits HIV-1 replication in T4 lymphocyte cell lines, in a monocytic cell line, and in HeLa T4 cells. Furthermore, its antiviral activity against laboratory strains and against clinical isolates from geographically distinct regions in primary T4 lymphocytes and in primary monocytes (50% inhibitory concentration = 0.011 to 0.057 micrograms/ml) was demonstrated. SDZ NIM 811 does not inhibit proviral gene expression or virus-specific enzyme functions, either free or bound to cyclophilin. The compound does not influence CD4 expression or inhibit fusion between virus-infected and uninfected cells. SDZ NIM 811 was, however, found to block formation of infectious particles from chronically infected cells. Oral administration to mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys resulted in levels in blood considerably exceeding the drug concentration, which completely blocked virus replication in primary cells. SDZ NIM 811 caused changes of toxicity parameters in rats to a smaller degree than cyclosporine (formerly cyclosporin A). Thus, the potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity of SDZ NIM 811 and its favorable pharmacokinetic behavior together with its lower nephrotoxicity than that of cyclosporine make this compound a promising candidate for development as an anti-HIV drug. PMID:7527198

  2. Inflammatory joint disease and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S M; Seifert, M H; Keat, A C; Rowe, I F; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pinching, A J; Harris, J R W

    1988-01-01

    Nine men positive for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed peripheral, non-erosive arthritis were followed up. The clinical features were compatible with reactive arthritis but were atypical in several respects: the joint symptoms were generally severe, persistent, and unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The onset of arthritis was associated with various infections, none of which are known to be associated with the development of reactive arthritis. HLA typing was performed for three patients, all of whom were positive for HLA-B27. HIV was isolated from the synovial fluid of one patient. No patient had AIDS before developing arthritis, but four progressed to having AIDS after a mean of 7·5 months, and two died. Arthritis resolved in only one patient. The possibility of HIV infection should be considered in all patients with conditions suggesting reactive arthritis. Synovitis in patients with severe immunodeficiency has important pathogenetic implications. PMID:3135044

  3. Severe combined immunodeficiency resulting from mutations in MTHFD1.

    PubMed

    Keller, Michael D; Ganesh, Jaya; Heltzer, Meredith; Paessler, Michele; Bergqvist, A G Christina; Baluarte, H Jorge; Watkins, David; Rosenblatt, David S; Orange, Jordan S

    2013-02-01

    Folate and vitamin B(12) metabolism are essential for de novo purine synthesis, and several defects in these pathways have been associated with immunodeficiency. Here we describe the occurrence of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with megaloblastic anemia, leukopenia, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and neurologic abnormalities in which hydroxocobalamin and folate therapy provided partial immune reconstitution. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the MTHFD1 gene, which encodes a trifunctional protein essential for processing of single-carbon folate derivatives. We now report the immunologic details of this novel genetic cause of SCID and the response to targeted metabolic supplementation therapies. This finding expands the known metabolic causes of SCID and presents an important diagnostic consideration given the positive impact of therapy. PMID:23296427

  4. Mutations in XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism without causing immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinta; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-08-01

    In successive reports from 2014 to 2015, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 4 (XRCC4) has been identified as a novel causative gene of primordial dwarfism. XRCC4 is indispensable for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. As NHEJ is essential for V(D)J recombination during lymphocyte development, it is generally believed that abnormalities in XRCC4 cause severe combined immunodeficiency. Contrary to expectations, however, no overt immunodeficiency has been observed in patients with primordial dwarfism harboring XRCC4 mutations. Here, we describe the various XRCC4 mutations that lead to disease and discuss their impact on NHEJ and V(D)J recombination. PMID:27169690

  5. Thirty years of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Younai, Fariba S

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of battling a global epidemic, the prospect of eliminating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the most challenging infectious disease of the modern era is within our reach. Major scientific discoveries about the virus responsible for this immunodeficiency disease state, including its pathogenesis, transmission patterns and clinical course, have led to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs that offer great hopes in HIV treatment and prevention. Although these agents and many others still in development and testing are capable of effectively suppressing viral replication and survival, the medical management of HIV infection at the individual and the population levels remains challenging. Timely initiation of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to the appropriate therapeutic regimens, effective use of these agents in the pre and post-exposure prophylaxis contexts, treatment of comorbid conditions and addressing social and psychological factors involved in the care of individuals continue to be important considerations. PMID:24136672

  6. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  7. Molecular and biological aspects of the bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Andrea G; St-Louis, Marie-Claude; Archambault, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) was isolated in 1969 from a cow, R-29, with a wasting syndrome suggesting bovine leucosis. The virus, first designated bovine visna-like virus, remained unstudied until HIV was discovered in 1983. Then, it was demonstrated in 1987 that the bovine R-29 isolate was a lentivirus with striking similarity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Moreover, BIV has the most complex genomic structure among all identified lentiviruses shown by several regulatory/accessory genes encoding proteins, some of which are involved in the regulation of virus gene expression. This manuscript aims to review biological and molecular aspects of BIV, with emphasis on regulatory/accessory viral genes/proteins which are involved in virus expression. PMID:20210777

  8. Bacillary angiomatosis: a new entity in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hnatuk, L A; Brown, D H; Snell, G E

    1994-06-01

    Since the recognition of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 1981, previously rare infections and neoplasms have become increasingly common. Bacillary angiomatosis, undescribed in the medical literature prior to 1983, is now second in frequency only to Kaposi's sarcoma with respect to the cutaneous manifestations associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Caused by Rochalimaea henselae, bacillary angiomatosis is easily treated, when diagnosed early, with erythromycin. We present two cases of bacillary angiomatosis that presented to Toronto General Hospital and review this new and clinically interesting entity. The incidence of bacillary angiomatosis will undoubtedly increase as the HIV epidemic accelerates. Since bacillary angiomatosis commonly affects the head and neck region, it is important for the otolaryngologist to become increasingly proficient in its diagnosis and treatment. The current AIDS crisis demands that the otolaryngologist become aware not only of bacillary angiomatosis, but also of the other cutaneous head and neck manifestations of HIV infection.

  9. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  10. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  11. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  12. Mutations in XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism without causing immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinta; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-08-01

    In successive reports from 2014 to 2015, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 4 (XRCC4) has been identified as a novel causative gene of primordial dwarfism. XRCC4 is indispensable for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. As NHEJ is essential for V(D)J recombination during lymphocyte development, it is generally believed that abnormalities in XRCC4 cause severe combined immunodeficiency. Contrary to expectations, however, no overt immunodeficiency has been observed in patients with primordial dwarfism harboring XRCC4 mutations. Here, we describe the various XRCC4 mutations that lead to disease and discuss their impact on NHEJ and V(D)J recombination.

  13. Functional role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vpu.

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, E F; Cohen, E A; Lu, Y C; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of vpu in the replication and cytopathicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), infectious proviruses were constructed that were isogenic except for the ability to produce the protein product of vpu. The vpu-encoded protein is shown to decrease the rate of syncytium formation and cell killing in infected CD4+ human T cells, to increase greatly the export of virus particles from infected cells, and to reduce the rate of accumulation of cell-associated viral proteins. The vpu protein complements in trans the defect in a vpu- HIV-1 provirus but does not affect the simian immunodeficiency virus, which lacks vpu. These observations suggest that vpu may contribute to the AIDS epidemic by increasing the transmission efficiency of the virus. Images PMID:2472639

  14. Sicca complex and infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Couderc, L J; D'Agay, M F; Danon, F; Harzic, M; Brocheriou, C; Clauvel, J P

    1987-05-01

    Five male patients with the persistent generalized lymphadenopathy syndrome also had a sicca complex. Salivary gland biopsy specimens showed diffuse lymphocytic infiltration of the glandular parenchyma. Serum autoantibodies and rheumatoid factor were not detected. All patients had IgG antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and IgG to the viral capsid antigen of Epstein-Barr virus. These five patients had benign lymphocytic infiltrates in other organs (lung, liver, and kidneys). Sicca complex may be one of the various manifestations of the lymphoid hyperplasia noted in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. In these patients, the sicca complex showed specific features related to male predominance, lack of serum autoantibodies, and peripheral-blood T-lymphocyte subset distribution.

  15. Les dermatoses génitales: profil épidémiologique et Clinique

    PubMed Central

    Lakjiri, Siham; Meziane, Mariame; Elloudi, Sara; Sy, Ousmane; Nejjari, Chakib; Mernissi, Fatima Zahra

    2014-01-01

    La pathologie cutanéo-muqueuse des organes génitaux externes (OGE) est très variée. Le but de cette étude est de décrire le profil épidémiologique de cette dermatose au CHU Hassan II de FES. Il s'agit d'une étude prospective descriptive menée au sein du service de dermatologie de CHU Hassan II de FES s’étalant sur une période de 22 mois. Un total de 350 patients ont été inclus dans cette étude, 179 femmes (51%) et 171 hommes (49%). L’âge moyen de nos patients était de 39 ans, 69% étaient d'un niveau socio- économique faible. La plupart des patients étaient mariés (63,4%). Les étiologies retrouvées étaient dominées par l’étiologie virale (92 cas: 26%), suivi par le vitiligo (13%), l'origine fongique en 3ème classe avec un pourcentage de 11%, suivie par le psoriasis (8%), et d'autres étiologies diverses: Lichen plan et le lichen scléreux (7,7%), l'eczéma (5%), les tumeurs malignes (5%), dermatoses bulleuses, les maladies bactériennes et parasitaires. Avec 350 cas diagnostiqués en vingt-deux mois, notre étude montre que les dermatoses des OGE ne sont pas rares dans notre service. L'analyse des résultats de notre série montrait la survenue de dermatoses génitales chez toutes les tranches d’âge y compris les nourrissons avec une prédominance chez la population sexuellement active autour de 30 à 40 ans. Les dermatoses génitales d'origine virale étaient les plus retrouvés dans notre étude et cela était prédominant dans la population adulte la plus sexuellement active, cela peut être expliqué par le niveau socio-économique bas, la promiscuité et la multiplicité des partenaires sexuels. La plupart des causes ont un pronostic favorable, mais elles ont un impact psychologique important. Cette étude souligne l'importance de diagnostiquer les dermatoses génitales et réfute l'idée fausse générale que toutes les démangeaisons génitales sont le résultat d'une infection fongique notamment candidosique. PMID:25426198

  16. [Reflection on treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Ni

    2012-02-01

    The current situation of Chinese medicine and Western medicine treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has made the integrative medicine treatment of AIDS an important treatment strategy. Integrative medicine treatment of AIDS has made certain achievements in clinical research, basic research, and other aspects. It has good mass foundation and curative efficacy, as well as insufficiency. I hope integrative medicine can be brought into full play in the treatment of AIDS and make breakthrough progress.

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Patel, Shital M; Flash, Charlene A; Stager, Charles E; Goodman, Jerry C; Woc-Colburn, Laila

    2014-07-01

    As a result of global migration, a significant number of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection now live in the United States, Canada, many countries in Europe, and other non-endemic countries. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis is a rare cause of ring-enhancing lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that can closely mimic central nervous system (CNS) toxoplasmosis. We report a case of CNS Chagas reactivation in an AIDS patient successfully treated with benznidazole and antiretroviral therapy in the United States.

  18. Down syndrome associated with severe combined immunodeficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, M S; Artac, H; Reisli, I

    2009-01-01

    An 8-month-old boy was admitted to the hospital because of recurrent bronchopneumonia and gastrointestinal tract infections. On physical examination, he had hypotonia, mental retardation, microcephaly with flat facies, low nasal bridge, small nose, small ears. Laboratory evaluation revealed Down syndrome, lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, reduced proportions of the peripheral blood lymphocytes with an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio and markedly reduced mitogen response of the lymphocytes. We report here unique case of Down syndrome associated with severe combined immunodeficiency. PMID:19852434

  19. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wyand, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.

  20. Antiretroviral therapy reduces neurodegeneration in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Alex K.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Umlauf, Anya; Gouaux, Ben; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Letendre, Scott L.; Achim, Cristian L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of virally-suppressive antiretroviral therapy on cortical neurodegeneration and associated neurocognitive impairment. Design Retrospective, postmortem observational study. Methods Clinical neuropsychological and postmortem neuropathology data were analyzed in 90 human immunodeficiency virus-infected volunteers from the general community who had never undergone antiretroviral therapy (n=7, “naïve”) or who had undergone antiretroviral therapy and whose plasma viral load was detectable (n = 64 “unsuppressed”) or undetectable (n = 19, “suppressed”) at the last clinical visit prior to death. Subjects were predominately male (74/90, 82%) with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD 9.8). Cortical neurodegeneration was quantified by measuring microtubule-associated protein (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) density in midfrontal cortex tissue sections. Results The suppressed group had higher SYP density than the naïve group (p = 0.007) and higher MAP2 density than the unsuppressed group (p = 0.04). The suppressed group had lower odds of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders than naïve (OR 0.07, p = 0.03). Higher SYP was associated with lower likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders in univariable (OR 0.8, p=0.03) and multivariable models after controlling for antiretroviral treatment and brain human immunodeficiency virus p24 protein levels (OR 0.72, p=0.01). Conclusions We conclude that virally suppressive antiretroviral treatment protects against cortical neurodegeneration. Further, we find evidence supporting the causal chain from treatment-mediated peripheral and central nervous system viral load suppression to reduced neurodegeneration and improved neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686681

  1. Clinical, laboratory and molecular signs of immunodeficiency in patients with partial oculo-cutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Dotta, Laura; Parolini, Silvia; Prandini, Alberto; Tabellini, Giovanna; Antolini, Maddalena; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Badolato, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Hypopigmentation disorders that are associated with immunodeficiency feature both partial albinism of hair, skin and eyes together with leukocyte defects. These disorders include Chediak Higashi (CHS), Griscelli (GS), Hermansky-Pudlak (HPS) and MAPBP-interacting protein deficiency syndromes. These are heterogeneous autosomal recessive conditions in which the causal genes encode proteins with specific roles in the biogenesis, function and trafficking of secretory lysosomes. In certain specialized cells, these organelles serve as a storage compartment. Impaired secretion of specific effector proteins from that intracellular compartment affects biological activities. In particular, these intracellular granules are essential constituents of melanocytes, platelets, granulocytes, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. Thus, abnormalities affect pigmentation, primary hemostasis, blood cell counts and lymphocyte cytotoxic activity against microbial pathogens. Among eight genetically distinct types of HPS, only type 2 is characterized by immunodeficiency. Recently, a new subtype, HPS9, was defined in patients presenting with immunodeficiency and oculocutaneous albinism, associated with mutations in the pallidin-encoding gene, PLDN.Hypopigmentation together with recurrent childhood bacterial or viral infections suggests syndromic albinism. T and NK cell cytotoxicity are generally impaired in patients with these disorders. Specific clinical and biochemical phenotypes can allow differential diagnoses among these disorders before molecular testing. Ocular symptoms, including nystagmus, that are usually evident at birth, are common in patients with HPS2 or CHS. Albinism with short stature is unique to MAPBP-interacting protein (MAPBPIP) deficiency, while hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) mainly suggests a diagnosis of CHS or GS type 2 (GS2). Neurological disease is a long-term complication of CHS, but is uncommon in other syndromic albinism. Chronic

  2. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect.

  3. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect. PMID:25758115

  4. Changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Croxson, T S; Chapman, W E; Miller, L K; Levit, C D; Senie, R; Zumoff, B

    1989-02-01

    Serum total testosterone, total 17 beta-estradiol, LH, FSH, and PRL concentrations were measured by RIA in 59 homosexual men infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (32 clinically healthy antibody-positive men (HH+), 20 men with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 7 men with AIDS-related complex (ARC). The results were compared with those of 26 antibody-negative homosexual men (HH-) who served as controls. The mean serum total testosterone concentration was significantly lower in the men with AIDS [414 +/- 230 (+/- SD) ng/dL (14.5 +/- 8.0)] than in the HH- men [550 +/- 172 ng/dL (19.0 +/- 6.0 nmol/L); P less than 0.05]. The mean serum LH level was significantly higher in the men with AIDS (26 +/- 14 vs. 14 +/- 4 IU/L in HH- men; P less than 0.01) and slightly but significantly higher in the men with ARC (19 +/- 8 IU/L; 0.10 greater than P greater than 0.05). Serum FSH also was significantly higher in the men with AIDS (P less than 0.05). Serum PRL was significantly higher in the men with ARC (10 +/- 2 micrograms/L; P less than 0.05) and AIDS (16 +/- 10 micrograms/L; P less than 0.001) than in the HH- men (8 +/- 3 micrograms/L). Serum sex hormone-binding globulin levels were similar in HH- men and men with AIDS as were serum T responses to hCG administration for 2 days. These results suggest that alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis indicative of primary hypogonadism accompany human immunodeficiency virus infection in homosexual men.

  5. Guidelines for Screening, Early Diagnosis and Management of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in India.

    PubMed

    Madkaikar, Manisha; Aluri, Jahnavi; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is one of the most severe and fatal forms of inherited primary immunodeficiency. Early diagnosis of SCID improves the outcome of life before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). SCID fulfills the internationally-established criteria for a condition to be screened for at birth. T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) assay is commonly used in western countries as part of newborn blood spot screening (NBS) program as the assay has high sensitivity and specificity to identify SCID infants, allowing early intervention and curative bone marrow (BM) transplantation. In India, the blood spot based screening programs are yet to mature into a full-fledged national program. Moreover, TREC assay, a PCR based test, is not widely available and may cost USD 5-7 per test; thus limiting its applicability for screening newborns in Indian scenario. Most of the SCID patients have lymphopenia at birth and routine evaluation for absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) on cord blood samples can help in pre-symptomatic detection and early intervention for neonates with SCID. Although ALC count lacks the sensitivity and specificity of TREC assay; its lower cost and widespread availability makes it an attractive option for identifying newborns with lymphopenia during the post-partum hospital stay. BCG vaccine and other live attenuated vaccines (e.g., oral polio vaccine) should be withheld in lymphopenic infants until SCID is excluded by clinical and/or immunological work-up. A diagnosis of SCID warrants immediate care to prevent and treat infections and wherever feasible, early stem cell transplantation for disease free survival.

  6. Guidelines for Screening, Early Diagnosis and Management of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in India.

    PubMed

    Madkaikar, Manisha; Aluri, Jahnavi; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is one of the most severe and fatal forms of inherited primary immunodeficiency. Early diagnosis of SCID improves the outcome of life before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). SCID fulfills the internationally-established criteria for a condition to be screened for at birth. T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) assay is commonly used in western countries as part of newborn blood spot screening (NBS) program as the assay has high sensitivity and specificity to identify SCID infants, allowing early intervention and curative bone marrow (BM) transplantation. In India, the blood spot based screening programs are yet to mature into a full-fledged national program. Moreover, TREC assay, a PCR based test, is not widely available and may cost USD 5-7 per test; thus limiting its applicability for screening newborns in Indian scenario. Most of the SCID patients have lymphopenia at birth and routine evaluation for absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) on cord blood samples can help in pre-symptomatic detection and early intervention for neonates with SCID. Although ALC count lacks the sensitivity and specificity of TREC assay; its lower cost and widespread availability makes it an attractive option for identifying newborns with lymphopenia during the post-partum hospital stay. BCG vaccine and other live attenuated vaccines (e.g., oral polio vaccine) should be withheld in lymphopenic infants until SCID is excluded by clinical and/or immunological work-up. A diagnosis of SCID warrants immediate care to prevent and treat infections and wherever feasible, early stem cell transplantation for disease free survival. PMID:26920398

  7. Syphilis - primary

    MedlinePlus

    Primary syphilis; Secondary syphilis; Late syphilis; Tertiary syphilis ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted, infectious disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum . This bacterium causes ...

  8. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus-Neutralizing Antibodies in Different Immunoglobulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Rabel, Philip O.; Planitzer, Christina B.; Farcet, Maria R.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PIDs) depend on the presence of a variety of antibody specificities in intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Using the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), geographic variability in IVIG antibody content was shown. Care should therefore be exercised when treating PIDs in a given geography, as only locally sourced plasma contains the antibody specificities against the circulating pathogens in the given locality. PMID:22379062

  9. Implementation of an advanced hybrid MPC-PID control system using PAT tools into a direct compaction continuous pharmaceutical tablet manufacturing pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravendra; Sahay, Abhishek; Karry, Krizia M; Muzzio, Fernando; Ierapetritou, Marianthi; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2014-10-01

    It is desirable for a pharmaceutical final dosage form to be manufactured through a quality by design (QbD)-based approach rather than a quality by testing (QbT) approach. An automatic feedback control system coupled with PAT tools that is part of the QbD paradigm shift, has the potential to ensure that the pre-defined end product quality attributes are met in a time and cost efficient manner. In this work, an advanced hybrid MPC-PID control architecture coupled with real time inline/online monitoring tools and principal components analysis (PCA) based additional supervisory control layer has been proposed for a continuous direct compaction tablet manufacturing process. The advantages of both MPC and PID have been utilized in a hybrid scheme. The control hardware and software integration and implementation of the control system has been demonstrated using feeders and blending unit operation of a continuous tablet manufacturing pilot plant and an NIR based PAT tool. The advanced hybrid MPC-PID control scheme leads to enhanced control loop performance of the critical quality attributes in comparison to a regulatory (e.g. PID) control scheme indicating its potential to improve pharmaceutical product quality. PMID:24974987

  10. A controlled study of funding for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome as resource capacity building in the health system in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Donald S; Zeng, Wu; Amico, Peter; Rwiyereka, Angelique K; Avila-Figueroa, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    Because human inmmunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) receives more donor funding globally than that for all other diseases combined, some critics allege this support undermines general health care. This empirical study evaluates the impact of HIV/AIDS funding on the primary health care system in Rwanda. Using a quasi-experimental design, we randomly selected 25 rural health centers (HCs) that started comprehensive HIV/AIDS services from 2002 through 2006 as the intervention group. Matched HCs with no HIV/AIDS services formed the control group. The analysis compared growth in inputs and services between intervention and control HCs with a difference-in-difference analysis in a random-effects model. Intervention HCs performed better than control HCs in most services (seven of nine), although only one of these improvements (Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination) reached or approached statistical significance. In conclusion, this six-year controlled study found no adverse effects of the expansion of HIV/AIDS services on non-HIV services among rural health centers in Rwanda.

  11. [Management of the esophageal candidiasis by the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Behrens, Garance; Bocherens, Astrid; Senn, Nicolas

    2014-05-14

    Esophageal candidiasis is one of the most common opportunistic infections in patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathology is also found in patients without overt immunodeficiency. Other risk factors are known to be associated with this disease like inhaled or systemic corticosteroid treatment or proton-pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. In the absence of identified risk factors, a primary immune deficiency should be sought. Prevention of esophageal candidiasis is based primarily on the identification of risk factors, and a better control of them. This article presents a review of the physiopathology, clinical presentation and management of esophageal candidiasis by primary care physicians. We will also discuss ways of preventing esophageal candidiasis when necessary.

  12. [Discriminant analysis to predict the clinical diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies: a preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Murata, Chiharu; Ramírez, Ana Belén; Ramírez, Guadalupe; Cruz, Alonso; Morales, José Luis; Lugo-Reyes, Saul Oswaldo

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: las características clínicas de un paciente con sospecha de inmunodeficiencia primaria orientan el diagnóstico diferencial por medio del reconocimiento de patrones. Las inmunodeficiencias primarias son un grupo heterogéneo de más de 250 enfermedades congénitas con mayor susceptibilidad a padecer infecciones, autoinflamación, autoinmunidad, alergia y cáncer. El análisis discriminante lineal es un método multivariante de clasificación supervisada para agrupar a los sujetos a partir de encontrar combinaciones lineales de un número de variables. Objetivo: identificar las características que mejor explican la pertenencia de pacientes pediátricos con inmunodeficiencias primarias a un grupo de defectos o a una enfermedad. Material y método: estudio analítico transversal en el que a partir de una base de datos preexistente, con registros clínicos y de laboratorio de 168 pacientes con inmunodeficiencia primaria, seguidos en el Instituto Nacional de Pediatría de 1991 a 2012, construimos modelos discriminantes lineales para explicar la pertenencia de cada paciente a los diferentes grupos de defectos y a las inmunodeficiencias primarias más prevalentes en nuestro registro. Luego de una corrida preliminar se incluyeron únicamente las 30 variables (4 demográficas, 10 clínicas, 10 de laboratorio y 6 gérmenes) de mayor peso, a partir de las que se construyeron los modelos de entrenamiento con el algoritmo paso-a-paso (stepwise) hacia atrás, utilizando selección automatizada de variables e incorporación manual “teórica” por un experto humano. Se evaluó la utilidad clínica de los modelos resultantes (sensibilidad, especificidad, exactitud y coeficiente kappa), con intervalos de confianza de 95%. Resultados: los modelos incluyeron 6 a 14 variables para explicar la pertenencia de 168 pacientes con inmunodeficiencias primarias a los cinco grupos más numerosos (combinados, anticuerpos, bien definidos, desregulación y fagocitosis) y las cuatro enfermedades más prevalentes (agammaglobulinemia ligada al cromosoma X, enfermedad granulomatosa crónica, inmunodeficiencia común variable y ataxia-telangiectasia). Prácticamente en todos los casos el desempeño de la máquina fue superior al del experto humano en lo que respecta a la selección de los atributos más pertinentes para incorporar en los modelos. La predicción del diagnóstico con base en las ecuaciones construidas tuvo exactitud global de 83 a 94%, con sensibilidad de 60 a 100%, especificidad de 83 a 95% y coeficiente kappa de 0.37 a 0.76. Conclusiones: la selección de variables, en general, tiene plausibilidad clínica y tiene la ventaja práctica de utilizar solamente atributos clínicos, gérmenes encontrados y estudios de laboratorio de rutina (biometría hemática e inmunoglobulinas séricas). El desempeño del modelo como herramienta de predicción fue aceptable. Las principales limitaciones del estudio incluyen un tamaño de muestra limitado, lo que no permitió que realizáramos validación cruzada en la evaluación. Éste es solamente un primer paso en la construcción de un sistema de aprendizaje automático, con un abordaje más amplio que incluya una base de datos más grande y diferentes metodologías, para asistir el diagnóstico clínico de las inmunodeficiencias primarias.

  13. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  14. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype–phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  15. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  16. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype–phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  17. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr Induces DNA Replication Stress In Vitro and In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Erik S.; Sherman, Michael P.; Blackett, Jana L.; Neidleman, Jason A.; Kreis, Christophe; Mundt, Pamela; Williams, Samuel A.; Warmerdam, Maria; Kahn, James; Hecht, Frederick M.; Grant, Robert M.; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Greene, Warner C.; Planelles, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) causes cell cycle arrest in G2. Vpr-expressing cells display the hallmarks of certain forms of DNA damage, specifically activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related kinase, ATR. However, evidence that Vpr function is relevant in vivo or in the context of viral infection is still lacking. In the present study, we demonstrate that HIV-1 infection of primary, human CD4+ lymphocytes causes G2 arrest in a Vpr-dependent manner and that this response requires ATR, as shown by RNA interference. The event leading to ATR activation in CD4+ lymphocytes is the accumulation of replication protein A in nuclear foci, an indication that Vpr likely induces stalling of replication forks. Primary macrophages are refractory to ATR activation by Vpr, a finding that is consistent with the lack of detectable ATR, Rad17, and Chk1 protein expression in these nondividing cells. These observations begin to explain the remarkable resilience of macrophages to HIV-1-induced cytopathicity. To study the in vivo consequences of Vpr function, we isolated CD4+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals and interrogated the cell cycle status of anti-p24Gag-immunoreactive cells. We report that infected cells in vivo display an aberrant cell cycle profile whereby a majority of cells have a 4N DNA content, consistent with the onset of G2 arrest. PMID:16956949

  19. PID15, a novel 6 kDa secreted peptide, mediates Naja naja venom phospholipase A2 induced apoptosis in isolated human peripheral lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Snake venoms are a complex mixture of active principles mainly peptides and proteins also including amino acids, nucleotides, free lipids, carbohydrates and metallic elements bound to proteins that interfere in several biological systems. In this study, we aimed to understand the mode of action of the apoptosis inducing ability of Naja naja venom phospholipase A2 (NV-PLA2) using isolated human peripheral lymphocytes. Results Human peripheral lymphocytes when incubated with Naja naja venom phospholipase A2 (NV-PLA2) induced up to 68% DNA fragmentation. The dialysed conditioned media obtained by incubating lymphocytes with NV-PLA2 at 15th min induced 44% DNA fragmentation, referred to as cmlp-active. Cmlp-active showed 20.5% increased protein concentration than the corresponding control condition media cmlp-c-15. Test for creatine kinase activity in cmlp-active proved negative and negligible amount of lactate dehydrogenase did not show significant DNA fragmentation. Fractionation of cmlp-active on Sephadex G-25 showed two peaks, major peak induced 38% DNA fragmentation, which was further rechromatographed on Sephadex G-25. The single peak obtained was named PID15 (Phospholipase A 2 Induced DNA fragmentation factor secreted at 15 th min). Q-Tof MS/MS analysis of PID-15 showed it is a 6 kDa peptide. PID15 sequence analysis gave 40 amino acids in the following order, msilpcknvs iwvikdtaas dkevvlgsdr aikflylatg. The homology search for the sequence revealed it to be an Apoptosis Inducing Factor (AIF). Conclusion Results indicate that the secretion of PID15 is dependent on concentration of NV-PLA2 treatment, incubation time and also on temperature and the probable membrane origin of PID15 and not of cytosolic origin with apoptosis inducing ability. PMID:25030355

  20. Structure-function analysis of yeast piD261/Bud32, an atypical protein kinase essential for normal cell life.

    PubMed

    Facchin, Sonia; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Stocchetto, Silvia; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Cesaro, Luca; Marin, Oriano; Carignani, Giovanna; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2002-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YGR262c/BUD32 gene, whose disruption causes a severe pleiotropic phenotype, encodes a 261-residue putative protein kinase, piD261, whose structural homologues have been identified in a variety of organisms, including humans, and whose function is unknown. We have demonstrated previously that piD261, expressed in Escherichia coli as a recombinant protein, is a Ser/Thr kinase, as judged by its ability to autophosphorylate and to phosphorylate casein. Here we describe a mutational analysis showing that, despite low sequence similarity, the invariant residues representing the signature of protein kinases are conserved in piD261 and in its structural homologues, but are embedded in an altered context, suggestive of unique mechanistic properties. Especially noteworthy are: (i) three unique inserts of unknown function within the N-terminal lobe, (ii) the lack of a lysyl residue which in all other Ser/Thr kinases participates in the catalytic event by interacting with the transferred ATP gamma-phosphate, and which in piD261 is replaced by a threonine, and (iii) an exceedingly short activation loop including two serines, Ser-187 and Ser-189, whose autophosphorylation accounts for the appearance of an upshifted band upon SDS/PAGE. A mutant in which these serines are replaced by alanines was devoid of the upshifted band and displayed reduced catalytic activity. This would include piD261 in the category of protein kinases activated by phosphorylation, although it lacks the RD (Arg-Asp) motif which is typical of these enzymes.