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Sample records for primary management choice

  1. College Choice+Enrollment Management = Enrollment Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the interaction between students and institutions as they move toward decisions related to college attendance. Enrollment managers will find this information useful as they work within their institution to develop and revise long-term recruiting strategies that benefit both the institution and future students. Typically,…

  2. [Determinants of primary care specialty choice].

    PubMed

    Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Bielecki, Jan

    2007-03-01

    This paper analyzes and synthesizes the literature on primary care specialty choice. Motivation for choosing medicine and its impact on recruitment to different types of medical work has been presented. Factors that influence medical students and young doctors to change specialty preference have also been explored. Variables, such as gender, martial status, age, income expectations and prestige, that affect medical students' specialty selection decisions for primary care, have been examined. Personality profiles of primary care physician have been evaluated and the influence of communication skills and knowledge of social psychology on his/her work have been analyzed. It is presented that other traits, such as patient-centeredness, needs to serve society and value orientation, is also associated with increases in numbers of students choosing primary care. The analyze shows that the preference for primary care is connected with being interested in diverse patients and health problems and also with being people-orientated. A survey conducted into Polish medical students' attitudes to primary care and family medicine is presented. There is a negative perception of family medicine among Polish students and doctors because of its long work hours and less time for family, insufficient diagnostic possibilities and monotony It is chosen because of lack of other possibilities, difficulties in employment and opportunity to become 'a specialist' in short time.

  3. Primary Influencers of Initial Vocational Choices for College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weishaar, Marjorie E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Most students, regardless of gender, were influenced by males, particularly fathers. However, a notable percentage of female students, especially those in traditional fields, were influenced by females. Students whose primary influencers were in fields closely related to their own vocational choices reported being more certain of their choices.…

  4. Career Choice and Primary Care in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Schiess, Nicoline; Ibrahim, Halah; Shaban, Sami; Perez, Maria Nichole; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Background  The low number of medical trainees entering primary care is contributing to the lack of access to primary care services in many countries. Despite the need for primary care physicians in the Middle East, there is limited information regarding trainees' career choices, a critical determinant in the supply of primary care physicians. Objective  We analyzed the career choices of medical students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), with a larger goal of reforming postgraduate training in the region and enhancing the focus on primary care. Methods  We conducted a cross-sectional survey of applicants to a large established internal medicine residency program in the UAE. We calculated data for demographics, subspecialty choice, and factors affecting subspecialty choice, and we also reported descriptive statistics. Results  Our response rate was 86% (183 of 212). Only 25% of applicants (n = 46) were interested in general internal medicine. The majority of respondents (n = 126, 69%) indicated a desire to pursue subspecialty training, and the remainder chose careers in research or administration. A majority of respondents (73%) were women, unmarried, and childless. Educational debt or lifestyle were not indicated as important factors in career choice. Conclusions  Low interest in primary care was similar to that in many Western countries, despite a much higher percentage of female applicants and a reduced emphasis on lifestyle or income factors in career decisions. Reasons for the reduced interest in primary care deserve further exploration, as do tests of interventions to increase interest, such as improving the primary care clerkship experience. PMID:26692983

  5. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Samer L; Witjes, Johannes Alfred; Kassouf, Wassim

    2016-11-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation therapy in women. There are no clear-cut indications for the choice of the most appropriate treatment modality. Organ-preserving modalities have shown effective and should be used whenever they do not compromise the oncological safety to decrease the physical and psychological trauma of dismemberment or loss of sexual/urinary function.

  6. Host nutritive quality and host plant choice in two grass miners: primary roles for primary compounds?

    PubMed

    Scheirs, Jan; De Bruyn, Luc; Verhagen, Ron

    2003-06-01

    The relationship between host plant choice and plant nutritional quality was investigated in two oligophagous grass miners Chromatomyia milii and C. nigra (Diptera, Agromyzidae). We tested whether host choice is determined by chemically mediated host suitability for offspring performance and/or adult performance. A second goal was to relate the observed variation among the different fitness parameters to quantitative and qualitative variation in foliar food quality. Choice experiments illustrated that both miners discriminated among grass species, and that C. milii has a smaller host range than C. nigra, as observed under natural conditions. Oviposition preference was correlated with adult feeding preference and related adult performance (longevity and fecundity) for both miners. Offspring performance measures (survival and pupal size) of at least C. nigra were more weakly related to host preference. Nearly all variation in adult performance of both miners was explained by foliar protein content, which had a positive effect on adult longevity and fecundity. Pupal size of both miners was positively related to foliar water and amino acid content and negatively related to lignin content. No clear relationship between host chemistry and offspring survival was observed. These observations show that fitness parameters are differentially related to host chemistry. Secondly, they suggest that chemically mediated host suitability for adult performance is an important determinant of host choice in this species. Finally, the results suggest a primary role for foliar protein content in host choice of the study species in general and in shaping the host range of C. milii in particular.

  7. Knowledge Management Technology: Making Good Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Linda D. R.; Coukos, Eleni D.; Pisapia, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the reliability of technology products that support knowledge management, particularly in higher education. Presents a conceptual framework for knowledge management technology, evaluates available software products, concludes that most products perform poorly, and offers recommendations for knowledge management strategies. (LRW)

  8. Public perspectives on health human resources in primary healthcare: context, choices and change.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sandra; Wong, Sabrina T; Watson, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors identified by patients as relevant to health human resources (HHR) planning for primary healthcare (PHC). Eleven focus groups were conducted in British Columbia and a thematic analysis was undertaken, informed by a needs-based HHR planning framework. Three themes emerged: (a) the importance of geographic context, (b) change management at the practice level and (c) the need for choices and changes in delivery of PHC. Findings suggest that more attention could be focused on overcoming geographic barriers to providing services, change management within office-based practices, and providing support structures that allow primary care providers to work closer to their full scope of practice. That these factors align with many strategic directions set out by government and planners signals the readiness for change in how PHC is delivered and HHR planned.

  9. Factors Influencing Career Choice of Management Students in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwala, Tanuja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the influence of a range of factors on the career choice of management students in India. The importance of different individuals in the family and at work in making career choices among these students is also to be explored. In addition, the study seeks to address the relationship of the cultural values of…

  10. Choice-Based Segmentation as an Enrollment Management Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents an approach to enrollment management based on target marketing strategies developed from a choice-based segmentation methodology. Students are classified into "switchable" or "non-switchable" segments based on their probability of selecting specific majors. A modified multinomial logit choice model is used to identify…

  11. Management Of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Bimaljit S.

    2006-01-01

    Management of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) can be divided into endoscopic, medical, and surgical treatments. Whereas endoscopic therapy is primarily used to manage dominant strictures, medical treatment is directed both at modifying course of the disease and at symptomatic relief. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the most promising disease-modifying agent. Corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents do not have a proven role. Cholestyramine and rifampicin improve pruritis but response to these agents cannot be reliably predicted. Opioid antagonists are useful in refractory pruritis. All patients with advanced PSC should be offered bone mineral-density measurement and, if needed, treatment for osteoporosis. These approaches are not mutually exclusive and are often used concurrently or in sequence depending on the clinical situation. Liver transplantation is the only therapy that improves survival. In this review, we discuss the various management options for PSC.

  12. Perspectives on "Choice and Challenge" in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses "Choice and Challenge" as a tool for school improvement and as a "practicable pedagogy" that attempts to embody the principles of "learning without limits," rejecting ability grouping and labelling. As considered here, "Choice and Challenge" emerges specifically from practice at the…

  13. Identity as the Primary Determinant of Language Choice in Valencia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Raquel Casesnoves; Sankoff, David

    2003-01-01

    Examines the determinants of language choice using sociodemographic, behavioral, and ideological data on a sample of 180 high school students in the city of Valencia, Spain and the neighboring town of Xativa. Evaluates the relative importance of sociodemographic and ideological factors on the choice of Valencian or Castilian in several contexts…

  14. Career Choice in Management: Findings from US MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Eddy S. W.; Burke, Ronald J.; Fiksenbaum, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to explore the role of values, family, and non-family influences on career choice in management among a sample of US MBA students. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires from 109 students in a mid-sized university located on the west coast of the USA. The respondents were in…

  15. Choice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jay

    2008-09-01

    Understanding how and why analysands make the choices they do is central to both the clinical and the theoretical projects of psychoanalysis. And yet we know very little about the process of choice or about the relationship between choices and motives. A striking parallel is to be found between the ways choice is narrated in ancient Greek texts and the experience of analysts as they observe patients making choices in everyday clinical work. Pursuing this convergence of classical and contemporary sensibilities will illuminate crucial elements of the various meanings of choice, and of the way that these meanings change over the course of psychoanalytic treatment.

  16. The Surprising Influence of Delayed Primary Reinforcement on Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Margaret A.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the duration of the delay between a response and consequence is inversely related to the impact of that consequence on future responding, and even short delays can greatly undermine the effectiveness of a consequence. However, several studies have shown that delayed primary reinforcement can have a substantial impact on…

  17. Patient Choice for Older People in English NHS Primary Care: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Andrew J. E.; Sanders, Frances; Lara, Antonieta Medina; van Teijlingen, Edwin R.; Wood, Cate; Galpin, Di; Baron, Sue; Crowe, Sam; Sharma, Sheetal

    2014-01-01

    In the English National Health Service (NHS), patients are now expected to choose the time and place of treatment and even choose the actual treatment. However, the theory on which patient choice is based and the implementation of patient choice are controversial. There is evidence to indicate that attitudes and abilities to make choices are relatively sophisticated and not as straightforward as policy developments suggest. In addition, and surprisingly, there is little research on whether making individual choices about care is regarded as a priority by the largest NHS patient group and the single largest group for most GPs—older people. This conceptual paper examines the theory of patient choice concerning accessing and engaging with healthcare provision and reviews existing evidence on older people and patient choice in primary care. PMID:24967329

  18. Management Philosophies of Primary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Said

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the management philosophies of primary school principals. Stratification method of sampling was used in the study. The study sample consisted of 33 school principals and 132 teachers serving at primary education schools in Isparta in the academic year 2008-2009. The "Manager Philosophy Scale" developed by Tanriogen and…

  19. Primary amenorrhea: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Courtney A; Grimstad, Frances W

    2014-10-01

    Puberty is a defining time of many adolescents' lives. It is a series of events that includes thelarche, pubarche, and menarche. Primary amenorrhea is the absence of menarche. There are numerous etiologies including outflow tract obstructions, gonadal dysgenesis, and anomalies of the hypothalamic axis. This review's aims are to define primary amenorrhea and describe the various causes, their workups, associated comorbidities, and treatment options. At the end, a generalist should be able to perform an assessment of an adolescent who presents with primary amenorrhea and, if warranted, begin initial treatment.

  20. Integrating Bipolar Disorder Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodrich, David E.; O’Donnell, Allison N.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care management, and measurement-based care, are well-established in primary care settings, and may help primary care practitioners manage bipolar disorder. However, further research is required to adapt CCMs to support complexities in diagnosing persons with bipolar disorder, and integrate decision-making processes regarding medication safety and tolerability in primary care. Additional implementation studies are also needed to adapt CCMs for persons with bipolar disorder in primary care, especially those seen in smaller practices with limited infrastructure and access to mental health care. PMID:23001382

  1. An Expanded Conceptual Framework of Medical Students' Primary Care Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Pfarrwaller, Eva; Audétat, Marie-Claude; Sommer, Johanna; Maisonneuve, Hubert; Bischoff, Thomas; Nendaz, Mathieu; Baroffio, Anne; Junod Perron, Noëlle; Haller, Dagmar M

    2017-04-04

    In many countries, the number of graduating medical students pursuing a primary care career does not meet demand. These countries face primary care physician shortages. Students' career choices have been widely studied, yet many aspects of this process remain unclear. Conceptual models are useful to plan research and educational interventions in such complex systems.The authors developed a framework of primary care career choice in undergraduate medical education, which expands on previously published models. They used a group-based, iterative approach to find the best way to represent the vast array of influences identified in previous studies, including in a recent systematic review of the literature on interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing a primary care career. In their framework, students enter medical school with their personal characteristics and initial interest in primary care. They complete a process of career decision making, which is subject to multiple interacting influences, both within and outside medical school, throughout their medical education. These influences are stratified into four systems-microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, and macrosystem-which represent different levels of interaction with students' career choices.This expanded framework provides an updated model to help understand the multiple factors that influence medical students' career choices. It offers a guide for the development of new interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing primary care careers and for further research to better understand the variety of processes involved in this decision.

  2. Managing coastal area resources by stated choice experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wirtz, Kai W.

    2010-02-01

    In many coastal regions, oil spills can be considered as one of the most important and certainly the most noticeable forms of marine pollution. Efficient contingency management responding to oil spills on waters, which aims at minimizing pollution effects on coastal resources, turns out to be critically important. Such a decision making highly depends on the importance attributed to different coastal economic and ecological resources. Economic uses can, in principal, be addressed by standard measures such as value added. However, there is a missing of market in the real world for natural goods. Coastal resources such as waters and beach cannot be directly measured in money terms, which increases the risk of being neglected in a decision making process. This paper evaluates these natural goods of coastal environment in a hypothetical market by employing stated choice experiments. Oil spill management practice in German North Sea is used as an example. Results from a pilot survey show that during a combat process, beach and eider ducks are of key concerns for households. An environmental friendly combat option has to be a minor cost for households. Moreover, households with less children, higher monthly income and a membership of environmental organization are more likely to state that they are willing to pay for combat option to prevent coastal resources from an oil pollution. Despite that choice experiments require knowledge of designing questionnaire and statistical skills to deal with discrete choices and conducting a survey is time consumed, the results have important implications for oil spill contingency management. Overall, such a stated preference method can offer useful information for decision makers to consider coastal resources into a decision making process and can further contribute to finding a cost-effective oil preventive measure, also has a wide application potential in the field of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM).

  3. Demographic, Educational, and Psychosocial Factors Influencing the Choices of Primary Care and Academic Medical Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubeck, Robert F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 246 primary care and 90 academic physicians found that for the former, length of training, direct patient contact, and threats of malpractice suits were significant influences in career choice. For the latter, long-term research participation, intellectual stimulation, specialty content, and mentor or role model were more significant…

  4. Managing depression in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kerry A.; Wolfe, Vicky V.; Fisman, Sandra; DePace, JoAnne; Steele, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ practice patterns for managing depression and mental health concerns among adolescent and adult patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING London, Ont, a mid-sized Canadian city. PARTICIPANTS One hundred sixty-three family physicians identified through the London and District Academy of Medicine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Practice patterns for managing depression, including screening, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, shared care, and training needs. RESULTS Response rate was 63%. Family physicians reported spending a substantial portion of their time during patient visits (26% to 50%) addressing mental health issues, with depression being the most common issue (51% to 75% of patients with mental health issues). About 40% of respondents did routine mental health screening, and 60% screened patients with risk factors for depression. Shared care with mental health professionals was common (care was shared for 26% to 50% of patients). Physicians and patients were moderately satisfied with shared care, but were frustrated by long waiting lists and communication barriers. Most physicians provided psychotherapy to patients in the form of general advice. Differences in practice patterns were observed; physicians treated more adults than adolescents with depression, and they reported greater comfort in treating adults. Although 33% of physicians described using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), they reported having little training in CBT. Moderate interest was expressed in CBT training, with a preference for a workshop format. CONCLUSION Although 40% of family physicians routinely screen patients for mental health issues, depression is often not detected. Satisfaction with shared care can be increased through better communication with mental health professionals. Physicians’ management of adolescent patients can be improved by further medical training, consultation, and collaboration with mental health professionals

  5. Choice of biodiversity index drives optimal fire management decisions.

    PubMed

    Giljohann, K M; McCarthy, M A; Kelly, L T; Regan, T J

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of biodiversity is a central goal of conservation management, yet the conditions that promote persistence may differ for the species in the community. For systems subject to stochastic disturbances such as fire, understanding which management practices promote persistence for all species in a community is complex. Before deciding on the best course of action, an objective must be specified. Yet an overarching goal of species persistence can be specified into a measureable objective many different ways. We investigated four alternative management objectives for maximizing species persistence that use common biodiversity indices: (1) attaining the minimally acceptable mix of successional vegetation states to support species' relative abundances, (2) maximizing the arithmetic mean abundance of species, (3) maximizing the geometric mean abundance of species, and (4) minimizing the average extinction risk of species. We used stochastic dynamic programming to model successional changes in vegetation in the presence of both planned and unplanned fires, and utilize an extensive data set on the occurrence of birds, reptiles, and small mammals in different successional states in semiarid Australia. We investigated the influence the choice of objective function and taxonomic focus has on the optimal fire management recommendations. We also evaluated a recent hazard reduction policy to annually burn a fixed amount of the landscape and compare results to the optimal solution. The optimal management strategy to maximize species persistence over a 100-year period is predominantly to minimize wildfires. This is because the majority of species are more likely to occur in intermediate, and late successional vegetation. However the optimal solution showed sensitivity to the objective and the species included in the analysis. These results highlight the need for careful consideration when specifying an objective to represent overarching conservation goals. Using the

  6. Variation in Predictors of Primary Care Career Choice by Year and Stage of Training

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Peters, Antoinette S; Clark-Chiarelli, Nancy; Zotov, Natasha; Martin, Nina; Simon, Steven R; Singer, Judith D; Block, Susan D

    2003-01-01

    CONTEXT It is not known whether factors associated with primary care career choice affect trainees differently at different times or stages of medical education. OBJECTIVE To examine how role models, encouragement, and personal characteristics affect career choice at different stages (medical school vs residency) and periods (1994 vs 1997) of training. DESIGN A split-panel design with 2 cross-sectional telephone surveys and a panel survey in 1994 and 1997. PARTICIPANTS A national probability sample of fourth-year students (307 in 1994, 219 in 1997), 645 second-year residents in 1994, and 494 third-year residents in 1997. Of the fourth-year students interviewed in 1994, 241 (78.5%) were re-interviewed as third-year residents in 1997. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Primary care (general internal medicine, general pediatrics, or family medicine) career choice. RESULTS Having a primary care role model was a stronger predictor of primary care career choice for residents (odds ratio [OR], 18.0; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 11.2 to 28.8 in 1994; OR, 43.7; 95% CI, 24.4 to 78.3 in 1997) than for students (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 4.3 to 10.2; no variation by year). Likewise, peer encouragement was more predictive for residents (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 3.3 to 8.9 in 1994; OR, 16.6; 95% CI; 9 .7 to 28.4 in 1997) than for students (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.3 to 3.2; no variation by year). Orientation to the emotional aspects of care was consistently associated with primary care career choice across stages and years of training. CONCLUSIONS The effect of peer encouragement and role models on career choice differed for students and residents and, in the case of residents, by year of training, suggesting that interventions to increase the primary care workforce should be tailored to stage of training. PMID:12648246

  7. Use of the NHS Choices website for primary care consultations: results from online and general practice surveys

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joanna; Majeed, Azeem; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Lee, John Tayu; Nelson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of using the NHS Choices website on primary care consultations in England and Wales. We examined the hypothesis that using NHS Choices may reduce the frequency of primary care consultations among young, healthy users. Design Two cross-sectional surveys of NHS Choices users. Setting Survey of NHS Choices users using an online pop-up questionnaire on the NHS Choices website and a snapshot survey of patients in six general practices in London. Participants NHS Choices website users and general practice patients. Main outcome measures For both surveys, we measured the proportion of people using NHS Choices when considering whether to consult their GP practice and on subsequent frequency of primary care consultations. Results Around 59% (n = 1559) of online and 8% (n = 125) of general practice survey respondents reported using NHS Choices in relation to their use of primary care services. Among these, 33% (n = 515) of online and 18% (n = 23) of general practice respondents reported reduced primary care consultations as a result of using NHS Choices. We estimated the equivalent capacity savings in primary care from reduced consultations as a result of using NHS Choices to be approximately £94 million per year. Conclusions NHS Choices has been shown to alter healthcare-seeking behaviour, attitudes and knowledge among its users. Using NHS Choices results in reduced demand for primary care consultations among young, healthy users for whom reduced health service use is likely to be appropriate. Reducing potentially avoidable consultations can result in considerable capacity savings in UK primary care. PMID:21847438

  8. Primary urban energy-management-planning methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, Joseph; Meador, Toni

    1980-11-01

    Metropolitan Dade County, Florida, developed a pragmatic, transferable methodology to assist local governments in attempts to develop and implement energy management plans. A summary of that work is presented and suggestions are provided to guide the application and refinement of a Primary Urban Energy Management Planning Methodology. The methodology provides local governments with the systematic approach for dealing with short and intermediate-term urban energy management problems while at the same time laying the groundwork for the formulation of long-term energy management activities. The five tasks of the methodology summarized are: organizing for the PEP process; performing an energy use and supply inventory; formulating energy management goals and objectives; developing strategies to achieve the energy management objectives; and monitoring and evaluation. (MCW)

  9. Development of an allergy management support system in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Flokstra - de Blok, Bertine MJ; van der Molen, Thys; Christoffers, Wianda A; Kocks, Janwillem WH; Oei, Richard L; Oude Elberink, Joanne NG; Roerdink, Emmy M; Schuttelaar, Marie Louise; van der Velde, Jantina L; Brakel, Thecla M; Dubois, Anthony EJ

    2017-01-01

    Background Management of allergic patients in the population is becoming more difficult because of increases in both complexity and prevalence. Although general practitioners (GPs) are expected to play an important role in the care of allergic patients, they often feel ill-equipped for this task. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an allergy management support system (AMSS) for primary care. Methods Through literature review, interviewing and testing in secondary and primary care patients, an allergy history questionnaire was constructed by allergists, dermatologists, GPs and researchers based on primary care and specialists’ allergy guidelines and their clinical knowledge. Patterns of AMSS questionnaire responses and specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE)-test outcomes were used to identify diagnostic categories and develop corresponding management recommendations. Validity of the AMSS was investigated by comparing specialist (gold standard) and AMSS diagnostic categories. Results The two-page patient-completed AMSS questionnaire consists of 12 (mainly) multiple choice questions on symptoms, triggers, severity and medication. Based on the AMSS questionnaires and sIgE-test outcome of 118 patients, approximately 150 diagnostic categories of allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, anaphylaxis, food allergy, hymenoptera allergy and other allergies were identified, and the corresponding management recommendations were formulated. The agreement between the allergy specialists’ assessments and the AMSS was 69.2% (CI 67.2–71.2). Conclusion Using a systematic approach, it was possible to develop an AMSS that allows for the formulation of diagnostic and management recommendations for GPs managing allergic patients. The AMSS thus holds promise for the improvement of the quality of primary care for this increasing group of patients. PMID:28352197

  10. Understanding performance management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Lisa; Boaden, Ruth

    2017-02-13

    Purpose Principal-agent theory (PAT) has been used to understand relationships among different professional groups and explain performance management between organisations, but is rarely used for research within primary care. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether PAT can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care. Design/methodology/approach Purposive sampling was used to identify a range of general practices in the North-west of England. Interviews were carried out with directors, managers and clinicians in commissioning and regional performance management organisations and within general practices, and the data analysed using matrix analysis techniques to produce a case study of performance management. Findings There are various elements of the principal-agent framework that can be applied in primary care. Goal alignment is relevant, but can only be achieved through clear, strategic direction and consistent interpretation of objectives at all levels. There is confusion between performance measurement and performance management and a tendency to focus on things that are easy to measure whilst omitting aspects of care that are more difficult to capture. Appropriate use of incentives, good communication, clinical engagement, ownership and trust affect the degree to which information asymmetry is overcome and goal alignment achieved. Achieving the right balance between accountability and clinical autonomy is important to ensure governance and financial balance without stifling innovation. Originality/value The principal-agent theoretical framework can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care; although it is likely that only partial goal alignment will be achieved, dependent on the extent and level of alignment of a range of factors.

  11. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  12. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  13. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  14. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  15. Management of primary megaureter in infancy.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, F; Madonna, L; Maggi, E; Piacenti, S; Bonanni, M; Roggini, M; Capocaccia, P; Pachí, A

    1993-08-01

    The natural history of primary megaureter was evaluated in 26 infants (20 boys, 6 girls) with 38 nonrefluxing primary megaureters. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis had been made in 21 infants. In all patients, primary megaureter was associated with pelvicaliceal dilatation. Two patients with urinary tract infection and two with agenesis of the contralateral kidney underwent surgical treatment. Asymptomatic infants with good differential renal function on DTPA scanning were managed conservatively regardless of their postfurosemide drainage curve. One of these infants later developed a slight deterioration in function and was submitted to surgery. One patient was lost to follow-up. Twenty patients, after a period ranging from 4 months to 8 years, showed partial or complete regression of ureteral dilatation with stable good renal function. In conclusion, many asymptomatic primary megaureters in infancy improve spontaneously and do not require surgical treatment.

  16. Risk preferences in strategic wildfire decision making: a choice experiment with U.S. wildfire managers.

    PubMed

    Wibbenmeyer, Matthew J; Hand, Michael S; Calkin, David E; Venn, Tyron J; Thompson, Matthew P

    2013-06-01

    Federal policy has embraced risa management as an appropriate paradigm for wildfire management. Economic theory suggests that over repeated wildfire events, potential economic costs and risas of ecological damage are optimally balanced when management decisions are free from biases, risa aversion, and risa seeking. Of primary concern in this article is how managers respond to wildfire risa, including the potential effect of wildfires (on ecological values, structures, and safety) and the likelihood of different fire outcomes. We use responses to a choice experiment questionnaire of U.S. federal wildfire managers to measure attitudes toward several components of wildfire risa and to test whether observed risa attitudes are consistent with the efficient allocation of wildfire suppression resources. Our results indicate that fire managers' decisions are consistent with nonexpected utility theories of decisions under risa. Managers may overallocate firefighting resources when the likelihood or potential magnitude of damage from fires is low, and sensitivity to changes in the probability of fire outcomes depends on whether probabilities are close to one or zero and the magnitude of the potential harm.

  17. Spotlight on advances in VTE management: CALLISTO and EINSTEIN CHOICE.

    PubMed

    Bach, Miriam; Bauersachs, Rupert

    2016-09-28

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with numerous complications and high mortality rates. Patients with cancer are at high risk of developing cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), and VTE recurrence is common. Evidence supporting use of non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with cancer is lacking - direct comparisons between NOACs and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) are needed, along with patient-reported outcomes. Cancer Associated thrombosis - expLoring soLutions for patients through Treatment and Prevention with RivarOxaban (CALLISTO) is an international research programme exploring the potential of the direct, oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban for the prevention and treatment of CAT, supplementing existing data from EINSTEIN DVT and EINSTEIN PE. Here, we focus on four CALLISTO studies: A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Rivaroxaban Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Ambulatory Cancer Participants receiving Chemotherapy (CASSINI), Anticoagulation Therapy in SELECTeD Cancer Patients at Risk of Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism (SELECT-D), Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients - a Randomized Phase III Study (CONKO-011) and a database analysis. Optimal anticoagulation duration for VTE treatment has always been unclear. Following favourable results for rivaroxaban 20 mg once-daily (Q. D.) for secondary VTE prevention (EINSTEIN EXT), EINSTEIN CHOICE is assessing rivaroxaban safety and (20 mg Q. D. or 10 mg Q. D.) vs acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), and will investigate whether an alternative rivaroxaban dose (10 mg Q. D.) could offer long-term VTE protection. It is anticipated that results from these studies will provide important answers and expand upon current evidence for rivaroxaban in VTE management.

  18. Medication Management in Primary and Secondary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Reutzel, Thomas; Watkins, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To identify whether and how pharmacy faculty members are addressing the issue of medication management in primary or secondary schools in their teaching, research, and service activities, and to ascertain the extent to which they think the issue is an important one. Methods Four hundred ninety-nine faculty members completed a questionnaire inquiring about the research, teaching, and service activities in which they participated that related to medication management in schools. Results Only 33 subjects (6.6%) addressed the topic of medication management in schools in their courses; only 13 (2.6%) conducted research on the topic; and only 30 (6%) were involved in service in this area. On the other hand, 432 respondents (86.6%) believed that the issue of medication management in schools was either somewhat or extremely important. Conclusions There is a large gap between the number of subjects that think medication management in schools is an important topic and the number who actually include the topic in teaching, research, and or service. PMID:17136150

  19. Knowledge of primary health care and career choice at primary health care settings among final year medical students - challenges to human resources for health in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Giang, Kim Bao; Minh, Hoang Van; Hien, Nguyen Van; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Hinh, Nguyen Duc

    2015-01-01

    There is a shortage of medical doctors in primary health care (PHC) settings in Vietnam. Evidence about the knowledge medical students have about PHC and their career decision-making is important for making policy in human resources for health. The objective of this study was to analyse knowledge and attitudes about PHC among medical students in their final year and their choice to work in PHC after graduation. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 400 final year general medical students from Hanoi Medical University. Self-administered interviews were conducted. Key variables were knowledge, awareness of the importance of PHC and PHC career choices. Descriptive and analytic statistics were performed. Students had essential knowledge of the concept and elements of PHC and were well aware of its importance. However, only one-third to one half of them valued PHC with regard to their professional development or management opportunities. Less than 1% of students would work at commune or district health facilities after graduation. This study evidences challenges related to increasing the number of medical doctors working in PHC settings. Immediate and effective interventions are needed to make PHC settings more attractive and to encourage medical graduates to start and continue a career in PHC.

  20. Development of Educational Management System in Small Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsammarry, Yupayao; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Duangcharthom, Surat

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the research were: (1) to study the factors of Educational Management System in Small Primary School; (2) to investigate current situations problems and guidelines of developing educational management in small primary school; (3) to develop Educational Management System in Small Primary School; and (4) to examine the results of…

  1. Negotiating and managing partnership in primary care.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, J

    2001-09-01

    In the UK public service organisations are increasingly working together in new partnerships, networks and alliances, largely stimulated by government legislation, which aims to encourage 'joined-up' policy-making. This is particularly prevalent in health-care where local government, health authorities and trusts, voluntary and community groups are extending existing, and developing new, forms of partnership, particularly around Health Improvement Programmes and new primary care organisations. This paper explores two main aspects of how these new interorganizational relationships are being developed and managed and is based on research conducted in one case study locality. First, the new structures of partnership in primary care are mapped out, together with discussion on why these particular patterns of relationship between statutory and voluntary sector organisations have emerged, exploring both centrally and locally determined influences. Secondly, the paper explores the tensions associated with working within new policy-making and management structures, and how the additional demands of audit, performance measurement and the sheer pace of change, pose a potential threat to the partnership process.

  2. Free Choice of Learning Management Systems: Do Student Habits Override Inherent System Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Gavin W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although multiple studies examine institutional transitions of learning management systems (LMS) or compare their merits, studies examining students' free choice of access on parallel LMSs for the same course are absent from the literature. In order to investigate usage in a free-choice situation, identical content was posted at the same…

  3. District nurses' experiences with the free-choice system in Swedish primary care.

    PubMed

    Hollman, Djana; Lennartsson, Sandra; Rosengren, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to describe the experiences of district nurses regarding their work situation after the free-choice system in primary care in Sweden was implemented. The study comprised a total of 17 semi-structured narratives with district nurses. The narratives were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis. One category,'being an underused resource', and three subcategories, 'being financially aware','being flexible' and 'being appealing', were identified. A focus on economic benefit can limit the cooperation and exchange of experiences within and between different care units, which could have a negative impact on the quality of care due to competition between different care providers. Underused resources and restrictions in terms of improvement skills have an impact on job satisfaction and the working environment, and affect the quality of care as a result.

  4. Women in construction management: Creating a theory of career choice and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jennifer Dawn

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a theory of women's career choice and development in the context of the construction industry. Focused on female constructors, or those engaged in the management of construction projects or companies, this study investigated the relevant factors, processes, and experiences of women who choose to enter the construction industry through construction management degree programs. The goal was to communicate as a theoretically and practically grounded theory of career choice and development an understanding of who female constructors are and those factors which led them to the construction industry and those influencing their career development. As a grounded theory research design, qualitative research methods were employed as the primary means of collecting and analyzing data. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to garner a sample of 24 women who had graduated within a ten year period and were actively employed as constructors. Participants' views and experiences, captured through small focus group interviews, were analyzed with quantitative data of demographics, education, construction experience, self-efficacy, personality, and career satisfaction and commitment gathered from a written questionnaire, to create a profile of female constructors used in this theory. The profiles completed from these data are complex, providing for an extensive understanding of their career choice and development process. The strongest common characteristic in the career development of these women was a mentor. This influence in cannot be overlooked, especially in light of the rather constant sense of isolation many of these women expressed as a significant minority in every facet of their careers. Recommendations for academia and industry are in many ways related to these findings. Recommendations for recruitment center on educating youth and those able to influence the career choice making process of youth about the career paths available

  5. Improving patient access and choice: Assisted Bibliotherapy for mild to moderate stress/anxiety in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T; Stace, J M

    2005-06-01

    Current traditional methods of mental healthcare service delivery, based on 'specialists' providing 'outpatient appointments' for formal therapy, are often inappropriate for the needs of patients in primary care. The estimated numbers of adults with mental health problems are immense, and it is this, combined with Department of Health initiatives aimed at improving choice and access, which make it essential that new ways of delivering services are explored. This trial examines the use of an assisted self-help treatment package for mild to moderate stress/anxiety [Assisted Bibliotherapy (AB)] with an adult clinical population referred by their general practitioner. Assisted Bibliotherapy is a brief intervention (8 weeks), with limited therapist contact (20-min sessions). Non-parametric statistical testing of scores from the Zung Anxiety Scale and the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE) questionnaire indicated positive results. There was significant improvement at post-treatment, which was maintained at 3 month follow-up. The results from this trial and a previous trial of AB by Kupshik & Fisher in 1999, indicate that it is an effective treatment which could be used as part of a stepped care approach to managing and treating stress/anxiety in primary care.

  6. Preferred Primary Healthcare Provider Choice Among Insured Persons in Ashanti Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Boachie, Micheal Kofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In early 2012, National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) members in Ashanti Region were allowed to choose their own primary healthcare providers. This paper investigates the factors that enrolees in the Ashanti Region considered in choosing preferred primary healthcare providers (PPPs) and direction of association of such factors with the choice of PPP. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, the study sampled 600 NHIS enrolees in Kumasi Metro area and Kwabre East district. The sampling methods were a combination of simple random and systematic sampling techniques at different stages. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse demographic information and the criteria for selecting PPP. Multinomial logistic regression technique was used to ascertain the direction of association of the factors and the choice of PPP using mission PPPs as the base outcome. Results: Out of the 600 questionnaires administered, 496 were retained for further analysis. The results show that availability of essential drugs (53.63%) and doctors (39.92%), distance or proximity (49.60%), provider reputation (39.52%), waiting time (39.92), additional charges (37.10%), and recommendations (48.79%) were the main criteria adopted by enrolees in selecting PPPs. In the regression, income (-0.0027), availability of doctors (-1.82), additional charges (-2.14) and reputation (-2.09) were statistically significant at 1% in influencing the choice of government PPPs. On the part of private PPPs, availability of drugs (2.59), waiting time (1.45), residence (-2.62), gender (-2.89), and reputation (-2.69) were statistically significant at 1% level. Presence of additional charges (-1.29) was statistically significant at 5% level. Conclusion: Enrolees select their PPPs based on such factors as availability of doctors and essential drugs, reputation, waiting time, income, and their residence. Based on these findings, there is the need for healthcare providers to improve on their quality levels

  7. Condom Tamponade in the Management of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Report of three cases in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ernest T; Buntugu, Kennedy A; Aki, Lovelace; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K

    2015-09-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the major causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The leading cause of primary postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony and active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin is recommended for preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage. Parenteral oxytocin is also the drug of choice for medical management of postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Condom uterine balloon tamponade is .a low cost technique that can be used as a second-line option for treatment. We report retrospectively three cases of primary PPH secondary to uterine atony which were managed successfully with condom tamponade. Condom tamponade is effective in managing post partum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony and we advocate for the training of all skilled attendants on how to insert the condom tamponade.

  8. Better Choices: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Behavior Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acuna, Miguel T.

    2011-01-01

    Managing student behavior is often looked upon as a sidebar in teaching. The lack of formal classroom management training in teacher education programs reveals the low importance placed on this skill. As a result, teachers are often very well prepared to instruct, but in terms of effectively understanding the behavior of students--particularly…

  9. What factors influence choice of waste management practice? Evidence from rice straw management in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Launio, Cheryll C; Asis, Constancio A; Manalili, Rowena G; Javier, Evelyn F; Belizario, Annabelle F

    2014-02-01

    This study applied a multinomial logit model to understand why farmers choose to burn, incorporate or remove rice straw in the field. Four hundred randomly selected farmers were interviewed in four major rice-producing provinces covering the 2009 wet and 2010 dry seasons. Results of the model with burning as the baseline category indicate farm type, location dummies, number of household members with older than 13 years, cow ownership and distance from farm to house as significant variables influencing farmers' choice of straw incorporation or removal over burning. Significant perception variables are the negative impacts of open-field burning, awareness of environmental regulations and attitude towards incentives. Other factors significantly influencing the decision to incorporate over-burn are training attendance and perceptions of effects of straw incorporation. Income from non-rice farming, total area cultivated, tenure status, presence of burning and solid waste management provincial ordinances are significant factors affecting choice to remove over burn. Continually providing farmers' training in rice production, increasing demand for rice straw for other uses, and increasing awareness of environmental laws and regulations are policy directions recommended.

  10. Factors Influencing the Likelihood of Choice of Gaelic-Medium Primary Education in Scotland: Results from a National Public Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Fiona; Paterson, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the factors influencing the likelihood of choice of Gaelic-medium primary education in Scotland by means of the analysis of a national survey of public attitudes conducted in 2012. Binary logistic regression is used to investigate the association of five dimensions found in previous literature to be associated with the…

  11. Rumour Has It: The Impact of Maternal Talk on Primary School Choice for Children Diagnosed with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Rozanna

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the pivotal role of rumour in shaping primary school choice decisions for parents of children diagnosed with autism. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 22 mothers conducted in Sydney, Australia, this study points to the varied functions of grapevine knowledge about schools gleaned in diverse contexts, including early…

  12. Caries Management Strategies for Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, R.M.; Innes, N.P.T.; Machiulskiene, V.; Evans, D.J.P.; Splieth, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal invasive approaches to managing caries, such as partial caries removal techniques, are showing increasing evidence of improved outcomes over the conventional complete caries removal. There is also increasing interest in techniques where no caries is removed. We present the 1-yr results of clinical efficacy for 3 caries management options for occlusoproximal cavitated lesions in primary molars: conventional restorations (CR; complete caries removal and compomer restoration), Hall technique (HT; no caries removal, sealing in with stainless steel crowns), and nonrestorative caries treatment (NRCT; no caries removal, opening up the cavity, teaching brushing and fluoride application). In sum, 169 children (3-8 yr old; mean, 5.56 ± 1.45 yr) were enrolled in this secondary care–based, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial. Treatments were carried out by specialist pediatric dentists or postgraduate trainees. One lesion per child received CR, HT, or NRCT. Outcome measures were clinical failure rates, grouped as minor failure (restoration loss/need for replacement, reversible pulpitis, caries progression, etc.) and major failure (irreversible pulpitis, abscess, etc.). There were 148 children (87.6%) with a minimum follow-up of 11 mo (mean, 12.23 ± 0.98 mo). Twenty teeth were recorded as having at least 1 minor failure: NRCT, n = 8 (5%); CR, n = 11 (7%); HT, n = 1 (1%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Only the comparison between NRCT and CR showed no significant difference (p = .79, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.80). Nine (6%) experienced at least 1 major failure: NRCT, n = 4 (2%); CR, n = 5 (3%); HT, n = 0 (0%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Individual comparison of NRCT and CR showed no statistically significant difference in major failures (p = .75, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.76). Success and failure rates were not significantly affected by pediatric dentists’ level of experience (p = .13, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.14). The HT was significantly more successful

  13. Women in Municipal Management: Choice, Challenge and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Ruth Ann; And Others

    This study on women in municipal management examines their personal agendas, the barriers they encounter as individual professionals, their career opportunities, the credentialing requirements they face, and the skills they perceive as necessary for their effective performance and career advancement. Data were collected through survey research,…

  14. Management of glaucoma in pregnancy: risks or choices, a dilemma?

    PubMed

    Sethi, Harinder Singh; Naik, Mayuresh; Gupta, Vishnu Swarup

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of glaucoma in and around pregnancy offers the unique challenge of balancing the risk of vision loss to the mother as against the potential harm to the fetus or newborn. Most anti-glaucoma drugs (i.e. beta-blockers, prostaglandin analogues, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors topical and systemic, cholinergics, anticholinesterases, and apraclonidine) are considered category C agents and ophthalmologists are usually limited to treating patients with the category B drugs of brimonidine and dipivefrin. Brimonidine is generally the preferred first-line drug in the first, second and early third trimester. Late in the third trimester, brimonidine should be discontinued because it can induce central nervous system depression in newborns wherein topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors may be the optimal choice. Glaucoma surgery can be performed with caution in second and third trimester if the patients have a strong indication for the procedure. However, anesthetics, sedative agents, and antimetabolites still have potential risk for the fetus. Argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) or selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is an alternative treatment that can be performed in all trimesters. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and β-blockers are certified by the American Academy of Pediatrics for use during nursing. However, low doses of these medications should be considered when used in the breast feeding period. Optimum treatment for glaucoma in pregnancy must not be withheld so as to prevent any further deterioration in progressive vision loss and quality of life.

  15. Management of glaucoma in pregnancy: risks or choices, a dilemma?

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Harinder Singh; Naik, Mayuresh; Gupta, Vishnu Swarup

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of glaucoma in and around pregnancy offers the unique challenge of balancing the risk of vision loss to the mother as against the potential harm to the fetus or newborn. Most anti-glaucoma drugs (i.e. beta-blockers, prostaglandin analogues, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors topical and systemic, cholinergics, anticholinesterases, and apraclonidine) are considered category C agents and ophthalmologists are usually limited to treating patients with the category B drugs of brimonidine and dipivefrin. Brimonidine is generally the preferred first-line drug in the first, second and early third trimester. Late in the third trimester, brimonidine should be discontinued because it can induce central nervous system depression in newborns wherein topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors may be the optimal choice. Glaucoma surgery can be performed with caution in second and third trimester if the patients have a strong indication for the procedure. However, anesthetics, sedative agents, and antimetabolites still have potential risk for the fetus. Argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) or selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is an alternative treatment that can be performed in all trimesters. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and β-blockers are certified by the American Academy of Pediatrics for use during nursing. However, low doses of these medications should be considered when used in the breast feeding period. Optimum treatment for glaucoma in pregnancy must not be withheld so as to prevent any further deterioration in progressive vision loss and quality of life. PMID:27990376

  16. Influencing dressing choice and supporting wound management using remote 'tele-wound care'.

    PubMed

    King, Brenda

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a local involvement in a project to evaluate a remote system of wound management, incorporating the use of digital and mobile technology. It outlines how this involvement influenced the current system of 'tele wound care' (remote wound management) in a large community organisation. The system allows remote wound assessment, management advice and ongoing monitoring of wounds to ensure that the dressing choice remains appropriate and that timely wound care support can be provided to community nurses, practice nurses and GPs.

  17. Primary hyperparathyroidism in the 1990s. Choice of surgical procedures for this disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, E L; Yashiro, T; Salti, G

    1992-01-01

    Many advances have occurred in recent years in the diagnosis, localization, and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism. Several different operative choices for primary hyperparathyroidism also have been proposed--a unilateral approach versus the standard bilateral parathyroid exploration. The unilateral approach is based on the concept that if an enlarged parathyroid gland and a normal gland are found on the first side of the neck that is explored, then this is an adenoma and the second side should not be explored. Only if both glands on the initial side are recognized to be abnormal is the second side explored. The theoretical advantages of this unilateral approach are a decrease in operative morbidity rates--hypoparathyroidism and nerve injuries--and a decrease in operative time. Furthermore, proponents argue that if persistent hyperparathyroidism occurs, the second side can be easily explored because it was previously untouched. In the hands of several expert parathyroid surgeons, excellent results have been achieved. However, the unilateral approach has a number of disadvantages. It places considerable pressure on the surgeon and pathologist, for they have only one parathyroid gland other than the large one to examine. There is a significant potential risk of missing double adenomas or asymmetric hyperplasia because the second, ipsilateral parathyroid gland may appear normal or near normal in these conditions. This could lead to an increased incidence of persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism. Furthermore, a significant reduction of operative time may be questioned, especially when the time for performing special fat stains, which often are performed with unilateral explorations, is added. Finally, even if the intent is to perform a unilateral exploration, a bilateral exploration will be necessary about half of the time. The authors strongly recommend a bilateral parathyroid exploration for all patients undergoing an initial parathyroid operation. In

  18. School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2006-01-01

    Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

  19. The health plan choices of retirees under managed competition.

    PubMed Central

    Buchmueller, T C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of price on the health insurance decisions of Medicare-eligible retirees in a managed competition setting. DATA SOURCE: The study is based on four years of administrative data from the University of California (UC) Retiree Health Benefits Program, which closely resembles the managed competition model upon which several leading Medicare reform proposals are based. STUDY DESIGN: A change in UC's premium contribution policy between 1993 and 1994 created a unique natural experiment for investigating the effect of price on retirees' health insurance decisions. This study consists of two related analyses. First, I estimate the effect of changes in out-of-pocket premiums between 1993 and 1994 on the decision to switch plans during open enrollment. Second, using data from 1993 to 1996, I examine the extent to which rising premiums for fee-for-service Medigap coverage increased HMO enrollment among Medicare-eligible UC retirees. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Price is a significant factor affecting the health plan decisions of Medicare-eligible UC retirees. However, these retirees are substantially less price sensitive than active UC employees and the non-elderly in other similar programs. This result is likely attributable to higher nonpecuniary switching costs facing older individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Although it is not clear exactly how price sensitive enrollees must be in order to generate price competition among health plans, the behavioral differences between retirees and active employees suggest that caution should be taken in extrapolating from research on the non-elderly to the Medicare program. PMID:11130806

  20. Venous access in haemophilic children: choice and management.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, E; Mancuso, M E

    2010-01-01

    Current haemophilia treatment in children is based on regular intravenous infusions of concentrates for prolonged periods, according to prophylaxis regimens or immune tolerance induction treatment, in cases of inhibitor development. Therefore, a stable and uncomplicated venous access is required and as such peripheral veins represent the preferred option. However, frequent infusions in the home setting can be problematic in very young children and for this reason, central venous access devices (CVADs) have been widely used to improve treatment feasibility. Unfortunately CVADs' use is associated with a high rate of complications, and infections and thrombotic occlusion can influence treatment outcome by causing unwanted treatment interruption. CVADs can be grouped into three main categories: external non-tunnelled, external tunnelled and fully implantable devices known as ports. The management of CVADs at home often represents a challenge because a strict adherence to sterile procedures is required. Indeed, the incidence of infections with ports is much lower than that reported for external devices; however, ports carry the inconvenience of needle sticks. More recently, arteriovenous fistula was shown to be a suitable alternative to CVADs because it is easy to use and is associated with a lower rate of complication.

  1. Training managers for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kekki, P

    1994-01-01

    The University of Helsinki has devised a powerful in-service training course for managers of health centres. By working together at the University and their own centres on setting objectives, analysing data and solving problems, the participants greatly enhance their management and teamwork skills.

  2. Primary Management and Outcome – Open Laryngotracheal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, Prashanth; Yempalle, Supriya Baswaraj; Karnam, Lavanya

    2017-01-01

    Acute external injury to the larynx is both life threatening and a potential long term management challenge. As Otorhinolaryngologist we must be prepared and well versed to manage these patients. In our study seven patients of open laryngeal traumas were managed by primary closure. In five patients nature of injury was known in other two patients exact nature of injury was not known. After primary closure five patients with known injury survived and two patients with unknown injury died. As per our experience, we recommend primary closure, if the exact nature of injury is known as the outcome is definitely favourable. PMID:28384898

  3. Teaching Teachers about Supply Chain Management to Influence Students' Career and Education Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Leslie L.

    2013-01-01

    Since teachers are influential in high school students' career choices, enabling high school teachers to introduce educational and career opportunities in supply chain management is a viable strategy for reaching high school students about these opportunities. This article presents a pilot program of supply chain workshops to educate high school…

  4. The Use of Management and Marketing Textbook Multiple-Choice Questions: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, David R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Four management and four marketing professors classified multiple-choice questions in four widely adopted introductory textbooks according to the two levels of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives: knowledge and intellectual ability and skill. Inaccuracies may cause instructors to select questions that require less thinking than they intend.…

  5. The Role of Culture and Gender in the Choice of a Career in Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malach-Pines, Ayala; Kaspi-Baruch, Oshrit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper addresses the influence of culture and gender on the choice of a management career among men and women MBA students in Israel, the USA, the UK, Turkey, Cyprus, Hungary and India. The culture by gender comparison enabled an examination of five theories: two that focused on culture (Hofstede's and an application of Schneider's ASA…

  6. How to manage burns in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Waitzman, A. A.; Neligan, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    Burns are common injuries; more than 200,000 occur in Canada annually. Nearly all burn injuries can be managed on on outpatient basis. Appropriate treatment depends on burn depth, extent, and location. Special types of burns, such as chemical, tar, and electrical injuries, need specific management strategies. Prevention through education is important to reduce the incidence of burns. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8268745

  7. Crisis Management in a Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Colette

    2004-01-01

    Dunblane Primary School, Scotland, and Columbine High School, USA. Two headline tragedies that have led to trauma for their pupils and staff. Trauma that could be devastating because of the psychological impact and the practical requirements a crisis brings. Children's social and personal development can be negatively affected, their academic…

  8. Primary and managed care. Ingredients for health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Bindman, A B

    1994-01-01

    The use of primary and managed care is likely to increase under proposed federal health care reform. I review the definition of primary care and primary care physicians and show that this delivery model can affect access to medical care, the cost of treatment, and the quality of services. Because the use of primary care is often greater in managed care than in fee-for-service, I compare the two insurance systems to further understand the delivery of primary care. Research suggests that primary care can help meet the goal of providing accessible, cost-effective, and high-quality care, but that changes in medical education and marketplace incentives will be needed to encourage students and trained physicians to enter this field. PMID:7941522

  9. Application of Total Quality Management System in Thai Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prueangphitchayathon, Setthiya; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn

    2015-01-01

    The present study seeks to develop a total quality management (TQM) system that can be applied to primary schools. The approach focuses on customer orientation, total involvement of all constituencies and continuous improvement. TQM principles were studied and synthesized according to case studies of the best practices in 3 primary schools (small,…

  10. Dental management of traumatic injuries to the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Dummett, C O

    2000-11-01

    There is considerable information on traumatic injury management of permanent teeth. However, there are no conclusive guidelines for treating traumatized primary teeth. This article will summarize a number of issues relative to primary dentition trauma and provide a system for treatment.

  11. Rare bleeding disorders in children: identification and primary care management.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Suchitra S

    2013-11-01

    Bleeding symptoms are common in healthy children but occasionally may indicate an underlying congenital or acquired bleeding diathesis. The rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) comprise inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors I (congenital fibrinogen deficiencies), II, V, VII, X, XI, and XIII and combined factor deficiencies, most notably of factors V and VIII and of vitamin K-dependent factors. These disorders often manifest during childhood and may present with recurrent or even serious or life-threatening bleeding episodes, particularly during the neonatal period. Accordingly, primary care and other nonhematologist pediatric providers should be familiar with the clinical presentation and initial evaluation of these rare disorders. Bleeding manifestations generally vary within the same RBD and may be indistinguishable from 1 RBD to another or from other more common bleeding disorders. Serious bleeding events such as intracranial hemorrhage may be heralded by less serious bleeding symptoms. The results of initial coagulation studies, especially prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, are often helpful in narrowing down the potential factor deficiency, with factor XIII deficiency being an exception. Consultation with a hematologist is advised to facilitate accurate diagnosis and to ensure proper management and follow-up. The approach to bleeding episodes and invasive procedures is individualized and depends on the severity, frequency, and, in the case of procedures, likelihood of bleeding. Prophylaxis may be appropriate in children with recurrent serious bleeding and specifically after life-threatening bleeding episodes. When available, specific purified plasma-derived or recombinant factor concentrates, rather than fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate, are the treatment of choice.

  12. Hypertension management: the primary care nursing role.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ehsan Ullah

    2005-03-01

    Hypertension is a prevalent chronic illness that is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Practice nurses and the district nursing team have a major role to play in its management. In this article, current British Hypertension Society guidelines are presented and discussed with regards to their evidence base. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.

  13. [Surgical management of primary bone cancer].

    PubMed

    Anract, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Patients with primary bone malignancies must be treated by specialized multidisciplinary teams composed of pathologists, surgeons, orthopedists, oncologists, radiologists and radiotherapists, all with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of these tumors. If a malignancy is suspected, the biopsy must also be performed in such a center. Biopsy is part of the treatment and must be done by a senior surgeon, before starting specific treatment. Indeed, inappropriate biopsy can compromise the patient's functional prognosis and sometimes the vital outcome. The biopsy can be done percutaneously under radiological control with a True-cut needle or a trocart to obtain cores of pathological tissue. The pathologist must be well-versed in bone disorders. Open surgical biopsy is preferable for primary bone tumors, especially when a cartilaginous tumor is suspected. A short incision is used, situated on the same approach as that which will be used for surgical resection of the tumor, so that the biopsy scar is excised along with the tumor, in a single block. Surgical treatment of primary bone malignancies requires extensive resection, i.e. excision of the affected bone segment and any invaded soft tissues, as a single block, without breaching the tumor, and preserving a peripheral margin of healthy tissue. In most cases, reconstruction is necessary to preserve the function of the resected region. It is based on standard orthopedic techniques, namely osteosynthesis, bone grafts (autografts and allografts), prostheses of variable size, or a combination of prostheses and allografts (composite reconstruction). Amputation is only indicated if conservative resection is impossible. It has been shown that conservative resection, now possible in about 80% of cases, does not reduce the survival chances of patients with osteosarcoma. The indications for amputation include massive tumors invading vessels and nerves, resection of which would leave the limb non functional, as sell as tumor

  14. Surgical management in primary congenital glaucoma: four debates.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ta C; Cavuoto, Kara M

    2013-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma is a worldwide diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although medical management is often a temporizing measure, early surgical intervention is the definitive treatment. As the abundance of surgical treatment options continues to expand, the authors will compare and contrast the available options and attempt to provide a consensus on surgical management.

  15. The Management of Small Primary Schools: The Case of Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiakkiros, Andreas; Pashiardis, Petros

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of Cypriot teachers on the management of small primary schools. From the wide range of issues identified in the literature, seven areas were chosen for examination: management and leadership; teachers in small schools; advice and support; pupils in small schools; curriculum and…

  16. Chronic disease management: the primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Bragaglia, Pauline; O'Brien, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    This response to the essay is a "view from the trenches" by two doctors who have worked over 23 years at the Group Health Centre in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. We would agree wholeheartedly that reducing wait times for selected procedures will not transform our health system, although they are a start that does provide improved quality of life for a relatively small number of people. We have struggled with the care gap between known best practices and the reality of care provided, from the perspectives of both prevention and chronic disease management. This has resulted in an acute awareness of the need for an across-the-system, "bottom-up" approach to the prevention of disease and management of healthcare. Limited resources must be carefully leveraged in innovative ways if we are to eliminate this care gap, decrease morbidity and minimize expensive "rescue" procedures that make our system increasingly unaffordable.

  17. Primary Care Management of Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Thomas J; Tankersley, Zach J; Qazi, Zain N; Jasko, John J; Odono, Russell; Shuler, Franklin D

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is present in 10% of the population and is the most common cause of plantar heel pain. PF is painful, can alter daily activities and presents as a sharp pain localized to the plantar foot and medial heel. The underlying etiology involves microtrauma to the plantar fascia, specifically at its insertion point on the calcaneus. Successful management of plantar fasciitis is typically achieved with the conservative therapy approaches discussed.

  18. Diagnosis and management of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmad H; Carey, Elizabeth J; Lindor, Keith D

    2014-12-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized histologically by destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts and serologically by the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies. The incidence and prevalence of PBC are increasing. Fatigue and pruritus are common symptoms in PBC, although the proportion of asymptomatic PBC is increasing due to the widespread use of screening biochemical tests and antimitochondrial antibody assays. PBC may eventually lead to cirrhosis and its consequent complications. In the 1980s, PBC was the leading indication for liver transplantation. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the only US FDA-approved therapeutic agent for PBC. Clinical trials have shown that the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in PBC results in reduction of liver biochemistries, a delay in histological progression, a delay in the development of varices and improvement in survival without liver transplantation.

  19. Diagnosis and management of primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jane S; Burgess, Andrea; Mitchison, Hannah M; Moya, Eduardo; Williamson, Michael; Hogg, Claire

    2014-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited autosomal-recessive disorder of motile cilia characterised by chronic lung disease, rhinosinusitis, hearing impairment and subfertility. Nasal symptoms and respiratory distress usually start soon after birth, and by adulthood bronchiectasis is invariable. Organ laterality defects, usually situs inversus, occur in ∼50% of cases. The estimated prevalence of PCD is up to ∼1 per 10,000 births, but it is more common in populations where consanguinity is common. This review examines who to refer for diagnostic testing. It describes the limitations surrounding diagnosis using currently available techniques and considers whether recent advances to genotype patients with PCD will lead to genetic testing and screening to aid diagnosis in the near future. It discusses the challenges of monitoring and treating respiratory and ENT disease in children with PCD.

  20. Primary healthcare in transition – a qualitative study of how managers perceived a system change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare in Sweden has undergone widespread reforms in recent years, including freedom of choice regarding provider, freedom of establishment and increased privatisation. The key aims of the reforms were to strengthen the role of the patient and improve performance in terms of access and responsiveness. The aim of this study was to explore how managers at publicly owned primary healthcare centres perceived the transition of the primary healthcare system and the impact it has had on their work. Methods In this qualitative study, 24 managers of publicly owned primary healthcare centres in the metropolitan region of Gothenburg were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data were analysed using content analysis inspired by Silverman. Results The analysis revealed two core themes: The transition is perceived as a rapid change, enforced mainly through financial incentives and Prioritisation conflicts arise between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment. The transition has produced powerful and rapid effects that were considered to be both positive and negative. While the new financial incentives were seen as a driving force and a tool for change, they also became a stress factor due to uncertainty, competition with other primary healthcare centres and negative feelings associated with staff cutbacks. The shift in power towards the patient improved access and service but also led to more patients with unreasonable demands. Managers found it difficult to prioritise correctly between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment and they were concerned about potentially negative effects on less empowered patients, e.g. multi-morbid patients. Managers also experienced shortcomings in their change management skills. Conclusions This qualitative study shows the complexity of the system change and describes the different effects and perceptions of the transition from a manager

  1. Impact of an informed choice invitation on uptake of screening for diabetes in primary care (DICISION): trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Eleanor; Prevost, A Toby; Griffin, Simon; Kellar, Ian; Sutton, Stephen; Parker, Michael; Sanderson, Simon; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Marteau, Theresa M

    2009-01-01

    Background Screening invitations have traditionally been brief, providing information only about population benefits. Presenting information about the limited individual benefits and potential harms of screening to inform choice may reduce attendance, particularly in the more socially deprived. At the same time, amongst those who attend, it might increase motivation to change behavior to reduce risks. This trial assesses the impact on attendance and motivation to change behavior of an invitation that facilitates informed choices about participating in diabetes screening in general practice. Three hypotheses are tested: 1. Attendance at screening for diabetes is lower following an informed choice compared with a standard invitation. 2. There is an interaction between the type of invitation and social deprivation: attendance following an informed choice compared with a standard invitation is lower in those who are more rather than less socially deprived. 3. Amongst those who attend for screening, intentions to change behavior to reduce risks of complications in those subsequently diagnosed with diabetes are stronger following an informed choice invitation compared with a standard invitation. Method/Design 1500 people aged 40–69 years without known diabetes but at high risk are identified from four general practice registers in the east of England. 1200 participants are randomized by households to receive one of two invitations to attend for diabetes screening at their general practices. The intervention invitation is designed to facilitate informed choices, and comprises detailed information and a decision aid. A comparison invitation is based on those currently in use. Screening involves a finger-prick blood glucose test. The primary outcome is attendance for diabetes screening. The secondary outcome is intention to change health related behaviors in those attenders diagnosed with diabetes. A sample size of 1200 ensures 90% power to detect a 10% difference in

  2. Management and outcome of primary vaginismus.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Cherng-Jye; Wang, Lih-Rong; Chou, Chun-Shan; Shen, Jenta; Tzeng, Chii-Ruey

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to access the success rate, and the factors affecting it, of treatment based on Masters and Johnson's sex therapy. For this prospective study, we enrolled 120 couples with unconsummated coitus due to vaginismus. We made a clinical diagnosis after taking a detailed history taking and conducting a clinical examination. Participants completed a questionnaire regarding characteristics of vaginismus after participating in a face-to-face interview. Both of these were done prior to treatment, after 3 months, and after 12 months. We provided sex therapy based on Masters and Johnson's method. Treatment results were then analyzed. After therapy, 93.3% of vaginismic women were successfully penetrated, and 83.3% had regular intercourse with orgasm. The abilities to reach orgasm and sexual desire were not different than that among normal women. There was a correlation between duration of unconsummation and success rate and also between severity of vaginismus, treatment sessions, and success rate. Because of our high success rate, we encourage vaginismic women and their partners to accept aggressive management.

  3. Primary care management of opioid use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anita; Kahan, Meldon; Nader, Maya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To advise physicians on which treatment options to recommend for specific patient populations: abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance, or methadone maintenance. Sources of information PubMed was searched and literature was reviewed on the effectiveness, safety, and side effect profiles of abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, and methadone treatment. Both observational and interventional studies were included. Main message Both methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone are substantially more effective than abstinence-based treatment. Methadone has higher treatment retention rates than buprenorphine-naloxone does, while buprenorphine-naloxone has a lower risk of overdose. For all patient groups, physicians should recommend methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone treatment over abstinence-based treatment (level I evidence). Methadone is preferred over buprenorphine-naloxone for patients at higher risk of treatment dropout, such as injection opioid users (level I evidence). Youth and pregnant women who inject opioids should also receive methadone first (level III evidence). If buprenorphine-naloxone is prescribed first, the patient should be promptly switched to methadone if withdrawal symptoms, cravings, or opioid use persist despite an optimal buprenorphine-naloxone dose (level II evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is recommended for socially stable prescription oral opioid users, particularly if their work or family commitments make it difficult for them to attend the pharmacy daily, if they have a medical or psychiatric condition requiring regular primary care (level IV evidence), or if their jobs require higher levels of cognitive functioning or psychomotor performance (level III evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is also recommended for patients at high risk of methadone toxicity, such as the elderly, those taking high doses of benzodiazepines or other sedating drugs, heavy drinkers, those with a lower

  4. Nurse/physician conflict management mode choices: implications for improved collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Tova; Fish, Miri; Berger, Ornit

    2007-01-01

    In today's complex healthcare organizations, conflicts between physicians and nurses occur daily. Consequently, organizational conflict has grown into a major subfield of organizational behavior. Researchers have claimed that conflict has a beneficial effect on work group function and identified collaboration as one of the intervening variables that may explain the relationship between magnet hospitals and positive patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare conflict mode choices of physicians and head nurses in acute care hospitals and examine the relationship of conflict mode choices with their background characteristics. In a cross-sectional correlational study, 75 physicians and 54 head nurses in 5 hospitals were surveyed, using the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument. No difference was found between physicians and nurses in choice of the most frequently used mode in conflict management. The compromising mode was found to be the significantly most commonly chosen mode (P = .00) by both. Collaborating was chosen significantly more frequently among head nurses (P = .001) and least frequently among physicians (P = .00). Most of the respondents' characteristics were not found to be correlated with mode choices. The findings indicate a need to enhance partnerships in the clinical environment to ensure quality patient care and staff satisfaction.

  5. Management of Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Can We Do Better?

    PubMed

    Sharata, Ahmed; Kelly, Tracy L; Rozenfeld, Yelena; Hammill, Chet W; Schuman, Earl; Carlisle, James R; Aliabadi-Wahle, Shaghayegh

    2017-01-01

    The failure to follow national guidelines in management of various diseases has been previously established. We sought to quantify primary care providers' familiarity with primary hyperparathyroidism as it affects adherence to the 2009 National Institute of Health (NIH) consensus recommendations in treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism. A large primary care group was surveyed to determine their familiarity with the 2009 NIH consensus recommendations for management of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Retrospective review of the group's records (2009-2011) was performed to verify compliance. Survey responders included 109 clinicians, 31 per cent were familiar with all criteria for surgical intervention in asymptomatic patients and 34 per cent correctly identified appropriate surveillance testing for patients undergoing observation. Chart review identified 124 patients with PHPT. Of the patients who met NIH criteria, 34 per cent had a parathyroidectomy. Younger age, higher intact parathyroid hormone, hypercalciuria, and history of nephrolithiasis were associated with surgery in multivariable analysis. Of the observed patients, 16 per cent had appropriate surveillance studies. In conclusion, this study confirms suboptimal adherence with consensus recommendations in management of PHPT. A minority of clinicians demonstrated solid familiarity with management strategies, paralleling their treatment approach. Educational efforts may improve adherence with upcoming national recommendations.

  6. Giant Inguinal Herniae Managed by Primary Repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Madhur; Naku, Narang; Hajong, Debobratta; Singh, K Lenish

    2017-01-01

    Giant inguinal hernia are usually found in developing countries due to delay in seeking medical attention. The management of such hernias may sometimes require procedures to increase the intra-peritoneal capacity prior to the repair of the giant hernia. Otherwise patients may develop abdominal compartment syndrome leading to various unwanted complications. Primary repair of giant hernias are possible in some cases without having significant post-operative complications. In this present case series, we have managed a total of four patients of giant inguinal hernia by primary repair without much post-operative complications. PMID:28384934

  7. Administration to innovation: the evolving management challenge in primary care.

    PubMed

    Laing, A; Marnoch, G; McKee, L; Joshi, R; Reid, J

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the primary health-care team involving an increasingly diverse range of health care professionals is widely recognized as central to the pursuit of a primary care-led health service in the UK. Although GPs are formally recognized as the team leaders, there is little by way of policy prescription as to how team roles and relationships should be developed, or evidence as to how their roles have in fact evolved. Thus the notion of the primary health-care team while commonly employed, is in reality lacking definition with the current contribution of practice managers to the operation of this team being poorly understood. Focusing on the career backgrounds of practice managers, their range of responsibilities, and their involvement in innovation in general practice, presents a preliminary account of a chief scientist office-funded project examining the role being played by practice managers in primary health-care innovation. More specifically, utilizing data gained from the ongoing study, contextualizes the role played by practice managers in the primary health-care team. By exploring the business environment surrounding the NHS general practice, the research seeks to understand the evolving world of the practice manager. Drawing on questionnaire data, reinforced by qualitative data from the current interview phase, describes the role played by practice managers in differing practice contexts. This facilitates a discussion of a set of ideal type general practice organizational and managerial structures. Discusses the relationships and skills required by practice managers in each of these organizational types with reference to data gathered to date in the research.

  8. Diagnosis and management of primary cicatricial alopecia: part I.

    PubMed

    Otberg, Nina; Wu, Wen-Yu; McElwee, Kevin John; Shapiro, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    In this 2-part article, the authors review the primary cicatricial alopecias. Primary cicatricial alopecia can be defined as predominantly lymphocytic, neutrophilic, or mixed based on the nature of the follicular infiltrate that is present around affected hair follicles. Lymphocytic primary cicatricial alopecias include chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus (discoid lupus erythematosus), lichen planopilaris, classic pseudopelade of Brocq, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, alopecia mucinosa, and keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans. In this first part, the authors summarize the classification, epidemiology, diagnostic approach, and patient management of lymphocytic cicatricial alopecias. In part II, the authors will focus on neutrophilic cicatricial alopecias and mixed cicatricial alopecias.

  9. A framework for fibromyalgia management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J; Dunegan, L Jean; Turk, Dennis C

    2012-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder commonly associated with comorbid symptoms, including fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. As in the management of other chronic medical disorders, the approach for fibromyalgia management follows core principles of comprehensive assessment, education, goal setting, multimodal treatment including pharmacological (eg, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran) and nonpharmacological therapies (eg, physical activity, behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, education), and regular education and monitoring of treatment response and progress. Based on these core management principles, this review presents a framework for primary care providers through which they can develop a patient-centered treatment program for patients with fibromyalgia. This proactive and systematic treatment approach encourages ongoing education and patient self-management and is designed for use in the primary care setting.

  10. Choices for return of primary and secondary genomic research results of 790 members of families with Mendelian disease.

    PubMed

    Fiallos, Katie; Applegate, Carolyn; Mathews, Debra Jh; Bollinger, Juli; Bergner, Amanda L; James, Cynthia A

    2017-03-08

    Although consensus is building that primary (PR) and secondary findings (SF) from genomic research should be offered to participants under some circumstances, data describing (1) actual choices of study participants and (2) factors associated with these choices are limited, hampering study planning. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of choices made for return of PR and SF during informed consent by members of the first 247 families (790 individuals) enrolled in the Baylor-Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics, a genome sequencing study. Most (619; 78.3%) chose to receive SF and PR, 66 (8.4%) chose PR only, 65 (8.2%) wanted no results, and 40 (5.1%) chose SF only. Choosing SF was associated with an established clinical diagnosis in the proband (87.8 vs 79%, P=0.009) and European ancestry (EA) (87.7 vs 73%, P<0.008). Participants of non-European ancestry (NEA) were as likely as those of EA to choose SF when consented by a genetic counselor (GC) (82% NEA vs 88.3% EA, P=0.09) but significantly less likely when consented by a physician (67.4% NEA vs 85.4% EA, P=0.001). Controlling for proband diagnosis, individuals of NEA were 2.13-fold (95% CI: 1.11-4.08) more likely to choose SF when consented by a GC rather than a physician. Participants of NEA were 3-fold more likely than those of EA to decline all study results (14.7% NEA vs 5.4% EA, P<0.008). In this ethnically diverse population, whereas most participants desired PR and SF, more than 20% declined some or all results, highlighting the importance of research participant choice.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 8 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.21.

  11. Impact of an informed choice invitation on uptake of screening for diabetes in primary care (DICISION): randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Eleanor; Prevost, A Toby; Vasconcelos, Joana C; Kellar, Ian; Sanderson, Simon; Parker, Michael; Griffin, Simon; Sutton, Stephen; Kinmonth, Ann Louise

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of an invitation promoting informed choice for screening with a standard invitation on attendance and motivation to engage in preventive action. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Four English general practices. Participants 1272 people aged 40-69 years, at risk for diabetes, identified from practice registers using a validated risk score and invited to attend for screening. Intervention Intervention was a previously validated invitation to inform the decision to attend screening, presenting diabetes as a serious potential problem, and providing details of possible costs and benefits of screening and treatment in text and pie charts. This was compared with a brief, standard invitation simply describing diabetes as a serious potential problem. Main outcome measures The primary end point was attendance for screening. The secondary outcome measures were intention to make changes to lifestyle and satisfaction with decisions made among attenders. Results The primary end point was analysed for all 1272 participants. 55.8% (353/633) of those in the informed choice group attended for screening, compared with 57.6% (368/639) in the standard invitation group (mean difference −1.8%, 95% confidence interval −7.3% to 3.6%; P=0.51). Attendance was lower among the more deprived group (most deprived third 47.5% v least deprived third 64.3%; P<0.001). Interaction between deprivation and effect of invitation type on attendance was not significant. Among attenders, intention to change behaviour was strong and unaffected by invitation type. Conclusions Providing information to support choice did not adversely affect attendance for screening for diabetes. Those from more socially deprived groups were, however, less likely to attend, regardless of the type of invitation received. Further attention to invitation content alone is unlikely to achieve equity in uptake of preventive services. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN

  12. The effect of managed care on the incomes of primary care and specialty physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, C J; Dranove, D; White, W D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of managed care growth on the incomes of primary care and specialist physicians. DATA SOURCES: Data on physician income and managed care penetration from the American Medical Association, Socioeconomic Monitoring System (SMS) Surveys for 1985 and 1993. We use secondary data from the Area Resource File and U.S. Census publications to construct geographical socioeconomic control variables, and we examine data from the National Residency Matching Program. STUDY DESIGN: Two-stage least squares regressions are estimated to determine the effect of local managed care penetration on specialty-specific physician incomes, while controlling for factors associated with local variation in supply and demand and accounting for the potential endogeneity of managed care penetration. DATA COLLECTION: The SMS survey is an annual telephone survey conducted by the American Medical Association of approximately one percent of nonfederal, post-residency U.S. physicians. Response rates average 60-70 percent, and analysis is weighted to account for nonresponse bias. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The incomes of primary care physicians rose most rapidly in states with higher managed care growth, while the income growth of hospital-based specialists was negatively associated with managed care growth. Incomes of medical subspecialists were not significantly affected by managed care growth over this period. These findings are consistent with trends in postgraduate training choices of new physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence is consistent with a relative increase in the demand for primary care physicians and a decline in the demand for some specialists under managed care. Market adjustments have important implications for health policy and physician workforce planning. PMID:9685122

  13. Sustainable Assessment for Large Science Classes: Non-Multiple Choice, Randomised Assignments through a Learning Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a tool that generates randomised, non-multiple choice assessment within the BlackBoard Learning Management System interface. An accepted weakness of multiple-choice assessment is that it cannot elicit learning outcomes from upper levels of Biggs' SOLO taxonomy. However, written assessment items require…

  14. Inequality in the Transition from Primary to Secondary School: School Choices and Educational Disparities in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietsch, Marcus; Stubbe, Tobias C.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the mechanisms of educational pathway decision making at the transition from primary to secondary school in the German education system by analysing data from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS). The highly reliable data of the German sample of the 2001 PIRLS make it possible to take into…

  15. [Professional autonomy in the choice and management of therapy. Medicolegal aspects].

    PubMed

    Bolino, G; Alfano, C

    2002-02-01

    Any discussion of the delicate subject of a doctor's autonomy in the choice and management of therapy entails addressing the intimate question of professional and ethical conduct. The professional freedom to choose which therapy to use continues to be the most quintessential expression of the medical professional and, in respect of the primary purpose of safeguarding health, must be aligned with: the choices of the informed patient or his/her legal representatives, existing guidelines and the equitable allocation of resources. On these grounds, the author sets out brief considerations regarding a number of issues frequently raised in the everyday work of the pediatrician and neonatologist: from the doctor's autonomy to adopt a diagnostic-therapeutic approach, with special reference to the prescription of drugs and the subtle differences compared to pharmacological trials, to the promotion and protection of breastfeeding, with explicit reference to the Ministry of Health's recent Circular no. 16 of 24.10.2000 ("Promotion and protection of breastfeeding") which, following a cursory reading of the text, appears to highlight restrictions to the pediatrician's decision-making autonomy. Special emphasis is also given to the medicolegal problems of caring for high-risk neonates. The clinical practice of neonatology often places the doctor in "critical" decision-making situations, with far from negligible ethical and moral implications, not to mention juridical and forensic ones. The author sets out a number of decision-making parameters for use as guidelines: the statistical criterion, the legal criterion and the clinical criterion, the only one capable of adjusting to scientific progress and to the specific technical and professional resources of the medical centre where the doctor is required to intervene in order to preserve even the simple "possibility" of autonomous life for the fetus. From this point of view, the so-called chronological vitality and scientifically

  16. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays: An Unexpected Challenge for the Choice of an Assay in Primary Cervical Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ejegod, Ditte Møller; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41% tested positive on all four. Agreement was lower in women aged ≥30 years (30%, vs. 49% at <30 years), in primary screening samples (29%, vs. 38% in follow-up samples), and in women with concurrent normal cytology (22%, vs. 68% with abnormal cytology). Among primary screening samples from women aged 30–65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women. PMID:24466262

  17. Diagnosis and management of benign prostatic hyperplasia in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Tanguay, Simon; Awde, Murray; Brock, Gerald; Casey, Richard; Kozak, Joseph; Lee, Jay; Nickel, J. Curtis; Saad, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and its clinical manifestation as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), is a major health concern for aging men. There have been significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of BPH in recent years. There has been a renewed interest in medical therapies and less invasive surgical techniques. As a consequence, the treatment needs of men with mild to moderate LUTS without evidence of prostate cancer can now be accomplished in a primary care setting. There are differences in the way urologists and primary care physicians approach the evaluation and management of LUTS due to BPH, which is not reflected in Canadian Urological Association (CUA) and American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines. A “shared care” approach involving urologists and primary care physicians represents a reasonable and viable model for the care of men suffering from LUTS. The essence of the model centres around educating and communicating effectively with the patient on BPH. This article provides primary care physicians with an overview of the diagnostic and management strategies outlined in recent CUA and AUA guidelines so that they may be better positioned to effectively deal with this patient population. It is now apparent that we must move away from the urologist as the first-line physician, and allow primary care physicians to accept a new role in the diagnosis and management of BPH. PMID:19543429

  18. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.168...

  19. Total Quality Management Practices in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toremen, Fatih; Karakus, Mehmet; Yasan, Tezcan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of total quality management (TQM) practices in primary schools based on teachers' perceptions, and how their perceptions are related to different variables. Design/methodology/approach: In this study, a survey based descriptive scanning model was used. This study was carried out in…

  20. Tools for Successful Weight Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Turer, Christy Boling

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most pervasive and costly public-health problems. Clinicians need effective tools to address weight management in primary care, including evaluation and communication methods, guideline-based weight-management interventions, and safe and effective weight-loss medications and surgery. The objective of this Grand-Rounds presentation is to provide practicing clinicians with the latest information regarding effective ways to care for and communicate with patients about weight loss; evidence-based guidelines for selecting weight-management therapies; and safety, efficacy, and adverse effects of weight-loss medications and surgery. PMID:26218666

  1. Primary and secondary management of pediatric soft tissue injuries.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Nicholas J V

    2012-08-01

    Injury is the most common cause of death in pediatric patients, with a large proportion related to head injury. The craniofacial region in children develops rapidly and at an early age, making the area more prominent compared with the remainder of the body, increasing the likelihood of injury. This article reviews the primary management of pediatric soft tissue injuries, including assessment, cleansing, surgical technique, anesthesia, and considerations for special wounds. The secondary management of pediatric facial injury is also discussed, including scar revision, management of scar hypertrophy/keloids, and staged surgical correction.

  2. A case of severe ectopic ACTH syndrome from an occult primary – diagnostic and management dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Katherine; Amer, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Summary Resection of primary tumour is the management of choice in patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome. However, tumours may remain unidentified or occult in spite of extensive efforts at trying to locate them. This can, therefore, pose a major management issue as uncontrolled hypercortisolaemia can lead to life-threatening infections. We present the case of a 66-year-old gentleman with ectopic ACTH syndrome from an occult primary tumour with multiple significant complications from hypercortisolaemia. Ectopic nature of his ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome was confirmed by non-suppression with high-dose dexamethasone suppression test and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling. The primary ectopic source remained unidentified in spite of extensive anatomical and functional imaging studies, including CT scans and Dotatate-PET scan. Medical adrenolytic treatment at maximum tolerated doses failed to control his hypercortisolaemia, which led to recurrent intra-abdominal and pelvic abscesses, requiring multiple surgical interventions. Laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy was considered but decided against given concerns of technical difficulties due to recurrent intra-abdominal infections and his moribund state. Eventually, alcohol ablation of adrenal glands by retrograde adrenal vein approach was attempted, which resulted in biochemical remission of Cushing's syndrome. Our case emphasizes the importance of aggressive management of hypercortisolaemia in order to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality and also demonstrates that techniques like percutaneous adrenal ablation using a retrograde venous approach may be extremely helpful in patients who are otherwise unable to undergo bilateral adrenalectomy. Learning points Evaluation and management of patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome from an unidentified primary tumour can be very challenging.Persisting hypercortisolaemia in this setting can lead to debilitating and even life-threatening complications and hence

  3. Non-pharmacological management of musculoskeletal disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Bremander, Ann; Bergman, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases as a group are one of the most common causes of contact in primary care and the most common causes of disability and long-term sick leave in several Western countries. Pain and dysfunction are often present without any specific findings in the musculoskeletal system, and a strictly biomedical approach is often inadequate. Body structure and function interact with personal and environmental factors, affecting the ability to perform activities and participate in society. It is important to meet these needs in primary care, and non-pharmacological principles such as physical activity and patient education with a cognitive approach are cornerstones in a multimodal management model.

  4. Making Choices about the Use of the Outdoors in Manager and Management Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossman, Alan

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest a framework for analyzing "outdoor management development" so as to help potential consumers assess the compatibility of provider organizations and their own. (Author/SSH)

  5. Management of Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, E; Russell, A; Kearney, P M

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as a raised serum thyroid stimulating hormone level with normal thyroxine. Despite a prevalence of up to 9% of the adult population there is widespread uncertainty on how to manage it. The aim of this study was to assess how older adults with SCH are managed in primary care. A retrospective case-note review was carried out on patients attending Mallow Primary Healthcare Centre. This study identified patients 65 years and over meeting the criteria for SCH in one year. The prevalence of SCH in this study was calculated as 2.9%. 22.2% of patients were treated with thyroxine. 6.1% of untreated patients progressed to clinical hypothyroidism within the study period while 18.2% spontaneously reverted to normal TSH levels.

  6. The psychopathology of choice.

    PubMed

    Headlee, R; Kalogjera, I J

    1988-10-01

    The important, often neglected factor of choice, learned in childhood, is examined in detail and illustrated by clinical examples. The primary etiological factors in psychopathology of choice are: (1) Too much choice allowed before integration is possible; (2) Too little choice allowed and (3) Distortions of choice due to racial, sexual, and religious prejudices or cognitive distortions.

  7. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  8. Management of locally advanced primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ambarish S; Kumar, Rajiv; Purandare, Nilendu; Jiwnani, Sabita; Karimundackal, George; Pramesh, CS

    2017-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma (PMSS) is a relatively rare disease, and patients are treated predominantly with surgery for resectable disease. Management of locally advanced borderline resectable and unresectable PMSS is not only challenging but also lacks standard guidelines. We present three patients with PMSS, who were unresectable or borderline resectable at presentation and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:28360472

  9. Primary Care Clinic Re-Design for Prescription Opioid Management

    PubMed Central

    Parchman, Michael L.; Von Korff, Michael; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Stephens, Mark; Ike, Brooke; Cromp, DeAnn; Hsu, Clarissa; Wagner, Ed H.

    2017-01-01

    Background The challenge of responding to prescription opioid overuse within the United States has fallen disproportionately on the primary care clinic setting. Here we describe a framework comprised of 6 Building Blocks to guide efforts within this setting to address the use of opioids for chronic pain. Methods Investigators conducted site visits to thirty primary care clinics across the United States selected for their use of team-based workforce innovations. Site visits included interviews with leadership, clinic tours, observations of clinic processes and team meetings, and interviews with staff and clinicians. Data were reviewed to identify common attributes of clinic system changes around chronic opioid therapy (COT) management. These concepts were reviewed to develop narrative descriptions of key components of changes made to improve COT use. Results Twenty of the thirty sites had addressed improvements in COT prescribing. Across these sites a common set of 6 Building Blocks were identified: 1) providing leadership support; 2) revising and aligning clinic policies, patient agreements (contracts) and workflows; 3) implementing a registry tracking system; 4) conducting planned, patient-centered visits; 5) identifying resources for complex patients; and 6) measuring progress toward achieving clinic objectives. Common components of clinic policies, patient agreements and data tracked in registries to assess progress are described. Conclusions In response to prescription opioid overuse and the resulting epidemic of overdose and addiction, primary care clinics are making improvements driven by a common set of best practices that address complex challenges of managing COT patients in primary care settings. PMID:28062816

  10. Managing patient populations in primary care: points of leverage.

    PubMed

    Eidus, Robert; Pace, Wilson D; Staton, Elizabeth W

    2012-01-01

    Common "quality" metrics may represent the quality of care for large populations; however, they do not adequately represent quality in individual primary care settings, especially as stand-alone indices. Using discreet threshold values to measure quality in primary care may result in physicians focusing on managing patients by the numbers at the expense of making individualized and nuanced clinical decisions. Current performance measures may be misapplied as proxies for both cost savings and quality. We posit that developing and focusing measurement on high-leverage activities will yield better clinical outcomes and potentially lower cost. As a starting point for further work in this area, we suggest the development of metrics that track identification and management of depression; management of transitions of care; care coordination; team-based care; identification and support of socially frail/isolated individuals; pharmacologic management, including optimizing medication and dealing with adherence issues; and establishment of a therapeutic environment. These processes, or others like them, will require infrastructure that may be costly and time-consuming, and measuring these processes will require thought and effort. Nevertheless, we believe developing metrics based on high-leverage activities will yield greater clinical and economic returns than relying on the metrics currently in place.

  11. Changing concepts in management of primary obstructive megaureter

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, M.A.; Escala, J.; Snyder, H.M. III; Heyman, S.; Duckett, J.W.

    1989-08-01

    The management of neonatal urinary tract dilatations represents one of the most challenging dilemmas in pediatric urology today. We have been confronted with 44 renal units in 35 neonates diagnosed as having primary obstructive megaureter during the last 6 years. Of these units 23 in 17 infants were diagnosed antenatally and 20 (87 per cent) have been managed without surgical intervention. Notably, 16 renal units were graded as moderate to severe megaureters by an excretory urogram. The decision to manage conservatively was based on the initial extraction of the /sup 99m/diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid renal scan (the extraction factor). This estimate of absolute renal function has been used to differentiate dilatations with obstructive implications for the renal parenchyma from those without. Significantly, expectant treatment has resulted in improvement of dilatation on sequential excretory urograms in 15 megaureters and none has shown a deterioration of function by renal scan. Similar diagnostic criterion also has resulted in conservative management for 12 of 21 additional neonatal megaureters seen during this period with symptoms or they were discovered serendipitously. Only 2 of these 12 megaureters required surgical correction. The neonatal primary megaureter appears in many cases to represent a different entity than those that commonly presented before the advent of antenatal and perinatal diagnosis.

  12. Controversies in the management of primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, Jeremy S; Pereira, Stephen P; Devlin, John; Harrison, Phillip M; Joshi, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains a rare but significant disease, which affects mainly young males in association with inflammatory bowel disease. There have been few advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the condition and no therapeutics with proven mortality benefit aside from liver transplantation. There remain areas of controversy in the management of PSC which include the differentiation from other cholangiopathies, in particular immunoglobulin G4 related sclerosing cholangitis, the management of dominant biliary strictures, and the role of ursodeoxycholic acid. In addition, the timing of liver transplantation in PSC remains difficult to predict with standard liver severity scores. In this review, we address these controversies and highlight the latest evidence base in the management of PSC. PMID:26925200

  13. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Simon DS; Blakeman, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally. In national and international guidelines, CKD is defined and staged according to measures of kidney function that allow for a degree of risk stratification using commonly available markers. It is often asymptomatic in its early stages, and early detection is important to reduce future risk. The risk of cardiovascular outcomes is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease for most people with CKD. CKD also predisposes to acute kidney injury – a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although only a small proportion of people with CKD progress to end-stage kidney disease, renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) represents major costs for health care systems and burden for patients. Efforts in primary care to reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease, acute kidney injury, and progression are therefore required. Monitoring renal function is an important task, and primary care clinicians are well placed to oversee this aspect of care along with the management of modifiable risk factors, particularly blood pressure and proteinuria. Good primary care judgment is also essential in making decisions about referral for specialist nephrology opinion. As CKD commonly occurs alongside other conditions, consideration of comorbidities and patient wishes is important, and primary care clinicians have a key role in coordinating care while adopting a holistic, patient-centered approach and providing continuity. This review aims to summarize the vital role that primary care plays in predialysis CKD care and to outline the main considerations in its identification, monitoring, and clinical management in this context. PMID:27822135

  14. Potential benefits of integrated COPD management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kruis, A L; Chavannes, N H

    2010-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a major and progressive cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, resulting in an important financial and health burden in coming decades. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been proven to be the most effective treatment in all patients in whom respiratory symptoms are associated with diminished functional capacity or reduced quality of life. Nevertheless, despite wide recommendation and proven efficacy, the use of PR is limited in daily practice. Reasons for these include low accessibility and availability, high costs, and lack of motivation to continue a healthy life style after treatment. By contrast, it has been demonstrated that primary care patients can be reactivated by formulating personal targets and designing individualized treatment plans in collaboration with their general practitioner or practice nurse. Based on these personal plans and targets, specific education must be provided and development of self management skills should be actively encouraged. Ideally, elements of pulmonary rehabilitation are tailored into a comprehensive primary care integrated disease management program. In that way, the benefits of PR can be extended to a substantially larger part of the COPD population, to reach even those with milder stages of disease. Favorable long-term effects on exercise tolerance and quality of life in a number of studies have been demonstrated in recent years, but broad introduction in the primary care setting still needs further justification in the form of a proper cost effectiveness analysis.

  15. [Management of the esophageal candidiasis by the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Behrens, Garance; Bocherens, Astrid; Senn, Nicolas

    2014-05-14

    Esophageal candidiasis is one of the most common opportunistic infections in patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathology is also found in patients without overt immunodeficiency. Other risk factors are known to be associated with this disease like inhaled or systemic corticosteroid treatment or proton-pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. In the absence of identified risk factors, a primary immune deficiency should be sought. Prevention of esophageal candidiasis is based primarily on the identification of risk factors, and a better control of them. This article presents a review of the physiopathology, clinical presentation and management of esophageal candidiasis by primary care physicians. We will also discuss ways of preventing esophageal candidiasis when necessary.

  16. Choice of Scottish Gaelic-Medium and Welsh-Medium Education at the Primary and Secondary School Stages: Parent and Pupil Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparative study of the reasons for parental choice of Scottish Gaelic-medium and Welsh-medium primary education in the year 2000 and of the reasons for pupils' decisions to continue with Gaelic or Welsh-medium education at secondary school in 2007. Parents in both contexts cited the quality of Celtic-medium education…

  17. Parental Choice of Schools and Parents' Perceptions of Multicultural and Co-Existence Education: The Case of the Israeli Palestinian-Jewish Bilingual Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekerman, Zvi; Tatar, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    The present research effort aims to better understand parental choice of the Israeli Palestinian-Jewish bilingual primary schools and its implications in contributing (or not) to fostering multicultural and co-existence educational efforts in conflict-ridden societies. The manuscript offers a short description of the educational initiative under…

  18. Parental Choice of Schooling, Learning Processes and Inter-Ethnic Friendship Patterns: The Case of Malay Students in Chinese Primary Schools in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sua, Tan Yao; Ngah, Kamarudin; Darit, Sezali Md.

    2013-01-01

    This study surveys 200 Malay students enrolled in three Chinese primary schools in relation to three issues, i.e., parental choice of schooling, learning processes and inter-ethnic friendship patterns. The three issues are explored through a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Parental expectations for their…

  19. Management of childhood "hyperactivity" by primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F C; Sherman, R

    1983-06-01

    A questionnaire assessing current clinical approach to the problem of childhood hyperactivity was mailed to 910 primary care physicians in the state of Washington. A response of 462 (50.8%) was obtained. Pediatricians assess and manage hyperactivity in a manner significantly different from that of family physicians or general practitioners. Age of physician also accounted for significant differences, although to a lesser degree than type of training. Few differences were determined by size of community. An overall high prevalence of the problem of hyperactivity was apparent. Combined use of stimulant medications, behavioral programs, and special diets was common.

  20. Diagnosis and management of dementia in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Jasneet; Dobbs, Bonnie; McKay, Rhianne; Kirwan, Catherine; Cooper, Tim; Marin, Alexandra; Gupta, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current identification and management of patients with dementia in a primary care setting; to determine the accuracy of identification of dementia by primary care physicians; to examine reasons (triggers) for referral of patients with suspected dementia to the geriatric assessment team (GAT) from the primary care setting; and to compare indices of identification and management of dementia between the GAT and primary care network (PCN) physicians and between the GAT and community care (CC). Design Retrospective chart review and comparisons, based on quality indicators of dementia care as specified in the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia, were conducted from matching charts obtained from 3 groups of health care providers. Setting Semirural region in the province of Alberta involving a PCN, CC, and a GAT. Participants One hundred patients who had been assessed by the GAT randomly selected from among those diagnosed with dementia or mild cognitive impairment by the GAT. Main outcome measures Diagnosis of dementia and indications of high-quality dementia care listed in PCN, CC, and GAT charts. Results Only 59% of the patients diagnosed with dementia by the GAT had a documented diagnosis of dementia in their PCN charts. None of the 12 patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment by the GAT had been diagnosed by the PCN. Memory decline was the most common reason for referral to the GAT. There were statistically significant differences between the PCN and the GAT on all quality indicators of dementia, with underuse of diagnostic and functional assessment tools and lack of attention to wandering, driving, medicolegal, and caregiver issues, and underuse of community supports in the PCN. There was higher congruence between CC and the GAT on assessment and care indices. Conclusion Dementia care remains a challenge in primary care. Within our primary care setting, there are opportunities for

  1. Introducing quality management into primary health care services in Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Omaswa, F.; Burnham, G.; Baingana, G.; Mwebesa, H.; Morrow, R.

    1997-01-01

    In 1994, a national quality assurance programme was established in Uganda to strengthen district-level management of primary health care services. Within 18 months both objective and subjective improvements in the quality of services had been observed. In the examples documented here, there was a major reduction in maternal mortality among pregnant women referred to Jinja District Hospital, a reduction in waiting times and increased patient satisfaction at Masaka District Hospital, and a marked reduction in reported cases of measles in Arua District. Beyond these quantitative improvements, increased morale of district health team members, improved satisfaction among patients, and greater involvement of local government in the decisions of district health committees have been observed. At the central level, the increased coordination of activities has led to new guidelines for financial management and the procurement of supplies. District quality management workshops followed up by regular support visits from the Ministry of Health headquarters have led to a greater understanding by central staff of the issues faced at the district level. The quality assurance programme has also fostered improved coordination among national disease-control programmes. Difficulties encountered at the central level have included delays in carrying out district support visits and the failure to provide appropriate support. At the district level, some health teams tackled problems over which they had little control or which were overly complex; others lacked the management capacity for problem solving. PMID:9185368

  2. Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Bovi, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Primary central nervous cell lymphoma (PCNSL) is an uncommon neoplasm of the brain, leptomeninges, and rarely the spinal cord. Initially thought to be characteristically associated with congenital, iatrogenic, or acquired immunosuppression, PCNSL is now recognized with increasing frequency in immunocompetent individuals. The role of surgery is limited to establishing diagnosis, as PCNSL is often multifocal with a propensity to involve the subarachnoid space. A whole-brain radiation volume has empirically been used to adequately address the multifocal tumor frequently encountered at the time of PCNSL diagnosis. Despite high rates of response after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), rapid recurrence is common and long-term survival is the exception. Chemotherapy alone or in combination with WBRT has more recently become the treatment of choice. Most effective regimens contain high-dose methotrexate and or other agents that are capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. High response rates and improved survival with the use of chemotherapy has led to treatment strategies that defer or eliminate WBRT in hopes of lessening the risk of neurotoxicity attributed to WBRT. Unfortunately, elimination of WBRT is also associated with a higher rate of relapse. Combined chemotherapy and WBRT regimens are now being explored that use lower total doses of radiation and altered fractionation schedules with the aim of maintaining high rates of tumor control while minimizing neurotoxicity. Pretreatment, multifactor prognostic indices have recently been described that may allow selection of treatment regimens that strike an appropriate balance of risk and benefit for the individual PCNSL patient.

  3. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Seong Feei; Agarwal, Rachna; Chan, Jerry; Chia, Sing Joo; Cho, Li Wei; Lim, Lean Huat; Lau, Matthew Sie Kuei; Loh, Sheila Kia Ee; Hendricks, Marianne Sybille; Nair, Suresh; Quah, Joanne Hui Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Wong, PC; Yeong, Cheng Toh; Yu, Su Ling

    2014-01-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for infertility. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the AMS-MOH clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_ medical/2013/cpgmed_infertility.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:24570313

  4. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: assessment and management of infertility at primary healthcare level.

    PubMed

    Loh, Seong Feei; Agarwal, Rachna; Chan, Jerry K; Chia, Sing Joo; Cho, Li Wei; Lim, Lean Huat; Lau, Matthew Sie Kuei; Loh, Sheila Kia Ee; Hendricks, Marianne Sybille; Nair, Suresh; Quah, Joanne Hui Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Wong, P C; Yeong, Cheng Toh; Yu, Su Ling

    2014-02-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for infertility. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the AMS-MOH clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical/2013/cpgmed_infertility.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  5. [Primary management and treatment of paediatric septic shock].

    PubMed

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Henneveld, Hetty Th

    2010-01-01

    Paediatric shock is common. Hypovolaemic and septic shock are the main forms. Early and rapid results-oriented therapy of paediatric septic shock has a favourable effect on survival. There is an international guideline for the primary management of paediatric shock during the first hour after presentation of the patient. The goal of treatment is to prevent oxygen debt and consequently organ failure. The main symptoms of paediatric shock are tachycardia and reduced consciousness. In a child in shock, the clinical picture should be recognized within 15 minutes and an attempt should be made to reverse the situation by rapid fluid infusion. If the shock persists after 15 minutes, vasoactive medication should be given and the child should be transferred to a local paediatric intensive care unit. Intubation and mechanical ventilation are then also required.

  6. Biodiversity informatics: managing and applying primary biodiversity data.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Jorge; Peterson, A Townsend

    2004-04-29

    Recently, advances in information technology and an increased willingness to share primary biodiversity data are enabling unprecedented access to it. By combining presences of species data with electronic cartography via a number of algorithms, estimating niches of species and their areas of distribution becomes feasible at resolutions one to three orders of magnitude higher than it was possible a few years ago. Some examples of the power of that technique are presented. For the method to work, limitations such as lack of high-quality taxonomic determination, precise georeferencing of the data and availability of high-quality and updated taxonomic treatments of the groups must be overcome. These are discussed, together with comments on the potential of these biodiversity informatics techniques not only for fundamental studies but also as a way for developing countries to apply state of the art bioinformatic methods and large quantities of data, in practical ways, to tackle issues of biodiversity management.

  7. Primary immunodeficiency in the neonate: Early diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walkovich, Kelly; Connelly, James A

    2016-02-01

    Many primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) manifest in the neonatal period but can be challenging to diagnose and manage optimally. In part, the difficulty stems from the natural immaturity of the neonatal immune system that may mask immune deficits and/or complicate interpretation of clinical findings and laboratory assays. The great diversity of PIDs--from innate immune system defects to those that impact the humoral and/or cellular components of the adaptive immune system--and the rapid rate at which new PIDs are being discovered makes it challenging for practitioners to stay current. Moreover, recent appreciation for immune deficiencies that lead to autoinflammation and autoimmunity have broadened the spectrum of neonatal PID, adding additional complexity to an already intricate field. This article serves to highlight the deficiencies in the neonatal immune system, while providing a review of the more common PIDs that present in the neonate and guidelines for diagnosis and supportive care.

  8. Review on the Management of Primary Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu Chan, Julia Yan; Choy, Bonnie NK; Ng, Alex LK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite being documented in medical history from over 2400 years ago, primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), being a disease with low incidence rate, remains a challenge to ophthalmologists. The article provides a broad overview on the pathophysiology and diagnostic approach to PCG with major emphasis on the treatment options of PCG. While reviewing on the well-established treatment options, namely goniotomy, trabeculo-tomy and combined trabeculotomy-trabeculectomy, emphasis has also been made to recent updates on secondary treatments: trabeculectomy, antimetabolites, glaucoma-drainage devices and cyclodestructive procedures. It is, however, important to note that the rarity of PCG places limitations on study design, most studies are, thus, retrospective, nonrandomized and have different definitions of surgical success. Ophthalmologists need to interpret the results with critical thinking and formulate individual treatment plans for each patient. How to cite this article: Yu Chan JY, Choy BNK, Alex LK Ng, Shum JWH. Review on the Management of Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):92-99. PMID:26997844

  9. Anxiety and diabetes: Innovative approaches to management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Hazel

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chief concern for patients, healthcare providers, and health care systems in America, and around the globe. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit clinical and subclinical symptoms of anxiety more frequently than people without diabetes. Anxiety is traditionally associated with poor metabolic outcomes and increased medical complications among those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Collaborative care models have been utilized in the multidisciplinary treatment of mental health problems and chronic disease, and have demonstrated success in managing the pathology of depression which often accompanies diabetes. However, no specific treatment model has been published that links the treatment of anxiety to the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the success of collaborative care models in treating depression associated with diabetes, and anxiety unrelated to chronic disease, it is possible that the collaborative care treatment of primary care patients who suffer from both anxiety and diabetes could be met with the same success. The key issue is determining how to implement and sustain these models in practice. This review summarizes the proposed link between anxiety and diabetes, and offers an innovative and evidence-based collaborative care model for anxiety and diabetes in primary care. PMID:27390262

  10. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    PubMed Central

    PORPORATTI, André Luís; COSTA, Yuri Martins; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; CALDERON, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n=64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n=48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management. PMID:25004051

  11. Laparoscopic management of primary abdominal pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Altay, Mehmet Metin; Dündar, Betül; Erol, Ahmet Okyar; Kurtaran, Volkan; Gelişen, Orhan

    2010-01-01

    This is a case report of a primary abdominal pregnancy managed by laparoscopic intervention. A 22 year old, gravida 1, woman was admitted to our emergency room with vaginal bleeding and pain in lower abdomen. She was 4 weeks pregnant according to her last menstrual period. She had undergone right salpingoophorectomy previously. Pelvic examination revealed cervical motion tenderness, bilateral adnexal tenderness and rebound tenderness. Her vital signs were normal. Beta hCG was 15826 IU/ml and hemoglobin was 10.0 g/dl. Transvaginal sonography showed an endometrium of 3 mm thickness and free fluid in the pelvis. Upon admission to the Early Pregnancy Clinic, abdominal pain became worse and hemoglobin decreased to 8.0 g/dL. Therefore, we performed a laparoscopy which showed that the uterus, left tube and ovary were completely normal with absence of the right ovary and tube. Approximately 500 cc blood was aspirated from the pelvis. Between the right sacrouterine ligament and rectum, there was a bleeding area 2 cm in width which was removed with forceps and sent for frozen pathological examination,which revealed 'placental tissue fragments'. Endometrial sampling was reported to be 'secretory endometrium'. A rapid decrease in the beta HCG post operative titer confirmed the resolution of the pregnancy. Primary abdominal pregnancy is extremely rare. The diagnosis is confirmed according to Studdiford's criteria. In the literature, there only a few cases of abdominal pregnancy in which laparoscopic procedure has been used effectively as treatment. However, laparoscopic procedure is usually successful in treatment of abdominal pregnancy if the gestational age is early enough.

  12. Linking pediatric primary care obesity management to community programs.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Hartman, Jennifer; Grodecki, Jennifer; Clavier, Alejandro; Ghaey, Kamala; Elsner, Mary; Moore, Chantal; Reina, Olga Ochoa; Binns, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for obesity management in primary care call for linking to community services. The Promoting Health Project (PHP) was a multi-component, practice-based intervention aimed at improving care of obese children, including referrals to community services. Promoting Health Project staff identified and interviewed representatives of 40 nutrition or physical activity services/programs. Quality improvement (QI) teams at three practices worked to improve overweight/obesity identification and care and implement practice-to-community connections that used the information gathered from the programs/ services. A practice community coordinator (PCC) facilitated interactions between practices, community programs and families. Researchers tracked patients referred, PCC to family interactions, and time spent. They surveyed parents of referred patients and interviewed key clinicians. Forty-six patients participated in programs. Substantial efforts were necessary to create smooth referral systems. Family motivation was perceived as a limiting factor in program attendance. Clinicians were satisfied with systems established. Effectively linking practitioners to community programs requires the use of additional resources.

  13. Working capital management, corporate performance, and strategic choices of the wholesale and retail industry in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-guo; Dong, Hui-min; Chen, Shou; Yang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the influence of strategic choice on working capital configurations and observe how the relationship between working capital ratio and operational performance differs depending on strategy. By clustering the strategic factors of the wholesale and retail industry, we find three categories of strategies: terminal market strategy, middle market strategy, and hybrid strategy. Using the panel data of the listed companies of the wholesale and retail industry as our sample, we analyze the differences in the ways companies configure working capital, the speed with which working capital adjusts to its target, and the effects of working capital on performance for companies that make different strategic choices. The empirical results suggest that working capital is configured and adjusted to its target in different ways under different competitive strategic choices. This effect is finally transferred to influence the relationship between working capital configuration and operational performance.

  14. Working Capital Management, Corporate Performance, and Strategic Choices of the Wholesale and Retail Industry in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan-guo; Dong, Hui-min; Chen, Shou; Yang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the influence of strategic choice on working capital configurations and observe how the relationship between working capital ratio and operational performance differs depending on strategy. By clustering the strategic factors of the wholesale and retail industry, we find three categories of strategies: terminal market strategy, middle market strategy, and hybrid strategy. Using the panel data of the listed companies of the wholesale and retail industry as our sample, we analyze the differences in the ways companies configure working capital, the speed with which working capital adjusts to its target, and the effects of working capital on performance for companies that make different strategic choices. The empirical results suggest that working capital is configured and adjusted to its target in different ways under different competitive strategic choices. This effect is finally transferred to influence the relationship between working capital configuration and operational performance. PMID:25121141

  15. Questionable methods of cancer management: the Committee for Freedom of Choice in Medicine, Inc.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    The Committee for Freedom of Choice in Medicine is the political arm of several interlocking corporations promoting and/or marketing questionable remedies for cancer and other serious diseases. Operating during the 1970s as the Committee for Freedom of Choice in Cancer Therapy, the organization fought for legalization of laetrile and claimed to have many members. Today the Committee appears to be a small group whose principal activities are speeches and press conferences by its leaders, protests to government agencies, and publication of a small-circulation newsletter.

  16. Preschool Education and Primary School Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions about Classroom Management: A Metaphorical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Hatice; Burçak, Firdevs; Tepetas, Gülüzar Sule; Akman, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the perceptions of preschool and primary school teachers about classroom management by means of metaphors. The sample which selected by the use of convenience sampling techniques was drawn from preschool and primary school undergraduate students who had taken the "Classroom Management" course in…

  17. Investigation of Primary School Teachers' Perception of Discipline Types They Use for Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayraktar, Hatice Vatansever; Dogan, M. Cihangir

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the primary school teachers' the perceptions of discipline types they use for classroom management; and also to find out if there is a statistically significant difference between the perceptions of discipline types used in classroom management according to the demographic characteristics of primary school…

  18. Contemporary Role of Radiotherapy in the Management of Primary Penile Tumors and Metastatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Juanita

    2016-11-01

    Squamous cell cancer of the penis is a radiocurable malignancy all too often managed solely by partial or total penectomy. Effective management of the primary tumor while preserving penile morphology and function is a priority. External radiotherapy and brachytherapy have a role to play in the definitive management of the primary tumor. Surgical nodal staging remains a cornerstone of management because it is the strongest predictor of survival, and inguinal status determines pelvic management. Postoperative radiotherapy of the regional nodes for high-risk pathology is indicated. Chemoradiotherapy should be considered as neoadjuvant treatment for unresectable nodes or as definitive management.

  19. [Diagnostic approach and management of hypercalcaemia in dogs exemplary of primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Ballhausen, Bianca Désirée; Wehner, Astrid; Zöllner, Martin; Hartmann, Katrin; Unterer, Stefan

    2017-03-29

    Hypercalcaemia can be caused by many different diseases. This article summarizes the causes, pathophysiologic mechanisms and diagnostic procedures as well as treatment recommendations. The main focus is on hypercalcaemia in primary hyperparathyroidism (PH), complemented by a case report. An elevated total calcium level should generally be investigated and verified by measurement of ionized calcium concentration. The further diagnostic approach depends on the phosphate level. Tumour screening, measurement of parathormone and parathromone-related protein and sonography of parathyroid glands may be necessary. If the calcium-phosphate-product exceeds 60 mg/dl, there is a risk of tissue mineralisation and a rapid treatment of hypercalcaemia is required. For acute therapy, sodium chloride infusion, furosemide and glucocorticoids can be used. Glucocorticoids should only be given after strict indication and after a definite diagnosis. For long-term management, bisphosphates, particularly alendronate, are increasingly used successfully. Causal therapy of PH can be performed by parathyreoidectomy, heat ablation or ethanol ablation. Thereafter, particularly in cases of severe preoperative hypercalcaemia, hypocalcaemia can occur. Treatment is performed using vitamin D3 (calcitriol), which may also be given preoperatively in cases of severe hypercalcaemia. A concomitant oral calcium supplementation using calcium carbonate as medication of choice is contentious. Due to a potential relapse after successful excision of the affected parathyroid gland in PH, the serum calcium level should be monitored periodically.

  20. 42 CFR 438.52 - Choice of MCOs, PIHPs, PAHPs, and PCCMs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE State Responsibilities § 438.52 Choice of... in the HIO has a choice of at least two primary care providers within the entity. (d) Limitations on changes between primary care providers. For an enrollee of a single MCO, PIHP, PAHP, or HIO...

  1. Patient preferences for managing asthma: results from a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    King, Madeleine T; Hall, Jane; Lancsar, Emily; Fiebig, Denzil; Hossain, Ishrat; Louviere, Jordan; Reddel, Helen K; Jenkins, Christine R

    2007-07-01

    Effective control of asthma requires regular preventive medication. Poor medication adherence suggests that patient preferences for medications may differ from the concerns of the prescribing clinicians. This study investigated patient preferences for preventive medications across symptom control, daily activities, medication side-effects, convenience and costs, using a discrete choice experiment embedded in a randomized clinical trial involving patients with mild-moderate persistent asthma. The present data were collected after patients had received 6 weeks' treatment with one of two drugs. Three choice options were presented, to continue with the current drug, to change to an alternative, hypothetical drug, or to take no preventive medication. Analysis used random parameter multinomial logit. Most respondents chose to continue with their current drug in most choice situations but this tendency differed depending on which medication they had been allocated. Respondents valued their ability to participate in usual daily activities and sport, preferred minimal symptoms, and were less likely to choose drugs with side-effects. Cost was also significant, but other convenience attributes were not. Demographic characteristics did not improve the model fit. This study illustrates how discrete choice experiments may be embedded in a clinical trial to provide insights into patient preferences.

  2. Better for ourselves and better for our patients: chronic disease management in primary care networks.

    PubMed

    Every, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Capital Health in Edmonton, Alberta, implemented a system-wide chronic disease management model to support people with chronic disease and their primary care physicians. Groups of family physicians, in partnership with the health region, developed primary care networks to provide services that are customized to meet the priorities of the local community. Management of chronic disease is a cornerstone service, and diabetes management is the most fully developed program. Key to its success are standardized protocols, consistent follow-up and patient education by trained primary care nurses. This model will be used as a template for the management of other chronic diseases.

  3. A multi-stakeholder framework for urban runoff quality management: Application of social choice and bargaining techniques.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, Seyed Hamed; Kerachian, Reza; Zahmatkesh, Zahra

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, an integrated framework is proposed for urban runoff management. To control and improve runoff quality and quantity, Low Impact Development (LID) practices are utilized. In order to determine the LIDs' areas and locations, the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II), which considers three objective functions of minimizing runoff volume, runoff pollution and implementation cost of LIDs, is utilized. In this framework, the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is used for stream flow simulation. The non-dominated solutions provided by the NSGA-II are considered as management scenarios. To select the most preferred scenario, interactions among the main stakeholders in the study area with conflicting utilities are incorporated by utilizing bargaining models including a non-cooperative game, Nash model and social choice procedures of Borda count and approval voting. Moreover, a new social choice procedure, named pairwise voting method, is proposed and applied. Based on each conflict resolution approach, a scenario is identified as the ideal solution providing the LIDs' areas, locations and implementation cost. The proposed framework is applied for urban water quality and quantity management in the northern part of Tehran metropolitan city, Iran. Results show that the proposed pairwise voting method tends to select a scenario with a higher percentage of reduction in TSS (Total Suspended Solid) load and runoff volume, in comparison with the Borda count and approval voting methods. Besides, the Nash method presents a management scenario with the highest cost for LIDs' implementation and the maximum values for percentage of runoff volume reduction and TSS removal. The results also signify that selection of an appropriate management scenario by stakeholders in the study area depends on the available financial resources and the relative importance of runoff quality improvement in comparison with reducing the runoff volume.

  4. A case study for efficient management of high throughput primary lab data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In modern life science research it is very important to have an efficient management of high throughput primary lab data. To realise such an efficient management, four main aspects have to be handled: (I) long term storage, (II) security, (III) upload and (IV) retrieval. Findings In this paper we define central requirements for a primary lab data management and discuss aspects of best practices to realise these requirements. As a proof of concept, we introduce a pipeline that has been implemented in order to manage primary lab data at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK). It comprises: (I) a data storage implementation including a Hierarchical Storage Management system, a relational Oracle Database Management System and a BFiler package to store primary lab data and their meta information, (II) the Virtual Private Database (VPD) implementation for the realisation of data security and the LIMS Light application to (III) upload and (IV) retrieve stored primary lab data. Conclusions With the LIMS Light system we have developed a primary data management system which provides an efficient storage system with a Hierarchical Storage Management System and an Oracle relational database. With our VPD Access Control Method we can guarantee the security of the stored primary data. Furthermore the system provides high performance upload and download and efficient retrieval of data. PMID:22005096

  5. Clinical features and management of primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Marina G; Lindor, Keith D

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts, resulting in cirrhosis and need for liver transplantation and reduced life expectancy. The majority of cases occur in young and middle-aged men, often in association with inflammatory bowel disease. The etiology of primary sclerosing cholangitis includes immune-mediated components and elements of undefined nature. No effective medical therapy has been identified. The multiple complications of primary sclerosing cholangitis include metabolic bone disease, dominant strictures, bacterial cholangitis, and malignancy, particularly cholangiocarcinoma, which is the most lethal complication of primary sclerosing cholangitis. Liver transplantation is currently the only life-extending therapeutic alternative for patients with end-stage disease, although recurrence in the allografted liver has been described. A PSC-like variant attracting attention is cholangitis marked by raised levels of the immunoglobulin G4 subclass, prominence of plasma cells within the lesions, and steroid responsiveness. PMID:18528931

  6. Newcomers Navigating Language Choice and Seeking Voice: Peer Talk in a Multilingual Primary School Classroom in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokkonen, Alicia Copp

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how two young newcomers navigate an institutional policy of "English only" in a Finnish primary school and how this policy impacts opportunities for voice. From a discourse analytic and sociolinguistic perspective, the analysis takes an ethnographic path to a focal event of language conflict in the classroom.…

  7. Mr. Gadgrind and Miss Beale: Old Dichotomies, Inexorable Choices and What Shall We Tell the Students about Primary Teaching Methods?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, Keith

    1997-01-01

    This paper argues that British initial teacher training should address primary teaching methods directly so preservice students can appreciate the limitations of much popular debate about teaching styles, understand the historical backdrop against which the current situation has emerged, and appreciate the realities underpinning the context in…

  8. School Management Related Knowledge Levels of Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugurlu, Celal Teyyar

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge levels of the teachers affect the qualifications of operations and transactions in schools. School management related knowledge of the teachers is an essential tool to reach the targets of the school. The objective of this study was to determine the school management related knowledge levels of the teachers. Qualitative and…

  9. The Alignment of Global Management Strategies, International Communication Approaches, and Individual Rhetorical Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that thinking about international communication within a framework that aligns an organization's global management strategies with international communication practices enhances not only consulting practice but teaching as well. Describes the framework, and argues it introduces ways of thinking about global management strategies and their…

  10. Changes in initial COPD treatment choice over time and factors influencing prescribing decisions in UK primary care: in UK primary care: a real-world, retrospective, observational

    PubMed Central

    Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin; Brusselle, Guy; Jones, Rupert; Miravitlles, Marc; Baldwin, Michael; Stewart, Rebecca; Rigazio, Anna; Davis, Emily; Keininger, Dorothy L; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Prescribing patterns in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often inconsistent with published guidelines. This retrospective, observational study utilised data from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database to examine the changes in COPD prescribing patterns over time and to identify predictors of physician treatment choice for patients newly diagnosed with COPD. Initial therapy was defined as the treatment(s) prescribed at or within 1 year before COPD diagnosis. Changes over time were assessed in three cohorts based on the date of diagnosis: (1) 1997–2001; (2) 2002–2006; and (3) 2007–2010. Factors affecting the odds of being prescribed any initial therapy or any initial maintenance therapy were identified by univariable and multivariable logistic regression. The analysis included 20,154 patients, 45% of whom were prescribed an initial regimen containing an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), whereas 28% received no initial pharmacological treatment. Prescribing of ICS monotherapy decreased over time, as did the proportion of patients receiving no therapy at or within 1 year before diagnosis. Comorbid asthma, a high exacerbation rate, increased symptoms and poor lung function each increased the likelihood of being prescribed any initial therapy or initial maintenance therapy; comorbid asthma and an annual rate of ⩾3 exacerbations were the strongest predictors. In conclusion, our analyses revealed major differences between actual prescribing behaviour and guideline recommendations for patients with newly diagnosed COPD, with many patients receiving no treatment and large numbers of patients receiving ICS-containing regimens. Predictors of initial therapy were identified. PMID:28358398

  11. [The medical and osteopathic management of isolated primary nocturnal enuresis].

    PubMed

    Burguete, Emmanuel; Dubois, Thibault

    2013-01-01

    Isolated primary nocturnal enuresis is a functional disorder Its conventional treatment is based around lifestyle changes, rehabilitation with an alarm system and medication. Osteopathy offers a complementary or alternative treatment but studies need to be carried out to determine its effectiveness.

  12. Identifying Primary Care Skills and Competencies in Opioid Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.; Zacharoff, Kevin; Bond, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care physicians (PCPs) treat a high proportion of chronic pain patients but often lack training about how to assess and address issues associated with prescribing opioids when they are an appropriate component of therapy. The result may be that they may avoid treating these patients, which can lead to an undertreatment of…

  13. Recognizing and Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This review aims to impart information regarding recognition of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and associated excessive sleepiness (ES) in the primary care setting in order to provide optimal care to patients with this common but serious condition. This review will also discuss the prevalence and treatment of depression in patients with OSA. Data Sources: A MEDLINE search of articles published between 1990 and 2008 was conducted using the search terms obstructive sleep apnea AND excessive sleepiness, obstructive sleep apnea AND depression, and obstructive sleep apnea AND primary care. Searches were limited to articles in English concerned with adult patients. Study Selection: In total, 239 articles were identified. Articles concerning other sleep disorders and forms of apnea were excluded. The reference lists of identified articles were searched manually to find additional articles of interest. Data Synthesis: Primary care physicians can aid in the diagnosis of OSA and associated ES by being vigilant for lifestyle and physical risk factors associated with this condition. In addition, primary care physicians should maintain a high level of clinical suspicion when presented with illnesses that are commonly comorbid with OSA, such as psychiatric disorders and depression, in particular. Conversely, assessment of patients with OSA for common comorbidities may also improve a patient's prognosis and quality of life. Conclusions: Primary care physicians play a vital role in recognizing OSA and ES. These clinicians are crucial in supporting their patients during treatment by ensuring that they have clear, concise information regarding available therapies and the correct application and maintenance of prescribed devices. PMID:20098525

  14. Management of primary dysmenorrhea by school adolescents in ILE-IFE, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A; Babatunde, Oluwayemisi A

    2010-04-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a problem that girls and women face and often manage themselves with or without support from health professionals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among adolescents with dysmenorrhea (N = 150) in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The aims of the study were to determine their knowledge of menstruation and primary dysmenorrhea, assess the severity of pain they experienced during an episode of primary dysmenorrhea, and determine the management strategies they adopted. A pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings revealed the adolescents had a knowledge deficit regarding menstruation and dysmenorrhea, 58% of respondents reported pain between face 4 and face 10 on the Faces Pain Scale and the majority used inappropriate methods to manage primary dysmenorrhea. School nurses are able to assist adolescents and their mothers in proper management of primary dysmenorrhea.

  15. A collaborative approach to diabetes management: the choice made for Colorado schools.

    PubMed

    Bobo, Nichole; Wyckoff, Leah; Patrick, Kathleen; White, Cathy; Glass, Sue; Carlson, Jessie Parker; Perreault, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Students with diabetes deserve a school nurse who can effectively manage the disease. Tensions between the school and families sometimes emerge when a child with diabetes goes to school. To resolve these tensions in Colorado, stakeholders collaborated to implement a statewide program to meet the needs of students with diabetes. Colorado school nursing leadership partnered with the National Association of School Nurses to adapt components of the Managing and Preventing Diabetes and Weight Gain Program (MAP), funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management, integral to MAP, provided guidance for the Colorado Collaborative to design the Diabetes Resource Nurse Program. The program supports the practicing school nurse, and facilitates collaboration between the family, school, and health care provider. This article describes how stakeholders in Colorado chose to collaborate when faced with rising tensions over how to best manage students with diabetes.

  16. Cross-cultural aspects of depression management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Hails, Katherine; Brill, Charlotte D; Chang, Trina; Yeung, Albert; Fava, Maurizio; Trinh, Nhi-Ha

    2012-08-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent illness in minority populations. Minority patients with MDD are often unrecognized and untreated. This review examines promising interventions to address MDD in primary care settings, where minority groups are more likely to seek care. Since 2010, eleven interventions have been developed to address patient-specific and provider-specific barriers, many of which are adaptations of the collaborative care model. Other promising interventions include cultural tailoring of the collaborative care model, as well as the addition of telepsychiatry, motivational interviewing, cultural consultation, and innovations in interpreting. Overall, collaborative care was found feasible and improved satisfaction and treatment engagement of depressed minority patients in primary care. It remains inconclusive whether these newer intervention models improve MDD treatment outcomes. Future research will be needed to establish the effectiveness of these intervention models in improving the treatment outcomes of minority populations with MDD.

  17. Training community-based primary care physicians in the screeningand management of mental health disorders among Latino primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapana R.; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Olfson, Mark; Bell, Michelle A.; Jackson, Elizabeth; Sánchez-Lacay, J. Arturo; Alfonso, César; Leeman, Eve; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Toevaluate a quality improvementintervention to improve thescreening and management (e.g., referral to psychiatric care) of common mental disorders in small independent Latino primary care practices serving patient populations of predominantly low-income Latino immigrants. Methods In 7 practices, academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatry were first implemented (Stage 1) and then supplemented withappointment scheduling and reminders to primary care physicians (PCP’s) by clinic staff (Stage 2).Acceptability and feasibility were assessed with independent patient samples during each stage. Results Participating PCP found the interventions acceptable and noted that referrals to language-matched specialty care and case-by-case consultation on medication management were particularly beneficial. The academic detailing and consultation/liaison intervention (Stage 1) did not significantly affect PCP screening, management or patient satisfaction with care. When support for appointment scheduling and reminders (Stage 2) was added, however, PCP referral to psychiatric services increased (p=.04) and referred patients were significantly more likely to follow through and have more visits to mental health professionals (p=.04). Conclusion Improving the quality of mental health care in low-resourced primary care settings may require academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatric intervention supplemented with staff outreach to achieve meaningful improvement in the processes of care. PMID:26598287

  18. Principals' and Teachers' Perceptions of Quality Management in Hong Kong Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Alison Lai Fong; Yau, Hon Keung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of a sample of Hong Kong principals and teachers of the extent to which quality management (QM) has been effectively implemented in primary schools. The features of QM improvement implemented in Hong Kong primary schools include: values and duties, systems and teams(ST) resources and…

  19. Views of Primary School Administrators on Change in Schools and Change Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosgörür, Vural

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the opinions of primary school administrators about change, and to reveal which strategies they use to manage change in schools. This is a qualitative study conducted in 2014 academic year in Mugla province. Research data were collected from primary school administrators through semi-structured interviews.…

  20. Demand Management: The Primary Care Role at Ireland Army Community Hospital (IACH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-29

    internal medicine, and pediatrics (Kongstvedt, 2001). The principal role of primary care physicians is an inevitable evolution of managed care (Fox... Moron , Bacchetti, Baker & Bindman, 2001; Zhan, Miller, Wong, & Myer, 2004). A study examining the correlation of preventable hospitalizations and...effectiveness of primary care (Gill & Mainous, 1998; Backus, Moron , Bacchetti, Baker & Bindman, 2001; Bindman, et al., 1995; Zhan, Miller, Wong, & Myer, 2004

  1. Primary headache syndromes and sinus headache: An approach to diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Emma Catherine; Smyth, David

    2012-06-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and primary headache syndromes are common disease entities and headache and facial pain are common reasons for referral to otolaryngology units. Because of an association of nasal symptoms with primary headache syndromes and considerable similarities in their clinical presentations, primary headache syndromes may be misdiagnosed as sinus disease and vice versa. In this review we examine the evidence on which otolaryngologists can base clinical diagnosis and management and offer an approach to distinguishing these common clinical entities.

  2. Missing an opportunity: the embedded nature of weight management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Asselin, J; Osunlana, A M; Ogunleye, A A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D

    2015-12-01

    The 5As Team study was designed to create, implement and evaluate a flexible intervention to improve the quality and quantity of weight management visits in primary care. The objective of this portion of the study was to explore how primary care providers incorporate weight management in their practice. 5AsT is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the implementation of a 6-month 5 As Team (5AsT) intervention designed to operationalize the 5As of obesity management in primary care. Data for the qualitative portion of the study presented here included semi-structured interviews with 29 multidisciplinary team providers and field notes of intervention sessions. Thematic analysis was undertaken. A key pattern that emerged from the data was that healthcare providers usually do not address obesity as a primary focus for a visit. Rather, obesity is embedded in a wide range of primary care encounters for other conditions. Implications were it can take extra time to discuss weight, it can be inappropriate to bring up weight as a topic, and treating risk factors and root causes of obesity have indirect benefits to patient weight management. Our findings have implications for obesity treatment approaches and tools that assume a discreet weight management visit. The embedded nature of obesity management in primary care can be harnessed to leverage multiple opportunities for asking and assessing root causes of obesity, and working longitudinally towards individual health goals.

  3. Riverine threat indices to assess watershed condition and identify primary management capacity of agriculture natural resource management agencies.

    PubMed

    Fore, Jeffrey D; Sowa, Scott P; Galat, David L; Annis, Gust M; Diamond, David D; Rewa, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Managers can improve conservation of lotic systems over large geographies if they have tools to assess total watershed conditions for individual stream segments and can identify segments where conservation practices are most likely to be successful (i.e., primary management capacity). The goal of this research was to develop a suite of threat indices to help agriculture resource management agencies select and prioritize watersheds across Missouri River basin in which to implement agriculture conservation practices. We quantified watershed percentages or densities of 17 threat metrics that represent major sources of ecological stress to stream communities into five threat indices: agriculture, urban, point-source pollution, infrastructure, and all non-agriculture threats. We identified stream segments where agriculture management agencies had primary management capacity. Agriculture watershed condition differed by ecoregion and considerable local variation was observed among stream segments in ecoregions of high agriculture threats. Stream segments with high non-agriculture threats were most concentrated near urban areas, but showed high local variability. 60 % of stream segments in the basin were classified as under U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) primary management capacity and most segments were in regions of high agricultural threats. NRCS primary management capacity was locally variable which highlights the importance of assessing total watershed condition for multiple threats. Our threat indices can be used by agriculture resource management agencies to prioritize conservation actions and investments based on: (a) relative severity of all threats, (b) relative severity of agricultural threats, and (c) and degree of primary management capacity.

  4. [Choice of surgical procedure and management of postoperative incision for anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaowen; Peng, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Anal fistula is a common disease in general surgery. It is difficult to heal without intervention and surgical treatment is the major treatment. Method of surgical treatment and management of postoperative incision are based on features and classifications of anal fistula. Choosing the appropriate approach in accordance with specific conditions of patients can obtain effective healing and proper protection against anal sphincter, along with the improvement of life quality. Comprehensive evaluation on methods of surgical treatment and managements of postoperative incision for anal fistula is presented in this paper.

  5. Otitis externa. Management in the primary care office.

    PubMed

    Mirza, N

    1996-05-01

    Otitis externa is a widespread problem that is most commonly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pain, ear discharge, and edema of the ear canal are the main manifestations. The presence of granulation tissue is an ominous sign that usually indicates necrotizing otitis externa or even a neoplastic process. It is important for primary care physicians to be familiar with methods of ear cleaning and use of topical medications for otitis externa. It is equally vital to be aware of the importance of a timely referral to an otolaryngologist when a serious underlying cause is suspected.

  6. The Role of the Primary Care Physician in the Management of Bladder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Khaled A

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a major health challenge for primary care physicians. Unfortunately, the majority of incontinent patients remain untreated. Primary care physicians are ideally positioned to screen for and manage urinary incontinence. A knowledge of basic micturition physiology is important for the physician to accurately identify the cause of incontinence and arrive at the correct treatment course. To this end, this article reviews the physiology of the lower urinary tract, describes the clinical types of urinary incontinence, and outlines a stepwise approach for the primary care physician to the basic evaluation and management of patients with this condition. PMID:16985854

  7. Use of the short form 36 in a primary care based disease management program for patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Jaan; Shull, Robert D; Girolami, Sabrina; Mensch, Debra

    2003-01-01

    While disease management has been described as an important strategy for the care of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) in the managed care setting, little is known about the impact of this approach on overall health-related quality of life. In this study the Short Form 36 (SF-36) was administered to all patients entering CHF disease management at the time of program entry and at 1 year following entry. Scores on the eight subscales and the two composite scales were calculated and compared before and after. Patients were enrolled from a mixed-model health maintenance organization (HMO) with 34,740 Medicare + Choice enrollees residing in 38 counties in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. Two hundred sixty-eight continuously enrolled patients in an HMO-sponsored CHF disease state management program with completed baseline and follow-up SF-36 surveys were sampled. All patients entered into disease management received primary care based, nurse-directed education about CHF self-management including instruction on etiology of CHF, the importance of medication compliance, home care services if indicated, monitoring weight gain, increased understanding of the warning signs of worsening CHF, and coaching on strategies to contact a physician in a timely manner when CHF worsens. Nurses also facilitated for CHF guidelines among primary care physicians, including the need to obtain a baseline assessment of cardiac function, prescribe angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers when appropriate, and initiated appropriate specialist referral. Compared with enrollees who did not complete a pair of SF-36 surveys, the 268 respondents were younger and had a significantly higher rate of cardiac imaging as well as use of ACE inhibitors and beta blocker medications. Analysis of the SF-36 data revealed that three of the eight (Role Physical, General Health Perceptions, and Role Emotional) subscales increased in a statistically significant manner, as

  8. The Influence of Individual and Situational Factors on Children's Choice of a Conflict Management Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamm, Anni; Tõugu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of individual and situational factors on nursery school children's conflict management strategies. This observational study of triadic interaction was carried out among 69 children whose mean age was 48 months. The video-recorded data were coded for the type of…

  9. A Collaborative Approach to Diabetes Management: The Choice Made for Colorado Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Wyckoff, Leah; Patrick, Kathleen; White, Cathy; Glass, Sue; Carlson, Jessie Parker; Perreault, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Students with diabetes deserve a school nurse who can effectively manage the disease. Tensions between the school and families sometimes emerge when a child with diabetes goes to school. To resolve these tensions in Colorado, stakeholders collaborated to implement a statewide program to meet the needs of students with diabetes. Colorado school…

  10. Chinese Postgraduate Choices When Considering a UK Business and Management Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manns, Yihan; Swift, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated Chinese students' decision making processes for enrolling on a postgraduate taught business and management programme in a UK university, based on structured interviews, followed by a survey of just over 450 respondents. The validity and reliability of the research instrument were assessed prior to issuing the survey.…

  11. Managing Change in Small Scottish Primary Schools. SCRE Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Valerie; McPake, Joanna

    This report describes Scottish research on ways in which headteachers in small primary schools managed mandated changes. The research focused on implementation of four recent major initiatives: 5-14 Curriculum Guidelines, School Development Planning, Staff Development and Appraisal, and Devolved School Management. Research methods included a…

  12. Collaborative Classroom Management in a Co-Taught Primary School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rytivaara, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers manage their classroom in co-taught lessons. The data were collected by observing and interviewing a pair of primary school teachers. The most important influence of collaboration on classroom management seemed to be the emotional support of another adult, and the opportunity to use different…

  13. Development of an Academic Consortium for Nurse-Managed Primary Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Joanne M.; Bostrom, Andrea C.; Talarczyk, Geraldine; Cavanagh, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    The Michigan Academic Consortium brought together four universities' nursing schools to address advanced practice issues in nurse-managed primary health care. The collaboration enabled participants to leverage financial resources and take advantage of partnership opportunities. Challenges included multiple management practices, competition, and…

  14. Primary Care Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Veterans: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, S. Sobiya; Nader, Samir; Wang, Jia; Lawler, Timothy; Hagenlocker, Brian; Roos, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians managing older patients with chronic pain play an important role. This paper explores the attitudes of primary care clinicians (PCPs) toward chronic nonmalignant pain management and their experiences using a clinical decision support system. Our investigation followed a qualitative approach based on grounded theory. Twenty-one PCPs…

  15. Responsibility for Financial Management in Primary Schools: Evidence from an English Local Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Drake, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Financial management in primary schools has changed in the UK with the introduction of the Schools Financial Value Standard (SFVS). There is increasing delegation of financial responsibility to the management team in the school, increasing the role of the head teacher and the governing body as part of overall responsibility for the strategic…

  16. [Information management skills: a practical guide in primary care medicine].

    PubMed

    Pasche, O; Cornuz, J

    2005-10-26

    Evidence-Based Medicine has taught us how to evaluate the validity of medical information. At the present time, with the abundance of information available, a doctor often lacks the time needed to select and apply what medical literature suggests. Consequently a new paradigm is called for, namely that of Information Management. In order to reconcile evidence with the principle of reality, a carefully measured use of medical literature has become necessary. The information consulted must not only be valid, but relevant to the context of the patient and must be easily accessible. The article under consideration offers some indication as to how to improve the management of information on a day to day basis through a system of up-dating by email newsletters and by the advantageous use of prefiltered medical literature.

  17. Management of primary germ cell tumors of the mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Economou, J S; Trump, D L; Holmes, E C; Eggleston, J E

    1982-05-01

    Twenty-eight patients with primary malignant germ cell tumors (GCT) of the mediastinum were treated at the University of California at Los Angeles and The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the past 30 years. Of 11 patients with pure seminomas, nine (82%) are free of disease from 6 months to 15 years following therapy. The primary treatment modality in these patients was mediastinal radiation; one patient with metastatic disease had a complete remission and prolonged survival following combination chemotherapy. Seventeen patients had GCT with nonseminomatous elements. Only three (18%) are alive and free of disease. One patient treated only surgically is alive at 15 years and two patients treated with combination chemotherapy and operation are alive and free of disease at 6 months and 3 years. When analyzed by a Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival estimate, patients with nonseminomatous GCT who were treated with cisplatin-bleomycin-based chemotherapy had a median survival of 14.0 months whereas those treated with chemotherapy regimens not employing these agents had a median survival of 4.0 months (generalized Wilcoxon test, p = 0.0495). Patients with pure seminomas are effectively treated with radiation therapy. Patients with nonseminomatous tumors have a much poorer prognosis and deserve aggressive multimodality therapy with cisplatin-bleomycin-based chemotherapy.

  18. The role and choice criteria of antihistamines in allergy management – expert opinion

    PubMed Central

    Jurkiewicz, Dariusz; Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena M.; Pawliczak, Rafał; Woroń, Jarosław; Moniuszko, Marcin; Emeryk, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are the most common chronic conditions lasting throughout the patient’s life. They not only cause significant deterioration in the quality of life of patients but also lead to significant absenteeism and reduced productivity, resulting in very high costs for society. Effective and safe treatment of allergic diseases is therefore one of the main challenges for public health and should be carried out by all the specialists in family medicine, internists and paediatricians in collaboration with allergists, otorhinolaryngologists and dermatologists. Antihistamines are most commonly used in the treatment of allergies. Several dozen drugs are available on the pharmaceutical market, and their generic forms are advertised widely as very effective drugs for the treatment of allergic diseases. What is the truth? What are the data from clinical trials and observational studies? Are all drugs equally effective and safe for the patient? According to a panel of experts representing various fields of medicine, inappropriate treatment of allergies can be very risky for patients, and seemingly equally acting medications may differ greatly. Therefore, a panel of experts gathered the latest data from the entire scientific literature and analysed the latest standards and recommendations prepared by scientific societies. This paper provides a summary of these studies and highlights the importance for the patient of the proper choice of drug to treat his allergies. PMID:28035215

  19. Food choice as a key management strategy for functional gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter R; Shepherd, Susan J

    2012-05-01

    Recognition of food components that induce functional gut symptoms in patient's functional bowel disorders (FBD) has been challenging. Food directly or indirectly provides considerable afferent input into the enteric nervous system. There is an altered relationship between the afferent input and perception/efferent response in FBD. Defining the nature of food-related stimuli may provide a means of minimizing such an input and gut symptoms. Using this premise, reducing the intake of FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-, di-, and mono-saccharides and polyols)--poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates that, by virtue of their small molecular size and rapid fermentability, will distend the intestinal lumen with liquid and gas--improves symptoms in the majority of patients. Well-developed methodologies to deliver the diet via dietician-led education are available. Another abundant source of afferent input is natural and added food chemicals (such as salicylates, amines, and glutamates). Studies are needed to assess the efficacy of the low food chemical dietary approach. A recent placebo-controlled trial of FODMAP-poor gluten provided the first valid evidence that non-celiac gluten intolerance might actually exist, but its prevalence and underlying mechanisms require elucidation. Food choice via the low FODMAP and potentially other dietary strategies is now a realistic and efficacious therapeutic approach for functional gut symptoms.

  20. A choice experiment of the residential preference of waste management services - the example of Kagoshima city, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yusuke

    2007-01-01

    Municipal governments have attempted to reduce waste disposal and increase recycling rates in Japan. However, it is difficult to get full cooperation from residents. Using experiments in which residents are given an opportunity to choose the components of the waste management system (choice experiments), we measure the cost of each characteristic of the waste collection services. The estimation result reveals that there are trade-offs between the risk, payments, and handling costs. The marginal loss in utility revenues from an increase in the types of waste being separated is almost 200 yen (US$ 1.74) and a 1% increase in the recycling rate raises the cost of service by 53 yen (US$ 0.46). In addition, the results show the need for communications about risks between municipal authorities and residents.

  1. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: new choices for patient management in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Walid

    2015-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a significant problem for the aging population and remains a major factor underlying stroke risk. Warfarin anticoagulation has been proven effective for stroke prevention in AF, but can be difficult to manage and requires frequent monitoring. The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been shown to be as effective as warfarin for stroke prevention in nonvalvular AF (NVAF) and are associated with a reduced risk of bleeding compared with warfarin. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban have been approved in the USA for reducing the risk of stroke in patients with NVAF. In this article, AF risk assessment is discussed and NOAC phase III clinical trials for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolic events are reviewed. Further, differences in stroke and bleeding outcomes between NOACs are highlighted, the use of NOACs for cardioversion and special patient populations is discussed, and management considerations for patients with AF are reviewed.

  2. Development of Participative Management System in Learning Environment Management for Small Sized Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernthaisong, Prasertsak; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Wisetrinthong, Kanjana

    2017-01-01

    The research aimed to: 1) study the factors of a participative management system in learning environment management, 2) study the current situation, desirable outcomes, and further needs for developing a participative management system in learning management, 3) develop a working participative management system, and 4) assess the system's…

  3. [Facial palsy: diagnosis and management by primary care physicians].

    PubMed

    Alvarez, V; Dussoix, P; Gaspoz, J-M

    2009-01-28

    The incidence of facial palsy is about 50/100000/year, i.e. 210 cases/year in Geneva. Clinicians can be puzzled by it, because it encompasses aetiologies with very diverse prognoses. Most patients suffer from Bell palsy that evolves favourably. Some, however, suffer from diseases such as meningitis, HIV infection, Lyme's disease, CVA, that require fast identification because of their severity and of the need for specific treatments. This article proposes an algorithm for pragmatic and evidence-based management of facial palsy.

  4. Created versus natural coastal islands: Atlantic waterbird populations, habitat choices, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Allen, D.H.; Jenkins, D.

    2003-01-01

    Nesting colonial waterbirds along the Atlantic Coast of the United States face a number of landscape-level threats including human disturbance, mammalian predator expansion, and habitat alteration. There have been changes from 1977 to the mid-1990s in use of nesting habitats and populations of a number of seabird species of concern in the region, including black skimmers Rynchops niger Linnaeaus, common terns Sterna hirundo Linnaeaus, gull-billed terns Sterna nilotica Linnaeaus, least terns Sterna antillarum Lesson, royal terns Sterna maxima Boddaert, and sandwich terns Sterna sandvicensis Cabot. These species form colonies primarily on the following habitat types: large, sandy barrier or shoal islands, natural estuarine or bay islands (mostly marsh), man-made islands of dredged deposition materials (from navigation channels), and the mainland. Significant changes in the use of the dredged material islands have occurred for these species in New Jersey and North Carolina, but not in Virginia. Population declines and changes in bird habitat use appear to be at least partially associated with the conditions and management of the existing dredged material islands, coastal policy changes associated with creating new dredged material islands, and competing demands for sand for beach augmentation by coastal communities. As these and other coastal habitats become less suitable for colonial waterbirds, other manmade sites, such as bridges and buildings have become increasingly more important. In regions with intense recreational demands, coastal wildlife managers need to take a more aggressive role in managing natural and man-made habitats areas and as stakeholders in the decision-making process involving dredged materials and beach sand allocation.

  5. Dental management of a talon cusp on a primary incisor.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Richard K; Chussid, Steven

    2007-01-01

    There are many treatment options for the pediatric patient with a talon cusp (TC). The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a TC involving a primary maxillary right central incisor in a 14-month-old male causing displacement of the affected tooth. The etiology of a TC is thought to be a disturbance during the morphodifferentiation stage of tooth development. Clinical problems include: (1) occlusal interferences; (2) esthetic disturbances; (3) accidental cusp fracture; (4) tongue irritation; (5) nursing difficulty; (6) caries; and (7) displacement of the affected tooth. The TC affecting the central incisor was reduced over a period of 4 visits, followed by immediate placement of a 5% sodium fluoride varnish at the conclusion of each reduction visit. Restoration of esthetics and function was evident within 1 month following complete cusp reduction. There were no clinical signs of any problems related to the reduction, and the prognosis was considered to be guarded. The pediatric patient was placed on a 6-month oral hygiene maintenance follow-up.

  6. Managing risk in cancer presentation, detection and referral: a qualitative study of primary care staff views

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Neil; Thomson, Gillian; Dey, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In the UK, there have been a number of national initiatives to promote earlier detection and prompt referral of patients presenting to primary care with signs and symptoms of cancer. The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of a range of primary care staff in promoting earlier presentation, detection and referral of patients with symptoms suggestive of cancer. Setting Six primary care practices in northwest England. Participants: 39 primary care staff from a variety of disciplines took part in five group and four individual interviews. Results The global theme to emerge from the interviews was ‘managing risk’, which had three underpinning organising themes: ‘complexity’, relating to uncertainty of cancer diagnoses, service fragmentation and plethora of guidelines; ‘continuity’, relating to relationships between practice staff and their patients and between primary and secondary care; ‘conflict’ relating to policy drivers and staff role boundaries. A key concern of staff was that policymakers and those implementing cancer initiatives did not fully understand how risk was managed within primary care. Conclusions Primary care staff expressed a range of views and opinions on the benefits of cancer initiatives. National initiatives did not appear to wholly resolve issues in managing risk for all practitioners. Staff were concerned about the number of guidelines and priorities they were expected to implement. These issues need to be considered by policymakers when developing and implementing new initiatives. PMID:24928585

  7. Carbon--making the right choice for waste management in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Barton, J R; Issaias, I; Stentiford, E I

    2008-01-01

    Due to initiatives such as the clean development mechanism (CDM), reducing greenhouse gas emissions for a developing country can offer an important route to attracting investment in a variety of qualifying project areas, including waste management. To date CDM projects have been largely confined to schemes that control emission from landfill, but projects that avoid landfilling are beginning to be submitted. In considering the waste options which might be suitable for developing countries certain ones, such as energy from waste, have been discounted for a range of reasons related primarily to the lack of technical and other support services required for these more sophisticated process trains. The paper focuses on six options: the base case of open dumping; three options for landfill (passive venting, gas capture with flaring, and gas capture with energy production), composting and anaerobic digestion with electricity production and composting of the digestate. A range of assumptions were necessary for making the comparisons based on the effective carbon emissions, and these assumptions will change from project to project. The highest impact in terms of carbon emissions was from using a sanitary landfill without either gas flaring or electricity production; this was worse than the baseline case using open dumpsites. Landfills with either flaring or energy production from the collected gas both produced similar positive carbon emissions, but these were substantially lower than both open dumping and sanitary landfill without flaring or energy production. Composting or anaerobic digestion with energy production and composting of the digestate were the two best options with composting being neutral in terms of carbon emissions and anaerobic digestion being carbon negative. These generic conclusions were tested for sensitivity by modifying the input waste composition and were found to be robust, suggesting that subject to local study to confirm assumptions made, the

  8. Termination is not the treatment of choice for severe hyperemesis gravidarum: Successful management using prednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ozairi, E; Waugh, J J S; Taylor, R

    2009-01-01

    Summary Severe hyperemesis gravidarum causes profound maternal morbidity. Termination of pregnancy is still offered before the use of medical therapy. This report describes management of a woman who had undergone two previous terminations for hyperemesis, and additionally presents the dosage profile of prednisolone used to successfully manage a consecutive series of 33 women with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. The treatment protocol is described. The group had a median weight loss in pregnancy of 5.5 kg (range 2.0–12.5 kg), had been admitted on a median of 3.0 (range 0–9) occasions and had spent 7.5 (range 0–25) days on i.v. fluids. Continuing vomiting prevented oral steroid therapy in 14 women and i.v. hydrocortisone (50 mg t.i.d.; two women required 100 mg t.i.d.) was used initially for 24–48 h. Nineteen women commenced prednisolone 10 mg t.i.d. and this achieved suppression of vomiting within 48 h in all but two women who required 15 mg t.i.d. Two distinct subtypes of hyperemesis gravidarum were identified. Remitting hyperemesis spontaneously ceases between 14 and 22 weeks gestation and accounts for approximately 80% of cases. In contrast, full-term hyperemesis persists until minutes after delivery. These separate sub-types have not previously been described. Steroid treatment of hyperemesis should be considered in women who fulfil the criteria of severe disease. PMID:27582805

  9. The reality of waste management in primary health care units in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sergiane B; e Souza, Adenícia C S; Tipple, Anaclara F V; Rezende, Keyti C A D; de Resende, Fabiana R; Rodrigues, Érika G; Pereira, Milca S

    2014-09-01

    A large number of users are serviced in primary health care units in Brazil, both in health facilities and in households. These services generate waste that must be managed safely, but there is no legislation that regulates this type of waste management in Brazil. The objective of this study was to analyse the production and management of waste in primary health care. A direct observation was performed of the stages in the handling and weighing of waste generated in primary health care units in the municipality of Goiânia (Brazil). The units generated infectious, chemical, and common waste, as well as sharp objects. The generation of waste ranged between 0.027 and 0.075 kg user-day. The generated waste was classified mostly as common and recyclable. Flaws were observed in the management of all types of waste. The critical point is segregation. Only 34.1% of the waste disposed of as infectious actually belonged to this group, the rest was ordinary waste. Flaws at this stage increase the volume of infectious waste, the occupational and environmental risks, and associated costs. Intervention to change this reality is needed and it requires the careful preparation of a waste management plan, corroborating structural changes to the implementation of this plan, and professional training and public policies to guide waste management in primary care, especially those generated in households.

  10. Algorithms for the assessment and management of insomnia in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Hilty, Donald; Young, Julie S; Bourgeois, James A; Klein, Sally; Hardin, Kimberly A

    2009-01-01

    Insomnia is a leading cause of sleep disturbance in primary care practice affecting >30% of people in the United States and can result in psychological and physiological consequences. We aim for a focused discussion of some of the underpinnings of insomnia and practical tips for management (eg, algorithms). A PubMed search was conducted using English language papers between 1997–2007, with the terms “sleep,” “insomnia”; “primary care” and “clinics”; “comorbid conditions”; “treatment” and “management.” Sleep, psychiatric and medical disorders significantly affect sleep, causing patient suffering, potentially worsening of other disorders and increasing the use of primary care services. We provide an outline for practical assessment and treatment of insomnia in primary care, including the strengths and weaknesses of medications. PMID:19936140

  11. Managing tradeoffs in geoengineering through optimal choice of non-uniform radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, D. G.; Keith, D.; Kravitz, B.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-12-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) could be used to offset some or all anthropogenic radiative forcing, with the goal of reducing some of the associated climatic change. However, the degree of compensation will vary, with residual climate changes larger in some regions than others. Similarly, the insolation reduction that best compensates climate changes in one region may not be the same as for another, leading to concerns about equity. We show that optimizing the latitudinal and seasonal distribution of insolation reduction can improve the fidelity with which SRM offsets anthropogenic climate change. Using the HadCM3L general circulation model, we consider three trade-offs: the trade-off between minimizing global rms climate changes and minimizing residual changes at the worst-off location, the trade-off between minimizing global rms climate changes and the average solar reduction required to do so, and the trade-off between minimizing global rms climate changes and maximizing Northern Hemisphere September sea ice, for a given average solar reduction. First, the residual temperature and precipitation changes in the worst-off region can be reduced by 30% relative to uniform insolation reduction, with only a modest impact on global root-mean-square (rms) changes; this has implications for managing regional inequalities. Second, the same rms residual climate changes can be obtained with up to 30% less insolation reduction than with a uniform distribution, implying that it may be possible to reduce side effects and risks of SRM (e.g., ozone depletion from sulfate). Finally, allowing spatial and temporal variability increases the range of trade-offs to be considered, such as the relative importance of restoring Northern Hemisphere sea ice versus minimizing overall climate impacts, or the relative weighting between temperature and precipitation residuals. This raises the question of how to weight different objectives. In summary, decisions involving SRM do not need to be

  12. Portrait, treatment choices and management of breast cancer in nonagenarians: an ongoing challenge.

    PubMed

    Méry, Benoite; Assouline, Avi; Rivoirard, Romain; Bosacki, Claire; Auberdiac, Pierre; Falk, Alexander T; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Merrouche, Yacine; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    There are only scarce data on the management of nonagenarians with breast cancer, and more particularly on the place of radiation therapy (RT). We report a retrospective study on patients aged 90 years old or older, with breast cancer, receiving RT. Records from RT departments from five institutions were reviewed to identify patients 90 years old of age and older undergoing RT over past decade for breast cancer. Tumors' characteristics were examined, as well treatment specificities and treatment intent. 44 patients receiving RT courses were identified, mean age 92 years. Treatment was given with curative and palliative intent in 72.7% and 27.3% respectively. Factors associated with a curative treatment were performance status (PS), place of life, previous surgery, and tumor stage. Median total prescribed dose was 40 Gy (23-66). Hypo fractionation was used in 77%. Most toxicities were mild to moderate. RT could not be completed in 1 patient (2.3%). No long-term toxicity was reported. Among 31 patients analyzable for effectiveness, 24 patients (77.4%) had their diseased controlled until last follow-up, including 17 patients (54.8%) experiencing complete response. At last follow-up, 4 patients (12.9%) were deceased, cancer being cause of death for two of them. The study shows that breast/chest RT is feasible in nonagenarians. Although the definitive benefit of RT could not be addressed here, hypofractionated therapy allowed a good local control with acceptable side effects.

  13. Clinical Immunology Review Series: An approach to the management of pulmonary disease in primary antibody deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tarzi, M D; Grigoriadou, S; Carr, S B; Kuitert, L M; Longhurst, H J

    2009-01-01

    The sinopulmonary tract is the major site of infection in patients with primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and structural lung damage arising from repeated sepsis is a major determinant of morbidity and mortality. Patients with common variable immunodeficiency may, in addition, develop inflammatory lung disease, often associated with multi-system granulomatous disease. This review discusses the presentation and management of lung disease in patients with primary antibody deficiency. PMID:19128358

  14. Positive practice environments influence job satisfaction of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses constitute the majority of the health workforce in South Africa and they play a major role in providing primary health care (PHC) services. Job satisfaction influences nurse retention and successful implementation of health system reforms. This study was conducted in light of renewed government commitment to reforms at the PHC level, and to contribute to the development of solutions to the challenges faced by the South African nursing workforce. The objective of the study was to determine overall job satisfaction of PHC clinic nursing managers and the predictors of their job satisfaction in two South African provinces. Methods During 2012, a cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Stratified random sampling was used to survey a total of 111 nursing managers working in PHC clinics. These managers completed a pre-tested Measure of Job Satisfaction questionnaire with subscales on personal satisfaction, workload, professional support, training, pay, career prospects and standards of care. Mean scores were used to measure overall job satisfaction and various subscales. Predictors of job satisfaction were determined through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 108 nursing managers completed the survey representing a 97% response rate. The mean age of respondents was 49 years (SD = 7.9) and the majority of them (92%) were female. Seventy-six percent had a PHC clinical training qualification. Overall mean job satisfaction scores were 142.80 (SD = 24.3) and 143.41 (SD = 25.6) for Gauteng and Free State provinces respectively out of a maximum possible score of 215. Predictors of job satisfaction were: working in a clinic of choice (RRR = 3.10 (95% CI: 1.11 to 8.62, P = 0.030)), being tired at work (RRR = 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.50, P = 0.001)) and experience of verbal abuse (RRR = 0.18 (95% CI: 0.06 to 0.55, P = 0.001). Conclusion Allowing nurses greater choice of clinic

  15. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease: do they exist?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-04-21

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated supportive literature. The purpose of this review is to investigate what non-specialist tools, action plans or guidelines for IBD are published in readily searchable medical literature and compare these to those which exist for other chronic conditions.

  16. Instructional Leadership for Quality Learning: An Assessment of the Impact of the Primary School Management Development Project in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pansiri, Nkobi Owen

    2008-01-01

    A descriptive study using questionnaires was conducted in 2004 to assess the effectiveness of instructional leadership displayed by primary school management teams following the implementation of the Primary School Management Project in Botswana. Leadership skills, Coordination of instructional activities, management of curriculum and quality of…

  17. 25 CFR 558.2 - Review of notice of results for a key employee or primary management official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... management official. 558.2 Section 558.2 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GAMING LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.2 Review of notice of...

  18. 25 CFR 558.2 - Review of notice of results for a key employee or primary management official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... management official. 558.2 Section 558.2 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GAMING LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.2 Review of notice of...

  19. Parental perspectives regarding primary-care weight-management strategies for school-age children.

    PubMed

    Turer, Christy Boling; Mehta, Megha; Durante, Richard; Wazni, Fatima; Flores, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    To identify parental perspectives regarding weight-management strategies for school-age children, focus groups were conducted of parents of overweight and obese (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) 6-12-year-old children recruited from primary-care clinics. Questions focused on the role of the primary-care provider, effective components of weight-management strategies and feasibility of specific dietary strategies. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analysed using margin coding and grounded theory. Six focus groups were held. The mean age (in years) for parents was 32, and for children, eight; 44% of participants were Latino, 33%, African-American and 23%, white. Parents' recommendations on the primary-care provider's role in weight management included monitoring weight, providing guidance regarding health risks and lifestyle changes, consistent follow-up and using discretion during weight discussions. Weight-management components identified as key included emphasising healthy lifestyles and enjoyment, small changes to routines and parental role modelling. Parents prefer guidance regarding healthy dietary practices rather than specific weight-loss diets, but identified principles that could enhance the acceptability of these diets. For dietary guidance to be feasible, parents recommended easy-to-follow instructions and emphasising servings over counting calories. Effective weight-management strategies identified by parents include primary-care provider engagement in weight management, simple instructions regarding healthy lifestyle changes, parental involvement and deemphasising specific weight-loss diets. These findings may prove useful in developing primary-care weight-management strategies for children that maximise parental acceptance.

  20. [Surgical and non-surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism:How do calcimimetics work?

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disease. The first line therapy for the disease is surgical removal of affected parathyroid gland(s). Other therapeutic options with medication are needed to be established, because many of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism have few or no symptoms and are expected to have a long life expectancy without surgery. Cinacalcet as a calcimimetic, bisphosphonates and denosumab are promising candidates for medical management of the disease. Effectiveness and efficiency of these drugs for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism is to be evaluated in comparison with surgical treatment.

  1. When Government Is No Longer Employer of Choice: What May the Sector Perceptions of Public Managers Be Like after the Economy Recovers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Craig; Ponomariov, Branco

    2012-01-01

    In today's economic climate, government is now considered by many to be the "employer of choice." However, employers at all levels of government may eventually lose their recent gains in the war for talent, as the economy improves. Accordingly, it is important to explain how public sector managers viewed the relative advantages and…

  2. Translating Evidence-Based Depression Management Services to Community-Based Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Schulberg, Herbert C; Post, Edward P; Rollman, Bruce L; Belnap, Bea Herbeck; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2004-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of using treatment models for major depression in primary care settings. Nonetheless, translating these models into enduring changes in routine primary care has proved difficult. Various health system and organizational barriers prevent the integration of these models into primary care settings. This article discusses barriers to introducing and sustaining evidence-based depression management services in community-based primary care practices and suggests organizational and financial solutions based on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Depression in Primary Care Program. It focuses on strategies to improve depression care in medical settings based on adaptations of the chronic care model and discusses the challenges of implementing evidence-based depression care given the structural, financial, and cultural separation between mental health and general medical care. PMID:15595945

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Primary Aldosteronism: What is New in the 2016 Update?

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Damian G; Yanes Cardozo, Licy L

    2016-01-01

    Primary Aldosteronism is the single most common cause of secondary hypertension and is associated with increased target organ injury. The Endocrine Society has recently released the updated Clinical Practice Guideline for Primary Aldosteronism entitled “The Management of Primary Aldosteronism: Case Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline”. We review the updated Clinical Practice Guideline, highlighting the new recommendations and the implications that they may have in clinical practice. The recognition by the Endocrine Society’s Task Force that Primary Aldosteronism is a public health issue and that the population at risk for screening should be significantly expanded will surely have an impact in the clinical practice which hopefully will translate in better detection, diagnosis and treatment of patients with Primary Aldosteronism. PMID:28018978

  4. A study of litter and waste management policies at (primary) eco-schools in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Kayihan, Kutlu Sevinç; Tönük, Seda

    2012-01-01

    In addition to environmental and economic benefits, systematic application of sustainable waste management in elementary education buildings also makes a positive contribution to the education of future generations. This study examines elementary schools in Istanbul, which are part of the Eco-Schools International Programme. This programme was established in 1994 with European Union support and it aims to introduce environmental management systems into primary schools within the scope of ISO 14001/EMAS. A questionnaire study was administered on the theme of litter management and sustainable waste management within elementary schools located in the Asian and European parts of Istanbul city, and the findings of a field survey were examined. Questionnaire findings were gathered under five themes: litter management, composting of organic waste, re-use of school materials, reducing consumption-selection of recycled products, waste management and sorting of recyclable materials.

  5. Organizational factors and depression management in community-based primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence-based quality improvement models for depression have not been fully implemented in routine primary care settings. To date, few studies have examined the organizational factors associated with depression management in real-world primary care practice. To successfully implement quality improvement models for depression, there must be a better understanding of the relevant organizational structure and processes of the primary care setting. The objective of this study is to describe these organizational features of routine primary care practice, and the organization of depression care, using survey questions derived from an evidence-based framework. Methods We used this framework to implement a survey of 27 practices comprised of 49 unique offices within a large primary care practice network in western Pennsylvania. Survey questions addressed practice structure (e.g., human resources, leadership, information technology (IT) infrastructure, and external incentives) and process features (e.g., staff performance, degree of integrated depression care, and IT performance). Results The results of our survey demonstrated substantial variation across the practice network of organizational factors pertinent to implementation of evidence-based depression management. Notably, quality improvement capability and IT infrastructure were widespread, but specific application to depression care differed between practices, as did coordination and communication tasks surrounding depression treatment. Conclusions The primary care practices in the network that we surveyed are at differing stages in their organization and implementation of evidence-based depression management. Practical surveys such as this may serve to better direct implementation of these quality improvement strategies for depression by improving understanding of the organizational barriers and facilitators that exist within both practices and practice networks. In addition, survey information can

  6. Health Care Assistants in Primary Care Depression Management: Role Perception, Burdening Factors, and Disease Conception

    PubMed Central

    Gensichen, Jochen; Jaeger, Cornelia; Peitz, Monika; Torge, Marion; Güthlin, Corina; Mergenthal, Karola; Kleppel, Vera; Gerlach, Ferdinand M.; Petersen, Juliana J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE In primary care, the involvement of health care assistants (HCAs) in clinical depression management is an innovative approach. Little is known, however, about how HCAs experience their new tasks. We wanted to describe the perceptions and experiences of HCAs who provided case management to patients with depression in small primary care practices. METHODS This qualitative study was nested in the Primary Care Monitoring for Depressive Patients Trial on case management in Germany. We used a semi-structured instrument to interview 26 HCAs and undertook content analysis. We focussed on 3 key aspects: role perception, burdening factors, and disease conception. RESULTS Most HCAs said their new role provided them with personal and professional enrichment, and they were interested in improving patient-communication skills. They saw their major function as interacting with the patient and considered support for the family physician to be of less importance. Even so, some saw their role as a communication facilitator between family physician and patient. Burdening factors implementing the new tasks were the increased workload, the work environment, and difficulties interacting with depressed patients. HCAs’ disease conception of depression was heterogeneous. After 1 year HCAs believed they were sufficiently familiar with their duties as case managers in depression management. CONCLUSION HCAs were willing to extend their professional responsibilities from administrative work to more patient-centred work. Even if HCAs perform only monitoring tasks within the case management concept, the resulting workload is a limiting factor. PMID:19901310

  7. "We will not rest." Filipino women want a fertility management program that respects women's dignity, women's bodies and women's choices.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R O

    1993-03-01

    The program officer for the Institute for Social Studies and Action presents 1) her views on women's fertility management under different political administrations in the Philippines, 2) the political postures of influential groups, 3) the goals of women's and health groups, and 4) the actions taken by Filipino women. Under Ferdinand Marcos, the official family planning (FP) program emphasized reduction of population growth and established a quota system and incentives for the number of new acceptors. Women, as a result, became victims; e.g. IUDs were inserted without prior knowledge, and inadequate information and follow-up were provided on oral contraceptive use. Efforts were criticized for treating women as program targets and not as individuals capable of making choices. Under Corazon Aquino, the Roman Catholic hierarchy dominated and would have banned all forms of artificial contraception had women's and health groups not blocked the effort. Only in 1989 did President Aquino finally announce that multiple methods of family planning (FP) would be promoted. There was a transition in program services during the transfer to the Department of Health. Currently the government promotes FP within the safe motherhood and child survival context, but adolescents and unmarried women and couples are excluded from FP services. Population control advocates believe FP is a health issue. The Roman Catholic Church accepts only natural methods and believes artificial methods interfere with the natural processes of procreation. Anti-FP groups promote only natural FP methods and wage campaigns to discredit contraceptive methods. Women's and FP groups contend that it is a woman's right to regulate her own fertility. Safe abortion should be made available to those who need it. Women's networks are mobilizing to talk about the issues, to hold public activities to change laws and policies and to encourage women's involvement in decision making affecting their lives, and to conduct

  8. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed for all 129 quality indicators from the domains: ‘infrastructure’, ‘information’, ‘finance’, and ‘quality and safety’ to examine changes over time. Results Significant improvements were found in three of four domains: ‘quality and safety’ (F=22.81, p<0.01), ‘information’ (F=27.901, p<0.01) and ‘finance’ (F=4.073, p<0.02). The 129 quality indicators showed a significant improvement within the three points of measurement (F=33.864, p<0.01). Conclusions The European Practice Assessment for primary care practices thus provides a functioning quality management programme, focusing on the sustainable improvement of structural and organisational aspects to promote high quality of primary care. The implementation of a quality management system which also includes a continuous improvement process would give added value to provide good care. PMID:25900466

  9. Musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents managed in Australian primary care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care settings play a vital role in the early detection and appropriate management of musculoskeletal conditions in paediatric populations. However, little data exist regarding these conditions in a primary care context or on the presentation of specific musculoskeletal disorders in children. The aim of this study was to estimate the caseload and describe typical management of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents presenting to primary care in Australia. Methods An analysis of data from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) study was performed. The BEACH study is a continuous national study of general practice (GP) activity in Australia. We identified all GP encounters with children and adolescents over the past five years and extracted data on demographic details, the problems managed, and GP management of each problem. SAS statistical software was used to calculate robust proportions and after adjustment for the cluster, the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results From the period April 2006 to March 2011, there were 65,279 encounters with children and adolescents in the BEACH database. Of the 77,830 problems managed at these encounters, 4.9% (95%CI 4.7% to 5.1%) were musculoskeletal problems. The rate of musculoskeletal problems managed increased significantly with age, however there was a significant decrease for girls aged 15–17 years. Upper and lower limb conditions were the most common, followed by spine and trunk conditions. Spine and trunk conditions were significantly more likely to be managed with medication, but less likely to receive imaging, than upper or lower limb problems. Conclusions Musculoskeletal problems in children and adolescents present a significant burden and an important challenge to the primary health care system in Australia. There is variability in rates of presentation between different age groups, gender and affected body region. PMID:24885231

  10. Development of a Program to Enhance Curriculum and Learning Management Competency of Private Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panichpongsapak, Ratthasart; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this research were: (1) to study the factors and indicators to enhance curriculum and learning management competency of private primary school teachers; (2) to study current situations and desirable situations and techniques; (3) to develop a program; and (4) to study the effects of a program. The study comprised 4 phases: Phase…

  11. Management of Primary Dysmenorrhea by School Adolescents in ILE-IFE, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A.; Babatunde, Oluwayemisi A.

    2010-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a problem that girls and women face and often manage themselves with or without support from health professionals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among adolescents with dysmenorrhea (N = 150) in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The aims of the study were to determine their knowledge of menstruation and primary dysmenorrhea,…

  12. Analysis of Classroom Management Problems in Primary Schools in Delta State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oghuvbu, Enamiroro Patrick; Atakpo, Theresa Edirin

    2008-01-01

    This article identifies classroom management problems, their causes, and possible ways to reduce these problems in primary schools located in Delta State, Nigeria. A total of 600 teachers selected from twelve local government areas participated in this study. Data were collected in a checklist containing 27 items and a two section questionnaire…

  13. Surgical management for Hirschsprung disease: A review for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Holly L; Rizzolo, Denise; Austin, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Primary care providers may encounter infants and children with Hirschsprung disease, a congenital colonic defect. Although primarily a surgical problem, the disease requires extensive supportive care and a multidisciplinary approach that often extends beyond surgical correction. This article reviews the management of Hirschsprung disease.

  14. The Management of the Induction of Newly Qualified Teachers in Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Mike

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study of new teachers employed in English primary schools. Case studies of inductees and interviews with all people involved in the management of the teachers' probation and induction indicated the linked importance of appropriate placement, affective human relationships, and inductees' attitudes in achieving success in the induction…

  15. Using claims data to select primary care physicians for a managed care network.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, P; Noether, M; Ozminkowski, R J; Smith, K M; Raney, B E; Mickey, D; Hawley, P M

    1994-01-01

    An insurance claims databased profiling system was developed to help select new primary care physicians (PCPs) for a managed care network. PCPs (family practitioners, internists, and pediatricians) were ranked based on how closely their actual use of outpatient services conformed to the predictions of a mathematical model that adjusted for differences in age, sex, and case mix.

  16. Formative evaluation of practice changes for managing depression within a Shared Care model in primary care.

    PubMed

    Beaulac, Julie; Edwards, Jeanette; Steele, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To investigate the implementation and initial impact of the Physician Integrated Network (PIN) mental health indicators, which are specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression, in three primary care practices with Shared Mental Health Care in Manitoba.

  17. The Organizational Strategies of School Management in Japan: Focus on Primary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisse, Makia; Okato, Toshitaka

    2009-01-01

    The study examines the organizational strategies of Japanese principals in school management. One hundred principals of primary schools in Hiroshima Prefecture were surveyed in 2007. The samples comprised of the differences between the two groups aged 51-55 and 56-60 in terms of how competency level should be exerted in school. The study was…

  18. Primary cardiac lymphoma: utility of multimodality imaging in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Mato, Anthony R; Morgans, Alicia K; Roullet, Michele R; Bagg, Adam; Glatstein, Eli; Litt, Harold I; Downs, Lisa H; Chong, Elise A; Olson, Erin R; Andreadis, Charalambos; Schuster, Stephen J

    2007-12-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) is an extremely rare disease defined as a lymphoma strictly confined to the heart or pericardium without dissemination. We present the case of an 82 yr old male with newly diagnosed PCL and two years of subsequent follow up. This report highlights the utility of a multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis and management of PCL.

  19. Using a Learning Management System to Personalise Learning for Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Bronwyn; Hartnett, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on one aspect of a descriptive multiple-case study which set out to explore the role of a learning management system (LMS) in personalising learning for students from the perspective of three teachers in one primary school in New Zealand. The intention was to provide insight into the role the LMS could play in classrooms when…

  20. Endodontic Management of an Infected Primary Molar in a Child with Agenesis of the Permanent Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2017-01-01

    Missing of mandibular second premolar is one of the most common types of tooth agenesis. In such cases, maintenance of the primary second molar, if possible at all, can prevent many treatment procedures in future. The present case report represents the endodontic management of a necrotic left mandibular primary second molar that had developed an abscess. Considering the missing of the permanent successor, the tooth was disinfected during endodontic preparation and the root canal system was filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in the same session. After 12 months of regular follow-up, not only the tooth was functional and symptom-free, but also healing of the inter-radicular bone lesion and re-establishment of the lamina dura was indicative of treatment success. Further trials are suggested to confirm CEM biomaterial use for management of infected primary molars associated with endodontic lesion. PMID:28179938

  1. ADHD in school-aged youth: Management and special treatment considerations in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Weed, Elizabeth D

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is considered one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. Primary care providers are in the unique position of providing comprehensive care-routine care, well child visits, immunizations, and other healthcare needs-to a majority of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. As such, primary care providers are pivotal in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of this population. This article will address special treatment considerations to aid in the management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the primary care setting, including substance use disorders and diversion, cardiac issues and stimulant medication, medication holidays and follow-up monitoring. The database of PubMed was searched using keywords that included attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, children, prevalence, medication holidays, safety, cardiovascular, cardiac, blood pressure, substance use, diversion, adverse drug reactions; inclusion dates were January 1, 2011 to September 30, 2015.

  2. Managed care can be better care for all citizens: a primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, T

    1997-01-01

    The CPN seeks to enhance the care of patients by judicious expenditure of health care dollars, currently for the Unit "Community" Network, but ultimately also for other insurers who would enter risk-sharing relationships with the CPN. Improvements in health care delivery will be made in enhanced access to primary care, including telephone access to nurse triage; in collaboration and communication between the selected consultant and the referring primary care giver, including an electronic network allowing for selected information sharing; and in renewing medicine's collective commitment to care provided as close to home as possible, or in the home if this is the highest quality. The care of the uninsured remains a challenge and a normal obligation from which the CPN does not shrink. The economic realities of primary care delivery must be improved, with additional resources allocated being substantially rededicated to patient care. The patient's control of the selection of the site of health care and the absence of incentives to their primary care provider for a referral pattern different than the patient's choice will remain important to the CPN. The CPN hopes to provide the diplomacy between third party payers to enhance collaboration and minimize competition in the delivery of care in communities.

  3. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Stellefson, Michael; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and the following search terms: “chronic care model” (and) “diabet*.” We included articles published between January 1999 and October 2011. We summarized details on CCM application and health outcomes for 16 studies. Results The 16 studies included various study designs, including 9 randomized controlled trials, and settings, including academic-affiliated primary care practices and private practices. We found evidence that CCM approaches have been effective in managing diabetes in US primary care settings. Organizational leaders in health care systems initiated system-level reorganizations that improved the coordination of diabetes care. Disease registries and electronic medical records were used to establish patient-centered goals, monitor patient progress, and identify lapses in care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) were trained to deliver evidence-based care, and PCP office–based diabetes self-management education improved patient outcomes. Only 7 studies described strategies for addressing community resources and policies. Conclusion CCM is being used for diabetes care in US primary care settings, and positive outcomes have been reported. Future research on integration of CCM into primary care settings for diabetes management should measure diabetes process indicators, such as self-efficacy for disease management and clinical decision making. PMID:23428085

  4. Prevalence and management of osteoarthritis in primary care: an epidemiologic cohort study from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    Morkem, Rachael; Peat, George; Williamson, Tyler; Green, Michael E.; Khan, Shahriar; Jordan, Kelvin P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a common chronic condition that affects many older Canadians and is a considerable cause of disability. Our objective was to describe the epidemiology of osteoarthritis in patients aged 30 years and older using electronic medical records (EMRs) in a Canadian primary care population. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the EMRs of 207 610 patients over 30 years of age (extracted on December 31, 2012) who had at least one clinic visit during the preceding 2 years. We calculated the age–sex standardized prevalence of diagnosed osteoarthritis and its association with comorbidities and covariates available in the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network database. Results The estimated prevalence of diagnosed osteoarthritis was 14.2% (15.6% among women, 12.4% among men). The diagnosis of osteoarthritis was associated with several comorbidities: hypertension (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.18), depression (PR 1.26, 95% CI 1.22–1.3), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (PR 1.16, 95% CI 1.11–1.21) and epilepsy (PR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13–1.43). In addition, 56.6% of patients had received a prescription for a range of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 45% of which were topical. Opioid medications were prescribed to 33% of patients for pain management. Conclusion Osteoarthritis is a common disease in middle-aged and older Canadians. It is more common in women than in men and is associated with comorbid conditions. Most patients with osteoarthritis received pharmacotherapy for inflammation and pain management. As the Canadian population ages, osteoarthritis will become an increasing burden for individuals and the health care system. PMID:26442224

  5. Managing low back pain in the primary care setting: The know-do gap

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N Ann; Moga, Carmen; Harstall, Christa

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) in the primary care setting to prepare a scoping survey for identifying knowledge gaps in LBP management among Alberta’s primary care practitioners, and to identify potential barriers to implementing a multidisciplinary LBP guideline. METHODS: English language studies, published from 1996 to 2008, comparing the clinical practice patterns of primary care practitioners with guideline recommendations were identified by systematically searching literature databases, the websites of various health technology assessment agencies and libraries, and the Internet. Data were synthesized qualitatively. RESULTS: The literature search identified 14 relevant studies. Knowledge gaps were reported among various primary care practitioner groups in the assessment of red flags, use of diagnostic imaging, provision of advice regarding sick leave and continuing activity, administration of some medications (muscle relaxants, oral steroids and opioids) and recommendation of particular treatments (acupuncture, physiotherapy, spinal manipulation, traction, ultrasound, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal mobilization). CONCLUSIONS: A know-do gap clearly exists among primary care practitioners with respect to the diagnosis and treatment of LBP. The information on know-do gaps will be used to construct a survey tool for unearthing the local knowledge gaps extant among Alberta’s primary care practitioners, and to develop a dissemination strategy for a locally produced multidisciplinary LBP guideline, with the aim of ensuring that the know-do gaps inherent within each primary practice discipline are specifically targeted. PMID:21165374

  6. Do referral-management schemes reduce hospital outpatient attendances? Time-series evaluation of primary care referral management

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan MS; Steel, Nicholas; Clark, Allan B; Kumaravel, Bharathy; Bachmann, Max O

    2013-01-01

    Background Ninety-one per cent of primary care trusts were using some form of referral management in 2009, although evidence for its effectiveness is limited. Aim To assess the impact of three referral-management centres (RMCs) and two internal peer-review approaches to referral management on hospital outpatient attendance rates. Design and setting A retrospective time-series analysis of 376 000 outpatient attendances over 3 years from 85 practices divided into five groups, with 714 000 registered patients in one English primary care trust. Method The age-standardised GP-referred first outpatient monthly attendance rate was calculated for each group from April 2009 to March 2012. This was divided by the equivalent monthly England rate, to derive a rate ratio. Linear regression tested for association between the introduction of referral management and change in the outpatient attendance rate and rate ratio. Annual group budgets for referral management were obtained. Results Referral management was not associated with a reduction in the outpatient attendance rate in any group. There was a statistically significant increase in attendance rate in one group (a RMC), which had an increase of 1.05 attendances per 1000 persons per month (95% confidence interval = 0.46 to 1.64; attendance rate ratio increase of 0.07) after adjustment for autocorrelation. Mean annual budgets ranged from £0.55 to £6.23 per registered patient in 2011/2012. RMCs were more expensive (mean annual budget £5.18 per registered patient) than internal peer-review approaches (mean annual budget £0.97 per registered patient). Conclusion Referral-management schemes did not reduce outpatient attendance rates. RMCs were more expensive than internal peer review. PMID:23735409

  7. Healthcare professionals' accounts of challenges in managing motor neurone disease in primary healthcare: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lerum, Sverre Vigeland; Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Frich, Jan C

    2017-02-22

    Motor neurone disease (MND) is a progressive neurological disease causing muscle wasting, gradual paralysis and respiratory failure, with a life expectancy of 2-4 years. In order to better understand how MND is managed in the community, we conducted a qualitative study to explore the challenges healthcare professionals encounter when managing MND in primary healthcare. Based on data from 15 semi-structured interviews with primary healthcare professionals in Norway, we found that MND is viewed as a condition that requires exceptional effort and detailed planning. Healthcare professionals reported five main challenges in managing MND in primary healthcare: (i) building relationships with those giving and receiving care in the home; (ii) preventing caregiver burnout and breakdown; (iii) providing tailored care; (iv) ensuring good working conditions in patients' homes; and (v) recruiting and retaining qualified nursing assistants. Healthcare professionals reported needing working conditions that allow them to tailor their approach to the personal, emotional and existential nature of care preferences of those living with MND. However, people with MND and their families were sometimes perceived by healthcare professionals to prefer a strictly task-focused relationship with care providers. Such relationships limited the healthcare professionals' control over the MND trajectory and their capacity to prevent family caregiver burnout and breakdown. Adequate resources, along with training and support of nursing assistants, may increase the continuity of nursing assistants. Responsiveness to patient and family needs may enhance collaboration and promote tailored primary care and support for patients with MND and their families.

  8. Management of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: a primary care summary of the BSACI guideline.

    PubMed

    Angier, Elizabeth; Willington, Jenny; Scadding, Glenis; Holmes, Steve; Walker, Samantha

    2010-09-01

    Rhinitis is a common problem in primary care which is often managed sub-optimally. It causes considerable morbidity and has been shown to have a detrimental impact on people's ability to concentrate at school and at work. Rhinitis and asthma often present together, and symptomatic rhinitis can be associated with poor asthma control and increased risk of exacerbations. There is therefore a clear need to recognise and treat rhinitis according to guideline recommendations. This article is a primary care summary of the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology (BSACI) Standards of Care Committee guideline on the management of rhinitis, written by a multi-disciplinary group of clinicians. It takes into account the time restrictions on assessment and the tests and equipment available in primary care, as well as the need for practical, clear and intuitive strategies for investigation and management. It recommends a stepwise approach to treatment, and highlights the relevance of less frequently prescribed treatments, including nasal douching leukotriene receptor antagonists and anticholinergics. Red flag symptoms are identified, together with indicators for referral. As with many other long term conditions, good communication between primary and secondary care in terms of timely and appropriate referral is a key factor for success.

  9. Management and Sequelae of Intruded Anterior Primary Teeth: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Muthu; Somasundaram, Sujatha

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this systematic review is to analyze the various treatment modalities and sequelae of intruded anterior primary teeth. Materials and methods Electronic search in PubMed, Cochrane, and Science Direct databases was done. Hand search was performed using the reference list of chosen articles from electronic search. Three reviewers analyzed the articles independently, assessed the quality of the studies, and derived data. Results Ten case series were identified from the electronic and hand search. No randomized control studies were available. In the observational studies treatment of intruded primary teeth ranged from conservative management, which includes waiting for spontaneous re-eruption as well as repositioning to invasive procedure, such as extraction. Conclusion Spontaneous eruption is a treatment option of intruded primary teeth in absence of damage to a permanent tooth. Surgical repositioning of intruded primary teeth has also shown as a viable alternative treatment modality. Extraction to be performed if complications develop. How to cite this article Gurunathan D, Murugan M, Somasundaram S. Management and Sequelae of Intruded Anterior Primary Teeth: A Systematic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):240-250. PMID:27843257

  10. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  11. Management commitments and primary care: another lesson from Costa Rica for the world?

    PubMed

    Soors, Werner; De Paepe, Pierre; Unger, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Maintained dedication to primary care has fostered a public health delivery system with exceptional outcomes in Costa Rica. For more than a decade, management commitments have been part of Costa Rican health reform. We assessed the effect of the Costa Rican management commitments on access and quality of care and on compliance with their intended objectives. We constructed seven hypotheses on opinions of primary care providers. Through a mixed qualitative and quantitative approach, we tested these hypotheses and interpreted the research findings. Management commitments consume an excessive proportion of consultation time, inflate recordkeeping, reduce comprehensiveness in primary care consultations, and induce a disproportionate consumption of hospital emergency services. Their formulation relies on norms in need of optimization, their control on unreliable sources. They also affect professionalism. In Costa Rica, management commitments negatively affect access and quality of care and pose a threat to the public service delivery system. The failures of this pay-for-performance-like initiative in an otherwise well-performing health system cast doubts on the appropriateness of pay-for-performance for health systems strengthening in less advanced environments.

  12. Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care: It Really Does Take a Village.

    PubMed

    Seal, Karen; Becker, William; Tighe, Jennifer; Li, Yongmei; Rife, Tessa

    2017-03-23

    Some healthcare systems are relieving primary care providers (PCPs) of "the burden" of managing chronic pain and opioid prescribing, instead offloading chronic pain management to pain specialists. Last year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended a biopsychosocial approach to pain management that discourages opioid use and promotes exercise therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and non-opioid medications as first-line patient-centered, multi-modal treatments best delivered by an interdisciplinary team. In the private sector, interdisciplinary pain management services are challenging to assemble, separate from primary care and not typically reimbursed. In contrast, in a fully integrated health care system like the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), interdisciplinary clinics already exist, and one such clinic, the Integrated Pain Team (IPT) clinic, integrates and co-locates pain-trained PCPs, a psychologist and a pharmacist in primary care. The IPT clinic has demonstrated significant success in opioid risk reduction. Unfortunately, proposed legislation threatens to dismantle aspects of the VA such that these interdisciplinary services may be eliminated. This Perspective explains why it is critical not only to maintain interdisciplinary pain services in VHA, but also to consider disseminating this model to other health care systems in order to implement patient-centered, guideline-concordant care more broadly.

  13. Part III. Performance measurements of primary care physicians in managed care.

    PubMed

    Dent, T

    1998-08-01

    A fundamental change occurring for physicians is that there are increasingly organized efforts to comprehensively assess physician performance. Managed care is the factor most instrumental in leading to an enhanced focus on physician measurements. Another major factor that has prompted increased attention to the measurement of physicians' performance is that patients are beginning to act more as consumers of health care. Efforts to measure physician performance in geographically dispersed primary care practices is inherently more difficult than measuring hospital care. However, according to some studies that have attempted to do this, the delivery in primary care offices of basic preventive services and the care given to patients with chronic illnesses is surprisingly poor. If primary care physicians don't address these issues, managed care companies will make it policy to refer some patients with chronic disease to specialists, who are comprehensively achieving higher measurement scores. What is being measured is at present quite variable in different primary care offices. Most of the initial measurements have been from claims data or from other data that might be obtained and aggregated outside of the primary care physician's office. As this data is not very rich in clinical information, significant misinterpretation is possible. In order to augment these shortcomings, office records are increasingly being reviewed. A standardization of primary care physicians' office medical records is rapidly occurring and is being driven by the measurable items reviewed by managed care organizations. Measurement of patient complaints and patient surveys is another means that managed care organizations presently use to assess primary care physicians' performance. Extreme caution should be used when interpreting this data, as often the small numbers of patients, multifactorial issues, and ambiguity about responsible parties may skew the results. Measurement processes are

  14. The role of chemotherapy and new targeted agents in the management of primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev Srinivas; Pacey, Simon

    2016-01-01

    While early treatment of primary prostate cancer is very effective, the incidence of primary prostate cancer continues to rise and therefore the detection of men with high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer and their subsequent management is becoming increasingly important. There continues to be no molecularly-targeted or chemotherapeutic options with proven, statistically significant survival benefit in this setting. However, there are indications that further risk stratification using molecular features could potentially help distinguish indolent from aggressive prostate cancer, ultimately providing biological markers that could guide a more personalised approach to therapy selection. PMID:28344814

  15. Lumbo-sacral radiculopathy referral decision-making and primary care management. A case report.

    PubMed

    Haswell, Kate; Gilmour, John Martin; Moore, Barbara Joyce

    2015-04-01

    Low back pain guideline recommendations can inform a decision in primary care to refer for surgical assessment. The purpose of this report is to present a patient with clinical signs and symptoms of lumbo-sacral radiculopathy who experienced pain of high intensity, severe paresis and depression. The guideline informed decision-making process resulted in a decision not to refer. This case report aims to increase awareness of referral guidelines and to demonstrate radicular pain and weakness, disability and depression outcomes subsequent to primary care management.

  16. Initial manifestation of primary hyperoxaluria type I in adults-- recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, J J

    1996-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I may initially manifest as urolithiasis, renal insufficiency, or symptoms of systemic oxalosis. This hereditary disorder was fatal until effective therapies evolved during the past two decades. Difficulty in recognizing and diagnosing this disorder in adults is illustrated in a report of a patient eventually restored to good health by high-flux dialysis and combined renal and hepatic transplantation. I explore the molecular processes of the genetic defect and discuss clinical indicators of primary hyperoxaluria type I, manifestations of oxalosis, the pathogenesis of chronic oxalate nephropathy, and the diagnosis and management of this disease. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8779202

  17. Managing Osteoporosis: A Survey of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices among Primary Care Physicians in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Elena; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by impaired bone quality and microstructural deterioration leading to an increased propensity to fractures. This is a major health problem for older adults, which comprise an increasingly greater proportion of the general population. Due to a large number of patients and the insufficient availability of specialists in Israel and worldwide, osteoporosis is treated in large part by primary care physicians. We assessed the knowledge of primary care physicians on the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Physician's knowledge, sources of knowledge acquisition and self-evaluation of knowledge were assessed using a multiple choice questionnaire. Professional and demographic characteristics were assessed as well. Results Of 490 physicians attending a conference, 363 filled the questionnaires (74% response rate). The physicians demonstrated better expertise in diagnosis than in medications (mechanism of action, side effects or contra-indications) but less than for other treatment related decisions. Overall, 50% demonstrated adequate knowledge of calcium and vitamin D supplementation, 51% were aware of the main therapeutic purpose of osteoporosis pharmacotherapy and 3% were aware that bisphosphonates should be avoided in patients with impaired renal function. Respondents stated frontal lectures at meetings as their main source of information on the subject. Conclusion The study indicates the need to intensify efforts to improve the knowledge of primary care physicians regarding osteoporosis, in general; and osteoporosis pharmacotherapy, in particular. PMID:27494284

  18. Challenges in interdisciplinary weight management in primary care: lessons learned from the 5As Team study.

    PubMed

    Asselin, J; Osunlana, A M; Ogunleye, A A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, research is directed at advancing methods to address obesity management in primary care. In this paper we describe the role of interdisciplinary collaboration, or lack thereof, in patient weight management within 12 teams in a large primary care network in Alberta, Canada. Qualitative data for the present analysis were derived from the 5As Team (5AsT) trial, a mixed-method randomized control trial of a 6-month participatory, team-based educational intervention aimed at improving the quality and quantity of obesity management encounters in primary care practice. Participants (n = 29) included in this analysis are healthcare providers supporting chronic disease management in 12 family practice clinics randomized to the intervention arm of the 5AsT trial including mental healthcare workers (n = 7), registered dietitians (n = 7), registered nurses or nurse practitioners (n = 15). Participants were part of a 6-month intervention consisting of 12 biweekly learning sessions aimed at increasing provider knowledge and confidence in addressing patient weight management. Qualitative methods included interviews, structured field notes and logs. Four common themes of importance in the ability of healthcare providers to address weight with patients within an interdisciplinary care team emerged, (i) Availability; (ii) Referrals; (iii) Role perception and (iv) Messaging. However, we find that what was key to our participants was not that these issues be uniformly agreed upon by all team members, but rather that communication and clinic relationships support their continued negotiation. Our study shows that firm clinic relationships and deliberate communication strategies are the foundation of interdisciplinary care in weight management. Furthermore, there is a clear need for shared messaging concerning obesity and its treatment between members of interdisciplinary teams.

  19. The missing link: improving quality with a chronic disease management intervention for the primary care office.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, John

    2007-01-01

    Bold steps are necessary to improve quality of care for patients with chronic diseases and increase satisfaction of both primary care physicians and patients. Office-based chronic disease management (CDM) workers can achieve these objectives by offering self-management support, maintaining disease registries, and monitoring compliance from the point of care. CDM workers can provide the missing link by connecting patients, primary care physicans, and CDM services sponsored by health plans or in the community. CDM workers should be supported financially by Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial health plans through reimbursements to physicians for units of service, analogous to California's Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program. Care provided by CDM workers should be standardized, and training requirements should be sufficiently flexible to ensure wide dissemination. CDM workers can potentially improve quality while reducing costs for preventable hospitalizations and emergency department visits, but evaluation at multiple levels is recommended.

  20. A controlled study to evaluate directed masturbation in the management of primary orgasmic failure in women.

    PubMed

    Riley, A J; Riley, E J

    1978-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a prospective controlled study evaluating a programme of directed masturbation against a combined sensate focus and supportive psychotherapeutic approach in the management of female primary orgasmic failure. Of the 20 patients who followed the masturbation programme 90 per cent gained orgasmic capacity compared with 53 per cent of 15 patients who were treated conventionally. Eighty-five per cent of the patients treated by the masturbation programme and 47 per cent of the control group of patients became coitally orgasmic on at least 75 per cent of coital occasions. The difference is statistically significant at the 5 per cent level. The results suggest that directed masturbation is an effective adjunct in the management of primary female orgasmic failure.

  1. Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: what can we learn from cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Steel, Emma J; Collins, Ian; Emery, Jon; Pirotta, Marie; Mann, G Bruce; Butow, Phyllis; Hopper, John L; Trainer, Alison; Moreton, Jane; Antoniou, Antonis C; Cuzick, Jack; Keogh, Louise

    2016-01-01

    To capitalise on advances in breast cancer prevention, all women would need to have their breast cancer risk formally assessed. With ~85% of Australians attending primary care clinics at least once a year, primary care is an opportune location for formal breast cancer risk assessment and management. This study assessed the current practice and needs of primary care clinicians regarding assessment and management of breast cancer risk. Two facilitated focus group discussions were held with 17 primary care clinicians (12 GPs and 5 practice nurses (PNs)) as part of a larger needs assessment. Primary care clinicians viewed assessment and management of cardiovascular risk as an intrinsic, expected part of their role, often triggered by practice software prompts and facilitated by use of an online tool. Conversely, assessment of breast cancer risk was not routine and was generally patient- (not clinician-) initiated, and risk management (apart from routine screening) was considered outside the primary care domain. Clinicians suggested that routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk might be achieved if it were widely endorsed as within the remit of primary care and supported by an online risk-assessment and decision aid tool that was integrated into primary care software. This study identified several key issues that would need to be addressed to facilitate the transition to routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk in primary care, based largely on the model used for cardiovascular disease.

  2. Improving population management through pharmacist-primary care integration: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Amanda G; Chen, Harry; Corriveau, Michele; MacLean, Charles D

    2015-02-01

    Pharmacists have unique skills that may benefit primary care practices. The objective of this demonstration project was to determine the impact of integrating pharmacists into patient-centered medical homes, with a focus on population management. Pharmacists were partnered into 5 primary care practices in Vermont 1 day per week to provide direct patient care, population-based medication management, and prescriber education. The main measures included a description of drug therapy problems identified and cost avoidance models. The pharmacists identified 708 drug therapy problems through direct patient care (336/708; 47.5%), population-based strategies (276/708; 38.9%), and education (96/708; 13.6%). Common population-based strategies included adjusting doses and discontinuing unnecessary medications. Pharmacists' recommendations to correct drug therapy problems were accepted by prescribers 86% of the time, when data about acceptance were known. Of the 49 recommendations not accepted, 47/49 (96%) were population-based and 2/49 (4%) were related to direct patient care. The cost avoidance model suggests $2.11 in cost was avoided for every $1.00 spent on a pharmacist ($373,092/$176,690). There was clear value in integrating pharmacists into primary care teams. Their inclusion prevented adverse drug events, avoided costs, and improved patient outcomes. Primary care providers should consider pharmacists well suited to offer direct patient care, population-based management, and prescriber education to their practices. To be successful, pharmacists must have full permission to document findings in the primary care practices' electronic health records. Given that many pharmacist services do not involve billable activities, sustainability requires identifying alternative funding mechanisms that do not rely on a traditional fee-for-service approach.

  3. Developmental enamel defects in the primary dentition: aetiology and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Salanitri, S; Seow, W K

    2013-06-01

    Developmental enamel defects, presenting as enamel hypoplasia or opacities are caused by damage or disruption to the developing enamel organ as a result of inherited and acquired systemic conditions. The high prevalence of these defects in the primary dentition demonstrates the vulnerability of the teeth to changes in the pre- and postnatal environment. The presence of enamel hypoplasia increases the risk of primary teeth to early childhood caries and tooth wear as the defective enamel is thinner, more plaque retentive and less resistant to dissolution in acid compared to normal enamel. The purpose of this paper was to critically review the aetiology and clinical complications of developmental enamel defects in the primary dentition and propose recommendations for the clinical management of affected teeth.

  4. Effectiveness of a quality-improvement program in improving management of primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Laux, Gunter; Willms, Sara; Wensing, Michel; Goetz, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Background: The European Practice Assessment program provides feedback and outreach visits to primary care practices to facilitate quality improvement in five domains (infrastructure, people, information, finance, and quality and safety). We examined the effectiveness of this program in improving management in primary care practices in Germany, with a focus on the domain of quality and safety. Methods: In a before–after study, 102 primary care practices completed a practice assessment using the European Practice Assessment instrument at baseline and three years later (intervention group). A comparative group of 102 practices was included that completed their first assessment using this instrument at the time of the intervention group’s second assessment. Mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100. Results: We found significant improvements in all domains between the first and second assessments in the intervention group. In the domain of quality and safety, improvements in scores (mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100) were observed in the following dimensions: complaint management (from a mean score of 51.2 at first assessment to 80.7 at second assessment); analysis of critical incidents (from 79.1 to 89.6); and quality development, quality policy (from 40.7 to 55.6). Overall scores at the time of the second assessment were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the comparative group. Interpretation: Primary care practices that completed the European Practice Assessment instrument twice over a three-year period showed improvements in practice management. Our findings show the value of the quality-improvement cycle in the context of practice assessment and the use of established organizational standards for practice management with the

  5. Managing early childhood obesity in the primary care setting: a behavior modification approach.

    PubMed

    Drohan, Samantha H

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to encourage primary care pediatric nurses to begin behavioral-based obesity treatment efforts as early as the preschool years. By examining the critical periods for obesity development and how the formation of food and activity behaviors interacts with those critical periods during the preschool years, the value of initiating early obesity treatment will be highlighted. Furthermore, the theory of behavior modification is presented and core principles are applied to early childhood weight management efforts.

  6. Esthetic management of a primary double tooth using a silicone putty guide: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ravi; Chaudhry, Kalpna; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2013-03-01

    The term double tooth is often used to describe fusion and gemination. The development of isolated large or joined teeth is not rare, but the literature is confusing when the appropriate terminology is presented. The objective of this paper is to present a case of a primary double tooth in a 5-year-old girl with a history of trauma. The tooth was endodontically treated and esthetic management was carried out using a silicone putty guide.

  7. Chile: Acceptability of a Training Program for Depression Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Rigoberto; Martínez, Pablo; Cornejo, Juan P.; Díaz, Berta; Peralta, José; Tala, Álvaro; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Chile, there are inconsistencies in the management of depression in primary care settings, and the National Depression Program, currently in effect, was implemented without a standardized training program. The objective of this study is to evaluate the acceptability of a training program on the management of depression for primary care health teams. Methods: The study was a randomized controlled trial, and two primary centers from the Metropolitan Region of Santiago were randomly selected to carry out the intervention training program. Pre-post surveys were applied, to evaluate expectations and satisfaction with the intervention, respectively. Descriptive and content analysis was carried out. Result: The sample consisted of 41 health professionals, 56.1% of who reported that their expectations for the intervention were met. All of the training activities were evaluated with scores higher than 6.4 (on a 1–7 scale). The trainers, the methodology, and the learning environment were considered strengths and facilitators of the program, while the limited duration of the training, the logistical problems faced during part of the program, and the lack of educational material were viewed as weaknesses. Conclusion: The intervention was well accepted by primary health care teams. However, the clinical impact in patients still has to be evaluated. PMID:27375531

  8. Raising awareness of bronchiectasis in primary care: overview of diagnosis and management strategies in adults.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D; Sethi, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic lung disease characterised by recurrent infection, inflammation, persistent cough and sputum production. The disease is increasing in prevalence, requiring a greater awareness of the disease across primary and secondary care. Mild and moderate cases of bronchiectasis in adults can often be managed by primary care clinicians. Initial assessments and long-term treatment plans that include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, however, should be undertaken in collaboration with a secondary care team that includes physiotherapists and specialists in respiratory medicine. Bronchiectasis is often identified in patients with other lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and in a lesser but not insignificant number of patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Overall goals of therapy are to prevent exacerbations, improve symptoms, improve quality of life and preserve lung function. Prompt treatment of exacerbations with antibiotic therapy is important to limit the impact of exacerbations on quality of life and lung function decline. Patient education and cooperation with health-care providers to implement treatment plans are key to successful disease management. It is important for the primary care provider to work with secondary care providers to develop an individualised treatment plan to optimise care with the goal to delay disease progression. Here, we review the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis with a focus on practical considerations that will be useful to primary care.

  9. Modeling strategy to identify patients with primary immunodeficiency utilizing risk management and outcome measurement.

    PubMed

    Modell, Vicki; Quinn, Jessica; Ginsberg, Grant; Gladue, Ron; Orange, Jordan; Modell, Fred

    2017-02-21

    This study seeks to generate analytic insights into risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. The Jeffrey Modell Centers Network database, Jeffrey Modell Foundation's 10 Warning Signs, the 4 Stages of Testing Algorithm, physician-reported clinical outcomes, programs of physician education and public awareness, the SPIRIT® Analyzer, and newborn screening, taken together, generates P values of less than 0.05%. This indicates that the data results do not occur by chance, and that there is a better than 95% probability that the data are valid. The objectives are to improve patients' quality of life, while generating significant reduction of costs. The advances of the world's experts aligned with these JMF programs can generate analytic insights as to risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. This strategy reduces the uncertainties related to primary immunodeficiency risks, as we can screen, test, identify, and treat undiagnosed patients. We can also address regional differences and prevalence, age, gender, treatment modalities, and sites of care, as well as economic benefits. These tools support high net benefits, substantial financial savings, and significant reduction of costs. All stakeholders, including patients, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, third party payers, and government healthcare agencies, must address the earliest possible precise diagnosis, appropriate intervention and treatment, as well as stringent control of healthcare costs through risk assessment and outcome measurement. An affected patient is entitled to nothing less, and stakeholders are responsible to utilize tools currently available. Implementation offers a significant challenge to the entire primary immunodeficiency community.

  10. Primary care management of alcohol use disorder and at-risk drinking

    PubMed Central

    Spithoff, Sheryl; Kahan, Meldon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide primary care physicians with evidence-based information and advice on the management of at-risk drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Sources of information We conducted a nonsystematic literature review using search terms that included primary care; screening, interventions, management, and treatment; and at-risk drinking, alcohol use disorders, alcohol dependence, and alcohol abuse; as well as specific medical and counseling interventions of relevance to primary care. Main message For their patients with at-risk drinking and AUD, physicians should counsel and, when indicated (ie, in patients with moderate or severe AUD), prescribe and connect. Counsel: Offer all patients with at-risk drinking a brief counseling session and follow-up. Offer all patients with AUD counseling sessions and ongoing (frequent and regular) follow-up. Prescribe: Offer medications (disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate) to all patients with moderate or severe AUD. Connect: Encourage patients with AUD to attend counseling, day or residential treatment programs, and support groups. If indicated, refer patients to an addiction medicine physician, concurrent mental health and addiction services, or specialized trauma therapy. Conclusion Family physicians can effectively manage patients with at-risk drinking and AUD. PMID:26071155

  11. Effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Kurlowicz, Kirsty; Vladusic, Sharon; Grimmer, Karen

    2005-03-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, a complication of childbirth, occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births internationally. Traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus is thought to be the primary mechanism of injury and this may occur in utero, during the descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that vary in severity, extent of damage and functional use of the affected upper limb. Most infants receive treatment, such as conservative management (physiotherapy, occupational therapy) or surgery; however, there is controversy regarding the most appropriate form of management. To date, no synthesised evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of primary conservative management for obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 14 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Those studies that were reported in English and published over the last decade (July 1992 to June 2003) were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion in this review. This excluded studies that solely investigated the effect of primary surgery for these infants, management of secondary deformities and the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents, such as botulinum toxin. Data collection and analysis

  12. Impact of decision support in electronic medical records on lipid management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Gill, James M; Chen, Ying Xia; Glutting, Joseph J; Diamond, James J; Lieberman, Michael I

    2009-10-01

    Electronic decision-support tools may help to improve management of hyperlipidemia and other chronic diseases. This study examined the impact of lipid management tools integrated into an electronic medical record (EMR) in primary care practices. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in a national network of physicians who use an outpatient EMR. Adult primary care physicians were randomized by office to receive an electronic form that was embedded in the EMR. The form contained prompts regarding suboptimal care based on Adult Treatment Panel-III (ATP-III) guidelines, as well as reporting tools to identify patients outside of office visits whose lipid management was suboptimal. All active patients, ages 20-79 years, whose physicians participated in the study, were categorized as high, moderate, or low cardiovascular risk, and the proportion who were tested for hyperlipidemia, at lipid goal, and on lipid-lowering medications if not at goal were measured according to ATP-III guidelines. A total of 105 physicians from 25 offices and 64,150 patients were included in the study. Outcomes improved for most measures from before to 1 year after the intervention (November 1, 2005 to October 31, 2006). However, after controlling for confounding variables and for clustering in multilevel modeling, only up-to-date lipid testing for high-risk patients was statistically better in the intervention group as compared to the control group (adjusted odds ratio 15.0, P < 0.05). This study showed few differences in quality of lipid management after implementing an EMR-based disease management intervention in primary care settings. Future studies may need to examine more comprehensive interventions that include office staff in a team approach to care.

  13. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of invasive versus conservative management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Simon G A; Ball, Emma L; Perrin, Kyle; Read, Catherine A; Asha, Stephen E; Beasley, Richard; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Jones, Peter G; Keijzers, Gerben; Kinnear, Frances B; Kwan, Ben C H; Lee, Y C Gary; Smith, Julian A; Summers, Quentin A; Simpson, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is variable, with little evidence from randomised controlled trials to guide treatment. Guidelines emphasise intervention in many patients, which involves chest drain insertion, hospital admission and occasionally surgery. However, there is evidence that conservative management may be effective and safe, and it may also reduce the risk of recurrence. Significant questions remain regarding the optimal initial approach to the management of PSP. Methods and analysis This multicentre, prospective, randomised, open label, parallel group, non-inferiority study will randomise 342 participants with a first large PSP to conservative or interventional management. To maintain allocation concealment, randomisation will be performed in real time by computer and stratified by study site. Conservative management will involve a period of observation prior to discharge, with intervention for worsening symptoms or physiological instability. Interventional treatment will involve insertion of a small bore drain. If drainage continues after 1 hour, the patient will be admitted. If drainage stops, the drain will be clamped for 4 hours. The patient will be discharged if the lung remains inflated. Otherwise, the patient will be admitted. The primary end point is the proportion of participants with complete lung re-expansion by 8 weeks. Secondary end points are as follows: days in hospital, persistent air leak, predefined complications and adverse events, time to resolution of symptoms, and pneumothorax recurrence during a follow-up period of at least 1 year. The study has 95% power to detect an absolute non-inferiority margin of 9%, assuming 99% successful expansion at 8 weeks in the invasive treatment arm. The primary analysis will be by intention to treat. Ethics and dissemination Local ethics approval has been obtained for all sites. Study findings will be disseminated by publication in a high

  14. Management of orthodontic emergencies in primary care - self-reported confidence of general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Popat, H; Thomas, K; Farnell, D J J

    2016-07-08

    Objective To determine general dental practitioners' (GDPs) confidence in managing orthodontic emergencies.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Primary dental care.Subjects and methods An online survey was distributed to dentists practicing in Wales. The survey collected basic demographic information and included descriptions of ten common orthodontic emergency scenarios.Main outcome measure Respondents' self-reported confidence in managing the orthodontic emergency scenarios on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences between the Likert responses and the demographic variables were investigated using chi-squared tests.Results The median number of orthodontic emergencies encountered by respondents over the previous six months was 1. Overall, the self-reported confidence of respondents was high with 7 of the 10 scenarios presented scoring a median of 4 indicating that GDPs were 'confident' in their management. Statistical analysis revealed that GDPs who saw more orthodontic emergencies in the previous six months were more confident when managing the presented scenarios. Other variables such as age, gender, geographic location of practice and number of years practising dentistry were not associated with self-reported confidence.Conclusions Despite GDPs encountering very few orthodontic emergencies in primary care, they appear to be confident in dealing with commonly arising orthodontic emergency situations.

  15. Management of primary hypothyroidism: statement by the British Thyroid Association Executive Committee.

    PubMed

    Okosieme, Onyebuchi; Gilbert, Jackie; Abraham, Prakash; Boelaert, Kristien; Dayan, Colin; Gurnell, Mark; Leese, Graham; McCabe, Christopher; Perros, Petros; Smith, Vicki; Williams, Graham; Vanderpump, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The management of primary hypothyroidism with levothyroxine (L-T4) is simple, effective and safe, and most patients report improved well-being on initiation of treatment. However, a proportion of individuals continue to suffer with symptoms despite achieving adequate biochemical correction. The management of such individuals has been the subject of controversy and of considerable public interest. The American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the European Thyroid Association (ETA) have recently published guidelines on the diagnosis and management of hypothyroidism. These guidelines have been based on extensive reviews of the medical literature and include sections on the role of combination therapy with L-T4 and liothyronine (L-T3) in individuals who are persistently dissatisfied with L-T4 therapy. This position statement by the British Thyroid Association (BTA) summarises the key points in these guidelines and makes recommendations on the management of primary hypothyroidism based on the current literature, review of the published positions of the ETA and ATA, and in line with best principles of good medical practice. The statement is endorsed by the Association of Clinical Biochemistry, (ACB), British Thyroid Foundation, (BTF), Royal College of Physicians (RCP) and Society for Endocrinology (SFE).

  16. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, Vincent A.; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D.; De Grauw, Wim J.C.; Vervoort, Gerald M.M.; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C.J.; Braspenning, Jozé C.C.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Aim To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Design and setting Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). Method CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Results Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Conclusion Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Key pointsQuality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved.In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal

  17. Development of a Knowledge Management Model for the Development of a Quality Public Sector Management System for the Office of the Primary Educational Service Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khotbancha, Wijitra; Chantarasombat, Chalard; Sriampai, Anan

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: 1) to study the current situation and problem of Knowledge Management of the office of the primary education service area, 2) to develop a Knowledge Management model, 3) to study the success of the implementation of the Knowledge Management system. There were 25 persons in the target group. There were 2 kinds…

  18. Adolescence and asthma management: the perspective of adolescents receiving primary health care☆

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Alisson; Rocha, Regina Lunardi; Alvim, Cristina Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of adolescence characteristics on asthma management. Methods: This was a qualitative study conducted in the city of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Southeast Brazil. Data were collected through semistructured interviews guided by a questionnaire with seven asthmatic adolescents followed-up in the primary public health care service of the city. Results: Using content analysis, three thematic categories were observed in the adolescents' responses: 1) family relationships in the treatment of asthma in adolescence; 2) the asthmatic adolescents and their peers; and 3) the role of the school for the asthmatic adolescents. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that peers, family, and school should be more valued by health professionals and by health care services when treating asthmatic adolescents, as these social relationships are closely associated with the adolescent and have an important role in asthma management. Attempts to meet the demands of adolescents contribute to improve asthma management. PMID:25479845

  19. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Oussama M.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies, and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low-risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of ADT or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented. PMID:22655274

  20. A 2016 clinical practice pattern in the management of primary hypothyroidism among doctors from different clinical specialties in New Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Surana, Vineet; Aggarwal, Sameer; Khandelwal, Deepak; Singla, Rajiv; Bhattacharya, Saptarshi; Chittawar, Sachin; Kalra, Sanjay; Dutta, Deep

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to document practices in managing hypothyroidism among doctors in New Delhi, with special focus on subclinical hypothyroidism, pregnancy, and old age, and to compare it with global practices. Methods: During an academic program attended by 394 doctors, all participants were given a questionnaire designed based on thyroid practices survey done by Burch et al. to evaluate the practice patterns. Questions were based on evaluating doctor's preferred choices in diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of hypothyroidism in different scenarios. Results: Responses from 308 questionnaires (general physicians [n = 204], obstetricians [n = 51], pediatricians [n = 27], surgeons [n = 12], endocrinologists [n = 10], and others [n = 4]) were analyzed. In the evaluation of 52-year-old female patient with primary hypothyroidism, 52% doctors would prefer thyroid ultrasonography, comparable to global rates. Nearly 96.1% doctors would have initiated levothyroxine, with a large majority of doctors (83.77%) preferred using branded levothyroxine. About 58.74% doctors preferred gradual restoration of euthyroidism. Levothyroxine dose of 25 mcg was the most preferred increment dose (46.07%) during follow-up, with 6 weekly being the most frequent dose adjustment frequency (41.57%). Most preferred target thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the 52-year-old female patient was 2.5–4.99 mU/L (63.96%), 25-year-old female patient was 1–2.49 mU/L (53.90%), and in 85-year-old female was 2.5–4.99 mU/L (45.45%). Only 68% of doctors in our study preferred keeping TSH <2.5 mU/L during the first trimester of pregnancy, in contrast to global trends of 95% (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was a disproportionately high use of ultrasonography in hypothyroidism management, near exclusive preference for branded levothyroxine, widespread use of age-specific TSH targets, and low threshold for treating mild thyroid failure, a highly variable approach to both rates and means of restoring

  1. Concussion management for the adolescent patient: an algorithm for primary-care providers.

    PubMed

    Kostyun, Regina O; Hafeez, Imran

    2012-09-01

    A sharp increase in the number of diagnosed concussions has been observed for the traditional adultathlete, as well as the young recreational athlete. An enhancing awareness and growing concern has been noted for the potentially larger number of concussions that go undiagnosed and the unknown capability for long-term complications associated with this injury. This increase in concussion awareness has appropriately led to an enhanced utilization of the health-care system for concussion evaluation and management. As is always the case in the practice of medicine, it is important for healthcare providers, from all points of entry in the healthcare system, to provide consistent management for the best outcomes for any disease process. Millions of sport-related concussions occur each year in the United States, placing a large demand on the healthcare system. Utilization of appropriate and congruent treatment plans during the medical discourse when transferring care of patients between providers is paramount. In the co-management model of care, subspecialists lend expertise to assist primary-care providers (PCPs) in gaining the core competencies necessary to provide appropriate levels of care for certain conditions. Increased use of co-management could make the health-care system more efficient and collaborative, leading to: increased access for patients, lower overall costs, and improved quality of care and health outcomes. Co-management allows patients and families to have access to the expert knowledge of subspecialist while receiving more of their care from their PCP, increasing their comfort and making treatment more convenient. The intent of this paper is to distribute an algorithm created by a multidisciplinary group of medical providers to provide a rational approach, congruent with the standard of care, for the primary-care provider to institute an individualized stepwise progression.

  2. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  3. Considerations for management of migraine symptoms in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder that affects one in seven US citizens annually. The burden of migraine is substantial, both in economic terms and for individual patients and their close family members. Initial medical consultations for migraine are usually with a primary care physician (PCP), and it is predominantly managed in a primary care setting; therefore, PCPs need a thorough understanding of migraine and the treatment options. This review provides an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, burden, and diagnosis of migraine with a focus on adults. Important aspects of migraine management, such as medication overuse and chronic migraine, are highlighted and insight is provided into factors for consideration when prescribing acute/abortive treatment for migraine to ensure that individual patients receive optimal pharmaceutical management. The effects of associated symptoms, e.g. nausea/vomiting, on treatment efficacy are pertinent in migraine; however, many therapy options, including alternative delivery systems, are available, thus facilitating the selection of optimal treatment for an individual patient.

  4. Noncommunicable disease management in resource-poor settings: a primary care model from rural South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, R.; Gill, G.; Wilkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, asthma, diabetes and epilepsy are placing an increasing burden on clinical services in developing countries and innovative strategies are therefore needed to optimize existing services. This article describes the design and implementation of a nurse-led NCD service based on clinical protocols in a resource-poor area of South Africa. Diagnostic and treatment protocols were designed and introduced at all primary care clinics in the district, using only essential drugs and appropriate technology; the convenience of management for the patient was highlighted. The protocols enabled the nurses to control the clinical condition of 68% of patients with hypertension, 82% of those with non-insulin-dependent diabetes, and 84% of those with asthma. The management of NCDs of 79% of patients who came from areas served by village or mobile clinics was transferred from the district hospital to such clinics. Patient-reported adherence to treatment increased from 79% to 87% (P = 0.03) over the 2 years that the service was operating. The use of simple protocols and treatment strategies that were responsive to the local situation enabled the majority of patients to receive convenient and appropriate management of their NCD at their local primary care facility. PMID:10191559

  5. Improving cellular therapy for primary immune deficiency diseases: Recognition, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Candotti, Fabio; Conley, Mary Ellen; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Kohn, Donald B.; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Roifman, Chaim M.; Small, Trudy N.; Shearer, William T.

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 North American academic centers account for the majority of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) procedures for primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), with smaller numbers performed at additional sites. Given the importance of a timely diagnosis of these rare diseases and the diversity of practice sites, there is a need for guidance as to best practices in management of patients with PIDs before, during, and in follow-up for definitive treatment. In this conference report of immune deficiency experts and HCT physicians who care for patients with PIDs, we present expert guidance for (1) PID diagnoses that are indications for HCT, including severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), combined immunodeficiency disease, and other non-SCID diseases; (2) the critical importance of a high degree of suspicion of the primary care physician and timeliness of diagnosis for PIDs; (3) the need for rapid referral to an immune deficiency expert, center with experience in HCT, or both for patients with PIDs; (4) medical management of a child with suspicion of SCID/combined immunodeficiency disease while confirming the diagnosis, including infectious disease management and workup; (5) the posttransplantation follow-up visit schedule; (6) antimicrobial prophylaxis after transplantation, including gamma globulin administration; and (7) important indications for return to the transplantation center after discharge. Finally, we discuss the role of high-quality databases in treatment of PIDs and HCTas an element of the infrastructure that will be needed for productive multicenter clinical trials in these rare diseases. PMID:20004776

  6. Improving cellular therapy for primary immune deficiency diseases: recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Puck, Jennifer M; Buckley, Rebecca H; Candotti, Fabio; Conley, Mary Ellen; Fleisher, Thomas A; Gaspar, H Bobby; Kohn, Donald B; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Rizzo, J Douglas; Roifman, Chaim M; Small, Trudy N; Shearer, William T

    2009-12-01

    More than 20 North American academic centers account for the majority of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) procedures for primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), with smaller numbers performed at additional sites. Given the importance of a timely diagnosis of these rare diseases and the diversity of practice sites, there is a need for guidance as to best practices in management of patients with PIDs before, during, and in follow-up for definitive treatment. In this conference report of immune deficiency experts and HCT physicians who care for patients with PIDs, we present expert guidance for (1) PID diagnoses that are indications for HCT, including severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), combined immunodeficiency disease, and other non-SCID diseases; (2) the critical importance of a high degree of suspicion of the primary care physician and timeliness of diagnosis for PIDs; (3) the need for rapid referral to an immune deficiency expert, center with experience in HCT, or both for patients with PIDs; (4) medical management of a child with suspicion of SCID/combined immunodeficiency disease while confirming the diagnosis, including infectious disease management and workup; (5) the posttransplantation follow-up visit schedule; (6) antimicrobial prophylaxis after transplantation, including gamma globulin administration; and (7) important indications for return to the transplantation center after discharge. Finally, we discuss the role of high-quality databases in treatment of PIDs and HCT as an element of the infrastructure that will be needed for productive multicenter clinical trials in these rare diseases.

  7. Survivorship after allogeneic transplantation-management recommendations for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Tichelli, André; Rovó, Alicia

    2015-03-01

    Prognosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has greatly improved. Therefore, long-term survivorship becomes an important issue. A number of malignant and nonmalignant late effects can cause substantial morbidity, with considerable impact on health and quality of life. The main factors responsible for late effects after HSCT are total body irradiation-based conditioning and chronic graft-versus-host disease and its treatment. The knowledge on late effects serves as guidance for surveillance and management decision. Aftercare includes screening and counseling for prevention and treatment of late complications. The care of HSCT recipients tends with time to be transferred from the transplant center back to the primary care provider, who might not be however familiar with the unique needs of long-term survivors. A broad expertise is needed for the post-transplant management; therefore, transplant centers together with primary care providers should ensure complementary care delivery. Standardized follow-up guidelines on late effects represent the best tool to guaranty good management of long-term survivors. Distribution, broad promotion, and applications of these guidelines are therefore needed.

  8. The Need for Improved Management of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Sobhy, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The provision of care for patients with type II diabetes in primary care must involve assessing patients for peripheral neuropathy of the feet. Objectives. This paper will demonstrate that painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is poorly assessed for and treated in primary care. Methods. A critical analysis of research will be conducted to identify the prevalence and impact of PDN among individuals with type II diabetes. Results. Research evidence and best practice guidelines are widely available in supporting primary care practitioners to better assess for and treat PDN. However, the lack of knowledge, awareness, and implementation of such research and guidelines prevents patients with PDN from receiving appropriate care. Discussion. Much international research exists on the prevalence and impact of PDN in primary care; however, Canadian research is lacking. Furthermore, the quantity and quality of research on treatment modalities for PDN are inadequate. Finally, current research and guidelines on PDN management are inadequately implemented in the clinical setting. Conclusion. The undertreatment of PDN has significant implications on the individual, family, and society. Healthcare practitioners must be more aware of and better implement current research and guidelines into practice to resolve this clinical issue. PMID:27445600

  9. The Need for Improved Management of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Sobhy, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The provision of care for patients with type II diabetes in primary care must involve assessing patients for peripheral neuropathy of the feet. Objectives. This paper will demonstrate that painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is poorly assessed for and treated in primary care. Methods. A critical analysis of research will be conducted to identify the prevalence and impact of PDN among individuals with type II diabetes. Results. Research evidence and best practice guidelines are widely available in supporting primary care practitioners to better assess for and treat PDN. However, the lack of knowledge, awareness, and implementation of such research and guidelines prevents patients with PDN from receiving appropriate care. Discussion. Much international research exists on the prevalence and impact of PDN in primary care; however, Canadian research is lacking. Furthermore, the quantity and quality of research on treatment modalities for PDN are inadequate. Finally, current research and guidelines on PDN management are inadequately implemented in the clinical setting. Conclusion. The undertreatment of PDN has significant implications on the individual, family, and society. Healthcare practitioners must be more aware of and better implement current research and guidelines into practice to resolve this clinical issue.

  10. The impact of blood management on length of stay after primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Monsef, Jad B; Della Valle, Alejandro G; Mayman, David J; Marx, Robert G; Ranawat, Amar S; Boettner, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigates the impact of patient factors, surgical factors, and blood management on postoperative length of stay (LOS) in 516 patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. Age, gender, type of anticoagulation, but not body mass index (BMI) were found to be highly significant predictors of an increased LOS. Allogeneic transfusion and the number of allogeneic units significantly increased LOS, whereas donation and/or transfusion of autologous blood did not. Hemoglobin levels preoperatively until 48 hours postoperatively were negatively correlated with LOS. After adjusting for confounding factors through Poisson regression, age (p = 0.001) and allogeneic blood transfusion (p = 0.002) were the most significant determinants of LOS. Avoiding allogeneic blood plays an essential role in reducing the overall length of stay after primary total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Continuing professional development in HIV chronic disease management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Helen; Yip, Benita; Chau, William; Nóhpal De La Rosa, Adriana; Hall, David; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio; Guillemi, Silvia

    2014-12-09

    Abstract Primary care providers need continuing professional development (CPD) in order to improve their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with chronic conditions. We developed an intensive modular CPD program in the chronic disease management of HIV for primary care providers. The program combines self-directed learning, interactive tutorials with experts, small group discussions, case studies, clinical training, one-on-one mentoring and individualized learning objectives. We trained 27 family physicians and 7 nurse practitioners between 2011 and 2013. The trainees reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. There was a 136.76% increase in the number of distinct HIV-positive patients receiving HIV-related medication refills that were prescribed by the trainees.

  12. The diagnosis and management of cow milk protein intolerance in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Whitney Merrill; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2005-01-01

    Cow milk protein intolerance (CMPI) affects 3% of infants under the age of 12 months and is often misdiagnosed as GERD or colic, risking dangerous exposure to antigens. Most infants out grow CMPI by 12 months; however, those with IgE-mediated reactions usually continue to be intolerant to cow's milk proteins and also develop other allergens including environmental allergens that cause asthmatic symptoms. Clinical manifestations of CMPI include diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting, feeding refusal, eczema, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, allergic rhinitis, coughing, wheezing, failure to thrive, and anaphylaxis. The research and literature showed that CMPI is easily missed in the primary care setting and needs to be considered as a cause of infant distress and clinical symptoms. This article focuses on correctly diagnosing CMPI and managing it in the primary care setting.

  13. Fluoroquinolones in the management of community-acquired pneumonia in primary care.

    PubMed

    Wispelwey, Brian; Schafer, Katherine R

    2010-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the respiratory fluoroquinolones (gemifloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin) and their efficacy and safety in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data show that CAP is a common presentation in primary care practice, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Although the causative pathogens differ depending on treatment setting and patient factors, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in all treatment settings. As a class, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have a very favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile. Pharmacodynamic criteria suggest that moxifloxacin and gemifloxacin are more potent against S. pneumoniae, which may have the added benefit of reducing resistance selection and enhancing bacterial eradication. The respiratory fluoroquinolones are also generally well tolerated, and are first-line options for outpatient treatment of CAP in patients with comorbidities or previous antibiotic use.

  14. Identification and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia: what does it mean to primary care?

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Nadeem; Humphries, Steve E; Seed, Mary; Rowlands, Philip; Minhas, Rubin

    2009-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia is one of the most common dominantly inherited disorders to be identified in primary care, leading to raised serum cholesterol evident from the first year of life. Around 1 in 500 people are affected by this condition, but less than 15% of these are currently attending lipid clinics, suggesting that the vast majority are unrecognised in general practice. The recently released National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence evidence-based guideline on the identification and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia provides an opportunity to bridge this gap. Primary care has a role in systematic and opportunistic case finding, such as recognising the relevance of a family history of premature coronary heart disease and/or grossly elevated cholesterol. Although affected individuals need specialist care, GPs can reinforce the information provided by specialists and support cascade screening to other affected members of the extended family. PMID:19765358

  15. Conventional and emerging treatments in the management of acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Boey, Pui Yi; Singhal, Shweta; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2012-01-01

    The management of acute primary angle closure is directed at lowering the intraocular pressure and relieving pupil block. Conventional treatment involves the use of medical treatment and laser peripheral iridotomy, respectively, as a means for achieving these aims. Newer therapeutic strategies have been described that are potentially useful adjuncts or alternatives to conventional treatment. Emerging strategies that lower intraocular pressure include anterior chamber paracentesis, as well as laser procedures such as iridoplasty and pupilloplasty. A possible alternative to relieving pupil block is lens extraction, and may be combined with adjunctive measures such as goniosynechiolysis and viscogoniosynechiolysis. Trabeculectomy has a limited role in the acute setting. This review paper reviews the current evidence regarding conventional and newer treatment modalities for acute primary angle closure. PMID:22536030

  16. A retrospective study on how primary care providers manage specialists’ recommendations after an e-consultation

    PubMed Central

    Pecina, Jennifer L; Frank, Jennifer M; North, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: E-consultations are asynchronous text-based consultations between providers which can facilitate patient access to timely specialty care. In contrast to traditional face-to-face consults, conveying and completing recommendations of the specialist is the responsibility of the referring provider. This presents a new workflow for primary care providers who have multiple options (face-to-face, telephone, letter, secure message) to communicate the e-consultation recommendations. This study examines how primary care providers are managing this new workflow. Methods: We performed a retrospective random sampling of e-consultations with individual medical record review and classified e-consultations by type of recommendation, how recommendations were communicated to patients, and whether recommendations were carried out. Results: We randomly selected 220 e-consultations in 13 different specialties for review. In all, 85% of e-consultations contained recommendations for referring providers. Recommendations on medication(s) were most common (35%) followed by recommendations on ordering laboratory tests (29%). In all, 25% of the time e-consultants gave multiple possible courses of action for referring providers to choose from. Patient notification of recommendations was found for 192 (87%) of e-consultations with providers performing the notification 63% of the time and nursing staff performing the notification 37% of the time. The communication back to the patients included communication via nurse telephone calls (37%), provider telephone calls (23%), secure messages (24%), face-to-face visits (11%), and by written correspondence (5%). Discussion: Managing recommendations from e-consultations results in a new workflow for primary care providers. Healthcare institutions that utilize e-consults should be aware of this new workflow. Further study is needed to determine best practices for this task that is now increasing in primary care. PMID:28348734

  17. Evaluation of computerized decision support for oral anticoagulation management based in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Hobbs, F D; Murray, E T; Bradley, C P; Holder, R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing indications for oral anticoagulation has led to pressure on general practices to undertake therapeutic monitoring. Computerized decision support (DSS) has been shown to be effective in hospitals for improving clinical management. Its usefulness in primary care has previously not been investigated. AIM: To test the effectiveness of using DSS for oral anticoagulation monitoring in primary care by measuring the proportions of patients adequately controlled, defined as within the appropriate therapeutic range of International Normalised Ratio (INR). METHOD: All patients receiving warfarin from two Birmingham inner city general practices were invited to attend a practice-based anticoagulation clinic. In practice A all patients were managed using DSS. In practice B patients were randomized to receive dosing advice either through DSS or through the local hospital laboratory. Clinical outcomes, adverse events and patient acceptability were recorded. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients were seen in total. There were significant improvements in INR control from 23% to 86% (P > 0.001) in the practice where all patients received dosing through DSS. In the practice where patients were randomized to either DSS or hospital dosing, logistic regression showed a significant trend for improvement in intervention patients which was not apparent in the hospital-dosed patients (P < 0.001). Mean recall times were significantly extended in patients who were dosed by the practice DSS through the full 12 months (24 days to 36 days) (P = 0.033). Adverse events were comparable between hospital and practice-dosed patients, although a number of esoteric events occurred. Patient satisfaction with the practice clinics was high. CONCLUSION: Computerized DSS enables the safe and effective transfer of anticoagulation management from hospital to primary care and may result in improved patient outcome in terms of the level of control, frequency of review and general acceptability. PMID

  18. Safer Choice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Safer Choice is a voluntary program that works to advance the mission of EPA to protect human health and the environment by helping product manufacturers choose the safest chemical ingredients possible.

  19. Management of diabetes mellitus and hypertension at UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Yusef, J I

    2000-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at all UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon Field, to assess the quality of care of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The study reviewed 2202 records of diabetic and hypertensive patients. Both diseases were present at an early age (< 40 years), with family history, obesity and sedentary lifestyle being the main risk factors. The major complication was cardiovascular disease followed by retinopathy. Action-oriented measures to improve the organization and management of the health care services were identified.

  20. Diagnosis and management of primary autoimmune neutropenia in children: insights for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune neutropenia of infancy (AIN), also called primary autoimmune neutropenia, is a disease in which antibodies recognize membrane antigens of neutrophils, mostly located on immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc receptor type 3b (FcγIIIb receptor), causing their peripheral destruction. It is the most frequent type of neutropenia in children under 3–4 years of age and in most cases shows a benign, self-limited course. The diagnosis is based on evidence of indirect antineutrophil antibodies, whose detection frequently remains difficult. In this review we have analyzed the literature regarding AIN and present our personal experience in diagnosis and management. PMID:25642312

  1. Acceptability to primary care providers of telemedicine in diabetes case management.

    PubMed

    Palmas, Walter; Teresi, Jeanne; Weinstock, Ruth S; Shea, Steven

    2008-01-01

    We studied the perceptions of primary care providers (PCPs) about the telemedicine intervention in a trial of telemedicine for management of diabetes in medically under-served areas of New York State. A survey was mailed to 206 rural and 159 urban PCPs. The response rates were 25% and 22%, respectively. Eighty percent of respondents believed that a diabetes telemedicine case management system would help their practice. An overall satisfaction score (possible range 0-80) suggested good acceptability (mean 66, SD 12). In multiple linear regression, the rural location and younger age of the PCPs were independent predictors of higher satisfaction (both P < 0.01). Within-PCP comparisons showed a higher perceived impact on patients, as compared to impact on PCP practices (P < 0.001). However, the findings should be interpreted with caution due to the low response rates.

  2. Gouty arthritis: understanding the disease state and management options in primary care.

    PubMed

    Sunkureddi, Prashanth

    2011-09-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of monosodium urate crystal deposits into the joint space. The disease is associated with debilitating clinical symptoms and functional impairments as well as adverse economic and quality-of-life burdens. Because gouty arthritis is typically diagnosed and managed in the primary care setting, clinicians require a thorough knowledge of the presenting clinical features, risk factors, differential diagnoses, and treatment options for appropriate management. Although generally effective, the use of currently available therapies to control gouty arthritis is challenging because many medications used to treat comorbidities can exacerbate gouty arthritis and because current agents are associated with a number of adverse events, contraindications, or both. Based on an understanding of the underlying inflammatory pathogenesis of gouty arthritis, several new agents are being developed that may provide improved efficacy.

  3. Stress and Primary Headache: Review of the Research and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R

    2016-07-01

    This review begins with a discussion of the nature of stress and then presents the functional model of primary headache as a framework for conceptualizing the complex relationship between stress and headaches. Research is reviewed on stress as a trigger of headaches and how stress can play a role in the developmental and psychosocial context of headaches. Clinical management of headaches from a stress perspective is considered both at the level of trials of behavioral interventions that broadly fit into the stress management category and the additional strategies that might be useful for individual cases based on the research demonstrating associations between stress and headaches. The review concludes by suggesting that although some researchers have questioned whether stress can trigger headaches, overall, the literature is still supportive of such a link. Advances in methodology are discussed, the recent emphasis on protective factors is welcomed, and directions for future research suggested.

  4. Choice and conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Fantino, E; Freed, D; Preston, R A; Williams, W A

    1991-01-01

    A potential weakness of one formulation of delay-reduction theory is its failure to include a term for rate of conditioned reinforcement, that is, the rate at which the terminal-link stimuli occur in concurrent-chains schedules. The present studies assessed whether or not rate of conditioned reinforcement has an independent effect upon choice. Pigeons responded on either modified concurrent-chains schedules or on comparable concurrent-tandem schedules. The initial link was shortened on only one of two concurrent-chains schedules and on only one of two corresponding concurrent-tandem schedules. This manipulation increased rate of conditioned reinforcement sharply in the chain but not in the tandem schedule. According to a formulation of delay-reduction theory, when the outcomes chosen (the terminal links) are equal, as in Experiment 1, choice should depend only on rate of primary reinforcement; thus, choice should be equivalent for the tandem and chain schedules despite a large difference in rate of conditioned reinforcement. When the outcomes chosen are unequal, however, as in Experiment 2, choice should depend upon both rate of primary reinforcement and relative signaled delay reduction; thus, larger preferences should occur in the chain than in the tandem schedules. These predictions were confirmed, suggesting that increasing the rate of conditioned reinforcement on concurrent-chains schedules may have no independent effect on choice. PMID:2037826

  5. Managing multimorbidity in primary care in patients with chronic respiratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Deborah; Agur, Karolina; Mercer, Stewart; Eiras, Andreia; González-Montalvo, Juan I; Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The term multimorbidity is usually defined as the coexistence of two or more chronic conditions within an individual, whereas the term comorbidity traditionally describes patients with an index condition and one or more additional conditions. Multimorbidity of chronic conditions markedly worsens outcomes in patients, increases treatment burden and increases health service costs. Although patients with chronic respiratory disease often have physical comorbidities, they also commonly experience psychological problems such as depression and anxiety. Multimorbidity is associated with increased health-care utilisation and specifically with an increased number of prescription drugs in individuals with multiple chronic conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine Education Section case study involves a patient in a primary care consultation presenting several common diseases prevalent in people of this age. The patient takes nine different drugs at this moment, one or more pills for each condition, which amounts to polypharmacy. The problems related with polypharmacy recommend that a routine medication review by primary care physicians be performed to reduce the risk of adverse effects of polypharmacy among those with multiple chronic conditions. The primary care physician has the challenging role of integrating all of the clinical problems affecting the patient and reviewing all medicaments (including over-the-counter medications) taken by the patient at any point in time, and has the has the key to prevent the unwanted consequences of polypharmacy. Multimorbid chronic disease management can be achieved with the use of care planning, unified disease templates, use of information technology with appointment reminders and with the help of the wider primary care and community teams. PMID:27629064

  6. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GAMING LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY... at a gaming operation, a tribe shall: (1) Forward to the Commission a completed application...

  7. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GAMING LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY... at a gaming operation, a tribe shall: (1) Forward to the Commission a completed application...

  8. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GAMING LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY... at a gaming operation, a tribe shall: (1) Forward to the Commission a completed application...

  9. Solid waste management in primary healthcare centers: application of a facilitation tool 1

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ana Maria Maniero; Günther, Wanda Maria Risso

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: to propose a tool to facilitate diagnosis, formulation and evaluation of the Waste Management Plan in Primary Healthcare Centers and to present the results of the application in four selected units. Method: descriptive research, covering the stages of formulation /application of the proposed instrument and the evaluation of waste management performance at the units. Results: the tool consists in five forms; specific indicators of waste generation for outpatients healthcare units were proposed, and performance indicators that give scores for compliance with current legislation. In the studied units it is generated common waste (52-60%), infectious-sharps (31-42%) and recyclable (5-17%). The average rates of generation are: 0,09kg of total waste/outpatient assistance and 0,09kg of infectious-sharps waste/outpatient procedure. The compliance with regulations, initially 26-30%, then reached 30-38% a year later. Conclusion: the tool showed to be easy to use, bypassing the existence of a complex range of existing regulatory requirements, allowed to identify non-conformities, pointed out corrective measures and evaluated the performance of waste management. In this sense, it contributes to decision making and management practices relating to waste, tasks usually assigned to nurses. It is recommended that the tool be applied in similar healthcare units for comparative studies, and implementation of necessary adaptations for other medical services. PMID:27556874

  10. GPs’ views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss EM; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP’s workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. Aim To explore GPs’ views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Design and setting Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Method Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. Results GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient’s interests. Conclusion GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. PMID:26120137

  11. The Testimony of Neoliberal Contradiction in Education Choice and Privatisation in a Poor Country: The Case of a Private, Undocumented Rural Primary School in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayengo, Nathaniel; Namusoke, Jane; Dennis, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    With international momentum to achieve "Education for All" by 2015, global attention is being paid to those parts of the world where mass formal primary schooling is relatively new. Uganda is such a place. In the context of ethnographic fieldwork at a poor, undocumented, private primary school in rural Uganda, parents were interviewed in…

  12. Choice and control: how involved are people with epilepsy and their families in the management of their epilepsy? Results from an Australian survey in the disability sector.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Michelle; Pfeiffer, Wayne; Maurici, Vanessa

    2014-08-01

    This study explored the extent to which people with epilepsy and their families have choice and control over the management of their epilepsy and the support provided in the Australian disability sector. It measured the level of direct involvement in planning and recording of their epilepsy health-care needs and support required through the use of epilepsy management plans. An Australian online survey was completed by 118 adults with epilepsy and 171 family members of children and adults with epilepsy, providing demographic and diagnostic data and details of their epilepsy management plan, whether they were involved in writing the plan and the extent to which it included their views on how they want to be supported. Results indicate that just over half of all respondents had an epilepsy management plan, with 83% revised within the past 12 months. Although the majority of respondents were directly involved in writing their plan (87%), only two-thirds (66%) felt that their plan included their views on how they wanted to be supported. Open-ended comments from 111 respondents indicated their desire to be actively involved in this process, as either collaborative team members or 'in charge' of the process. In spite of a move towards person-centered approaches and greater choice and control, further emphasis must be placed on actively involving the person with epilepsy and their family in writing and incorporating their views on support within their epilepsy management plans. This research was undertaken by the Epilepsy Foundation to inform the development of epilepsy support resources for the newly introduced Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme.

  13. Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures by primary fascio-septo-cutaneous local flap and primary fixation: The ‘fix and shift’ technique

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, P R

    2017-01-01

    Background: Open fractures of tibia have posed great difficulty in managing both the soft tissue and the skeletal components of the injured limb. Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures are more difficult to manage than I, II, and III A fractures. Stable skeletal fixation with immediate soft tissue cover has been the key to the successful outcome in treating open tibial fractures, in particular, Gustilo Anderson III B types. If the length of the open wound is larger and if the exposed surface of tibial fracture and tibial shaft is greater, then the management becomes still more difficult. Materials and Methods: Thirty six Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures managed between June 2002 and December 2013 with “fix and shift” technique were retrospectively reviewed. All the 36 patients managed by this technique had open wounds measuring >5 cm (post debridement). Under fix and shift technique, stable fixation involved primary external fixator application or primary intramedullary nailing of the tibial fracture and immediate soft tissue cover involved septocutaneous shift, i.e., shifting of fasciocutaneous segments based on septocutaneous perforators. Results: Primary fracture union rate was 50% and reoperation rate (bone stimulating procedures) was 50%. Overall fracture union rate was 100%. The rate of malunion was 14% and deep infection was 16%. Failure of septocutaneous shift was 2.7%. There was no incidence of amputation. Conclusion: Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures with “fix and shift” technique has resulted in better outcome in terms of skeletal factors (primary fracture union, overall union, and time for union and malunion) and soft tissue factors (wound healing, flap failure, access to secondary procedures, and esthetic appearance) when compared to standard methods adopted earlier. Hence, “fix and shift” could be recommended as one of the treatment modalities for open III B tibial fractures. PMID:28216752

  14. Managing and monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases in a primary health care clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Manjomo, R. C.; Mwagomba, B.; Ade, S.; Ali, E.; Ben-Smith, A.; Khomani, P.; Bondwe, P.; Nkhoma, D.; Douglas, G. P.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Chikosi, L.; Gadabu, O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Objective: Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. Design: A cross-sectional study. Results: Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged ⩾65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for ⩾1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80–90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60–75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41–51%) and diabetes (15–38%) was poor. Conclusion: It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes. PMID:27358797

  15. Performance of newly implemented Environmental Management Systems in primary schools in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hens, Luc; Wiedemann, Torsten; Raath, Schalk; Stone, Riana; Renders, Paul; Craenhals, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative results from Environmental Management Systems (EMS) at primary schools have rarely been examined in literature. This paper presents the monitoring results of environmental care in 39 primary schools in Northern South Africa. During 2 years, after the EMS was implemented in the curriculum and in the school's management, the progress of environmental performances of the participating schools has been measured, by means of detailed questionnaires, related to four environmental aspects: water, waste, energy and greening. At the beginning of the project, 50% of the schools performed well on water-related environmental actions. Two years later it was 76%. For waste-related activities the improvement was even stronger: from 50% to 100%. The environmental performances of the schools improved also for greening-related actions, from 50% at the start of the project to 64% two years later. Only energy-related activities did not improve significantly with only 24% of all schools performing well at the end of the survey period. In general, the introduction of an EMS succeeded in an improvement of the overall environmental performances of the schools, but cost-intensive activities were less successful than others.

  16. Diagnosis and Management of Hidden Caries in a Primary Molar Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Arwa

    2017-01-01

    Hidden caries is a dentinal lesion beneath the dentinoenamel junction, visible on radiographs. A single report described this lesion in primary dentition. This case report describes a case of hidden caries in a mandibular second primary molar, misdiagnosed as malignant swelling. A 3-year-old white girl was referred to the Department of Pediatric Dentistry with a chief complaint of pain and extraoral swelling on the right side of the mandible for the last 3 months. She was earlier referred to the surgical department for biopsy of the lesion. Radiographic and computed tomography scan examination showed a periapical lesion with buccal plate resorption and radiolucency beneath the enamel on the mesial part of tooth 85. The tooth was extracted, and follow-up of 2 years showed normal development of tooth 45. The main problem is early detection and treatment, since the outer surface of enamel may appear intact on tactile examination. How to cite this article Gera A, Zilberman U. Diagnosis and Management of Hidden Caries in a Primary Molar Tooth. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):99-102. PMID:28377664

  17. The role of public relations activities in hospital choice.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Yesiltas, Mehmet; Kisa, Adnan; Dziegielewski, Sophia F

    2007-01-01

    Public relations activities for all organizations can have an important effect on consumer decision-making when buying goods or services. This study examines the effect that public relations activities can have regarding consumer decisions and choice. To explore exemplify this relationship a questionnaire was given to 971 patients within public, university and private hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Study results show that public relations activities were a crucial factor in determining consumer hospital choice. The majority of respondents reported that the behaviors and attitude of personnel as public relations activities that support the hospital's reputation within the public were the primary variables in hospital choice. Health care managers can use these findings to further understand how patients make informed choices related to usage of a health care facility and to develop and/or improve public relations activities.

  18. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    PubMed Central

    Odusola, Aina O.; Stronks, Karien; Hendriks, Marleen E.; Schultsz, Constance; Akande, Tanimola; Osibogun, Akin; van Weert, Henk; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11) and health insurance managers (n=4). Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA. PMID:26880152

  19. Evaluating and Managing Acute Low Back Pain in the Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Steven J; Deyo, Richard A

    2001-01-01

    Acute low back pain is a common reason for patient calls or visits to a primary care clinician. Despite a large differential diagnosis, the precise etiology is rarely identified, although musculoligamentous processes are usually suspected. For most patients, back symptoms are nonspecific, meaning that there is no evidence for radicular symptoms or underlying systemic disease. Because episodes of acute, nonspecific low back pain are usually self-limited, many patients treat themselves without contacting their primary care clinician. When patients do call or schedule a visit, evaluation and management by primary care clinicians is appropriate. The history and physical examination usually provide clues to the rare but potentially serious causes of low back pain, as well as to identify patients at risk for prolonged recovery. Diagnostic testing, including plain x-rays, is often unnecessary during the initial evaluation. For patients with acute, nonspecific low back pain, the primary emphasis of treatment should be conservative care, time, reassurance, and education. Current recommendations focus on activity as tolerated (though not active exercise while pain is severe) and minimal if any bed rest. Referral for physical treatments is most appropriate for patients whose symptoms are not improving over 2 to 4 weeks. Specialty referral should be considered for patients with a progressive neurologic deficit, failure of conservative therapy, or an uncertain or serious diagnosis. The prognosis for most patients is good, although recurrence is common. Thus, educating patients about the natural history of acute low back pain and how to prevent future episodes can help ensure reasonable expectations. PMID:11251764

  20. Monitoring and managing urinary albumin excretion: practical advice for primary care clinicians.

    PubMed

    Bakris, George L; Kuritzky, Louis

    2009-07-01

    Albuminuria has a strong, continuous, direct, linear relationship with adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes and chronic kidney disease progression. Even at levels below the accepted upper limit of what is considered "normal" daily albumin excretion (< 30 mg/24 h), a relationship between albumin excretion level and adverse CV events is evident. Primary care clinicians (eg, physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) are usually the first point of contact for patients at risk for CV and kidney disease. Hence, identifying and treating problematic albuminuria levels are important in primary care. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) endorse routine annual screening for microalbuminuria (small amounts of albumin in the urine). Once excess albumin excretion is detected, clinicians must employ aggressive CV risk reduction. To optimize outcomes, treatment of microalbuminuria often requires the combined skills of experts in primary care, cardiology, metabolic disease, and nephrology. Although blood pressure reduction usually improves microalbuminuria, agents that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are most efficacious. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers (ie, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors) may confer CV and kidney advantages in high-risk patients. Their effects on microalbuminuria reduction are greater than those associated with attaining guideline-recommended blood pressure goals. Effective RAAS blockade sometimes induces transient changes in creatinine and potassium, which merit consistent monitoring for the first 2 to 3 months of their use, but rarely necessitate discontinuation. This article also presents an approach to managing increases in creatinine and potassium that should fit comfortably in the hands of primary care clinicians.

  1. The Role of Surgery in the Clinical Management of Primary Gastrointestinal Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Ian T; Shannon, Evan M; Dawes, Aaron J; Ostrzega, Nora; Russell, Marcia M; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2015-10-01

    Primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (PGINHL) is a heterogeneous family of tumors, with treatment modalities including chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy. Because the role of surgery in PGINHL remains disputed, this study aims to assess the impact of operative resection on survival. We used a pathology database to identify all cases of PGINHL diagnosed at a single academic-affiliated medical center from 1988 to 2013. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from the medical record. We summarized the clinical courses of patients with PGINHL and then performed a survival analysis to compare overall and disease-free survival, stratified by demographic and clinical variables. We identified 33 patients diagnosed with PGINHL during the study period. Of 29 who subsequently received treatment at the institution, 15 initially underwent chemotherapy, 10 underwent surgical resection, and 4 underwent surgery for other reasons such as diagnosis without resection or management of disease complications. Three patients suffered surgical complications and two of these patients died. We found no difference in overall survival between patients receiving surgical resection and patients managed initially with chemotherapy. This case series supports a continued role for surgical resection in the management of patients with PGINHL, though anticipated benefits should be weighed against the risk of complications.

  2. Challenges in managing elderly people with diabetes in primary care settings in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences and clinical challenges that nurses and nursing assistants face when providing high-quality diabetes-specific management and care for elderly people with diabetes in primary care settings. Design Focus-group interviews. Subjects and setting Sixteen health care professionals: 12 registered nurses and four nursing assistants from nursing homes (10), district nursing service (5), and a service unit (1) were recruited by municipal managers who had local knowledge and knew the workforce. All the participants were women aged 32–59 years with clinical experience ranging from 1.5 to 38 years. Results Content analysis revealed a discrepancy between the level of expertise which the participants described as important to delivering high-quality care and their capacity to deliver such care. The discrepancy was due to lack of availability and access to current information, limited ongoing support, lack of cohesion among health care professionals, and limited confidence and autonomy. Challenges to delivering high-quality care included complex, difficult patient situations and lack of confidence to make decisions founded on evidence-based guidelines. Conclusion Participants lacked confidence and autonomy to manage elderly people with diabetes in municipal care settings. Lack of information, support, and professional cohesion made the role challenging. PMID:24205973

  3. Using an established telehealth model to train urban primary care providers on hypertension management.

    PubMed

    Masi, Christopher; Hamlish, Tamara; Davis, Andrew; Bordenave, Kristine; Brown, Stephen; Perea, Brenda; Aduana, Glen; Wolfe, Marcus; Bakris, George; Johnson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a videoconference-based telehealth network can increase hypertension management knowledge and self-assessed competency among primary care providers (PCPs) working in urban Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). We created a telehealth network among 6 urban FQHCs and our institution to support a 12-session educational program designed to teach state-of-the-art hypertension management. Each 1-hour session included a brief lecture by a university-based hypertension specialist, case presentations by PCPs, and interactive discussions among the specialist and PCPs. Twelve PCPs (9 intervention and 3 controls) were surveyed at baseline and immediately following the curriculum. The mean number of correct answers on the 26-item hypertension knowledge questionnaire increased in the intervention group (13.11 [standard deviation (SD)]=3.06) to 17.44 [SD=1.59], P<.01) but not among controls (14.33 [SD=3.21] to 13.00 [SD=3.46], P=.06). Similarly, the mean score on a 7-item hypertension management self-assessed competency scale increased in the intervention group (4.68 [SD=0.94] to 5.41 [SD=0.89], P<.01) but not among controls (5.28 [SD=0.43] to 5.62 [SD=0.67], P=.64). This model holds promise for enhancing hypertension care provided by urban FQHC providers.

  4. Sustainability of the integrated chronic disease management model at primary care clinics in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Asmall, Shaidah

    2016-01-01

    Background An integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model consisting of four components (facility reorganisation, clinical supportive management, assisted self-supportive management and strengthening of support systems and structures outside the facility) has been implemented across 42 primary health care clinics in South Africa with a view to improve the operational efficiency and patient clinical outcomes. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the sustainability of the facility reorganisation and clinical support components 18 months after the initiation. Setting The study was conducted at 37 of the initiating clinics across three districts in three provinces of South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sustainability Model (SM) self-assessment tool was used to assess sustainability. Results Bushbuckridge had the highest mean sustainability score of 71.79 (95% CI: 63.70–79.89) followed by West Rand Health District (70.25 (95% CI: 63.96–76.53)) and Dr Kenneth Kaunda District (66.50 (95% CI: 55.17–77.83)). Four facilities (11%) had an overall sustainability score of less than 55. Conclusion The less than optimal involvement of clinical leadership (doctors), negative staff behaviour towards the ICDM, adaptability or flexibility of the model to adapt to external factors and infrastructure limitation have the potential to negatively affect the sustainability and scale-up of the model. PMID:28155314

  5. Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Practices of Diabetes Management During Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mujtaba; Adams, Alexandra; Hossain, Md Anwar; Sutin, David; Han, Benjamin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 3.5 million Muslims in North America. During the holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims are to fast from predawn to after sunset. While there are exemptions for older and sick adults, many adults with diabetes fast during Ramadan. However, there are risks associated with fasting and specific management considerations for patients with diabetes. We evaluated provider practices and knowledge regarding the management of patients with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. A 15-question quality improvement survey based on a literature review and the American Diabetes Association guidelines was developed and offered to providers at the outpatient primary care and geriatric clinics at an inner-city hospital in New York City. Forty-five providers completed the survey. Most respondents did not ask their Muslim patients with diabetes if they were fasting during the previous Ramadan. Knowledge of fasting practices during Ramadan was variable, and most felt uncomfortable managing patients with diabetes during Ramadan. There is room for improvement in educating providers about specific cultural and medical issues regarding fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan.

  6. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions.

  7. A Collaborative Paradigm for Improving Management of Sleep Disorders in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Jack D.; Grubber, Janet; Ulmer, Christi; Zervakis, Jennifer; Olsen, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To test a collaborative care model for interfacing sleep specialists with primary care providers to enhance patients' sleep disorders management. Methods: This study used a randomized, parallel group, clinical intervention trial design. A total of 137 adult (29 women) VA outpatients with sleep complaints were enrolled and randomly assigned to (1) an intervention (INT) consisting of a one-time consultation with a sleep specialist who provided diagnostic feedback and treatment recommendations to the patient and the patient's primary care provider; or (2) a control condition consisting of their usual primary care (UPC). Provider-focused outcomes included rates of adherence to recommended diagnostic procedures and sleep-focused interventions. Patient-focused outcomes included measures taken from sleep diaries and actigraphy; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores; and self-report measures of sleepiness, fatigue, mood, quality of life, and satisfaction with health care. Results: The proportions of provider-initiated sleep-focused interventions were significantly higher in the INT group than in the UPC group for polysomnography referrals (49% versus 6%; P < 0.001) and mental health clinic referrals (19% versus 6%; P = 0.02). At the 10-mo follow up, INT recipients showed greater estimated mean reductions in diary total wake time (−17.0 min; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −30.9, −3.1; P = 0.02) and greater increases in sleep efficiency (+3.7%; 95% CI: 0.8, 6.5; P = 0.01) than did UPC participants. A greater proportion of the INT group showed ≥ 1 standard deviation decline on the PSQI from baseline to the 10-mo follow-up (41% versus 21%; P = 0.02). Moreover, 69% of the INT group had normal (≤ 10) Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores at the 10-mo follow-up, whereas only 50% of the UPC group fell below this clinical cutoff (P = 0.03). Conclusions: A one-time sleep consultation significantly increased healthcare providers' attention to sleep problems and

  8. Choice Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Darcy

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the author allows the children to make choices about their art and writing, enabling them to make connections between their own lives and work. Suggests that educators need to provide doorways to the things that give students ideas: books, music, objects, pictures, smells, sounds, and textures. (SG)

  9. Project Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice was begun with the goal of increasing the number of inner-city students who graduate on time. Ewing M. Kauffman and his business and foundation associates designed and elected to test a model that used the promise of postsecondary education or training as the incentive to stay in school. This report details the evolution of Project…

  10. Innovation in Management of Primary School Construction: Multi-Purpose Primary School Buildings in Bangladesh. Educational Building Report 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinos, Fecadu

    This report deals with school building construction utilizing technology carried out by the Lutheran World Service/Rangpur Dinajpur Rehabilitation Service in Bangladesh. The purpose was to develop an alternative design for primary school constructions. The design, construction, and multipurpose use of the school buildings are described. Appended…

  11. The Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound in the Diagnosis and Management of Primary Gastric Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schizas, Dimitrios; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tsilimigras, Diamantis I.; Scotiniotis, Ilias

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered a valuable diagnostic tool during the workup of malignant gastric lesions, including primary gastric lymphomas (PGL). Although endoscopy combined with multiple biopsies remains essential in the establishment of PGL diagnosis, EUS utilization in locoregional disease staging has been well documented in the literature. Data also support the possible role of EUS in prediction of response to first-line treatment, that is, Helicobacter pylori eradication. However, its application in the posttreatment setting remains problematic, since concordance rates between endosonography and histology findings during follow-up seem to vary substantially. The aim of the present review is to summarize all available data regarding the role of EUS in the management of PGL.

  12. Primary HIV infection: a medical and public health emergency requiring rapid specialist management.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Sarah; Fox, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Primary HIV infection (PHI) refers to the first six months following HIV acquisition and represents a unique opportunity for expedited diagnosis, and consideration of rapid antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation to improve immune function, reduce the size of the viral reservoir and limit the risk of onward viral transmission. Failure to diagnose and rapidly treat individuals with PHI has significant individual and public health implications. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial recently identified a clinical benefit of immediate ART over deferral of treatment according to CD4 count threshold, and has led to rapid changes in World Health Organization and specialist national guidelines. For all individuals living with HIV, the offer of immediate therapy irrespective of CD4 count is now recommended. This paper summarises the presentation and management of PHI, incorporating current research and guideline changes and discusses the role of PHI in onward transmission.

  13. [Management of sudden neurosensory hearing loss in a Primary Care Centre].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Proto, F; Carnevale, C; Bejarano-Panadés, N; Ferrán-de la Cierva, L; Mas-Mercant, S; Sarría-Echegaray, P

    2014-04-01

    Sudden hearing loss is a rapid loss of neurosensory hearing that may occur within hours or days in an apparently healthy patient. Its origins are variable and multifactorial. Most patients do not recover hearing if not treated, and some even develop cophosis (deafness) in the affected ear. It is an otological emergency, as early therapeutic management offers a better hearing prognosis. As there is limited knowledge on this condition, it may be underdiagnosed in Primary Health Care Centers. It should be suspected in patients with abrupt hearing loss or tinnitus. Sophisticated instruments are not required for its diagnosis, just a detailed history, basic otoscopy, and proper interpretation of the hearing test. In this way, an accurate diagnosis is achieved in most cases, which is confirmed by audiometry.

  14. PRIMARY STROKE PREVENTION IN CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL ANEMIA LIVING IN AFRICA: THE FALSE CHOICE BETWEEN PATIENT-ORIENTED RESEARCH AND HUMANITARIAN SERVICE

    PubMed Central

    DEBAUN, MICHAEL R.; GALADANCI, NAJIBAH A.; KASSIM, ADETOLA A.; JORDAN, LORI C.; PHILLIPS, SHARON; ALIYU, MUKTAR H.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, primary stroke prevention in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) is now the standard of care and includes annual transcranial Doppler ultrasound evaluation to detect elevated intracranial velocities; and for those at risk, monthly blood transfusion therapy for at least a year followed by the option of hydroxyurea therapy. This strategy has decreased stroke prevalence in children with SCA from approximately 11% to 1%. In Africa, where 80% of all children with SCA are born, no systematic approach exists for primary stroke prevention. The two main challenges for primary stroke prevention in children with SCA in Africa include: 1) identifying an alternative to blood transfusion therapy, because safe monthly blood transfusion therapy is not feasible; and 2) assembling a health care team to implement and expand this effort. We will emphasize early triumphs and challenges to decreasing the incidence of strokes in African children with SCA. PMID:28066035

  15. Improving management and effectiveness of home blood pressure monitoring: a qualitative UK primary care study

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Sabrina; Greenfield, Sheila M; Nouwen, Arie; McManus, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring blood pressure (SMBP) is becoming an increasingly prevalent practice in UK primary care, yet there remains little conceptual understanding of why patients with hypertension engage in self-monitoring. Aim To identify psychological factors or processes prompting the decision to self-monitor blood pressure. Design and setting A qualitative study of patients previously participating in a survey study about SMBP from four general practices in the West Midlands. Method Taped and transcribed in-depth interviews with 16 patients (6 currently monitoring, 2 used to self-monitor, and 8 had never self-monitored). Thematic analysis was undertaken. Results Three main themes emerged: ‘self’ and ‘living with hypertension’ described the emotional element of living with an asymptomatic condition; ‘self-monitoring behaviour and medication’ described overall views about self-monitoring, current practice, reasons for monitoring, and the impact on medication adherence; and ‘the GP–patient transaction’ described the power relations affecting decisions to self-monitor. Self-monitoring was performed by some as a protective tool against the fears of a silent but serious condition, whereas others self-monitor simply out of curiosity. People who self-monitored tended not to discuss this with their nurse or GP, partly due to perceiving minimal or no interest from their clinician about home monitoring, and partly due to fear of being prescribed additional medication. Conclusion The decision to self-monitor appeared often to be an individual choice with no schedule or systems to integrate it with other medical care. Better recognition by clinicians that patients are self-monitoring, perhaps utilising the results in shared decision-making, might help integrate it into daily practice. PMID:26500326

  16. Comparison of American and European practices in the management of patients with primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Trujillo, H S; Chapel, H; Lo Re III, V; Notarangelo, L D; Gathmann, B; Grimbacher, B; Boyle, J M; Hernandez-Trujillo, V P; Scalchunes, C; Boyle, M L; Orange, J S

    2012-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) comprise a heterogeneous group of rare disorders. This study was devised in order to compare management of these diseases in the northern hemisphere, given the variability of practice among clinicians in North America. The members of two international societies for clinical immunologists were asked about their management protocols in relation to their PID practice. An anonymous internet questionnaire, used previously for a survey of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), was offered to all full members of the European Society for Immunodeficiency (ESID). The replies were analysed in three groups, according to the proportion of PID patients in the practice of each respondent; this resulted in two groups from North America and one from Europe. The 123 responses from ESID members (23·7%) were, in the majority, very similar to those of AAAAI respondents, with > 10% of their practice devoted to primary immunodeficiency. There were major differences between the responses of these two groups and those of the general AAAAI respondents whose clinical practice was composed of < 10% of PID patients. These differences included the routine use of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIg) for particular types of PIDs, initial levels of IVIg doses, dosing intervals, routine use of prophylactic antibiotics, perceptions of the usefulness of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy (SCIg) and of the risk to patients' health of policies adopted by health-care funders. Differences in practice were identified and are discussed in terms of methods of health-care provision, which suggest future studies for ensuring continuation of appropriate levels of immunoglobulin replacement therapies. PMID:22670779

  17. Is diabetes management in primary care improving clinical outcomes? A study in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Mochtar, I; Al-Monjed, M F

    2015-06-09

    There has been little research into the effectiveness of primary-care diabetes clinics in the Middle East. This study in Qatar compared patient outcomes at a primary-care facility with a dedicated diabetes clinic and one without. Using a cross-sectional method, data on demographics, diabetes status and 6 clinical outcomes of diabetes care were collected from the records of patients who visited the clinics during 2012. Diabetes management in both facilities improved clinical outcomes over the 1-year observation period. The mean total cholesterol of patients attending the special clinic (n = 102) decreased significantly from 4.66 to 4.27 mmol/dL and LDL cholesterol from 3.42 to 3.22 mmol/dL. The LDL cholesterol of patients receiving standard care (n = 108) reduced significantly from 3.41 to 3.22 mmol/dL and HDL cholesterol increased from 0.83 to 0.87 mmol/dL. Inter-provider comparisons indicated that the outcomes in the facility with a diabetes clinic were not superior to those in the facility with standard care.

  18. The prognosis of primary intracerebral tumours presenting with epilepsy: the outcome of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F; Hutton, J L; Sandemann, D; Foy, P M; Shaw, M D; Williams, I R; Chadwick, D W

    1991-01-01

    It is not known whether conservative or early aggressive (resective surgery with or without radiotherapy) management is better for tumours presenting with epilepsy. The prognosis of 560 patients with a clinical and CT diagnosis of intrinsic supratentorial tumour was examined retrospectively. Epilepsy was the first symptom in 164 patients. Histological confirmation of diagnosis was available in 391 (70%) of cases. Median survival was 37 months in the group presenting with epilepsy and six months in those presenting with other symptoms (p less than 0.0001). Patients presenting with epilepsy were more likely to have a normal clinical examination, a non-enhancing low density lesion on CT scan and a low grade tumour. From Cox's stepwise proportional hazards model, significant independent variables adversely affecting prognosis were increasing age, focal neurological signs and enhancing CT lesions at diagnosis, non-resective surgery and male sex. Of those presenting with epilepsy 80 patients had surgical treatment within two months of CT diagnosis. The Cox's model failed to identify any beneficial effects for either early resective surgery or radiotherapy. In primary intracerebral tumours with presentations other than epilepsy, resective surgery and radiotherapy were amongst the important factors associated with prolonged survival. Primary intracerebral tumours presenting with epilepsy are relatively benign and their outcome appears to be chiefly determined by clinical factors. PMID:1744647

  19. Assessing Primary Care Trainee Comfort in the Diagnosis and Management of Thermal Injuries.

    PubMed

    Vrouwe, Sebastian Q; Shahrokhi, Shahriar

    2016-12-02

    Thermal injuries are common and the majority will initially present to primary care physicians. Despite being a part of the objectives of training in family medicine (FM) and emergency medicine (EM), previous study has shown that in practice, gaps exist in the delivery of care. An electronic survey was sent to all FM/EM trainees at our university for the 2014 to 2015 academic year. Plastic Surgery trainees were included as a control group. Demographics and educational/clinical experience were assessed. Trainee comfort was measured on a five-point Likert scale across 15 domains related to thermal injuries. Preferences for educational interventions were also ranked. Descriptive statistics and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used (P < .05 considered significant). The survey response rate was 27.4% (117/427). FM and EM (CCFP and Royal College) trainees estimated a median 0, 1, and 2 hours of total didactic instruction, respectively. During that academic year, FM and EM (CCFP and Royal College) trainees cared for a median 1, 4, and 5 patients, respectively. Significant differences were noted in comfort levels across all 15 domains when compared with plastic surgery trainees. Preferences for educational interventions were ranked, with clinical rotations and traditional lecture scoring the highest. Primary care trainees are not comfortable in the diagnosis and management of thermal injuries. This may be attributed to limited clinical exposure and teaching during their postgraduate training. There exists an opportunity for specialists in burn care to collaborate with primary care training programs and deliver an educational intervention with the aim of long-lasting quality improvement.

  20. Sustainable forest management preferences of interest groups in three regions with different levels of industrial forestry: an exploratory attribute-based choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Kati; Adamowicz, Wiktor; Kneeshaw, Daniel; Messier, Christian

    2010-07-01

    The challenge of sustainable forest management is to integrate diverse and sometimes conflicting management objectives. In order to achieve this goal, we need a better understanding of the aspects influencing the preferences of diverse groups and how these groups make trade-offs between different attributes of SFM. We compare the SFM preferences of interest groups in regions with different forest use histories based on the reasoning that the condition of the forest reflects the forest use history of the area. The condition of the forest also shapes an individual's forest values and attitudes. These held values and attitudes are thought to influence SFM preferences. We tested whether the SFM preferences vary amongst the different interest groups within and across regions. We collected data from 252 persons using a choice experiment approach, where participants chose multiple times among different options described by a combination of attributes that are assigned different levels. The novelty of our approach was the use of choice experiments in the assessment of regional preference differences. Given the complexity of inter-regional comparison and the small sample size, this was an exploratory study based on a purposive rather than random sample. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the aggregation of preferences of all individuals within a region does not reveal all information necessary for forest management planning since opposing viewpoints could cancel each other out and lead to an interpretation that does not reflect possibly polarised views. Although based on a small sample size, the preferences of interest groups within a region are generally statistically significantly different from each other; however preferences of interest groups across regions are also significantly different. This illustrates the potential importance of assessing heterogeneity by region and by group.

  1. School Choice for the Poor? The Limits of Marketisation of Primary Education in Rural India. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harma, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    In recent years India has seen an explosion in low-fee private (LFP) schooling aimed at the poorer strata of society. This marketisation of primary education is a reaction to the well-documented failings of the government system. This paper looks at LFP schooling in one rural district of Uttar Pradesh, and compares government to low cost private…

  2. Practice Characteristics of Graduates of East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine: Factors Related to Career Choices in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Click, Ivy A.

    2013-01-01

    The nation is facing a physician shortage, specifically in relation to primary care and in rural underserved areas. The most basic function of a medical school is to educate physicians to care for the national population. The purpose of this study was to examine the physician practicing characteristics of the graduates of East Tennessee State…

  3. Review of experimental studies in social psychology of small groups when an optimal choice exists and application to operating room management decision-making.

    PubMed

    Prahl, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Braun, Michael T; Van Swol, Lyn

    2013-11-01

    Because operating room (OR) management decisions with optimal choices are made with ubiquitous biases, decisions are improved with decision-support systems. We reviewed experimental social-psychology studies to explore what an OR leader can do when working with stakeholders lacking interest in learning the OR management science but expressing opinions about decisions, nonetheless. We considered shared information to include the rules-of-thumb (heuristics) that make intuitive sense and often seem "close enough" (e.g., staffing is planned based on the average workload). We considered unshared information to include the relevant mathematics (e.g., staffing calculations). Multiple studies have shown that group discussions focus more on shared than unshared information. Quality decisions are more likely when all group participants share knowledge (e.g., have taken a course in OR management science). Several biases in OR management are caused by humans' limited abilities to estimate tails of probability distributions in their heads. Groups are more susceptible to analogous biases than are educated individuals. Since optimal solutions are not demonstrable without groups sharing common language, only with education of most group members can a knowledgeable individual influence the group. The appropriate model of decision-making is autocratic, with information obtained from stakeholders. Although such decisions are good quality, the leaders often are disliked and the decisions considered unjust. In conclusion, leaders will find the most success if they do not bring OR management operational decisions to groups, but instead act autocratically while obtaining necessary information in 1:1 conversations. The only known route for the leader making such decisions to be considered likable and for the decisions to be considered fair is through colleagues and subordinates learning the management science.

  4. The management of type 1 diabetes in primary school: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marks, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Crisp, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in childhood. The introduction of intensive insulin therapy and the rising prevalence of diabetes in younger children has increased the need for involvement of diabetes educators and school personnel in school diabetes care. School encompasses a significant proportion of a child's day, therefore diabetes treatment at school needs to be optimal or the child will have poor metabolic control. The aim of this literature review is to examine diabetes management in the early primary school setting. The main areas of diabetes management explored are: type, provision, and location of treatment, the impact on the child, and the role of the credentialed diabetes educator. The review identifies that the majority of children are not receiving intensive diabetes treatment at school. Younger children require more assistance with care and may be disadvantaged due to lack of appropriate school staff support. Most schools do not have nurses to assist with diabetes care, therefore teaching and administration staff are utilized. The use of insulin pump therapy may increase access to insulin at school, as children and teaching staff appear more confident with this method of delivery than injections. Treatment is frequently performed away from the classroom and can impact on class attendance, metabolic control, and emergencies. Diabetes educators need to work in collaboration with children, parents, and school personnel to ensure diabetes care is fully integrated into the school day.

  5. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  6. Critical issues and needs in management of primary immunodeficiency diseases in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Condino-Neto, A; Franco, J L; Trujillo-Vargas, C; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Leiva, L E; Rodriguez-Quiroz, F; King, A; Lagos, M; Oleastro, M; Bezrodnik, L; Grumach, A S; Costa-Carvalho, B T; Sorensen, R U

    2011-01-01

    Experts from six Latin American countries met to discuss critical issues and needs in the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). The diagnosis of PIDD is generally made following referral to an immunology centre located in a major city, but many paediatricians and general practitioners are not sufficiently trained to suspect PIDD in the first place. Access to laboratory testing is generally limited, and only some screening tests are typically covered by government health programmes. Specialised diagnostic tests are generally not reimbursed. Access to treatment varies by country reflecting differences in healthcare systems and reimbursement policies. An online PIDD Registry Programme for Latin America has been available since 2009, which will provide information about PIDD epidemiology in the region. Additional collaboration across countries appears feasible in at least two areas: a laboratory network to facilitate the diagnosis of PIDD, and educational programmes to improve PIDD awareness. In total, these collaborations should make it possible to advance the diagnosis and management of PIDD in Latin America.

  7. Depression care management for Chinese Americans in primary care: a feasibility pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Kenny; Chung, Henry; Cheal, Karen; Chou, Jolene C; Chen, Teddy

    2013-04-01

    This study describes a culturally relevant intervention using a collaborative depression care model to integrate mental health and primary care services for depressed low income Chinese-Americans at a community health center. A total of 6,065 patients were screened for depression. Of the 341 who screened positive, 57 participated and were randomly assigned to receive either enhanced physician care with care management (32) or enhanced physician care only (25). All enrolled participants were assessed at baseline and 4 monthly follow-up visits for depression, physical and mental health functioning, and perceived stigma toward receiving depression care, to determine the impact, if any, of their mental health treatment. Both groups reported significant reduction of depressive symptoms and improved mental health functioning from baseline to follow-up assessments although there was no significant difference between the two groups. Although the study found no advantage to adding the care management component in the treatment of depression, screening and assertive treatment of immigrant Chinese Americans who tend to underutilize mental health services is important and consistent with the increased adoption of team based care models in patient centered medical homes. High refusal rates for enrollment in the study have implications for future study designs for this group.

  8. Management of children and adolescents with primary immune thrombocytopenia: controversies and solutions.

    PubMed

    Kühne, T; Imbach, P

    2013-01-01

    The management including diagnostic procedures, prophylaxis, treatment and follow-up of patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in childhood is controversial due to limited clinical data, difficulties in the estimation of individual bleeding risk and heterogeneity of pathophysiology potentially causing various treatment responses. Advances in the management of children include increased international collaborations, improved quality of diagnosis and treatment, increased clinical data, refinement of consensus statements where clinical evidence is absent, new drugs and last but not least establishment of watch-and-wait strategies. The Intercontinental Cooperative ITP Study Group promotes international collaboration since more than 10 years based on a worldwide network and experience in registries. Future considerations include concentration of available resources, strengthening international collaboration, focusing on most important scientific and clinical questions, such as identification of the subgroup of patients that benefits most from prophylactic platelet-enhancing treatments and investigation of treatment endpoints other than concepts solely based on the platelet count, including bleeding symptoms, health-related quality of life and economical aspects of treatments.

  9. Child diet and healthy growth in the context of rural poverty in the peruvian andes: what influences primary caregivers' opportunities and choices?

    PubMed

    Urke, Helga B; Bull, Torill; Mittelmark, Maurice B

    2013-09-01

    This study explored opportunities and choices related to child feeding among women living in a remote and low-income district in the Andean highlands. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with mothers (N = 7) with reputations for providing good child care, and who participated in an NGO-run social and health programme. The aim of this study was to learn about women's positive experience with child feeding, in the context of living in low-income communities. Such knowledge could be of substantial practical value to health promotion practitioners, in illuminating existing local circumstances and practices that produce good child nutrition. The women who were most knowledgeable about child health and diet were better educated and had relatively higher social positions in the community. Regarding contextual factors related to child feeding, numerous references were made to the extensive use of own crops and food stuffs, seen to provide a better diet than that available in cities where people buy their food. In discussing food and meal preparation habits, there were clear references to child welfare and health as motivating factors in the choices that were made. The NGO programme was not mentioned by the interviewer, to avoid prompting, yet the respondents referred to it explicitly, and attributed improved health-related knowledge and skills to the NGO education interventions (e.g. education about nutritious meal preparation, child care skills, and sanitation practices). It is concluded that the women were concerned about providing a good diet to their children, they were aware of the impact of feeding practices on child health, and that education about health and diet helped them to improved feeding practices.

  10. Nurse-patient communication in primary care diabetes management: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a major health issue for individuals and for health services. There is a considerable literature on the management of diabetes and also on communication in primary care consultations. However, few studies combine these two topics and specifically in relation to nurse communication. This paper describes the nature of nurse-patient communication in diabetes management. Methods Thirty-five primary health care consultations involving 18 patients and 10 nurses were video-recorded as part of a larger multi-site study tracking health care interactions between health professionals and patients who were newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Patients and nurses were interviewed separately at the end of the 6-month study period and asked to describe their experience of managing diabetes. The analysis used ethnography and interaction analysis. In addition to analysis of the recorded consultations and interviews, the number of consultations for each patient and total time spent with nurses and other health professionals were quantified and compared. Results This study showed that initial consultations with nurses often incorporated completion of extensive checklists, physical examination, referral to other health professionals and distribution of written material, and were typically longer than consultations with other health professionals. The consultations were driven more by the nurses’ clinical agenda than by what the patient already knew or wanted to know. Interactional analysis showed that protocols and checklists both help and hinder the communication process. This contradictory outcome was also evident at a health systems level: although organisational targets may have been met, the patient did not always feel that their priorities were attended to. Both nurses and patients reported a sense of being overwhelmed arising from the sheer volume of information exchanged along with a mismatch in expectations. Conclusions Conscientious nursing work was

  11. Practice nurse involvement in primary care depression management: an observational cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most evidence on the effect of collaborative care for depression is derived in the selective environment of randomised controlled trials. In collaborative care, practice nurses may act as case managers. The Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP) aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative models of practice nurse involvement in a real world Australian setting. Previous analyses have demonstrated the value of high level practice nurse involvement in the management of diabetes and obesity. This paper reports on their value in the management of depression. Methods General practices were assigned to a low or high model of care based on observed levels of practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of depression (i.e. percentage of depression patients seen, percentage of consultation time spent on clinical-based activities). Linked, routinely collected data was used to determine patient level depression outcomes (proportion of depression-free days) and health service usage costs. Standardised depression assessment tools were not routinely used, therefore a classification framework to determine the patient’s depressive state was developed using proxy measures (e.g. symptoms, medications, referrals, hospitalisations and suicide attempts). Regression analyses of costs and depression outcomes were conducted, using propensity weighting to control for potential confounders. Results Capacity to determine depressive state using the classification framework was dependent upon the level of detail provided in medical records. While antidepressant medication prescriptions were a strong indicator of depressive state, they could not be relied upon as the sole measure. Propensity score weighted analyses of total depression-related costs and depression outcomes, found that the high level model of care cost more (95% CI: -$314.76 to $584) and resulted in 5% less depression-free days (95% CI: -0.15 to 0.05), compared to the

  12. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized

  13. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolíbar, Ignasi; Plaza, Vicente; Llauger, Mariantònia; Amado, Ester; Antón, Pedro A; Espinosa, Ana; Domínguez, Leandra; Fraga, Mar; Freixas, Montserrat; de la Fuente, Josep A; Liguerre, Iskra; Medrano, Casimira; Peiro, Meritxell; Pou, Mariantònia; Sanchis, Joaquin; Solanes, Ingrid; Valero, Carles; Valverde, Pepi

    2009-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1) improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2) benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients) and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients). The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of complex cases. PMID

  14. Primary care-based, targeted screening programme to promote sustained weight management

    PubMed Central

    Järvenpää, Salme; Kautiainen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To identify overweight and obese subjects at increased cardiovascular risk in the community, and provide them with lifestyle counselling that is possible to implement in real life. Design. Longitudinal cohort study. Setting. The communities of Harjavalta and Kokemäki in south-western Finland. Subjects. A tape for measurement of waist and a risk factor questionnaire was mailed to home-dwelling inhabitants aged 45–70 years (n = 6013). Of the 4421 respondents, 2752 with at least one cardiovascular risk factor were examined by a public health nurse. For the subjects with high cardiovascular risk (n = 1950), an appointment with a physician was scheduled. The main goal of lifestyle counselling for the 1608 high-risk subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 was weight reduction of at least 5%. Among these, 906 had completed self-administrated questionnaires at baseline and form the present study population. Main outcome measure. Success in weight management. Results. At the three-year follow-up visit, 18% of subjects had lost ≥ 5% of their initial weight and 70% had stabilized their weight, while 12% had gained weight ≥ 5%. Newly diagnosed glucose disorder (OR 1.37 [95% CI 1.02–1.84]) predicted success in weight management, whereas depressive symptoms (OR 0.61 [95% CI 0.42–0.90]), excess alcohol use (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.44–0.90]), and number of drugs used (OR 0.91 [95% CI 0.83–0.99]) at baseline predicted poor outcome. Conclusions. A primary care screening programme to identify overweight or obese individuals can promote sustained weight management. Psychological factors, especially depressive symptoms, are a critical component to consider before attempts to change the lifestyle of an individual. PMID:24592894

  15. Estimation and Analysis of Gross Primary Production of Soybean Under Various Management Practices and Drought Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, P.; Xiao, X.; Suyker, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) of croplands may be used to quantify crop productivity and evaluate a range of management practices. Eddy flux data from three soybean (Glycine max L.) fields under different management practices (no-till vs till; rainfed vs irrigated) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived vegetation indices (VIs) were used to evaluate the biophysical performance of VIs and crop phenology, and to model GPP using a satellite-based vegetation photosynthesis model (VPM). The VIs tracked soybean phenology well and delineated the growing season length. The results show that the carbon uptake period and seasonal sums of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and GPP can be inferred from the length of the vegetation activity period from satellite remote sensing data. Land surface water index (LSWI) tracked drought-impacted vegetation well. On a seasonal scale, NEE of the soybean sites ranged from -37 to -264 g C m-2. The result suggests that rainfed soybean fields needed about 450-500 mm of well-distributed seasonal rainfall to maximize the net carbon sink. During non-drought conditions, VPM accurately estimated seasonal dynamics and interannual variation of GPP of soybean under different management practices. However, some large discrepancies between GPPVPM and GPPEC were observed under drought conditions as the VI did not reflect the corresponding decrease in GPP. Diurnal GPP dynamics showed a bimodal distribution with a pronounced midday depression at the period of higher water vapor pressure deficit (> 1.2 kPa). A modified Wscalar based on LSWI, to account for the water stress, in VPM helped quantify the reduction in GPP during severe drought and the model's performance improved substantially. The results of this study demonstrate the potential use of remotely sensed VIs for better understanding of carbon dynamics and extrapolation of GPP of soybean croplands.

  16. Improving management of gout in primary care using a customised electronic records template.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Keith; McNab, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the management of chronic gout in relation to serum uric acid (SUA) monitoring, allopurinol dosing, and lifestyle advice is often sub-optimal in primary care.[1] A quality improvement project in the form of a criterion based audit was carried out in an urban general practice to improve the care of patients being treated for gout. Baseline searching of EMIS confirmed that management of patients with gout who were taking allopurinol was not in line with current guidance. 51(40%) had a SUA checked in the past 12 months, 88(25%) had a SUA below target level, and gout lifestyle advice was not being recorded. An audit was performed to measure and improve the following criteria: Monitoring of SUA levels in the past 12 monthsTitration of urate lowering therapy to bring the SUA below target levelLifestyle advice in the past 12 months An audit standard of 60% achievement at 2 months and 80% achievement at 4 months was set. The intervention consisted of a custom electronic template within EMIS which allowed guidance of gout management to be displayed and for data to be entered. All members of the team including GPs and administrative staff were educated regarding the intervention. This resulted in a sustained improvement over a 6 month period in all 3 components of the audit with 112(84%) having a SUA level checked, 79(51%) having a SUA below target level and 76(57%) receiving lifestyle advice. Although the improvement did not reach the audit standard in 2 of the criteria it would be expected that outcomes would continue given the systems changes which have been made.

  17. Work-up and management of a high-risk patient with primary central nervous system lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalova, Pervin A.; Tumyan, Gayane S.; Dolgushin, Mikhail B.; Akhmedov, Mobil I.

    2016-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare disorder that, in 95% of cases, represents diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. As such, making an accurate diagnosis is important. At present, stereotactic-guided biopsy is a recognized method of choice for tissue analysis. However, the diagnostic work-up for high-risk patients is determined by their performance status. Here, we report a case of PCNSL in a high-risk patient, for whom diagnosis was established by cerebrospinal fluid cytology and flow cytometry, which significantly shortened a diagnostic work-up period and allowed for the immediate treatment of the patient. PMID:28154784

  18. Prevalence and management of hypertension in primary care practices with electronic medical records: a report from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Tyler; Khan, Shahriar; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Asghari, Shabnam; Morkem, Rachel; Dawes, Martin; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Most epidemiologic reports on hypertension in Canada are based on data from surveys or on administrative data. We report on the prevalence and management of hypertension based on data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), which consists of validated, national, point-of-care data from primary care practices. Methods We included CPCSSN data as of Dec. 31, 2012, for patients 18 years and older who had at least 1 clinical encounter during the previous 2 years with one of the 444 family physicians and nurse-practitioners who participate in the CPCSSN. We calculated the prevalence of hypertension, the proportion of patients who achieved blood pressure targets, the number of encounters with primary care providers, comorbidities and pharmacologic management. Results Of the 250 346 patients who met the eligibility criteria, 57 180 (22.8%) had a diagnosis of hypertension. Of the 44 981 patients for whom blood pressure data were available, 35 094 (78.0%) had achieved both targets for systolic (≤□140 mm Hg) and diastolic (≤□90 mm Hg) pressure. Compared with patients who did not have a hypertension diagnosis, those with hypertension were significantly more likely to have a comorbidity and visited their primary care provider more often. Among the patients with hypertension, 12.1% were not taking antihypertensive medications; nearly two-thirds (61.7%) had their condition controlled with 1 or 2 drugs. Interpretation The prevalence of hypertension based on CPCSSN data was similar to estimates from the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Although achievement of blood pressure targets was high, patients with hypertension had more comorbidities and saw their primary care provider more often than those without hypertension. PMID:25844373

  19. Influence of walking route choice on primary school children's exposure to air pollution--A proof of concept study using simulation.

    PubMed

    Mölter, Anna; Lindley, Sarah

    2015-10-15

    This study developed a walking network for the Greater Manchester area (UK). The walking network allows routes to be calculated either based on the shortest duration or based on the lowest cumulative nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or particulate matter (PM10) exposure. The aim of this study was to analyse the costs and benefits of faster routes versus lower pollution exposure for walking routes to primary schools. Random samples of primary schools and residential addresses were used to generate 100,000 hypothetical school routes. For 60% (59,992) and 40% (40,460) an alternative low NO2 and PM10 route was found, respectively. The median change in travel time (NO2: 4.5s, PM10: 0.5s) and average route exposure (NO2: -0.40 μg/m(3), PM10: -0.03 μg/m(3)) was small. However, quantile regression analysis indicated that for 50% of routes a 1% increase in travel time was associated with a 1.5% decrease in NO2 and PM10 exposure. The results of this study suggest that the relative decrease in pollution exposure on low pollution routes tends to be greater than the relative increase in route length. This supports the idea that a route planning tool identifying less polluted routes to primary schools could help deliver potential health benefits for children.

  20. Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money

    SciTech Connect

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-08-06

    Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school facilities managers and business officials, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.

  1. Hypothetical intertemporal choice and real economic behavior: delay discounting predicts voucher redemptions during contingency-management procedures.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Warren K; Jones, Bryan A; Landes, Reid D; Christensen, Darren R; Jackson, Lisa; Mancino, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Delay discounting rates are predictive of drug use status, the likelihood of becoming abstinent, and a variety of health behaviors. Rates of delay discounting may also be related to other relevant behaviors associated with addiction, such as the frequency at which individuals redeem contingency management voucher earnings. This study examined the discounting rates of 152 participants in a buprenorphine treatment program for opioid abuse. Participants received up to 12 weeks of buprenorphine treatment combined with contingency management. Participant's drug use was measured via urine specimens submitted three times a week. Successive negative urine specimens were reinforced with increasing amounts of money. After each negative urine specimen, a participant could either redeem his or her earnings or accumulate it in an account. Analysis of the frequency of redemptions showed that participants with higher rates of delay discounting at study intake redeemed their earnings significantly more often than participants with lower rates of discounting. Age and income also predicted redemption rates. We suggest that delay discounting rates can be used to predict redemption behaviors in a contingency management treatment program and that these findings are consistent with the recent theory of the competing neurobehavioral decision systems.

  2. Attitudes of primary health care physician managers toward research: a pre-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Saulat; Henary, Basem

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary health care (PHC) is underdeveloped and scarce, especially in developing countries. It is important to understand the attitudes and aspirations of PHC physicians for the promotion of research. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of PHC physician managers toward research in Qassim province and to identify barriers that impede performing research in the PHC system. The study was based on social cognitive theory framework, and was pre-experimental with a 'one-group pre-test-post-test' design. The study participants were physician managers in PHC administration, Qassim. The participants' attitudes were measured by adapting statements from the Attitude Towards Research scale. The intervention was the 1-day training program 'Introduction to Research in Primary Health Care'. A total of 23 PHC physicians participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 45.4 (±1.6) years, and the mean years of work experience was 16.2 (±2.2) years. Only one participant had an article published in a peer-reviewed journal. The results of the study showed that PHC physicians had a baseline positive attitude toward research that was further enhanced after participating in an introductory research-training program. During the pre-test, out of the total score of 63, the mean score on attitude toward research was 48.35 (±6.8) while the mean total attitude score in the post-test was 49.7 (±6.6). However, the difference was not statistically significant at P<0.05. The item with the highest score regarded the role of research in the improvement of health care services, while the lowest-scoring item was about support from administration to conduct research. The participants recognised lack of skills, lack of training and inadequate resources as major barriers in conducting research. Our study results suggest that the PHC physicians' positive attitudes toward research can be further improved through in-service training. To promote research in PHC

  3. Hard choices.

    PubMed

    Furedi, A

    1999-01-01

    The cultural discourse that frames the abortion debate has changed and become more complex over the years. To date, concerns about the need to defend the choice have shifted to moral and ethical issues surrounding abortion. The right of women to abortion can be situated in the context of ethical principles, which are basic to what we hold valuable in the modern society. The ethical principle of "procreative autonomy", the right of humans to control their own role in procreation has an unusually significant place in modern political culture in which human dignity was an important feature. Central to human dignity was the principle that "people possess the moral right and responsibility to answer the basic questions about the value and meaning of their own lives." Another crucial issue is the need to defend the "bodily autonomy" of women. Forcing women to support the fetus against her will flies against such principles as the need for voluntary consent to medical treatment. These arguments do not suggest for a moral indifference towards abortion choices, but as Ronald Dworkin argues, "tolerance is a cost we must pay for our adventure in liberty."

  4. Treating asthma by the guidelines: developing a medication management information system for use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Twiggs, Joan E; Fifield, J; Jackson, E; Cushman, R; Apter, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and assess an automated asthma medication management information system (MMIS) that provides patient-specific evaluative guidance based on 1997 NAEPP clinical consensus guidelines. MMIS was developed and implemented in primary care settings within a pediatric asthma disease management program. MMIS infrastructure featured a centralized database with Internet access. MMIS collects detailed patient asthma medication data, evaluates pharmacotherapy relative to practitioner-reported disease severity, symptom control and model of guideline-recommended severity-appropriate medications and produces a patient-specific "curbside consult" feedback report. A system algorithm translates actual detailed medication data into actual severity-specific medication-class combinations. A table-driven computer program compares actual medication-class combinations to a guideline-based medication-class combinations model. Methodology determines whether the patient was prescribed a "severity-appropriate" amount or an amount "more" or "less" medication than indicated for patient's reported severity. Feedback messages comment on comparison. Missing data, unrecognized amounts of controller medication or unrecognized medication combinations create error cases. Post hoc review analyzed error cases to determine prevalence of non-guideline medicating practices among these practitioners. Proportion of valid and error cases across two clinical visits before and after post hoc clinical review were measured, as well as proportion of severity-appropriate, out-of-severity and non-guideline medications. MMIS produced a valid feedback report for 83% of patient visits. Missing data accounted for 60% of error cases. Practitioners used severity-appropriate medications for 60% of cases. When non-severity-appropriate medications were used they tended to be "too much" rather than "too little" (22%, 5%), suggesting appropriate use of guideline-recommended "step

  5. Practical Approach to Detection and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease for the Primary Care Clinician.

    PubMed

    Vassalotti, Joseph A; Centor, Robert; Turner, Barbara J; Greer, Raquel C; Choi, Michael; Sequist, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    A panel of internists and nephrologists developed this practical approach for the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative to guide assessment and care of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by primary care clinicians. Chronic kidney disease is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and/or markers of kidney damage for at least 3 months. In clinical practice the most common tests for CKD include GFR estimated from the serum creatinine concentration (eGFR) and albuminuria from the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Assessment of eGFR and albuminuria should be performed for persons with diabetes and/or hypertension but is not recommended for the general population. Management of CKD includes reducing the patient's risk of CKD progression and risk of associated complications, such as acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease, anemia, and metabolic acidosis, as well as mineral and bone disorder. Prevention of CKD progression requires blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with albuminuria and hypertension, hemoglobin A1c ≤7% for patients with diabetes, and correction of CKD-associated metabolic acidosis. To reduce patient safety hazards from medications, the level of eGFR should be considered when prescribing, and nephrotoxins should be avoided, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The main reasons to refer to nephrology specialists are eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), severe albuminuria, and acute kidney injury. The ultimate goal of CKD management is to prevent disease progression, minimize complications, and promote quality of life.

  6. Comparison of primary health-care models in the management of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Negative lifestyle habits (potential risks for chronic kidney disease, CKD) are rarely modified by physicians in a conventional health-care model (CHCM). Multidisciplinary strategies may have better results; however, there is no information on their application in the early stages of CKD. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare a multiple intervention model versus CHCM on lifestyle and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CKD stage 1–2. In a prospective cohort study, a family medicine unit (FMU) was assigned a multiple intervention model (MIM) and another continued with conventional health-care model (CHCM). MIM patients received an educational intervention guided by a multidisciplinary team (family physician (FP), social worker, dietitian, physical trainer); self-help groups functioned with free activities throughout the study. CHCM patients were managed only by the FP, who decided if patients needed referral to other professionals. Thirty-nine patients were studied in each cohort. According to a lifestyle questionnaire, no baseline differences were found between cohorts, but results reflected an unhealthy lifestyle. After 6 months of follow-up, both cohorts showed significant improvement in their dietary habits. Compared to CHCM diet, exercise, emotional management, knowledge of disease, and adherence to treatment showed greater improvement in the MIM. Blood pressure decreased in both cohorts, but body mass index, waist circumference, and HbA1C significantly decreased only in MIM. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was maintained equally in both cohorts, but albuminuria significantly decreased only in MIM. In conclusion, MIM achieves better control of lifestyle-related variables and CKD risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with CKD stage 1–2. Broadly, implementation of a MIM in primary health care may produce superior results that might assist in preventing the progression of CKD. PMID:25018986

  7. Industrial hazardous waste management in Turkey: current state of the field and primary challenges.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Güray

    2010-05-15

    A holistic evaluation of a country's hazardous waste management (HWM) practices is useful in identifying the necessary actions to focus on. Based on an analysis of industrial hazardous waste (HW) generation in Turkey, this paper attempts to critically evaluate and report current Turkish HWM practices and discuss the primary challenges to be addressed. The generation of industrial HW for Turkey reported in 2004 was 1.195 million tons, which accounted for 7% of the total industrial solid waste (ISW) generated by the manufacturing industry, and for nearly 4.9% of the total solid waste generated in the country. The HW generated by the top five manufacturing product categories--basic metals, chemicals and chemical products, food and beverages, coke and refined petroleum, motor vehicles and trailers--accounted for 89.0% of total industrial HW. 21% of the HW generated in 2004 was recycled or reused, and 6% was sold or donated, whereas 73% was sent to ultimate disposal. 67% of the HW sent to ultimate disposal was disposed of at municipal landfills. The total capacity of the existing regional HW facilities is 212,500 tons/year, which accounts for about 24% of the HW to be disposed. Turkey has identified the HW problem in the country and enacted legislation, designated a lead agency, and promulgated rules and regulations. Several new initiatives are planned for improving HW management nationally; however, some HWM problems will be persistent due to previous and existing industrial development plans. These development policies led to the concentration of industry in regions marked by precious agricultural fields and high population density. This occurred because the government previously exhibited a default prioritization towards industrial development, leading to insufficient implementation of regulations on HW generators. Some of the problems may also be rooted in other countries that allow illegal trans boundary HW movements despite international regulations.

  8. Effectiveness of Case Management for 'At Risk' Patients in Primary Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan; Panagioti, Maria; Alam, Rahul; Checkland, Kath; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background An ageing population with multimorbidity is putting pressure on health systems. A popular method of managing this pressure is identification of patients in primary care ‘at-risk’ of hospitalisation, and delivering case management to improve outcomes and avoid admissions. However, the effectiveness of this model has not been subjected to rigorous quantitative synthesis. Methods and Findings We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of case management for ‘at-risk’ patients in primary care. Six bibliographic databases were searched using terms for ‘case management’, ‘primary care’, and a methodology filter (Cochrane EPOC group). Effectiveness compared to usual care was measured across a number of relevant outcomes: Health – self-assessed health status, mortality; Cost – total cost of care, healthcare utilisation (primary and non-specialist care and secondary care separately), and; Satisfaction – patient satisfaction. We conducted secondary subgroup analyses to assess whether effectiveness was moderated by the particular model of case management, context, and study design. A total of 15,327 titles and abstracts were screened, 36 unique studies were included. Meta-analyses showed no significant differences in total cost, mortality, utilisation of primary or secondary care. A very small significant effect favouring case management was found for self-reported health status in the short-term (0.07, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.14). A small significant effect favouring case management was found for patient satisfaction in the short- (0.26, 0.16 to 0.36) and long-term (0.35, 0.04 to 0.66). Secondary subgroup analyses suggested the effectiveness of case management may be increased when delivered by a multidisciplinary team, when a social worker was involved, and when delivered in a setting rated as low in initial ‘strength’ of primary care. Conclusions This was the first meta-analytic review which examined the effects

  9. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  10. Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contributions to wildlife habitat, management issues, challenges and policy choices--an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.; Vandever, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The following bibliography presents brief summaries of documents relevant to Conservation Reserve Program relations to wildlife habitat, habitat management in agriculturally dominated landscapes, and conservation policies potentially affecting wildlife habitats in agricultural ecosystems. Because the literature summaries furnished provide only sweeping overviews, users are urged to obtain and evaluate those papers appearing useful to obtain a more complete understanding of study findings and their implications to conservation in agricultural ecosystems. The bibliography contains references to reports that reach beyond topics that directly relate to the Conservation Reserve Program. Sections addressing grassland management and landowner surveys/opinions, for example, furnish information useful for enhancing development and administration of conservation policies affecting lands beyond those enrolled in conservation programs. Some sections of the bibliography (for example, agricultural conservation policy, economics, soils) are far from inclusive of all relevant material written on the subject. Hopefully, these sections will serve as fundamental introductions to related issues. In a few instances, references may be presented in more than one section of the bibliography. For example, individual papers specifically addressing both non-game and game birds are included in respective sections of the bibliography. Duplication of citations and associated notes has, however, been kept to a minimum.

  11. Challenges to the Implementation of PLAP in Primary Schools: Perceptions of ZOU Bachelor of Educational Management Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercy, Kurebwa; Mabhanda, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    The study explored the challenges that impact on the implementation of PLAP in the Primary schools. The research was conducted with teachers who study towards the BEd Management degree with Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) in the Midlands Region. The study used a qualitative research approach and collected data through open ended questionnaires and…

  12. Conflicts in Schools, Conflict Management Styles and the Role of the School Leader: A Study of Greek Primary School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Conflict may occur in any organization (and hence school) and, for schools, conflict management style is a joint activity and the degree of its effectiveness determines the type of impact of conflict on school performance. This empirical study investigates the potential sources of conflict in Greek primary schools, determine appropriate approaches…

  13. Enhancing the primary care team to provide redesigned care: the roles of practice facilitators and care managers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin Fries; Machta, Rachel M; Meyers, David S; Genevro, Janice; Peikes, Deborah N

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care require multiple supports. Two potential members of the primary care team-practice facilitator and care manager-can play important but distinct roles in redesigning and improving care delivery. Facilitators, also known as quality improvement coaches, assist practices with coordinating their quality improvement activities and help build capacity for those activities-reflecting a systems-level approach to improving quality, safety, and implementation of evidence-based practices. Care managers provide direct patient care by coordinating care and helping patients navigate the system, improving access for patients, and communicating across the care team. These complementary roles aim to help primary care practices deliver coordinated, accessible, comprehensive, and patient-centered care.

  14. Estimation and analysis of gross primary production of soybean under various management practices and drought conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, Pradeep; Xiao, Xiangming; Suyker, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) of croplands may be used to quantify crop productivity and evaluate a range of management practices. Eddy flux data from three soybean (Glycine max L.) fields under different management practices (no-till vs. till; rainfed vs. irrigated) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived vegetation indices (VIs) were used to test the capabilities of remotely sensed VIs and soybean phenology to estimate the seasonal dynamics of carbon fluxes. The modeled GPP (GPPVPM) using vegetation photosynthesis model (VPM) was compared with the GPP (GPPEC) estimated from eddy covariance measurements. The VIs tracked soybean phenology well and delineated the growing season length (GSL), which was closely related to carbon uptake period (CUP, R2 = 0.84), seasonal sums of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE, R2 = 0.78), and GPPEC (R2 = 0.54). Land surface water index (LSWI) tracked drought-impacted vegetation well, as the LSWI values were positive during non-drought periods and negative during severe droughts within the soybean growing season. On a seasonal scale, NEE of the soybean sites ranged from -37 to -264 g C m-2. The result suggests that rainfed soybean fields needed about 450-500 mm of well-distributed seasonal rainfall to maximize the net carbon sink. During non-drought conditions, VPM accurately estimated seasonal dynamics and interannual variation of GPP of soybean under different management practices. However, some large discrepancies between GPPVPM and GPPEC were observed under drought conditions as the VI did not reflect the corresponding decrease in GPPEC. Diurnal GPPEC dynamics showed a bimodal distribution with a pronounced midday depression at the period of higher water vapor pressure deficit (>1.2 kPa). A modified Wscalar based on LSWI to account for the water stress in VPM helped quantify the reduction in GPP during severe drought and the model's performance improved substantially. In conclusion, this study demonstrates

  15. Choice of Moisturiser for Eczema Treatment (COMET): feasibility study of a randomised controlled parallel group trial in children recruited from primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ridd, Matthew J; Garfield, Kirsty; Gaunt, Daisy M; Redmond, Niamh M; Powell, Kingsley; Wilson, Victoria; Guy, Richard H; Ball, Nicola; Shaw, Lindsay; Purdy, Sarah; Metcalfe, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of ‘leave on’ emollients for children with eczema. Design Single-centre, pragmatic, 4-arm, observer-blinded, parallel, randomised feasibility trial. Setting General practices in the UK. Participants Children with eczema aged 1 month to <5 years. Outcome measures Primary outcome—proportion of parents who reported use of the allocated study emollient every day for the duration of follow-up (12 weeks). Other feasibility outcomes—participant recruitment and retention, data collection and completeness and blinding of observers to allocation. Interventions Aveeno lotion, Diprobase cream, Doublebase gel, Hydromol ointment. Results 197 children were recruited—107 by self-referral (mainly via practice mail-outs) and 90 by inconsultation (clinician consenting and randomising) pathways. Participants recruited inconsultation were younger, had more severe Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure scores and were more likely to withdraw than self-referrals. Parents of 20 (10%) of all the randomised participants reported using the allocated emollient daily for 84 days. The use of other non-study emollients was common. Completeness of data collected by parent-held daily diaries and at monthly study visits was good. Daily diaries were liked (81%) but mainly completed on paper rather than via electronic (‘app’) form. Major costs drivers were general practitioner consultations and eczema-related prescriptions. Observer unblinding was infrequent, and occurred at the baseline or first follow-up visit through accidental disclosure. Conclusions It is feasible in a primary care setting to recruit and randomise young children with eczema to emollients, follow them up and collect relevant trial data, while keeping observers blinded to their allocation. However, reported use of emollients (study and others) has design implications for future trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN21828118/EudraCT2013

  16. Guideline concordant detection and management of depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Smith, Julia J.; Norman, Sara M.; Manson, Spero M.; Dillard, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A tribal health organization in Alaska implemented a primary care depression screening, detection and management initiative amongst 55,000 Alaska Native/American Indian people (AN/AIs). Objectives (a) To describe the proportion of AN/AIs screening positive for depression with depression noted or diagnosed and proportion with guideline concordant management and (b) to assess whether management varied by patient and provider factors. Research design Secondary analysis of electronic and paper medical record information of 400 AN/AIs. Measures Provider variables, patient demographics and patient clinical factors were electronically queried. Manual chart audits assessed depression notation, diagnoses and management within 12 weeks of positive screening. Multilevel ordinal logistic modelling assessed management by patient and provider factors. Results A depression diagnosis was present in 141 (35%) charts and 151 (38%) had depressive symptoms noted. Detection was higher among AN/AIs with moderate and severe depression (p<0.001). In total, 258 patients (66%) received guideline concordant management, 32 (8%) had some management, and 110 (28%) received no management. Younger patient age and increased provider tenure increased odds of management. Conclusions Most AN/AIs screening positive for depression received initial guideline concordant management. Additional outreach to older patients and additional support for providers newer to practices appears warranted. PMID:26519359

  17. Endodontic management of a four rooted retained primary maxillary second molar

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    The presence of accessory roots is rare in the primary dentition. Complete knowledge and understanding of tooth anatomy is essential to carry out high quality dental treatment with excellent outcome. In addition, the persistent primary tooth and its missing permanent successor in the dental arch pose several hurdles in front of the clinician due to doubtful survival of primary tooth. In this paper, highlights the root canal treatment of a rarest four rooted retained primary maxillary second molar. PMID:24347898

  18. Ayurveda in changing scenario of diabetes management for developing safe and effective treatment choices for the future.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subhadip; Debnath, Parikshit; Rao, Prasanna N; Tripathy, Tapas Brata; Adhikari, Anjan; Debnath, Pratip K

    2015-06-01

    Ayurveda described diabetes mellitus (DM) as Madhumeha. This ancient evidence-based system of medicine enumerated various herbs and formulations for its management, which needs scientific validation. Whereas translational "bedside to bench" approach in biomedical research is an upcoming concept, its application in traditional and complementary medicine can be interesting. The intersecting concepts in the field Ayurveda and translational research needs "omics" approach. The Ayurvedic biology concepts about DM have its close relations with present systems biology approach. Metabolic changes causing tissue damage connected with genetic and immunological irregularities leading to insulin resistance coincide with ancient knowledge. Combinatorial therapy according to Prakriti type as elucidated by Ayurgenomics should be carried on for further research. "Bedside to bench" approaches in research utilizing metabolomics and pharmacogenomics approach can be a major step towards changing the therapeutic strategy towards diabetes. Prameha which is described as the pre-diabetic state is a novel concept in Ayurvedic etiopathogenesis, while metabolomic parameters like lipid level in urine can be a thrust area of research to have a pre-diabetic screening method in high-risk populations. This tradition-guided research paradigm can open up novel opportunities in traditional knowledge-inspired systems biology and drug discovery against diabetes.

  19. Systems for the management of respiratory disease in primary care - an international series: Canada.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Alan

    2008-06-01

    Canada has a universal health care system funded by the government. All people are supposed to have unrestricted access to all essential health care in a timely fashion. Canada has ten provinces and three territories. Health care is funded by each province/territory, with federal payments providing some of the funding. The bulk of the provision of respiratory care in Canada is provided by primary care practitioners. Across the country we have a family physician shortage; thus, in many areas of the country there is insufficient access since patients do not actually have a family physician. This has less effect on acute medical services, which can be available in ER or walk-in settings, but certainly does affect the provision of services for chronic illnesses. While thus far the health care system is 'free', there are some significant limitations; the commonest is waiting times for specialist care and investigations. Other significant deficiencies include the lack of coverage for medications for both acute and chronic conditions and of medical devices. Primary care reforms by local governments have attempted to fix these issues by changing care models. Fee-for-service medicine by physicians is slowly being changed in places to capitation models and other systems such as rewards for managing chronic conditions optimally. Ontario has instituted 'reward systems' for diabetes and smoking cessation. British Columbia has rewards for multiple chronic diseases. In many areas, care in the provinces is regionalised to allow local arrangements to help decide on where and how care is organised. Respiratory diseases (excluding lung cancer) rank fourth in Canada in the total proportion of direct health care costs (behind neuropsychiatric, injury and cardiovascular diseases). A number of studies have shown that respiratory conditions such as asthma and COPD are underdiagnosed and/or undermanaged. Other conditions need treatment by specialists or physicians with a special interest

  20. Drinking water management: health risk perceptions and choices in First Nations and non-First Nations communities in Canada.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Diane; Waldner, Cheryl; Bharadwaj, Lalita; Plummer, Ryan; Carter, Blair; Cave, Kate; Zagozewski, Rebecca

    2014-05-30

    The relationship between tap water and health has been a topic of public concern and calls for better management in Canada since well-publicized contamination events in two provinces (Ontario and Saskatchewan) in 2000-2001. This study reports the perspectives on health risks from tap water and corresponding use of, and spending on, bottled water in a number of different communities in Canada. In 2009-2010, four First Nations communities (three from Ontario and one from Saskatchewan) and a geographically diverse sample of non-First Nations Canadians were surveyed about their beliefs concerning health risks from tap water and their spending practices for bottled water as a substitute. Responses to five identical questions were examined, revealing that survey respondents from Ontario First Nations communities were more likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe bottled water is safer than tap water (OR 1.6); more likely to report someone became ill from tap water (OR 3.6); more likely to express water and health concerns related to tap water consumption (OR 2.4); and more likely to spend more on bottled water (OR 4.9). On the other hand, participants from one Saskatchewan First Nations community were less likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe that someone had become ill from drinking tap water (OR 3.8), less likely to believe bottled water is safer than tap (OR 2.0), and less likely to have health concerns with tap water (OR 1.5). These differences, however, did not translate into differences in the likelihood of high bottled water expenditures or being a 100% bottled water consumer. The paper discusses how the differences observed may be related to water supply and regulation, trust, perceived control, cultural background, location, and past experience.

  1. An evaluation of the competencies of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces.

    PubMed

    Munyewende, Pascalia O; Levin, Jonathan; Rispel, Laetitia C

    2016-01-01

    Background Managerial competencies to enhance individual and organisational performance have gained currency in global efforts to strengthen health systems. Competent managers are essential in the implementation of primary health care (PHC) reforms that aim to achieve universal health coverage. Objective To evaluate the competencies of PHC clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Using stratified random sampling, 111 PHC clinic nursing managers were selected. All supervisors (n=104) and subordinate nurses (n=383) were invited to participate in the survey on the day of data collection. Following informed consent, the nursing managers, their supervisors, and subordinate nurses completed a 40-item, 360-degree competency assessment questionnaire, with six domains: communication, leadership and management, staff management, financial management, planning and priority setting, and problem-solving. Standard deviations, medians, and inter-quartile ranges (IQRs) were computed separately for PHC nursing managers, supervisors, and subordinate nurses for competencies in the six domains. The Tinsley and Weiss index was used to assess agreement between each of the three possible pairs of raters. Results A 95.4% response rate was obtained, with 105 nursing managers in Gauteng and Free State completing the questionnaires. There was a lack of agreement about nursing managers' competencies among the three groups of raters. Overall, clinic nursing managers rated themselves high on the five domains of communication (8.6), leadership and management (8.67), staff management (8.75), planning and priority setting (8.6), and problem-solving (8.83). The exception was financial management with a median score of 7.94 (IQR 6.33-9.11). Compared to the PHC clinic managers, the supervisors and subordinate nurses gave PHC nursing managers lower ratings on all six competency domains, with the lowest rating

  2. Awareness in Primary School Teachers regarding Traumatic Dental Injuries in Children and Their Emergency Management: A Survey in South Jaipur

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Ather Ahmed; Chaturvedi, Shefali; Goenka, Puneet; Sharma, Swati

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Trauma to primary and permanent teeth and their supporting structures is one of the most common dental problems seen in children. The prognosis of traumatized teeth depends on timely attention with prompt and appropriate treatment, which often relies on knowledge of the teachers who may be present at the place of accidents. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate via a questionnaire the knowledge level of primary school teachers in South Jaipur regarding dental trauma. Design: Questionnaire survey. Materials and methods: A self-designed questionnaire was administered to 300 primary school teachers from 20 randomly selected private and semi-aided schools of South Jaipur. Results: A total of 278 teachers responded to the survey. The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis. It was found that most of the respondents had accepted poor knowledge regarding dental trauma, with a mean knowledge of 10.56 ± 2.58. Conclusion: This study highlighted inadequate knowledge regarding emergency management of traumatic dental injuries, and teachers felt the need for training in the management of dental trauma as part of their training program. How to cite this article: Nirwan M, Syed AA, Chaturvedi S, Goenka P, Sharma S. Awareness in Primary School Teachers regarding Traumatic Dental Injuries in Children and Their Emergency Management: A Survey in South Jaipur. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):62-66. PMID:27274158

  3. Localized Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoma Tissue Lymphoma Managed With Primary Radiation Therapy: Efficacy and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Jayant Sastri; Le, Lisa W.; Lapperriere, Normand J.; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Payne, David; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Sun, Alexander; Simpson, Rand; Tsang, Richard W.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and late effects of radiation therapy (RT) in localized primary orbital mucosa-associated lymphoma tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POML). Methods and Materials: From 1989 to 2007, 89 patients with Stage IE POML received RT. The median age was 56 years old. Sites involved conjunctiva (59 patients [66%]), lacrimal gland (20 patients [23%]), and soft tissue (10 patients [11%]). Megavoltage beam(s) was used in 91%, electrons in 7%, and orthovoltage in 2% of cases. The dose given was 25 Gy in 97% and 30 Gy in 3% of patients. Lens shielding was possible in 57% of patients. Results: The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Complete response or unconfirmed complete response was seen in 88 patients (99%). Relapse occurred in 22 patients (25%). First relapse sites were local (2 patients [9%]), in the contralateral orbit (5 patients [23%]), and distant (15 patients [68%]). The 7-year overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and local control (LC) rates were 91%, 96%, 64%, and 97%, respectively. Radiation-related late sequelae were documented in 40 patients (45%). Cataracts were observed in 22 patients (Grade 1 in 2 patients; Grade 3 in 20 patients). The incidence of Grade 3 cataract at 7 years was 25%. Other late sequelae (n = 28) were dry eye(s) (22 patients [Grade 1 in 14 patients; Grade 2 in 2 patients; Grade 3 in 2 patients; n/s in 4 patients), keratitis (3 patients), macular degeneration/cystoid edema (2 patients), and vitreous detachment (1 patient). Five patients developed Grade 3 noncataract late effects. Lens shielding reduced the incidence of Grade 3 cataract and all Grade {>=}2 late sequelae. Seventeen patients (16 with cataracts) underwent surgery; 23 patients were treated conservatively. The outcome for managing late effects was generally successful, with 30 patients completely improved, and 9 patients with persisting late sequelae (10%). Conclusions: POML responds favorably to moderate doses

  4. Caries management strategies for primary molars: 1-yr randomized control trial results.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, R M; Innes, N P T; Machiulskiene, V; Evans, D J P; Splieth, C H

    2014-11-01

    Minimal invasive approaches to managing caries, such as partial caries removal techniques, are showing increasing evidence of improved outcomes over the conventional complete caries removal. There is also increasing interest in techniques where no caries is removed. We present the 1-yr results of clinical efficacy for 3 caries management options for occlusoproximal cavitated lesions in primary molars: conventional restorations (CR; complete caries removal and compomer restoration), Hall technique (HT; no caries removal, sealing in with stainless steel crowns), and nonrestorative caries treatment (NRCT; no caries removal, opening up the cavity, teaching brushing and fluoride application). In sum, 169 children (3-8 yr old; mean, 5.56 ± 1.45 yr) were enrolled in this secondary care-based, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial. Treatments were carried out by specialist pediatric dentists or postgraduate trainees. One lesion per child received CR, HT, or NRCT. Outcome measures were clinical failure rates, grouped as minor failure (restoration loss/need for replacement, reversible pulpitis, caries progression, etc.) and major failure (irreversible pulpitis, abscess, etc.). There were 148 children (87.6%) with a minimum follow-up of 11 mo (mean, 12.23 ± 0.98 mo). Twenty teeth were recorded as having at least 1 minor failure: NRCT, n = 8 (5%); CR, n = 11 (7%); HT, n = 1 (1%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Only the comparison between NRCT and CR showed no significant difference (p = .79, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.80). Nine (6%) experienced at least 1 major failure: NRCT, n = 4 (2%); CR, n = 5 (3%); HT, n = 0 (0%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Individual comparison of NRCT and CR showed no statistically significant difference in major failures (p = .75, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.76). Success and failure rates were not significantly affected by pediatric dentists' level of experience (p = .13, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.14). The HT was significantly more successful

  5. Enlightened Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Will

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author has taken a little excursion back in time to illustrate the importance of two vital concepts in the minds of smart IT project managers, when they begin to consider smart-classroom installations and implementations, and the technologies they will choose. Those watchwords are: "standardization" and "boring." Certainly,…

  6. Iron Chelation Therapy with Deferasirox in the Management of Iron Overload in Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Elena Maria; Belotti, Angelo; Aroldi, Andrea; Parma, Matteo; Pioltelli, Pietro; Pogliani, Enrico Maria

    2014-01-01

    Deferasirox (DSX) is the principal option currently available for iron-chelation-therapy (ICT), principally in the management of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), while in primary myelofibrosis (PMF) the expertise is limited. We analyzed our experience in 10 PMF with transfusion-dependent anemia, treated with DSX from September 2010 to December 2013. The median dose tolerated of DSX was 750 mg/day (10 mg/kg/day), with 3 transient interruption of treatment for drug-related adverse events (AEs) and 3 definitive discontinuation for grade 3/4 AEs. According to IWG 2006 criteria, erythroid responses with DSX were observed in 4/10 patients (40%), 2 of them (20%) obtaining transfusion independence. Absolute changes in median serum ferritin levels (Delta ferritin) were greater in hematologic responder (HR) compared with non-responder (NR) patients, already at 6 months of ICT respect to baseline. Our preliminary data open new insights regarding the benefit of ICT not only in MDS, but also in PMF with the possibility to obtain an erythroid response, overall in 40 % of patients. HR patients receiving DSX seem to have a better survival and a lower incidence of leukemic transformation (PMF-BP). Delta ferritin evaluation at 6 months could represent a significant predictor for a different survival and PMF-BP. However, the tolerability of the drug seems to be lower compared to MDS, both in terms of lower median tolerated dose and for higher frequency of discontinuation for AEs. The biological mechanism of action of DSX in chronic myeloproliferative setting through an independent NF-κB inhibition could be involved, but further investigations are required. PMID:24959339

  7. Management of the primary obstructed megaureter (POM) and indication for operative treatment.

    PubMed

    Stehr, M; Metzger, R; Schuster, T; Porn, U; Dietz, H-G

    2002-02-01

    Presented is the diagnostic and therapeutic management of the primary obstructed megaureter (POM). 42 patients presented with 53 ureteral units (UU) of POM (5 females, 37 males, 36 neonates and 6 children aged 3 to 8 years). Of the 53 megaureters 10 UU (19%) were on the right and 27 UU(51 %)were on the left. 8 patients (19%)with 16 UU (30%)showed a bilateral abnormality. In 41% of the patients, hydronephrosis had been discovered by prenatal ultrasound. All patients were evaluated postnatally by ultrasound (US), voiding cysturethrogram (VCUG), intravenous pyelogram (IVP) and diuresis renogram (MAG-3) (DR). Due to the percentage of urinary drainage,the renogram results were classified into different categories:no obstruction, functional obstruction, equivocal and obstruction. A partial renal function was also calculated. Follow-up of the patients ranges between 5 to 48 months (mean: 22.1). All patients underwent serial US and serial DR were obtained in 36 patients. Initially, 9 (17%) UU showed a functional obstruction, 34 (64.2%) an equivocal and 10 (18.8%) an obstructive urinary drainage pattern. 2 kidneys showed a significant decreased partial function of 20, respectively 26%. Surgery was performed in an initial im-paired renal function with an obstructive pattern or in cases with normal function and at least equivocal urinary drainage pattern with no improvement or deterioration of the urinary drainage and/or function in the follow-up. Considering these criteria, 5(9.6%) patients needed surgery. No loss of kidney function has been observed in follow-up. DR is the most valuable diagnostic tool. Criteria interpreting the results are demonstrated in this article.

  8. Therapeutic alliance and obesity management in primary care - a cross-sectional pilot using the Working Alliance Inventory.

    PubMed

    Sturgiss, E A; Sargent, G M; Haesler, E; Rieger, E; Douglas, K

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic alliance is a well-recognized predictor of patient outcomes within psychological therapy. It has not been applied to obesity interventions, and Bordin's theoretical framework shows particular relevance to the management of obesity in primary health care. This cross-sectional study of a weight management programme in general practice aimed to determine if therapeutic alliance was associated with patient outcomes. The Working Alliance Inventory short revised version (WAI-SR) was administered to 23 patients and 11 general practitioners (GPs) at the end of a 6-month weight management programme. Use of the WAI-SR indicated that the strength of therapeutic alliance varied between different patient-GP relationships in this pilot intervention. A robust therapeutic alliance was strongly associated with patient engagement in the weight management programme indicated by number of appointments. It was also associated with some general health and quality of life outcomes. These are promising results that require confirmation with larger studies in primary health care. The measurement of therapeutic alliance using the WAI-SR may predict patient attendance and outcomes in obesity interventions in primary healthcare settings.

  9. Improving equity in the provision of primary health care: lessons from decentralized planning and management in Namibia.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ruth; Ithindi, Taathi; Low, Anne

    2002-01-01

    This paper draws lessons from a review of primary health care services in Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, undertaken by a regional health management team. The review was carried out because of perceived increases in workload and inadequate staffing levels, arising from the rapid expansion of the city associated with inward migration. A survey of the utilization of government clinics was used to develop a more equitable allocation of primary health care services between localities. The survey revealed disparities between patterns of utilization of the services and the allocation of staff: the poorer localities were relatively underprovided. Decisions made centrally on resource allocation had reinforced the inequities. On the basis of the results of the review, the regional health management team redistributed nursing and medical staff and argued for a shift in the allocation of capital expenditure towards the poorer communities. The review demonstrates the potential for regional and provincial health management teams to make effective assessments of the needs of their populations and to promote the equitable delivery of primary health care services. In order to achieve this they need not only to become effective managers, but also to develop population-based planning skills and the confidence and authority to influence the allocation of resources between and within their regions and provinces. PMID:12219160

  10. An evaluation of the competencies of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    Munyewende, Pascalia O.; Levin, Jonathan; Rispel, Laetitia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Managerial competencies to enhance individual and organisational performance have gained currency in global efforts to strengthen health systems. Competent managers are essential in the implementation of primary health care (PHC) reforms that aim to achieve universal health coverage. Objective To evaluate the competencies of PHC clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Using stratified random sampling, 111 PHC clinic nursing managers were selected. All supervisors (n=104) and subordinate nurses (n=383) were invited to participate in the survey on the day of data collection. Following informed consent, the nursing managers, their supervisors, and subordinate nurses completed a 40-item, 360-degree competency assessment questionnaire, with six domains: communication, leadership and management, staff management, financial management, planning and priority setting, and problem-solving. Standard deviations, medians, and inter-quartile ranges (IQRs) were computed separately for PHC nursing managers, supervisors, and subordinate nurses for competencies in the six domains. The Tinsley and Weiss index was used to assess agreement between each of the three possible pairs of raters. Results A 95.4% response rate was obtained, with 105 nursing managers in Gauteng and Free State completing the questionnaires. There was a lack of agreement about nursing managers’ competencies among the three groups of raters. Overall, clinic nursing managers rated themselves high on the five domains of communication (8.6), leadership and management (8.67), staff management (8.75), planning and priority setting (8.6), and problem-solving (8.83). The exception was financial management with a median score of 7.94 (IQR 6.33–9.11). Compared to the PHC clinic managers, the supervisors and subordinate nurses gave PHC nursing managers lower ratings on all six competency domains, with the lowest

  11. Model for understanding consumer textural food choice.

    PubMed

    Jeltema, Melissa; Beckley, Jacqueline; Vahalik, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm for developing products that will match the marketing messaging is flawed because the drivers of product choice and satisfaction based on texture are misunderstood. Qualitative research across 10 years has led to the thesis explored in this research that individuals have a preferred way to manipulate food in their mouths (i.e., mouth behavior) and that this behavior is a major driver of food choice, satisfaction, and the desire to repurchase. Texture, which is currently thought to be a major driver of product choice, is a secondary factor, and is important only in that it supports the primary driver-mouth behavior. A model for mouth behavior is proposed and the qualitative research supporting the identification of different mouth behaviors is presented. The development of a trademarked typing tool for characterizing mouth behavior is described along with quantitative substantiation of the tool's ability to group individuals by mouth behavior. The use of these four groups to understand textural preferences and the implications for a variety of areas including product design and weight management are explored.

  12. Model for understanding consumer textural food choice

    PubMed Central

    Jeltema, Melissa; Beckley, Jacqueline; Vahalik, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The current paradigm for developing products that will match the marketing messaging is flawed because the drivers of product choice and satisfaction based on texture are misunderstood. Qualitative research across 10 years has led to the thesis explored in this research that individuals have a preferred way to manipulate food in their mouths (i.e., mouth behavior) and that this behavior is a major driver of food choice, satisfaction, and the desire to repurchase. Texture, which is currently thought to be a major driver of product choice, is a secondary factor, and is important only in that it supports the primary driver—mouth behavior. A model for mouth behavior is proposed and the qualitative research supporting the identification of different mouth behaviors is presented. The development of a trademarked typing tool for characterizing mouth behavior is described along with quantitative substantiation of the tool's ability to group individuals by mouth behavior. The use of these four groups to understand textural preferences and the implications for a variety of areas including product design and weight management are explored. PMID:25987995

  13. A Comparative Study of the Influence of Head Teachers Management Styles on Pupils Performance in KCPE in Public and Private Primary Schools in Nakuru Municipality, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibo, Margaret Nekesa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of management styles of head teacher's on pupils' performance in private and public primary schools in Nakuru municipality at Kenya Certificate of Primary Education level. The population comprised of teachers and head teachers in public primary schools. The study adopted the ex post facto…

  14. Part-time, e-learning interprofessional pain management education for the primary and community care setting

    PubMed Central

    Bean, W Geinor; Luke, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-term condition, which has a major impact on patients, carers and the health service. Despite the Chief Medical Officer setting chronic pain and its management as a national priority in 2008, the utilisation of health services by patients with long-term conditions is increasing, people with pain-related problems are not seen early enough and pain-related attendances to accident and emergency departments is increasing. Early assessment with appropriate evidence-based intervention and early recognition of when to refer to specialist and specialised services is key to addressing the growing numbers suffering with chronic pain. Pain education is recommended in many guidelines, as part of the process to address pain in these issues. Cardiff University validated an e-learning, master’s level pain management module for healthcare professionals working in primary and community care. The learning outcomes revolve around robust early assessment and management of chronic pain in primary and community care and the knowledge when to refer on. The module focuses on the biopsychosocial aspects of pain and its management, using a blog as an online case study assessment for learners to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and application to practice. The module has resulted in learners developing evidence-based recommendations, for pain management in clinical practice. PMID:26516530

  15. Valuing conservation benefits of disease control in wildlife: A choice experiment approach to bovine tuberculosis management in New Zealand's native forests.

    PubMed

    Tait, Peter; Saunders, Caroline; Nugent, Graham; Rutherford, Paul

    2017-03-15

    We assess the non-monetary environmental benefits that accrue incidentally in New Zealand (NZ) from pest management conducted primarily to control an animal disease, bovine tuberculosis (TB). TB is an infectious disease that is one of the world's most serious animal health problems and, in many parts of the developing world, still a major mortality risk for humans. The incidence of TB in New Zealand (NZ) farmed livestock has been reduced progressively over the last 20 years, largely due to extensive and sustained population control of the main wildlife reservoir of disease, the introduced brushtail possum. Possums are also major pests that threaten indigenous forest biodiversity, and so extensive possum control for TB mitigation also incidental benefits conservation, but the extent and public value of this benefit has yet to be quantified. We conducted a choice experiment survey of the NZ public in an effort to value the native forest biodiversity benefits of TB-related possum control. We find strong public support for conservation outcomes consequent to TB-possum control in public native forests. The public place substantial value on the most observable biodiversity benefits of TB possum control, such as improved forest canopies and presence of native birds. The benefits, costs and values of TB-possum control are discussed in relation to the future directives of NZ's TB control programme, which is headed toward first regional and then national level disease eradication.

  16. Microscopy, culture, and sensitive management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in adults in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Sivathasan, Niroshan; Rakowski, Krzysztof R

    2011-06-01

    The high prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) places a significant burden on healthcare systems. Clinicians may over-manage the issue, and there is great variability in practice, with economic- and resource- implications. Up to 40% of patients with a suspected UTI do not have an infection. Using PubMed (Medline) to shortlist relevant papers in English from the last 30 years, and further sub-selection to include only uncomplicated UTIs in adults in primary care, we reviewed the literature pertaining to uncomplicated UTIs, and how it should be managed efficiently in the primary care setting. In general practice, there is no advantage to routinely request microscopy and culture of urine samples in the presence of an appropriate history and urinalysis reagent-strip testing. If antibiotics are required, then a 3-day course shall suffice. Larger epidemiological studies focusing on more susceptible sub-populations may provide better guidance for discriminatory factors to produce an algorithm for treatment.

  17. Problems of management of medical solid waste at primary health care centres in the Palestinian Territory and their remedial measures.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, I A

    2014-01-09

    This study was conducted to investigate the management aspects of medical solid waste (MSW) at primary health care centres in Nablus and Salfit governorates in the West Bank, Palestine. We interviewed 190 health care staff from primary health care centres in this area. The most frequent type of waste produced was sharps waste: only 5.3% of respondents said this was never produced. Infectious waste was the second most frequent type produced. Only 40.4% of the respondents stated that hazardous MSW was always treated. Over 80% said that non-sharps MSW was separated into its different components, but almost 20% said that sharps were not placed in special containers. We recorded a mean of 34 g of hazardous solid waste and 55 g of non-hazardous solid waste generated per outpatient per day. Staff awareness and training, separation of MSW, establishment of simple treatment facilities are the major measures suggested for improvement of the waste management practices.

  18. Classroom Management: A Study on the Training Needs of Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Warfali, Faida Imhemid Salem; Yusoff, Nik Mohd Rahimi Nik

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the training needs of the in-service primary school teachers in the city of Benghazi, Libya. Data collection involved the administration of a set of questionnaire to 420 teachers and interviews with ten of them. The study found that the most important training needs of the primary school teachers in terms of classroom…

  19. The Primary School in Changing Times: The Australian Experience. Educational Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Tony, Ed.

    Following substantial changes throughout the Australian education system, primary schools are no longer in the protected position of having a regulated flow of clients, a predetermined curriculum, and marginal levels of staff development. This book reviews the impact of this change on Australian primary schools, the people who are involved with…

  20. Role of primary substrate composition and concentration on attenuation of trace organic chemicals in managed aquifer recharge systems.

    PubMed

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Li, Dong; Ouf, Mohamed; Drewes, Jörg E

    2014-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the role of primary substrate composition and concentration on the attenuation of biodegradable emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) in simulated managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems. Four sets of soil columns were established in the laboratory, each receiving synthetic feed solutions comprising different ratios and concentrations of peptone-yeast and humic acid as the primary substrate to investigate the effect on removal of six TOrCs (atenolol, caffeine, diclofenac, gemfibrozil, primidone, and trimethoprim). Based on abiotic control experiments, adsorption was not identified as a significant attenuation mechanism for primidone, gemfibrozil and diclofenac. Caffeine, atenolol and trimethoprim displayed initial adsorptive losses, however, adsorption coefficients derived from batch tests confirmed that adsorption was limited and in the long-term experiment, biodegradation was the dominant attenuation process. Within a travel time of 16 h, caffeine - an easily degradable compound exhibited removal exceeding 75% regardless of composition or concentration of the primary substrate. Primidone - a poorly degradable compound, showed no removal in any column regardless of the nature of the primary substrate. The composition and concentration of the primary substrate, however, had an effect on attenuation of moderately degradable TOrCs, such as atenolol, gemfibrozil and diclofenac, with the primary substrate composition seeming to have a larger impact on TOrC attenuation than its concentration. When the primary substrate consisted mainly of refractory substrate (humic acid), higher removal of the moderately degradable TOrCs was observed. The microbial communities in the columns receiving more refractory carbon, were noted to be more diverse and hence likely able to express a wider range of enzymes, which were more suitable for TOrC transformation. The effect of the primary substrate on microbial community composition, diversity

  1. European course on HPV associated pathology: guidelines for primary care physicians for the diagnosis and management of anogenital warts

    PubMed Central

    von Krogh, G; Lacey, C; Gross, G; Barrasso, R; Schneider, A

    2000-01-01

    The European Course on HPV Associated Pathology (ECHPV) was founded in 1990 by a group of clinicians, pathologists, and virologists to teach important principles for the practice and management of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease to gynaecologists, dermatologists, and other medical disciplines. These guidelines are intended to assist the practice of primary care physicians for diagnosis and treatment of anogenital warts. Key Words: anogenital warts; human papillomavirus; condylomata acuminata; guidelines PMID:10961190

  2. A Study of the Outcome of Primary Excision and Closure Technique in the Management of Lip Leukoderma in 30 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shilpa, Kanathur; Sacchidanand, S.; Savitha, Somaiah; Ranjitha, Ramamurthy; Lakshmi, DV; Divya, Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Context: Lips being one of the graceful cosmetic units of the face, any disfigurement, including depigmentation, can be embarrassing, psychologically distressing, and socially stigmatizing. Even with the evolution of various surgical modalities, none of the techniques ensure 100% pigmentation with a good cosmetic appearance. With this background, this study was undertaken to study the efficacy of the technique—primary excision and closure in treatment of lip leukoderma (LL). Aims: To study the efficacy, cosmetic outcome, and recurrence following primary excision and closure technique in the management of LL. Settings and Design: A prospective single-center open-label uncontrolled study. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with LL involving inner margin of the lower lip and those who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. After obtaining consent and physician fitness, patients were posted for primary excision and closure of the vitiliginous area of the lip. Patients were followed up at the immediate postoperative period and 6 months later. Patient satisfaction scale was done by asking the patient to grade the response between one and ten. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and percentiles. Results: Out of 30 patients, 29 patients achieved complete clearance that was cosmetically acceptable. Only one patient showed recurrence at the end of 6 months. Average patient satisfaction scale showed an average of 9.66. Conclusions: Primary excision and closure technique is one of the safe, inexpensive modality in the management of LL involving the inner margin of the lip with immediate result. PMID:27081245

  3. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care: integrating disease management competencies into primary care to improve composite diabetes quality measures.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Joe; DaSilva, Karen; Marshall, Richard

    2008-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses in the United States requires a fundamental redesign of the primary care delivery system's structure and processes in order to meet the changing needs and expectations of patients. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care are 3 potential processes that can be integrated into primary care and are compatible with the Chronic Care Model. In 2003, Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty ambulatory physician group practice based in Boston, Massachusetts, began implementing all 3 processes across its primary care practices. From 2004 to 2006, the overall diabetes composite quality measures improved from 51% to 58% for screening (HgA1c x 2, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure in 12 months) and from 13% to 17% for intermediate outcomes (HgA1c management functions into the front lines of primary care and the positive impact of those changes on overall diabetes quality of care.

  4. School Choice. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robledo Montecel, Maria, Ed.; Supik, Josie Danini, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains five articles on the implications of school choice for minority and disadvantaged students. "School Choice: Choices for Whom? Promises and Panaceas," by Maria Robledo Montecel, discusses some major problems related to school choice and vouchers, particularly who would have the choice (families or schools), who…

  5. Splenic trauma. Choice of management.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, C E

    1991-01-01

    The modern era for splenic surgery for injury began in 1892 when Riegner reported a splenectomy in a 14-year-old construction worker who fell from a height and presented with abdominal pain, distension, tachycardia, and oliguria. This report set the stage for routine splenectomy, which was performed for all splenic injury in the next two generations. Despite early reports by Pearce and by Morris and Bullock that splenectomy in animals caused impaired defenses against infection, little challenge to routine splenectomy was made until King and Schumacker in 1952 reported a syndrome of "overwhelming postsplenectomy infection" (OPSI). Many studies have since demonstrated the importance of the spleen in preventing infections, particularly from the encapsulated organisms. Overwhelming postsplenectomy infection occurs in about 0.6% of children and 0.3% of adults. Intraoperative splenic salvage has become more popular and can be achieved safely in most patients by delivering the spleen with the pancreas to the incision, carefully repairing the spleen under direct vision, and using the many adjuncts to suture repair, including hemostatic agents and splenic wrapping. Intraoperative splenic salvage is not indicated in patients actively bleeding from other organs or in the presence of alcoholic cirrhosis. The role of splenic replantation in those patients requiring operative splenectomy needs further study but may provide significant long-term splenic function. Although nonoperative splenic salvage was first suggested more than 100 years ago by Billroth, this modality did not become popular in children until the 1960s or in adults until the latter 1980s. Patients with intrasplenic hematomas or with splenic fractures that do not extend to the hilum as judged by computed tomography usually can be observed successfully without operative intervention and without blood transfusion. Nonoperative splenic salvage is less likely with fractures that involve the splenic hilum and with the severely shattered spleen; these patients usually are treated best by early operative intervention. Following splenectomy for injury, polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine decreases the likelihood of OPSI and should be used routinely. The role of prophylactic penicillin is uncertain but the use of antibiotics for minor infectious problems is indicated after splenectomy. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. PMID:1992948

  6. Evolution, current structure, and role of a primary care clinical pharmacy service in an integrated managed care organization.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Rachel M F; Campbell, Stephanie M; Kroner, Beverly A; Proksel, Jenel R; Billups, Sarah J; Witt, Daniel M; Helling, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the declining number of primary care physicians is exacerbated by a growing elderly population in need of chronic disease management. Primary care clinical pharmacy specialists, with their unique knowledge and skill set, are well suited to address this gap. At Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO), primary care clinical pharmacy specialists have a long history of integration with medical practices and are located in close proximity to physicians, nurses, and other members of the health care team. Since 1992, Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Services (PCCPS) has expanded from 4 to 30 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to provide services in all KPCO medical office buildings. With this growth in size, PCCPS has evolved to play a vital role in working with primary care medical teams to ensure that drug therapy is effective, safe, and affordable. In addition, PCCPS specialists provide ambulatory teaching sites for pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. There is approximately 1 specialist FTE for every 13,000 adult KPCO members and every 9 clinical FTEs of internal medicine and family medicine physicians. All clinical pharmacy specialists in the pharmacy department are required to have a PharmD degree, to complete postgraduate year 2 residencies, and, as a condition of employment, to become board certified in an applicable specialty. The evolution, current structure, and role of PCCPS at KPCO, including factors facilitating successful integration within the medical team, are highlighted. Patient and nonpatient care responsibilities are described.

  7. One Year On: First-Year Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Preparedness to Manage Misbehaviour and Their Confidence in the Strategies They Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Sue; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a one-year follow-up study of Australian beginning primary teachers' perceived preparedness to manage a variety of problematic student behaviours, and their confidence and use of behaviour management strategies based on their preservice coursework in classroom behaviour management. A total of 216 primary…

  8. How do primary health care teams learn to integrate intimate partner violence (IPV) management? A realist evaluation protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the existence of ample literature dealing, on the one hand, with the integration of innovations within health systems and team learning, and, on the other hand, with different aspects of the detection and management of intimate partner violence (IPV) within healthcare facilities, research that explores how health innovations that go beyond biomedical issues—such as IPV management—get integrated into health systems, and that focuses on healthcare teams’ learning processes is, to the best of our knowledge, very scarce if not absent. This realist evaluation protocol aims to ascertain: why, how, and under what circumstances primary healthcare teams engage (if at all) in a learning process to integrate IPV management in their practices; and why, how, and under what circumstances team learning processes lead to the development of organizational culture and values regarding IPV management, and the delivery of IPV management services. Methods This study will be conducted in Spain using a multiple-case study design. Data will be collected from selected cases (primary healthcare teams) through different methods: individual and group interviews, routinely collected statistical data, documentary review, and observation. Cases will be purposively selected in order to enable testing the initial middle-range theory (MRT). After in-depth exploration of a limited number of cases, additional cases will be chosen for their ability to contribute to refining the emerging MRT to explain how primary healthcare learn to integrate intimate partner violence management. Discussion Evaluations of health sector responses to IPV are scarce, and even fewer focus on why, how, and when the healthcare services integrate IPV management. There is a consensus that healthcare professionals and healthcare teams play a key role in this integration, and that training is important in order to realize changes. However, little is known about team learning of IPV management, both in

  9. Psychosocial factors associated with successful transition into HIV case management for those without primary care in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek; Polansky, Marcia; Matosky, Marlene; Teti, Michelle

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the psychosocial factors which influence transitioning HIV positive clients without primary medical care to a case management agency within 6 weeks by a city brokerage agency. People living with HIV who reported being in a social support group and those who requested assistance with meeting their basic needs were significantly more likely to attend their first case management appointment within 6 weeks (adjusted OR 1.91 95% CI 1.22-2.97 and OR 1.24 95% CI 1.01-1.54, respectively). Individuals requesting medical care or substance abuse treatment were less likely to accomplish transitioning (adjusted OR 0.75 95% CI 0.59-0.95 and adjusted OR 0.70 95% CI 0.53-0.91, respectively). The implications of this study for improving the effectiveness of brokering case management for those with HIV are discussed.

  10. Perceived involvement in condition management among inner-city youth with asthma and their primary caregivers.

    PubMed

    Greenley, Rachel Neff; Josie, Katherine Leigh; Drotar, Dennis

    2006-11-01

    This study examined patterns of agreement versus disagreement in family perceptions of caregiver and youth involvement in asthma management tasks and associations of these patterns with youth asthma outcomes. Fifty-six caregiver-child dyads completed questionnaires of family involvement in asthma management and asthma health outcomes (i.e., symptom days, health care utilization, and medication adherence). Discrepancies were documented for perceptions of both caregiver and youth involvement. Caregiver overestimation of youth involvement in asthma management was associated with greater asthma severity and more asthma symptoms. Discrepancies in family perceptions of involvement pose salient challenges for effective clinical management and require clinical attention.

  11. [Place of the pathologist in the management of primary bone tumors (osteosarcoma and Ewing's family tumors after neoadjuvant treatment)].

    PubMed

    Gomez-Brouchet, Anne; Bouvier, Corinne; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Larousserie, Frédérique; Aubert, Sébastien; Leroy, Xavier; Guinebretière, Jean-Marc; Coulomb, Aurore; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; de Muret, Anne; Audard, Virginie; Marie, Béatrice; de Pinieux, Gonzague

    2011-12-01

    The survival of osteosarcoma and Ewing family tumours has been improved by the introduction of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The response to preoperative chemotherapy is evaluated on the microscopic analysis of the surgical resection, by the percentage of tumour necrosis according to the Huvos and Rosen's grading. It remains the only reliable prognostic factor for patients and is used to guide the choice of post-operative chemotherapy. The macroscopic and microscopic management of the surgical resection (cf. supra) is essential and is the subject of a specific protocol. Several studies have been conducted to identify news factors able to predict the response to chemotherapy, the tumour aggressiveness and its ability to develop metastases. Inhibitors of mTOR and/or regulators of the balance RANKL/OPG are promising therapeutics. The study's expression of these new factors could be performed on the biopsy and will offer new therapeutic strategy.

  12. Whole School Behaviour Management and Perceptions of Behaviour Problems in Australian Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Nobile, John; London, Teola; El Baba, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, whole school behaviour management systems have been implemented in many Australian schools in efforts to reduce undesirable behaviours and improve outcomes for students with behaviour problems. There is evidence in the literature suggesting that whole school approaches are more effective at managing student…

  13. Differential Effectiveness of Depression Disease Management for Rural and Urban Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Scott J.; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran; Fortney, John; Rost, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Context: Federally qualified health centers across the country are adopting depression disease management programs following federally mandated training; however, little is known about the relative effectiveness of depression disease management in rural versus urban patient populations. Purpose: To explore whether a depression disease management…

  14. The Effects of a Classroom Management Teacher Training Primary Prevention Program on Fifth-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    Effective Classroom Management II-Elementary (ECM), an in-service teacher training course, was evaluated. Grade 5 teachers were taught techniques in communication, classroom management, and self-esteem enhancement. The goals were to make classroom environments more responsive to students' affective and cognitive needs, thereby fostering positive…

  15. The Integration of Pedagogical Aspects in Environmental Management Systems in Selected South African Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanyimba, Alex; Richter, Barry; Raath, Schalk

    2015-01-01

    Environmental management systems implemented in schools are regarded by many as a mechanism for the integration of environmental matters in all the operational functions of the school. The links, however, between environmental management and curriculum practice have not been adequately addressed in the literature. This article reports on the…

  16. Barriers and enablers in primary care clinicians' management of osteoarthritis: protocol for a systematic review and qualitative evidence synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buchbinder, R; Bennell, K; Slade, S C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent and disabling condition. Primary care management of osteoarthritis is generally suboptimal despite evidence for several modestly effective interventions and the availability of high-quality clinical practice guidelines. This report describes a planned study to synthesise the views of primary care clinicians on the barriers and enablers to following recommended management of osteoarthritis, with the aim of providing new interpretations that may facilitate the uptake of recommended treatments, and in turn improve patient care. Methods and analysis A systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. 5 databases will be searched using key search terms for qualitative research, evidence-based practice, clinical practice guidelines, osteoarthritis, beliefs, perceptions, barriers, enablers and adherence. A priori inclusion/exclusion criteria include availability of data from primary care clinicians, reports on views regarding management of osteoarthritis, and studies using qualitative methods for both data collection and analysis. At least 2 independent reviewers will identify eligible reports, conduct a critical appraisal of study conduct, extract data and synthesise reported findings and interpretations. Synthesis will follow thematic analysis within a grounded theory framework of inductive coding and iterative theme identification. The reviewers plus co-authors will contribute to the meta-synthesis to find new themes and theories. The Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research (CERQual) approach will be used to determine a confidence profile of each finding from the meta-synthesis. The protocol has been registered on PROSPERO and is reported using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The results

  17. Management of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Central and Eastern Europe: Self-Reported Practice of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    PALKA, Małgorzata; KRZTOŃ-KRÓLEWIECKA, Anna; TOMASIK, Tomasz; SEIFERT, Bohumil; WÓJTOWICZ, Ewa; WINDAK, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal disorders account for 7–10% of all consultations in primary care. General practitioners’ management of digestive disorders in Central and Eastern European countries is largely unknown. Aims To identify and compare variations in the self-perceived responsibilities of general practitioners in the management of digestive disorders in Central and Eastern Europe. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a randomized sample of primary care physicians from 9 countries was conducted. An anonymous questionnaire was sent via post to primary care doctors. Results We received 867 responses; the response rate was 28.9%. Over 70% of respondents reported familiarity with available guidelines for gastrointestinal diseases. For uninvestigated dyspepsia in patients under 45 years, the “test and treat” strategy was twice as popular as “test and scope”. The majority (59.8%) of family physicians would refer patients with rectal bleeding without alarm symptoms to a specialist (from 7.6% of doctors in Slovenia to 85.1% of doctors in Bulgaria; p<0.001). 93.4% of respondents declared their involvement in colorectal cancer screening. In the majority of countries, responding doctors most often reported that they order fecal occult blood tests. The exceptions were Estonia and Hungary, where the majority of family physicians referred patients to a specialist (p<0.001). Conclusions Physicians from Central and Eastern European countries understood the need for the use of guidelines for the care of patients with gastrointestinal problems, but there is broad variation between countries in their management. Numerous efforts should be undertaken to establish and implement international standards for digestive disorders’ management in general practice. PMID:27669515

  18. Using diaries to explore the work experiences of primary health care nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    Munyewende, Pascalia O.; Rispel, Laetitia C.

    2014-01-01

    Background South Africa is on the brink of another wave of major health system reforms that underscore the centrality of primary health care (PHC). Nursing managers will play a critical role in these reforms. Objective The aim of the study was to explore the work experiences of PHC clinic nursing managers through the use of reflective diaries, a method hitherto under-utilised in health systems research in low- and middle-income countries. Design During 2012, a sub-set of 22 PHC nursing managers was selected randomly from a larger nurses’ survey in two South African provinces. After informed consent, participants were requested to keep individual diaries for a period of 6 weeks, using a clear set of diary entry guidelines. Reminders consisted of weekly short message service reminders and telephone calls. Diary entries were analysed using thematic content analysis. A diary feedback meeting was held with all the participants to validate the findings. Results Fifteen diaries were received, representing a 68% response rate. The majority of respondents (14/15) were female, each with between 5 and 15 years of nursing experience. Most participants made their diary entries at home. Diaries proved to be cathartic for individual nursing managers. Although inter-related and not mutually exclusive, the main themes that emerged from the diary analysis were health system deficiencies; human resource challenges; unsupportive management environment; leadership and governance; and the emotional impact of clinic management. Conclusions Diaries are an innovative method of capturing the work experiences of managers at the PHC level, as they allow for confidentiality and anonymity, often not possible with other qualitative research methods. The expressed concerns of nursing managers must be addressed to ensure the success of South Africa's health sector reforms, particularly at the PHC level. PMID:25537937

  19. Addressing the challenges of improving primary care quality in Uzbekistan: a qualitative study of chronic heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Ahmedov, Mohir; Green, Judith; Azimov, Ravshan; Avezova, Guloyim; Inakov, Sherzod; Mamatkulov, Bahrom

    2013-08-01

    Uzbekistan has a well-developed primary care system, with universal access to care, but faces challenges in improving the quality of clinical care provided. This study aimed to identify barriers to quality improvement by focusing on one common condition, Chronic Heart Failure (CHF), for which there are evidence-based international guidelines for management. To identify the challenges to improving the quality of care for CHF in line with such guidelines we took a qualitative approach, interviewing 15 physicians and 30 patients in detail about their experiences of CHF management. Despite recent improvements to the training of primary care physicians, their access to up-to-date information was limited, and they were disproportionately reliant on information from pharmaceutical companies. The main barriers to implementing international standards of care were: reluctance of physicians (and patients) to abandon ineffective interventions; enduring, system-wide incentives for clinically unnecessary hospitalization; and the lack of structural support for evidence-based health services improvement. Patients were in general positive about adherence to medications, but faced some problems in affording drugs and hospital care. Future interventions to strengthen primary care should be implemented with evaluations of their impact on the processes and outcomes of care for chronic conditions.

  20. ‘Tempos’ management in primary care: a key factor for classifying adverse events, and improving quality and safety

    PubMed Central

    Brami, J

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of time management in safe and efficient medicine is important but poorly incorporated into the taxonomies of error in primary care. This paper addresses the lack of time management, presenting a framework integrating five time scales termed ‘Tempos’ requiring parallel processing by GPs: the disease's tempo (unexpected rapid evolutions, slow reaction to treatment); the office's tempo (day-to-day agenda and interruptions); the patient's tempo (time to express symptoms, compliance, emotion); the system's tempo (time for appointments, exams, and feedback); and the time to access to knowledge. The art of medicine is to control all of these tempos in parallel and simultaneously. Method Two qualified physicians reviewed a sample of 1046 malpractice claims from one liability insurer to determine whether a medical injury had occurred and, if so, whether it was due to one or more tempo-related problems. 623 of these reports were analysed in greater detail to identify the prevalence and characteristics of claims and related time management errors. Results The percentages of contributing factors were as follows: disease tempo, 37.9%; office tempo, 13.2%; patient tempo, 13.8%; out-of-office coordination tempo, 22.6%; and GP's access to knowledge tempo, 33.2%. Conclusion Although not conceptualised in most error taxonomies, the disease and patient tempos are cornerstones in risk management in primary care. Traditional taxonomies describe events from an analytical perspective of care at the system level and offer opportunities to improve organisation, process, and evidence-based medicine. The suggested classification describes events in terms of (unsafe) dynamic control of parallel constraints from the carer's perspective, namely the GP, and offers improvement on how to self manage and coordinate different contradictory tempos and day-to-day activities. Further work is needed to test the validity and usefulness of this approach. PMID:22927486

  1. Primary care practitioner and patient understanding of the concepts of multimorbidity and self-management: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Cassandra; Fisher, Louise; Bee, Penny; Bower, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to offer insight into how professionals and patients understand and experience multimorbidity and how these accounts differ, and how they affect attitudes and engagement with self-management. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 primary healthcare practitioners and 20 patients with at least 2 long-term conditions (including coronary heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and depression). Thematic analysis was used, and themes were identified using an open-coding method. Results: Practitioners associated multimorbidity with complexity and uncertainty in the clinic, leading to emotional strain and ‘heart sink’. Patient accounts differed. Some described multimorbidity as problematic when it exacerbated their symptoms and caused emotional and psychological strain. Others did not perceive multimorbidity as problematic. Self-management was seen by practitioners and patients to be a key element of managing multiple conditions, but drivers for prompting and engaging in self-management differed between patients and practitioners. Conclusion: This study suggests that recommendations for clinical practice for multimorbid patients should take into account the gap in perceptions between practitioner and patients about experiences of multimorbidity. Not least, practice would need to reflect the tension between practitioners’ and patients’ accounts about the role and benefits of self-management in the presence of multimorbidity. PMID:26770690

  2. A new approach: oblique excision and primary closure in the management of acute pilonidal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Fatih; Abdurrahman, Ibrahim; Tosun, Mirhan; Bas, Gurhan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare incision and drainage with oblique excision and primary closure in the treatment of pilonidal abscesses. Materials and methods: In this prospective study, one of two surgeons at the same hospital performed incision and drainage as the treatment method for patients presenting with pilonidal abscesses. (Group A). The other surgeon performed oblique excision and primary closure (Group B). The rate of development of chronic pilonidal sinus and time to return to active work were assessed using the chi-square and Student’s t-tests to compare the two methods of treatment. Of the 128 patients, incision and simple drainage was applied to 69 patients and primary closure was applied to 59 patients. Results: The rate of development of chronic pilonidal sinus was 78.8% in Group A and 6.0% in Group B (P < 0.001). In Group A, the average healing time and time to return to active work were 18 and 25 days, respectively. In Group B, these times were 22 and 27 days, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Oblique excision and primary closure may be a preferable treatment for acute pilonidal abscesses because of its low rate of chronic sinus development. PMID:25664095

  3. The Talent Managing Work of the Balaton-Felvideki Szin-Vonal Primary Art School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranyai, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, art education has been recognized as a suitable tool for enhancing emotional intelligence and nurturing a child's creative development. However, it seems that the education of art has lost the race against other primary school subjects, with only a minimal number of lessons being taught. The establishment of the afternoon art…

  4. Inter-Professional Primary Care Practices Addressing Diabetes Prevention and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagrie, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a partnership of university and community which addresses the needs of the community to keep its citizens healthy as long as possible. Through a planning exercise to address the community's needs in primary health care and health promotion, the university has developed key strategic directions to help support the needs of the community it…

  5. Maintenance Matters: Maintenance and Minor Works in Primary Schools. A Manual for Boards of Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, Dublin (Ireland).

    This manual provides guidance in the maintenance requirements of primary education schools in Ireland, covering: roofing; floors and walls; doors and windows; external and internal finishes; heating, plumbing, and drainage; electrical installations; paved and grassed surfaces; and furniture and loose equipment. The basic considerations are covered…

  6. Occult primary, version 3.2014.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, David S; Handorf, Charles R; Agulnik, Mark; Bowles, Daniel W; Cates, Justin M; Cristea, Mihaela; Dotan, Efrat; Eaton, Keith D; Fidias, Panagiotis M; Gierada, David; Gilcrease, G Weldon; Godby, Kelly; Iyer, Renuka; Lenzi, Renato; Phay, John; Rashid, Asif; Saltz, Leonard; Schwab, Richard B; Shulman, Lawrence N; Smerage, Jeffrey B; Stevenson, Marvaretta M; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Zager, Jonathan S; Zhen, Weining Ken; Bergman, Mary Anne; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

    2014-07-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Occult Primary tumors provide recommendations for the evaluation, workup, management, and follow-up of patients with occult primary tumors (cancers of unknown primary). These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2014 NCCN Occult Primary panel meeting. The panel discussed gene expression profiling (GEP) for the identification of the tissue of origin and concluded that, although GEP has a diagnostic benefit, a clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. The panel recommends against GEP as standard management, although 20% of the panel believes the diagnostic benefit of GEP warrants its routine use. In addition, the panel discussed testing for actionable mutations (eg, ALK) to help guide choice of therapy, but declined to add this recommendation.

  7. 5As Team obesity intervention in primary care: development and evaluation of shared decision-making weight management tools.

    PubMed

    Osunlana, A M; Asselin, J; Anderson, R; Ogunleye, A A; Cave, A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D L

    2015-08-01

    Despite several clinical practice guidelines, there remains a considerable gap in prevention and management of obesity in primary care. To address the need for changing provider behaviour, a randomized controlled trial with convergent mixed method evaluation, the 5As Team (5AsT) study, was conducted. As part of the 5AsT intervention, the 5AsT tool kit was developed. This paper describes the development process and evaluation of these tools. Tools were co-developed by the multidisciplinary research team and the 5AsT, which included registered nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 15), mental health workers (n = 7) and registered dieticians (n = 7), who were previously randomized to the 5AsT intervention group at a primary care network in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The 5AsT tool development occurred through a practice/implementation-oriented, need-based, iterative process during learning collaborative sessions of the 5AsT intervention. Feedback during tool development was received through field notes and final provider evaluation was carried out through anonymous questionnaires. Twelve tools were co-developed with 5AsT. All tools were evaluated as either 'most useful' or 'moderately useful' in primary care practice by the 5AsT. Four key findings during 5AsT tool development were the need for: tools that were adaptive, tools to facilitate interdisciplinary practice, tools to help patients understand realistic expectations for weight loss and shared decision-making tools for goal setting and relapse prevention. The 5AsT tools are primary care tools which extend the utility of the 5As of obesity management framework in clinical practice.

  8. Awareness, knowledge and practice of dyslipidaemia management among postgraduate primary care trainees in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Said, Abdul Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Dyslipidaemia is one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in Malaysia. This study assessed the awareness, knowledge and practice of lipid management among primary care physicians undergoing postgraduate training in Malaysia. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Postgraduate primary care trainees in Malaysia. Participants 759 postgraduate primary care trainees were approached through email or hard copy, of whom 466 responded. Method A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess their awareness, knowledge and practice of dyslipidaemia management. The total cumulative score derived from the knowledge section was categorised into good or poor knowledge based on the median score, where a score of less than the median score was categorised as poor and a score equal to or more than the median score was categorised as good. We further examined the association between knowledge score and sociodemographic data. Associations were considered significant when p<0.05. Results The response rate achieved was 61.4%. The majority (98.1%) were aware of the national lipid guideline, and 95.6% reported that they used the lipid guideline in their practice. The median knowledge score was 7 out of 10; 70.2% of respondents scored 7 or more which was considered as good knowledge. Despite the majority (95.6%) reporting use of guidelines, there was wide variation in their clinical practice whereby some did not practise based on the guidelines. There was a positive significant association between awareness and the use of the guideline with knowledge score (p<0.001). However there was no significant association between knowledge score and sociodemographic data (p>0.05). Conclusions The level of awareness and use of the lipid guideline among postgraduate primary care trainees was good. However, there were still gaps in their knowledge and practice which are not in accordance with standard guidelines. PMID:28249849

  9. Risk management in primary apicultural production. Part 1: bee health and disease prevention and associated best practices.

    PubMed

    Formato, Giovanni; Smulders, Frans J M

    2011-03-01

    Prompted by FAO/WHO's and the European Commission's recognition that documents on Good Farming Practices (GFPs) and Good Veterinary Practices (GVPs) in apicultural production are hardly available, part 1 of this contribution provides an update of current apicultural production and associated best practices to ensure animal and public health. Major bee health and disease prevention issues and risk management options at the primary production level are summarised with particular reference to the role of the veterinary practitioner/consultant and the official veterinarian in a control function in the safe production of honey.

  10. Development of a questionnaire to evaluate practitioners’ confidence and knowledge in primary care in managing chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the UK, chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD) is largely managed in primary care. We developed a tool to assess practitioner confidence and knowledge in managing CKD compared to other chronic diseases. This questionnaire was part of a cluster randomised quality improvement interventions in chronic kidney disease (QICKD; ISRCTN56023731). Methods The questionnaire was developed by family physicians, primary care nurses, academics and renal specialists. We conducted three focus groups (n = 7, 6, and 8) to refine the questionnaire using groups of general practitioners, practice nurses and trainees in general practice. We used paper based versions to develop the questionnaire and online surveys to test it. Practitioners in a group of volunteer, trial practices received the questionnaire twice. We measured its reliability using Cohen’s Kappa (K). Results The practitioners in the focus groups reached a consensus as to the key elements to include in the instrument. We achieved a 73.1% (n = 57/78) initial response rate for our questionnaire; of these 57, 54 completed the questionnaire a second time. Family physicians made up the largest single group of respondents (47.4%, n = 27). Initial response showed more female (64.9%, n = 37) than male (35.1%, n = 20) respondents. The reliability results from retesting showed that there was moderate agreement (k > 0.4) on all questions; with many showing substantial agreement (k > 0.6). There was substantial agreement in the questions about loop diuretics (k = 0.608, CI 0.432-0.784, p < 0.001), confidence in managing hypertension (k = 0.628, 95%CI 0.452-0.804, p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure treatment thresholds in CKD (k = 0.608, 95%CI 0.436-0.780, p < 0.001) and the rate of decline of eGFR that would prompt referral (k = 0.764, 95%CI 0.603-0.925, p < 0.001). Conclusion The QICKD-CCQ is a reliable instrument for measuring confidence and

  11. Agenesis of Multiple Primary and Permanent Teeth Unilaterally and its Possible Management

    PubMed Central

    Ephraim, Rena; Rajamani, T; Feroz, TP Mohammed; Abraham, Sajith

    2015-01-01

    Oligodontia is the agenesis of numerous teeth (more than six teeth). Agenesis of teeth in primary and permanent dentition is a rare incidence and very few are reported in the dental literature. Although the etiology of congenital agenesis of teeth is unclear, several factors such as a tendency toward genetic predilection, metabolic disorders, trauma, infection, radiation or idiopathic reasons are found to be responsible. Available literature reports agenesis most often of third molars, maxillary lateral incisors, mandibular central and lateral incisors, and mandibular second premolars in decreasing order of frequency of occurrence. Males are more often affected than females. Maxillary primary teeth are more often found affected by agenesis than mandibular primary teeth. Available literature reports missing teeth to be found unilaterally or orbilaterally with a predisposition toward a similar phenomenon occurring in the permanent dentition. In congenital agenesis impaired growth of the alveolar process, reduced lower facial height, speech impairment, deep bite, restriction in the movement of the tongue due to ankyloglossia, asymmetry of the affected side of the face are clinical features evident. There has been no report of complete agenesis of primary and permanent teeth in a whole mandibular quadrant in conjunction with the absence of maxillary second and third molars on the affected side. Here, we report an incidence of a rare occurrence of complete agenesis of more than 10 primary and permanent teeth, unilaterally, in the right mandibular quadrant, in a child of 10 years presenting with a chief complaint of several missing primary teeth and difficulty in speech due to its complete absence. Treatment strategies included various orthodontic and restorative procedures to improve esthetics and function. The orthodontic procedures involved expansion of the narrow maxillary arch to obtain a functionally adapted occlusion and creation of space for future alignment, and

  12. Agenesis of multiple primary and permanent teeth unilaterally and its possible management.

    PubMed

    Ephraim, Rena; Rajamani, T; Feroz, Tp Mohammed; Abraham, Sajith

    2015-05-01

    Oligodontia is the agenesis of numerous teeth (more than six teeth). Agenesis of teeth in primary and permanent dentition is a rare incidence and very few are reported in the dental literature. Although the etiology of congenital agenesis of teeth is unclear, several factors such as a tendency toward genetic predilection, metabolic disorders, trauma, infection, radiation or idiopathic reasons are found to be responsible. Available literature reports agenesis most often of third molars, maxillary lateral incisors, mandibular central and lateral incisors, and mandibular second premolars in decreasing order of frequency of occurrence. Males are more often affected than females. Maxillary primary teeth are more often found affected by agenesis than mandibular primary teeth. Available literature reports missing teeth to be found unilaterally or orbilaterally with a predisposition toward a similar phenomenon occurring in the permanent dentition. In congenital agenesis impaired growth of the alveolar process, reduced lower facial height, speech impairment, deep bite, restriction in the movement of the tongue due to ankyloglossia, asymmetry of the affected side of the face are clinical features evident. There has been no report of complete agenesis of primary and permanent teeth in a whole mandibular quadrant in conjunction with the absence of maxillary second and third molars on the affected side. Here, we report an incidence of a rare occurrence of complete agenesis of more than 10 primary and permanent teeth, unilaterally, in the right mandibular quadrant, in a child of 10 years presenting with a chief complaint of several missing primary teeth and difficulty in speech due to its complete absence. Treatment strategies included various orthodontic and restorative procedures to improve esthetics and function. The orthodontic procedures involved expansion of the narrow maxillary arch to obtain a functionally adapted occlusion and creation of space for future alignment, and

  13. Progressive Return to Activity Following Acute Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Guidance for the Primary Care Manager in Deployed and Non-deployed Settings (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Progressive Return to Activity Following Acute Concussion /Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Guidance for the Primary Care Manager in Deployed and Non...Following Acute Concussion /Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Guidance for the Primary Care Manager in Deployed and Non-deployed Settings (BRIEFING SLIDES) 5a...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Describe the role of this clinical recommendation and overall goal for recovery following concussion /mTBI Understand the

  14. SELF-MANAGEMENT COUNSELING IN PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE: PRIMARY RESULTS FROM THE HEART FAILURE ADHERENCE AND RETENTION TRIAL (HART)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Lynda H.; Calvin, James E.; Richardson, Dejuran; Janssen, Imke; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Flynn, Kristin J.; Grady, Kathleen L.; Rucker-Whitaker, Cheryl S.; Eaton, Claudia; Avery, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context Activating patients with heart failure (HF) to adhere to physician advice has not translated into clinical benefit, but past trials have had methodologic limitations. Objective To determine the value of self-management counseling plus HF education, over HF education alone, on the primary endpoint of death or HF hospitalization. Design, Setting, and Patients A single center behavioral efficacy trial in 902 patients with mild to moderate systolic or diastolic dysfunction, randomized between 2001–2004. Interventions All patients were offered 18 contacts and 18 HF educational tip sheets over the course of 1 year. Patients randomized to education received tip sheets in the mail and phone calls to check comprehension. Patients randomized to self-management received tip sheets in groups and were taught self-management skills to implement the advice. Main Outcome Measure Death or HF hospitalization, blindly adjudicated by cardiologists. Intent-to-treat results were analyzed as time-to-event and accelerated failure time models were used for non-proportional hazards. Results Patients were an average of 63.6 years, 47% female, 40% minority, 52% with family income <$30,000/year, and 23% with diastolic dysfunction. The self-management arm was no different from the education arm on the primary endpoint (Wilcoxon p=0.58). Post-hoc analyses on pre-specified subgroups revealed a significant income x treatment interaction (log-logistic estimate=0.64, p=0.02). Patients with income <$30,000 in self-management had a slower time to event than those in education (p=0.05) and were no different than higher income patients in either treatment arm. Conclusions The addition of self-management counseling to HF education does not reduce death or HF hospitalizations in patients with mild to moderate HF. Future trials should evaluate tailored outpatient HF management featuring ongoing education and comprehension checks for all, augmented by group-based skill development for those more

  15. The role of radionuclide imaging in the surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hindié, Elif; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Tabarin, Antoine; Rubello, Domenico; Morelec, Isabelle; Wagner, Tristan; Henry, Jean-François; Taïeb, David

    2015-05-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a frequent and potentially debilitating endocrine disorder for which surgery is the only curative treatment. The modalities of parathyroid surgery have changed over the last 2 decades, as conventional bilateral neck exploration is no longer the only surgical approach. Parathyroid scintigraphy plays a major role in defining the surgical strategy, given its ability to orient a targeted (focused) parathyroidectomy and to recognize ectopic locations or multiglandular disease. This review, which represents a collaborative effort between nuclear physicians, endocrinologists, and endocrine surgeons, emphasizes the importance of performing imaging before any surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism, even in the case of conventional bilateral neck exploration. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of targeted parathyroidectomy and the performance of various scintigraphic protocols to guide limited surgery. We also discuss the optimal strategy to localize the offending gland before reoperation for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism. Finally, we describe the potential applications of novel PET tracers, with special emphasis on (18)F-fluorocholine.

  16. The intrinsic features of Environmental Management Systems that facilitate adoption and encourage innovation in primary industries.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Genevieve; Vanclay, Frank

    2012-11-15

    This paper examines the theoretical underpinnings of the adoption of innovations, and applies this knowledge to the uptake of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) amongst Australian farmers. We examine the specific features of the EMS process that might encourage or inhibit EMS adoption. We also consider elements of the EMS process to assess their utility in promoting adoption of various other innovations. We evaluate the EMS process in the light of two characteristics previously found to influence adoption of improved natural resource management practices - 'relative advantage' and 'trialability'. Drawing on literature, and our research and experience with farmers, we conclude that there are inherent features of EMS that promote the adoption of new practices, and that the elements of the EMS process actually create an on-going process of culture change as it is implemented. We believe that the EMS process offers significant advantages to farmers seeking to improve production whilst simultaneously meeting societal expectations for enhanced natural resource management.

  17. A Primary Care Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) Be able to recognize characteristic symptoms of intermittent claudication (2) Diagnose PAD on the basis of history, physical exam, and simple limb blood pressure measurements (3) Recognize the significance of peripheral artery disease as a marker for coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (4) Provide appropriate medical management of atherosclerosis risk factors-- including use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death (5) Manage symptoms of intermittent claudication with program of smoking cessation, exercise, and medication The diagnosis of intermittent claudication secondary to peripheral artery disease (PAD) can often be made on the basis of history and physical examination. Additional evaluation of PAD is multi-modal and the techniques used will vary depending on the nature and severity of the patient's presenting problem. Most patients can be appropriately managed without referral for specialized diagnostic services or interventions.

  18. Primary School Environment Trend, Class-Ratio and Head Teachers Overcrowded Classrooms Management Strategies in Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babatunde, Ehinola Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Primary school Enrolment Trend, Class-Ratio and Head Teachers overcrowded classrooms management strategies in Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State, Nigeria was investigated. The purpose of the study is to examine the current enrolment trend in public primary schools in northern senatorial District of Ondo State. Also, is to ascertain the…

  19. Does a Year Make a Difference? The Classroom Management Practices of Primary Student Teachers before and after a One-Year Teacher Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reupert, Andrea; Woodcock, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine primary student teachers' use, confidence and success in various classroom management strategies at the start and at the end of a one-year teaching programme and ascertain any significant differences between the two time periods. One hundred and twenty-four English primary student teachers were surveyed at…

  20. Real-life management of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adult patients and adherence to practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lozano, María Luisa; Revilla, N; Gonzalez-Lopez, T J; Novelli, S; González-Porras, J R; Sánchez-Gonzalez, B; Bermejo, N; Pérez, S; Lucas, F J; Álvarez, M T; Arilla, M J; Perera, M; do Nascimento, J; Campos, R M; Casado, L F; Vicente, V

    2016-06-01

    Very few data exist on the management of adult patients diagnosed with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The objectives of this study were to describe the diagnostic and treatment patterns for ITP and to compare the findings to recent ITP guidelines. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of adult ITP patients diagnosed with primary ITP between January 2011 and June 2012 and examined whether management strategies were consistent or not with eight recent guideline-recommended practices. Overall, median age at the diagnosis of the disease (n = 101) was 58 years and median platelet count 12 × 10(9)/L with 75.2 % of patients having symptoms of ITP. The study perceived two major shortcomings in the diagnostic approach: (1) failure to perform peripheral blood film examination in 22.8 % of patients, a test that is mandatory by all guidelines, and (2) ordinary bone marrow assessment in more than half of the patients at diagnosis (50.5 %), a test not routinely recommended by guidelines. Low appropriateness in therapeutic management of patients included (1) unjustified use of intravenous immunoglobulin in the absence of bleeding in 54.8 % of patients and (2) splenectomy not being deferred until 6-12 months from diagnosis (median 161 days). Data also reflect a trend towards the early use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in the treatment of patients who are refractory to any first-line therapy. We have recognized important areas of inapropriateness in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult ITP patients. Compliance with established guidelines should be encouraged in order to improve patient outcomes.

  1. An interdisciplinary clinical practice model for the management of low-back pain in primary care: the CLIP project

    PubMed Central

    Poitras, Stéphane; Rossignol, Michel; Dionne, Clermont; Tousignant, Michel; Truchon, Manon; Arsenault, Bertrand; Allard, Pierre; Coté, Manon; Neveu, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Background Low-back pain is responsible for significant disability and costs in industrialized countries. Only a minority of subjects suffering from low-back pain will develop persistent disability. However, this minority is responsible for the majority of costs and has the poorest health outcomes. The objective of the Clinic on Low-back pain in Interdisciplinary Practice (CLIP) project was to develop a primary care interdisciplinary practice model for the clinical management of low-back pain and the prevention of persistent disability. Methods Using previously published guidelines, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, a clinical management model for low-back pain was developed by the project team. A structured process facilitating discussions on this model among researchers, stakeholders and clinicians was created. The model was revised following these exchanges, without deviating from the evidence. Results A model consisting of nine elements on clinical management of low-back pain and prevention of persistent disability was developed. The model's two core elements for the prevention of persistent disability are the following: 1) the evaluation of the prognosis at the fourth week of disability, and of key modifiable barriers to return to usual activities if the prognosis is unfavourable; 2) the evaluation of the patient's perceived disability every four weeks, with the evaluation and management of barriers to return to usual activities if perceived disability has not sufficiently improved. Conclusion A primary care interdisciplinary model aimed at improving quality and continuity of care for patients with low-back pain was developed. The effectiveness, efficiency and applicability of the CLIP model in preventing persistent disability in patients suffering from low-back pain should be assessed. PMID:18426590

  2. Managing an Online Survey about Influenza Vaccination in Primary Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Diana; Aerny, Nicole; Soldevila, Núria; Baricot, Maretva; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Torner, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Domíguez, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used due to their speed and efficiency. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that may have contributed to the quality and speed of response of an online survey on influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers. A multicenter study including family physicians, nurses and pediatricians from primary healthcare teams from seven Spanish Autonomous Communities was designed. The centers were selected by simple random sampling. The survey remained active and accessible for 56 days and four reminders were sent. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the association of sociodemographic variables and responding to the survey before the second reminder. Complete, validated information was obtained from 1965 primary healthcare workers. The total response rate was 36.2%. More nurses (46.3%) responded before the second reminder and more family physicians (52.8%) after the second reminder. The adjusted OR shows that family physicians responded later (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.2–1.8) than nurses. The responses obtained in the first 24 h after the initial sending and the reminders accounted for 41.7% of the completed surveys, indicating the importance of reminders. PMID:25584421

  3. Electronic clinical records in primary care for estimating disease burden and management. An example of COPD.

    PubMed

    Verde-Remeseiro, Luis; López-Pardo, Estrella; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Gude-Sampedro, Francisco; Castro-Calvo, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant health problem in developed countries. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of COPD in a single Spanish healthcare area. We also aimed to assess if there are any differences in prevalence and spirometry use among primary care services by utilizing already registered information. We designed a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of COPD and the performance of spirometries in each primary care service. A total of 8,444 patients were diagnosed with COPD, with a prevalence of 2.6% for individuals older than 39 years. The prevalence increased with age and was much higher in men. Significant heterogeneity was found in the prevalence of COPD and spirometry use among primary care services. COPD was underdiagnosed and there was wide variability in spirometry use in our area. Greater efforts are needed to diagnose COPD in order to improve its clinical outcomes and to refine registries so that they can be used as reliable sources of information.

  4. The role of interstitial brachytherapy in the management of primary radiation therapy for uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuma; Kato, Tomoyasu; Nakamura, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shima, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Keisuke; Kashihara, Tairo; Harada, Ken; Takahashi, Kana; Umezawa, Rei; Inaba, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to report the clinical results of uterine cervical cancer patients treated by primary radiation therapy including brachytherapy, and investigate the role of interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT). Material and methods All consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients who were treated by primary radiation therapy were reviewed, and those who were treated by ISBT were further investigated for clinical outcomes and related toxicities. Results From December 2008 to October 2014, 209 consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients were treated with primary radiation therapy. Among them, 142 and 42 patients were treated by intracavitary and hybrid brachytherapy, respectively. Twenty-five patients (12%) were treated by high-dose-rate (HDR)-ISBT. Five patients with distant metastasis other than para-aortic lymph node were excluded, and 20 patients consisted of the analysis. Three-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) rate were 44.4%, 38.9%, and 87.8%, respectively. Distant metastasis was the most frequent site of first relapse after HDR-ISBT. One and four patients experienced grade 3 and 2 rectal bleeding, one grade 2 cystitis, and two grade 2 vaginal ulcer. Conclusions Feasibility and favorable local control of interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer was demonstrated through a single institutional experience with a small number of patients. PMID:27895680

  5. Management of dental patients on warfarin therapy in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Vikram

    2004-09-01

    The surgical management of patients on anticoagulant therapy is often poorly understood in all fields of medicine (not just dentistry). Until now there has been no uniform approach to managing these patients and much of the advice routinely given by medical practitioners and haematologists has fallen behind the recent evidence. Many medical conditions from atrial fibrillation to prosthetic heart valves predispose patients to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (Table 1). In order to prevent these complications, these patients are normally placed on an anticoagulant. By far the most common one in use is Warfarin, which is a derivative of 4 hydroxycoumarin.

  6. Primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Víctor; Torres, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2014-05-21

    Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) occurs due to an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder of the metabolism of glyoxylate, which causes excessive oxalate production. The most frequent and serious disorder is due to enzyme deficit of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (PH type I) specific to hepatic peroxisome. As oxalate is not metabolised in humans and is excreted through the kidneys, the kidney is the first organ affected, causing recurrent lithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and early renal failure. With advance of renal failure, particularly in patients on haemodialysis (HD), calcium oxalate is massively deposited in tissues, which is known as oxalosis. Diagnosis is based on family history, the presence of urolithiasis and/or nephrocalcinosis, hyperoxaluria, oxalate deposits in tissue forming granulomas, molecular analysis of DNA and enzyme analysis if applicable. High diagnostic suspicion is required; therefore, unfortunately, in many cases it is diagnosed after its recurrence following kidney transplantation. Conservative management of this disease (high liquid intake, pyridoxine and crystallisation inhibitors) needs to be adopted early in order to delay kidney damage. Treatment by dialysis is ineffective in treating excess oxalate. After the kidney transplant, we normally observe a rapid appearance of oxalate deposits in the graft and the results of this technique are discouraging, with very few exceptions. Pre-emptive liver transplantation, or simultaneous liver and kidney transplants when there is already irreversible damage to the kidney, is the treatment of choice to treat the underlying disease and suppress oxalate overproduction. Given its condition as a rare disease and its genetic and clinical heterogeneity, it is not possible to gain evidence through randomised clinical trials. As a result, the recommendations are established by groups of experts based on publications of renowned scientific rigour. In this regard, a group of European experts (OxalEurope) has

  7. Dietary Management in Gastrointestinal Diseases. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Joan Z.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  8. Primary Children's Management of Themselves and Others in Collaborative Group Work: "Sometimes It Takes Patience…"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershner, Ruth; Warwick, Paul; Mercer, Neil; Kleine Staarman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    We focus on children's approaches to managing group work in classrooms where collaborative learning principles are explicit. Small groups of 8-10 year olds worked on collaborative science activities using an interactive whiteboard. Insubsequent interviews, they spoke of learning to "be patient" and "wait", for multiple social…

  9. Dietary Management in Hyperlipidemia. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Townley, Nancy A.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  10. School Leadership Practices That Promote Effective Whole School Behaviour Management: A Study of Australian Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Nobile, John; El Baba, Mariam; London, Teola

    2016-01-01

    When considering the management of student behaviour issues, a substantial body of literature, as well as logical common sense, points to the advantages of whole school policy over the individual efforts of teachers. Less is known, however, about the direct or indirect role school leadership plays in the development of well-implemented whole…

  11. Quality of Disease Management and Risk of Mortality in English Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Dusheiko, Mark; Gravelle, Hugh; Martin, Stephen; Smith, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether better management of chronic conditions by family practices reduces mortality risk. Data Two random samples of 5 million patients registered with over 8,000 English family practices followed up for 4 years (2004/5–2007/8). Measures of the quality of disease management for 10 conditions were constructed for each family practice for each year. The outcome measure was an indicator taking the value 1 if the patient died during a specified year, 0 otherwise. Study Design Cross-section and multilevel panel data multiple logistic regressions were estimated. Covariates included age, gender, morbidity, hospitalizations, attributed socio-economic characteristics, and local health care supply measures. Principal Findings Although a composite measure of the quality of disease management for all 10 conditions was significantly associated with lower mortality, only the quality of stroke care was significant when all 10 quality measures were entered in the regression. Conclusions The panel data results suggest that a 1 percent improvement in the quality of stroke care could reduce the annual number of deaths in England by 782 [95 percent CI: 423, 1140]. A longer study period may be necessary to detect any mortality impact of better management of other conditions. PMID:25597263

  12. Integrated palmer amaranth management in glufosinate-resistant cotton: II. primary, secondary, and conservation tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate the role of inversion tillage, cover crops and spring tillage methods for Palmer amaranth between-row (BR) and within-row (WR) management in glufosinate-resistant cotton. Main plots were two inversion tillage systems: fall inversion tillage (IT...

  13. Primary and Secondary Contamination Mechanisms for Consideration in ASR Modeling and Practical Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a useful water resource management option for water storage and reuse. Its increased use is recognized in adaptation to the ever increasing problem of water availability, both in timing and flow. Challenges in the ASR process may arise from...

  14. Primary and Secondary Contamination Mechanisms in ASR Modeling and Design of Practical Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a useful water resource management option for water storage and reuse. Its increased use is recognized in adaptation to the ever increasing problem of water availability, both in timing and flow. Challenges in the ASR process may arise from...

  15. Dietary Management in Hypertension. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molleson, Ann L.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  16. The Hepatitis C Self-Management Program: Sustainability of Primary Outcomes at 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groessl, Erik J.; Ho, Samuel B.; Asch, Steven M.; Stepnowsky, Carl J.; Laurent, Diana; Gifford, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chronic hepatitis C infection afflicts millions of people worldwide. Although antiviral treatments are increasingly effective, many hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients avoid treatment, do not complete or respond to treatment, or have contraindications. Self-management interventions are one option for promoting behavioral changes leading to…

  17. Dietary Management for Alcoholic Patients. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Roberta Smith; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  18. Dietary Management in Diabetes Mellitus. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossetti, Brenda; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  19. Nurse-managed health centers and patient-centered medical homes could mitigate expected primary care physician shortage.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Chen, Peggy G; Friedberg, Mark W; Reid, Rachel; Lau, Christopher; Buerhaus, Peter I; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2013-11-01

    Numerous forecasts have predicted shortages of primary care providers, particularly in light of an expected increase in patient demand resulting from the Affordable Care Act. Yet these forecasts could be inaccurate because they generally do not allow for changes in the way primary care is delivered. We analyzed the impact of two emerging models of care--the patient-centered medical home and the nurse-managed health center--both of which use a provider mix that is richer in nurse practitioners and physician assistants than today's predominant models of care delivery. We found that projected physician shortages were substantially reduced in plausible scenarios that envisioned greater reliance on these new models, even without increases in the supply of physicians. Some less plausible scenarios even eliminated the shortage. All of these scenarios, however, may require additional changes, such as liberalized scope-of-practice laws; a larger supply of medical assistants, licensed practical nurses, and aides; and payment changes that reward providers for population health management.

  20. Analysis of benzodiazepine withdrawal program managed by primary care nurses in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzodiazepine (BZD), the long-term treatment of which is harmful for cognitive function, is widely prescribed by General Practitioners in Spain. Based on studies performed in other countries we designed a nurse-led BZD withdrawal program adapted to Spanish Primary Care working conditions. Results A pseudo-experimental (before-after) study took place in two Primary Care Centres in Barcelona. From a sample of 1150 patients, 79 were identified. They were over 44 years old and had been daily users of BZD for a period exceeding six months. Out of the target group 51 patients agreed to participate. BZD dosage was reduced every 2-4 weeks by 25% of the initial dose with the optional support of Hydroxyzine or Valerian. The rating measurements were: reduction of BZD prescription, demographic variables, the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) to measure quality of life, the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Sleep Scale, and the Goldberg Depression and Anxiety Scale. By the end of the six-month intervention, 80.4% of the patients had discontinued BZD and 64% maintained abstinence at one year. An improvement in all parameters of the Goldberg scale (p <0.05) and in the mental component of SF-12 at 3.3 points (p = 0.024), as well as in most components of the MOS scale, was observed in the group that had discontinued BZD. No significant differences in these scales before and after the intervention were observed in the group that had not discontinued. Conclusions At one year approximately 2/3 of the patients had ceased taking BZD. They showed an overall improvement in depression and anxiety scales, and in the mental component of the quality of life scale. There was no apparent reduction in the sleep quality indicators in most of the analysed components. Nurses in a Primary Care setting can successfully implement a BZD withdrawal program. PMID:23237104

  1. Dementia With Lewy Bodies: Diagnosis and Management for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aman; Handa, Kamna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review is to aid primary care providers in distinguishing dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from Alzheimer's disease and from Parkinson's disease with dementia. Differentiating these entities has important treatment implications. Data Sources: A PubMed search was undertaken using the keywords Lewy body dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and Lewy body disease. There were no date restrictions. Only articles in the English language were reviewed. References of selected articles were reviewed for additional sources. Data Selection and Extraction: Initially, 2,967 articles were retrieved. All 3 authors participated in data selection and extraction. Articles were further selected for content specific to epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, treatment, and prognosis. For articles with repetitive information, the most current article was used. This resulted in a total of 62 articles included in the review. Data Synthesis: Dementia with Lewy bodies is the second leading cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The core symptoms of DLB, including cognitive fluctuations, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism, may not always be present as a triad, and clinicians may be unaware of associated symptoms. Thus, this diagnosis is frequently missed by primary care providers. Often, DLB is misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or a primary psychiatric illness. Treatments for DLB include cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists. Antipsychotics should be avoided or used with caution. Conclusions: Dementia with Lewy bodies is an often missed diagnosis. Symptoms are often attributed to other disorders. A high clinical suspicion is helpful in accurate diagnosis, and presence of any of the core symptoms should initiate clinical suspicion of DLB. Distinguishing DLB from other disorders has important treatment implications. PMID:22295275

  2. Parent Report of Child's Health-Related Quality of Life after a Primary-Care-Based Weight Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Schetzina, Karen E.; McBee, Matthew T.; Maphis, Laura; Fulton-Robinson, Hazel; Ho, Ai-Leng; Tudiver, Fred; Wu, Tiejian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been recognized as an important target and health outcome in obesity research. The current study aimed to examine HRQoL in overweight or obese children after a 10-week primary-care–based weight management program, Parent-Led Activity and Nutrition for Healthy Living, in southern Appalachia. Methods: Sixty-seven children (ages 5–12 years) and their caregivers were recruited from four primary care clinics, two of which were randomized to receive the intervention. Caregivers in the intervention groups received two brief motivational interviewing visits and four group sessions led by providers as well as four phone follow-ups with research staff. Caregivers completed the PedsQL and demographic questionnaires at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postintervention. Child height and weight were collected to determine standardized BMI. Results: Caregivers of children receiving the weight control intervention reported no statistically significant improvements in child total HRQoL, as compared to the control group, across the course of treatment (β=0.178; 95% confidence interval, −0.681, 1.037; p=0.687). Additionally, no statistically significant improvements were found across other HRQoL domains. Conclusions: Future studies examining HRQoL outcomes in primary care may consider treatment dose as well as methodological factors, such as utilization of multiple informants and different measures, when designing studies and interpreting outcomes. PMID:24152081

  3. Management of Proximal Primary Urethral Cancer: Should Multidisciplinary Therapy Be the Gold Standard?

    PubMed

    Zinman, Leonard N; Vanni, Alex J

    2016-11-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a rare, but devastating genitourinary tumor that affects men and women. Although most PUC are localized, proximal PUC frequently presents with locally advanced disease, with 30% to 40% having lymph node metastasis. Single modality surgical or radiation therapy has dismal results. Multimodal therapy with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and consolidation surgery has greatly improved the local recurrence and overall survival rates for this aggressive disease. In locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the urethra, radiotherapy combined with radiosensitizing chemotherapy is an option for genital preservation. Prospective, multi-institutional studies are required to further define the optimal multidisciplinary treatment strategy for this destructive disease.

  4. Diagnosis and management of non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy in infancy - a UK primary care practical guide.

    PubMed

    Venter, Carina; Brown, Trevor; Shah, Neil; Walsh, Joanne; Fox, Adam T

    2013-07-08

    The UK NICE guideline on the Diagnosis and Assessment of Food Allergy in Children and Young People was published in 2011, highlighting the important role of primary care physicians, dietitians, nurses and other community based health care professionals in the diagnosis and assessment of IgE and non-IgE-mediated food allergies in children. The guideline suggests that those with suspected IgE-mediated disease and those suspected to suffer from severe non-IgE-mediated disease are referred on to secondary or tertiary level care. What is evident from this guideline is that the responsibility for the diagnostic food challenge, ongoing management and determining of tolerance to cow's milk in children with less severe non-IgE-mediated food allergies is ultimately that of the primary care/community based health care staff, but this discussion fell outside of the current NICE guideline. Some clinical members of the guideline development group (CV, JW, ATF, TB) therefore felt that there was a particular need to extend this into a more practical guideline for cow's milk allergy. This subset of the guideline development group with the additional expertise of a paediatric gastroenterologist (NS) therefore aimed to produce a UK Primary Care Guideline for the initial clinical recognition of all forms of cow's milk allergy and the ongoing management of those with non-severe non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy in the form of algorithms. These algorithms will be discussed in this review paper, drawing on guidance primarily from the UK NICE guideline, but also from the DRACMA guidelines, ESPGHAN guidelines, Australian guidelines and the US NIAID guidelines.

  5. [A computerised clinical decision-support system for the management of depression in Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Enric; Comín, Eva; Cavero, Myriam; Pérez, Víctor; Molina, Cristina; Palao, Diego

    2017-01-09

    Despite its clinical relevance and its importance as a public health problem, there are major gaps in the management of depression. Evidence-based clinical guidelines are useful to improve processes and clinical outcomes. In order to make their implementation easier these guidelines have been transformed into computerised clinical decision support systems. In this article, a description is presented on the basics and characteristics of a new computerised clinical guideline for the management of major depression, developed in the public health system in Catalonia. This tool helps the clinician to establish reliable and accurate diagnoses of depression, to choose the best treatment a priori according to the disease and the patient characteristics. It also emphasises the importance of systematic monitoring to assess the clinical course, and to adjust therapeutic interventions to the patient's needs at all times.

  6. Perceptions of culturally competent diabetes management in a primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Julienne K; Hildebrandt, Carol; Davis, Stephen; Crandall, Sonia J; Siciliano, Alissa B; Marion, Gail S

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether clinicians consider the impact of culture on diabetes management, a survey was mailed to 300 randomly selected patients > or = 50 years with type 2 diabetes and 153 surveys were returned. Data were correlated with A1C values. African Americans (AA) and non-Hispanic whites (NHW), (91.9%, 97.0%) respectively, reported clinicians discussed benefits of controlling blood sugar but did not discuss effects of cultural issues on glucose control (< or = 50%). AAs perceived clinicians were more accommodating of their cultural preferences than did NHWs (49.2% versus 30.6%) (P < .05). Females (51.9%) (P < .01) reported that clinicians acknowledged the importance of their cultural beliefs with a slightly higher percentage for African American females (54.8%) versus non-Hispanic White females (48.6%). Understanding the patient's and clinician's views of cultural beliefs as they relate to diabetes self-management can provide perspectives to guide care.

  7. Long-term management of an idiopathic gingival fibromatosis patient with the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Kamolmatyakul, S; Kietthubthew, S; Anusaksathien, O

    2001-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is usually seen as an isolated finding or occasionally in association with other features as part of a syndrome. The combination of gingival enlargement, hypertrichosis, epilepsy and mental retardation is also a commonly reported syndrome that features gingival fibromatosis. The following report is about a mentally retarded patient who has shown no sign of hypertrichosis, but has been taking phenobarbital as a long-term therapy drug for anti-convulsion. Long-term management of this patient has been carried out from the age of one-and-a-half years to 14 years old. The patient's clinical features, treatment received, histopathologic presentation of gingival fibromatosis and proper management of the condition are discussed.

  8. Providing care to transgender persons: a clinical approach to primary care, hormones, and HIV management.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Transgender (TG) persons have had historically difficult interactions with health care providers, leading to limited care and risks for a broad spectrum of health problems. This is of particular concern for TG persons with or at risk for HIV infection. This article discusses care providers' roles in establishing TG-friendly clinical care sites; conducting appropriate and thorough physical examinations for TG patients; managing hormones, especially in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy; and engaging TG persons in education about prevention and treatment of HIV.

  9. Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, David N., Ed.; Sykes, Gary, Ed.

    The chapters in this book originated as papers for a conference, School Choice and Educational Change, held in March 2000 at Michigan State University. An introductory chapter provides a comparative analysis of the lessons learned from international experience with school-choice policies, based on a review of case studies in several countries. The…

  10. Bronchial Artery and Systemic Artery Embolization in the Management of Primary Lung Cancer Patients with Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hong Suk Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyae Young; Zo, Jae-Ill; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Jin Soo

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To assess the safety and effectiveness of arterial embolization in lung cancer patients with hemoptysis. Methods. Nineteen primary lung cancer patients with hemoptysis underwent bronchial artery and systemic artery embolization from April 2002 to March 2005. There were 17 men and 2 women, with a mean age of 59 years. Histologic analysis revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 10 patients and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 9 patients. The amount of hemoptysis was bleeding of 25-50 ml within 24 hr in 8 patients, recurrent blood-tinged sputum in 6, and bleeding of 100 ml or more per 24 hr in 5. Embolization was done with a superselective technique using a microcatheter and polyvinyl alcohol particles to occlude the affected vessels. Results. Arterial embolization was technically successful in all patients and clinically successful in 15 patients (79%). The average number of arteries embolized was 1.2. Bronchial arteriography revealed staining (all patients), dilatation of the artery or hypervascularity (10 patients), and bronchopulmonary shunt (6 patients). The recurrence rate was 33% (5/15) and 11 patients were alive with a mean follow-up time of 148 days (30-349 days). Conclusion. Arterial embolotherapy for hemoptysis in patients with primary lung cancer is an effective, safe therapeutic modality despite the fact the vascular changes are subtle on angiography.

  11. Patients’ views about taking a polypill to manage cardiovascular risk: a qualitative study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Virdee, Satnam K; Greenfield, Sheila M; Fletcher, Kate; McManus, Richard J; Mant, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background A ‘polypill’ containing a combination of antihypertensives and statins could prevent up to 80% of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Aim To investigate patients’ opinions about the use of a polypill for CVD prevention. Design and setting Qualitative study of 17 patients from seven primary care practices in Birmingham, UK. Method Patients were recruited through purposive sampling to maximise variation of characteristics. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with responders. Results were analysed and reported using a qualitative description approach. Results Patients expressed concerns that polypill prescription for primary prevention simply on the basis of age was unnecessary and would lead to side effects, despite recognising potential benefits. For high-risk patients, or for secondary prevention, a polypill was deemed more acceptable, but was still felt to require regular monitoring of blood pressure and cholesterol. Conclusion Patients were sceptical about the role of a polypill as a ‘blanket’ approach. If a population strategy offering a polypill to all people over a certain age was to be implemented, it would need to be supported by patient education. PMID:26077268

  12. Autonomy and modernisation: the management of change in an English primary care trust.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ruth; Harrison, Stephen

    2004-05-01

    Recent New Labour policy for the 'modernisation' of Government places a good deal of emphasis on decentralisation. This emphasis is particularly marked in relation to the organisation of primary care. However, like hospitals and other National Health Service institutions, primary care trusts (PCTs) are subject to a substantial raft of centrally established performance targets and indicators, including those which contribute to the public award of between zero and three performance 'stars'. This raises questions about the extent to which employees can exercise autonomy in the context of rigid top-down directives. This paper presents findings from a study using participant observation and interviews to examine the impact of a training course aimed ostensibly at increasing employee autonomy in an English PCT. The suggestion is that attempts to make employees more autonomous can be seen as a strategy for increasing central control based upon the internalisation by the employees of centrally promulgated values. The attraction of such strategies is that they may be potentially more effective and less costly than alternative strategies of direct control. However, the study suggests that the outcome of attempts by such methods as programmes to increase employee autonomy may be very different from those intended.

  13. Blueprint for an Undergraduate Primary Care Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Sara B; Demasi, Monica; Farren, Erin; Frankl, Susan; Gottlieb, Barbara; Hoy, Jessica; Johnson, Amanda; Kasper, Jill; Lee, Patrick; McCarthy, Claire; Miller, Kathe; Morris, Juliana; O'Hare, Kitty; Rosales, Rachael; Simmons, Leigh; Smith, Benjamin; Treadway, Katherine; Goodell, Kristen; Ogur, Barbara

    2016-07-12

    In light of the increasing demand for primary care services and the changing scope of health care, it is important to consider how the principles of primary care are taught in medical school. While the majority of schools have increased students' exposure to primary care, they have not developed a standardized primary care curriculum for undergraduate medical education. In 2013, the authors convened a group of educators from primary care internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, and medicine-pediatrics, as well as five medical students to create a blueprint for a primary care curriculum that could be integrated into a longitudinal primary care experience spanning undergraduate medical education and delivered to all students regardless of their eventual career choice.The authors organized this blueprint into three domains: care management, specific areas of content expertise, and understanding the role of primary care in the health care system. Within each domain, they described specific curriculum content, including longitudinality, generalism, central responsibility for managing care, therapeutic alliance/communication, approach to acute and chronic care, wellness and prevention, mental and behavioral health, systems improvement, interprofessional training, and population health, as well as competencies that all medical students should attain by graduation.The proposed curriculum incorporates important core features of doctoring, which are often affirmed by all disciplines but owned by none. The authors argue that primary care educators are natural stewards of this curriculum content and can ensure that it complements and strengthens all aspects of undergraduate medical education.

  14. Does patient experience of multimorbidity predict self-management and health outcomes in a prospective study in primary care?

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Cassandra; Coventry, Peter A; Gibbons, Chris; Bee, Penny; Fisher, Louise; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is a need to better understand the mechanisms which lead to poor outcomes in patients with multimorbidity, especially those factors that might be amenable to intervention. Objective. This research aims to explore what factors predict self-management behaviour and health outcomes in patients with multimorbidity in primary care in the UK. Methods. A prospective study design was used. Questionnaires were mailed out to 1460 patients with multimorbidity. Patients were asked to complete a range of self-report measures including measures of multimorbidity, measures of their experience of multimorbidity and service delivery and outcomes (three measures of self-management: behaviours, Self-monitoring and Insight and medication adherence; and a measure of self-reported health). Results. In total, 36% (n = 499) of patients responded to the baseline survey and 80% of those respondents completed follow-up. Self-management behaviour at 4 months was predicted by illness perceptions around the consequences of individual conditions. Self-monitoring and Insight at 4 months was predicted by patient experience of ‘Hassles’ in health services. Self-reported medication adherence at 4 months was predicted by health status, Self-monitoring and Insight and ‘Hassles’ in health services. Perceived health status at 4 months was predicted by age and patient experience of multimorbidity. Conclusions. This research shows that different factors, particularly around patients’ experiences of health care and control over their treatment, impact on various types of self-management. Patient experience of multimorbidity was not a critical predictor of self-management but did predict health status in the short term. The findings can help to develop and target interventions that might improve outcomes in patients with multimorbidity. PMID:25715962

  15. Antiphospholipase A2 Receptor Autoantibodies: A Step Forward in the Management of Primary Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obrisca, Bogdan; Ismail, Gener; Jurubita, Roxana; Baston, Catalin; Andronesi, Andreea; Mircescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Since the identification of PLA2R (M-type phospholipase A2 receptor) as the first human antigenic target in primary membranous nephropathy (MN), perpetual progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. Accumulating clinical data support a pathogenic role for the anti-PLA2R antibodies (PLA2R ABs), but confirmation in an animal model is still lacking. However, PLA2R ABs were related to disease activity and outcome, as well as to response therapy. Accordingly, PLA2R ABs assay seems to be promising tool not only to diagnose MN but also to predict the course of the disease and could open the way to personalize therapy. Nevertheless, validation of a universal assay with high precision and definition of cut-off levels, followed by larger studies with a prolonged follow-up period, are needed to confirm these prospects. PMID:26576418

  16. Managing Mental Health Problems Among Immigrant Women Attending Primary Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Straiton, Melanie L; Powell, Kathryn; Reneflot, Anne; Diaz, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in Norway explore treatment options in primary care for immigrant women with mental health problems compared with nonimmigrant women. Three national registers were linked together for 2008. Immigrant women from Sweden, Poland, the Philippines, Thailand, Pakistan, and Russia were selected for analysis and compared with Norwegian women. Using logistic regression, we investigated whether treatment type varied by country of origin. Rates of sickness leave and psychiatric referrals were similar across all groups. Conversational therapy and use of antidepressants and anxiolytics were lower among Filipina, Thai, Pakistani, and Russian women than among Norwegians. Using the broad term "immigrants" masks important differences in treatment and health service use. By closely examining mental health treatment differences by country of origin, gaps in service provision and treatment uptake may be identified and addressed with more success.

  17. Simple algorithms for the management of genital ulcers: evaluation in a primary health care centre in Kigali, Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Bogaerts, J.; Vuylsteke, B.; Martinez Tello, W.; Mukantabana, V.; Akingeneye, J.; Laga, M.; Piot, P.

    1995-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 395 patients presenting with genital ulcers at a primary health care centre in Kigali, Rwanda. Using clinical data and the results of a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, we simulated the diagnostic outcome of two simple WHO flowcharts for the management of genital ulcers. These outcomes and a clinical diagnosis were then compared with the laboratory diagnosis based on culture for genital herpes and Haemophilus ducreyi and serology for syphilis. The prevalence of HIV infection was high (73%) but there was no difference between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in the clinical presentation and etiology of genital ulcer disease. The proportion of correctly managed chancroid and/or syphilis cases was 99% using a syndromic approach, 82.1% using a hierarchical algorithm including an RPR test, and 38.3% with a clinical diagnosis. In situations where no laboratory support is available, a simple syndromic approach is preferable to the clinical approach for the management of genital ulcer. If an RPR test can be included in the diagnostic strategy, patients with a reactive RPR test should be treated for both syphilis and chancroid infection. PMID:8907769

  18. Variations in the management of fibromyalgia by physician specialty: rheumatology versus primary care

    PubMed Central

    Able, Stephen L; Robinson, Rebecca L; Kroenke, Kurt; Mease, Philip; Williams, David A; Chen, Yi; Wohlreich, Madelaine; McCarberg, Bill H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of physician specialty regarding diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia (FM) and assess the clinical status of patients initiating new treatment for FM using data from Real-World Examination of Fibromyalgia: Longitudinal Evaluation of Costs and Treatments. Patients and methods Outpatients from 58 sites in the United States were enrolled. Data were collected via in-office surveys and telephone interviews. Pairwise comparisons by specialty were made using chi-square, Fisher’s exact tests, and Student’s t-tests. Results Physician specialist cohorts included rheumatologists (n=54), primary care physicians (n=25), and a heterogeneous group of physicians practicing pain or physical medicine, psychiatry, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, osteopathy, or an unspecified specialty (n=12). The rheumatologists expressed higher confidence diagnosing FM (4.5 on a five-point scale) than primary care physicians (4.1) (P=0.037). All cohorts strongly agreed that recognizing FM is their responsibility. They agreed that psychological aspects of FM are important, but disagreed that symptoms are psychosomatic. All physician cohorts agreed with a multidisciplinary approach including nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments, although physicians were more confident prescribing medications than alternative therapies. Most patients reported moderate to severe pain, multiple comorbidities, and treatment with several medications and nonpharmacologic therapies. Conclusion Physician practice characteristics, physician attitudes, and FM patient profiles were broadly similar across specialties. The small but significant differences reported by physicians and patients across physician cohorts suggest that despite published guidelines, treatment of FM still contains important variance across specialties. PMID:27799842

  19. Barriers to effective management of type 2 diabetes in primary care: qualitative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rushforth, Bruno; McCrorie, Carolyn; Glidewell, Liz; Midgley, Eleanor; Foy, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of evidence-based guidance, many patients with type 2 diabetes do not achieve treatment goals. Aim To guide quality improvement strategies for type 2 diabetes by synthesising qualitative evidence on primary care physicians’ and nurses’ perceived influences on care. Design and setting Systematic review of qualitative studies with findings organised using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Method Databases searched were MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and ASSIA from 1980 until March 2014. Studies included were English-language qualitative studies in primary care of physicians’ or nurses’ perceived influences on treatment goals for type 2 diabetes. Results A total of 32 studies were included: 17 address general diabetes care, 11 glycaemic control, three blood pressure, and one cholesterol control. Clinicians struggle to meet evolving treatment targets within limited time and resources, and are frustrated with resulting compromises. They lack confidence in knowledge of guidelines and skills, notably initiating insulin and facilitating patient behaviour change. Changing professional boundaries have resulted in uncertainty about where clinical responsibility resides. Accounts are often couched in emotional terms, especially frustrations over patient compliance and anxieties about treatment intensification. Conclusion Although resources are important, many barriers to improving care are amenable to behaviour change strategies. Improvement strategies need to account for differences between clinical targets and consider tailored rather than ‘one size fits all’ approaches. Training targeting knowledge is necessary but insufficient to bring about major change; approaches to improve diabetes care need to delineate roles and responsibilities, and address clinicians’ skills and emotions around treatment intensification and facilitation of patient behaviour change. PMID:26823263

  20. [Structured medication management in primary care - a tool to promote medication safety].

    PubMed

    Mahler, Cornelia; Freund, Tobias; Baldauf, Annika; Jank, Susanne; Ludt, Sabine; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic disease usually need to take multiple medications. Drug-related interactions, adverse events, suboptimal adherence, and self-medication are components that can affect medication safety and lead to serious consequences for the patient. At present, regular medication reviews to check what medicines have been prescribed and what medicines are actually taken by the patient or the structured evaluation of drug-related problems rarely take place in Germany. The process of "medication reconciliation" or "medication review" as developed in the USA and the UK aim at increasing medication safety and therefore represent an instrument of quality assurance. Within the HeiCare(®) project a structured medication management was developed for general practice, with medical assistants playing a major role in the implementation of the process. Both the structured medication management and the tools developed for the medication check and medication counselling will be outlined in this article; also, findings on feasibility and acceptance in various projects and experiences from a total of 200 general practices (56 HeiCare(®), 29 HiCMan,115 PraCMan) will be described. The results were obtained from questionnaires and focus group discussions. The implementation of a structured medication management intervention into daily routine was seen as a challenge. Due to the high relevance of medication reconciliation for daily clinical practice, however, the checklists - once implemented successfully - have been applied even after the end of the project. They have led to the regular review and reconciliation of the physicians' documentation of the medicines prescribed (medication chart) with the medicines actually taken by the patient.

  1. KEY ITEMS OF INNOVATION MANAGEMENT IN THE PRIMARY HEALTHCARE CENTRES CASE STUDY: FINLAND.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Alireza; Zolfagharzadeh, Mohammad Mahdi; Naaranoja, Marja

    2015-09-01

    Trends such as aging populations, excess costs, rising public expectations, and progress in medical science and technologies point out the necessity of adaptation and development of innovation in the healthcare systems particularly in developed countries. The main objective of this article is to review diffusion of innovation in the healthcare sector. Different types of innovation, diffusion characteristics, and adoption mechanisms are the subjects that are discussed in the selected case study, Finland. Finally, the key items of innovation management in the Finnish health system are introduced. The results can be implemented in other countries as well.

  2. Kidney disease management in UK primary care: guidelines, incentives and information technology.

    PubMed

    Klebe, Bernhard; Farmer, Chris; Cooley, Roger; de Lusignan, Simon; Middleton, Rachel; O'Donoghue, Donal; New, John; Stevens, Paul

    2007-09-01

    The last few years have seen new developments to understand and tackle the significant public health issue posed by chronic kidney disease (CKD). Established renal disease currently consumes 2% of the UK National Health Service budget and predictions are that this figure will increase significantly due to the rising number of people requiring renal replacement therapy fuelled by the ageing population and the diabetes mellitus epidemic. This paper reviews the scale of CKD and discusses the new developments such as staging, referral guidelines and new Department of Health incentives brought about to improve awareness. The importance of Information Technology in assisting the management of renal disease is also outlined. We identify various types of intervention which might be used to do this: feedback in an educational context, the establishment of computerized decision support and enhancement of the patient journey. Many principles may be extended to the management of any chronic disease. While new developments are necessary to improve care, wider implementation is required to be able to see if improved outcomes are achieved.

  3. Management of Normal Tissue Toxicity Associated With Chemoradiation (Primary Skin, Esophagus, and Lung)

    PubMed Central

    Yazbeck, Victor Y.; Villaruz, Liza; Haley, Marsha; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly one quarter of patients with lung cancer present with locally advanced disease where concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care for patients with good performance status. Cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy consistently showed an improvement in survival compared with sequential chemoradiotherapy, at the expense of an increase in the toxicity profile. Over the past decades, several encouraging biomarkers such as transforming growth factor-beta and radioprotective agents such as amifostine were studied but without reaching approval for patient care. We reviewed the prevalence and risk factors for different adverse effects associated with the combined chemoradiotherapy modality, especially dermatitis, mucositis, esophagitis, and pneumonitis. These adverse effects can further be divided into acute, subacute, and chronic. Dermatitis is usually rare and responds well to topical steroids and usual skin care. Acute esophagitis occurs in 30% of patients and is treated with proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, local anesthetic, and dietary changes. Radiation pneumonitis is a subacute complication seen in 15% of patients and is usually managed with steroids. Chronic adverse effects such as radiation fibrosis and esophageal stricture occur approximately 6 months after completion of radiation therapy and are usually permanent. In this review, complications of chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer are delineated, and approaches to their management are described. Given that treatment interruption is associated with a worse outcome, patients are aggressively treated with a curative intent. Therefore, planning for treatment adverse effects improves patient tolerance, compliance, and outcome. PMID:23708070

  4. Adoption of a Portal for the Primary Care Management of Pediatric Asthma: A Mixed-Methods Implementation Study

    PubMed Central

    DuRivage, Nathalie; Mayne, Stephanie L; Finch, Stacia; Ross, Michelle E; Giacomini, Kelli; Suh, Andrew; McCarn, Banita; Brandt, Elias; Karavite, Dean; Staton, Elizabeth W; Shone, Laura P; McGoldrick, Valerie; Noonan, Kathleen; Miller, Dorothy; Lehmann, Christoph U; Pace, Wilson D; Grundmeier, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient portals may improve communication between families of children with asthma and their primary care providers and improve outcomes. However, the feasibility of using portals to collect patient-reported outcomes from families and the barriers and facilitators of portal implementation across diverse pediatric primary care settings have not been established. Objective We evaluated the feasibility of using a patient portal for pediatric asthma in primary care, its impact on management, and barriers and facilitators of implementation success. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods implementation study in 20 practices (11 states). Using the portal, parents of children with asthma aged 6-12 years completed monthly surveys to communicate treatment concerns, treatment goals, symptom control, medication use, and side effects. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of portal use with child characteristics and changes to asthma management. Ten clinician focus groups and 22 semistructured parent interviews explored barriers and facilitators of use in the context of an evidence-based implementation framework. Results We invited 9133 families to enroll and 237 (2.59%) used the portal (range by practice, 0.6%-13.6%). Children of parents or guardians who used the portal were significantly more likely than nonusers to be aged 6-9 years (vs 10-12, P=.02), have mild or moderate/severe persistent asthma (P=.009 and P=.04), have a prescription of a controller medication (P<.001), and have private insurance (P=.002). Portal users with uncontrolled asthma had significantly more medication changes and primary care asthma visits after using the portal relative to the year earlier (increases of 14% and 16%, respectively). Qualitative results revealed the importance of practice organization (coordinated workflows) as well as family (asthma severity) and innovation (facilitated communication and ease of use) characteristics for implementation success

  5. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy is not superior to pneumatic dilation in the management of primary achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ji-Wei; Li, Yin; Xing, Wen-Qun; Lv, Hong-Wei; Wang, Hao-Ran

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder, of unknown cause, which results in increased lower esophageal sphincter tone and symptoms of difficulty swallowing. Current major therapeutic options include laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) and pneumatic dilation (PD). We undertake a systematic review comparing the efficacy and safety of these 2 treatments in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Methods: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for randomized controlled trial investigating LHM versus PD in the treatment of primary achalasia. The primary outcome was symptom remission rates. The Mantel–Haenszel method with fixed-effect or random-effects model was used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Five studies involving 498 participants were included. The cumulative remission rate was significantly higher with LHM at 3 months and 1 year (short-term), with a risk ratio of 1.16 (95% CI 1.01–1.35, P = 0.04) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.02–1.27, P = 0.02), respectively. There were no significant differences between LHM and PD in 2-year and 5-year remission rate (long-term), with a risk ratio of 1.05 (95% CI 0.91–1.22, P = 0.49) and 1.17 (95% CI 0.84–1.64, P = 0.34), respectively. Rates of major mucosal tears requiring subsequent intervention with LHM were significantly lower than those of esophageal perforation with PD requiring postprocedural medical or surgical therapy, with a risk ratio of 0.25 (95% CI 0.08–0.81, P = 0.02). Postprocedural rates of gastroesophageal reflux, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and quality of life scores did not differ in trials with sufficient data. Conclusions: There were no significant differences between LHM and PD in 2-year and 5-year remission rate. This study indicates that either treatment can be proposed as initial treatment for achalasia. PMID:28207499

  6. Office-based nursing staff management of hypertension in primary care.

    PubMed

    Gindlesberger, Danielle R

    2012-08-01

    A family medicine practice in a large multi-specialty clinic undertook a quality improvement initiative focusing on blood pressure control. Current rooming procedures were reviewed, including obtaining accurate and reliable blood pressures. All rooming staff were instructed how to take an accurate blood pressure and were observed at random over a 3-month period to ensure continued accuracy. Rooming staff (medical assistants and licensed practical nurses) were engaged to give patient education and to arrange a standard 2-week follow-up with a rooming staff team member (nurse visit) if the patient's blood pressure was elevated. Clinicians were educated briefly about the importance of managing hypertension regardless of reason for visit. Blood pressure control (<140/90) in patients age 18-85 without diabetes improved from 68.4% to 75.8% in 3 months.

  7. Peer Support for Diabetes Management in Primary Care and Community Settings in Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhimin; Fisher, Edwin B.; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We evaluated a peer leader–support program (PLSP) for diabetes self-management in China in terms of acceptability and feasibility; implementation; perceived advantages; disadvantages and barriers; reach and recruitment; effectiveness in terms of diabetes knowledge and clinical impacts; adoption; and sustainability. METHODS Within each of 3 cities in Anhui Province, 2 subcommunities were randomly assigned to usual care or PLSP. Peer leaders and staff of Community Health Service Centers (CHSCs) co-led biweekly educational meetings. Peer leaders also led biweekly discussion meetings, promoted regular care through the CHSCs, organized informal health promotion activities (eg, walking and tai chi groups), and provided informal individual support to participants through casual contact. RESULTS Qualitative evaluations indicated acceptance of and positive responses to the program among patients, peer leaders, and CHSC staff. Implementation was successful in 2 of 3 subcommunities, the third failing for lack of staff resources. Reported advantages included peer support as a bridge between CHSCs and their patients. In 2 sites where the PLSP was implemented, analyses controlling for baseline differences and site showed significant benefits for PLSP relative to controls (P <0.05) for knowledge, self-efficacy, BMI, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and both fasting and 2-hour post-prandial blood glucose. The Anhui Provincial Health Bureau has extended the PLSP model to other communities and to cardiovascular disease prevention and management. CONCLUSION The PLSP was well accepted, feasible given sufficient administrative and staff resources, effective for those who participated, and generalizable to other sites and health problems. PMID:26304972

  8. Primary extranodal lymphomas of stomach: clinical presentation, diagnostic pitfalls and management

    PubMed Central

    Psyrri, A.; Papageorgiou, S.; Economopoulos, T.

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphoma is the most common form of extranodal lymphoma, accounting for 30%–40% of cases. The most commonly involved site is the stomach (60%–75% of cases), followed by the small bowel, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum. The most common histological subtypes are diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Helicobacter pylori infection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of MALT gastric lymphoma, but its role in gastric diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is controversial. The therapeutic approach for patients with gastric NHL has been revised over the last 10 years. Conservative treatment with anthracycline-based chemotherapy alone or in combination with involved-field radiotherapy has replaced gastrectomy as standard therapy in cases with DLBCL. Additionally, MALT lymphomas are mainly treated with antibiotics alone, which can induce lasting remissions in those cases associated with H. pylori infection. Nevertheless, various therapeutic aspects for primary gastric lymphomas are still controversial and several questions remain unanswered. Among others, the role of rituximab, consolidation radiotherapy as well as H. pylori eradication in histological aggressive subtypes warrants better clarification. PMID:18647965

  9. Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Weight Management Program: Primary Care Clinicians' Perceptions of Program Implementation.

    PubMed

    Arigo, Danielle; Funderburk, Jennifer; Hooker, Stephanie; Dundon, Margaret; Evans-Hudnall, Gina; Dubbert, Patricia; Dickinson, Eva-Maria; Catanese, Sarah; O'Donohue, Jenny

    2015-10-01

    The Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Program is the largest health care-delivered weight loss intervention in the United States. As a referring clinician's perceptions and knowledge of health programs may impact implementation, examining perceptions of MOVE! may inform improvements to this and other programs. This study investigated primary care clinician perceptions of MOVE! (n = 754, 50% nurses). Perceived effectiveness ratings were highest for groups with 11 to 25 group members (p < 0.01) and for a combined lecture and support group format (p = 0.026), though session length and several other aspects of delivery were not associated with perceptions of effectiveness. MOVE! staff also rated the program as more effective than did other clinicians (p < 0.01). Many respondents lacked knowledge about program specifics, especially those not involved with MOVE! delivery (vs. those directly involved; p < 0.01). These findings indicate that variety in group size and format is related to perceptions of MOVE! effectiveness. Also, clinicians not involved with MOVE! may lack knowledge about the program and underestimate its effectiveness, which could negatively affect referral likelihood or enthusiasm expressed to referred patients. Findings highlight opportunities for clarifying perceptions of a weight control program among clinicians in a large health care system.

  10. Primary Care Management of Chronic Constipation in Asia: The ANMA Chronic Constipation Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Gonlachanvit, Sutep; Chua, Andrew Seng Boon; Myung, Seung-Jae; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Patcharatrakul, Tanisa; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Wu, Justin C Y; Chen, Min-Hu; Gong, Xiao-Rong; Lu, Ching-Liang; Chen, Chien-Lin; Pratap, Nitesh; Abraham, Philip; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Ke, Meiyun; Ricaforte-Campos, Jane D; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Abdullah, Murdani

    2013-01-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) may impact on quality of life. There is substantial patient dissatisfaction; possible reasons are failure to recognize underlying constipation, inappropriate dietary advice and inadequate treatment. The aim of these practical guidelines intended for primary care physicians, and which are based on Asian perspectives, is to provide an approach to CC that is relevant to the existing health-care infrastructure. Physicians should not rely on infrequent bowel movements to diagnose CC as many patients have one or more bowel movement a day. More commonly, patients present with hard stool, straining, incomplete feeling, bloating and other dyspeptic symptoms. Physicians should consider CC in these situations and when patients are found to use laxative containing supplements. In the absence of alarm features physicians may start with a 2-4 week therapeutic trial of available pharmacological agents including osmotic, stimulant and enterokinetic agents. Where safe to do so, physicians should consider regular (as opposed to on demand dosing), combination treatment and continuous treatment for at least 4 weeks. If patients do not achieve satisfactory response, they should be referred to tertiary centers for physiological evaluation of colonic transit and pelvic floor function. Surgical referral is a last resort, which should be considered only after a thorough physiological and psychological evaluation. PMID:23667746

  11. Pediatricians’ and health visitors’ views towards detection and management of maternal depression in the context of a weak primary health care system: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study’s aim has been to investigate, identify and interpret the views of pediatric primary healthcare providers on the recognition and management of maternal depression in the context of a weak primary healthcare system. Methods Twenty six pediatricians and health visitors were selected by using purposive sampling. Face to face in-depth interviews of approximately 45 minutes duration were conducted. The data were analyzed by using the framework analysis approach which includes five main steps: familiarization, identifying a thematic framework, indexing, charting, mapping and interpretation. Results Fear of stigmatization came across as a key barrier for detection and management of maternal depression. Pediatric primary health care providers linked their hesitation to start a conversation about depression with stigma. They highlighted that mothers were not receptive to discussing depression and accepting a referral. It was also revealed that the fragmented primary health care system and the lack of collaboration between health and mental health services have resulted in an unfavorable situation towards maternal mental health. Conclusions Even though pediatricians and health visitors are aware about maternal depression and the importance of maternal mental health, however they fail to implement detection and management practices successfully. The inefficiently decentralized psychiatric services but also stigmatization and misconceptions about maternal depression have impeded the integration of maternal mental health into primary care and prevent pediatric primary health care providers from implementing detection and management practices. PMID:24725738

  12. Endodontic treatment and esthetic management of a primary double tooth with direct composite using silicone buildup guide.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Vinaya Kumar; Ragavendra, T Raju; Deshmukh, Jeevanand; Vanka, Amit; Duddu, Mahesh Kumar; Patil, Anand Kumar G

    2012-04-01

    Gemination and fusion are morphological dental anomalies, characterized by the formation of a clinically wide tooth. Gemination occurs when one tooth bud tries to divide, while fusion occurs if two buds unite. The terms double teeth, double formation, conjoined teeth, geminifusion, vicinifusion and dental twinning are often used to describe fusion and gemination. Double teeth are associated with clinical problems such as poor esthetics, spacing problems and caries susceptibility. Management of such cases requires a comprehensive knowledge of the clinical entity as well as the problems associated with it. This report presents a case of primary double tooth in a 6-year-old boy involving maxillary left central incisor. The anomalous tooth was carious and pulpally involved. This was treated conservatively by endodontic treatment and esthetic rehabilitation was done with direct composite restoration using a silicone buildup guide. The treated tooth was followed up until exfoliation.

  13. Privatization and Educational Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Myron

    This book describes how and why educational choice movements will affect public education. It uses a public-choice approach to argue that both the supporters and opponents of private and school choice have failed to address several critical issues. Following an introductory chapter, chapter 2 is devoted to the rationale for contracting out…

  14. [Community resources prescription for self-care improvement in chronic illnesses. Clinical case management in Primary Health Care].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vico-Díaz de Rada, Lucía; González-Suárez, Miriam; Duarte-Clíments, Gonzalo; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 52 year-old male seen in a Primary Care nursing clinic for a type 2 diabetes mellitus metabolic control. The frequency of the visits increased due to perceived difficulties caused by changing the medical treatment. A focused interview was conducted under functional health patterns framework. The patient was unable to write or read, had not worked for the last 25 years, and expressed a lack of control over his self-care. An action plan was prepared, prioritizing Ineffective Health Maintenance, Powerlessness, and Impaired Social Interaction NANDA-I nursing diagnoses. The goals were set at improving knowledge and control over his disease and participating in leisure activities. To achieve these, the social health resources in the area were contacted, and agreed that the patient could attend activities that could improve his self-care and his quality of life. An improvement in his diabetes control was observed in the following evaluations, with an increase in his level of knowledge and self-care. The Primary Health care nurse should consider available community resources by using a comprehensive approach to chronic diseases for their therapeutic benefit and management, especially in those patients with adverse sociocultural conditions.

  15. Impact of an EHR-based diabetes management form on quality and outcomes of diabetes care in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Herrin, Jeph; da Graca, Briget; Aponte, Phil; Stanek, H Greg; Cowling, Terianne; Fullerton, Cliff; Hollander, Priscilla; Ballard, David J

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology shows promise for improving chronic disease care. This study assessed the impact of a diabetes management form (DMF), accessible within an electronic health record. From 2007 to 2009, 2108 diabetes patients were seen in 20 primary care practices; 1103 visits involved use of the DMF in 2008. The primary outcome was "optimal care": HbA1c ≤8%, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol <100 mg/dL, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, not smoking, and aspirin prescription in patients ≥40 years. After adjusting for number of visits, age, sex, and insulin use, DMF-exposed patients showed less improvement in attaining "optimal care" (estimated difference-in-difference [DID] = -2.06 percentage points; P < .001), LDL cholesterol (DID = -2.30; P = .023), blood pressure (DID = -3.05; P < .001), and total cholesterol (DID = -0.47; P = .004) targets. Documented microalbumin tests, aspirin prescription, and eye and foot exams increased more. Thus, DMF use was associated with smaller gains in achieving evidence-based targets, but greater improvement in documented delivery of care.

  16. Experiences of primary health care nurses in implementing integrated management of childhood illnesses strategy at selected clinics of Limpopo Province.

    PubMed

    Vhuromu, E N; Davhana-Maselesele, M

    2009-09-01

    Treatment of the under five years is a national priority as an attempt in curbing deaths and deformities affecting children. Primary health care was implemented in the clinics in order to help in the treatment of illnesses affecting the community, including children. As a result of childhood illnesses; the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nation Children's Fund (UNICEF) came up with Integrated Management of Childhood illnesses (IMCI) strategy to enhance treatment of such illnesses in developing countries. Primary health care nurses (PHCNS) in Limpopo Province were also trained to implement the strategy. This study is intended to explore and describe the experiences of PHCNS in implementing the IMCI strategy at selected clinics in Vhembe District in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with PHCNS who are IMCI trained and have implemented the strategy for a period of not less than two years. Data analysis was done through using Tesch 's method of open coding for qualitative analysis. Findings revealed that PHCNS had difficulty in rendering IMCI services due to lack of resources and poor working conditions. Recommendations address the difficulties experienced by PHCNS when implementing the IMCI strategy.

  17. Surgical versus non-surgical management for primary patellar dislocations: an up-to-date meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozuo; Kang, Kai; Li, Tong; Lu, Bo; Dong, Jiangtao; Gao, Shijun

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this up-to-date meta-analysis was to compare the effects of surgical versus non-surgical treatment of patients following primary patellar dislocation and to provide the best evidence currently available. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using multiple databases, including Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Registry of Clinical Trials. All databases were searched from the earliest records to May 2013. Eligible studies were selected, and data were extracted by two independent investigators. The primary outcome variable was the frequency of recurrent patellar dislocation. The other outcomes included knee function scores, patient-rated outcomes, and radiographic examination. If appropriate, meta-analysis of these variables was performed. Nine independent trials were found to match the inclusion criteria. The pooled results demonstrated that the incidence of recurrent patellar dislocation and Hughston visual analog scale was significantly lower in the surgical treatment group than that in the non-surgical treatment group (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two treatment groups in frequency of subsequent surgical interventions, percentage of excellent or good subjective opinion, Kujala score, pain score on visual analog scale, and severity of patellofemoral joint osteoarthrosis (P > 0.05). This up-to-date meta-analysis indicates that surgical treatment was associated with a lower risk of recurrent patellar dislocation, but a lower Hughston VAS than non-surgical treatment for primary patellar dislocation. More large high-quality trials and further studies are needed to overcome the limitations of small sample sizes, and varieties of different surgical procedures or non-surgical management strategies adopted in the included trials.

  18. Collaborative Management of Neurocognitive Disorders in Primary Care: Explorations of an Attempt at Culture Change

    PubMed Central

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Mainguy, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Minor neurocognitive disorder (MiND; previously mild cognitive impairment) is a transitional zone between normal cognitive function and early stages of major neurocognitive disorder (previously called dementia). Of people with MiND, 5% to 10% progress to major neurocognitive disorder. Simple interventions such as memory activities, balance exercises, and anti-inflammatory diets have been shown to improve cognitive ability. Also, education and support in group settings have proved beneficial for patients with MiND. Design: Survey evaluation of outcomes of geriatric consultation and prospective educational study. Main Outcome Measures: We collaborated with an academic training program to introduce into primary care the ideas of educational activities and participation in group medical care for people with MiND. Educational programs were developed and presented to family medicine residents and practicing physicians, and their knowledge was assessed before and after education. Results: Two group programs were implemented: one at our hospital and one at a local skilled nursing facility. These were initially envisioned as time-limited, but participants insisted on their continuance. Thirty-two different patients attended the groups for at least six sessions. Participants enthusiastically reported positive change on qualitative interviews and showed improvement in cognition, balance, and self-esteem. Family medicine residents and practicing physicians both shifted toward lifestyle medicine and significantly changed their views on the efficacy of treatments. Despite these activities, community physicians making referrals for geriatric consultations did not change their discussions with patients and families about exercise, diet, cognitive enhancement, and socialization for MiND. Conclusion: Group visits that emphasized support for increased exercise, improved diet, more movement and balance, and cognitive enhancement appear to please and benefit patients with

  19. Role for therapeutic drug monitoring during induction therapy with TNF antagonists in IBD: evolution in the definition and management of primary nonresponse.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Gils, Ann; Rutgeerts, Paul; Levesque, Barrett G; Vermeire, Séverine; Sandborn, William J; Vande Casteele, Niels

    2015-01-01

    : Primary nonresponse and primary nonremission are important limitations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists, occurring in 10% to 40% and 50% to 80% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, respectively. The magnitude of primary nonresponse differs between phase III clinical trials and cohort studies, indicating differences, e.g., in definition, patient population or blinding. The causes of nonresponse can be attributed to the drug (pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity), the patient (genetics, disease activity), the disease (type, location, severity), and/or the treatment strategy (dosing regimen, combination therapy). Primary nonresponse has been attributed to "non-TNF-driven disease" which is an overly simplified and potentially misleading approach to the problem. Many patients with primary nonresponse could successfully be treated with dose optimization during the induction phase or switching to another TNF antagonist. Therefore, primary nonresponse is frequently not a non-TNF-driven disease. Recent studies from rheumatoid arthritis and preliminary data from inflammatory bowel disease evaluating therapeutic drug monitoring have suggested that early measurement of drug and anti-drug antibody concentrations could help to define primary nonresponse and rationalize patient management of this problem. Moreover, a modeling approach including pharmacological parameters and patient-related covariants could potentially be predictive for response to the treatment. We describe an overview of this evolution in thinking, underpinned by previous findings, and assess the potential role of early measurement of drug and antidrug antibody concentrations in the definition and management of primary nonresponse.

  20. Further Effort is Needed to Improve Management of Chronic Pain in Primary Care. Results from the Arkys Project

    PubMed Central

    Piccinocchi, Gaetano; Piccinocchi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pain is challenging. The Arkys project was initiated in Italy to assist general practitioners (GPs) in the management of chronic pain. The main objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Arkys for selecting new therapeutic strategies. An online interactive questionnaire for assessing pain and guiding therapeutic decisions was made available to GPs participating to Arkys. The GPs were invited to complete the questionnaire for each patient who presented moderate-severe chronic pain, and to decide on a new analgesic treatment based on the information provided by the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty four GPs participated with a total of 3035 patients. Patients (mean age 68.9 years) had mostly chronic non-cancer pain (87.7%). In 42.3%, pain had neuropathic components. Only 53.6% of patients were in treatment with analgesics (strong opioids, 38.9%; NSAIDs, 32.6%; weak opioids, 25.6%; anti-epileptics, 17.3%; paracetamol, 14.9%). Use of the questionnaire resulted in the prescription of analgesics to all patients and in increased prescription of strong opioids (69.7%). NSAID prescription decreased (12.8%), while anti-epileptics use remained stable. These findings show that current management of chronic pain in primary care is far from optimal and that efforts are needed to educate GPs and improve guideline implementation. PMID:27478585

  1. Cost-effectiveness of cardiovascular risk management by practice nurses in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is largely preventable and prevention expenditures are relatively low. The randomised controlled SPRING-trial (SPRING-RCT) shows that cardiovascular risk management by practice nurses in general practice with and without self-monitoring both decreases cardiovascular risk, with no additional effect of self-monitoring. For considering future approaches of cardiovascular risk reduction, cost effectiveness analyses of regular care and additional self-monitoring are performed from a societal perspective on data from the SPRING-RCT. Methods Direct medical and productivity costs are analysed alongside the SPRING-RCT, studying 179 participants (men aged 50–75 years, women aged 55–75 years), with an elevated cardiovascular risk, in 20 general practices in the Netherlands. Standard cardiovascular treatment according to Dutch guidelines is compared with additional counselling based on self-monitoring at home (pedometer, weighing scale and/ or blood pressure device) both by trained practice nurses. Cost-effectiveness is evaluated for both treatment groups and patient categories (age, sex, education). Results Costs are €98 and €187 per percentage decrease in 10-year cardiovascular mortality estimation, for the control and intervention group respectively. In both groups lost productivity causes the majority of the costs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is approximately €1100 (95% CI: -5157 to 6150). Self-monitoring may be cost effective for females and higher educated participants, however confidence intervals are wide. Conclusions In this study population, regular treatment is more cost effective than counselling based on self-monitoring, with the majority of costs caused by lost productivity. Trial registration Trialregister.nl identifier: http://NTR2188 PMID:23418958

  2. Assessing and managing wounds of Buruli ulcer patients at the primary and secondary health care levels in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Eric; Aboagye, Samuel Yaw; Kpeli, Grace; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Junghanss, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Beyond Mycobacterium ulcerans—specific therapy, sound general wound management is required for successful management of Buruli ulcer (BU) patients which places them among the large and diverse group of patients in poor countries with a broken skin barrier. Methods Clinically BU suspicious patients were enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 at a primary health care (PHC) center and a municipal hospital, secondary health care (SHC) center in Ghana. All patients were IS2404 PCR tested and divided into IS2404 PCR positive and negative groups. The course of wound healing was prospectively investigated including predictors of wound closure and assessment of infrastructure, supply and health staff performance. Results 53 IS2404 PCR positive patients—31 at the PHC center and 22 at the SHC center were enrolled—and additionally, 80 clinically BU suspicious, IS2404 PCR negative patients at the PHC center. The majority of the skin ulcers at the PHC center closed, without the need for surgical intervention (86.7%) compared to 40% at the SHC center, where the majority required split-skin grafting (75%) or excision (12.5%). Only 9% of wounds at the PHC center, but 50% at the SHC center were complicated by bacterial infection. The majority of patients, 54.8% at the PHC center and 68.4% at the SHC center, experienced wound pain, mostly severe and associated with wound dressing. Failure of ulcers to heal was reliably predicted by wound area reduction between week 2 and 4 after initiation of treatment in 75% at the PHC center, and 90% at the SHC center. Obvious reasons for arrested wound healing or deterioration of wound were missed additional severe pathology; at the PHC center (chronic osteomyelitis, chronic lymphedema, squamous cell carcinoma) and at the SHC center (malignant ulceration, chronic lymphedema) in addition to hygiene and wound care deficiencies. When clinically suspicious, but IS2404 PCR negative patients were recaptured in the community, 76

  3. Using an internet intervention to support self-management of low back pain in primary care: protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial (SupportBack)

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Adam W A; Stanford, Rosie; Little, Paul; Roberts, Lisa; Foster, Nadine E; Hill, Jonathan C; Hay, Elaine; Stuart, Beth; Turner, David; Yardley, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. The majority of patients experiencing LBP are managed in primary care, where first-line care recommendations consist of advice to self-manage and remain active. Internet interventions present a potential means of providing patients with tailored self-management advice and evidence-based support for increasing physical activity. Methods/analysis This protocol describes a single-blind, randomised controlled feasibility trial of an internet intervention developed to support the self-management of LBP in primary care. Patients are being randomised to 1 of 3 groups receiving either usual primary care, usual primary care with the addition of an internet intervention or an internet intervention with physiotherapist telephone support. Patients are followed up at 3 months. Primary outcomes are the feasibility of (1) the trial design/methods, (2) the delivery of the internet intervention and (3) the provision of telephone support by physiotherapists. Secondary outcomes will include exploratory analysis of estimates and variation in clinical outcomes of pain and disability, in order to inform a future main trial. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by the National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee, REC Reference 13/SC/0202. The feasibility findings will be disseminated to the research community through presentations at conferences and publication in peer review journals. Broader dissemination will come following a definitive trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 31034004. PMID:26399575

  4. Evaluation and Management of Behavioral Health Disorders in Women: An Overview of Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, and Sleep in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Fitelson, Elizabeth; McGibbon, Cheryl

    2016-06-01

    Providers of obstetric and gynecologic care are often the most commonly seen medical providers for adult women, providing primary and reproductive care. Even where psychiatric care is readily available, obstetricians/gynecologists are frequently the front line for recognition, education, and initial management of many mental health problems. In settings where psychiatric treatment is a more scarce resource, obstetricians/gynecologists often are responsible for ongoing treatment of these disorders. This review focuses on the impact of the female reproductive life cycle on the presentation and management of some of the most common behavioral health problems in women: major depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, and primary sleep disorders.

  5. Plumage variation and social partner choice in the greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hani D; Valuska, Annie J; Taylor, Ryan R; Ferrie, Gina M; Grand, Alison P; Leighty, Katherine A

    2016-09-01

    There is evidence that plumage coloration is related to mate choice in several different bird species. However, the relationship between plumage coloration to mate or other social partner choice has rarely been investigated in flamingos. This is important to study because we know plumage coloration can be an indicator of welfare. We assessed plumage color score in relation to sex, age, and social partner choice over a 9-month period in a flock of 34 adult greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) living at Disney's Animal Kingdom(®) . When looking at primary social partners, redder males were more likely to have primary social partners compared to less red males. In addition, primary social partners tended to have similar color scores to each other. These findings provide insight into one factor that might influence social partner choice in greater flamingos living in ex situ situations. Future studies should investigate how these results relate to reproductive success as part of ex situ management. Zoo Biol. 35:409-414, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. INVESTIGATING THE MANAGEMENT OF CARIOUS PRIMARY TEETH IN GENERAL DENTAL PRACTICE: AN OVERVIEW OF THE DEVELOPMENT AND CONDUCT OF THE FICTION TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Matthew; Keightley, Alexander; Maguire, Anne; Chadwick, Barbara; Vale, Luke; Homer, Tara; Douglas, Gail; Deery, Chris; Marshman, Zoe; Ryan, Vicky; Innes, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The management of carious primary teeth is a challenge for patients, parents and clinicians. Most evidence supporting different management strategies originates from a specialist setting and therefore its relevance to the primary care setting is questionable. The UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment (HTA) has commissioned the FiCTION (Filling Children's Teeth: Indicated Or Not?) trial; a multi-centre primary dental care randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the most clinically and cost- effective approach to managing caries in the primary dentition in the UK. This large trial began in 2012, is due to be completed in late 2017 and involves 72 practices and 1,124 children initially aged three to seven years with dentine caries, following randomisation to one of three caries management strategies. Clinical, radiographic, quality of life, treatment acceptability and health economics data are collected during the three-year follow up period. This article provides an overview of the development and conduct of FiCTION and discusses some approaches adopted to manage challenges and achieve the patient recruitment target.

  7. Screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management of hepatitis C: a novel, comprehensive, online resource center for primary care providers and specialists.

    PubMed

    Lebovics, Edward; Czobor, Klara

    2014-11-01

    Current initiatives focusing on hepatitis C (HCV) screening and diagnosis, together with the advent of oral interferon (IFN)-free treatment regimens have prompted Elsevier Multimedia Publishing and the American Journal of Medicine (AJM) to develop a novel, comprehensive, online Resource Center dedicated to providing both primary care providers and specialists with the latest information on the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management of HCV. To date, only 25% of infected patients have been diagnosed and only 5% cured. With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Prevention Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation of one-time screening for all individuals born between 1945 and 1965, and the availability of safe and effective therapy, it is anticipated that primary care providers and community practices will become increasingly responsible for the screening, diagnosis, and management of infected patients, as well as providing access to care by specialists when needed. The AJM Hepatitis C Resource Center site will have two major channels; one channel tailored to specifically address the needs of internal medicine physicians and other primary care providers, and one channel tailored to address the needs of specialists including hepatologists, gastroenterologists, and infectious disease specialists. Systematic surveys of these clinician audiences are being conducted by Elsevier to assess educational gaps, and ensure that the content of each channel of the Resource Center satisfies the needs of the intended audiences. In a recent Elsevier survey of primary care physicians (PCPs) who had screened and/or participated in the care of patients with HCV within 6 months of participating in the survey, 60% of PCPs stated that they were not very confident or only somewhat confident about screening patients for chronic HCV infection. A recent Elsevier survey of specialists revealed low levels of satisfaction with the treatment options available in

  8. Quality indicators for the detection and management of chronic kidney disease in primary care in Canada derived from a modified Delphi panel approach

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Karen; Bevan, Lindsay; Hunter, Katie; Rogers, Jess; Young, Jacqueline; Nesrallah, Gihad

    2017-01-01

    Background: The detection and management of chronic kidney disease lies within primary care; however, performance measures applicable in the Canadian context are lacking. We sought to develop a set of primary care quality indicators for chronic kidney disease in the Canadian setting and to assess the current state of the disease's detection and management in primary care. Methods: We used a modified Delphi panel approach, involving 20 panel members from across Canada (10 family physicians, 7 nephrologists, 1 patient, 1 primary care nurse and 1 pharmacist). Indicators identified from peer-reviewed and grey literature sources were subjected to 3 rounds of voting to develop a set of quality indicators for the detection and management of chronic kidney disease in the primary care setting. The final indicators were applied to primary care electronic medical records in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD) to assess the current state of primary care detection and management of chronic kidney disease in Ontario. Results: Seventeen indicators made up the final list, with 1 under the category Prevalence, Incidence and Mortality; 4 under Screening, Diagnosis and Risk Factors; 11 under Management; and 1 under Referral to a Specialist. In a sample of 139 993 adult patients not on dialysis, 6848 (4.9%) had stage 3 or higher chronic kidney disease, with the average age of patients being 76.1 years (standard deviation [SD] 11.0); 62.9% of patients were female. Diagnosis and screening for chronic kidney disease were poorly performed. Only 27.1% of patients with stage 3 or higher disease had their diagnosis documented in their cumulative patient profile. Albumin-creatinine ratio testing was only performed for 16.3% of patients with a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and for 28.5% of patients with risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Family physicians performed relatively better with the management of chronic kidney disease

  9. International Expert Consensus on Primary Systemic Therapy in the Management of Early Breast Cancer: Highlights of the Fifth Symposium on Primary Systemic Therapy in the Management of Operable Breast Cancer, Cremona, Italy (2013)

    PubMed Central

    Amoroso, Vito; Generali, Daniele; Buchholz, Thomas; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Pedersini, Rebecca; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Di Cosimo, Serena; Dowsett, Mitchell; Fox, Stephen; Harris, Adrian L.; Makris, Andreas; Vassalli, Lucia; Ravelli, Andrea; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Hatzis, Christos; Hudis, Clifford A.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Sapino, Anna; Semiglazov, Vladimir; Von Minckwitz, Gunter; Simoncini, Edda L.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Barry, Peter; Kühn, Thorsten; Darby, Sarah; Hermelink, Kerstin; Symmans, Fraser; Gennari, Alessandra; Schiavon, Gaia; Dogliotti, Luigi; Berruti, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Expert consensus-based recommendations regarding key issues in the use of primary (or neoadjuvant) systemic treatment (PST) in patients with early breast cancer are a valuable resource for practising oncologists. PST remains a valuable therapeutic approach for the assessment of biological antitumor activity and clinical efficacy of new treatments in clinical trials. Neoadjuvant trials provide endpoints, such as pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment, that potentially translate into meaningful improvements in overall survival and disease-free survival. Neoadjuvant trials need fewer patients and are less expensive than adjuvant trial, and the endpoint of pCR is achieved in months, rather than years. For these reasons, the neoadjuvant setting is ideal for testing emerging targeted therapies in early breast cancer. Although pCR is an early clinical endpoint, its role as a surrogate for long-term outcomes is the key issue. New and better predictors of treatment efficacy are needed to improve treatment and outcomes. After PST, accurate management of post-treatment residual disease is mandatory. The surgery of the sentinel lymph-node could be an acceptable option to spare the axillary dissection in case of clinical negativity (N0) of the axilla at the diagnosis and/or after PST. No data exists yet to support the modulation of the extent of locoregional radiation therapy on the basis of the response attained after PST although trials are underway. PMID:26063896

  10. Primary care practitioners’ views on test result management in EHR-enabled health systems: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Spitzmueller, Christiane; Petersen, Nancy J; Sawhney, Mona K; Smith, Michael W; Murphy, Daniel R; Espadas, Donna; Laxmisan, Archana; Sittig, Dean F

    2013-01-01

    Context Failure to notify patients of test results is common even when electronic health records (EHRs) are used to report results to practitioners. We sought to understand the broad range of social and technical factors that affect test result management in an integrated EHR-based health system. Methods Between June and November 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional, web-based survey of all primary care practitioners (PCPs) within the Department of Veterans Affairs nationwide. Survey development was guided by a socio-technical model describing multiple inter-related dimensions of EHR use. Findings Of 5001 PCPs invited, 2590 (51.8%) responded. 55.5% believed that the EHRs did not have convenient features for notifying patients of test results. Over a third (37.9%) reported having staff support needed for notifying patients of test results. Many relied on the patient's next visit to notify them for normal (46.1%) and abnormal results (20.1%). Only 45.7% reported receiving adequate training on using the EHR notification system and 35.1% reported having an assigned contact for technical assistance with the EHR; most received help from colleagues (60.4%). A majority (85.6%) stayed after hours or came in on weekends to address notifications; less than a third reported receiving protected time (30.1%). PCPs strongly endorsed several new features to improve test result management, including better tracking and visualization of result notifications. Conclusions Despite an advanced EHR, both social and technical challenges exist in ensuring notification of test results to practitioners and patients. Current EHR technology requires significant improvement in order to avoid similar challenges elsewhere. PMID:23268489

  11. Atrial fibrillation in New Zealand primary care: Prevalence, risk factors for stroke and the management of thromboembolic risk.

    PubMed

    Tomlin, Andrew M; Lloyd, Hywel S; Tilyard, Murray W

    2017-02-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for stroke and heart disease but there is limited information on its prevalence in New Zealand primary care or the treatment provided to manage thromboembolic risk. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of atrial fibrillation, assess patient risk for thromboembolism and evaluate the appropriateness of risk reduction using antiplatelet and oral anticoagulation therapy. Design A retrospective cohort study utilising electronic medical records for 739,000 patients registered with 170 general practices in 2014. Methods Patient diagnoses and prescriptions from 2010-2014 were analysed to identify patients with atrial fibrillation in 2014 and co-morbidities included in the CHA2DS2-VASc algorithm. Adjusted prevalence of atrial fibrillation by patient demographic group and the proportion of patients following recommended antithrombotic therapy were calculated. Results 12,712 patients were identified with AF (1.72%, 95% confidence interval 1.69%-1.75%). Prevalence was significantly higher for Maori (odds ratio 1.91, 95% confidence interval 1.80-2.03) than Europeans after adjusting for age, sex, deprivation and clinical risk factors. Stroke risk for Maori and Pacific Island patients was higher than for Europeans across all age groups. Of the 10,406 patients (81.9%) at high risk for thromboembolism, 60.5% were using anticoagulants, 24.1% aspirin monotherapy and 15.4% neither anticoagulants nor aspirin. Oral anticoagulants were used by 31.5% of patients at low risk (CHA2DS2-VASc <2). Conclusions Oral anticoagulants are under-utilised in the management of thromboembolic risk in high risk patients with atrial fibrillation. Better promotion of guideline recommendations for the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation may be required to improve clinician and patient decision-making.

  12. Implementation and evaluation of a pharmacist-led hypertension management service in primary care: outcomes and methodological challenges

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suboptimal utilisation of pharmacotherapy, non-adherence to prescribed treatment, and a lack of monitoring all contribute to poor blood (BP) pressure control in patients with hypertension. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a pharmacist-led hypertension management service in terms of processes, outcomes, and methodological challenges. Method: A prospective, controlled study was undertaken within the Australian primary care setting. Community pharmacists were recruited to one of three study groups: Group A (Control – usual care), Group B (Intervention), or Group C (Short Intervention). Pharmacists in Groups B and C delivered a service comprising screening and monitoring of BP, as well as addressing poor BP control through therapeutic adjustment and adherence strategies. Pharmacists in Group C delivered the shortened version of the service. Results: Significant changes to key outcome measures were observed in Group C: reduction in systolic and diastolic BPs at the 3-month visit (P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively), improvement in medication adherence scores (P=0.01), and a slight improvement in quality of life (EQ-5D-3L Index) scores (P=0.91). There were no significant changes in Group B (the full intervention), and no differences in comparison to Group A (usual care). Pharmacists fed-back that patient recruitment was a key barrier to service implementation, highlighting the methodological implications of screening. Conclusion: A collaborative, pharmacist-led hypertension management service can help monitor BP, improve medication adherence, and optimise therapy in a step-wise approach. However, blood pressure screening can effect behaviour change in patients, presenting methodological challenges in the evaluation of services in this context. PMID:27382427

  13. Self-Management for Primary School Students Demonstrating Problem Behavior in Regular Classrooms: Evidence Review of Single-Case Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busacca, Margherita L.; Anderson, Angelika; Moore, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    This review evaluates self-management literature targeting problem behaviors of primary school students in general education settings. Thirty-one single-case design studies met inclusion criteria, of which 16 demonstrated adequate methodological rigor, according to What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) design standards. Visual analysis and WWC…

  14. Development and Implementation of Nonpharmacologic Protocols for the Management of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Families in a Multiracial Primary Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austrom, Mary Guerriero; Damush, Teresa M.; Hartwell, Cora West; Perkins, Tony; Unverzagt, Frederick; Boustani, Malaz; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Callahan, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Most patients and families with dementia are cared for in primary care clinics. These clinics are seldom designed to provide the necessary comprehensive care. The purpose of this article is to describe nonpharmacologic protocols for the management of patients with Alzheimer's disease and their families that are administered as part of a…

  15. Development of a Curriculum Management Process by Applying Lean Concept for Waste Elimination to Enhance Curriculum Implementation of Primary School Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitrangsan, Nadrudee; Sawekngam, Wichai; Thongthew, Sumlee

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to study and develop a curriculum management process by applying Lean concept for waste elimination to enhance curriculum implementation of primary school teacher. This study was conducted with a focus on qualitative data collection by dividing into 2 phases, including (1) analyze and synthesize relevant notions, theories,…

  16. An Investigation into the Need for Effective Leadership Mechanisms in the Management of a Successful Inclusive Programme in the Primary School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, Wilma A.

    2007-01-01

    This research project aims to highlight the need for effective leadership mechanisms to be put in place for the management of a successful inclusive program in the Primary School System in Barbados. The outcomes of the research findings show evidence of the need for strong instructional leadership by the principals in order to implement workable…

  17. A Qualitative Study on Change Management in Primary Schools Award Winning and Non-Award Winning Schools Case in Study of TQM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altunay, Esen; Arli, Didem; Yalcinkaya, Munevver

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the need of change in primary schools and to reveal out the principals' experiences during the change process by taking the total quality management practices into consideration and finally give suggestions according to the results of the study. In this study by employing qualitative research method, semi…

  18. Primary Care Pediatricians' Experience, Comfort and Competence in the Evaluation and Management of Child Maltreatment: Do We Need Child Abuse Experts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Wendy G.; Dubowitz, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the self-reported experience, comfort and competence of primary care pediatricians in evaluating and managing child maltreatment (CM), in rendering opinions regarding the likelihood of CM, and in providing court testimony. We examined pediatricians' need for expert consultation when evaluating possible maltreatment. Methods:…

  19. Concurrent analysis of choice and control in childbirth

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper reports original research on choice and control in childbirth. Eight women were interviewed as part of a wider investigation into locus of control in women with pre-labour rupture of membranes at term (PROM) [1]. Methods The following study uses concurrent analysis to sample and analyse narrative aspects of relevant literature along with these interviews in order to synthesise a generalisable analysis of the pertinent issues. The original PROM study had found that women experienced a higher degree of control in hospital, a finding that appeared at odds with contemporary notions of choice. However, this paper contextualises this finding by presenting narratives that lucidly subscribe to the dominant discourse of hospital as the safest place to give birth, under the premise of assuring a live healthy baby irrespective of their management type. Results This complex narrative is composed of the following themes: 'perceiving risk', 'being prepared', 'reflecting on experience', maintaining control' and relinquishing control'. These themes are constructed within and around the medical, foetocentric, risk averse cultural context. Primary data are presented throughout to show the origins and interconnected nature of these themes. Conclusions Within this context it is clear that there is a highly valued role for competent health professionals that respect, understand and are capable of facilitating genuine choice for women. PMID:21631910

  20. Risk management in primary apicultural production. Part 2: a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point approach to assuring the safety of unprocessed honey.

    PubMed

    Formato, Giovanni; Zilli, Romano; Condoleo, Roberto; Marozzi, Selene; Davis, Ivor; Smulders, Frans J M

    2011-06-01

    In managing risks associated with the human consumption of honey, all sectors of the production chain must be considered, including the primary production phase. Although the introduction of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system has not been made compulsory for purposes of quality and safety control in farming operations, European legislation makes many references to the key role of primary production in food safety management and the HACCP system has been indicated as the preferred tool to ensure that consumers are provided with safe foods. This article describes a systematic HACCP-based approach to identifying, preventing and controlling food safety hazards occurring in primary apicultural production. This approach serves as a useful tool for beekeepers, food business operators, veterinary advisors, and for Food and Veterinary Official Control Bodies in their planning and conducting of audits and for establishing priorities for the evaluation of training programmes in the apicultural sector.